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Sample records for naturally occurring radioactivity

  1. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training)

  2. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  3. Natural occurring radioactive substances. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emara, A E [National Center for radiation Research and Technology Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive substances produced by cosmic rays of those of terrestrial origin are surveyed. The different radioactive decay series are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the element radium as regards its properties and distribution in different environmental samples. The properties of naturally occurring k-40 and its distribution in different natural media are also outlined. Induced radionuclides which are formed as a result of the interaction of cosmic rays with the constituents of the atmosphere are mentioned. In this respect the intensity of natural background radiation and the dose at different locations and levels is surveyed. Some regions of exceptionally high radioactivity which result in high exposure rates are mentioned. Monazite deposits and water springs are mentioned in some detail. The Oklo phenomenon as a natural reactor is also discussed. 8 tabs.

  4. Natural occurring radioactive substances. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emara, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive substances produced by cosmic rays of those of terrestrial origin are surveyed. The different radioactive decay series are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the element radium as regards its properties and distribution in different environmental samples. The properties of naturally occurring k-40 and its distribution in different natural media are also outlined. Induced radionuclides which are formed as a result of the interaction of cosmic rays with the constituents of the atmosphere are mentioned. In this respect the intensity of natural background radiation and the dose at different locations and levels is surveyed. Some regions of exceptionally high radioactivity which result in high exposure rates are mentioned. Monazite deposits and water springs are mentioned in some detail. The Oklo phenomenon as a natural reactor is also discussed. 8 tabs

  5. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, P.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose

  6. Leachability of naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desideri, D.; Feduzi, L.; Meli, M.A.; Roselli, C.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are present in the environment and can be concentrated by technical activities, particularly those involving natural resources. These NORM deposits are highly stable and very insoluble under environmental conditions at the earth's surface. However, reducing or oxidant conditions or pH changes may enable a fraction of naturally occurring radionuclides to eventually be released to the environment. Leachability of 210 Pb and 210 Po was determined in three samples coming from a refractories production plant (dust, sludge, finished product), in one dust sample from a steelwork and in one ash sample coming from an electric power station. A sequential extraction method consisting of five operationally-defined fractions was used. The average leaching potential observed in the samples from the refractory industry is very low (mean values: 5.8% for 210 Pb and 1.7% for 210 Po). The 210 Pb and 210 Po leachability increases for the ash sample coming from an electric power plant using carbon (17.8% for 210 Pb and 10.0% for 210 Po); for the dust sample coming from a steelwork, the percent soluble fraction is 41.1% for 210 Pb and 8.5% for 210 Po. For all samples the results obtained show that 210 Pb is slightly more soluble than 210 Po. (author)

  7. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egidi, P.

    1997-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. Some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose-based standards. So when is TENORM a problem? Where is it a problem? That depends on when, where, and whom you talk to exclamation point We will start by reviewing background radioactivity, then we will proceed to the geology, mobility, and variability of these

  8. Deposition of naturally occurring radioactivity in oil and gas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysebo, I.; Strand, T.

    1997-01-01

    This booklet contains general information about naturally occurring radioactive materials, NORM, in production of oil and natural gas, occupational doses, radiation protection procedures and measures, and classification methods of contaminated equipment. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  9. Naturally occurring radioactive materials at New South Wales mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Until recently mines in New South Wales have been largely exempt from the provisions of the Radiation Control Act with respect to radioactive ore being mined and processed. Legislative changes and the national harmonisation efforts for mine safety regulation have drawn attention to the emerging issue of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). While mine operators are already obliged under their duty of care to manage this hazard, specific control measures are increasingly expected by the community and regulators. This applies throughout the whole mine life cycle from exploration right through to rehabilitation.

  10. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included

  11. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

  12. Technically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials; identification, characterization and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, H.F.

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive materials (TENORM) is produced in a relatively large amount with relatively small radioactivity, however in many instances the radioactivity levels exceeds that permissible. In this presentation, the different industries where enhanced levels of natural radioactivity is identified and characterized will be given. The different approaches for treatment of this enhanced radioactivity will be addressed. Finally, our research and development activities in characterization and treatment of TENORM produced from the oil fields in Egypt will be presented. (authors)

  13. Naturally occurring radioactive material in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steingraber, W.A.

    1994-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) has been found in the Earth's crust and soil, the water we drink, the food we eat, the air we breathe, and the tissues of every living organism. It is relatively easy to determine open-quotes concentrationsclose quotes, or specific activity levels, in the range of 1 part per trillion for radioactive materials. With radioactive elements so abundant and detection possible at such low levels, the presence of NORM in oil and gas operations shouldn't be surprising. In fact, this presence has been recognized since at least the 1930's, but the phenomenon received only minimal attention in the United States until the mid-1980's. At that time regulatory agencies in several oil- and gas-producing states began to focus on NORM in the exploration and production segment of the industry, expressing concern over potential health and safety implications. The most significant aspects of NORM in oil production operations include original source, transport media, composition/radionuclides present, measurement methods, health/safety issues, waste classification, and waste disposal. In addition, I will summarize industry-sponsored NORM data collection and analysis efforts being conducted to aid in development of sound policies and procedures to address environmental, health, and safety issues. Current activities by state and federal regulatory agencies relevant to NORM in the oil and gas industry will also be reviewed

  14. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) in oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algalhoud, K. A.; AL-Fawaris, B. H.

    2008-01-01

    Oil and gas industry in the Great Jamahiriya is one of those industries that were accompanied with generation of some solid and liquid waste, which associated with risks that might lead to harmful effects to the man and the environment. Among those risks the continuous increase of radioactivity levels above natural radioactive background around operating oil fields, due to accumulation of solid and liquid radioactive scales and sludge as well as contaminated produced water that contain some naturally occurring radioactive materials ( NORM/TE-NORM). Emergence of NORM/TE-NORM in studied area noticed when the natural background radioactivity levels increased around some oil fields during end of 1998, For this study, six field trips and a radiation surveys were conducted within selected oil fields that managed and owned by six operating companies under NOC, in order to determine the effective radiation dose in contrast with dose limits set by International Counsel of Radiation Protection(ICRP),and International Atomic Energy Agency(IAEA) Additionally solid samples in a form of scales and liquid samples were also taken for further investigation and laboratory analysis. Results were tabulated and discussed within the text .However to be more specific results pointed out to the fact that existence of NORM/TE-NORM as 226 Ra, 228 Ra, within some scale samples from surface equipment in some oil and gas fields in Jamahiriya were significant. As a result of that, the workers might receive moderate radiation dose less than the limits set by ICRP,IAEA, and other parts of the world producing oil and gas. Results predicted that within the investigated oil fields if workers receive proper training about handling of NORM/TE-NORM and follow the operating procedure of clean ups, work over and maintenance plane carefully, their committed exposure from NORM/TE-NORM will be less than the set limits by ICRP and IAEA. In a trend to estimate internal radiation dose as a result of possible

  15. Radiation protection and the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; MacDowell, P.

    1996-01-01

    There are many industries dealing with naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), some of them without knowing that their industrial processes and/or their regular wastes involve radioactivity. However, an increasing number of industries that produce NORM wastes are being sued, wherever there is a legal framework to do so. In particular, NORM wastes produced for a long time by the oil industry became foci of legal battles in the United States and elsewhere. The ripple effect of these judicial battles will influence the decision making processes of NORM wastes producing industries, mostly because of the costs incurred by remedial and preventive actions concerning NORM contamination. The regulation of NORM will occur sooner or later, and such actions may become mandatory. A foreseeable consequence of such regulation is a change in attitude concerning the sources and materials associated with NORM. Among those industries likely to be affected one can mention: niobium; rare earth processing; oil production; phosphate; uranium mining and milling; zircon; water treatment; and waste water treatment. The paper will briefly review data on exempt concentration activities, as suggested by the basic safety standards based on realistic environmental and dosimetric models. These activity concentrations are compared with those found in a number of extractive industries, and may be used to establish derived limits from a pre-established dose limit. (author)

  16. Combustion of crude oil sludge containing naturally occurring radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Puad Abu; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus; Shamsuddin, A.H.; Sopian, K.

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of crude oil sludge fi-om the crude oil terminal are very unique because it contains both heavy metals and also Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). As a result, the Department of Environmental (DOE) and the Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) considered it as Scheduled Wastes and Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) respectively. As a Scheduled Wastes, there is no problem in dealing with the disposal of it since there already exist a National Center in Bukit Nanas to deal with this type of waste. However, the Center could not manage this waste due to the presence of NORM by which the policy regarding the disposal of this kind of waste has not been well established. This situation is unclear to certain parties, especially with respect to the relevant authorities having final jurisdiction over the issue as well as the best practical method of disposal of this kind of waste. Existing methods of treatment viewed both from literature and current practice include that of land farming, storing in plastic drum, re-injection into abandoned oil well, recovery, etc., found some problems. Due to its organic nature, very low level in radioactivity and the existence of a Scheduled Waste incineration facility in Bukit Nanas, there is a potential to treat this sludge by using thermal treatment technology. However, prior to having this suggestion to be put into practice, there are issues that need to be addressed. This paper attempts to discuss the potentials and the related issues of combusting crude oil sludge based on existing experimental data as well as mathematical modeling

  17. Regulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials in non-nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The volume and concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive material is large across a variety of industries commonly thought not to involve radioactive material. The regulation of naturally occurring radioactive material in the United States is in a state of flux. Inventory of naturally occurring radioactive materials is given, along with a range of concentrations. Current and proposed regulatory limits are presented. (author)

  18. Is anyone regulating naturally occurring radioactive material? A state survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, E.M.; Barisas, S.G.

    1993-08-01

    As far as we know, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) has surrounded humankind since the beginning of time. However, recent data demonstrating that certain activities concentrate NORM have increased concern regarding its proper handling and disposal and precipitated the development of new NORM-related regulations. The regulation of NORM affects the management of government facilities as well as a broad range of industrial processes. Recognizing that NORM regulation at the federal level is extremely limited, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a 50-state survey to determine the extent to which states have assumed the responsibility for regulating NORM as well as the NORM standards that are currently being applied at the state level. Though the survey indicates that NORM regulation comprises a broad spectrum of controls from full licensing requirements to virtually no regulation at afl, a trend is emerging toward recognition of the need for increased regulation of potential NORM hazards, particularly in the absence of federal standards

  19. Discrimination of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material in Plastic Scintillator Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Schweppe, John E.; Warner, Ray A.

    2003-01-01

    Plastic scintillator material is used in many applications for the detection of gamma-rays from radioactive material, primarily due to the sensitivity per unit cost compared to other detection materials. However, the resolution and lack of full-energy peaks in the plastic scintillator material prohibits detailed spectroscopy. Therefore, other materials such as doped sodium iodide are used for spectroscopic applications. The limited spectroscopic information can however be exploited in plastic scintillator materials to provide some discrimination. The discrimination between man-made and naturally occurring sources would be useful in reducing alarm screening for radiation detection applications which target man-made sources. The results of applying the limited energy information from plastic scintillator material for radiation portal monitors are discussed.

  20. 'The NORM Report' : the journal addressing naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, C.T.; Tsurikov, N.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The need for the specific international publication dedicated to the radiation protection and regulatory issues associated with exposures of workers, general public and the environment in situations involving naturally occurring radioactive materials (Norm) has been identified almost ten years ago. In the 1990-s the journal entitled 'the NORM report' was published in the U.S.A. mainly dealt with legislative updates in regard to NORM in different states and at a later stage Canada. The printed journal has a wide following among industries and regulatory authorities concerned with NORM. Unfortunately, the publishing ceased in early 2000-s with the passing of the editor, Dr. Peter Gray. The publication of 'the NORM Report' will re-commence in early 2008 as an internet based publication that is intended to be a resource for: Regulatory authorities exchange information in regards to the 'NORM-specific' regulations and guidelines applicable in their jurisdictions. They are also able to collect details from authorities in other countries/states - to ensure the adoption of the most appropriate regulatory standards to similar levels of radiation exposure and the same industries world-wide (not only within the USA), a) Researches, who will be able to publish the results of their studies in a journal specifically dedicated to naturally occurring radioactive materials and b) Industries that use, process, and generate - to facilitate the information exchange in regards to best practices in controlling radiation exposure and in the disposal or re-use of NORM-containing materials. The intent of the presentation is to obtain the opinion of a wider radiation protection community of the usefulness and the contents of the publication of 'the NORM Report' to ensure the journal meets its state objectives. (author)

  1. Regulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffries, C.; Akber, R.; Johnston, A.; Cassels, B.

    2011-01-01

    In order to promote uniformity between jurisdictions, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has developed the National Directory for Radiation Protection, which is a regulatory framework that all Australian governments have agreed to adopt. There is a large and diverse range of industries involved in mining or mineral processing, and the production of fossil fuels in Australia. Enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides can be associated with mineral extraction and processing, other industries (e.g. metal recycling) and some products (e.g. plasterboard). ARPANSA, in conjunction with industry and State regulators, has undertaken a review and assessment of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) management in Australian industries. This review has resulted in guidance on the management of NORM that will be included in the National Directory for Radiation Protection. The first NORM safety guide provides the framework for NORM management and addresses specific NORM issues in oil and gas production, bauxite, aluminium and phosphate industries. Over time further guidance material for other NORM-related industries will be developed. This presentation will provide an overview of the regulatory approach to managing NORM industries in Australia. (authors)

  2. Regulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Cameron; Akber, Riaz; Johnston, Andrew; Cassels, Brad

    2011-07-01

    In order to promote uniformity between jurisdictions, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) has developed the National Directory for Radiation Protection, which is a regulatory framework that all Australian governments have agreed to adopt. There is a large and diverse range of industries involved in mining or mineral processing, and the production of fossil fuels in Australia. Enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides can be associated with mineral extraction and processing, other industries (e.g. metal recycling) and some products (e.g. plasterboard). ARPANSA, in conjunction with industry and State regulators, has undertaken a review and assessment of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) management in Australian industries. This review has resulted in guidance on the management of NORM that will be included in the National Directory for Radiation Protection. The first NORM safety guide provides the framework for NORM management and addresses specific NORM issues in oil and gas production, bauxite, aluminium and phosphate industries. Over time further guidance material for other NORM-related industries will be developed. This presentation will provide an overview of the regulatory approach to managing NORM industries in Australia.

  3. Naturally occurring radioactivity in the Nordic countries. Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In the publication 'Naturally Occurring Radiation in the Nordic Countries - Recommendations' published in 1986 the radiation protection authorities in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden gave radiation protection recommendations for natural radiation in the Nordic countries. The exposure of the populations in the Nordic countries to natural radiation sources is among the highest in the world and much effort has been devoted during the last 10 to 20 years to characterising, assessing and, where feasible, to reduce these exposures. The exposure of workers to natural radiation sources has also been an important area of work in the same period. During this period the international recommendations on radiation protection policy have been further developed with ICRP Publication 60: '1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection', and ICRP Publication 65: 'Protection Against Radon-222 at Home and at Work'. The European Basic Safety Standards Directive from 1996 (96/29/EURATOM), which is based on the ICRP recommendations, differs from the earlier versions in that special provisions have been laid down concerning exposure to natural radiation sources. As Denmark, Finland and Sweden are members of European Union and the EFTA-countries (Iceland and Norway) have close co-operation with the EU, the practical implementation of the EU-BSS will play an important role in all the Nordic countries. In November 1998, a new Drinking Water Directive, 98/83/EC, was adopted. The directive also includes radioactivity in drinking water, excluding potassium-40, radon, and radon decay products. Altogether this means that the Nordic recommendations from 1986 for natural radiation needed to be updated. The Nordic Radiation Protection Authorities therefore decided to set up a working group with the aim of revising the recommendations from 1986. The new revised recommendations will, as before, only deal with the components of the exposure to natural

  4. Assessment of terrestrial naturally occurring radioactive Material in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of natural radioactivity of 40K, 238U and 232Th in soils and mine tailings of Awo and Ede areas of Osunstate, Nigeria have been measured using a portable, advanced survey meter 992 Fluke Victoreen Gamma Scout Model for in-situ investigation and a 1 inch by 1 inch Cesium Iodide detector system.

  5. Naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials: 1987 review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    From time to time, the issue as to whether the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) should seek legislative authority to regulate naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials (NARM) is raised. Because NARM exists in the environment, in homes, in workplaces, in medical institutions, and in consumer products, the issue of Federal controls over NARM is very old and very complex. This report presents a review of NARM sources and uses as well as incidents and problems associated with those materials. A review of previous congressional and Federal agency actions on radiation protection matters, in general, and on NARM, in particular, is provided to develop an understanding of existing Federal regulatory activity in ionizing radiation and in control of NARM. In addition, State controls over NARM are reviewed. Eight questions are examined in terms of whether the NRC should seek legislative authority to regulate NARM. The assessment of these questions serves as the basis for developing and evaluating five options. The evaluation of those options leads to two recommendations

  6. Regulation of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) -- an international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) was first recognized as a potential problem as long ago as 1904 in the oil fields of Canada. NORM later became an issue in the North Sea oil and gas production facilities in the early 1980's and became more widely recognized in the United States in 1986 during a routine well workover in the state of Mississippi. NORM contamination of oil and gas industry production equipment has since been identified world wide. The United States, including Alaska and the Gulf of Mexico region, the North Sea region, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and several Middle Eastern countries have all reported NORM contamination. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the international regulations or guidelines that have been promulgated concerning NORM in the oil and gas industry. Additionally, the impact of these regulations or guidelines on non-oil and gas industries will also be discussed. A comparison of these regulations or guidelines to those generally found in the United States shall be drawn

  7. Natural occurring radioactivity materials (NORM) in Ecuadorian oil fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, R.; Enriquez, F.; Reinoso, T.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Many natural elements contain radioactive isotopes, and most of them are present in the soil. In the gas and oil industries the most important radio nuclides are Ra-226 from the decay series of U-238, and in lower grade Ra-228 from the decay series of Th-232. Water exit from the perforation and perforation mud in the Oil towers drowns the NORM materials. Changes in temperature and pressure, allows the presence of sulphates and carbonates in pipes and internal areas of equipment. A Ra and Ba similarity leads to the selective co-precipitation in mud and incrustations of radioisotopes. A measure made in the pipe lines show that these industries generate important doses overcoming the levels of exemption and even the limits of established doses. The research was done by finding a pipe at Shushufindi 52 B well of production near by Coca city in the Ecuadorian jungle. The 'Comision Ecuatoriana de Energia Atomica' (CEEA), supervises the pipe line and accessories that are used in PETROPRODUCION fields accomplishing the radiological characterization, identifying the useless pipes and separate them in order of take care the good ones. Meanwhile the identification of the radioactive isotopes the CEEA proceed with the isolation of the radioactive disposals. From 57.830 pipes and accessories there were 1.607 useless ones, 56.223 didn't show radioactivity. Those pipes were monitored from the PETRODUCCION'S warehouses in Coca, Lago Agrio and Guarumo from September 12 th 2005 to September 12 th 2006. The CEEA is interested in NORMS because inadvertent workers may get high levels of radioactivity exposition. The Oil industries should have a manual about the complete handling of these materials. (author)

  8. Hungarian situation of the technologically enhanced naturally occuring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhasz, L.; Szerbin, P.; Czoch, I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In Hungary, the main goal is that the Hungarian regulations should meet with the EU Directive No. 96/29. For this aim, a surveying project has been launched in order to collect all relevant information about the Hungarian TENORM situation. This surveying programme covers a lot of data collection (work activities, disposal places, residue quantities) and radiological measurements on the TENORM site. The Hungarian situation of TENORM definitely differs from other countries in the aspect of occurrence forms of natural sources (or in the imported raw materials), in the quantities of exploitation, in the level of the radioactivity and in the applied technological processes. Firstly, those work activities have been choosen where the huge amount of residues have been produced. The other criteria is that the activity concentration in a great portion of the given residues is much higher than the average activity concentration of the typical Hungarian soil. After filtering and ranking, the following main activities enhanced the radioactivity level are left: uranium mining and milling, coal mining, coal firing in power plants, bauxite mining and aluminous earth production. At the uranium mining and milling area the uranium content of residues ranges from 20 to 70 g t -1 , and above those the dose rate is 0.4-10 μSv h -1 . The waste rock piles and heaps for leaching were restored and the remediation of tailings ponds is still under way. In the mountain Mecsek and on the territory from the highland Balaton to the mountain Vertes, the radioactivity level of the coals is 10-50 times higher than the worldwide average. The coal fired plants have piled up in the order of magnitude of 10 million tons of fly ash, bottom ash and slag in ponds around the plants. The radioactivity of U-238 series of ash and slag is in the range from 200 to 2000 Bq·kg -1 . The radionuclide concentrations of bauxite ores range from 200 to 300 Bq·kg -1 . At the refining factories, a lot of red

  9. Treatment of Gravel Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohsah, M. A.; Kamal, S. M.; Mamoon, A.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental protection primarily means controlling the releases of radioactive and non-radioactive wastes to the environment and involves treatment, storage, cleanup and disposal of these wastes. The present study concerns the cleanup of gravel that has been contaminated with 2 26 R a. Aqueous solutions of different compositions including water and various concentrations of calcium chloride and barium chloride were used to leach the contaminated gravel. The leaching experiments were carried out in glass column. In some leaching experiments, samples of sandy soil were placed below the gravel to test the sorption of the leached 2 26 R a by the soil. The relative efficiencies of the leachant and the extent of sorption of the leached radionuclide were determined both by the liquid scintillation counting and by the thermoluminescent chips. The TLD chips record the dose before and after decontamination of the gravel and before and after contamination of the soil samples when used. The results obtained indicated that acidified barium chloride was relatively the most effective leachant of 2 26 R a contamination. It reduced the dose from the contaminated gravel to almost half. The soil sample used adsorbs the leached radionuclides efficiently, increasing the soil naturally low dose to about six folds

  10. Deposits of naturally occurring radioactivity in production of oil and natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, T.; Lysebo, I.; Kristensen, D.; Birovljev, A.

    1997-01-01

    Deposits of naturally occurring radioactive materials is an increasing problem in Norwegian oil and gas production. Activity concentration in solid-state samples and production water, and doses to workers involved in different operations off-shore, have been measured. The report also includes a discussion of different methods of monitoring and alternatives for final disposal of wastes. 154 refs

  11. Natural occurring radioactivity in Palmyra and its surrounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Shwekani, R.; Raja, G.; Hushari, M.; Al-Hent, R.; Issa, M.

    2006-06-01

    In this work, the natural radiation background has been carried out for Palmyra city and its surroundings area. The study has covered gamma radiation measurements, indoor radon gas concentration and radionuclides levels in environmental samples (soil, water, plat). The results showed that indoor radon gas concentrations and radiation exposure rates are within the background levels. Also, the results showed that there is no artificial radiation in the area and there is no correlation between the natural radiation levels and the reported cancer cases. Therefore, the reported cancer cases in this area may be due to non-radiation cases, which must be investigated, or they are within the natural levels in Syria unless accurate statistics proves the opposite. (author)

  12. Determination of radioactive scales in oil industry using naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.

    2006-06-01

    In the present study, naturally occurring radioactive materials (Radium isotopes) present in produced water and radiation measurements have been used to study the formation of scales, evaluate their age, determination of geological formations and between wells interactions. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed monthly for 5 months from 11 oil wells in three Syrian oil fields. Analysis includes radium isotopes and anions and cations concentrations in addition to radiation measurements at the well heads. The highest mean values of radium 226, Radium 228 and Radium 224 concentration in produced were 41 Bq/1, 57.1 Bq/1 and 1.1 Bq/1, respectively. The values obtained for Radium 226, Radium 228 and the activity ratio were statistically evaluated and the results were presented using the box plot method. The mean value of the activity ration of Radium 226 and Radium 228 was used to determine the age of scales accumulated inside tubulars. (author)

  13. Radiation and Radioactivity Levels Survey of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) at PT Caltex Pacific Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakri, Jusuf; Siregar, Roland

    2003-01-01

    PT Caltex Pacific Indonesia (CPI) is the largest oil company sharing contractor with Pertamina, located in Riau Province, Central Sumatera, employs about 6,800 employees and works together with 28,000 business partner employees. Currently CPI produces about 510,000 bbls crude oil. The production process mobilizes the naturally occurring radionuclides from deep reservoir rock that are deposited as Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) in well tubes, surface pipes, vessels and other processing equipment. NORM has a potential to be externally exposed during production process due to the accumulation of gamma emitting radionuclides and internal exposure to employees/business partners particularly during maintenance, sludge processing and decontamination of equipment. Understanding of the possible NORM hazards to human life, CPI initiated a NORM survey in order to obtain a clear picture of the magnitude of NORM in CPI operations. The survey has been conducted in 2001 and 2002 involved experts from Chevron Texaco USA, BATAN and BAPETEN Jakarta. The survey covered the determination of gamma exposure rates and the concentration of 238 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K in several samples taken from scale, sludge, tank bottom and sand. To safely management of NORM, the Industrial Health Team of Corporate Health, Environment and Safety in coordination with Training Center Team and BATAN have conducted a NORM training for Industrial Hygienist and employees exposed to NORM, developed Standard Operating Procedure for NORM Handling and Disposal and continuously performed NORM survey and mapping of all suspected areas. (author)

  14. Safety protection suggestion of naturally occurring radioactive materials in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaojian; Zhou Qifu; Wang Xiaotao; Xu Zhongyang; Song Peifeng

    2014-01-01

    It's not enough concern about the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) of oil and gas industry in China. NORM with radium and radon mainly exist in the scale, sludge and production water, and they tend to deposit on the pipe wall, wellhead equipment and so on. These materials are a threat to the health of workers, so it is very important to have the safe disposal of them. This paper introduces the radioactive hazards and puts for-ward the safe disposal measures so as to provide the reference for the safe disposal of radioactive materials. Some management and technical advices are presented too. (authors)

  15. Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P.; Tebes, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary radiological dose assessment related to equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials in production waste streams. The assessment evaluated the relative dose of these activities and included a sensitivity analysis of certain input parameters. Future studies and potential policy actions are recommended

  16. Development of simple and rapid radioactivity analysis for thorium series in the products containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Ryong; Park, Se Young; Yoon, Seok Won; Ha, Wi Ho [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Kook; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is necessary to analyze radioactivity of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in products to ensure radiological safety required by Natural Radiation Safety Management Act. The pretreatments for the existing analysis methods require high technology and time. Such destructive pretreatments including grinding and dissolution of samples make impossible to reuse products. We developed a rapid and simple procedure of radioactivity analysis for thorium series in the products containing NORM. The developed method requires non-destructive or minimized pretreatment. Radioactivity of the product without pretreatment is initially measured using gamma spectroscopy and then the measured radioactivity is adjusted by considering material composition, mass density, and geometrical shape of the product. The radioactivity adjustment can be made using scaling factors, which is derived by radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation. Necklace, bracelet, male health care product, and tile for health mat were selected as representative products for this study. The products are commonly used by the public and directly contacted with human body and thus resulting in high radiation exposure to the user. The scaling factors were derived using MCNPX code and the values ranged from 0.31 to 0.47. If radioactivity of the products is measured without pretreatment, the thorium series may be overestimated by up to 2.8 times. If scaling factors are applied, the difference in radioactivity estimates are reduced to 3-24%. The developed procedure in this study can be used for other products with various materials and shapes and thus ensuring radiological safety.

  17. Radioactivity in papers: the concentration and source of naturally occurring radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobashi, Asaya

    2005-01-01

    The radioactivities of naturally occurring radionuclides ( 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K) in papers such as magazines, newspapers, and copying papers produced in Japan were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry to obtain information on radioactivity level of papers. The X-ray diffraction measurement of the samples was also carried out to elucidate the source of radionuclides contained in them. The average 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th, and 40 K contents of pocket-sized books were 6.4, 21.5, 23.7, and 18.8 Bq kg -1 , respectively, and those of other kinds of samples were near to or less than the values. The 228 Th content was generally somewhat higher than the 228 Ra content. Possibly 228 Ra was leached from the raw materials of the papers to water during their production in preference to 228 Th. The concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides were correlated to each other. The X-ray diffraction study showed that kaolinite, talc, and calcite were contained in the papers. The kaolinite content of the samples was correlated to the concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides, indicating that the naturally occurring radionuclides in the paper samples were mainly brought with kaolinite used as filler or coating pigment in the papers. The regression analysis of the data showed that the natural radioactivity content of filler kaolinite was higher than that of pigment kaolinite. (author)

  18. Assessment of radiation exposures from naturally occurring radioactive materials in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlat, M.S.; Djeffal, S.; Kadi, H.

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive deposits, often referred to as naturally occurring radioactive material scale, can, because of incompatibility of formation and injection waters, be formed inside production equipment of the oil and gas industry. These scales contain mainly 226 Ra and its daughter products, which can cause an exposure risk. The gamma ray dose rates, with the associated occupational doses in the oil and gas industry, and 226 Ra concentration in production water, crude oil and hard/soft scale samples were determined. Results obtained are discussed and compared to those from other studies

  19. Scenarios identified internationally for occupational and public exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2012-01-01

    Natural radiation for decades was considered a normal phenomenon that existed in nature, so that man was conditioned to ignore; unlike artificial ionizing radiation. This mindset has changed, in the late seventies of the last century, because it has became aware of the danger that exposure to natural radiation could pose health. Studies on it have been initiated to conduct and publish. All humans are exposed to natural radiation; but, this exposure is not uniform, has depended on where they live and work, whether they have been in areas with rocks or soils particularly radioactive, their way of life, of the use of certain building materials in their homes, the use of natural gas, the use of home heating with coal. Air travel also have increased exposure to natural radiation. Ionizing radiation, whether natural or artificial, have interacted with the human body in the same way, there fore have failed to say that the natural are less or more harmful than artificial. Natural sources are grouped into two major categories. The first are the external sources: from abroad as cosmic radiation (the sun and interstellar spaces of the universe), terrestrial radiation (emitted by rocks and soil), the radiation of some buildings (e.g. granite, which can emit radon gas) and radiation contained in some foods. The second category are the internal resources: due to the presence in the human body from the environment radionuclides that are able to ionize (potassium-40, carbon-14). The naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM for its acronym in English) have been referred to those naturally occurring radioactive materials on which any human technological activity has increased its exposure potential compared with the situation unchanged. (author) [es

  20. Emissions of naturally occurring radioactivity from aluminum and copper facilities. Report No. 6 (final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, V.E.

    1982-11-01

    This report summarizes five surveys which were conducted at a Bauxite mining operation, an alumina reduction plant, an aluminum reduction plant, an underground copper mine and mill, and an open pit copper mine and concentrator. Process components and controlled source releases were sampled for naturally occurring radioactivity. Particular emphasis was given to radon-222, lead-210, and polonium-210 emissions from crushing and drying processes

  1. Regulation of naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials. A Task Force review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaumer, D.A.; Lubenau, J.O.; Cool, W.S.; Cunningham, L.J.; Mapes, J.R.; Schwartz, S.A.; Smith, D.A.

    1977-06-01

    The use of accelerator-produced radioisotopes (NARM), particularly in medicine, is growing rapidly. One NARM radioisotope, 226 Ra, is one of the most hazardous of radioactive materials, and 226 Ra is used by about 1 / 5 of all radioactive material users. Also, there are about 85,000 medical treatments using 226 Ra each year. All of the 25 Agreement States and 5 non-Agreement States have licensing programs covering NARM users. The Agreement States' programs for regulating NARM are comparable to their programs for regulating byproduct, source, and special nuclear materials under agreements with NRC. But there are 7 states who exercise no regulatory control over NARM users, and the remaining States have control programs which are variable in scope. There are no national, uniformly applied programs to regulate the design, fabrication and quality of sources and devices containing NARM or consumer products containing NARM which are distributed in interstate commerce. Naturally occurring radioactive material (except source material) associated with the nuclear fuel cycle is only partially subject to NRC regulation, i.e., when it is associated with source or special nuclear material being used under an active NRC license. The Task Force recommends that the NRC seek legislative authority to regulate naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials for the reason that these materials present significant radiation exposure potential and present controls are fragmentary and non-uniform at both the State and Federal level

  2. Characteristics of Airborne Particulates Containing Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Monazite Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Geon; Choi, Cheol Kyu; Park, Il; Kim, Min Jun; Go, A Ra; Ji, Seung Woo; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Bon Cheol [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The objective of this study was to characterize physicochemical properties of airborne particulates at a monazite pulverization industry. The properties included particulate size distribution, concentration, shape, density, and radioactivity concentration. Monazite is one of the minerals containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Therefore, external and internal exposure can be occurred to the workers in monazite industry. The major exposure pathway of the workers is internal exposure due to inhalation of airborne particulates. According to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), radiation dose due to inhaled particulates containing NORM depends on particulate properties. Therefore, ICRP recommended the internal dose assessment using measured physicochemical properties of the airborne particulates. In the absence of specific information, ICRP provided default reference values. In this study, we characterized physicochemical properties of airborne particulates at a monazite pulverization industry. The databases of particulate information can be used for accurate internal dose assessment of worker.

  3. Deposits of naturally occurring radioactivity in production of oil and natural gas; Radioaktive avleiringer i olje- og gassproduksjon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, T; Lysebo, I; Kristensen, D; Birovljev, A

    1997-01-01

    Deposits of naturally occurring radioactive materials is an increasing problem in Norwegian oil and gas production. Activity concentration in solid-state samples and production water, and doses to workers involved in different operations off-shore, have been measured. The report also includes a discussion of different methods of monitoring and alternatives for final disposal of wastes. 154 refs.

  4. Characterization of naturally occurring radioactive materials and Cobald-60 contaminated ferrous scraps from steel industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, H.E.; Chiu, H.S.; Hunga, J.Y.; His, H.W.; Chen, Y.B.

    2002-01-01

    Since the occurrence of radioactively contaminated rebar incident in 1992, steel industries in Taiwan were encouraged by Atomic Energy Council (AEC) to install portal monitor to detect the abnormal radiation in shipments of metal scrap feed. From 1994 through 1999, there were 53 discoveries of radioactivity in ferrous scraps by steel companies. These include 15 orphan radioactive sources, 16 cobalt-60 contaminated rebars, 20 Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) contaminated scraps, and two unknowns. Most NORM-contaminated scraps were from abroad. The NORM and cobalt-60 contaminated scraps were taken from the steel mills and analyzed in laboratory. The analytical results of scales and sludge sampled from NORM-contaminated scraps combining with the circumstantial evidences indicate that five possible industrial processes may be involved. They are oil production and treatment, heavy mineral sand benefication and rare earth processing, copper mining and processing, recovery of ammonium chloride by lime adsorption in Ammonium-soda process, and tailing of uranium enrichment process. The cobalt-60 activity and trace elements concentrations of contaminated rebars confirm that all of them were produced domestically in the period from Oct. 1982 to Jan. 1983, when the cobalt-60 sources were lost and entered the electric arc furnace to produce the contaminated rebars. (author)

  5. Dating of oilfield contamination by Natural Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) using isotopic ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Othman, I.; Aba, A.

    2008-05-01

    In the present work, the possibility of using radium isotope ratios (226, 224, 228) for dating of NORM contaminated sites in the oilfields due to uncontrolled disposal of produced water into the environmental NORM contaminated soil sample were collected from different locations in Syrian Oilfields and radioactivity analysed. In addition, production water samples were collected and analysed to determine the isotopes ratios of the naturally occurring radioactive materials. The results have shown that the 228 Ra/ 226 Ra can be successfully used to date contaminated soil provided that this ratio is determined in production water. Moreover, the 210 Pb/ 226 Ra activity ratios was used for the first time for dating of contaminated soil where all factors affecting the method application have been evaluated. Furthermore, the obtained results for dating using the three methods were compared with the actual contamination dates provided by the oil companies. (Authors)

  6. Analysis of radioactivity concentration in naturally occurring radioactive materials used in coal-fired plants in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Geom; Kim, Si Young; Ji, Seung Woo; Park, Il; Kim, Min Jun; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Coals and coal ashes, raw materials and by-products, in coal-fired power plants contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). They may give rise to internal exposure to workers due to inhalation of airborne particulates containing radioactive materials. It is necessary to characterize radioactivity concentrations of the materials for assessment of radiation dose to the workers. The objective of the present study was to analyze radioactivity concentrations of coals and by-products at four coal-fired plants in Korea. High purity germanium detector was employed for analysis of uranium series, thorium series, and potassium 40 in the materials. Radioactivity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 40}K were 2⁓53 Bq kg{sup -1}, 3⁓64 Bq kg{sup -1}, and 14⁓431 Bq kg{sup -1} respectively in coal samples. For coal ashes, the radioactivity concentrations were 77⁓133 Bq kg{sup -1}, 77⁓105 Bq kg{sup -1}, and 252⁓372 Bq kg{sup -1} in fly ash samples and 54⁓91 Bq kg{sup -1}, 46⁓83 Bq kg{sup -1}, and 205⁓462 Bq kg{sup -1} in bottom ash samples. For flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, the radioactivity concentrations were 3⁓5 Bq kg{sup -1}, 2⁓3 Bq kg{sup -1}, and 22⁓47 Bq kg{sup -1}. Radioactivity was enhanced in coal ash compared with coal due to combustion of organic matters in the coal. Radioactivity enhancement factors for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 40}K were 2.1⁓11.3, 2.0⁓13.1, and 1.4⁓7.4 for fly ash and 2.0⁓9.2, 2.0⁓10.0, 1.9⁓7.7 for bottom ash. The database established in this study can be used as basic data for internal dose assessment of workers at coal-fred power plants. In addition, the findings can be used as a basic data for development of safety standard and guide of Natural Radiation Safety Management Act.

  7. Remediation plan for contaminated areas by naturally occurring radioactivity materials in Syrian Petroleum Company oil fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Al-Masri, M. S.; Awad, I.

    2006-01-01

    The present report contains a detailed plan for remediation of areas contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials in the syrian Petroleum Company Oil fields. This plan includes a description of the contaminated areas and the procedures that will be followed before and during the execution of the project in addition to the final radiation surveys according to the Syrian regulations. In addition, responsibilities of the main personnel who will carry out the work have been defined and the future monitoring program of the remediated areas was determined. (author)

  8. Remediation plan for contaminated areas by naturally occurring radioactivity materials in Syrian petroleum company oil fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shwekani, R.; Al-Masri, M.S.; Awad, I.

    2005-08-01

    The present report contains a detailed plan for remediation of areas contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials in the Syrian petroleum company oil fields. This plan includes a description of the contaminated areas and the procedures that will be followed before and during the execution of the project in addition to the final radiation surveys according to the Syrian regulations. In addition, responsibilities of the main personnel who will carry out the work have been defined and the future monitoring program of the remediated areas was determined. (author)

  9. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the oil and gas processing and production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najera F, J.

    1994-01-01

    NORM contamination is produced by concentration in petroleum facilities of naturally occurring radioactive materials. The presence of NORM in petroleum reservoirs and in the oil and gas industry has been widely recognized. It's not a critical technical problem if you proceed timely to solve it. NORM is a great but controllable hazard to the human health and the environment, and represents a severe waste management problem. We suggest to the latino american oil companies to conduct studies to detect NORM contamination in their facilities an use to them to plan the appropriate actions to control the situation. (author). 15 refs

  10. Commentary on guidelines for radiation measurement and treatment of substances including naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Naoyuki; Ishiguro, Hideharu

    2007-01-01

    Study group on safety regulation on research reactors in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) reported the guidelines of 'Guidelines on radiation measurement and treatment of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM)' on 6 February 2006. RANDEC made the website contents 'Study on use and safety of the substances including uranium or thorium', based on the contract with MEXT to make theirs contents. This paper describes the outline of the website in MEXT homepage, background and contents of NORM guidelines in order to understand easily and visually the NORM guidelines, adding in some flowcharts and figures. (author)

  11. Naturally occurring radioactive materials in construction integrating radiation protection in Reuse

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeyers, Wouter

    2017-01-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Construction (COST Action NORM4Building) discusses the depletion of energy resources and raw materials and its huge impact not only on the building market, but also in the development of new synthetic building materials, whereby the reuse of various (waste) residue streams becomes a necessity. It is based on the outcome of COST Action TU 1301, where scientists, regulators, and representatives from industry have come together to present new findings, sharing knowledge, experiences, and technologies to stimulate research on the reuse of residues containing enhanced concentrates of natural radionuclides (NORM) in tailor-made building materials. Chapters address legislative issues, measurement, and assessment of building materials, physical and chemical aspects, from raw materials, to residues with enhanced concentrations of natural radionuclides (NORM), processes, building products containing NORM, and end-of-life and reuse requirements. Presents a holistic app...

  12. Alternatives for the disposal of NORM [naturally occurring radioactive materials] wastes in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.; Pollard, C.G.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the Texas wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have been disposed of in a uranium mill tailings impoundment. There is currently no operating disposal facility in Texas to accept these wastes. As a result, some wastes containing extremely small amounts of radioactivity are sent to elaborate disposal sites at extremely high costs. The Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority has sponsored a study to investigate lower cost, alternative disposal methods for certain wastes containing small quantities of NORM. This paper presents the results of a multipathway safety analysis of various scenarios for disposing of wastes containing limited quantities of NORM in Texas. The wastes include pipe scales and sludges from oil and gas production, residues from rare-earth mineral processing, and water treatment resins, but exclude large-volume, diffuse wastes (coal fly ash, phosphogypsum). The purpose of the safety analysis is to define concentration and quantity limits for the key nuclides of NORM that will avoid dangerous radiation exposures under different waste disposal scenarios

  13. Geologic considerations for the subsurface injection of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM): A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladle, G.H.

    1995-01-01

    NORM waste consists of naturally occurring radioactive material associated with oil and gas operations as scale deposited in tubulars, surface piping, pumps, and other producing and processing equipment. NORM also occurs as sludge and produced sands at wellheads, transport vessels and tank bottoms. For disposal, NORM scale and sludge are separated from the tubulars and tank bottoms and ground to less than 100 microns and mixed into a slurry at the surface facility for disposal into a deep well injection interval below the Underground Sources of Drinking Water zone. This paper addresses two primary considerations: (1) subsurface geologic investigations which identify specific geologic horizons that have sufficient porosity and permeability to accept NORM slurries containing high total suspended solids concentrations, and (2) surface facility requirements. Generic and specific information, criteria, and examples are included in the paper to allow the application of the geologic principles to other areas or regions

  14. Radiological dose assessment of naturally occurring radioactive materials in concrete building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amran AB Majid; Aznan Fazli Ismail; Muhamad Samudi Yasir; Redzuwan Yahaya; Ismail Bahari

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the natural radioactivity contained in building materials have significantly influenced the dose rates in dwelling. Exposure to natural radiation in building has been of concerned since almost 80 % of our daily live are spend indoor. Thus, the aim of the study is to assess the radiological risk associated by natural radioactivity in soil based building materials to dwellers. A total of 13 Portland cement, 46 sand and 43 gravel samples obtained from manufacturers or bought directly from local hardware stores in Peninsular of Malaysia were analysed for their radioactivity concentrations. The activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in the studied building materials samples were found to be in the range of 3.7-359.3, 2.0-370.8 and 10.3-1,949.5 Bq kg -1 respectively. The annual radiation dose rates (μSv year -1 ) received by dwellers were evaluated for 1 to 50 years of exposure using Resrad-Build Computer Code based on the activity concentration of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K found in the studied building material samples. The rooms modelling were based on the changing parameters of concrete wall thickness and the room dimensions. The annual radiation dose rates to dwellers were found to increase annually over a period of 50 years. The concrete thicknesses were found to have significantly influenced the dose rates in building. The self-absorption occurred when the concrete thickness was thicker than 0.4 m. Results of this study shows that the dose rates received by the dwellers of the building are proportional to the size of the room. In general the study concludes that concrete building materials; Portland cements, sands, and gravels in Peninsular of Malaysia does not pose radiological hazard to the building dwellers. (author)

  15. Regulation of naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolling, L.A.; Lubenau, J.O.; Nussbaumer, D.A.

    1984-10-01

    In 1977, NRC published a report (NUREG-0301) of a task force review of the need for, and feasibility of, the Federal government regulating naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials (NARM). Since that time, the Federal regulatory role has not significantly changed but State calls for increased Federal involvment have continued. In 1983, a National Governors' Association report on the NRC Agreement State program recommended amendment of the Atomic Energy Act to authorize NRC regulation of these materials. Based on that recommendation, and with the cooperation of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc., NRC staff undertook a review of the current status of use and regulation of NARM. This report contains the results of that review. 10 references

  16. Implementing a corporate-wide policy for dealing with naturally occurring radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, S.E.; Abernathy, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    With the increased environmental awareness about naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), many companies are adopting policies to address the exposure and contamination issues associated with this material. In developing and implementing a NORM policy, every aspect of a business must be thoroughly evaluated to determine at what point the material is encountered and what processes tend to concentrate the material. Once all areas having elevated levels of NORM are identified, the interrelationships between these areas must be evaluated. Corporate policy regarding NORM is discussed, including employee exposure, environmental contamination, facility and equipment contamination, logistics of moving between facilities covered by different regulations, existing and proposed regulations, trends of proposed regulations, disposal of NORM, training and survey equipment. 14 refs., 7 figs

  17. Study of 222Rn emanation levels present in naturally occurring radioactive materials - NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Marcia Valeria F.E. Sa; Crispim, Verginia Reis; Lima, Clara Teresa S.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM), contaminating oil and gas installations, is usual in the petroleum industry, and can be severe enough to expose the workers to elevated levels of radiation. The segregation of contaminated residues although necessary, is still a problem without a satisfactory solution. Currently, the most practical and economic option for discarding this material is to stock it in areas of the installation with controlled access. Certain equipment used in the petroleum industry has scale and sludge that could be associated to important levels of radioactivity. Typically, the scales are mixtures of carbonate and sulphate minerals, such as barite (BaSO 4 ), that easily incorporate 226 Ra and 228 Ra in their structures. The objective of this work was to measure the emanations of the radon present in NORM samples, via diffusion chambers containing a nuclear track detector (CR-39). The images of α particle tracks emanated by 222 Rn registered on CR-39 were observed with a Nikon E400 optic microscope and captured by a Nikon Coolpix digital camera and then stored in a database, to later count the tracks using the computational program, Image Pro plus. Since the number of those tracks resulted proportional to the emanation rate of 222 Rn this methodology allowed the comparison of contamination levels in analyzed samples. (author)

  18. Study of the emanation levels of 222Rn present in Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials - NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Marcia Valeria de Fatima da Encarnacao Sa

    2009-01-01

    The presence of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM), contaminating oil and gas facilities, is a common fact in the petroleum industry, and can be severe enough to expose the workers to elevated levels of radiation. Thus, contaminated residues need to be segregated but, this is still a problem without a satisfactory solution. Currently, the most practical and economic option for discarding this material is to stock it in areas of the facility whose access is controlled. Certain equipment used in the petroleum industry has scale and sludge that could be associated to important levels of radioactivity. Typically, the scale is a mixture of carbonate and sulphate minerals, such as barite (BaSO 4 ), that easily incorporates 226 Ra and 228 Ra in its structures. The objective of this work was to measure the emanations of the radon present in these NORM samples, via diffusion chambers containing a nuclear track detector (CR-39). The images of particle alpha tracks emanated by 222 Rn registered on CR-39 were observed with a Nikon E400 optic microscope and captured by a Nikon Coolpix digital camera and then stored in a database, to later count the tracks using the computational program, Image Pro plus. Being that the emanation rate of 222 Rn was proportional to the number of these tracks the methodology permitted the comparison of contamination levels of the analyzed samples. (author)

  19. Measurement of naturally occurring radioactive materials in commonly used building materials in Hyderabad, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbudhe, A.Y.; Vishwa Prasad, K.; Vidya Sagar, D.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    Building materials can cause significant gamma dose indoors, due to their natural radioactivity content. The knowledge of the natural radioactivity level of building materials is important for determination of population exposure, as most people spend 80-90% of their time indoors furthermore, it is useful in setting the standards and national guidelines for the use and management of these materials. The concentrations of natural radionuclides in building materials vary depending on the local geological and geographical conditions as well as geochemical characteristics of those materials. The aim of the study is to determine levels of natural radionuclide in the commonly used building materials in Hyderabad, India

  20. Naturally occurring radioactive elements, arsenic and other metals in drinking water from private wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, Britt-Marie; Thunholm, Bo; Oestergren, Inger; Falk, Rolf; Mjoenes, Lars

    2008-04-01

    Approximately 50 % of all drinking water is extracted from groundwater. For private supply of drinking water almost 100 % emanates from groundwater. For approximately 1.2 of the 9 million Swedish citizens, private wells are the primary water source where 700 000 get their water from wells drilled in the bedrock. Radioactive elements and metals that occur naturally in the bedrock can be found in the well water. The radioactive elements include radon-222 ( 222 Rn), uranium (U), radium-226 ( 226 Ra) as well as polonium-210 ( 210 Po) and lead-210 ( 210 Pb), which are long-lived progeny of radon. In 2001 SGU and SSI initiated a collaboration to investigate the occurrence of radioactive elements and metals in water from private wells. Data sampling and analysis was completed in 2006. The aim of the project was to map the occurrence of radioactive elements in drinking water from private wells and to estimate their respective dose contribution. Another aim was to map metals and other elements in the water, to study temporal variations and possible co-variations between analysed elements. Sampling was conducted in a random fashion throughout the country. However, in regions where bedrock and soils are known to show enhanced concentrations of radioactive elements and arsenic the sampling density was increased. The analyses comprises: total beta activity, total alpha activity, radium-226, radon-222, uranium, aluminium, chloride, calcium, vanadium, chromium, iron, manganese, cobalt, nickel, copper, zink, arsenic, strontium, molybdenum, cadmium, barium, lead, thorium, boron, sodium, manganese, potassium, silica, alkalinity, sulfate, fluoride, phosphate, nitrate, pH and electric conductivity. In a few cases chemistry analyses of polonium-210 and lead-210 have been done. It was observed that the south-western part of Sweden, with exception for granite areas in the county of Bohuslaen, has relatively low concentrations of natural radioactive elements in the drinking water. The

  1. Potential environmental and regulatory implications of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    The immense volume of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) wastes produced annually by extracting industries throughout the world deserves to come to the attention of international and national environmental protection agencies and regulatory bodies. Although a great deal of work has been done in the fields of radiation protection and remedial actions concerning uranium and other mines, the need to dispose of diffuse NORM wastes will have environmental and regulatory implications that thus far are not fully appreciated. NORM wastes constitute, by and large, unwanted byproducts of industrial activities as diverse as thorium and uranium milling, niobium, tin and gold mining extraction, water treatment, and the production of oil, gas, phosphate fertilizer, coal fire and aluminium. The volumes of NORM wastes produced annually could reach levels so high that the existing low level radioactive waste (LLRW) facilities would be readily occupied by NORM if controlled disposal procedures were not adopted. On the other hand, NORM cannot just be ignored as being below radiological concern (BRC) or lower than exempt concentration levels (ECLs), because sometimes NORM concentrations reach levels as high as 1 x 10 3 kBq/kg for 226 Ra, and not much less for 228 Ra. Unfortunately, thus far, there is not enough information available concerning NORM wastes in key industries, though the international scientific community has been concerned, for a long time now, with technologically enhanced natural radiation exposures (TENRE). This article is written with the intention of examining, to the extent possible, the potential environmental and regulatory implications of NORM wastes being produced in selected industries. (Author)

  2. Technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) and its regulation. Aspects at issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, Shankar

    2001-01-01

    It has been known for quite a long time that mankind lives in a naturally radioactive world. However, it is only during the last decade that it has become generally registered that naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is artificially concentrated ('technologically enhanced') in many non- nuclear industries. This concentration, termed TENORM, can be in the products, the by- products or the wastes arising from these industries. The emergence of the NORM/TENORM issue has been of great significance for the discussions on clearance regulations in the nuclear industry. A task group of the OECD/NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning has found that TENORM arisings occur in huge quantities; two to three orders of magnitude larger than those used in European studies on release of material from the nuclear industry. The activity levels in TENORM arisings are generally the same as in very low level nuclear waste. Their occurrence in a large number of industries, as well as their activity levels and quantities, have not been generally known, even to regulatory authorities, until fairly recently. Thus the regulation of TENORM is in its early stages. Ra 226 with a half-life of 1,600 years is by far the most important radionuclide. These data are only shown to give an idea of quantities and activity levels. Other industries with significant radioactive waste streams are petroleum processing, geothermal plants and paper mills. Studies by the European Commission have shown that more or less comparable quantities of TENORM arise in Europe, with similar concentrations of radioactivity. Two of the largest source industries of TENORM are the coal and fertiliser industries. According to UNSCEAR, 280 million tons of coal ash arise globally every year. 40 million tons are used in the production of bricks and cement and 'a great deal' is utilised as road stabiliser, road fill, asphalt mix and fertiliser. Annual doses to residents can be up to several mSv. These doses are

  3. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM IV). Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    Radionuclides of natural origin are ubiquitous in both working and public environments, although their activity concentrations vary considerably. Exposures to natural sources are in most cases not a matter for regulatory concern. However, there are situations where exposures to natural sources may warrant consideration as to whether controls should be applied. One such situation is where the conditions are conducive to the buildup of elevated concentrations of radon in air. Another situation is the mining and/or processing of material where the activity concentrations of radionuclides of natural origin in the material itself, or in any material arising from the process, are significantly elevated - such material has come to be referred to as Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). In the past, regulatory attention has been focused mostly on exposures arising from the mining and processing of uranium ores because such activities are part of the nuclear fuel cycle. More recently, attention has been broadened to include exposures from other industrial activities involving NORM, in recognition of the potential for such activities to also give rise to significant exposures of workers and members of the public if not adequately controlled. More and more countries are now including provisions in their national legislation and regulations for the control of exposures to natural sources, and the body of radiological data on such exposures is growing rapidly. This international conference, NORM IV, follows three previous conferences dealing with radon and NORM. The first was held in Amsterdam in 1997, the second in Krefeld, Germany in 1998 (NORM II), and the third in Brussels in 2001 (NORM III). In addition, an International Symposium on Technologically Enhanced Natural Radiation was held in Rio de Janeiro in 1999 - the IAEA was involved in the organization of that symposium, and published the proceedings as IAEA-TECDOC-1271. The main topic addressed at NORM IV was

  4. Radiological safety and environmental implications in beach mineral industry due to naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, P.M.B.; Haridasan, P.P.; Maniyan, C.G.; Khan, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of monazite (primary ore of Thorium) along with ilmenite and other minerals in the beach sand deposits of coastal regions of South India has made some of these coastal areas prominent among Natural High Background Radiation Areas (NHBRA) in the world. The beach mineral industries are situated in populated areas in these NHBRAs. The radiation background prevailing in these areas due to the presence of the Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) Thorium with traces of Uranium and their decay products had been found to result in estimated percaput annual external exposures ranging from 3 to 25 mSv to the population at NHBRA depending on the monazite content of the soil in the area. The internal exposures estimated are of the order of 1 to 2 mSv per year. The mining of minerals and refilling of the mined out areas with mineral free sand and rehabilitation of the area is found to reduce the external radiation fields by a factor of 3. The notional environmental external radiation exposures to the population occupying this modified NHBRA also reduce correspondingly. (author)

  5. Risk analysis and protective measures for occupationally workers with technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, R.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides are present in many natural resources. Elevated concentrations of these radionuclides are often found in certain geological materials, namely igneous rocks and ores. Human activities that exploit these resources may lead to enhanced concentrations of radionuclides (often referred to as technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TE-NORM). Enhanced levels of natural background radiation are encountered in many occupational industrial activities involving a large number of workers. Uncontrolled activities associated with TE-NORM can contaminate the environment and pose a risk to human health. This risk can be alleviated by the adoption of controls to identify where NORM is present; and cleaning the NORM-contaminated equipment and waste management while protecting workers. The main objective of this study is to investigate the natural radioactivity and the hazard parameters in the TE-NORM samples from different industrial activities. Also to describe the models and develop the computer codes that allow one to estimate the risk of cancer resulting from any specified dose of ionizing radiation for occupationally workers in different industrial activities. The present study deals with 50 different samples. This waste generated from petroleum fields, phosphate fertilizers samples, consumer product samples from China, ceramic and zircon samples. The radon exhalation rates calculated using solid state nuclear track detector (CR-39). The value of radon exhalation rate 58.82±5.3 x10 3 , 4.28±0.49 x10 3 and 0.306±0.025 x10 3 Bq/m 2 h for scale, sludge and sand, respectively. The value of radon exhalation rate 82.67±7.98, 62.58 ±5.7, 46.16 ±3.91 and 198.51±18.68 Bq/m 2 h for phosphate fertilizers samples, consumer product samples from China, ceramic and zircon samples, respectively. The 226 Ra activity concentrations were 301.4±771.5, 52.1±438 and 2.56±55.37 kBq/kg for scale, sludge and sand, respectively. The

  6. Regulatory Initiatives for Control and Release of Technologically Enhanced Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidi, P.V.

    1999-03-02

    Current drafts of proposed standards and suggested State regulations for control and release of technologically-enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive material (TENORM), and standards for release of volumetrically-contaminated material in the US are reviewed. These are compared to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Safety Series and the European Commission (EC) proposals. Past regulatory efforts with respect to TENORM in the US dealt primarily with oil-field related wastes. Currently, nine states (AK, GA, LA, MS, NM, OH, OR SC, TX) have specific regulations pertaining to TENORM, mostly based on uranium mill tailings cleanup criteria. The new US proposals are dose- or risk-based, as are the IAEA and EC recommendations, and are grounded in the linear no threshold hypothesis (LNT). TENORM wastes involve extremely large volumes, particularly scrap metal and mine wastes. Costs to control and dispose of these wastes can be considerable. The current debate over the validity of LNT at low doses and low dose rates is particularly germane to this discussion. Most standards setting organizations and regulatory agencies base their recommendations on the LNT. The US Environmental Protection Agency has released a draft Federal Guidance Report that recommends calculating health risks from low-level exposure to radionuclides based on the LNT. However, some scientific and professional organizations are openly questioning the validity of LNT and its basis for regulations, practices, and costs to society in general. It is not clear at this time how a non-linear regulatory scheme would be implemented.

  7. Construction of a naturally occurring radioactive material project in the BeAAT hazardous waste facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuahmad, H

    2015-06-01

    This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is produced during exploration and production operations of subsidiaries of the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) in the United Arab Emirates, and accumulates in drilling tubulars, plant equipment, and components. These NORM hazardous wastes need to be managed in such a way that they do not damage human health and the environment. The primary radionuclides of concern in the oil and gas industries are radium-226 and radium-228. These radioisotopes are the decay products of uranium and thorium isotopes that are present in subsurface formations from which hydrocarbons are produced. While uranium and thorium are largely immobile, radium is slightly more soluble and may become mobilised in the fluid phases of the formation (International Association of Oil & Gas Producers, 2008). In order to treat and dispose of NORM waste products safely, ADNOC's subsidiary 'TAKREER' is developing a new facility, on behalf of all ADNOC subsidiaries, within the existing Central Environmental Protection Facilities (BeAAT) in Ruwais city. The NORM plant is envisaged to treat, handle, and dispose of NORM waste in the forms of scale, sludge, and contaminated equipment. The NORM treatment facility will cover activities such as decontamination, volume reduction, NORM handling, and concrete immobilisation of NORM waste into packages for designated landfilling. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Perceived risks of produced water management and naturally occurring radioactive material content in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Luisa; Yadav, Om Prakash; Khan, Eakalak

    2017-07-01

    Unconventional oil and gas development using hydraulic fracturing has caused conflict and controversy across the globe including the U.S. where some States banned the practice. Nevertheless, North Dakota (ND) has supported the practice because the State perceives the risks to be acceptable and because it has brought growth and opportunities to small communities. However, social acceptance of new technology is based on a number of factors and not contingent on economic benefits. To date, no research has been conducted to understand public risk perception of hazards associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing in ND. This study focuses on understanding the risk perception of select ND stakeholder groups regarding produced water management and naturally occurring radioactive material. The software Qualtrics was used to create an online survey, collect data, and perform statistical analysis. The most important variables that seem to influence risk perception are the images and thoughts associated with produced water, level of knowledge about produced water handling and content, and knowing how to proceed in case of a spill of produced water. Overall, social risk perception could be in alignment with actual technical risk if availability of objective information is improved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1996-09-01

    A preliminary radiological dose assessment of equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in production waste streams. The assessment estimated maximum individual dose equivalents for workers and the general public. Sensitivity analyses of certain input parameters also were conducted. On the basis of this assessment, it is concluded that (1) regulations requiring workers to wear respiratory protection during equipment cleaning operations are likely to result in lower worker doses, (2) underground injection and downhole encapsulation of NORM wastes present a negligible risk to the general public, and (3) potential doses to workers and the general public related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment can be controlled by limiting the contamination level of the initial feed. It is recommended that (1) NORM wastes be further characterized to improve studies of potential radiological doses; (2) states be encouraged to permit subsurface disposal of NORM more readily, provided further assessments support this study; results; (3) further assessment of landspreading NORM wastes be conducted; and (4) the political, economic, sociological, and nonradiological issues related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment be studied to fully examine the feasibility of this disposal option

  10. Regulatory Initiatives for Control and Release of Technologically Enhanced Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egidi, P.V.

    1999-01-01

    Current drafts of proposed standards and suggested State regulations for control and release of technologically-enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive material (TENORM), and standards for release of volumetrically-contaminated material in the US are reviewed. These are compared to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Safety Series and the European Commission (EC) proposals. Past regulatory efforts with respect to TENORM in the US dealt primarily with oil-field related wastes. Currently, nine states (AK, GA, LA, MS, NM, OH, OR SC, TX) have specific regulations pertaining to TENORM, mostly based on uranium mill tailings cleanup criteria. The new US proposals are dose- or risk-based, as are the IAEA and EC recommendations, and are grounded in the linear no threshold hypothesis (LNT). TENORM wastes involve extremely large volumes, particularly scrap metal and mine wastes. Costs to control and dispose of these wastes can be considerable. The current debate over the validity of LNT at low doses and low dose rates is particularly germane to this discussion. Most standards setting organizations and regulatory agencies base their recommendations on the LNT. The US Environmental Protection Agency has released a draft Federal Guidance Report that recommends calculating health risks from low-level exposure to radionuclides based on the LNT. However, some scientific and professional organizations are openly questioning the validity of LNT and its basis for regulations, practices, and costs to society in general. It is not clear at this time how a non-linear regulatory scheme would be implemented

  11. Managing Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials In the Petroleum Industry in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahsat, H.; Korany, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) have been known to be present in varying concentrations in hydrocarbon reservoirs. These NORM under certain reservoir conditions can reach hazardous contamination levels.the recognition of NORM as a potential source of contamination to oil and gas facilities has become widely spread and gained increased momentum from the industry. Some contamination levels may be sufficiently severe that maintenance and other personnel may be sufficiently severe that maintenance and other personnel may be exposed to hazardous concentrations. Health and environmental concerns regarding NORM have become an important safety issue in upstream petroleum industry in Egypt since the early 1990's when NORM have been detected in different gas and oil production facilities. In these facilities, radiation protection measures were taken to realize safe handling and disposal of NORM according to the applicable international standards. This paper describes the extent of the NORM contamination problem in Egypt and presents guidelines for dealing with NORM based on the latest scientific techniques and international experiences

  12. Industries processing naturally occurring radioactive materials: twenty years of emission data in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzi, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the dose assessment of discharges to air of two industries processing NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials) in the Netherlands. An industrial plant producing elemental phosphorus (thermal process, unique within Europe) reports since 1987 its emission data to the Dutch Ministry of the Environment (VROM: Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment). This plant accounts for the highest release of Po-210 to air in the Netherlands, with a yearly average of approximately 500 GBq. Other significant NORM discharges to air arise from an industrial plant with blast-furnaces for steel production. Yearly discharges fall under permit, and are reported, since 1993. RIVM, the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, is tasked by the Ministry to assess the dose to the general public arising from these discharges to air. Air transport modelling is used to determine both air concentration (for inhalation exposure) and deposition rate of the radionuclides. A (conservative) committed ingestion dose is determined by modelling the uptake of radionuclides from contaminated farmland, and assuming a food basket to be fairly representative for the population of the Netherlands. Discharges to water in the Netherlands have decreased in the past twenty years, due both to the closure of two phosphoric acid plants a decade ago and the improved treatment of waste fluids by other NORM industries. The collective dose assessed from discharges to air since 1987 is presented here. (author)

  13. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Uranium-Rich Coals and Associated Coal Combustion Residues from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Nancy; Vengosh, Avner; Dai, Shifeng

    2017-11-21

    Most coals in China have uranium concentrations up to 3 ppm, yet several coal deposits are known to be enriched in uranium. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in these U-rich coals and associated coal combustion residues (CCRs) have not been well characterized. Here we measure NORM (Th, U, 228 Ra, 226 Ra, and 210 Pb) in coals from eight U-rich coal deposits in China and the associated CCRs from one of these deposits. We compared NORM in these U-rich coals and associated CCRs to CCRs collected from the Beijing area and natural loess sediments from northeastern China. We found elevated U concentrations (up to 476 ppm) that correspond to low 232 Th/ 238 U and 228 Ra/ 226 Ra activity ratios (≪1) in the coal samples. 226 Ra and 228 Ra activities correlate with 238 U and 232 Th activities, respectively, and 226 Ra activities correlate well with 210 Pb activities across all coal samples. We used measured NORM activities and ash yields in coals to model the activities of CCRs from all U-rich coals analyzed in this study. The activities of measured and modeled CCRs derived from U-rich coals exceed the standards for radiation in building materials, particularly for CCRs originating from coals with U > 10 ppm. Since beneficial use of high-U Chinese CCRs in building materials is not a suitable option, careful consideration needs to be taken to limit potential air and water contamination upon disposal of U- and Ra-rich CCRs.

  14. Production and Evaluation of 236gNp and Reference Materials for Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Cyrus Kouroush

    This thesis is based on the development of a radiochemical separation scheme capable of separating both 236gNp and 236Pu from a uranium target of natural isotopic composition ( 1 g uranium) and 200 MBq of fission decay products. The isobaric distribution of fission residues produced following the bombardment of a natural uranium target with a beam of 25 MeV protons has been evaluated. Decay analysis of thirteen isobarically distinct fission residues were carried out using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry at the UK National Physical Laboratory. Stoichiometric abundances were calculated via the determination of absolute activity concentrations associated with the longest-lived members of each isobaric chain. This technique was validated by computational modelling of likely sequential decay processes through an isobaric decay chain. The results were largely in agreement with previously published values for neutron bombardments on natural uranium at energies of 14 MeV. Higher relative yields of products with mass numbers A 110-130 were found, consistent with the increasing yield of these radionuclides as the bombarding energy is increased. Using literature values for the production cross-section for fusion of protons with uranium targets, it is estimated that an upper limit of approximately 250 Bq of activity from the 236Np ground state was produced in this experiment. Using a radiochemical separation scheme, Np and Pu fractions were separated from the produced fission decay products, with analyses of the target-based final reaction products made using Inductively Couple Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high-resolution alpha and gamma-ray spectrometry. In a separate research theme, reliable measurement of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials is of significance in order to comply with environmental regulations and for radiological protection purposes. The thesis describes the standardisation of three reference materials, namely Sand, Tuff and TiO2 which

  15. Trace elements and naturally occurring radioactive materials in 'Non-traditional fertilizers' used in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assibey, E. O.

    2013-07-01

    Fertilizers have been implicated for being contaminated with toxic trace elements and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) even though they are an indispensable component of our agriculture. This phenomenon of contamination has been investigated and established world-wide in various forms of fertilizers (i.e., granular or 'traditional' type and liquid/powder or 'non-traditional type'). In Ghana, the crop sub-sector has seen a gradual rise in the importation and use of 'non-traditional fertilizers' which are applied to both the foliar parts and roots of plants. This notwithstanding, research on fertilizers has been largely skewed towards the 'traditional' types, focusing principally on the subjects of yield, effects of application and their quality. This study was, therefore, undertaken to bridge the knowledge gap by investigating the levels of trace elements and NORMs found in the 'non-traditional' fertilizers used in Ghana. The principal objective of the study was to investigate the suitability of the 'non-traditional fertilizers' for agricultural purposes with respect to trace elements and NORMs contamination. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis were employed to determine the trace elements (Cu, Zn, Fe, Na, Al, Br, Ni, Cd, As, Hg, Co, Pb, La, Mn, Si, Ca, Cl, S, K, Ba and V) and NORMs ( 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K) concentrations in thirty-nine (39) fertilizer samples taken from two major agro-input hubs in the country (Kumasi-Kejetia and Accra). Multivariate statistical analyses (cluster analysis, principal component analysis and pearson's correlation) were applied to the data obtained in order to identify possible sources of contamination, investigate sample/ parameter affinities and groupings and for fingerprinting. The toxic trace element concentrations determined in all samples were found to be in the order Fe>Cu>Co>Cd>Cr >Ni>Pb>As>Hg. The study found most of the trace elements determined to be within limits set

  16. Travel Times of Water Derived from Three Naturally Occurring Cosmogenic Radioactive Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Ate; Thaw, Melissa; Deinhart, Amanda; Bibby, Richard; Esser, Brad

    2017-04-01

    confirm a small fraction of younger (travel time responses to hydrological conditions and further characterize the catchment properties. Combined analysis of three cosmogenic tracers provides a unique insight into the functioning of the catchment and constrains the volume of subsurface water storage. Short-lived naturally occurring radioactive isotopes sulfur-35 and sodium-22 are especially useful for vulnerability assessment of springs and karst systems where a contribution of very young water is expected. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-717377

  17. Pennsylvania's technologically enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive material experiences and studies of the oil and gas industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, David J

    2015-02-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's experiences and ongoing studies related to technologically enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) in the oil and gas industry. It has been known for many years that Pennsylvania's geology is unique, with several areas having relatively high levels of natural uranium and thorium. In the 1950s, a few areas of the state were evaluated for commercial uranium production. In the late 1970s, scoping studies of radon in homes prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Bureau of Radiation Protection (BRP) to begin planning for a larger state-wide radon study. The BRP and Oil and Gas Bureau also performed a TENORM study of produced water in the early 1990s for a number of conventional oil and gas wells. More recently, BRP and the Bureau of Solid Waste developed radiation monitoring regulations for all Pennsylvania solid waste disposal facilities. These were implemented in 2001, prompting another evaluation of oil and gas operations and sludge generated from the treatment of conventionally produced water and brine but mainly focused on the disposal of TENORM solid waste in the state's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D landfills. However, since 2008, the increase in volumes of gas well wastewater and levels of Ra observed in the unconventional shale gas well flow-back fracking water has compelled DEP to fully re-examine these oil and gas operations. Specifically, with BRP in the lead, a new TENORM study of oil and gas operations and related wastewater treatment operations has been initiated (), supported by an American National Standards Institute standard on TENORM () and a U.S. Government Accountability Office report on shale resource development and risks (). This study began in early 2013 and will examine the potential public and worker radiation exposure and environmental impact as well as re-evaluate TENORM waste disposal. This

  18. Impact modelling of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olyslaegers, G.

    2009-01-01

    Remediation of sites contaminated by Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) is a current issue in many countries world wide. These materials could arise from many types of industries such as mining and milling of uranium, thorium and other metals, phosphate industry, coal mining and combustion, oil and gas industry, abandoned radium and thorium extraction facilities. Waste products originating from these industries need to be managed in a proper way. In recent years, new radiation protection legislation, growing awareness of radiation risks at some sites and public perception have created the necessity to develop remediation strategies for those sites. These strategies can be based on the exploration of hypothetical scenarios, where different exposure pathways are screened. The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN has been involved in an international comparison exercise under the IAEA EMRAS programme where the radiological impact of a hypothetical NORM waste dump site and the effect of corrective actions had to be assessed. The outcome of different radiological assessment models was compared. The waste dump (surface 1 km 2 , 10 m deep, containing 1 Bq g -1 of 238 U in secular equilibrium with her daughters) is located above an aquifer which can be contaminated by the waste due to percolation of rain water. The waste dump is either uncovered or covered by a 2 m thick layer, with an erosion rate of 0.1 mm y -1 and an effective porosity of 0.2. The dose, resulting from living on top and at 200 m distance from the border of the waste dump was to be calculated

  19. Regulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) with emphasis on NORM disposal options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, P.

    1995-01-01

    Regulation of radioactive material can occur at the Federal, State, and sometimes local level. In addition to regulations at the federal and state level, there are guidelines and standards that do not carry the weight of law, yet are often referenced. Neither the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) categorically regulates NORM at this time. However, many of the existing regulations and guidelines for licensed radioactive material can be applied by states and other regulatory agencies to NORM. The primary regulations covering radioactive materials and exposures were promulgated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) or 1954, as amended. NRC licenses and regulates civilian use of nuclear materials to protect public health and safety and the environment. NRC makes rules and sets standards for licensees and inspects the activities of licensees to insure that they do not violate safety rules. OSHA regulations for worker protection from exposures to radioactivity are contained in 29CFR1910.96. These standards are designed to protect workers from exposure to radiation in programs other than those regulated by OSHA. The Uranium Mill Tailings Control Act, with implementing regulations found in 40CFR192 were promulgated by the EPA for cleanup of uranium mill tailings. These standards are often used by states and other agencies in regulating cleanup of NORM. EPA is currently considering regulation of NORM on NRC and DOE facilities under 40CFR195

  20. Assessment of radiological hazards of naturally occurring radioactive materials in cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Gul, R.; Ara, T.; Hussain, M.

    2012-01-01

    A study on the radiological hazard in Portland cement due to the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials is being carried out. The Portland cement manufactured in the Islamabad/Rawalpindi region of Pakistan, intermediate products (clinker) and the various raw materials which compose the product have been analysed for 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K using a gamma spectrometry system with a N-type high-purity germanium detector of 80 % relative efficiency. From the measured gamma ray spectra, specific activities were determined. The mean values of the total specific activity of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K are 34.2±11.9, 29.1±3.6 and 295.1±66.9 Bq kg -1 , respectively in Portland cement, 28.4±8.7, 11.3±1.7 and 63.1±17.3 Bq kg -1 , respectively in lime stone, 8.2±1.9, 16.2±3.9 and 187.7±53.2 Bq kg -1 , respectively in gypsum, 34.7±13.1, 41.2±6.7 and 187.6±17.2 Bq kg -1 , respectively in clay, 41.1±11.8, 39.3±6.9 and 195.1±29.2 Bq kg -1 , respectively in laterite and 51.1±18.2, 23.2±1.2 and 258.4±15.3 Bq kg -1 , respectively in clinker. The radium equivalent activities (Ra eq ), external hazard index (H ex ), internal hazard index (H in ), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose rate (E eff ) were also determined. The measured activity concentrations for these radio nuclides and radiological indices were compared with the reported national and international data. All these measured values are comparable with the worldwide data reported in UNSCEAR publications. (authors)

  1. In-situ Measurements and Analysis of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.F.; Ilie, G.; Russ, W.R.; Lange, H.J.; Rotty, M.

    2013-06-01

    The measurement and quantification of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) is an important element of workplace radioprotection in key industries such as oil and gas production, heavy metals mining and refining, coal burning waste, and water treatment. Monitoring of NORM content in home building materials is another challenge for human safety in the prevention of chronic dose uptake. Materials are classified NORM in case they contain significant amounts of the decay chains of U-238 (Ra-226 as a long lived daughter), U-235 or Th- 232 or the primordial nuclide K-40. Due to the decay of the radionuclides, gamma rays with a signature in the energy range from 45 keV up to 2615 keV are emitted. The most accurate method to measure NORM in a sample is to use a high resolution spectrometric instrument such as a germanium detector in a well-shielded laboratory environment. The shield is used to prevent background with the same signature from the building material of the laboratory. There are occasions in which one is required to assay samples in the field. These in situ field applications may require performing measurements with reduced (or no) background shielding conditions, or involve the use of medium resolution spectrometric instruments such as LaBr 3 or NaI detectors. In-situ analyses such as these have increased complexity. The reduced shielding enforces the subtraction of NORM events produced from the environment but the sample material and container can also shield the detector against this background thus biasing the measured results if not appropriately accounted. The use of medium resolution detectors has additional complications that the multiplicity of gamma-rays from NORM materials is such that most of the gamma-rays are interfering and thus require a very careful quantitative analysis. In this presentation, we will discuss the details of the NORM source term both in the environment and what could potentially be in the sample. We will also discuss

  2. Assessment of inhalation dose sensitivity by physicochemical properties of airborne particulates containing naturally occurring radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Young; Choi, Cheol Kyu; Kim, Yong Geon; Choi, Won Chul; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Facilities processing raw materials containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) may give rise to enhanced radiation dose to workers due to chronic inhalation of airborne particulates. Internal radiation dose due to particulate inhalation varies depending on particulate properties, including size, shape, density, and absorption type. The objective of the present study was to assess inhalation dose sensitivity to physicochemical properties of airborne particulates. Committed effective doses to workers resulting from inhalation of airborne particulates were calculated based on International Commission on Radiological Protection 66 human respiratory tract model. Inhalation dose generally increased with decreasing particulate size. Committed effective doses due to inhalation of 0.01μm sized particulates were higher than doses due to 100μm sized particulates by factors of about 100 and 50 for {sup 238}U and {sup 230}Th, respectively. Inhalation dose increased with decreasing shape factor. Shape factors of 1 and 2 resulted in dose difference by about 18 %. Inhalation dose increased with particulate mass density. Particulate mass densities of 11 g·cm{sup -3} and 0.7 g·cm{sup -3} resulted in dose difference by about 60 %. For {sup 238}U, inhalation doses were higher for absorption type of S, M, and F in that sequence. Committed effective dose for absorption type S of {sup 238}U was about 9 times higher than dose for absorption F. For {sup 230}Th, inhalation doses were higher for absorption type of F, M, and S in that sequence. Committed effective dose for absorption type F of {sup 230}Th was about 16 times higher than dose for absorption S. Consequently, use of default values for particulate properties without consideration of site specific physiochemical properties may potentially skew radiation dose estimates to unrealistic values up to 1-2 orders of magnitude. For this reason, it is highly recommended to consider site specific working materials and

  3. Fate of the naturally occurring radioactive materials during treatment of acid mine drainage with coal fly ash and aluminium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzivire, Godfrey; Maleka, Peane P; Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Gitari, Wilson M; Lindsay, Robert; Petrik, Leslie F

    2014-01-15

    Mining of coal is very extensive and coal is mainly used to produce electricity. Coal power stations generate huge amounts of coal fly ash of which a small amount is used in the construction industry. Mining exposes pyrite containing rocks to H2O and O2. This results in the oxidation of FeS2 to form H2SO4. The acidic water, often termed acid mine drainage (AMD), causes dissolution of potentially toxic elements such as, Fe, Al, Mn and naturally occurring radioactive materials such as U and Th from the associated bedrock. This results in an outflow of AMD with high concentrations of sulphate ions, Fe, Al, Mn and naturally occurring radioactive materials. Treatment of AMD with coal fly ash has shown that good quality water can be produced which is suitable for irrigation purposes. Most of the potentially toxic elements (Fe, Al, Mn, etc) and substantial amounts of sulphate ions are removed during treatment with coal fly ash. This research endeavours to establish the fate of the radioactive materials in mine water with coal fly ash containing radioactive materials. It was established that coal fly ash treatment method was capable of removing radioactive materials from mine water to within the target water quality range for drinking water standards. The alpha and beta radioactivity of the mine water was reduced by 88% and 75% respectively. The reduced radioactivity in the mine water was due to greater than 90% removal of U and Th radioactive materials from the mine water after treatment with coal fly ash as ThO2 and UO2. No radioisotopes were found to leach from the coal fly ash into the mine water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Handling of natural occurring radioactive deposits in the oil and gas industry in Norway, United Kingdom and the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysebo, I.; Tufto, P.

    1999-03-01

    Deposits containing naturally occurring radioactive materials is an increasing problem in oil and gas production. Laws and regulations in this area is under preparation, and it is a wish for harmonization with the other oil and gas producing countries in the North Sea. The report gives an overview of amounts of waste and activity levels, decontamination methods and waste handling in Norway, Great Britain and the Netherlands

  5. Concerns on the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiations from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohankumar, Mary N.

    2005-01-01

    It is a widely known fact that man evolved in a naturally radioactive environment. Even today life exists in an atmosphere of cosmic and terrestrial radiation. Radionuclides are found naturally in air, water and soil. They are even found in us, we being the products of our environment. Every day, we ingest and inhale radionuclides in our air and food and the water. Natural radioactivity is common in the rocks and soil that makes up our planet, in water and oceans, and in our building materials and homes. There is nowhere on earth that one cannot find natural radioactivity. Radioactive materials which occur naturally and expose people to radiation occur widely, and are known by the acronym 'NORM' (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials). Besides, around the globe there are some areas with an elevated background radiation. These areas include parts of Brazil, Iran, India and China. The sources of radiation in these areas include monazite containing beach sands and radium from hot springs. On the southwest coast of India, there are large deposits of thorium bearing monazite sands that contribute to an external radiation dose of about 5 - 6 mGy/yr, but in some parts doses up to 32.6 mGy/yr have been reported. Nevertheless, most general public associate ionising radiations only with the nuclear industry. Antinuclear activists often fail to accept the fact that coal-fired power stations and the oil and gas exploration operations may emit more radioactivity than an operating nuclear reactor. Another NORM issue relates to radon exposure in homes, particularly those built on granite grounds. The solid airborne Rn-222 progeny, particularly Po-218, Pb-214 and Bi-214 are of health importance because they can be inspired and retained in the lung causing cancer. Man-made operations like oil and gas production and processing operations result in technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) to accumulate at elevated concentrations in by

  6. Uptake of naturally occurring radioisotopes by vegetation in a region of high radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahon, D C; Mathewes, R W [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

    1983-05-01

    The accumulation of four naturally occurring radionuclides of the sup(238)U series, uranium, sup(226)Ra, sup(210)Pb and sup(210)Po, in 15 species of native plants was investigated. Of the plants sampled some accumulated, but none concentrated uranium or sup(226)Ra. Grouseberry (Vaccinium scoparium Leiberg) appeared to concentrate sup(210)Pb and sup(210)Po. There were marked seasonal variations in the accumulation of uranium by grass (Calamagrostis rubescens Buckl.), and of sup(210)Pb and sup(210)Po by grass and fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium L.). High positive correlations between soil and vegetation radionuclide content were found for uranium in fireweed and grouseberry in spring, sup(226)Ra in willow (Salix scouleriana L.) in spring, and uranium in fireweed in summer.

  7. Steam reforming as an alternative technique for treatment of oil sludge containing naturally occurring radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norasalwa Zakaria; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus; Mohd Khairi Muhd Said; Mohamad Azman Che Mat Isa; Mohd Puad Abu

    2004-01-01

    Steam reforming treatment system is an innovative technology that holds a potential to treat mixed waste containing radioactive material. The system is utilizing the thermal heat of the superheated steam at 500 degree C to produce combustible gases and integrates it with ash melting at 1400 degree C for final destruction. In this system, liquids are evaporated, organics are converted into a hydrogen-rich gas, chlorinated compounds are converted in hydrochloric acid, and reactive chemicals in the waste containing radionuclide and heavy metals are converted into the stable product through ash melting dioxins and furans are not formed, but instead are destroyed in the reducing environment of the system. No secondary pollutants are produced from the system that requires subsequent treatment. The system is divided into three development stages, and currently the project is progressing at development stage 1. This project is an entailment of a concentrated effort to solve oil sludge containing radioactive material treatment issue. (Author)

  8. Determination of naturally occurring radioactive materials and heavy metals in soil sample at industrial site area Gebeng, Pahang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Dzulkhairi Zulkifly

    2012-01-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the natural occurring radioactivity and heavy metal at an industrial site area Gebeng, Pahang. Sampling has been done in four different stations. This study has been carried out to determine the natural radioactivity ( 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and 226 Ra) and heavy metal in soil sample. Natural radioactivities were determined using Gamma Spectrometry System, the heavy metal determination was done using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The result for analysis radioactivity concentration showed that Uranium-238 were in the range of 28.18 ± 4.78 Bq/ kg - 39.63 ± 4.79 Bq/ kg, while the concentration for Thorium-232 were in the range of 45.66 ± 5.49 Bq/ kg - 72.43 ± 9.47 Bq/ kg and for the Radium-226, the concentration were in the range of 8.93 ± 1.15 Bq/ kg - 14.29 ± 2.61 Bq/ kg. The concentration of Potassium-40 were in the range of 51.06 ± 12.18 Bq/ kg - 426.28 ± 137.70 Bq/ kg. 8 heavy metals have been found from the four different stations which are Al, Fe, V, Mn, Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb. Fe show the highest concentration among the other heavy metal while Pb show the lowest concentration. From this study, the specific activities of natural radionuclide in almost all stations were below the world limit average for soil, which is 35 Bq/ kg for Uranium-238 and Radium-226, while Thorium-232 and Potassium-40 were above the world limit average which are 30 Bq/ kg and 400 Bq/ kg. (author)

  9. Semi-empirical modelling of radiation exposure of humans to naturally occurring radioactive materials in a goldmine in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darko, E. O.; Tetteh, G.K.; Akaho, E.H.K.

    2005-01-01

    A semi-empirical analytical model has been developed and used to assess the radiation doses to workers in a gold mine in Ghana. The gamma dose rates from naturally occurring radioactive materials (uranium-thorium series, potassium-40 and radon concentrations) were related to the annual effective doses for surface and underground mining operations. The calculated effective doses were verified by comparison with field measurements and correlation ratios of 0.94 and 0.93 were obtained, respectively, between calculated and measured data of surface and underground mining. The results agreed with the approved international levels for normal radiation exposure in the mining environment. (au)

  10. Comparison of thermally induced and naturally occurring water-borne leakages from hard rock depositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, P.J.; Robinson, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    The relative importance of thermally induced and naturally occurring flows of water as causes of leakage from hard rock depositories for radioactive wastes is assessed. Separate analyses are presented for involatile, high level waste from reprocessing of fuel and for plutonium contaminated waste from fabrication of fuel. The effects of varying the quantities of wastes, pre-burial storage and the shapes and depths of depositories are considered. It is concluded that for representative values of these variables, thermal flow will remain the major cause of leakage for long times after the burial of both types of waste. (Auth.)

  11. Distribution of naturally occurring radioactivity and 137Cs in the marine sediment of Farasan island, southern red sea, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-zahrany, A. A.; Farouk, M. A.; Al-yousef, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is a part of a project dedicated to measure the marine radioactivity near the Saudi Arabian coast of the Red Sea and Arabian Gulf for establishing a marine radioactivity database, which includes necessary information on the background levels of both naturally occurring and man-made radionuclides in the marine environment. Farasan Islands is a group of 84 islands (archipelago), under the administration of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, in the Red Sea with its main island of Farasan, which is 50 km off the coast of Jazan City. The levels of natural radioactivity of 238 U, 235 U, 226 Ra, 232 Thand 40 K and man-made radionuclides such as 137 Cs in the grab sediment and water samples around Farasan Island have been measured using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The average activity concentrations of 238 U, 235 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 137C s in the sediment samples were found to be 35.46, 1.75, 3.31, 0.92, 34.34 and 0.14 Bq kg -1 , respectively. (authors)

  12. Characteristics of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the oil and gas industries: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Puad Abu; Mohd Noor Mohd Yunus; Sopian, K.; Amran Abd Majid

    1999-01-01

    Activities and work practices in which radiation exposure of workers and members of the public is increased due to the presence of NORM are receiving increased attention from regulatory agencies and, to lesser extent, from the general public. In Malaysia the main sources of NORM are from the technological activities of tin mining, ore and heavy mineral processing, combustion of coal to generate power, and oil and gas extraction. The crude oil sludge that contains NORM arising from the oil and gas extraction activities lately has received special attention by the Malaysian regulatory authorities. These crude oil sludge are considered as Scheduled Waste (contains heavy metals) by Department of Environmental (DOE) and very low level radioactive waste which contains NORM by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB), and its cannot be disposed without permission and proper control. This paper reviewed the radiological behaviour and characteristic o NORM in the crude oil sludge from the oil and gas production activities in Malaysia. (Author)

  13. National survey of potential scenarios for occupational and public exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials in the Republic of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2012-01-01

    The naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) unchanged in its natural state has been considered that can pose a problem from the radiological point of view; however, that are monitored by regulators has been rare. Furthermore, exposures to NORMs that have been altered during the exploitation of natural resources can in principle be regulated. The NORMs have found in some waste generated in various industries, e.g. metal scrap, sludge, slag and fluids. These materials, by-products and the end products of processing, can increase the exposure of both workers and members of the public. Besides, can have a significant environmental damage. Two important situations of exploitation of natural resources which may be present NORMs relevant in relation to the potential effects of these materials on human health and the environment, are: (1) when NORMs concentrations have risen above their natural levels in a product, byproduct or waste, (2) when the release of NORMs to the biosphere may increase due to physicochemical changes or the method by which the wastes are managed. This problem is considered and in Cuba has done a survey of all those potential scenarios of occupational and public exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. Documents and ongoing work carried out by the European Union and the International Atomic Energy Agency, have been taken as reference, to identify potential scenarios for occupational and public exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials in Cuba. The availability of information is taken into account, and the level of care that has received this problem within the community of nations. Recommendatory criteria are developed for countries that can serve as an excellent reference for a study of this type. This issue is still in development in other regions, its relevance and importance from the point of view of radiation safety. The handling, storage, transport and use of equipment or contaminated waste with NORMs

  14. Naturally-occurring alpha activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayneord, W V

    1960-12-01

    In view of the difficulties of assessing the significance of man-made radioactivity it is important to study for comparison the background of natural radioactivity against which the human race has evolved and lives. It is also important to define the present levels of activity so that it will be possible to detect and study as quickly as possible any changes which may occur owing to the release into the environment of new radioactive materials. Moreover, by the study of the behaviour of natural radioactivity light may be shed upon that of the artificially produced isotopes and a number of analogies traced between the two groups. These concepts have led to studies of naturally-occurring radioactive materials alongside a programme of research into fission products in food, water and air, as well as studies of the metabolism of both sets of materials in the human body. Since the last report there has been a useful increase in our knowledge of natural radioactivity in the biosphere, and its levels relative to the new man-made activities. These studies have necessitated technical developments, particularly in the methods of measuring and identifying alpha-ray emitters, to which group many of the more important natural radioactive materials belong.

  15. The state-of-the-art on worldwide studies in some environments with elevated naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran

    1998-01-01

    Direct observations and studies of the radiobiological and epidemiological effects of ionising radiation from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) on man, in particular in areas with elevated NORM, are becoming of prime concern in radiation protection. This is due to existing discrepancies in the application of the linear no-threshold theory in obtaining radiation risks at low doses by extrapolation from high dose to low dose using dose and dose-rate effective factors. Many areas in the world have elevated NORM caused either by the geological and geochemical structure of the soil, or by the radioactive content of the water flowing from hot springs and/or due to technologically enhanced radioactivity as well as due to cosmic rays. Such areas, with relatively large cohort sizes, have been the subject of intensive dosimetry, radiobiological and epidemiological studies. It is the purpose of this article to review: sources of NORM and human exposure, needs and problems in study of areas with elevated NORM; the criteria for their classification; some areas with elevated NORM and the results of related studies, and some conclusions and recommendations for unification of an approach in future studies aimed at obtaining better estimates of human radiation risk factors from the effects of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  16. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, F; Shala, F; Xhixha, G; Xhixha, M K; Hodolli, G; Kadiri, S; Bylyku, E; Cfarku, F

    2014-12-01

    The energy production in Kosovo depends primarily on lignite-fired power plants. During coal combustion, huge amounts of fly ash and bottom ash are generated, which may result in enriched natural radionuclides; therefore, these radionuclides need to be investigated to identify the possible processes that may lead to the radiological exposure of workers and the local population. Lignite samples and NORMs of fly ash and bottom ash generated in lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo are analyzed using a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the activity concentration of natural radionuclides. The average activity concentrations of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th in lignite are found to be 36 ± 8 Bq kg(-1), 9 ± 1 Bq kg(-1) and 9 ± 3 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Indications on the occurrence and geochemical behavior of uranium in the lignite matrix are suggested. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in fly ash and bottom ash samples are found to be concentrated from 3 to 5 times that of the feeding lignite. The external gamma-ray absorbed dose rate and the activity concentration index are calculated to assess the radiological hazard arising from ash disposal and recycling in the cement industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasani, F.; Shala, F.; Xhixha, G.; Xhixha, M.K.; Hodolli, G.; Kadiri, S.; Bylyku, E.; Cfarku, F.

    2014-01-01

    The energy production in Kosovo depends primarily on lignite-fired power plants. During coal combustion, huge amounts of fly ash and bottom ash are generated, which may result in enriched natural radionuclides; therefore, these radionuclides need to be investigated to identify the possible processes that may lead to the radiological exposure of workers and the local population. Lignite samples and NORMs of fly ash and bottom ash generated in lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo are analyzed using a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the activity concentration of natural radionuclides. The average activity concentrations of 40 K, 226 Ra and 232 Th in lignite are found to be 36 ± 8 Bq kg −1 , 9 ± 1 Bq kg −1 and 9 ± 3 Bq kg −1 , respectively. Indications on the occurrence and geochemical behavior of uranium in the lignite matrix are suggested. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in fly ash and bottom ash samples are found to be concentrated from 3 to 5 times that of the feeding lignite. The external gamma-ray absorbed dose rate and the activity concentration index are calculated to assess the radiological hazard arising from ash disposal and recycling in the cement industry. - Highlights: • NORMs in lignite combustion residues from CFPPs are studied. • Th/U indicates either low U uptake from host rocks and/or high leaching from peat. • The concentration factor of NORMs in fly and bottom ash samples are 3–5 times. • No 226 Ra enrichment is observed in fly ash while a depletion in bottom ash. • The reuse of fly ash in cement industry poses no significant radiological issue

  18. Effectiveness of mineral soil to adsorb the natural occurring radioactive material (norm), uranium and thorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amir, Muhammad Nur Iman; Ismail, Nurul Izzatiafifi; Wood, Ab. Khalik, E-mail: khalik@salam.uitm.edu.my; Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    A study has been performed on U-soil and Th-soil adsorption of three types of soil collected from Selangor State of Malaysia which are Saujana Putra, Bukit Changgang and Jenderam Hilir. In this study, natural radionuclide (U and Th) soil adsorption based on batch experiments with various initial concentrations of the radionuclide elements were carried out. Parameters that were set constant include pH at 5;amount of soil used was 5 g each, contact time was 24 hour and different initial concentration for each solution of U and Th which is 5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, 15 mg/L, 20 mg/L, 25 mg/L and 40 mg/L were used. The K{sub d} values for each type of soil were determined in this batch experiments which was based on US-EPA method, in order to estimate adsorption capacity of the soil.The K{sub d} values of Th found higher than Kd values of U for all of the soil samples, and the highest was found on the soil collected from Bukit Changgang. The soil clay content was one of factors to influence the adsorption of both U and Th from dilute initial solution. The U-soil and Th-soil adsorption process for all the soil samples studied are generally obeying unimolecular layer Langmuir isotherm model. From Langmuir isotherm, the maximum adsorption capacity for U was 0.393mg/g and for Th was 1.53 mg/g for the soil that was taken from Bukit Changgang. From the study, it suggested that the soil from Bukit Changgang applicable as potential enhanced barrier for site disposing waste containing U and Th.

  19. Effectiveness of mineral soil to adsorb the natural occurring radioactive material (norm), uranium and thorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Muhammad Nur Iman; Ismail, Nurul Izzatiafifi; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini

    2015-04-01

    A study has been performed on U-soil and Th-soil adsorption of three types of soil collected from Selangor State of Malaysia which are Saujana Putra, Bukit Changgang and Jenderam Hilir. In this study, natural radionuclide (U and Th) soil adsorption based on batch experiments with various initial concentrations of the radionuclide elements were carried out. Parameters that were set constant include pH at 5;amount of soil used was 5 g each, contact time was 24 hour and different initial concentration for each solution of U and Th which is 5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, 15 mg/L, 20 mg/L, 25 mg/L and 40 mg/L were used. The Kd values for each type of soil were determined in this batch experiments which was based on US-EPA method, in order to estimate adsorption capacity of the soil.The Kd values of Th found higher than Kd values of U for all of the soil samples, and the highest was found on the soil collected from Bukit Changgang. The soil clay content was one of factors to influence the adsorption of both U and Th from dilute initial solution. The U-soil and Th-soil adsorption process for all the soil samples studied are generally obeying unimolecular layer Langmuir isotherm model. From Langmuir isotherm, the maximum adsorption capacity for U was 0.393mg/g and for Th was 1.53 mg/g for the soil that was taken from Bukit Changgang. From the study, it suggested that the soil from Bukit Changgang applicable as potential enhanced barrier for site disposing waste containing U and Th.

  20. Development of internal dose assessment procedure for workers in industries using raw materials containing naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Cheol Kyu; KIm, Yong Geon; Ji, Seung Woo; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Koo, Bon Cheol; Chang, Byung Uck

    2016-01-01

    It is necessary to assess radiation dose to workers due to inhalation of airborne particulates containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) to ensure radiological safety required by the Natural Radiation Safety Management Act. The objective of this study is to develop an internal dose assessment procedure for workers at industries using raw materials containing natural radionuclides. The dose assessment procedure was developed based on harmonization, accuracy, and proportionality. The procedure includes determination of dose assessment necessity, preliminary dose estimation, airborne particulate sampling and characterization, and detailed assessment of radiation dose. The developed dose assessment procedure is as follows. Radioactivity concentration criteria to determine dose assessment necessity are 10 Bq·g-1 for 40K and 1 Bq·g-1 for the other natural radionuclides. The preliminary dose estimation is performed using annual limit on intake (ALI). The estimated doses are classified into 3 groups (<0.1 mSv, 0.1-0.3 mSv, and >0.3 mSv). Air sampling methods are determined based on the dose estimates. Detailed dose assessment is performed using air sampling and particulate characterization. The final dose results are classified into 4 different levels (<0.1 mSv, 0.1-0.3 mSv, 0.3-1 mSv, and >1 mSv). Proper radiation protection measures are suggested according to the dose level. The developed dose assessment procedure was applied for NORM industries in Korea, including coal combustion, phosphate processing, and monazite handing facilities. The developed procedure provides consistent dose assessment results and contributes to the establishment of optimization of radiological protection in NORM industries

  1. Development of internal dose assessment procedure for workers in industries using raw materials containing naturally occurring radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Cheol Kyu; KIm, Yong Geon; Ji, Seung Woo; Kim, Kwang Pyo [College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Bon Cheol; Chang, Byung Uck [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    It is necessary to assess radiation dose to workers due to inhalation of airborne particulates containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) to ensure radiological safety required by the Natural Radiation Safety Management Act. The objective of this study is to develop an internal dose assessment procedure for workers at industries using raw materials containing natural radionuclides. The dose assessment procedure was developed based on harmonization, accuracy, and proportionality. The procedure includes determination of dose assessment necessity, preliminary dose estimation, airborne particulate sampling and characterization, and detailed assessment of radiation dose. The developed dose assessment procedure is as follows. Radioactivity concentration criteria to determine dose assessment necessity are 10 Bq·g-1 for 40K and 1 Bq·g-1 for the other natural radionuclides. The preliminary dose estimation is performed using annual limit on intake (ALI). The estimated doses are classified into 3 groups (<0.1 mSv, 0.1-0.3 mSv, and >0.3 mSv). Air sampling methods are determined based on the dose estimates. Detailed dose assessment is performed using air sampling and particulate characterization. The final dose results are classified into 4 different levels (<0.1 mSv, 0.1-0.3 mSv, 0.3-1 mSv, and >1 mSv). Proper radiation protection measures are suggested according to the dose level. The developed dose assessment procedure was applied for NORM industries in Korea, including coal combustion, phosphate processing, and monazite handing facilities. The developed procedure provides consistent dose assessment results and contributes to the establishment of optimization of radiological protection in NORM industries.

  2. Treatment and disposal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in the oil and gas industry. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Ruediger B.; Schmuelling, Marcus; Hosemann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Concerning naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) from the oil/ and gas industry most of the industrial countries were lacking clear regulatory frameworks in waste legislation for many years. In the meanwhile on several places in Europe, but also in some of the GCC states in the Middle East such as in the United Arab Emirates and in Oman specialized treatment facilities are either in the stage of construction or already in operation. In particular, pilot plants for the decontamination of NORM-contaminated equipment have been tested recently. The paper reflects on the generation and the technical characterization of NORM but also the legislation compared on international level. Particularly an overview was provided by comparing the common practice on disposal in the North American Countries in comparison to Germany, the UK but also Australia. In addition the successful treatment of produced water from crude oil separation in a ''Constructed Wetland'' in the Sultanate Oman is briefly highlighted.

  3. Risk assessment from intake of Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials in some bottled drinking water on the Ghanaian market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portuphy, M. O.

    2015-07-01

    Activity concentrations of the Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORMs) in some bottled water brands were analyzed using gamma spectrometry. 40 K activity concentrations were in the range of 3.57-5.47Bq/L, the highest occurring in brand L9. Similarly 232 Th activity concentrations were in the range of 0.30-0.56 Bq/L with the highest occurring in brand L8. 226 Ra was identified in eleven brands with the remaining five below detection limit. The highest value (0.53Bq/L) occurred in brand L9. Comparison of the mean concentrations showed significant differences at (α=0.05) between the various brands of bottled water. Estimated committed effective doses were generally below 0.1mSv/a for all age groups with the exception of children <1yr. Estimated lifetime cancer and hereditary risk was done using the ICRP risk assessment methodology. Relationship between Activity concentrations and some physicochemical parameters were established using scatter graphs. The significant one was the conductivity parameter and how estimated activity concentrations tend to correlate (Jobbàgy et al, 2013). Trace elements and heavy metals were analysed using titrimetry, UV-VIS spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Their levels were below recommended and conventional levels. Conclusively bottled water brands analyzed were therefore radiologically safe. (au)

  4. Health and safety impacts from discrete sources of naturally-occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials (NARM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaumer, D.; Wiblin, C.; Welch, L.

    1993-02-01

    This report characterizes discrete sources of naturally-occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material (NARM) and estimates risks posed by the possession, use and disposal of them. A distinction between discrete and diffuse NARM sources is made with discrete sources being high activity, low volume and diffuse sources being low activity, high volume. Two nanocuries per gram is used as a separation guide between high and low activity, although use of this value does not impact the report's conclusions. Most NARM is under regulatory control of States that either license or register users but reporting requirements are not uniform. Use in consumer products has declined with virtually no production today; however, lack of information available concerning radiation exposures resulting form possession of ageing radium sources precludes a quantitative risk assessment in this report. The report identifies the type of information needed to permit such an assessment. Regarding accelerator-produced radioactive material (ARM), use of this material in nuclear medicine programs has recently increased. Available radiation exposure data regarding ARM handling and use indicates that the risk to workers and the public is low at this time

  5. Fuzzy rule-based modelling for human health risk from naturally occurring radioactive materials in produced water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakhawat, Chowdhury; Tahir, Husain; Neil, Bose

    2006-01-01

    Produced water, discharged from offshore oil and gas operations, contains chemicals from formation water, condensed water, and any chemical added down hole or during the oil/water separation process. Although, most of the contaminants fall below the detection limits within a short distance from the discharge port, a few of the remaining contaminants including naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are of concern due to their bioavailability in the media and bioaccumulation characteristics in finfish and shellfish species used for human consumption. In the past, several initiatives have been taken to model human health risk from NORM in produced water. The parameters of the available risk assessment models are imprecise and sparse in nature. In this study, a fuzzy possibilistic evaluation using fuzzy rule based modeling has been presented. Being conservative in nature, the possibilistic approach considers possible input parameter values; thus provides better environmental prediction than the Monte Carlo (MC) calculation. The uncertainties of the input parameters were captured with fuzzy triangular membership functions (TFNs). Fuzzy if-then rules were applied for input concentrations of two isotopes of radium, namely 226 Ra, and 228 Ra, available in produced water and bulk dilution to evaluate the radium concentration in fish tissue used for human consumption. The bulk dilution was predicted using four input parameters: produced water discharge rate, ambient seawater velocity, depth of discharge port and density gradient. The evaluated cancer risk shows compliance with the regulatory guidelines; thus minimum risk to human health is expected from NORM components in produced water

  6. Uranium pollution in an estuary affected by pyrite acid mine drainage and releases of naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Manjon, G.; Hurtado, S.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Huelva estuary is affected by former phosphogypsum releases and pyrite acid mine drainage. → Time evolution of uranium concentration is analyzed after halting of NORM releases. → Two new contamination sources are preventing the complete uranium cleaning: (1) The leaching of phosphogypsum stacks located close to Tinto River. (2) Pyrite acid mine drainage. → High uranium concentrations are dissolved in water and precipitate subsequently. - Abstract: After the termination of phosphogypsum discharges to the Huelva estuary (SW Spain), a unique opportunity was presented to study the response of a contaminated environmental compartment after the cessation of its main source of pollution. The evolution over time of uranium concentrations in the estuary is presented to supply new insights into the decontamination of a scenario affected by Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) discharges. The cleaning of uranium isotopes from the area has not taken place as rapidly as expected due to leaching from phosphogypsum stacks. An in-depth study using various techniques of analysis, including 234 U/ 238 U and 230 Th/ 232 Th ratios and the decreasing rates of the uranium concentration, enabled a second source of uranium contamination to be discovered. Increased uranium levels due to acid mine drainage from pyrite mines located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain) prevent complete uranium decontamination and, therefore, result in levels nearly twice those of natural background levels.

  7. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim; Meira Castro, Ana Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  8. Use of naturally occurring helium to estimate ground-water velocities for studies of geologic storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine, I.W.

    1977-01-01

    In a study of the potential for storing radioactive waste in metamorphic rock at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina, the rate of water movement was determined to be about 0.06 m/y by analyzing gas dissolved in the water. The gas contained up to 6 percent helium, which originated from the radioactive decay of natural uranium and thorium in the crystalline rock. The residence time of the water in the rock was calculated to be 840,000 years from the quantity of uranium and thorium in the rock, their rates of radioactive decay, and the quantity of helium dissolved in the water. The estimation of ground-water velocities by the helium method is more applicable to the assessment of a geologic site for storage of radioactive waste than are velocities estimated from packer tests, pumping tests, or artificial tracer tests, all of which require extensive time and space extrapolations

  9. Environmental, health, and safety decision making for naturally occurring radioactive materials in producing operations using pathway exposure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, H.T.; Cook, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    A number of health and safety issues have arisen because of the occurrence of NORM, naturally occurring radioactive materials of the 226 radium and 228 radium decay chains, in production operations. Issues such as risk to workers or the general public, disposal of contaminated production fluids, disposal of NORM removed in cleaning equipment and tubing, and procedures to follow in well rework, equipment decontamination and other types of maintenance must be addressed. This paper describes the application of a procedural aid to decision making known as pathway exposure analysis to these issues. The procedure examines the radiation exposure of individuals and population groups by calculating the dose from each exposure route and pathway. The sum of these is used to calculate the overall risk to the individual or the group. This method can be used to examine management and procedural options to identify the option offering the smallest risk. Risk information coupled with cost estimates then permits management maximum utilization of its available resources

  10. Characterization of the National Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) Site for Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material(NORM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G.J; Rood, A.S.

    1999-01-21

    The National Petroleum Reserve No. 3 site (NPR-3) near Casper, Wyoming is being prepared for transfer to private industry. Remediation of the NPR-3 site has already begun in anticipation of this transfer. This document describes the characterization of the NPR-3 site for Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Data generated on radionuclide concentrations and radon emanation may be used to determine disposal options and the need for remediation at this site. A preliminary gamma survey of the NPR-3 site was conducted to identify areas of potential NORM contamination. Based on these gamma surveys, two general areas of NORM contamination were found: the North Water Flood area and the BTP-10 produced water discharge steam. A maximum surface exposure rate of 120 {micro}R h{sup -1} was observed in the North Water Flood area, with the highest readings found along the drainage channel from the area. Exposure rates dropped to background quickly with increasing distance from the center of the drainage. The maximum observed exposure rate in the BTP-10 produced water drainage was 40 {micro}R h{sup -1}. Soil and sediment sampling were concentrated in these two areas. All samples were analyzed for concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 40}K. Maximum {sup 226}Ra concentrations observed in the samples collected were 46 pCi g{sup -1} for soil and 78 pCi g{sup -1} for sediment. Concentrations in most samples were considerably lower than these values. Radon emanation fraction was also measured for a randomly selected fraction of the samples. The mean Rn emanation fraction measured was 0.10, indicating that on average only 10 percent of the Rn produced is released from the medium. Based on the results of these analyses, NORM contamination at the NPR-3 site is minimal, and appears to be restricted to the two general areas sampled. Concentrations of NORM radionuclides found soils and sediments in these two locations do not justify remedial actions at present

  11. Safety aspects in handling naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) at geothermal usage; Arbeitssicherheitstechnische Aspekte im Umgang mit NORM bei der Geothermie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettler, John; Havenith, Andreas [Aachen Institute for Nuclear Training GmbH (Germany); Hirsch, Marius

    2015-06-01

    This article describes potential radiological hazards, which originate through the mobilization of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) from deep geological deposits. The process of geothermal usage requires the artifical lift of injected fluids, which may also transport undesired by-products to the surface. As a result these by-products may precipitate, form residues and require radiation protection measures to cope with this task.

  12. Partitioning of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) and heavy metal in terminal crude oil sludge when undergoing thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fuad, H.A.; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus; Shamsuddin, A.H.; Sopian, K.

    2000-01-01

    In Malaysia currently more than one hundred oil rigs in operation extracting the crude oil, offshore the state of Terengganu, Sabah and Sarawak. Crude oil sludge are generated during the extraction of crude oil from the underground oil reservoir to the oil rigs, the separation process at the oil rigs and its storage at the crude oil terminal. These sludge are considered as Scheduled Waste (contains heavy metals) by Department of Environmental (DOE) and Low Level Radioactive Waste (contain NORM) by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB), thus cannot be disposed freely without proper control. The current method of disposal, such as land farming is not recommended and will have long term impact to the environment, whereas storage practices in plastic drums does not warrant an ultimate solution. Due to its organic nature, there is a move to treat this sludge by using thermal treatment technology but prior to this, a study has to be carried out to determine the partitioning of the various elements present in the sludge. Gamma spectroscopy and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) were used to analyze the concentrations of radionuclides whereas NAA as well as ICP-MS techniques were applied for heavy metal analysis in the sludge samples. The samples were then heated at temperature ranging from 100 degree C - 800 degree C for a period of 30 - 150 minutes. The ash produced at that temperature and duration were then analyzed again for the various elemental concentrations using the above mentioned techniques. The percent volatilization was then derived mathematically. From this study, it was found that the percentage of volatilization varies from 2-70%, which is a function of the elements of concerned, temperature and time. Uranium seems to volatilized much more than the rest of radionuclides. Higher temperature (>500 degree C) and longer exposure time (>60 minutes) promoted metal and radionuclide volatilization significantly. Typical to incinerator operating environment i

  13. Distribution of naturally occurring radioactive materials in sediments from the Ebro river reservoir in Flix (Southern Catalonia, Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mola, M.; Palomo, M.; Penalver, A.; Aguilar, C. [Departament de Quimica Analitica i Quimica Organica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Marcelli Domingo s/n, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria (URAIS), Consorci d' Aiguees de Tarragona (CAT), Ctra Nacional 340, km 1094, 43895 L' Ampolla (Spain); Borrull, F., E-mail: francesc.borrull@urv.cat [Departament de Quimica Analitica i Quimica Organica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Marcelli Domingo s/n, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria (URAIS), Consorci d' Aiguees de Tarragona (CAT), Ctra Nacional 340, km 1094, 43895 L' Ampolla (Spain)

    2011-12-30

    Industrial waste containing radioactive isotopes (from U-decay series) was released into Ebro river basin due to the activity of a dicalcium phosphate (DCP) plant for a period of more than two decades. Gross alpha, gross beta, {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb activities were determined in several sludge samples taken at different depths from different points in the area of influence of the DCP plant located in Flix. Samples were collected from two different zones: one in front of the DCP plant and the second in front of a wastewater treatment plant installed several years after the DCP plant. The data obtained verify the influence of industrial DCP production on radioactivity levels present in the area.

  14. Distribution of naturally occurring radioactivity and ¹³⁷Cs in the marine sediment of Farasan Island, southern Red Sea, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrany, A A; Farouk, M A; Al-Yousef, A A

    2012-11-01

    The present work is a part of a project dedicated to measure the marine radioactivity near the Saudi Arabian coasts of the Red Sea and Arabian Gulf for establishing a marine radioactivity database, which includes necessary information on the background levels of both naturally occurring and man-made radionuclides in the marine environment. Farasan Islands is a group of 84 islands (archipelago), under the administration of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, in the Red Sea with its main island of Farasan, which is 50 km off the coast of Jazan City. The levels of natural radioactivity of (238)U, (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and man-made radionuclides such as (137)Cs in the grab sediment and water samples around Farasan Island have been measured using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The average activity concentrations of (238)U, (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs in the sediment samples were found to be 35.46, 1.75, 3.31, 0.92, 34.34 and 0.14 Bq kg(-1), respectively.

  15. Exposure of the public and the environment to naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) produced in health centers: workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    A workshop was held with the aim of developing the scientific and technical basis of radiological protection and safety. Presentations have included topics such as: radiological accidents in medical practices, criteria, dosimetric methods, medical exposure and radiological characterizations of natural origin [es

  16. Evaluation of naturally occurring radioactivity and calculation of effective human dose at Homa Mount in Nyanza province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otwoma, D.O

    2008-01-01

    Report 39 of 1984 (ICRP) conceded that there are needs to subject some natural sources of radiation to control as applied for the artificial ones for the artificial ones. Recommends that, environmental surveys need to be done to determine levels of radiation form HBRA. Data obtained from such studies are used locally to establish necessity of controls, size opportunities and enrich the global data

  17. Natural atmospheric radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.

    1986-01-01

    After having summed up the different old or new units, used in radioactivity and radioprotection, the origins of atmospheric radioactivity are reported. Next the authors deal with the air content in radon, thoron and their radioactive descendants, insisting on the variations of the radon air content and on the radioactive balance between radon and its descendants. Then a few notions concerning the natural radioactive aerosol are developed: electric charge state, granulometric distribution. The possible effects of natural atmospheric radioactivity on man are studied with a distinction between inner irradiation and outer irradiation, an average assessment is shown. Finally the important problem of radon in inhabitations is approached [fr

  18. Determination of natural occurring radionuclides concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajic, J.; Markovic, V.; Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains certain concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from radioactive chains of uranium and thorium - 214 Pb, 214 Bi, 228 Ac, 208 Tl, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K. Inhaling of tobacco smoke leads to internal exposure of man. In order to estimate absorbed dose of irradiation it is necessary to determine concentrations of radionuclides present in the tobacco leaves. In this paper specific activities of naturally occurring radionuclides were measured in tobacco samples from cigarettes which are used in Serbia. [sr

  19. Naturally occurring radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djujic, I.

    1995-01-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclides are the major source of radiation exposure to humans. The principal way of natural radiation exposure is the inhalation of 222 Rn decay products (about 85% of the total). The remainder is equally divided between internally deposited radionuclides, cosmic and terrestrial sources. In the present study, the content of 40 K, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 230 Th, 232 Th and 238 U in representative food samples (milk, pork, beef, potatoes, wheat and corn flour) and samples of different food items that do not represent entire national production but provide interesting additional data for approximative calculation of naturally occurring radionuclide intake is presented. Daily weight of food eaten, participation of food groups, as well as daily intake by food of mentioned naturally occurring radionuclides in the Serbian diet was obtained on the base of house hold budget surveys. The result obtained for daily intake estimates in mBq for Serbian population are 78.1 ( 40 K), 38.2( 210 Pb), 52.3( 226 Ra), 2.0( 230 Th) and 12.5( 238 U). (author)

  20. Naturally occurring radioactive elements, arsenic and other metals in drinking water from private wells; Naturligt radioaktiva aemnen, arsenik och andra metaller i dricksvatten fraan enskilda brunnar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek, Britt-Marie; Thunholm, Bo (Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), Uppsala (SE)); Oestergren, Inger; Falk, Rolf; Mjoenes, Lars (Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-04-15

    Approximately 50% of all drinking water is extracted from groundwater. For private supply of drinking water almost 100% emanates from groundwater. For approximately 1.2 of the 9 million Swedish citizens, private wells are the primary water source where 700 000 get their water from wells drilled in the bedrock. Radioactive elements and metals that occur naturally in the bedrock can be found in the well water. The radioactive elements include radon-222 (222Rn), uranium (U), radium-226 (226Ra) as well as polonium-210 (210Po) and lead-210 (210Pb), which are long-lived progeny of radon. In 2001 SGU and SSI initiated a collaboration to investigate the occurrence of radioactive elements and metals in water from private wells. Data sampling and analysis was completed in 2006. The aim of the project was to map the occurrence of radioactive elements in drinking water from private wells and to estimate their respective dose contribution. Another aim was to map metals and other elements in the water, to study temporal variations and possible co-variations between analysed elements. Sampling was conducted in a random fashion throughout the country. However, in regions where bedrock and soils are known to show enhanced concentrations of radioactive elements and arsenic the sampling density was increased. The analyses comprises: total beta activity, total alpha activity, radium-226, radon-222, uranium, aluminium, chloride, calcium, vanadium, chromium, iron, manganese, cobalt, nickel, copper, zink, arsenic, strontium, molybdenum, cadmium, barium, lead, thorium, boron, sodium, manganese, potassium, silica, alkalinity, sulfate, fluoride, phosphate, nitrate, pH and electric conductivity. In a few cases chemistry analyses of polonium-210 and lead-210 have been done. It was observed that the south-western part of Sweden, with exception for granite areas in the county of Bohuslaen, has relatively low concentrations of natural radioactive elements in the drinking water. The occurrence of

  1. Atmospheric natural radioactivity outdoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.

    1985-01-01

    Following a short account of natural atmospheric radioactivity, radon concentrations are given as well as their variations with time obtained by means of a original apparatus developped in Brest. The radioactive equilibrium of radon and its daughters is then considered, many experiments demonstrating that equilibrium is seldom reached even for 218 Po (RaA). Finally, some characteristics of natural radioactive aerosols are studied: charge, particle size distribution (demonstrating they are fine aerosols since only 30 per cent are made of particles with radii exceeding 0,1 μm) [fr

  2. Proceedings of a specialist meeting on regulatory approaches for the control of environmental residues containing naturally occurring radioactive material. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides are present in most material. The most common naturally occurring radionuclides in material are those of the uranium and thorium series and potassium-40. This material is commonly referred to as Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). In some material the levels of naturally occurring radionuclides are significantly higher, to the extent that regulatory control may be required for radiation protection purposes. Regulation of NORM presents a range of new challenges for both regulators and operators. Unlike more traditional industries dealing with radionuclides, NORM industries have generally not had any radiological oversight and, for example, are not equipped for radiological monitoring. Some consumer goods containing NORM, which have not traditionally been considered as a radiological problem (such as some fertilizers), may require regulation and this may have social and economic consequences. The transport and disposal of NORM are also a concern, particularly due to the large volumes, which may need to be considered. For the majority of NORM, disposal has been by conventional means in the same way as for non-hazardous waste with no specific attention to radiological aspects. In some cases, there may be a need for intervention into existing NORM disposal sites. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) published ICRP No. 82, Protection of the Public in Situations of Prolonged Radiation Exposure in 2000. This document provides guidance on managing residues, such as those arising from NORM industries, with potential impact on the public. However, with NORM residual waste there may be three different situations: residual waste created as the result of a past practice, residual waste created by an ongoing practice and waste which will arise from future activities. Regulation of NORM may therefore be consistent with consideration of a practice, an intervention or a combination of both. Different regulatory

  3. Proceedings of a specialist meeting on regulatory approaches for the control of environmental residues containing naturally occurring radioactive material. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides are present in most material. The most common naturally occurring radionuclides in material are those of the uranium and thorium series and potassium-40. This material is commonly referred to as Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). In some material the levels of naturally occurring radionuclides are significantly higher, to the extent that regulatory control may be required for radiation protection purposes. Regulation of NORM presents a range of new challenges for both regulators and operators. Unlike more traditional industries dealing with radionuclides, NORM industries have generally not had any radiological oversight and, for example, are not equipped for radiological monitoring. Some consumer goods containing NORM, which have not traditionally been considered as a radiological problem (such as some fertilizers), may require regulation and this may have social and economic consequences. The transport and disposal of NORM are also a concern, particularly due to the large volumes, which may need to be considered. For the majority of NORM, disposal has been by conventional means in the same way as for non-hazardous waste with no specific attention to radiological aspects. In some cases, there may be a need for intervention into existing NORM disposal sites. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) published ICRP No. 82, Protection of the Public in Situations of Prolonged Radiation Exposure in 2000. This document provides guidance on managing residues, such as those arising from NORM industries, with potential impact on the public. However, with NORM residual waste there may be three different situations: residual waste created as the result of a past practice, residual waste created by an ongoing practice and waste which will arise from future activities. Regulation of NORM may therefore be consistent with consideration of a practice, an intervention or a combination of both. Different regulatory

  4. Naturally occurring methyl salicylate glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ping; Liu, Zizhen; Xie, Meng; Jiang, Rui; Liu, Weirui; Wang, Xiaohong; Meng, Shen; She, Gaimei

    2014-01-01

    As an important part of non steroids anti-inflammation drug (NSAIDs), salicylate has developed from natural substance salicylic acid to natrium salicylicum, to aspirin. Now, methyl salicylate glycoside, a new derivative of salicylic acid, is modified with a -COOH group integrated one methyl radical into formic ether, and a -OH linked with a monosaccharide, a disaccharide or a trisaccharide unit by glycosidic linkage. It has the similar pharmacological activities, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic and antithrombotic as the previous salicylates' without resulting in serious side effects, particularly the gastrointestinal toxicity. Owing to the superiority of those significant bioactivities, methyl salicylate glycosides have became a hot research area in NSAIDs for several years. This paper compiles all 9 naturally occurring methyl salicylate glycosides, their distribution of the resource and pharmacological mechanism, which could contribute to the new drug discovery.

  5. Radiological characterization and dose assessment in different scenarios of occupational and public exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials in the Republic of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cuba has identified situations where there working environments with the presence of natural radioactivity. Dose estimates in these environments could exceed the measured values for occupationally exposed workers, without there existed so far, with regulatory requirements for programs of radiation protection. In light of these situations, it has been necessary to assess the potential impact on these working groups of radiational load that they are subjected and establish regulatory criteria for protection in cases that require it. (author) [es

  6. Radiological survey and assessment of associated activity concentration of the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the Migori artisanal gold mining belt of southern Nyanza, Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odumo, O.B., E-mail: benodumoo@uonbi.ac.k [Department of Physics, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197-00100 Nairobi (Kenya); Mustapha, A.O. [Department of Physics, University of Agriculture, P.M.B. 2240 Abeokuta (Nigeria); Patel, J.P.; Angeyo, H.K. [Department of Physics, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197-00100 Nairobi (Kenya)

    2011-06-15

    A radiological survey and assessment was carried out at selected sites (Osiri, Mikei, Masara and Macalder) in the Migori gold mines of southern Nyanza, Kenya to determine the levels of exposure of the artisanal miners to the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) and dust. The activity concentrations of {sup 40}K and the decay products of {sup 232}Th and {sup 226}Ra were obtained using an innovative method in single channel NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometry. The counts for both the sample and the reference material in a specific window for a particular radionuclide were compared to arrive at the activity concentration of the radionuclide in the sample. Measurement of dust loading at various crushing sites was carried out by trapping the dust particles on a 0.45 {mu}m cellulose acetate filter paper (47 mm diameter) using a vacuum pump. The activity concentration levels range widely 80-413, 12-145 and 21-258 Bq/kg for {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 226}Ra, respectively. The calculated absorbed dose in air range from 16 to 178 nGy/h (with a mean of 42 nGy/h). Dust loading was found to range from 1.3 to 3.7 mg/m{sup 3}. Although the activity concentration of the radionuclides and the calculated annual absorbed dose is below the world's average, the dust level at the mines was relatively high. The results obtained show that the artisanal miners are exposed to various levels of radionuclides and dust and necessary precautions need to be taken.

  7. Radioactivity: A Natural Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is misinformation people have on the subject of radiation. The importance of comparing artificial source levels of radiation to natural levels is emphasized. Measurements of radioactivity, its consequences, and comparisons between the risks induced by radiation in the environment and from artificial sources are included. (KR)

  8. Assessment of naturally occurring radioactive materials and trace elements in playgrounds of selected basic schools in the Ga-East municipal district, Accra, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taapopi, E.E.

    2015-07-01

    The 235 U, 232 Th series and natural 40 K are the main source of natural radioactivity in soil and have long half-lives up to 10 10 years. Therefore their presence in soils and rocks is simply considered as permanent. Also due to rapid urbanization, most of Basic School playgrounds in Accra are built close to major roads or industrial areas for which they are subject to many potential pollution sources, including vehicle exhaust and industrial emissions. A study has been carried out on playgrounds of basic schools in the Ga East municipal district in order to determine the exposure of the school children to naturally occurring radioactive materials ( 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K) and trace elements [aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), potassium (K), lanthanum (La), manganese (Mn), sodium (Na), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), titanium (Ti), vanadium (V), zinc (Zn)]. The activity concentrations were determined using high‐purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The average activity concentrations of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K determined were 19.8 ± 8.7, 29.1 ± 16.3 and 119.4 ± 97.9 Bq.kg-1 respectively. The average annual effective dose was 0.039 ± 0.021 mSv and it is below the dose limit of 1 mSv/year recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for public exposure control. Radiological hazard assessments arising from the natural radionuclides were carried out. The average concentration of 222 Rn and exhalation rate were estimated to be 32.13 kBq.m -3 and 0.016 Bq.m -2 .s -1 respectively, which compared well with the world average values [78 kBq.m -3 and 0.033 Bq.m -2 .s -1 reported by (UNSCEAR, 2000)]. Soil samples were also analyzed for trace elements by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry in order to assess the potential adverse health effects of the exposure of children to trace elements during their games at school. Doses incurred via ingestion and inhalation and

  9. Modelling the Transfer of Radionuclides from Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). Report of the NORM Working Group of EMRAS Theme 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This working group was established to improve the modelling of the transfer of radionuclides from residues containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) for the purposes of radiological assessment. Almost all naturally occurring materials contain radionuclides from the primordial decay chains (for example, uranium-238, uranium-235, thorium-232 and their daughter products radium-226 and radium-228), plus some individual long-lived radionuclides such as potassium-40. Extraction and/or processing of minerals containing these materials results waste containing such radionuclides. Often the processing can enhance the concentration of the NORM in the waste as compared with the original material. The extraction and processing of minerals usually involves large volumes of material and the resulting waste is also present in large volumes which are usually left on the earth's surface. Human exposure to radionuclides from such waste piles can occur as a result of gaseous emanation from the waste (radon-222) or as a result of the leaching by rainfall of radionuclides from the waste into water courses and, possibly, food chains. There are a variety of situations involving NORM that require potential radiation doses to be assessed, they include: (1) surface storage of residues from the extraction and processing of minerals; (2) remediation of NORM-containing waste piles; and (3) the use of NORM-containing waste for backfilling, building materials, road construction etc. In all of these situations there is a need to understand the present and future behaviour of the radionuclides which may be released from NORM so that steps can be taken to ensure that humans are adequately protected from exposure to radiation. Because of the long-lived nature of many of the radionuclides, the assessments must be carried out over long times into the future. This is the first time that the modelling of NORM-containing radionuclides has been examined in this IAEA format and the working

  10. Radioactive mineral occurences of Colorado and bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson-Moore, J.L.; Collins, D.B.; Hornbaker, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    This two-part report provides an essentially complete listing of radioactive occurrences in Colorado, with a comprehensive bibliography and bibliographic cross-indexes. Part 1 lists approximately 3000 known radioactive occurrences with their locations and brief accounts of the geology, mineralogy, radioactivity, host rock, production data, and source of data for each. The occurrences are classified by host rock and plotted on U.S. Geological Survey 1 0 x 2 0 topographic quadrangle maps with a special 1 : 100,000-scale base map for the Uravan mineral belt. Part 2 contains the bibliography of approximately 2500 citations on radioactive mineral occurrences in the state, with cross-indexes by county, host rock, and the special categories of ''Front Range,'' ''Colorado Plateau,'' and ''thorium.'' The term ''occurrence'' as used in this report is defined as any site where the concentration of uranium or thorium is at least 0.01% or where the range of radioactivity is greater than twice the background radioactivity. All citations and occurrence data are stored on computer diskettes for easy retrieval, correction, and updating

  11. Characteristics of oil sludge from crude oil terminal and behaviors of the naturally occurring radioactive materials and heavy metals on combustion of the sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Puad Abu

    2001-01-01

    The study on the characteristics and behaviors of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) and heavy metals (HM) in the oil sludge from the crude oil terminal were performed using Gamma Spectroscopy (GM), Neutron Activation Analysis Instrumental (NAAI) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). GM and NAAI were used to analyze the concentrations of radionuclides whereas NAAI as well as ICP-MS techniques were applied for HM. The samples were then combusted at temperature ranging from 100 degree Celsius - 800 degree Celsius for a period of 30-150 minutes. The ashes produced were then analyzed again for the various elemental concentrations by the above techniques. The percentage of volatilization was then derived mathematically. The concentration of Ra-226 (123 Bq/ kg) and Ra-228 (117 Bq/ kg) in the oil sludge are higher compared with their parent U-238 (32.12 Bq/ kg) and Th-232 (35.36 Bq/ kg). The concentration of HM such as As (13.30 ppm), Cr (46 ppm) and Zn (4287 ppm) in the oil sludge are also higher compared with As (7.5 ppm), Cr (43 ppm) and Zn (36 ppm) contain in the Malaysian normal soil. The heating value for crude oil sludge is 9000 kJ/ kg which is below the value for self-sustaining combustion (11000 kJ/ kg). The percentage of volatilization varies from 2-70 % depends on the elements, temperature and period of combustion. Uranium was found to volatile more than other elements. Higher temperatures (>500 degree Celsius) and longer exposure time (>90 minutes) promoted metal and radionuclide volatilization significantly more than 20 %. Based on the first order kinetic reaction, a new global mathematical model was developed (Q e =1-e -k e t ). This model can predict the percentage of volatilization for the various elements contain in the sludge if the temperature and time of combustion are known. With this known percentage of volatilization, the concentration of various elements present in the bottom and fly ashes can be deduced. From

  12. Radiological assessment and chemical treatment of contaminated soil with naturally occurring radioactive materials ''NORM'' by leaching with different solvents and their reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nafae, T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Contaminated soil with naturally occurring radioactive material NORM is produced from uncontrolled disposal of oil field produced water in the surrounding environment or scale and sludge produced from clean-up operation system is considered as a real big problem in Iraq which causes exposure and contamination of worker and environment. The present work aims to treat the contaminated soil with NORM in order to minimize the volume of radioactive waste and to reduce the risk of radiation to the allowable limits. Samples of representative contaminated soil from Al-Rumaila oil field in Al-Basra governorate was prepared for analysis and leaching tests Gamma spectrometer with extended range low-level coaxial High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector with high resolution (2.1 keV at 1332 keV) and 50% relative efficiency was utilized to measured all samples. Two techniques were tested, mechanical separation and chemical treatment. Screening of contaminated soil was performed to evaluate the feasibility of particle size separation. The fractions obtained varied between 75micro meter Greek Small Letter (200 mesh) to 300μm (48 mesh).The results show that the largest weight percent in fine particle size ( -75, -125+75, -250+125) μm is 73.9% and all radium isotopes are concentrated in 37.5μm particle size while small fluctuations are observed in the other particle size cuts.In the chemical treatment, many factors were studied to determine the best conditions for leaching process; type of solvent (HNO 3 , HCl, C 2 H 4 O 2 , H 2 SO 4 , NaOH, H 2 O), acid concentration (3, 5, 7, 10 M) , liquid to solid ratio(L:S) (3, 5, 7, 9, 18, 30 ml/g), temperature ( 28, 40, 60,78°C), and number of stages. Results indicate that only small portions of radium are present on the surface of soil particles, while most radium located within soil particles. Concentrated nitric acid (5M) was found to be the most effective solvent using two stages with L:S ratio of 9 ml/g at a temperature of 60 Co. At

  13. Naturally occurring ω-Hydroxyacids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, P W

    2018-02-01

    ω-Hydroxyacids are fatty acids bearing a hydroxyl group on the terminal carbon. They are found in mammals and higher plants and are often involved in providing a permeability barrier, the primary purpose of which is to reduce water loss. Some ω-hydroxyacid derivatives may be involved in waterproofing and signalling. The purpose of this review was to survey the known natural sources of ω-hydroxyacids. ω-Hydroxyacids are produced by two different P450-dependent mechanisms. The longer (30-34 carbons) ω-hydroxyacids are produced by chain extension from palmitic acid until the chain extends across the membrane in which the extension is taking place, and then the terminal carbon is hydroxylated. Shorter fatty acids can be hydroxylated directly to produce C16 and C18 ω-hydroxyacids found in plants and 20-eicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) by a different P450. The C16 and C18 ω-hydroxyacids are components of polymers in plants. The long-chain ω-hydroxyacids are found in epidermal sphingolipids, in giant-ring lactones from the sebum of members of the equidae, as a component of meibum and in carnauba wax and wool wax. © 2017 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  14. Handling of natural occurring radioactive deposits in the oil and gas industry in Norway, United Kingdom and the Netherlands; Haandtering av radioaktive avleiringer i olje- og gassproduksjon i Norge, Storbritania og Nederland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lysebo, I.; Tufto, P

    1999-03-01

    Deposits containing naturally occurring radioactive materials is an increasing problem in oil and gas production. Laws and regulations in thisarea is under preparation, and it is a wish for harmonization with the other oil and gas producing countries in the North Sea. The report gives an overview of amounts of waste and activity levels, decontamination methods and waste handling in Norway, Great Britain and the Netherlands.

  15. Becquerel and natural origin radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the Becquerel as radioactivity measurement unit, this document briefly explains the origin of natural radioactivity (Earth formation and cosmic rays), gives and comments the evolution of radioactivity of some radionuclides (U 238 and descendants, Th 232 and descendants, K 40 ) between 4.5 billions yeas ago and nowadays. It also gives assessments of natural radioactivity due to radon in the atmosphere and in the soil, of natural radioactivity in building materials, coals, ashes, seawater and food. Some remarkable figures are then given

  16. Natural radioactivity and public health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The radioactivity have been existing everywhere in the nature for the night of times. The most radioactive places such Guarapari in Brazil or Ramsar in Iran or springs of Bad Gastein in Austria do not reveal more cancers linked to radioactivity than everywhere else. Only the important radiation doses over 100 MSv received in one time are dangerous for health. (N.C.)

  17. Natural radioactivity in water supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book outlines the scientific aspects of the control of natural radioactivity in water supplies, as well as the labyrinthine uncertainties in water quality regulation concerning natural radiocontamination of water. The author provides an introduction to the theory of natural radioactivity; addresses risk assessment, sources of natural radiocontamination of water, radiobiology of natural radioactivity in water, and federal water law concerning natural radiocontamination. It presents an account of how one city dealt with the perplexes that mark the rapidly evolving area of water quality regulation. The contents include: radioactivity and risk; an introduction to the atomic theory; an introduction to natural radioactivity; risk assessment; uranium and radium contamination of water; radiobiology of uranium and radium in water. Determination of risk from exposure to uranium and radium in water; the legal milieu; one city's experience; and summary: the determinants of evolving regulation

  18. Natural radioactivity in Rawatbhata environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, P.C.; Roy, Alpana; Gurg, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the gamma ray spectrometric measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides present in various environmental matrices collected from the environment of Rawatbhata. Natural radioactivity in the environmental samples is mainly due to 40 K and 238 U and 232 Th and their daughter products. In this study, these radionuclides have been estimated in local soil samples and their temporal variation has been discussed. It also presents 40 K concentrations in various biological samples. Transfer coefficients of 40 K in different matrices have also been obtained. Assessment of daily intake of 40 K has been made on the basis of the average daily intake of common dietary items grown in this region and the associated 40 K content. This works out to about 112 Bq/d. (author)

  19. Natural radioactivity in petroleum residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazineu, M.H.P.; Gazineu, M.H.P.; Hazin, C.A.; Hazin, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    The oil extraction and production industry generates several types of solid and liquid wastes. Scales, sludge and water are typical residues that can be found in such facilities and that can be contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (N.O.R.M.). As a result of oil processing, the natural radionuclides can be concentrated in such residues, forming the so called Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material, or T.E.N.O.R.M.. Most of the radionuclides that appear in oil and gas streams belong to the 238 U and 232 Th natural series, besides 40 K. The present work was developed to determine the radionuclide content of scales and sludge generated during oil extraction and production operations. Emphasis was given to the quantification of 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 40 K since these radionuclides,are responsible for most of the external exposure in such facilities. Samples were taken from the P.E.T.R.O.B.R.A.S. unity in the State of Sergipe, in Northeastern Brazil. They were collected directly from the inner surface of water pipes and storage tanks, or from barrels stored in the waste storage area of the E and P unit. The activity concentrations for 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 40 K were determined by using an HP Ge gamma spectrometric system. The results showed concentrations ranging from 42.7 to 2,110.0 kBq/kg for 226 Ra, 40.5 to 1,550.0 kBq/kg for 228 Ra, and 20.6 to 186.6 kBq/kg for 40 K. The results highlight the importance of determining the activity concentration of those radionuclides in oil residues before deciding whether they should be stored or discarded to the environment. (authors)

  20. Natural radioactivity in food chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnerts, W

    1989-03-01

    A number of longliving and still being produced radioactive isotopes produces well measurable and not to be neglected radiation, by which, via the food chains, plant, animal and man receives a socalled natural radiation dose. Six of the most important isotopes are discussed here. The radioisotopes /sup 14/C and /sup 40/K form part of the most live-necessary elements; they pass without strong enrichment and discrimination through the food chains and form a practically constant part of the living organism. Yet by excessive fertilizing a rather higher content of potassium than necessary is present in plants. Also a higher radiation dose arises from exessive uptake of food. The isotopes of uranium /sup 238/U and radium, /sup 226/Ra, discussed here, occur everywhere in the soil, but locally in very high amounts. They migrate for a very small part into plant and animal, sometimes occur in vegetable food as part of soil particles. Other important isotopes of the uranium families are radioactive lead, /sup 21/0Pb, and polonium, /sup 210/Po, which can be dispersed to a much greater amount than the other isotopes: in the form of the gaseous intermediate product radon, here the isotope /sup 222/Rn. /sup 210/Pb and /sup 210/Po are finally deposited upon plants and other food products. In the hydrosphere /sup 210/Po can be enriched in the food chain from plankton to fish. (author). 35 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs.

  1. Natural radioactivity in food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnerts, W.

    1989-01-01

    A number of longliving and still being produced radioactive isotopes produces well measurable and not to be neglected radiation, by which, via the food chains, plant, animal and man receives a socalled natural radiation dose. Six of the most important isotopes are discussed here. The radioisotopes 14 C and 40 K form part of the most live-necessary elements; they pass without strong enrichment and discrimination through the food chains and form a practically constant part of the living organism. Yet by excessive fertilizing a rather higher content of potassium than necessary is present in plants. Also a higher radiation dose arises from exessive uptake of food. The isotopes of uranium 238 U and radium, 226 Ra, discussed here, occur everywhere in the soil, but locally in very high amounts. They migrate for a very small part into plant and animal, sometimes occur in vegetable food as part of soil particles. Other important isotopes of the uranium families are radioactive lead, 21 0Pb, and polonium, 210 Po, which can be dispersed to a much greater amount than the other isotopes: in the form of the gaseous intermediate product radon, here the isotope 222 Rn. 210 Pb and 210 Po are finally deposited upon plants and other food products. In the hydrosphere 210 Po can be enriched in the food chain from plankton to fish. (author). 35 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  2. Natural Radioactivity in Ceramic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Khadra, S.A.; Kamel, N.H.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramics are one of the most important types of the industrial building materials. The raw materials of the ceramic are made of a mixture of clay, feldspar, silica, talc kaolin minerals together with zirconium silicates (ZrSiO4).The ceramic raw materials and the final products contain naturally occurring radionuclide mainly U-238 and, Th-232 series, and the radioactive isotope of potassium K-40. Six raw ceramic samples were obtained from the Aracemco Company at Egypt together with a floor tile sample (final product) for measuring radioactive concentration levels., The activity of the naturally U-238, Th-232, and K-40 were determined as (Bq/kg) using gamma spectroscopy (Hyperactive pure germanium detector). Concentration of U and Th were determined in (ppm) using spectrophotometer technique by Arsenazo 111 and Piridy l-Azo -Resorcinol (PAR) indicators. Sequential extraction tests were carried out in order to determine the quantity of the radionuclide associated with various fractions as exchangeable, carbonate, acid soluble and in the residue. The results evaluated were compared to the associated activity indices (AI) that were defined by former USSR and West Germany

  3. Characteristics of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) in the oil and gas industries and their behaviour under thermal treatment: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Puad Ali; Shamsuddin A H; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus

    1999-01-01

    Activities and work practices in which radiation exposure of workers and members of the public is increased due to the presence of NORM are receiving increased attention from regulatory agencies and, to lesser extent, from the general public. In Malaysia the main sources of NORM are from the technological activities of tin mining, ore and heavy mineral processing, combustion of coal to generate power, and oil and gas extraction. Sludge that contains NORM arising from the oil and gas extraction activities lately has received special attention by the Malaysian regulatory authorities. These sludge are considered as scheduled waste (contains heavy metals) by Department of Environmental (DOE) and low level radioactive waste (contains NORM) by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB), and its cannot be disposed freely without proper control. From literature, the present methods of treatment practiced via land farming and storing are not recommended and will have long term impact to the environment. The other possible method can be considered to treat this sludge is by using thermal treatment technology but before this technology can be fully applied, a study has to be carried out to determine the behaviour of the various elements present in the sludge. This paper reviewed the radiological characteristic of NORMs in relation with the oil and gas production activities in Malaysia and also their behaviour when under going thermal treatment at certain temperature and combustion time. (Author)

  4. Drill machine guidance using natural occurring radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, H.D.; Schroeder, R.L.; Williams, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    A drilling machine guidance system is described which uses only the naturally occuring radiation within the seam or stratum of interest. The apparatus can be used for guiding horizontal drilling machines through coal seams and the like. (U.K.)

  5. Determination of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) in ashes from coal-fired thermal power plants in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parami, Vangeline Kinilitan

    2008-04-01

    The activity concentration (AC) of TENORM - 238 U, 226 Ra ( 238 U series), 232 Th, 228 Ra, 228 Th ( 232 Th series) and 40 K in feed coal, bottom ash and fly ash samples from four coal-fired thermal power plants C, M, P and S were determined using two techniques: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometry. For 232 Th and 238 U [determined at National Institute for Radiological Sciences (NIRS) by the ICP-MS)], Plant S feed coal (FC) sample that originated from China had the highest AC (15.77 ± 0.32 Bq/kg and 13.67 ± 0.82 Bq/kg, respectively), followed by Plant M FC sample also from China (8.31 ± 0.33 Bq/kg and 5.84 ± 0.12 Bq/kg, respectively), while Plants C and P FC samples that originated from the Philippines and Indonesia had the lowest ACs of 232 Th and 238 U. Plant S also had the highest bottom ash (BA) AC of 80.86 ± 3.23 Bq/kg and 100.20 ± 4.01 Bq/kg, respectively while Plant P had the highest fly ash (FA) AC of 155.96 ± 6.24 Bq/kg and 268.03 ± 10.72 Bq/kg, respectively. For AC's of 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K determined by NIRS HPGe, Plant C had the highest in the FC sample (11.70 ± 1.39 Bq/kg, 13.65 ± 4.99 Bq/kg, 11.35 ± 3.96 Bq/kg ad 80.23 ± 10.91 Bq/kg, respectuvely). For AC's in the BA samples, Plant M had the highest 226 Ra (106.73 ± 6.74 Bq/kg) and Plant S had the highest 228 Ra and 40 K (66.64 ± 8.16 Bq/kg and 400.93 ± 43.06 Bq/kg, respectively For AC's in the FA samples, Plant S had the highest 226 Ra and 228 Ra AC's (131.13 ± 8.09 Bq/kg and 87.70 ± 10.45 Bq/kg, respectively) while Plant C had the highest 40 K AC (369.08 ± 40.87 Bq/kg). The highest AC enhancement of 238 U, 226 Ra ( 238 U series), 232 Th, 228 Ra, 228 Th ( 232 Th series) 40 K relative to feed coal occurred in Plant P FA sample, with 238 U showing the highest enhancement of 93.72 among the radionuclides. When normalized with 40 K, 238 U in Plant P FA sample also had the highest enrichment factor (EF

  6. Determination of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) in ashes from coal-fired thermal power plants in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parami, Vangeline Kinilitan

    2008-04-15

    The activity concentration (AC) of TENORM - {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra ({sup 238}U series), {sup 232}Th, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th ({sup 232}Th series) and {sup 40}K in feed coal, bottom ash and fly ash samples from four coal-fired thermal power plants C, M, P and S were determined using two techniques: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometry. For {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U [determined at National Institute for Radiological Sciences (NIRS) by the ICP-MS)], Plant S feed coal (FC) sample that originated from China had the highest AC (15.77 {+-} 0.32 Bq/kg and 13.67 {+-} 0.82 Bq/kg, respectively), followed by Plant M FC sample also from China (8.31 {+-} 0.33 Bq/kg and 5.84 {+-} 0.12 Bq/kg, respectively), while Plants C and P FC samples that originated from the Philippines and Indonesia had the lowest ACs of {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U. Plant S also had the highest bottom ash (BA) AC of 80.86 {+-} 3.23 Bq/kg and 100.20 {+-} 4.01 Bq/kg, respectively while Plant P had the highest fly ash (FA) AC of 155.96 {+-} 6.24 Bq/kg and 268.03 {+-} 10.72 Bq/kg, respectively. For AC's of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th and {sup 40}K determined by NIRS HPGe, Plant C had the highest in the FC sample (11.70 {+-} 1.39 Bq/kg, 13.65 {+-} 4.99 Bq/kg, 11.35 {+-} 3.96 Bq/kg ad 80.23 {+-} 10.91 Bq/kg, respectuvely). For AC's in the BA samples, Plant M had the highest {sup 226}Ra (106.73 {+-} 6.74 Bq/kg) and Plant S had the highest {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K (66.64 {+-} 8.16 Bq/kg and 400.93 {+-} 43.06 Bq/kg, respectively For AC's in the FA samples, Plant S had the highest {sup 226}Ra and{sup 228}Ra AC's (131.13 {+-} 8.09 Bq/kg and 87.70 {+-} 10.45 Bq/kg, respectively) while Plant C had the highest {sup 40}K AC (369.08 {+-} 40.87 Bq/kg). The highest AC enhancement of {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra ({sup 238}U series), {sup 232}Th,{sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th ({sup 232}Th series) {sup 40}K relative to feed coal occurred in Plant P FA sample

  7. Treatment and disposal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in the oil and gas industry. A review; Behandlung und Deponierung natuerlicher radioaktiver Abfaelle (NORM) der Erdoel- und Erdgasindustrie. Ein Ueberblick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Ruediger B.; Schmuelling, Marcus [Bauer Emirates Environment, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Hosemann, Peter [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Engineering

    2014-07-01

    Concerning naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) from the oil/ and gas industry most of the industrial countries were lacking clear regulatory frameworks in waste legislation for many years. In the meanwhile on several places in Europe, but also in some of the GCC states in the Middle East such as in the United Arab Emirates and in Oman specialized treatment facilities are either in the stage of construction or already in operation. In particular, pilot plants for the decontamination of NORM-contaminated equipment have been tested recently. The paper reflects on the generation and the technical characterization of NORM but also the legislation compared on international level. Particularly an overview was provided by comparing the common practice on disposal in the North American Countries in comparison to Germany, the UK but also Australia. In addition the successful treatment of produced water from crude oil separation in a ''Constructed Wetland'' in the Sultanate Oman is briefly highlighted.

  8. Radioactivity. Death prinicple in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.; Russell, L.

    2006-01-01

    Walter Russell's knowledge of the two basic Principles of the material universe, concentration and radiation, strongly suggests that the radioactivity is the ''death principle'' of creation. In its natural environment, radioactive radiation is vital for the overall balance, however, when spread out across the entire world, it causes massive global warming and turns planet earth into a hot desert. Part I: What is Atomic Energy?; How Radioactivity Kills; The World Voice. Part II: The True Nature of This Mind and Motion Universe; Prelude - The Transformation of Man; We Define God; The True Nature of Electricity and Gravitation; Our Eternal Universe; The Oneness of Gravity and Magnetism; The Mind Nucleus of the Atom; The Material Nucleus of the Atom. Part III: The Bridge Between Man and God. (orig./GL)

  9. Formal synthesis of naturally occurring norephedrine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A concise and simple synthesis of 1-hydroxy-phenethylamine derivatives has been achieved following classical organic transformations using commercially available chiral pools. The said derivatives were explored for the synthesis of naturally occurring bio-active small molecules. Formal synthesis of norephedrine, virolin ...

  10. Percieved functions of naturally occurring autobiographical memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treebak, L. S.; Henriksen, J. R.; Lundhus, S.

    2005-01-01

    The main empirical reference on functions of autobiographical memories is still Hyman & Faries (1992) who used the cue-word-method and retrospective judgements. We used diaries to sample naturally occurring autobiographical memories and participants? perceived use of these. Results partly replicate...

  11. A naturally occurring trap for antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eades, J.; Morita, N.; Ito, T.M.

    1993-05-01

    The phenomenon of delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium is the first instance of a naturally occurring trap for antimatter in ordinary matter. Recent studies of this effect at CERN are summarized, and plans are described for laser excitation experiments to test its interpretation in terms of metastable exotic helium atom formation. (author)

  12. Natural radioactivity aspects of the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, M.A.R.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the natural radioactivity distributions and their movement in the oceans and their significance, is of considerable interest, while attempting to understand the impact of man-made radioactivity sources on the marine environment. In this context the interesting environmental behaviour of Radium isotopes ( 226 Ra and 228 Ra) and 210 Pb and 210 Po pair of radionuclides in the marine environment -occurring in 238 U and 232 Th natural radionuclides series have been the subject of considerable investigations as part of the marine biogeochemical studies, some aspects of which are discussed

  13. Natural Radioactivity in Bananas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, V. A. B.; Medina, N. H.; Okuno, E.; Umisedo, N. K.

    2008-08-01

    The content of 40K natural radionuclide in bananas (Musa sapientum) from the Vale do Ribeira region, São Paulo, Brazil, has been measured. We have collected several samples of bananas prata and nanica, its peels, leaves, and also different soils where the banana tree was planted, such as soil with a standard amount of fertilizer, the fertilizer itself and also soil without fertilizer for comparison. We have used the gamma-ray spectroscopy technique with a NaI(T1) crystal inside a 12 cm thick lead shield to detect the gamma-radiation. The results indicate that only part of the available potassium is absorbed by the plant, which is mainly concentrated in the banana peel.

  14. Natural Radioactivity in Bananas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagatto, V. A. B.; Medina, N. H.; Okuno, E.; Umisedo, N. K.

    2008-01-01

    The content of 40 K natural radionuclide in bananas (Musa sapientum) from the Vale do Ribeira region, Sao Paulo, Brazil, has been measured. We have collected several samples of bananas prata and nanica, its peels, leaves, and also different soils where the banana tree was planted, such as soil with a standard amount of fertilizer, the fertilizer itself and also soil without fertilizer for comparison. We have used the gamma-ray spectroscopy technique with a NaI(T1) crystal inside a 12 cm thick lead shield to detect the gamma-radiation. The results indicate that only part of the available potassium is absorbed by the plant, which is mainly concentrated in the banana peel

  15. New type of natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubchenya, V.A.; Chechev, V.P.; Yavshits, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is being given in popular form to investigations of a new type of natural radioactivity - spontaneous emission of fragments, more massive than α-particles, by heavy element nuclei, called f-decay by analogy with known α and γ decays. Some data on radioactivity, origin of the decay are presented. Possibilities of f-decay, predictions and hypotheses are discussed. The reason of late discovery of f-decay lies in low f-decay probability 10 -9 with respect to α-decay and in a certain sluggishness of settled knowledge about possible types of radioactive decay. The idea of f-decay is presented. It differs from the idea about a new type of decay as modification of asymmetric fission and contains an attempt to explain the intermediate position of f-decay between α-decay and

  16. Bioassay of naturally occurring allelochemicals for phytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leather, G R; Einhellig, F A

    1988-10-01

    The bioassay has been one of the most widely used tests to demonstrate allelopathic activity. Often, claims that a particular plant species inhibits the growth of another are based entirely on the seed germination response to solvent extracts of the suspected allelopathic plant; few of these tests are of value in demonstrating allelopathy under natural conditions. The veracity of the bioassay for evaluating naturally occurring compounds for phytotoxicity depends upon the physiological and biochemical response capacity of the bioassay organism and the mechanism(s) of action of the allelochemicals. The possibility that more than one allelochemical, acting in concert at very low concentrations, may be responsible for an observed allelopathic effect makes it imperative that bioassays be extremely sensitive to chemical growth perturbation agents. Among the many measures of phytotoxicity of allelochemicals, the inhibition (or stimulation) of seed germination, radicle elongation, and/or seedling growth have been the parameters of choice for most investigations. Few of these assays have been selected with the view towards the possible mechanism of the allelopathic effect.

  17. Natural radioactivity of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrnustik, J.

    1988-01-01

    Within a study of the natural radioactivity of building materials, coefficients were determined of the emanation from selected materials and raw materials, such as porous concrete, bricks, marlite, quartzite, etc. Measurements were made of ground samples using Lucas scintillation chambers which give an accuracy of determination of the coefficient of about 10%. Specific radium activity was also determined for the samples. Tabulated is a comparison of the average specific activity of radium in concrete, power plant ash and porous concrete in Czechoslovakia and abroad. It is stated that monitoring the content of natural radionuclides in building materials is an indispensable part of the production process in the building industry, this with regard to the radiation protection of the population. This will be enhanced by the new Czechoslovak standard determining methods of measuring the content of natural radionuclides and the coefficient of radon emanation, and the subsequent evaluation of the properties of building materials. (Z.M.) 3 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Radiological control in a mine with a naturally occurring radioactive material: NORM: I assessment of activity concentration of alpha emitter with long half live in the air in a pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, W.S.; Py Junior, D.A.; Silva, A.C.A.; Garcia Filho, O., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, A., E-mail: akelecom@id.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/GETA/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos. Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais; Pereira, J.R.S., E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit (OTU) supports a laboratory process responsible for the development of new chemical processes for uranium extraction from ore elements associated with uranium. In 2009, a pilot plant for extraction of uranium from a phosphate ore mine with uranium associated was implanted, which is a case of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) in a mine at Santa Quiteria, CE, Brazil. This pilot plant was supervised by the radiological protection service, aiming the Occupational Exposed Individual' safety (OEI). During the pilot plant operation the monitoring of radionuclides concentration in air was carried out. During the functioning of the pilot plant 63 high-vol air monitoring and posterior gross alpha counts were made in order to evaluate the alpha emitters. One sampling was made before the beginning of operations in order to evaluate the background which was estimated in 0.003 Bq m{sup -3}. Monitoring results varied between 0.001 Bq m{sup -3} and 0.162 Bq m{sup -3} with the average equal to 0.041 Bq m{sup -3}. 100 % of the results were below the derived limit for OEI which is equal to 0.360 Bq m{sup -3}. Thirty results were below the derived limit for public exposure. By using this criterion the area must be classified as Supervised Area. In order to correctly classify the area, the internal exposure must also be measured. The small values of air concentration of long lived alpha emitters can be explained by the process of uranium extraction that is made by solvent in a wet way that creates few aerosol particles in air that can be monitored by this method. (author)

  19. Radiological control in a mine with a naturally occurring radioactive material: NORM: I assessment of activity concentration of alpha emitter with long half live in the air in a pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.S.; Py Junior, D.A.; Silva, A.C.A.; Garcia Filho, O.

    2013-01-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit (OTU) supports a laboratory process responsible for the development of new chemical processes for uranium extraction from ore elements associated with uranium. In 2009, a pilot plant for extraction of uranium from a phosphate ore mine with uranium associated was implanted, which is a case of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) in a mine at Santa Quiteria, CE, Brazil. This pilot plant was supervised by the radiological protection service, aiming the Occupational Exposed Individual' safety (OEI). During the pilot plant operation the monitoring of radionuclides concentration in air was carried out. During the functioning of the pilot plant 63 high-vol air monitoring and posterior gross alpha counts were made in order to evaluate the alpha emitters. One sampling was made before the beginning of operations in order to evaluate the background which was estimated in 0.003 Bq m -3 . Monitoring results varied between 0.001 Bq m -3 and 0.162 Bq m -3 with the average equal to 0.041 Bq m -3 . 100 % of the results were below the derived limit for OEI which is equal to 0.360 Bq m -3 . Thirty results were below the derived limit for public exposure. By using this criterion the area must be classified as Supervised Area. In order to correctly classify the area, the internal exposure must also be measured. The small values of air concentration of long lived alpha emitters can be explained by the process of uranium extraction that is made by solvent in a wet way that creates few aerosol particles in air that can be monitored by this method. (author)

  20. Naturally occurring flavonoids against human norovirus surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaowei; D'Souza, Doris H

    2013-06-01

    Naturally occurring plant-derived flavonoids are reported to have antibacterial, antiviral, and pharmacological activities. The objectives of this study were to determine the antiviral effects of four flavonoids (myricetin, L-epicatechin, tangeretin, and naringenin) on the infectivity of food borne norovirus surrogates after 2 h at 37 °C. The lab-culturable surrogates, feline calicivirus (FCV-F9) at titers of ~7 log₁₀ PFU/ml (high titer) or ~5 log₁₀ PFU/ml (low titer) and murine norovirus (MNV-1) at ~5 log₁₀ PFU/ml, were mixed with equal volumes of myricetin, L-epicatechin, tangeretin, or naringenin at concentrations of 0.5 or 1 mM, and incubated for 2 h at 37 °C. Treatments of viruses were neutralized in cell culture medium containing 10 % heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum, serially diluted, and plaque assayed. Each treatment was replicated thrice and assayed in duplicate. FCV-F9 (low titer) was not found to be reduced by tangeretin or naringenin, but was reduced to undetectable levels by myricetin at both concentrations. Low titer FCV-F9 was also decreased by 1.40 log₁₀ PFU/ml with L-epicatechin at 0.5 mM. FCV-F9 at high titers was decreased by 3.17 and 0.72 log₁₀ PFU/ml with myricetin and L-epicatechin at 0.5 mM, and 1.73 log10 PFU/ml with myricetin at 0.25 mM, respectively. However, MNV-1 showed no significant inactivation by the four tested treatments. The antiviral effects of the tested flavonoids are dependent on the virus type, titer, and dose. Further research will focus on understanding the antiviral mechanism of myricetin and L-epicatechin.

  1. Estimation of natural radioactivity in different fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Monika; Chauhan, Pooja; Chauhan, R.P.; Sonkawade, R.G.; Kant, K.

    2011-01-01

    Fertilizers have become essential to the agricultural field all over the world. The natural radionuclides of fertilizers consist mainly of 226 Ra, 232 Th, isotopes with their decay products. The level of activity concentration of radionuclides in phosphate fertilizers provides useful information in the monitoring of environmental contamination. The concepts of natural radiation are essential for radiation protection purpose. Radionuclides present in fertilizers affect the common people and farmers immensely. They are produced and used worldwide in increasing quantities to replenish natural nutrients depleted from soils because of forming and erosion. However, the mining, processing and use of fertilizer materials in massive quantities redistribute radioactive trace elements throughout the environment, principally uranium, radium, radium decay products. The agricultural phosphate fertilizer industries use raw materials that consist of phosphate rocks, phosphoric acid, ammonium phosphate. The level of activity concentration of radionuclides in different fertilizers provides useful information in the monitoring of environmental contamination. Radiological impacts of phosphate rocks mining and manufacture could be significant due to the elevated radioactivity contents of the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), such as 238 U series, 232 Th series and 40 K, in some phosphate deposits. The concepts of natural radiation are essential for radiation protection purpose. This paper emphasis on the public risk assessment in an integrated manner assessing doses to members of the public via the atmospheric aquatic and secondary pathways. In the present study radioactivity in different fertilizer samples, which are widely used in Indian fields, was determined. The experimental work includes the measurements of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K using gamma spectrometry and radon concentration and exhalation rates measurement using solid state nuclear track detectors to asses a

  2. Properties of Natural Radiation and Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitous natural sources of radiation and radioactive material (naturally occurring radioactive material, NORM) have exposed humans throughout history. To these natural sources have been added technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) sources and human-made (anthropogenic) sources. This chapter describes the ubiquitous radiation sources that we call background, including primordial radionuclides such as 40K, 87Rb, the 232Th series, the 238U series, and the 235U series; cosmogenic radionuclides such as 3H and 14C; anthropogenic radionuclides such as 3H, 14C, 137Cs, 90Sr, and 129I; radiation from space; and radiation from technologically-enhanced concentrations of natural radionuclides, particularly the short-lived decay products of 222Rn ('radon') and 220Rn ('thoron') in indoor air. These sources produce radiation doses to people principally via external irradiation or internal irradiation following intakes by inhalation or ingestion. The effective doses from each are given, with a total of 3.11 mSv y-1 (311 mrem y-1) to the average US resident. Over 2.5 million US residents receive over 20 mSv y-1 (2 rem y-1), primarily due to indoor radon. Exposure to radiation from NORM and TENORM produces the largest fraction of ubiquitous background exposure to US residents, on the order of 2.78 mSv (278 mrem) or about 89%. This is roughly 45% of the average annual effective dose to a US resident of 6.2 mSv y-1 (620 mrem y-1) that includes medical (48%), consumer products and air travel (2%), and occupational and industrial (0.1%). Much of this chapter is based on National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Report No. 160, 'Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States,' for which the author chaired the subcommittee that wrote Chapter 3 on 'Ubiquitous Background Radiation.'

  3. Naturally Occurring Cinnamic Acid Sugar Ester Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Tian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamic acid sugar ester derivatives (CASEDs are a class of natural product with one or several phenylacrylic moieties linked with the non-anomeric carbon of a glycosyl skeleton part through ester bonds. Their notable anti-depressant and brains protective activities have made them a topic of great interest over the past several decades. In particular the compound 3′,6-disinapoylsucrose, the index component of Yuanzhi (a well-known Traditional Chinese Medicine or TCM, presents antidepressant effects at a molecular level, and has become a hotspot of research on new lead drug compounds. Several other similar cinnamic acid sugar ester derivatives are reported in traditional medicine as compounds to calm the nerves and display anti-depression and neuroprotective activity. Interestingly, more than one third of CASEDs are distributed in the family Polygalaceae. This overview discusses the isolation of cinnamic acid sugar ester derivatives from plants, together with a systematic discussion of their distribution, chemical structures and properties and pharmacological activities, with the hope of providing references for natural product researchers and draw attention to these interesting compounds.

  4. Structural studies of naturally occurring toxicogenic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, J. P.

    1977-10-01

    The paralytic shellfish poison (PSP), saxitoxin, is a neurotoxin isolated from Alaska butter clams (Saxidomus giganteus), mussels (Mytilus californianus) and axenic cultures of the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax catenella. The structure of saxitoxin has been determined through the use of single crystal X-ray diffraction. It possesses a unique tricyclic arrangement of atoms containing two guanidinium moieties and also a hydrated ketone. The relative stereochemistry is presented as well as the absolute configuration. The chemical constitution of a tremorgenic metabolite, paxilline, isolated from extracts of the fungus Penicillium paxilli Bainier has been determined. Paxilline represents a previously unreported class of natural compounds formed by the combination of tryptophan and mevalonate subunits. The complete stereostructure of two other fungal metabolites, paspaline and paspalicine, closely related to paxilline but isolated from Claviceps paspali Stammes have also been determined and are presented. The stereochemistries of paxilline, paspaline and paspalicine are identical at corresponding chiral centers.

  5. Naturally occurring antifungal aromatic esters and amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.S.; Shahnaz; Tabassum, S.; Ogunwande, I.A.; Pervez, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    During the search of antifungal natural products from terrestrial plants, a new long chained aromatic ester named grandiflorate along with spatazoate from Portulaca grandiflora and N-[2-methoxy-2-(4-methoxyphenyl) ethyl]-trans-cinnamide and aegeline from Solanum erianthum of Nigeria were isolated and tested against six fungal species. The known constituents have not been reported so far from mentioned investigated plants. Structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated with the aid of spectroscopic techniques including two dimensional NMR experiments. Among the compounds, the esters found more potent than amides against Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus. The new compound grandiflorate gave response against all tested fungal species while aegeline was found to give lowest inhibition during this study. (author)

  6. Naturally occurring antifungal aromatic esters and amides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, M S; Shahnaz,; Tabassum, S; Ogunwande, I A; Pervez, M K [University of Karachi (Pakistan). HEJ Research Inst. of Chemistry, International Centre for Chemical and Biological Sciences

    2010-08-15

    During the search of antifungal natural products from terrestrial plants, a new long chained aromatic ester named grandiflorate along with spatazoate from Portulaca grandiflora and N-[2-methoxy-2-(4-methoxyphenyl) ethyl]-trans-cinnamide and aegeline from Solanum erianthum of Nigeria were isolated and tested against six fungal species. The known constituents have not been reported so far from mentioned investigated plants. Structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated with the aid of spectroscopic techniques including two dimensional NMR experiments. Among the compounds, the esters found more potent than amides against Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus. The new compound grandiflorate gave response against all tested fungal species while aegeline was found to give lowest inhibition during this study. (author)

  7. Determination of pharmacokinetic processes in body organs on the basis of the box model and, by analogy, of laws of radioactive disintegration of naturally occurring and artificially activated isotope families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauser, P.

    1992-01-01

    The research work described is based on the simple law of degradation and disintegration for pharmaceutical substances. The transport, storage and, possibly, accumulation of beneficial and harmful pharmaceuticals in the organs of the human body are analysed using the box model. The studies are not restricted to asymptotic conditions occurring after continuous treatment with a particular drug but also investigate into the so-called stabilisation phase immediately after the beginning of medication, which is described mathematically. This phase is shown to be subject to a set of rules that are much more complex than those responsible for asymptotic substance levels. The analytical procedures used here are described on the basis of typical cases drawn from medical practice. The laws derived from these observations can, by analogy, also be applied to the radioactive disintegration of isotope families. They also permit formulas to be determined for the activity of multiple-link chain members. The report proceeds by discussing cases, where the baseline substance is the result of nuclear chain reacting. The last issue to be treated within the scope of this study is the radioactive disintegration and simultaneous activation of isotope families. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Natural radioactivity in environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijnis, H.; Jenkinson, A.; Chisari, R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The use natural radioactivity in environmental studies has proven a very powerful tool to determine the dynamics of both natural and antrophogenic processes in our environment. The use of 14 C in archeology and past climate studies has led to many scientific discoveries (i.e. shroud of Turin and Utze 'the ice-man' from Austria). The use of the 238 U-decay series is of at least equal value to studies in archeology and past climates. Some of the Isotopes studied supplement 14 C (which is limited to 40,000 years) up to 350,000 years and others can be utilized to date very young sediments, which can't be dated by 14 C. The so-called 210 Pb dating method has been used over the past 3 decades to date recent sediment. The method uses the disequilibrium in the 238 U decay chain, caused by the escape of the intermediate daughter 222 Rn (a noble gas) from the earth's crust. In the atmosphere the 222 Rn decays via short-lived daughter isotopes to 210 Pb. This 210 Pb with a very convenient half-life of 22,3 years decays to stable 206 Pb. By measuring the surface activity of a sediment core and subsequent samples at regular intervals one can establish a chronology for the sediment core. By studying the trace metals in these cores, one could deduce a contamination history for the region. Examples of studies supported by AINSE and ANSTO will be given

  9. Effects of natural radioactivity on food radioactivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennyu, Atsuhito

    2012-01-01

    Since the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Company, groups and individuals including local governments, food manufacturers, distribution circles, retail circles, and citizens are eager to measure the radioactivity of food, in order to confirm the safety of food from the concerns about radioactive contamination. The measurement of radioactivity of food is done by quantitatively determining gamma rays due to radioactive cesium that was incorporated into the biosphere cycle after having been released into the environment. As for the radioactivity measurement of food using gamma-ray spectrometry with a potassium iodide scintillation detector, which is very commonly used, this paper describes the handling method of obtained data, the principle of erroneous detection of radioactive cesium and iodine interrupted by natural radionuclides, and countermeasures for it. Major natural radioactivity sources are uranium series and thorium series. This paper explains gamma rays, which are characteristic in the decay process of uranium series and often affect the measurement of radioactive cesium in food and water. (O.A.)

  10. The natural radioactivity of the biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertsov, L A

    1967-07-01

    Of the approximately 1200 isotopes presently known more than 900 are radioactive. The nuclei of these isotopes are unstable and decay spontaneously emitting ionizing gamma-, alpha- or beta-radiation. The overwhelming majority of known radioactive isotopes have been obtained artificially; only a few are natural. Numerous investigations have shown that many of the natural radioactive isotopes can be grouped into three radioactive families. Each such family is characterized by the existence of one long-lived isotope - the family parent, one gaseous isotope of radon, intermediate radioactive decay products and final stable isotopes of atomic weights 206, 207 and 208. No such generic relationship has been established among the remaining natural radioactive isotopes. The purpose of the book, in contrast to some recent review works, is to present, in addition to a summary of reference data characterizing the radioactivity levels of various components of the biosphere, a description of those phenomena and regularities which will apparently make it possible to understand more completely the basic dynamics of the natural radioactivity of the biosphere and, consequently, contribute to a more correct interpretation of radiation-hygiene in each specific case.

  11. The natural radioactivity of the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertsov, L.A.

    1967-01-01

    Of the approximately 1200 isotopes presently known more than 900 are radioactive. The nuclei of these isotopes are unstable and decay spontaneously emitting ionizing gamma-, alpha- or beta-radiation. The overwhelming majority of known radioactive isotopes have been obtained artificially; only a few are natural. Numerous investigations have shown that many of the natural radioactive isotopes can be grouped into three radioactive families. Each such family is characterized by the existence of one long-lived isotope - the family parent, one gaseous isotope of radon, intermediate radioactive decay products and final stable isotopes of atomic weights 206, 207 and 208. No such generic relationship has been established among the remaining natural radioactive isotopes. The purpose of the book, in contrast to some recent review works, is to present, in addition to a summary of reference data characterizing the radioactivity levels of various components of the biosphere, a description of those phenomena and regularities which will apparently make it possible to understand more completely the basic dynamics of the natural radioactivity of the biosphere and, consequently, contribute to a more correct interpretation of radiation-hygiene in each specific case

  12. Committed effective dose from naturally occuring radionuclides in shellfish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Wahib, Norfadira Binti; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Bradley, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing their importance in the average Malaysian daily diet, the radioactivity concentrations in mollusc- and crustacean-based food have been determined for key naturally occuring radionuclides. Fresh samples collected from various maritime locations around peninsular Malaysia have been processed using standard procedures; the radionuclide concentrations being determined using an HPGe γ-ray spectrometer. For molluscs, assuming secular equilibrium, the range of activities of 238 U ( 226 Ra), 232 Th ( 228 Ra) and 40 K were found to be 3.28±0.35 to 5.34±0.52, 1.20±0.21 to 2.44±0.21 and 118±6 to 281±14 Bq kg −1 dry weight, respectively. The respective values for crustaceans were 3.02±0.57 to 4.70±0.52, 1.38±0.21 to 2.40±0.35 and 216±11 to 316±15 Bq kg −1 . The estimated average daily intake of radioactivity from consumption of molluscs are 0.37 Bq kg −1 for 238 U ( 226 Ra), 0.16 Bq kg −1 for 232 Th ( 228 Ra) and 18 Bq kg −1 for 40 K; the respective daily intake values from crustaceans are 0.36 Bq kg −1 , 0.16 Bq kg −1 and 23 Bq kg −1 . Associated annual committed effective doses from molluscs are estimated to be in the range 21.3 to 34.7 μSv for 226 Ra, 19.3 to 39.1 μSv for 228 Ra and 17.0 to 40.4 μSv for 40 K. For crustaceans, the respective dose ranges are 19.6 to 30.5 μSv, 22.0 to 38.4 μSv and 31.1 to 45.5 μSv, being some several times world average values. - Highlights: ► Activity concentrations of naturally occuring radionuclides were assessed for shellfish. ► 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K intake via shellfish showed several times higher than world averages. ► Committed effective doses due to the ingestions of 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K are the first report in Malaysia. ► Estimated committed effective dose also showed higher values than the world average

  13. Forest decline, natural and technically generated radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teufel, D.

    1983-06-01

    The question investigated is whether the radioactive rare gases emanating from nuclear plants are causative or participate in the triggering of forest disease. For one thing, a chemical reaction could be responsible for such an effect exerted by these artificial radioactive effluents. However, a calculation shows the concentration of radionuclides, respectively, in this case, their decomposition products, to be by many orders of magnitude smaller than other constituents in air; so a chemical reaction of this kind may be excluded. For the other part, rare gases might contribute to forest damage by their radioactive decomposition and late physical, chemical, and biological effects. In this connection, a detailed analysis is made of the comparability of natural radioactivity with radioactivity generated by nuclear plants. A possible contribution towards the total stress situation of forests (chemical air pollution, natural radioactivity, artificially produced radioactive rare gases, weather conditions and conditions arising from forest management and the like) would amount to a proportion smaller than 1/1000 considering natural radioactivity as a possible stress factor only. (orig.) [de

  14. Ambiant natural radioactivity and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saumande, P.

    1989-01-01

    Measures made in France have showed that γ radioactivity and indoor radon concentration were more important in country with granitic soil. As long as radon was more particularly admitted to be inducer of broncho-pulmonary cancer by inhalation, epidemiologic inquiries were made. The results do not reveal any excess death caused by cancer in these countries selected because of their granitic soil [fr

  15. Correlation between soil parameters and natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasinska, M.; Niewiadomski, T.; Schwabenthan, J.

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that a linear correlation exists between the concentration of natural elements U-238, Th-232 and K-40 contained in the upper layer of the soil, and the fraction (by weight) of particles of diameter less than 0.02 mm, i.e. the soil's mechanical composition. This hypothesis has been verified on a larger and statistically significant material of soils frequently occurring in Poland: chernozem, podzolic, muds, and anthropogenic, where for a given soil type, samples were chosen to represent various mechanical compositions. And it is concluded that the radioactivity concentrations of the head elements in the soil depend on its mechanical composition rather than on the type of soil. Thus, in principle, one is able to estimate dose rates from terrestrial sources directly from soil maps, without the need for outdoor measurements

  16. Natural radioactivity in groundwater--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh Chau, Nguyen; Dulinski, Marek; Jodlowski, Pawel; Nowak, Jakub; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Sleziak, Monika; Wachniew, Przemyslaw

    2011-12-01

    The issue of natural radioactivity in groundwater is reviewed, with emphasis on those radioisotopes which contribute in a significant way to the overall effective dose received by members of the public due to the intake of drinking water originating from groundwater systems. The term 'natural radioactivity' is used in this context to cover all radioactivity present in the environment, including man-made (anthropogenic) radioactivity. Comprehensive discussion of radiological aspects of the presence of natural radionuclides in groundwater, including an overview of current regulations dealing with radioactivity in drinking water, is provided. The presented data indicate that thorough assessments of the committed doses resulting from the presence of natural radioactivity in groundwater are needed, particularly when such water is envisaged for regular intake by infants. They should be based on a precise determination of radioactivity concentration levels of the whole suite of radionuclides, including characterisation of their temporal variability. Equally important is a realistic assessment of water intake values for specific age groups. Only such an evaluation may provide the basis for possible remedial actions.

  17. The encounter and analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides in gas and oil production and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartog, F.A.; Jonkers, G.; Knaepen, W.A.I.

    1996-01-01

    As a result of oil and gas production, radioactive daughter elements from the uranium and thorium decay series can be mobilized and transported away from the reservoir. Due to changes in flow regime, temperature, pressure or chemical environment NORs (Naturally Occurring Radionuclides) may build up in products, by-products or waste streams from gas and oil production and processing facilities. Products containing NORs are commonly denoted by the acronym NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials). Main topics of this paper are: E and P (Exploration and Production) NORM characteristics; incentives for NORM analysis; NORM analysis; interlaboratory test programme; analysis techniques; results and conclusions of the test programme. 4 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Natural radioactivity in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petr, I [Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Fakulta Jaderna a Fysikalne Inzenyrska

    1980-01-01

    The effects were analyzed of natural radionuclides and cosmic radiation on radiation burden in man. The contents are shown of natural radionuclides in the earth crust, water, atmosphere, food chain and human organism. Using the data, the annual doses from natural sources to the gonads (1025 ..mu..Sv/yr) and to the bone marrow (986 ..mu..Sv) are estimated.

  19. Measurements of natural radioactivity in historical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kierzek, J.; Kunicki-Goldfinger, J.J.; Kasprzak, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    Natural radioactive components of historical glasses and two methods of the respective measurement of the radioactivity are discussed. The evaluation of radioactivity of glass objects using a Geiger-Mueller counter and high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry is presented. A survey of the Warsaw National Museum glass collection with a Geiger-Mueller counter allowed distinguishing the vessels made of potassium and sodium glass by their level of natural radioactivity. Gamma spectrometry, on the other hand, enables estimating a specific radionuclide content. Special attention is given to uranium glasses. One 19th century Bohemian vessel, coloured with a uranium compound, was carefully examined using gamma spectrometry. K 2 O and U content were estimated to be 16.2 and 0.33%, respectively. (orig.)

  20. A laboratory activity for teaching natural radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilakouta, M.; Savidou, A.; Vasileiadou, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an educational approach for teaching natural radioactivity using commercial granite samples. A laboratory activity focusing on the topic of natural radioactivity is designed to develop the knowledge and understanding of undergraduate university students on the topic of radioactivity, to appreciate the importance of environmental radioactivity and familiarize them with the basic technology used in radioactivity measurements. The laboratory activity is divided into three parts: (i) measurements of the count rate with a Geiger-Muller counter of some granite samples and the ambient background radiation rate, (ii) measurement of one of the samples using gamma ray spectrometry with a NaI detector and identification of the radioactive elements of the sample, (iii) using already recorded 24 h gamma ray spectra of the samples from the first part (from the Granite Gamma-Ray Spectrum Library (GGRSL) of our laboratory) and analyzing selected peaks in the spectrum, students estimate the contribution of each radioactive element to the total specific activity of each sample. A brief description of the activity as well as some results and their interpretation are presented.

  1. Committed effective dose from naturally occuring radionuclides in shellfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Wahib, Norfadira Binti; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Bradley, D. A.

    2013-07-01

    Recognizing their importance in the average Malaysian daily diet, the radioactivity concentrations in mollusc- and crustacean-based food have been determined for key naturally occuring radionuclides. Fresh samples collected from various maritime locations around peninsular Malaysia have been processed using standard procedures; the radionuclide concentrations being determined using an HPGe γ-ray spectrometer. For molluscs, assuming secular equilibrium, the range of activities of 238U (226Ra), 232Th (228Ra) and 40K were found to be 3.28±0.35 to 5.34±0.52, 1.20±0.21 to 2.44±0.21 and 118±6 to 281±14 Bq kg-1 dry weight, respectively. The respective values for crustaceans were 3.02±0.57 to 4.70±0.52, 1.38±0.21 to 2.40±0.35 and 216±11 to 316±15 Bq kg-1. The estimated average daily intake of radioactivity from consumption of molluscs are 0.37 Bq kg-1 for 238U (226Ra), 0.16 Bq kg-1 for 232Th (228Ra) and 18 Bq kg-1 for 40K; the respective daily intake values from crustaceans are 0.36 Bq kg-1, 0.16 Bq kg-1 and 23 Bq kg-1. Associated annual committed effective doses from molluscs are estimated to be in the range 21.3 to 34.7 μSv for 226Ra, 19.3 to 39.1 μSv for 228Ra and 17.0 to 40.4 μSv for 40K. For crustaceans, the respective dose ranges are 19.6 to 30.5 μSv, 22.0 to 38.4 μSv and 31.1 to 45.5 μSv, being some several times world average values.

  2. Natural and induced radioactivity in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    One of the first questions often asked about irradiated food is whether it is radioactive. Not many people understand that food and any natural substance contains natural radioactivity which can be measurable. It is therefore important to put the issue on natural radioactivity and possible induced radioactivity in food in perspective. While there is a clear consensus among the scientific community that no radioactivity is induced when food is irradiated by gamma rays from cobalt-60 or cesium-137, electron generated by a machine with energy less than 10 million electron volt (MeV) or X rays produced generated by a machine with energy less than 5 MeV. However, data to this effect were published many years ago and are not easy to find. As food irradiation is gaining wide acceptance in many countries, it was considered timely to compile data on natural and induced radioactivity in food into one document. We are grateful to A. Brynjolfsson, one of the few experts who have the knowledge on this subject as well as wide experience on food irradiation, who collected, compiled and evaluated all data on this subject into one report. This publication provides clear explanations not only why radioactivity cannot be induced in food irradiated by radiation sources mentioned above but to what extent the increase in dose or energy level of radiation sources would induce significantly radioactivity in food. The compilation of such data was prompted by a desire to increase the energy limit and the absorbed dose based on the need to irradiate thicker samples of food and to use sterilizing dose up to 60 kGy. This publication concluded that the increase in radiation background dose from consumption of food irradiated to an average dose up to 60 kGy with gamma rays from cobalt- 60 or cesium-137, with 10 MeV electrons or with 5 MeV X rays is insignificant. In addition, food irradiated with X ray with energy up to 7.5 MeV to a dose of 30 kGy has radioactivity well below natural

  3. Natural and induced radioactivity in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    One of the first questions often asked about irradiated food is whether it is radioactive. Not many people understand that food and any natural substance contains natural radioactivity which can be measurable. It is therefore important to put the issue on natural radioactivity and possible induced radioactivity in food in perspective. While there is a clear consensus among the scientific community that no radioactivity is induced when food is irradiated by gamma rays from cobalt-60 or cesium-137, electron generated by a machine with energy less than 10 million electron volt (MeV) or X rays produced generated by a machine with energy less than 5 MeV. However, data to this effect were published many years ago and are not easy to find. As food irradiation is gaining wide acceptance in many countries, it was considered timely to compile data on natural and induced radioactivity in food into one document. We are grateful to A. Brynjolfsson, one of the few experts who have the knowledge on this subject as well as wide experience on food irradiation, who collected, compiled and evaluated all data on this subject into one report. This publication provides clear explanations not only why radioactivity cannot be induced in food irradiated by radiation sources mentioned above but to what extent the increase in dose or energy level of radiation sources would induce significantly radioactivity in food. The compilation of such data was prompted by a desire to increase the energy limit and the absorbed dose based on the need to irradiate thicker samples of food and to use sterilizing dose up to 60 kGy. This publication concluded that the increase in radiation background dose from consumption of food irradiated to an average dose up to 60 kGy with gamma rays from cobalt- 60 or cesium-137, with 10 MeV electrons or with 5 MeV X rays is insignificant. In addition, food irradiated with X ray with energy up to 7.5 MeV to a dose of 30 kGy has radioactivity well below natural

  4. Natural radioactivity of the diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanmaire, L [CEA, CEN Fontenay-aux-Roses, Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Departement de Protection Sanitaire, 92 (France)

    1985-01-01

    The so-called ''natural'' radionuclides are present in food in different proportions according to the nature and origin of the food products. After a summary of the principles allowing to understand environmental transfers, a study is made of the respective radionuclides to be found in food.

  5. Natural Radioactivity of Thermal Springs in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marovic, G.; Sencar, J.; Cesar, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Republic of Croatia is rich in thermal and mineral springs, which are widely popular for medical therapy, tourism, recreation, rehabilitation and drinking. Considering the popularity of the spas and the habits of our population to use the beneficial effects of these springs it is of interest to estimate the radiation doses received by patients or tourists staying in the spas. In view of this, the Radiation Protection Unit of the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health in Zagreb has been engaged in a research programme dealing with the natural radioactivity concentration in the Croatian thermal and mineral waters. The aim of this paper was to estimate total natural radioactivity (Ra, Ra decay) in thermal and mineral waters from the several spas in Croatia. On basis of the obtained data the Ra and Ra activity ratio was calculated for each investigated spa. In this study possible effects of natural radioactivity were determined for each radionuclide using a derived concentration (DC) for a group of individuals for municipal drinking water supplies. Values exceeding DC represent radionuclide concentrations for radioactive waste. Total percentage ratio for each spring was also calculated. Since natural radioactivity in some spas exceeds DC value the practise of using these waters should be regularly estimated and monitored in order to avoid any possible health effects. (author)

  6. Population doses from naturally occurring radiation in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stranden, E.

    The main purpose of this work was to study the radiological consequences of the introduction of building materials with high concentrations of radioactivity and to analyse the impact of a reduction of the ventilation rates in houses on the population dose from inhalation of natural airborne radioactivity. The general problems of radioactivity in building materials are discussed. Measurements of radioactivity in building materials from different parts of the country are reported, together with theoretical calculations of the gamma doses in houses. These calculations are compared with experimental results and earlier measurements of the indoor gamma radiation in Norway. Measurements of the outdoor gamma radiation in different parts of Norway are presented. These results are used together with earlier measurements of the gamma radiation inside houses to calculate the average, and variations of population dose from this radiation. An experimental study on the radon concentrations inside different types of dwellings, and a discussion of the respiratory dose received by the inhalation of radon daughters is presented. Some factors that may have influence upon the radon concentrations are also discussed. A method for measurement of radon and thoron daughters in air is discussed. The possible radiological effects of an increased radon concentration in houses are discussed. (Auth.)

  7. Natural radioactivity at CBPP waste pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, Jadranka; Marovic, Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Electrical power requirements will necessitate doubling the present generating capacity in Croatia in the future. As a result, environmental discharges associated with the coal power industry will considerably increase. Burning of coal is one source of enhanced radiation exposure to naturally occurring elements, particularly members of uranium and thorium decay chains. By coal burning (in CBPP at about 1700 C degrees) the activity originating from uranium and thorium is redistributed from underground (where the impact on humanity is nil) and liberated into the environment. Most of the radioactive substances are concentrated in the ash and slag, which are heavy and drop to the bottom of a furnace, lately transported to deposit pile, from where some activity may leach into aquifer, or be dispersed by wind. Lighter fly ash, however, is carried up the chimney and into the atmosphere and irradiates people and contaminates food crops. Also, 222 Rn escapes into the atmosphere during incineration, while the non-gaseous members of the uranium decay series remain in the ash and slag. Extensive investigations have been performed in the coal burning power plant (CBPP) Plomin in Croatia and at deposit pile. A network of radon escalation measurements, in-situ gamma-spectrometric measurements and monitoring of waste pile were organized. The results of the measurements confirm that the ash/slag deposite site are well monitored and involve all the necessary protective measures. All obtained data can be used as a valuable database for future estimations and modeling of the impact of radioactive pollution to the marine environment. (author)

  8. The technologically-reinforced natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Technologically-reinforced natural radioactivity comes from mining industries, geological resources and ores de-confinement, and from separation, purification, transformation and use of by-products or products. Partly based on a survey and questionnaires sent to industrial organisations, this report proposes a large and detailed overview of this kind of radioactivity for different sectors or specific activities: the French phosphate sector, the international rare Earth and heavy ores sector, the French monazite sector, the ilmenite sector, the French and international zirconium sector, the non-ferrous metal sector, the international and French drinkable, mineral and spring water sector, the international wastewater sector, the French drilling sector, the international and French geothermal sector, the international and French gas and oil sector, the international and French coal sector, the international and French biomass sector, the international and French paper-making industry, and the management of wastes with technologically-reinforced natural radioactivity in France

  9. Regions with increased natural radioactivity. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansoni, B.; Matthes, W.

    1985-10-01

    The goals pursued by the investigation on hand were: 1. to get a survey of natural radioactivity in the Fichtelgebirge; 2. to find and describe locally restricted areas of high natural radioactivity (abnormal radiation, hot spots); this will be a starting point 3. for the assessment of possible increased radiation exposure and of the state of health of a restricted number of persons. Furthermore, there are also 4. underground data for the eventual stipulation of maximum permissible values for natural radioactivity. 5. The situation in the Fichtelgebirge shall be compared with that of the monazite sand-stone areas in India. The highest gamma dose rates measured in locally restricted areas were: 1. granite road pavement: 24 μR/h; 2. granite quarries (35 μR/h); 3. caves below granite rock (40 to 70 μR/h); 4. slag brick pavement on market place and main street of Marktredwitz (53.4 μR/h) (part of which removed already); 5. uranium abnormalities on a farmer's field (80-100 μR/h) (0.6 m below the surface: 1.500 μR/h); this may be considered an uranium deposit with a content in uranium of up to 0.3%; 6. over 100 μR/h in front of an uranium ore mine in the uranium prospection drift (rest of the drift in the granite no more than 29.3+-3.3 μR/h). The resulting maximum conceivable radiation exposure is assessed. The question whether there is a necessity for setting tolerance limit values for natural radioactivity is raised again; the magnitude in comparison with limit values for artificial radioactivity in radioactive controlled areas is pointed out. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Some applications of natural radioactivity in industry and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yonghe; Xu Qiujing

    1992-01-01

    There are natural radioactivity isotopes of uranium, thorium and potassium everywhere in nature. The characteristics of these isotopes form the basis of various applications. Some applications of natural radioactivity in industry and agriculture are introduced

  11. Natural radioactivity at Podravina gas fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, J.; Marovic, G.

    2006-01-01

    In Croatia, natural gas is an important source of energy, where its use exceeds other sources by one third. Composed primarily of the methane, natural gas from Croatian Podravina gas fields, beside other impurities, contains small amounts of radioactive elements. At Gas Treatment Plant (GTP) Molve, technological procedures for purification of natural gas and its distribution are performed. With yearly natural gas production of 3.5 109 m3 GTP Molve is major Croatian energy resource. Its safety and environment impact is matter of concern. Using different radioactivity measuring techniques the exposure of population to ionizing radiation were calculated at Central Natural Gas Station Molve and the underground wells. The measurement techniques included in-situ gamma spectrometric measurements, from which contribution to absorbed dose of the natural radionuclide in soil were calculated. Exposure dose measurements were performed using T.L.-dosimeters, and L.A.R.A. electronic dosimeters as well as field dose rate meter. Comparing used different radioactivity measuring methods, the correlations have been calculated. (authors)

  12. The natural radioactivity in 10 episodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Charmasson, S.; Foulquier, L.; Germain, P.; Klein, D.; Levrard, J.; Livolsi, P.; Lochard, J.; Lombard, J.; Masson, M.; Maubert, H.; Metivier, H.; Rannou, A.; Tort, V.

    2011-01-01

    Illustrated by drawings, strip cartoons, and graphs, this publication presents, describes and gives assessments of the different environments where natural radioactivity is present: in soils where many radionuclides are present, in water (notably in river reappearances), in the air (radon, notably in buildings), in the food chain (mainly potassium 40), in sea water and therefore in fishes and shells (potassium 40 and rubidium 87), in the interstellar space (cosmic rays), in cosmic rays in relationship with the Earth magnetic field, in the atmosphere because of cosmic rays (notably at high altitudes), in all kind of things (radioactivity is then used for dating purposes, i.e. carbon dating), and in the human body

  13. Influence of weather conditions on natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simion, Florin; Simion, Elena; Cuculeanu, Vasile; Mihalcea, Ion

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the dependence of the natural radioactivity on atmospheric weather conditions: air temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, atmospherical precipitations and relative humidity. The values used in the paper were taken from the environmental radioactivity monitoring in Botosani city, Romania, as measured by the Environmental Radioactivity Surveillance Station. Daily global measurements of atmospheric deposition beta and atmospheric aerosols as well were carried out, including the indirect determination of radon and thoron, and the absorbed gamma dose rate in air, as well. Sampling and measurement frequency depended on the type of sample analyzed as follows: atmospheric deposition were taken daily, atmospheric aerosols were collected 4 times/day, with a sampling interval of 5 hours while the air absorbed dose rate was determined at a hourly rate. The coefficient of multiple correlation between the type of analysis and weather conditions, was determined. By using multiple linear regression it was highlighted the natural radioactivity dependence on the atmospheric conditions and meteorological parameters by a mathematical expression that can be used to determine missing values in a time series of measured data. By predicting the measured values our procedure can be considered as a validation process of the measurement accuracy

  14. Distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides in soils of the southern districts of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, M. I.; Kamal, M.; Alam, M. N.; Yeasmin, S.; Mostafa, M. N.

    2006-01-01

    The activity concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive materials in soil samples of an elevated radiation background area of nine southern districts of Bangladesh were determined using gamma-ray spectrometry with an aim of evaluating the environmental radioactivity. The outdoor and indoor external effective dose rates and the radiation hazard indices from the soil activity were evaluated with an aim of minimising the harmful effects of ionising radiation to the population of the area concerned. The activity of 137 Cs was measured and observed in some of the locations. (authors)

  15. Immunoregulation by naturally occurring and disease-associated autoantibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The role of naturally occurring autoantibodies (NAbs) in homeostasis and in disease manifestations is poorly understood. In the present chapter, we review how NAbs may interfere with the cytokine network and how NAbs, through formation of complement-activating immune complexes with soluble self......-antigens, may promote the uptake and presentation of self-molecules by antigen-presenting cells. Both naturally occurring and disease-associated autoantibodies against a variety of cytokines have been reported, including NAbs against interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, granulocyte-macrophage colony...

  16. Natural radioactivity for some Egyptian building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, M. F.; Mostafa, R. M.; Shahin, F.; Hassan, K. F.; Saleh, Z. A.; Yahia, A.

    2007-01-01

    Study of the radiation hazards for the building materials is interested in most international countries. Measurements of natural radioactivity was verified for some egyptian building materials to assess any possible radiological hazard to man by the use of such materials. The measurements for the level of natural radioactivity in the materials was determined by γ-ray spectrum using HP Ge detector. A track detector Cr-39 was used to measure the radon exhalation rate from these materials. The radon exhalation rates were found to vary from 2.83±0.86 to 41.57 ± 8.38 mBqm -2 h -1 for egyptian alabaster. The absorbed dose rate in air is lower than the international recommended value (55 n Gy h -1 ) for all test samples

  17. The effects of naturally occurring impurities in rock salt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we investigate the effect that naturally occurring impurities in salt mines have both on effective permittivity of the medium and on radio wave propagation at ∼200 MHz. The effective permittivity is determined based on the dielectric properties of salt and the characteristics of the main impurities. We conclude that ...

  18. Transmission of naturally occurring lymphoma in macaque monkeys.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, R D; Blake, B J; Chalifoux, L V; Sehgal, P K; King, N W; Letvin, N L

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring rhesus monkey lymphomas were transmitted into healthy rhesus monkeys by using tumor cell suspensions. The naturally arising tumors included an immunoblastic sarcoma and an undifferentiated lymphoma. Recipient animals developed undifferentiated lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphomas, or parenchymal lymphoproliferative abnormalities suggestive of early lesions of lymphoma. Some of these animals developed such opportunistic infections as cytomegalovirus hepatitis and ...

  19. Learning by investing: evidence from a naturally occurring auction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanousek, Jan; Kočenda, Evžen

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2011), s. 125-149 ISSN 0967-0750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/09/1595; GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM0021620846 Keywords : learning * naturally occurring auction * stock market Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.679, year: 2011

  20. Adsorption of fluoride ions onto naturally occurring earth materials ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Batch sorption system using two naturally occurring earth materials (EM) as adsorbents was investigated to remove fluoride ions from aqueous solution. The system variables studied include initial concentration of the sorbate, agitation time, adsorbent dose, pH, co-ions and temperature. The experimental data fitted well to ...

  1. The draft Radioactive Substances (Natural Gas) Exemption Order (Northern Ireland) 2002. Consultation paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Natural gas, and products made from it such as liquefied petroleum gas, may contain small amounts of naturally occurring radioactive substances. The use, accumulation and disposal of radioactive substances by organisations is regulated by the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 (RSA 93) and in Northern Ireland the regulatory authority is the Chief Radiochemical Inspector in the Environment and Heritage Service, which is part of the Department of the Environment (the Department). RSA 93 ensures the control of radioactive wastes by requiring registration of use of radioactive substances and authorisation of disposal of radioactive waste. It sets out the levels at which certain naturally occurring radioelements eg. uranium in gases, liquids and solids, and radon in gases, should be regarded as radioactive

  2. Natural Transformation of Campylobacter jejuni Occurs Beyond Limits of Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegge, Christina S.; Brøndsted, Lone; Ligowska-Marzęta, Małgorzata; Ingmer, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a human bacterial pathogen. While poultry is considered to be a major source of food borne campylobacteriosis, C. jejuni is frequently found in the external environment, and water is another well-known source of human infections. Natural transformation is considered to be one of the main mechanisms for mediating transfer of genetic material and evolution of the organism. Given the diverse habitats of C. jejuni we set out to examine how environmental conditions and physiological processes affect natural transformation of C. jejuni. We show that the efficiency of transformation is correlated to the growth conditions, but more importantly that transformation occurs at growth-restrictive conditions as well as in the late stationary phase; hence revealing that growth per se is not required for C. jejuni to be competent. Yet, natural transformation of C. jejuni is an energy dependent process, that occurs in the absence of transcription but requires an active translational machinery. Moreover, we show the ATP dependent ClpP protease to be important for transformation, which possibly could be associated with reduced protein glycosylation in the ClpP mutant. In contrast, competence of C. jejuni was neither found to be involved in DNA repair following DNA damage nor to provide a growth benefit. Kinetic studies revealed that several transformation events occur per cell cycle indicating that natural transformation of C. jejuni is a highly efficient process. Thus, our findings suggest that horizontal gene transfer by natural transformation takes place in various habitats occupied by C. jejuni. PMID:23049803

  3. Cosmos 954. The occurence and nature of recovered debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gummer, W.K.; Campbell, F.R.; Knight, G.B.; Ricard, J.L.

    1980-05-01

    The Russian nuclear-powered satellite, Cosmos 954, re-entered the earth's atmosphere early on 24 January 1978. Concern about radioactive debris, whose presence was quickly verified on the frozen surfaces of lakes and land, led to a massive airborne and ground search and recovery program that lasted from re-entry date to the middle of October, 1978, interrupted only by the spring break-up period. The search area extended from Great Slave Lake northeastward towards Baker Lake. Only about 65 kilograms of material were found, although it is probable that the satellite weighed several tons. All fragments but one - itself weighing over 18 kg - were radioactive; many showed clear evidence of melting and erosion. A wide area stretching southwards from Great Slave Lake was affected by a scattered shower of minute particles representing the enriched fuel of the satellite's power source. Intensive searches were carried out in the Territories and adjacent Alberta and Saskatchewan in an effort to find and remove as much as possible of such material. Laboratory studies were carried out on particles to learn their chemical and physical nature, in order to understand their probable behaviour in the general environment. Search and recovery continued until it could be concluded that 1) it was most unlikely that highly raidoactive fragments had been missed; 2) all obvious large fragments had been located and removed; 3) the risk to people from particles remaining in unfrequented areas was not great because of the particles' tiny size, their general insolubility, and their scattered distribution. Residual radiological risks were also fading rapidly relative to the natural radiation background. (auth)

  4. Natural radioactivity in mining and hydrocarbon extraction industry. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, C; Desideri, D; Meli, M A; Roselli, C [General Chemistry Institute, Urbino University, 61029 Urbino, (Italy)

    1996-03-01

    Water and soil natural radioactivity is a well known phenomenon which can produced by variable concentrations of uranium and thorium series radionuclides. Generally, the relevant radiological hazard is not important; however, some radiation protection problems can occur in particular industrial processes involving the treatment of large quantities of materials. In this case a high concentration of radioactive substance (NORM: nationally occurring radioactive materials) can be found at special points of the plant, in the manufacture by-products and in the waters. Sometimes the national radioactivity concentration can be so high to raise radiation protection problems which can be assimilated in a sense to the ones faced in the presence, handling, and disposal of non-sealed radioactive sources. In this paper the following mining and hydrocarbon extraction plants were particularly taken into account: (a) industries using zircon sands to produce refractory and ceramic materials; (b) phosphorites manufacture to prepare phosphoric acids, plasters and fertilizers (c) hydrocarbon extraction and treatment processes where formations of low specific activity (L.S.A.) scales and sludges are produced. The relevant results and the possible radiation protection risks for the professional exposed staff will be reported. A special emphasis will be given to some african phosphorites (boucraa, togo, morocco), and L.S.A. scales (tunisia, congo, Egypt). 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Natural radioactivity in mining and hydrocarbon extraction industry. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testa, C.; Desideri, D.; Meli, M.A.; Roselli, C.

    1996-01-01

    Water and soil natural radioactivity is a well known phenomenon which can produced by variable concentrations of uranium and thorium series radionuclides. Generally, the relevant radiological hazard is not important; however, some radiation protection problems can occur in particular industrial processes involving the treatment of large quantities of materials. In this case a high concentration of radioactive substance (NORM: nationally occurring radioactive materials) can be found at special points of the plant, in the manufacture by-products and in the waters. Sometimes the national radioactivity concentration can be so high to raise radiation protection problems which can be assimilated in a sense to the ones faced in the presence, handling, and disposal of non-sealed radioactive sources. In this paper the following mining and hydrocarbon extraction plants were particularly taken into account: a) industries using zircon sands to produce refractory and ceramic materials; b) phosphorites manufacture to prepare phosphoric acids, plasters and fertilizers c) hydrocarbon extraction and treatment processes where formations of low specific activity (L.S.A.) scales and sludges are produced. The relevant results and the possible radiation protection risks for the professional exposed staff will be reported. A special emphasis will be given to some african phosphorites (boucraa, togo, morocco), and L.S.A. scales (tunisia, congo, Egypt). 4 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Natural radioactivity in industry, medicine, dentistry, hobbies, and camping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, M.

    1996-01-01

    A recent enquiry asked about the potential hazards of radioactivity in gas lamp mantles. This has prompted a quick review of uses, for other reasons, of materials which are incidentally radioactive. Thorium and uranium are the two highest atomic number elements which occur naturally in commercial quantities. They are both naturally radioactive. Both have been used for a variety of purposes utilising their chemical and physical, rather than radioactive properties. They have been incorporated in specialised industrial items and in some materials encountered in everyday life. While the properties of uranium and thorium make these materials useful for a variety of purposes, the fact that they are also incidentally radioactive materials means that any potential radiological hazards should also be taken into accoutnt. The use of these materials for medical and dental purposes has been discontiunued for these reasons. The only readily availabe consumer product which uses these materials on any scale is the thoriated gas lamp mantle. The radiological consequences of this use are small. (author). 2 refs

  7. An overview on measurements of natural radioactivity in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are always exposed during their lives to ionizing radiation arising outside and within the earth. The exposure to these radiation occurs from natural sources such as radioactive elements in rocks and soil, internal exposure form radioactive elements through water, food and air and cosmic rays entering from outer space to earth's atmosphere. About 87% of the radiation dose received by human beings is due to natural radiation, it is essential to assess the radiation doses in order to control possible health effects from such natural sources. In this regard, a number of articles have been appeared for Malaysia in international research journals, which have been reviewed and complied in this article. Most of these articles are about the measurement of activity concentrations of primordial (238U, 232Th, 226Ra and 40K and anthropogenic (137Cs radionuclide's and gamma dose rate in environmental samples using HPGe and NaI (Tl survey meter.

  8. On the noble gas isotopic fractionation in naturally occurring gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, B.

    1984-01-01

    The isotopic composition of neon in the mantle is an important geochemical constraint on the formation of the earth and subsequent degassing. Some deviation of neon isotopic composition in natural gas and rock samples from the atmospheric value which can not be accounted for by the known nuclear process has been reported, and Nagao et al. interpreted the deviation as the result of mass fractionation in natural gas in Japan. The possible cause of such fractionation was investigated. Gaseous diffusion, such as (a) free-molecule diffusion, (b) mutual diffusion and (c) thermal diffusion, is able to cause isotopic fractionation. After the detailed consideration on these three diffusion processes, conclusion that free-molecule diffusion occurs only in very particular condition, and it is questionable that thermal diffusion occurs in nature, were obtained. (b) which means the interaction of two or more gases, is supposed to occur in nature, and is able to confirm experimentally. In mutual diffusion only, gas transfer is concerned, but other form of fractionation should not be neglected. In solid diffusion, gas is trapped by fine grained sedimentary rocks, and may be fractionated by adsorption and communication to exterior through minute channels. Underground water also works as noble gas reservoir. For example, when gas stream is in contact with water, continuous exchange is possible to take place at the interface of gas and liquid, which contributes to the fractionation. (Ishimitsu, A.)

  9. Measurements of natural radioactivity in phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannides, K.G.; Mertzimekis, T.J.; Papachristodoulou, C.A.; Tzialla, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    The natural radioactivity, mainly due to radium ( 226 Ra), in phosphate fertilizers used in north-western Greece has been measured by γ-spectroscopy. Also radioactivity measurements were performed in soil samples and were compared to samples from undisturbed soils. 226 Ra belongs to the 238 U chain and is the precursor of radon gas ( 222 Rn). The radon concentrations in warehouses, where large quantities of fertilizers are kept, were measured with CR-39 SSNTDs. The radium concentrations in the fertilizers ranged from 0 to 4584 Bq kg -1 and the radon concentrations in warehouses were measured 540-3320 Bq m -3 . The results are discussed from the radiation protection point of view

  10. Naturally occuring radiation in the Nordic countries - recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In the publication ''Report on the Applicability of International Radiation Protection Recommendations in the Nordic Countries'', published in 1976, the radiation protection authorities in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden expessed their agreement on the main principles of radiation protection. The general aspects of radiation protection were covered in the recommendations with the exception of exposure of the public from natural sources of radiation. In 1983 a working group published the report ''Naturally Occurring radiation in the Nordic Countries, - Levels'' in the Radiation Protection Information-Series from the Nordic countries. In that report the present knowledge of the population exposure from natural sources of external gamma-radiation and from radon and thoron daughters in air was reviewed as a basis for the development of the radiation protection recommendations for natural radiation. During preparation of these recommendations due account has also been taken of ICRP publication no. 39: ''Principles for Limiting Exposure of the Public to Natural Sources of Radiation'', which was published in 1984 and in which ICRP for the first time has issued more specific recommendations for natural sources. The recommendations may serve as a basis for more formal rules and regulations within each country, if this is seemed necessary. However, no attempt has been made to formulate identical rules for all the five countries since the exposure levels from natural sources, methods of application and the legal frameworks differ between the countries. (EG)

  11. An Update on Antitumor Activity of Naturally Occurring Chalcones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Hui Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chalcones, which have characteristic 1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-one skeleton, are mainly produced in roots, rhizomes, heartwood, leaves, and seeds of genera Angelica, Sophora, Glycyrrhiza, Humulus, Scutellaria, Parartocarpus, Ficus, Dorstenia, Morus, Artocarpus, and so forth. They have become of interest in the research and development of natural antitumor agents over the past decades due to their broad range of mechanisms including anti-initiation, induction of apoptosis, antiproliferation, antimetastasis, antiangiogenesis, and so forth. This review summarizes the studies on the antitumor activity of naturally occurring chalcones and their underlying mechanisms in detail during the past decades.

  12. Naturally Occurring Anthraquinones: Chemistry and Therapeutic Potential in Autoimmune Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chang Chien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthraquinones are a class of aromatic compounds with a 9,10-dioxoanthracene core. So far, 79 naturally occurring anthraquinones have been identified which include emodin, physcion, cascarin, catenarin, and rhein. A large body of literature has demonstrated that the naturally occurring anthraquinones possess a broad spectrum of bioactivities, such as cathartic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, diuretic, vasorelaxing, and phytoestrogen activities, suggesting their possible clinical application in many diseases. Despite the advances that have been made in understanding the chemistry and biology of the anthraquinones in recent years, research into their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential in autoimmune disorders is still at an early stage. In this paper, we briefly introduce the etiology of autoimmune diabetes, an autoimmune disorder that affects as many as 10 million worldwide, and the role of chemotaxis in autoimmune diabetes. We then outline the chemical structure and biological properties of the naturally occurring anthraquinones and their derivatives with an emphasis on recent findings about their immune regulation. We discuss the structure and activity relationship, mode of action, and therapeutic potential of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes, including a new strategy for the use of the anthraquinones in autoimmune diabetes.

  13. Leaching Properties of Naturally Occurring Heavy Metals from Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Hoshino, M.; Yoshikawa, M.; Hara, J.; Sugita, H.

    2014-12-01

    The major threats to human health from heavy metals are associated with exposure to arsenic, lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury, as well as some other elements. The effects of such heavy metals on human health have been extensively studied and reviewed by international organizations such as WHO. Due to their toxicity, heavy metal contaminations have been regulated by national environmental standards in many countries, and/or laws such as the Soil Contamination Countermeasures Act in Japan. Leaching of naturally occurring heavy metals from the soils, especially those around abandoned metal mines into surrounding water systems, either groundwater or surface water systems, is one of the major pathways of exposure. Therefore, understanding the leaching properties of toxic heavy metals from naturally polluted soils is of fundamentally importance for effectively managing abandoned metal mines, excavated rocks discharged from infrastructure constructions such as tunneling, and/or selecting a pertinent countermeasure against pollution when it is necessary. In this study, soil samples taken from the surroundings of abandoned metal mines in different regions in Japan were collected and analyzed. The samples contained multiple heavy metals such as lead, arsenic and chromium. Standard leaching test and sequential leaching test considering different forms of contaminants, such as trivalent and pentavalent arsenics, and trivalent and hexavalent chromiums, together with standard test for evaluating total concentration, X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (XRF), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) tests were performed. In addition, sequential leaching tests were performed to evaluate long-term leaching properties of lead from representative samples. This presentation introduces the details of the above experimental study, discusses the relationships among leaching properties and chemical and mineral compositions, indicates the difficulties associated with

  14. Natural and artificial radioactivity in Great Bratislava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanc, J.

    1997-01-01

    The results of the aviation measurement of the gamma-radiation are presented in the form of the maps of iso-lines of the concentration of the natural radioactive elements (potassium, uranium, thorium) and artificial radionuclides (cesium-137, cesium-134). From the obtained dates the maps of dose rate of the gamma-radiation in the air are calculated, of the dose equivalent rate and the map of the fraction of the dose equivalent rate from the natural elements potassium, uranium, thorium. The natural radioactivity of the minerals in the Great Bratislava region, especially for the extreme low values of the contain of the thorium, does not amount the average values of the radioactivity of the Earth crust. The area activity of cesium-137 are in the range 2 - 10 kBq.m -2 and cesium-134 is 1 - 2.5 kBq.m -2 . From the point of view of the summary level of the external irradiation from the Earth surface the measured zone as relative even is evaluated, in the range 10-100 nSv.h -1 . The total average level of the dose rate of the external irradiation of man (inclusively from the cosmic radiation 40-50 nSv.h -1 ) in the conditions of Bratislava is 100 nSv.h -1 . The contribution of external component of the irradiation is 40-100 nSv.h -1 (0.1-0.3 mSv.y -1 ). The dose equivalent commitment of internal component from the cesium-137 is for the all age category of the population under the level negligible risk 0.01 mSv.y -1 [sk

  15. Natural transformation of Campylobacter jejuni occurs beyond limits of growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Brøndsted, Lone; Ligowska, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    of transformation is correlated to the growth conditions, but more importantly that transformation occurs at growth-restrictive conditions as well as in the late stationary phase; hence revealing that growth per se is not required for C. jejuni to be competent. Yet, natural transformation of C. jejuni is an energy......Campylobacter jejuni is a human bacterial pathogen. While poultry is considered to be a major source of food borne campylobacteriosis, C. jejuni is frequently found in the external environment, and water is another well-known source of human infections. Natural transformation is considered...... to be one of the main mechanisms for mediating transfer of genetic material and evolution of the organism. Given the diverse habitats of C. jejuni we set out to examine how environmental conditions and physiological processes affect natural transformation of C. jejuni. We show that the efficiency...

  16. Natural radioactivity levels in soils of Fiji

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garimella, S.; Kumar, A.; Prasad, U.; Jafar, M.

    1998-01-01

    A 10 cm (diameter) x 7.5 cm NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometer with a low background shield has been used to measure the natural radioactivity levels in soils of Viti Levu, the main island of Fiji. From this, the external gamma-dose which is likely to be delivered to the local population in this region is computed and found to be 99 μGy a -1 . This is well below the world average, but it is comparable to that observed in Marshall Islands and the Micronesia

  17. Natural radioactivity levels in soils of Fiji

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garimella, S.; Kumar, A.; Prasad, U.; Jafar, M.

    1998-01-01

    A 10 cm (diameter) x 7.5 cm NaI(TI) gamma-ray spectrometer with a low background shield has been used to measure the natural radioactivity levels in soils of Viti Levu, the main island of Fiji. From this, the external gamma-dose which is likely to be delivered to the local population in this region is computed and found to be 99 microG a -1 . This is well below the world average, but it is comparable to that observed in Marshall Islands and the Micronesia. (author). 17 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Measurements of natural radioactivity inside Dandara temple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.K.; Saied, M.H.; Abbady, A.; El-Kamel, A.H.

    1994-01-01

    The natural radioactivities inside Dandara temple are studied by using a NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer. The variation of these activities with location is investigated. Average values of the identified radionuclides inside the halls, sanctuary and crypt of the temple are examined. It is estimated that the mean value lies in the range 37.9-90.1 for 212 Pb, 70.0-36.0 for 214 Bi, 52.6-76.2 for 228 Ac, 1.6-5.9 for 208 Tl, while for 40 K it is 169.3-286.6. (author)

  19. Measurements of natural radioactivity inside Dandara temple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, N.K.; Saied, M.H.; Abbady, A.; El-Kamel, A.H. [Assiut Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Physics

    1994-07-01

    The natural radioactivities inside Dandara temple are studied by using a NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer. The variation of these activities with location is investigated. Average values of the identified radionuclides inside the halls, sanctuary and crypt of the temple are examined. It is estimated that the mean value lies in the range 37.9-90.1 for {sup 212}Pb, 70.0-36.0 for {sup 214}Bi, 52.6-76.2 for {sup 228} Ac, 1.6-5.9 for {sup 208} Tl, while for {sup 40}K it is 169.3-286.6. (author).

  20. Assessment of Natural Radioactivity in TENORM Samples Using Different Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salman, Kh.A.; Shahein, A.Y.

    2009-01-01

    In petroleum oil industries, technologically-enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive materials are produced. The presence of TENORM constitutes a significant radiological human health hazard. In the present work, liquid scintillation counting technique was used to determine both 222 Rn and 226 Ra concentrations in TENORM samples, by measuring 222 Rn concentrations in the sample at different intervals of time after preparation. The radiation doses from the TENORM samples were estimated using thermoluminenscent detector (TLD-4000). The estimated radiation doses were found to be proportional to both the measured radiation doses in site and natural activity concentration in the samples that measured with LSC

  1. The transport of radioactive matters. Situation of transport events occurred in France from 1999 to 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This report presents transport events involving radioactive material, occurred on French territory from 1999 to 2007, listed in the I.R.S.N. database. 901 events have been recorded. For each of them, about 70 parameters have been collected from the analysis of the notifications and reports of the events (type of event, type of package, level on the INES scale). This synthesis informs about the annual evolution of transport events involving radioactive material and about their seriousness level. It also presents a short description of the incidents with radiological aspect and of the main events occurred in 2007. Then, an analysis of the most frequent types of events from 1999 to 2007 and of their evolution tendencies is presented. It gives a view of the elements that could be deduced from this feedback, in order to improve the safety of the radioactive material transports. (authors)

  2. Determination of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil samples of Ayranci, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agar, Osman; Eke, Canel; Boztosun, Ismail; Emin Korkmaz, M.

    2015-04-01

    The specific activity, radiation hazard index and the annual effective dose of the naturally occurring radioactive elements (238U, 232Th and 40K) were determined in soil samples collected from 12 different locations in Ayranci region by using a NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometer. The measured activity concentrations of the natural radionuclides in studied soil samples were compared with the corresponding results of different countries and the internationally reported values. From the analysis, it is found that these materials may be safely used as construction materials and do not pose significant radiation hazards.

  3. Reference Material IAEA 434: Naturally Occurring Radionuclides in Phosphogypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Phosphogypsum is generated as a by-product of the phosphoric acid based fertilizer industry. The discharge of phosphogypsum on earth surface deposits is a potential source of enhanced natural radiation and heavy metals, and the resulting environmental impact should be considered carefully to ensure safety and compliance with environmental regulations. In addition, phosphogypsum can be used to make several building materials and it is used in agriculture as a conditioner to maintain soil productivity in areas where soils are poor and erode easily. A reliable determination of naturally occurring radionuclides in phosphogypsum is necessary to comply with the radiation protection and environmental regulations. The IAEA-434 will assist laboratories in the IAEA Member States in validating their analytical methods for the determination of naturally occurring radionuclides in phosphogypsum and to control the quality of the produced analytical results. Reference values for the massic activities and associated standard uncertainties were established for: Pb-210, Ra-226, Th-230, U-234 and U-238. During sample production and certification, the requirements for reference material production and certification as stated in ISO guides 34 and 35 were taken into account. This report summarizes the preparation and certification process

  4. Complexes of actinides with naturally occuring organic substances - Literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olofsson, U.; Allard, B.

    1983-02-01

    Properties of naturally occurring humic and fulvic acids and their formation of actinide complexes are reviewed. Actinides in all the oxdation states III, IV, V and VI would form complexes with many humic and fulvic acids, comparable in strength to the hydroxide and carbonate complexes. Preliminary experiments have shown, that the presence of predominantly humic acid complexes would significantly reduce the sorption of americium on geologic media. This does not, however, necessarily lead to a potentially enhanced mobility under environmental conditions, since humic and fulvic acids carrying trace metals also would be strongly bound to e.g. clayish material. (author)

  5. Immunomodulatory effects in workers exposed to naturally occurring asbestos fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledda, Caterina; Costa, Chiara; Matera, Serena; Puglisi, Beatrice; Costanzo, Valentina; Bracci, Massimo; Fenga, Concettina; Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla

    2017-05-01

    Natural asbestiform fibers are defined 'naturally occurring asbestos' (NOA) and refer to the mineral as a natural component of soils or rocks. The release of NOA fibers into the air from rocks or soils by routine human activities or natural weathering processes represents a risk for human beings. Fluoro-edenite (FE) is a NOA fiber detected in the benmoreitic lava in the area of Biancavilla, South-west slope of Mt. Etna. The aim of the present study was to investigate FE immunotoxicity pathways in a group of 38 occupationally exposed construction workers, in order to find any biological markers of its effect. Subjects underwent respiratory function tests and HRCT total chest scanning. Serum IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α were measured. The presence of PPs was significantly greater in subjects exposed than in the control (25 vs. 2). In subjects exposed to FE, IL-1β and TNF-α values were significantly higher than the controls. The previously observed increase of IL-1β and IL-18 showed a probable involvement of the proteic complex defined inflammosome by FE fibers.

  6. Naturally occurring radionuclides in agricultural products: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    Low levels of naturally occurring radionuclides exist in phosphatic clays, a by-product of phosphatic mining and beneficiation processes. Concerns about these radionuclides entering the human food chain were an immediate research priority before the phosphate clays could be reclaimed for intensive agricultural purposes. Efforts included the assembly of a large body of data from both sons and plants, part of which were produced by the Polk County (Florida) Mined Lands Agricultural Research/Demonstration Project MLAR/DP. Additional detailed studies involving dairy and beef cattle (Bos taurus) were conducted by researchers working with the MLAR/DP. A national symposium was conducted in which data concerning the MLAR/DP work and other research projects also dealing with naturally occurring radionuclides in agriculture could be discussed. The symposium included invited review papers dealing with the identification of radionuclide geological origins, the geochemistry and movement of radionuclides within the environment, mechanisms of plant uptake, entry points into the food chain, and evaluation of dose and risk assessment to the consumer of low levels of radionuclides. The risk to human health of an individual obtaining 0.1 of his or her dietary intake from crops produced on phosphatic clays increased by 1 in 5 x 10 6 /yr above a control individual consuming no food grown on phosphatic clays. Leaf tissues were found to be generally higher than fruit, grain, or root tissues. The natural range in radionuclide content among various food types was greater than the difference in radionuclides content between the same food produced on phosphatic clays vs. natural soils. 19 refs

  7. Natural and artificial radioactivity in the area of the Mochovce regional radioactive waste store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezak, J.; Daniel, J.; Moravek, J.

    2000-01-01

    The results of monitoring of natural and artificial radioactivity in the area of the Mochovce regional radioactive waste store before commission are presented. The concentrations of uranium, thorium, potassium, and cesium, as well as radon volume activity were measured

  8. Interaction between manufactured gold nanoparticles and naturally occurring organic macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diegoli, Sara; Manciulea, Adriana L.; Begum, Shakiela; Jones, Ian P.; Lead, Jamie R.; Preece, Jon A.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing exploitation of nanomaterials into many consumer and other products is raising concerns as these nanomaterials are likely to be released into the environment. Due to our lack of knowledge about the environmental chemistry, transport and ecotoxicology of nanomaterials, it is of paramount importance to study how natural aquatic colloids can interact with manufactured gold nanoparticles as these interactions will determine their environmental fate and behaviour. In this context, our work aims to quantify the effect of naturally occurring riverine macromolecules - International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) Suwannee River Humic Acid Standard (SRHA) - on citrate- and acrylate-stabilized gold nanoparticles. The influence of SRHA on the stability of the gold colloids was studied as a function of pH by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). At high ionic strengths (0.1 M), extensive and rapid aggregation occurred, while more subtle effects were observed at lower ionic strength values. Evidence was found that SRHA enhances particle stability at extreme pH values (ionic strength < 0.01 M) by substituting and/or over-coating the original stabilizer on the gold nanoparticle surface, thus affecting surface charge and chemistry. These findings have important implications for the fate and behaviour of nanoparticles in the environment and their ecotoxicity

  9. Daily intakes of naturally occurring radioisotopes in typical Korean foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Min-Seok; Lin Xiujing; Lee, Sun Ah; Kim, Wan; Kang, Hee-Dong; Doh, Sih-Hong; Kim, Do-Sung; Lee, Dong-Myung

    2008-01-01

    The concentrations of naturally occurring radioisotopes ( 232 Th, 228 Th, 230 Th, 228 Ra, 226 Ra, and 40 K) in typical Korean foods were evaluated. The daily intakes of these radioisotopes were calculated by comparing concentrations in typical Korean foods and the daily consumption rates of these foods. Daily intakes were as follows: 232 Th, 0.00-0.23; 228 Th, 0.00-2.04; 230 Th, 0.00-0.26; 228 Ra, 0.02-2.73; 226 Ra, 0.01-4.37 mBq/day; and 40 K, 0.01-5.71 Bq/day. The total daily intake of the naturally occurring radioisotopes measured in this study from food was 39.46 Bq/day. The total annual internal dose resulting from ingestion of radioisotopes in food was 109.83 μSv/y, and the radioisotope with the highest daily intake was 40 K. These values were same level compiled in other countries

  10. Natural radioactivity in building materials in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdizadeh, S.; Faghihi, R.; Sina, S.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a comprehensive study of natural radioactivity in building materials used in Iran. For this purpose, 177 samples of five types of building material, i.e. cement, gypsum, cement blocks, gravel and brick, were gathered from different regions of the country and analyzed by gamma spectroscopy to quantify radioactivity concentrations using a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector and a spectroscopy system. According to the results of this investigation, cement samples had maximum values of the mean Ra-226 and Th-232 concentrations, 39.6 and 28.9 Bq/kg, respectively, while the lowest value for mean concentration of these two radionuclides were found in gypsum samples 8.1 and 2.2 Bq/kg, respectively. The highest (851.4 Bq/kg) and lowest (116.2 Bq/kg) value of K-40 mean concentration were found in brick and gypsum samples, respectively. The absorbed dose rate and the annual effective dose were also calculated from the radioactivity content of the radionuclides. The results show that the maximum values of dose rate and annual effective dose equivalent were 53.72 nGy/h and 0.37 mSv/y in brick samples. The radium equivalent activities R eq calculated were below the permissible level of 370 Bq/kg for all building materials. The values of hazard indexes were below the recommended levels, therefore, it is concluded that the buildings constructed from such materials are safe for the inhabitants. The results of this study are consistent with the results of other investigations in different parts of the world. (authors)

  11. Altered dopamine signaling in naturally occurring maternal neglect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Gammie

    2008-04-01

    occurring neglect and that MaD1 mice are a useful model for understanding the basis of naturally occurring neglect.

  12. Naturally occurring dominant drug resistance mutations occur infrequently in the setting of recently acquired hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Tanya L; Gaudieri, Silvana; Plauzolles, Anne; Chopra, Abha; Grebely, Jason; Lucas, Michaela; Hellard, Margaret; Luciani, Fabio; Dore, Gregory J; Matthews, Gail V

    2015-01-01

    Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) are predicted to transform hepatitis C therapy, yet little is known about the prevalence of naturally occurring resistance mutations in recently acquired HCV. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and frequency of drug resistance mutations in the viral quasispecies among HIV-positive and -negative individuals with recent HCV. The NS3 protease, NS5A and NS5B polymerase genes were amplified from 50 genotype 1a participants of the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C. Amino acid variations at sites known to be associated with possible drug resistance were analysed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing. A total of 12% of individuals harboured dominant resistance mutations, while 36% demonstrated non-dominant resistant variants below that detectable by bulk sequencing (that is, Resistance variants (resistance from all classes, with the exception of sofosbuvir. Dominant resistant mutations were uncommonly observed in the setting of recent HCV. However, low-level mutations to all DAA classes were observed by deep sequencing at the majority of sites and in most individuals. The significance of these variants and impact on future treatment options remains to be determined. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00192569.

  13. Natural radioactivity of building materials used in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, M. [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Kajang, Selangor D.E. (Malaysia)

    2002-03-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the natural radioactive content of building materials used in Malaysia. The materials analysed include both old and new clay bricks, cement bricks, mortar, cement, sands, ceramic tiles and gypsum. Samples of the first three materials were collected from the 12 states of the Malay Peninsula. Radium-226 (from the U-238 series) and Ra-228 (from the Th-232 series), these both representing naturally occurring radionuclides, were analysed using high-resolution HpGe gamma spectrometers. The results of our investigations showed that some old clay bricks contain high levels (at more than 5 times the normal soil concentration) of natural radionuclides, with maximum concentrations of 590 Bq/kg and 480 Bq/kg for respectively Ra-226 and Ra-228. The reasons behind this finding were not clearly understood. As there are people living in old buildings, i.e. built using old clay bricks, there is a possibility that they are being exposed to significant radiation doses. However, there proved to be no significant overall difference between old and new clay bricks in terms of the natural radioactivity levels determined, at a 95% confidence level. The overall mean concentrations of Ra-226 and Ra-228 observed in Malaysian clay bricks were respectively 118 {+-} 58 Bq/kg and 120 {+-} 42 Bq/kg. The radioactive content of other materials was found to be not much different from that to be determined in normal soil from Malaysia. The data obtained can be used as a basis for reaching decisions on the regulatory limits for radioactivity levels in building materials in Malaysia. (orig.)

  14. Germanium detectors and natural radioactivity in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbini, Lucia [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GeDet-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Potassium is a very important mineral for many physiological processes, like fluid balance, protein synthesis and signal transmission in nerves. Many aliments like raisins, bananas or chocolate contain potassium. Natural potassium contains 0.012% of the radioactive isotope Potassium 40. This isotope decays via β{sup +} decay into a metastable state of Argon 40, which reaches its ground state emitting a gamma of 1460 keV. A commercially produced Germanium detector has been used to measure the energy spectra of different selected food samples. It was calibrated with KCl and potassium contents were extracted. Results verify the high potassium content of commonly recommended food samples. However, the measurement quantitatively differ from the expectations in several cases. One of the most interesting results concerns chocolate bars with different percentages of cacao.

  15. Environmental natural radioactivity concentrations of Tekirdag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarar, Y.; Kam, E.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In this study, the environmental natural radioactivity concentrations of Tekirdag, a city in the region of Marmara in Turkey, have been measured. Gamma spectrometric analysis of the soil samples collected from 40 points of Tekirdag was performed by using an HPGe detector and the radionuclide concentrations of the decay products of 238 U and 232 Th series, 40K and 137 Cs were determined. Gross alpha and gross beta activities of the water samples taken from municipal supplies, springs, wells and fountains were performed by using the Berthold, LB770-PC 10, a gas-flow proportional counter. Gamma exposure dose rates were measured by using an Eberline Smart Portable scintillation detector and the annual effective dose equivalents caused by exposure gamma dose rates were calculated

  16. Radiological Assessments and Enhanced Natural Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.; Vanmaercke, H.; Paridaens, K.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the research in the field of the environmental impact assessment models performed the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to elaborate and to improve methods and guidelines for the evaluation of restoration options for contaminated sites; (2) to develop, test and improve biosphere models for the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal in near-surface or geological repositories; (3) to asses the impact of releases from nuclear or industrial installations; (4) to apply new techniques for retrospective radon measurements and to assess radon decay product exposure by combining these techniques; and (5) to increase capabilities in mapping and surveying sites possibly or likely contaminated with enhanced levels of natural radiation. Main achievements in these areas for 2000 are summarised

  17. Determination of naturally occurring radionuclides in El-Sin Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.S.; Al-Rayyes, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides levels have been determined in El-Sin water for the period of 1995 and 1996. water samples were collected from four sites, which are the main drinking water sources of the area. Radon concentration was found to vary between 0.88 Bq/1 in Lattakia main water supply site and 8.4 Bq/1 in El-Sin springs.The highest values found for other radionuclides were 51.6 mBq/1, 18.6 mB/1 and 24.8 mBq/1 for sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra, sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po and total uranium (sup 2 sup 3 sup 4 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U) respectively. These levels are much lower than the maximum permissible levels in drinking water set by international organization.(author)

  18. Modification of radiation damage by naturally occurring substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, K.N.

    1984-01-01

    The major objectives of studying the modification of radiation sensitivity have been (1) to identify a compound that will produce a differential protection or sensitization of the effect of irradiation on normal and tumor tissue, and (2) to understand more about the mechanisms of radiation damage. In spite of massive research on this particular problem since World War II, the first objective remains elusive. During this period, numerous radioprotective and radiosensitizing agents have been identified. These agents have served as important biologic tools for increasing our understanding of radiation injuries. Most of these substances are synthetic compounds and are very toxic to humans. In addition, very few of the compounds provide differential modifications of the effect of radiation on tumor and normal cells. This chapter presents objectives for identifying naturally occurring substances that modify the effect of x-radiation on mammalian cells and discusses the role of physiologic substances in modifying radiation injuries on mammalian normal and tumor cells

  19. Epigenetic variation in mangrove plants occurring in contrasting natural environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Fonseca Lira-Medeiros

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation, are inherited in plant species and may occur in response to biotic or abiotic stress, affecting gene expression without changing genome sequence. Laguncularia racemosa, a mangrove species, occurs in naturally contrasting habitats where it is subjected daily to salinity and nutrient variations leading to morphological differences. This work aims at unraveling how CpG-methylation variation is distributed among individuals from two nearby habitats, at a riverside (RS or near a salt marsh (SM, with different environmental pressures and how this variation is correlated with the observed morphological variation.Significant differences were observed in morphological traits such as tree height, tree diameter, leaf width and leaf area between plants from RS and SM locations, resulting in smaller plants and smaller leaf size in SM plants. Methyl-Sensitive Amplified Polymorphism (MSAP was used to assess genetic and epigenetic (CpG-methylation variation in L. racemosa genomes from these populations. SM plants were hypomethylated (14.6% of loci had methylated samples in comparison to RS (32.1% of loci had methylated samples. Within-population diversity was significantly greater for epigenetic than genetic data in both locations, but SM also had less epigenetic diversity than RS. Frequency-based (G(ST and multivariate (beta(ST methods that estimate population structure showed significantly greater differentiation among locations for epigenetic than genetic data. Co-Inertia analysis, exploring jointly the genetic and epigenetic data, showed that individuals with similar genetic profiles presented divergent epigenetic profiles that were characteristic of the population in a particular environment, suggesting that CpG-methylation changes may be associated with environmental heterogeneity.In spite of significant morphological dissimilarities, individuals of L. racemosa from salt marsh and riverside presented

  20. Safe Management of natural Occurring radionuclides Materials (NORM) from Petroleum Industry in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hussany, B.S.

    2015-01-01

    The isolation of radioactive waste from the environment becomes a real problem need to solve in the last half century. Waste management system is created for safe isolation of the waste. Radioactive waste management including all activities, administrative and operational, That are involved in the handling, conditioning, transport, storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. In petroleum and gas industries there are many wastes containing natural occurring radioactive waste (NORM). The concentration of NORM is increased during the different processes. Accumulation of NORM in these areas makes hazard effects on the workers and on the environment. In Egypt, there are many oil and gas industries in different areas of the republic. Most of these exploration sites containing large amounts of NORM waste. The management of this waste is remained unclear for many companies. Some companies have storage designs for the waste. Others are stored the waste on the working site on land without barriers. Additionally final destination of these wastes is not decided. The improper management of this waste lead to hazard effects to workers in the present time and to public in the future. The present work studies the NORM waste management, from petroleum industry, in Egypt. Strategy of NORM is proposed. NORM waste management steps (system) is also proposed, Incineration and deoiling processes for the treatment of NORM waste are compered. Also in this study, human intrusion scenarios were studied for two NORM storage designs, A) above-ground and B) under-ground bunkers

  1. Areas with increased natural radioactivity. Pt. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soman, S.D.; Nambi, K.S.V.

    1990-03-01

    When studying possible health effects of environmental radioactivity to man, areas of high natural radiation background are especially valuable. The classical and most investigated areas with this respect in the world are the monazite sand regions on the beaches of the States of Kerala and Tamil Nadu in South-India. Indian scientists from the Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC) have investigated possible health effects to man by the high natural background radiation in this area since about thirty years. As a remarkable result of the epidemiological studies, no significant genetical radiation damage effects within a collective of about seventythousand investigated persons could be observed. When studying lung cancer risks as a function of natural radiation exposure in the region of relatively low doses, the central problem is, how to extrapolate from the high doses of uranium miners to zero doses. Since the relative number of lung cancer is too small and does not exceed the statistical noise level, no significant experimental approval could be made until today. Therefore, one has to rely mainly on three different hypothesis, among which one cannot make an experimental decision at the moment. Hypothesis I (linear extrapolation) is the most pessimistic one, which denies the existence of repair mechanisms. Hypethesis II (threshold behaviour) is more realistic and considers repair mechanisms. Hypothesis III (hormesis effect) assumes positive health effects at lower radiation doses because of the proved existence of repair mechanisms in the living human cell and their stimulation by irradiation. In possible agreement with hypothesis III, within the last few years several authors in different areas of the world with higher natural radiation background have observed a significant decrease of lung cancer risk with increasing natural radiation background. The authors of this report are demonstrating this behaviour for India with their sets of data. (orig./MG)

  2. Naturally occurring Vpr inhibitors from medicinal plants of Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Nwet Nwet; Ngwe, Hla; Abe, Ikuro; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) is a lentiviral family member that encodes the retroviral Gag, Pol, and Env proteins, along with six additional accessory proteins, Tat, Rev, Vpu, Vif, Nef, and Vpr. The currently approved anti-HIV drugs target the Pol and Env encoded proteins. However, these drugs are only effective in reducing viral replication. Furthermore, the drugs' toxicities and the emergence of drug-resistant strains have become serious worldwide problems. Resistance eventually arises to all of the approved anti-HIV drugs, including the newly approved drugs that target HIV integrase (IN). Drug resistance likely emerges because of spontaneous mutations that occur during viral replication. Therefore, new drugs that effectively block other viral components must be developed to reduce the rate of resistance and suppress viral replication with little or no long-term toxicity. The accessory proteins may expand treatment options. Viral protein R (Vpr) is one of the promising drug targets among the HIV accessory proteins. However, the search for inhibitors continues in anti-HIV drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the naturally occurring compounds discovered from two Myanmar medicinal plants as well as their structure-activity relationships. A total of 49 secondary metabolites were isolated from Kaempferia pulchra rhizomes and Picrasama javanica bark, and the types of compounds were identified as isopimarane diterpenoids and picrasane quassinoids, respectively. Among the isolates, 7 diterpenoids and 15 quassinoids were found to be Vpr inhibitors lacking detectable toxicity, and their potencies varied according to their respective functionalities.

  3. Status of transport events involving radioactive materials which occurred in France between 1999 and 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report presents transport events involving radioactive materials, occurred on French territory from 1999 to 2011, listed in the IRSN's database. 1,304 events have been recorded. For each of them, many parameters have been collected and analysed from information listed in the notifications and reports of the events sent by users (type of event, purpose, package design, level on the INES scale...). The numbers of events notified in 2010 and 2011 are slightly higher than the average of 100 events per year. The two main causes of notification concern documentation errors (in transport documents or labeling) and handling mishaps. The downward trend of frequency of package or conveyance contaminations has been confirmed. A short description of the outstanding events occurred in 2010 and 2011 is proposed. This synthesis also gives an outline of the actions recommended by IRSN to avoid recurrence of the notified events and improve the safety of the transports of radioactive materials

  4. Automation of a gamma spectrometric analysis method for naturally occuring radionuclides in different materials (NORM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzocchi, Olaf

    2009-06-01

    This work presents an improvement over the standard analysis routine used in the Physikalisches Messlabor to detect gamma peaks in spectra from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). The new routine introduces the use of custom libraries of known gamma peaks, in order to ease the work of the software than can therefore detect more peaks. As final result, the user performing the analysis has less chances of making errors and can also analyse more spectra in the same amount of time. A new software, with an optimised interface able to further enhance the productivity of the user, is developed and validated. (orig.)

  5. Radiochemical techniques for determining some naturally occurring radionuclides in marine environmental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C W [Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Lowestoft (UK). Fisheries Lab.

    1984-06-15

    The determination of some of the naturally-occurring, alpha-emitting radionuclides in marine environmental materials, is of interest for several reasons. Radium and radon nuclides are potentially useful as oceanographic tracers. Lead and thorium nuclides may be used to study sedimentation rates, mixing processes and bioturbation in sediments. Radium and polonium nuclides are incorporated into food chains and the data may provide a perspective against which to assess the significance, for marine organisms, of exposure to radiation in a marine radioactive waste disposal situation. This paper discusses the manner in which samples are taken, and the radiochemical methods which have been employed to measure the nuclides, together with some data produced.

  6. Monitoring of increased natural occuring radiation exposure; Arbeitsplatzueberwachung bei erhoehter natuerlicher Strahlenexposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guhr, Andreas [ALTRAC Radon-Messtechnik, Berlin (Germany); Leissring, Nick [Bergtechnisches Ingenieurbuero GEOPRAX, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The radiation exposure due to natural occurring sources is a special challenge for the health and safety protection at workplaces. The monitoring of the radon exposure of employees in mines, radon-spa and in water works is regulated by prescription of radiation protection. The relevant compounds of the radiation exposure are the inhalation of radon and radon daughter products; terrestrial irradiation; ingestion of radioactive contaminated materials and the inhalation of contaminated dust. The monitoring of the radiation workers is realized essentially by measurements by radiation safety officer of the performing company, by an external engineering firm as well as by control measurements of experts of local authorities. The experiences in the practice have shown that in the field of operational radiation protection only a combination of personal- and operational dosimetry is suitable to avoid health hazards by work in fields with increased natural occurring radiation exposures.

  7. Naturally Occurring Radionuclides in Pottery, Ceramic and Glasswares Produced in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, M.I.; Reaz, Rafia; Kamal, M.; Alam, M.N.; Mustafa, M.N.

    2005-01-01

    The concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides were measured using gamma spectrometry in the finished products of pottery, glass, ceramic and tiles. Ceramic and pottery utensils, tiles, basin and glassware contained naturally occurring radionuclides. Pottery is produced from local clay materials, but ceramic, tiles, basin and glassware's are made from both local and imported raw materials. Radium and thorium radionuclides are concentrated during the making of pottery from the clay materials due to calcination. Radionuclides concentrated more in the highly calcined pottery products than the low calcined products. Glassware products contained very low quantities of radionuclides comparing with the ceramic and pottery products. Study on radioactivity in the pottery, ceramic and glassware products is important in the assessment of possible radiological hazards to human health. The knowledge is essential for the development of standards and guidelines for the use and management of these materials. (author)

  8. Natural environmental radioactivity and radon gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowder, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    In recent decades, much has been learned about the nature and sources of human exposure to naturally-occurring radiation and radionuclides. A brief historical perspective is given on this growth of knowledge, and recent assessments of the contributions of the various sources to human population radiation exposure are discussed. This provides the context for a consideration of the significance of exposure to airborne radon decay products for the global population and of future exposure of an increasing number of space travelers to cosmic radiation. (author). 13 refs, 4 tabs

  9. Naturally occurring radionuclides in pasture soil, feed ingredients and milk of dairy cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turtiainen, T.; Kostiainen, E.; Solatie, D. [STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)

    2014-07-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides are generally considered being respective part of the environment and hence no statutory monitoring of their levels are required in food products. Therefore, limited data are available on the naturally occurring radionuclides in food. Dairy products constitute a significant portion of Finnish diet (400-500 g/d) and hence it is reasonable to study radionuclide levels in milk in more detail. Contrary to caesium, strontium and iodine, few transfer coefficients are available in the literature for naturally occurring radionuclide transfer to cow's milk. The renaissance of mining industry in Finland has raised a question among the public about the baseline values of naturally occurring radionuclides in Finnish agricultural products. The objective of this study was to investigate naturally occurring radionuclides in the components of dairy cattle diet and milk and calculate their transfer to milk. This information is needed for regulating the permitted discharges to the environment and for setting up monitoring programs if any unplanned discharges are released. In modern dairy farming, cattle are fed a precise diet in order to maximize milk production and quality and to achieve cost-effectiveness. Therefore, several different components are found in dairy cattle's diet and pasture grass concentrations are not sufficient for calculating radionuclide transfer to cow's milk. In this study, we carried out comprehensive sampling at four dairy farms each representing different areas of natural radiation background. The pasture soils were characterized and measured for natural radioactivity. Samples were taken from cattle's total diet (including e.g. pasture grass, water, silage, mineral forage) and milk. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  10. Technologically enhanced natural radioactivity around the coal fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, J.; Marovic, G.

    1997-01-01

    In some situations the exposure to natural radiation sources is enhanced as a result to technological developments. Burning of coal is one source of enhanced radiation exposure to naturally occurring elements, particularly radium, thorium and uranium. Most of the radioactive substances are concentrated in the ash and slag, which are heavy and drop to the bottom of a furnace. Lighter fly ash is carried up the chimney and into the atmosphere. The bottom ash and slag are usually deposited in a waste pile, from where some activity may leach into aquifers or be dispersed by wind.The main pathways through which the populations living around coal fired power plants are exposed to enhanced levels of natural radionuclides are inhalation and ingestion of the activity discharged into the Exosphere. For this reason, extensive investigations have been under way for several years in the coal fired power plant in Croatia, which uses an anthracite coal with a higher than usual uranium content. (authors)

  11. Naturally occurring mastitis disrupts developmental competence of bovine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Z; Dvir, A; Kalo, D; Lavon, Y; Krifucks, O; Wolfenson, D; Leitner, G

    2013-10-01

    We examined the effects of naturally occurring mastitis on bovine oocyte developmental competence in vitro. Specifically, we investigated the effects of intramammary infection on the ovarian pool of oocytes (i.e., follicle-enclosed oocytes) and their ability to undergo in vitro maturation, fertilization, and further development to the blastocyst stage. Culled Holstein cows (n=50) from 9 commercial dairy farms in Israel were allotted to 3 groups according to somatic cell count (SCC) records of the last 3 monthly milk tests as well as of quarter samples collected before slaughter: (1) low SCC (n=7), (2) medium SCC (n=16), or (3) high SCC (n=27). Means of SCC values differed among low-, medium-, and high-SCC groups: 148,000, 311,000 and 1,813,000 cell/mL milk, respectively. Milk yield and days in milk did not differ among the 3 groups. Bacterial isolates included coagulase-negative staphylococci, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, or no bacteria found. Ovaries were collected at the abattoir and brought to the laboratory. Cumulus oocyte complexes were recovered separately from each cow and subjected individually to in vitro maturation and fertilization, followed by 8d in culture. The number of aspirated oocytes did not differ among groups, with a range of 17 to 21 oocytes per cow. The proportion of oocytes that cleaved into 2- to 4-cell-stage embryos (86.1 ± 3.4%) did not differ among groups. In contrast, mean percentages of embryos developed to the blastocyst stage on d 7 and 8 after fertilization were less in both medium- and-high SCC groups than in the low-SCC group (5.6 ± 2.3 and 4.1 ± 1.8 vs. 18.1 ± 4.6%, respectively). Additional analysis indicated that cleavage and blastocyst-formation rates did not differ among the bacterial types in the low-, medium-, and high-SCC groups. These are the first results to demonstrate that naturally occurring mastitis disrupts the developmental competence of the ovarian pool of oocytes, (i.e., oocytes at the

  12. Intravenous Topiramate: Pharmacokinetics in Dogs with Naturally-Occurring Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Vuu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Barriers to developing treatments for human status epilepticus (SE include the inadequacy of experimental animal models. In contrast, naturally-occurring canine epilepsy is similar to the human condition and can serve as a platform to translate research from rodents to humans. The objectives of this study were to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK of an intravenous (IV dose of topiramate (TPM in dogs with epilepsy, and evaluate its effect on intracranial electroencephalographic (iEEG features. Five dogs with naturally occurring epilepsy were used for this study. Three were getting at least one antiseizure drug as maintenance therapy including phenobarbital (PB. Four (ID 1-4 were used for the 10 mg/kg IV TPM + PO TPM study, and three (ID 3-5 were used for the 20 mg/kg IV TPM study. IV TPM was infused over 5 minutes at both doses. The animals were observed for vomiting, diarrhea, ataxia, and lethargy. Blood samples were collected at scheduled pre- and post-dose times. Plasma concentrations were measured using a validated HPLC-MS method. Non-compartmental and population compartmental modeling were performed (Phoenix WinNonLin and NLME using plasma concentrations from all dogs in the study. Intracranial EEG (iEEG was acquired in one dog. The difference between averaged iEEG energy levels at 15 minutes pre- and post-dose was assessed using a Kruskal-Wallis test. No adverse events were noted. Topiramate concentration-time profiles were best fit by a two-compartment model. PB co-administration was associated with a 5.6 fold greater clearance and a ~4 fold shorter elimination half-life. iEEG data showed that TPM produced a significant energy increase at frequencies >4 Hz across all 16 electrodes within 15 minutes of dosing. Simulations suggested that dogs on an enzyme inducer would require 25 mg/kg, while dogs on non-inducing drugs would need 20 mg/kg to attain the target concentration (20-30 µg/mL at 30-minutes post-dose.This study shows that IV

  13. Naturally occurring minichromosome platforms in chromosome engineering: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Artificially modified chromosome vectors are non-integrating gene delivery platforms that can shuttle very large DNA fragments in various recipient cells: theoretically, no size limit exists for the chromosome segments that an engineered minichromosome can accommodate. Therefore, genetically manipulated chromosomes might be potentially ideal vector systems, especially when the complexity of higher eukaryotic genes is concerned. This review focuses on those chromosome vectors generated using spontaneously occurring small markers as starting material. The definition and manipulation of the centromere domain is one of the main obstacles in chromosome engineering: naturally occurring minichromosomes, due to their inherent small size, were helpful in defining some aspects of centromere function. In addition, several distinctive features of small marker chromosomes, like their appearance as supernumerary elements in otherwise normal karyotypes, have been successfully exploited to use them as gene delivery vectors. The key technologies employed for minichromosome engineering are: size reduction, gene targeting, and vector delivery in various recipient cells. In spite of the significant advances that have been recently achieved in all these fields, several unsolved problems limit the potential of artificially modified chromosomes. Still, these vector systems have been exploited in a number of applications where the investigation of the controlled expression of large DNA segments is needed. A typical example is the analysis of genes whose expression strictly depends on the chromosomal environment in which they are positioned, where engineered chromosomes can be envisaged as epigenetically regulated expression systems. A novel and exciting advance concerns the use of engineered minichromosomes to study the organization and dynamics of local chromatin structures.

  14. Canine osteosarcoma: a naturally occurring disease to inform pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenger, Joelle M; London, Cheryl A; Kisseberth, William C

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common form of malignant bone cancer in children and dogs, although the disease occurs in dogs approximately 10 times more frequently than in people. Multidrug chemotherapy and aggressive surgical techniques have improved survival; however, new therapies for OSA are critical, as little improvement in survival times has been achieved in either dogs or people over the past 15 years, even with significant efforts directed at the incorporation of novel therapeutic approaches. Both clinical and molecular evidence suggests that human and canine OSA share many key features, including tumor location, presence of microscopic metastatic disease at diagnosis, development of chemotherapy-resistant metastases, and altered expression/activation of several proteins (e.g. Met, ezrin, phosphatase and tensin homolog, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3), and p53 mutations, among others. Additionally, canine and pediatric OSA exhibit overlapping transcriptional profiles and shared DNA copy number aberrations, supporting the notion that these diseases are similar at the molecular level. This review will discuss the similarities between pediatric and canine OSA with regard to histology, biologic behavior, and molecular genetic alterations that indicate canine OSA is a relevant, spontaneous, large animal model of the pediatric disease and outline how the study of naturally occurring OSA in dogs will offer additional insights into the biology and future treatment of this disease in both children and dogs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Public Health Goal for Naturally Occurring Radionuclides in Groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamel, N.H.M.; Omar, H.A.; El-Baset, L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Naturally occurring and man-made radionuclide in groundwater may have a health hazardous to some residents. The objective of this work is to provide criteria for safety of drinking-water with respect to the chemical parameters and the radionuclide content. The annual effective dose for the consumption of drinking water was considered. Ground water samples were selected from different sites in Egypt, that have the most population, it were taken from aquifer regions along Giza sites in Egypt. Chemical analyses for the major anions, cations, and the radiological analyses were tested . Activity concentrations (Bq/l) of the gross alpha and the gross beta activities of our investigated samples were compared with the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of the world health organization (WHO). Some of the water samples were found to have a higher of gross beta and alpha particles than the MCL. Alpha activity were found depending on to the total dissolved solids (TDS) content of the water samples. Gamma activity concentrations were analyzed using low background germanium detector, the higher of activity values was found in some investigated samples is due to increasing of 226 Ra and 228 Ra activities. Tritium activity concentrations also were measured using soft beta liquid scintillation counter, it was found lower than the MCL. Our investigated samples were found to have a higher concentrations of the phosphate, nitrites, iron, and manganese contents than the maximum permissible limit, all the ground water samples were found to have a higher of silica and alumina content. Commercial carbon powder and natural clay materials were tested as ion exchangers for the removal of inorganic contaminants in the ground water samples. Clay materials was found to have a higher selectivity than activated carbon for the removal of radionuclides, phosphates, nitrites, and manganese content at the ground water samples

  16. Principle of natural and artificial radioactive series equivalency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyeva, A.N.; Starkov, O.V.

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper one approach used under development of radioactive waste management conception is under consideration. This approach is based on the principle of natural and artificial radioactive series radiotoxic equivalency. The radioactivity of natural and artificial radioactive series has been calculated for 10 9 - years period. The toxicity evaluation for natural and artificial series has also been made. The correlation between natural radioactive series and their predecessors - actinides produced in thermal and fast reactors - has been considered. It has been shown that systematized reactor series data had great scientific significance and the principle of differential calculation of radiotoxicity was necessary to realize long-lived radioactive waste and uranium and thorium ore radiotoxicity equivalency conception. The calculations show that the execution of equivalency principle is possible for uranium series (4n+2, 4n+1). It is a problem for thorium. series. This principle is impracticable for neptunium series. (author)

  17. GROWTH OF NATURALLY OCCURING Listeria innocua IN COPPA DI TESTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Merialdi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Coppa di testa is a traditional cooked pork salami produced in different Italian regions. The main raw material is deboned meat of pork head with the addition of tongue and rind. After a long (3-5 h high temperature (97°C cooking, additives and flavourings are added and the salami is prepared. After cooling the salami is often portioned and vacuum- packaged. In this study the growth of naturally occurring contamination of Listeria innocua in three batches of vacuum packaged Coppa di testa, stored at 4°C for 80 days, is described. The average max was 0.24 (days-1 and the average doubling time was 2.87 days. The maximum growth level ranged from 4.90 to 8.17 (log10 cfu/g. These results indicate that Coppa di testa definitely supports the growth of Listeria innocua in the considered storage conditions. Taking into account that at 4°C Listeria monocytogenes strains are associated with higher grow rates than L. innocua, these results emphasize the importance of preventing Listeria monocytogenes contamination in the production stages following cooking.

  18. Natural radioactivity monitoring in selected areas of the planet Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobst, L.

    2015-01-01

    Mankind lives with the natural radioactivity throughout its development. The effects of radiation may affect to some extent the evolutionary development of life on the Earth. It is therefore important to find out what values can achieve this natural radioactivity at different places of the world. In this presentation some results of dose rate measurement during transcontinental flyers are discussed.

  19. Measurement of natural radioactivity of the leaf Nefza (Oued belif)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourati Sofiane

    2009-01-01

    Nefza region, specifically Oued Belif, has a unique geological diversity in Tunisia. That's why it was chosen to be a study of natural radioactivity. The results were encouraging and have allowed us to draw conclusions about the origin of the high natural radioactivity found in certain rocks.

  20. Natural radioactivity of sediments from Wei River of Shannxi province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fengling; Lu Xinwei

    2008-01-01

    The natural radioactivity level in sediments from Wei River of Shannxi has been surveyed with a NaI(Tl) γ-spectrometer and its radiation hazards to the people has been assessed. The results indicate the natural radioactivity level in sediments from Wei River of Shaanxi is normal and the sediments can be safely used as building materials. (authors)

  1. An investigation on natural radioactivity from mining industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation on natural radioactivity from mining industry # ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Mining originating industries such as the coal industries, petroleum extraction and processing and natural gas, mining enrichment waste, phosphate, ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  2. Naturally occurring radionuclides transfer factor on aquatic flora and fauna in Nagarjuna Sagar Dam near proposed uranium mining site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunachalam, Kantha Deivi

    2015-04-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive element can be found in low levels within all rock, soil, and water. The present work aims to understand the transfer of naturally occurring radionuclides in different compartments of environment reflecting its behaviour in different tropic levels. The understanding and evaluation of the possible interactions of various naturally occurring radionuclides were done in the world's third largest man-made dam, Nagarjuna Sagar, built on river Krishna located in Andhra Pradesh, India. The naturally occurring radionuclides such as Uranium ( 238 U), Polonium ( 210 Po), Radium ( 226 Ra), and Lead ( 210 Pb) were analyzed in different matrices (i.e) sediment, water, and fish. The measurement of the naturally occurring radionuclides in the environment can be used as a reference baseline for long-term monitoring in the entire aquatic ecosystem

  3. Uranium occurence in nature: Geophysical prospecting, and its occurence in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haj Rasheed, Zaki

    1985-01-01

    A general idea about naturaly occured uranium minerals such as uranite, pechblende, carnotite, coffinit, and bronnerit is given. At the same time, different geophysical methods and detecting devices applied for uranium exploration have been demonstrated. Investigations and studies carried out in Syria point to a uranium content of 100 ppm in the exploited Syrian phosphorite. 1 fig., 1 tab

  4. Naturally occurring asbestos-A recurring public policy challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.J.; Strohmeier, B.R. [RJ Lee Group, Inc., 350 Hochberg Road, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States); Bunker, K.L. [RJ Lee Group, Inc., 350 Hochberg Road, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States)], E-mail: klbunker@rjlg.com; Van Orden, D.R. [RJ Lee Group, Inc., 350 Hochberg Road, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The potential environmental hazards and associated public health issues related to exposure to respirable dusts from the vicinity of natural in-place asbestos deposits (commonly referred to as naturally occurring asbestos, NOA) have gained the regulatory and media spotlight in many areas around the United States, such as Libby, MT, Fairfax County, VA, and El Dorado Hills, CA, among others. NOA deposits may be present in a variety of geologic formations. It has been suggested that airborne asbestos may be released from NOA deposits, and absent appropriate engineering controls, may pose a potential health hazard if these rocks are crushed or exposed to natural weathering and erosion or to human activities that create dust. The issue that needs to be addressed at a policy level is the method of assessing exposures to elongated rock fragments ubiquitous in dust clouds in these same environments and the associated risk. Elongated rock fragments and single crystal minerals present in NOA have been construed by some as having attributes, including the health effects, of asbestos fibers. However, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), and the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) found that the scientific evidence did not support this assumption. As in many environmental fields of study, the evidence is often disputed. Regulatory policy is not uniform on the subject of rock fragments, even within single agencies. The core of the issue is whether the risk parameters associated with exposures to commercial asbestos can or should be applied to rock fragments meeting an arbitrary set of particle dimensions used for counting asbestos fibers. Inappropriate inclusion of particles or fragments results in dilution of risk and needless expenditure of resources. On the other hand, inappropriate exclusion of particles or fragments may result in increased and unnecessary risk. Some of the fastest growing counties in

  5. Naturally occurring asbestos-A recurring public policy challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.J.; Strohmeier, B.R.; Bunker, K.L.; Van Orden, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    The potential environmental hazards and associated public health issues related to exposure to respirable dusts from the vicinity of natural in-place asbestos deposits (commonly referred to as naturally occurring asbestos, NOA) have gained the regulatory and media spotlight in many areas around the United States, such as Libby, MT, Fairfax County, VA, and El Dorado Hills, CA, among others. NOA deposits may be present in a variety of geologic formations. It has been suggested that airborne asbestos may be released from NOA deposits, and absent appropriate engineering controls, may pose a potential health hazard if these rocks are crushed or exposed to natural weathering and erosion or to human activities that create dust. The issue that needs to be addressed at a policy level is the method of assessing exposures to elongated rock fragments ubiquitous in dust clouds in these same environments and the associated risk. Elongated rock fragments and single crystal minerals present in NOA have been construed by some as having attributes, including the health effects, of asbestos fibers. However, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), and the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) found that the scientific evidence did not support this assumption. As in many environmental fields of study, the evidence is often disputed. Regulatory policy is not uniform on the subject of rock fragments, even within single agencies. The core of the issue is whether the risk parameters associated with exposures to commercial asbestos can or should be applied to rock fragments meeting an arbitrary set of particle dimensions used for counting asbestos fibers. Inappropriate inclusion of particles or fragments results in dilution of risk and needless expenditure of resources. On the other hand, inappropriate exclusion of particles or fragments may result in increased and unnecessary risk. Some of the fastest growing counties in

  6. Naturally occurring asbestos: a recurring public policy challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R J; Strohmeier, B R; Bunker, K L; Van Orden, D R

    2008-05-01

    The potential environmental hazards and associated public health issues related to exposure to respirable dusts from the vicinity of natural in-place asbestos deposits (commonly referred to as naturally occurring asbestos, NOA) have gained the regulatory and media spotlight in many areas around the United States, such as Libby, MT, Fairfax County, VA, and El Dorado Hills, CA, among others. NOA deposits may be present in a variety of geologic formations. It has been suggested that airborne asbestos may be released from NOA deposits, and absent appropriate engineering controls, may pose a potential health hazard if these rocks are crushed or exposed to natural weathering and erosion or to human activities that create dust. The issue that needs to be addressed at a policy level is the method of assessing exposures to elongated rock fragments ubiquitous in dust clouds in these same environments and the associated risk. Elongated rock fragments and single crystal minerals present in NOA have been construed by some as having attributes, including the health effects, of asbestos fibers. However, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), and the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) found that the scientific evidence did not support this assumption. As in many environmental fields of study, the evidence is often disputed. Regulatory policy is not uniform on the subject of rock fragments, even within single agencies. The core of the issue is whether the risk parameters associated with exposures to commercial asbestos can or should be applied to rock fragments meeting an arbitrary set of particle dimensions used for counting asbestos fibers. Inappropriate inclusion of particles or fragments results in dilution of risk and needless expenditure of resources. On the other hand, inappropriate exclusion of particles or fragments may result in increased and unnecessary risk. Some of the fastest growing counties in

  7. Probabilities of Natural Events Occurring at Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.C.

    2001-07-17

    This report documents the comprehensive evaluation of probability models of natural events which are applicable to Savannah River Plant. The probability curves selected for these natural events are recommended to be used by all SRP/SRL safety analysts. This will ensure a consistency in analysis methodology for postulated SAR incidents involving natural phenomena.

  8. Ion exchangers in radioactive waste management: natural Iranian zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilchi, A; Maalek, B; Khanchi, A; Ghanadi Maragheh, M; Bagheri, A; Savoji, K

    2006-01-01

    Five samples of natural zeolites from different parts of Iran were chosen for this study. In order to characterize and determine their structures, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectrometry were carried out for each sample. The selective absorption properties of each zeolite were found by calculating the distribution coefficient (K(d)) of various simulated wastes which were prepared by spiking the radionuclides with (131)I, (99)Mo, (153)Sm, (140)La and (147)Nd. All the zeolite samples used in this study had extremely high absorption value towards (140)La; clinoptolite from Mianeh and analsite from Ghalehkhargoshi showed good absorption for (147)Nd; clinoptolite from Semnan and clinoptolite from Firozkoh showed high absorption for (153)Sm; mesolite from Arababad Tabas showed good absorption for (99)Mo; and finally mesolite from Arababad Tabas, clinoptolite from Semnan and clinoptolite from Firozkoh could be used to selectively absorb (131)I from the stimulated waste which was prepared. The natural zeolites chosen for these studies show a similar pattern to those synthetic ion exchangers in the literature and in some cases an extremely high selectivity towards certain radioactive elements. Hence the binary separation of radioactive elements could easily be carried out. Furthermore, these zeolites, which are naturally occurring ion exchangers, are viable economically and extremely useful alternatives in this industry.

  9. Natural and artificial radioactivity in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosemann, G.; Wirth, E.

    1987-01-01

    Several authors analyse the processes, which occurred during and after the reactor accident at Chernobyl. Interactions and correlations are explained in a way easy to understand. In addition, other authors deal with issues of exposure to natural radiation from the earth's crust, from the atmosphere and outer space, and with their impacts on living organisms. In conclusion, one author evaluates the reactor accident and its consequences for society from the churches' point of view. 8 abstracts were entered separately into the data base. (DG) [de

  10. Natural radioactive environmental pollution and meteorological characteristics of Faisalabad environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.A.K.; Sharif, R.; Hussain, K.

    1999-01-01

    This study is about Faisalabad, the third largest and industrial city of Pakistan, where the maximum temperature in summer reaches up to 50 deg. C and in winter it may fall below the freezing point. In this study on attempt has been made to find co-relation between local weather conditions and natural radioactive concentrations. The natural radioactivity was found to have no co-relation with meteorological parameters. Thus the natural activity is independent of meteorological characteristics, which confirms the random nature of radioactivity. (author)

  11. A Naturally Occurring Recombinant Enterovirus Expresses a Torovirus Deubiquitinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Pengcheng; Misra, Saurav; Hause, Ben; Fang, Ying

    2017-07-15

    identified a special case of cross-order recombination between enterovirus G (order Picornavirales ) and torovirus (order Nidovirales ). This naturally occurring recombination event may have broad implications for other picornaviral and/or nidoviral species. Importantly, we demonstrated that the exogenous ToV-PLP gene that was inserted into the EVG genome encodes a deubiquitinase/deISGylase and potentially suppresses host cellular innate immune responses. Our results provide insights into how a gain of function through genetic recombination, in particular cross-order recombination, may improve the ability of a virus to evade host immunity. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. 3 Artificial and Natural Radioactivity.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The environment is defined within the ... Radiation Dose Assessment in the Vicinity of Ghana ... Radioactivity concentrations of Ra, Th, K and Cs in soil samples and water sources around the .... predominant rock type of the GAEC and its.

  13. Issues of natural radioactivity in phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnug, E.; Haneklaus, S.; Schnier, C.; Scholten, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    The fertilization of phosphorus (P) fertilizers is essential in agricultural production, but phosphates contain in dependence on their origin different amounts of trace elements. The problem of cadmium (Cd) loads and other heavy metals is well known. However, only a limited number of investigations examined the contamination of phosphates with the two heaviest metals, uranium (U) and thorium (Th), which are radioactive. Also potassium (K) is lightly radioactive. Measurements are done n the radioactivity content of phosphates, P fertilizers and soils. The radiation doses to workers and public as well as possible contamination of soils from phosphate rock or fertilizer caused by these elements or their daughter products is of interest with regard to radiation protection. The use of P fertilizers is necessary for a sustainable agriculture, but it involves radioactive contamination of soils. The consequences of the use of P fertilizers is discussed, also with regard to existing and proposed legislation. 11 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  14. Natural radioactivity distribution images and their educational uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Chizuo; Sumi, Tetsuo; Miyahara, Hiroshi; Uritani, Akira; Nishina, Kojiro

    1999-01-01

    Distribution images of natural radioactivities in vegetables, meat and porcelain works were obtained by use of Imaging Plate with very high sensitivity to radiations. A brochure titled 'Natural Radiations through Naked Eyes' was published in both Japanese and English which included the images mentioned above. In this paper, the method to obtain the distribution images of extremely low level natural radioactivity, the content of the brochure and the effect of it to the public are described. (author)

  15. Natural radioactivity distribution images and their educational uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Chizuo; Sumi, Tetsuo [Aichi Institute of Technology, Toyota, Aichi (Japan); Miyahara, Hiroshi; Uritani, Akira; Nishina, Kojiro

    1999-09-01

    Distribution images of natural radioactivities in vegetables, meat and porcelain works were obtained by use of Imaging Plate with very high sensitivity to radiations. A brochure titled 'Natural Radiations through Naked Eyes' was published in both Japanese and English which included the images mentioned above. In this paper, the method to obtain the distribution images of extremely low level natural radioactivity, the content of the brochure and the effect of it to the public are described. (author)

  16. Natural radiation, radioactive waste and chemical risk determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, T.; Mustonen, R.; Edhwall, H.; Hansen, H.; Soerensen, A.; Stranden, E.

    1990-01-01

    Doses from natural radiation to the population in the Nordic countries are summarized, and man-made modifications of the natural radiation environment are discussed. An account is given for the radiological concequences of energy concervation by reduced ventilation. Risks from possible future releases of radioactivity from final depositories of spent nuclear fuel are compared to the risks from present natural radioactivity in the environment. The possibilities for comparison between chemical and radiological risks are discussed. 104 refs., 36 figs., 47 tabs

  17. NATURALLY OCCURRING MELLEIN-TYPE 3,4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Mdachi

    isolation, characterization and bioassay studies of melleins, a number of synthetic studies have also been ... from Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL) - a readily available natural resource. Utilization of ...... of the currently available methods.

  18. Naturally Occurring Wound Healing Agents: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapanagioti, E G; Assimopoulou, A N

    2016-01-01

    Nature constitutes a pool of medicines for thousands of years. Nowadays, trust in nature is increasingly growing, as many effective medicines are naturally derived. Over the last decades, the potential of plants as wound healing agents is being investigated. Wounds and ulcers affect the patients' life quality and often lead to amputations. Approximately 43,000,000 patients suffer from diabetic foot ulcers worldwide. Annually, $25 billion are expended for the treatment of chronic wounds, with the number growing due to aging population and increased incidents of diabetes and obesity. Therefore a timely, orderly and effective wound management and treatment is crucial. This paper aims to systematically review natural products, mainly plants, with scientifically well documented wound healing activity, focusing on articles based on animal and clinical studies performed worldwide and approved medicinal products. Moreover, a brief description of the wound healing mechanism is presented, to provide a better understanding. Although a plethora of natural products are in vitro and in vivo evaluated for wound healing activity, only a few go through clinical trials and even fewer launch the market as approved medicines. Most of them rely on traditional medicine, indicating that ethnopharmacology is a successful strategy for drug development. Since only 6% of plants have been systematically investigated pharmacologically, more intensified efforts and emerging advancements are needed to exploit the potentials of nature for the development of novel medicines. This paper aims to provide a reliable database and matrix for thorough further investigation towards the discovery of wound healing agents.

  19. Determination of natural radioactivity in beach sediments collected from Kovalam, Chennai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajalakshmi, A.; Jananee, B.; Thangam, V.; Chandrasekaran, A.

    2018-01-01

    Long lived radioactive elements such as uranium, thorium, potassium and their decay products such as radium and radon are examples of naturally occurring radioactive materials abbreviated as NORM. All living things are exposed to ionizing radiation from NORM contributing to about 90% of human radiation exposure. The interaction of ionizing radiation with human body leads to several biological damages like leukemia, cancer etc due to damage and modification of cells and tissues in the body. Hence, the present work is carried out to determine the natural radioactivity of beach sediments along Kovalam Beach, Chennai. Associated parameters are also calculated

  20. Natural radioactivity in some specimens of the marine biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle Matta, M.A. do

    1980-01-01

    Marine environment contamination by natural radionuclides (uranium and 238 U daughters) is evaluated using marine -fauna and flora elements concentrating fission - and radioactivated products released by nuclear facilities. Total alpha and beta radiometry is done in the the biota to determine the radionuclide concentration. Uranium, 226 Ra and 210 PO assay is done to estimate their contribution to natural radioactivity in the chosen biological indicators. Several analytical techniques required by each radionuclide are used. Potassium assay is done to evaluate the contribution of 40 K to the natural radioactivity, and calcium assay to determine Ra/Ca and U/Ca ratios in the samples. For total alpha radiometry in algae the higher average value is detected in Phaeophyta (84.1 pCi/kg fresh weight); maximum concentration in animals is registered in Bunodosoma caissarum (43.1 pCi/kg fresh weight). For algae, the higher average total beta radiometry detected is in Chlorophyta (6.9 nCi/kg fresh weight); the maximum value found in animals refers to Thais Haemastoma (7.54 nCi/kg fresh weight). Potassium higher average ratio for algae occurs in Chlorophyta (12.77% ashes); for animals, the maximum value is found in Bunodosoma caissarum (13.80% ashes). The uranium concentration factor is maximum in Perna perna bissus (684) while the minimum is registered in Thais haemastoma and Sargassum vulgare (44). The 226 Ra concentration factor is maximum in Sargassum vulgare (2143) and minimum in Bunodosoma caissarum (32). Maximum average ratio for 210 PO in algae occurs in Phaephyta (11.5 pCi/g dry weight) and the maximum concentration for animals in Perna perna (31.5 pCi/g dry weight). The techniques employed proved to be efficient for the objectives aimed at. (Author) [pt

  1. Determination of Natural Radioactivity in Groundwater in Tanke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    A study of the radioactivity in groundwater from Tanke-Ilorin, Nigeria, has been carried out. Ten water ... et al., 1995) and soil/water samples obtained around production .... radioactive elements 238U and 232Th. The activity of naturally ...

  2. Natural Radioactivity Levels in Environmental Samples in North Western Desert of Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Daly, A.; Hussein, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Soil and sediment samples were collected from North western desert of Egypt. Gamma spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K. The hazard index due to these radionuclides has been calculated. The measurement results obtained from this study indicate that the region has background radioactivity levels within natural limits

  3. Shear strength properties of naturally occurring bituminous sands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available because of the cohesive nature of bitumen contents. However, results from the direct shear tests were comparable to properties of oil sands reported earlier from various other laboratory tests. Based on the direct shear test results, Mohr-Coulomb failure...

  4. Overview of naturally occurring Earth materials and human health concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, W. G.

    2012-10-01

    The biosphere and the Earth's critical zone have maintained a dynamic equilibrium for more than 3.5 billion years. Except for solar energy, almost all terrestrial substances necessary for life have been derived from near-surface portions of the land, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. If aggregate biological activities are less than the rate of nutrient supply and/or resource renewal, sustained population growth is possible. Where the replenishment rate of a life-sustaining Earth material is finite, usage may reach a condition of dynamic equilibrium in which biological consumption equals but on average cannot exceed the overall supply. Although large, most natural resources are present in finite abundances; for such commodities, excessive present-day human utilization reduces future availability, and thus the ultimate planetary carrying capacity for civilization. Intensive use of Earth materials has enhanced the quality of life, especially in the developed nations. Still, natural background levels, and Earth processes such as volcanic eruptions, as well as human activities involving agriculture, construction, and the extraction, refining, and transformation of mineral resources have led to harmful side effects involving environmental degradation and public health hazards. Among naturally and anthropogenically induced risks are bioaccessible airborne dusts and gases, soluble pollutants in agricultural, industrial, and residential waters, and toxic chemical species in foods and manufactured products. At appropriate levels of ingestion, many Earth materials are necessary for existence, but underdoses and overdoses have mild to serious consequences for human health and longevity. This overview briefly sketches several natural resource health hazards. Included are volcanic ash + aerosols + gases, mineral dusts, non-volcanic aerosols + nanoparticles, asbestos + fibrous zeolites, arsenic, fluorine, iodine, uranium + thorium + radium + radon + polonium, selenium, mercury, copper

  5. Natural radiation and radioactivity in education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanoue, Masanobu

    1999-01-01

    To understand radiation and radioactivity, it is important to recall the history of their investigation. At first, the works made by Elster and Geitel with a leaf electroscope about 100 years age are introduced. Then the variations of environmental radiation level are shown by the results obtained with a large volume NaI(Tl) detector on my car travelling all over Japan and the data with a pocket dosimeter during my tours in Europe. Among environmental radioactivity, radon and tritium are specially remarked from the historical and educational points of view, with various methods for their measurements. (author)

  6. Natural radiation and radioactivity in education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakanoue, Masanobu [Kanazawa Univ., Takarazuka, Hyogo (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    To understand radiation and radioactivity, it is important to recall the history of their investigation. At first, the works made by Elster and Geitel with a leaf electroscope about 100 years age are introduced. Then the variations of environmental radiation level are shown by the results obtained with a large volume NaI(Tl) detector on my car travelling all over Japan and the data with a pocket dosimeter during my tours in Europe. Among environmental radioactivity, radon and tritium are specially remarked from the historical and educational points of view, with various methods for their measurements. (author)

  7. Natural radioactive materials. We need/we use them; Natuerliche radioaktive Stoffe. Wir (ge-)brauchen sie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaus Flesch [Saechsisches Landesamt fuer Umwelt, Landwirtschaft und Geologie, Dresden (Germany). Strahlenschutz; Gellermann, Rainer [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Heuel-Fabianek, Burkhard [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); and others

    2017-04-01

    The articles in this edition present a small excerpt in the field of natural radioactive materials amongst others in the building industries, in the medical field or in scientific research. Due to the new radiation protection law, the natural occuring radioactive materials become more important to protect the general public.

  8. Natural radioactivity releases from lignite power plants in Southwestern Anatolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaprak, G.; Guer, F.; Cam, F.; Candan, O.

    2006-01-01

    The Mugla basin is one of the most productive lignite basins in Southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Mining activities started in 1979 and total reserves were estimated during exploration at 767.5 million tonnes. Total mean annual lignite production of the Mugla basin is estimated at about 10 million tonnes per year. Most of the lignite production supplies three thermal power plants (Yatagan 630 MW, Yenikoey 420 MW, Kemerkoey 630 MW) with a total capacity of 1680 MW. It is well known that the lignite contains naturally occurring primordial radionuclides arising from the uranium and thorium series as well as from 4 0K. Lignite burning is, therefore, one of the sources of technologically enhanced exposure to humans from natural radionuclides. The investigation reported here deals with the determination of the 2 26Ra, 2 32Th and 4 0K concentrations in the lignite feeding 3 thermal power plants in Mugla region and in the product ash. Samples of lignite feeding the power plants and fly and bottom ashes produced in the same power plants were collected over a period of 1 year and therefore systematic sampling allowed for the determination of mean representative values for the natural radioactivity content of above materials and also estimation of the radioactivity releases to the environment. Furthermore, grid soil sampling within 10-15 km around the power plants allowed for the mapping of the surface soil activity of natural radionuclides. Dosimetric calculations from terrestrial gamma radiation for the population living around the power plants were performed based on the guidance of UNSCEAR 2000 report

  9. Radioactive disequilibria in mineralised drill core samples from the Bjoerklund uranium occurence, northern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, J.A.T.

    1982-12-01

    Forming the basis of a pilot study to investigate the natural mobility of uranium and its daughter products within the geological environment, a series of six samples, chosen from two mineralised fracture zones at depths of 100-130m within a homogeneous leucocratic granite, were examined mineralogically and isotopically to establish the presence or absence of radioactive equilibrium that may indicate recent rock/water interaction processes (i.e. during the last 0.5 m.y.). The results show clear evidence of radioactive disequilibrium, and hence recent rock/water interaction, in four of the six samples. Some is attributable mostly to solution-solid 234 U recoil gain (weakly mineralised zones adjacent to the main mineralisation) and others to solid-solution 234 U recoil loss (moderate to highly mineralised zones). The richer type of impregnation mineralisation indicates apparent radioactive equilibrium. The absence of significant 238 U loss in the samples helps to underline the reducing conditions prevalent within open fracture systems at these depths. This has meant that uraninite, now found in fractured rock at about 100m depth, has been chemically stable in its environment for most, if not all, of its 1750 m.y. existence, including the last 0.5 m.y. when it has been closest to the atmosphere. This could indicate that spent nuclear fuel, which essentially is crystalline UO 2 , and comparable to uraninite once the main fission products have decayed, would also have been stable in this environment for similar periods of time. (Author)

  10. Complex forming properties of natural occurring fulvic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinsky, J.A.; Mathuthu, A.; Bicking, M.; Ephraim, J.

    1985-07-01

    The experimental program developed in our earlier investigations of the protonation equilibria encountered with Armadale Horizons Bh and Suwannee River fulvic-acid has been employed in the present investigation of a Swedish fulvic acid source. Complications introduced by the polyelectrolyte nature and the degree of heterogeneity in the functional unit content of this natural organic acid molecule have been resolved as they were with the previous fulvic acid samples. The physical chemical properties of this fulvic acid have been compared with those resolved for the Armadale Horizons Bh and the Suwannee River fulvic acid as well. The insight gained from these protonation studies and metal ion binding studies, also carried out in the course of this investigation, has led to the development of a model for interpretation of the binding of metal ions to fulvic acid at any fulvic acid concentration level. With 12 refs. (Author)

  11. Some considerations about the natural atmospheric radioactive aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoux, A.; Madelaine, G.

    1985-01-01

    From experiments made in Brest by the use of a semi-automatic device for direct measurements of atmospheric radon (the double filter method), we obtained daily average values of Radon 222 concentration, and establish that the values obtained are completely different according to the wind direction. We establish that radioactive balance is never realized in the air between radon and its daughters RaA(Po218), RaB(Pb214) and RaC(Bi214); the state of radioactive balance strongly depends on wind direction. We also study the ionic state of the radioactive aerosol accruing from Radon 222. Using an experimental system consisting of absolute filters, diffusion batteries, cascade impactors and ions tubes, we establish the size distribution of natural radioactive aerosol. We thus show 40% of the natural atmospheric radioactivity is located on particles whose radii are inferior to 2 . 10-2 mm. A good agreement is provided between the theory and our experimental points

  12. Review of research on impacts to biota of discharges of naturally occurring radionuclides in produced water to the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Ali; Brown, Justin E.; Gwynn, Justin P.; Dowdall, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Produced water has been described as the largest volume waste stream in the exploration and production process of oil and gas. It is accompanied by discharges of naturally occurring radionuclides raising concerns over the potential radiological impacts of produced water on marine biota. In the Northern European marine environment, radioactivity in produced water has received substantial attention owing to the OSPAR Radioactive Substances Strategy which aims at achieving ‘concentrations in the environment near background values for naturally occurring radioactive substances’. This review provides an overview of published research on the impacts to biota from naturally occurring radionuclides discharged in produced water by the offshore oil and gas industry. In addition to summarising studies and data that deal directly with the issue of dose and effect, the review also considers studies related to the impact of added chemicals on the fate of discharged radionuclides. The review clearly illustrates that only a limited number of studies have investigated possible impacts on biota from naturally occurring radionuclides present in produced water. Hence, although these studies indicate that the risk to the environment from naturally occurring radionuclides discharged in produced water is negligible, the substantial uncertainties involved in the assessments of impact make it difficult to be conclusive. With regard to the complexity involved in the problem under consideration there is a pressing need to supplement existing data and acquire new knowledge. Finally, the present work identifies some knowledge gaps to indicate future research requirements. -- Highlights: ► Produced water from offshore oil industry contains naturally occurring radionuclides. ► Published research on the impacts to biota from these radionuclides is reviewed. ► Review includes impact of added chemicals on the fate of discharged radionuclides. ► Studies indicate negligible risk to biota

  13. Modelling seasonal variations of natural radioactivity in soils: A case study in southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guagliardi, Ilaria; Rovella, Natalia; Apollaro, Carmine; Bloise, Andrea; Rosa, Rosanna De; Scarciglia, Fabio; Buttafuoco, Gabriele

    2016-12-01

    The activity of natural radionuclides in soil has become an environmental concern for local public and national authorities because of the harmful effects of radiation exposure on human health. In this context, modelling and mapping the activity of natural radionuclides in soil is an important research topic. The study was aimed to model, in a spatial sense, the soil radioactivity in an urban and peri-urban soils area in southern Italy to analyse the seasonal influence on soil radioactivity. Measures of gamma radiation naturally emitted through the decay of radioactive isotopes (potassium, uranium and thorium) were analysed using a geostatistical approach to map the spatial distribution of soil radioactivity. The activity of three radionuclides was measured at 181 locations using a high-resolution ?-ray spectrometry. To take into account the influence of season, the measurements were carried out in summer and in winter. Activity data were analysed by using a geostatistical approach and zones of relatively high or low radioactivity were delineated. Among the main processes which influence natural radioactivity such as geology, geochemical, pedological, and ecological processes, results of this study showed a prominent control of radio-emission measurements by seasonal changes. Low natural radioactivity levels were measured in December associated with winter weather and moist soil conditions (due to high rainfall and low temperature), and higher activity values in July, when the soil was dry and no precipitations occurred.

  14. Total syntheses of naturally occurring diacetylenic spiroacetal enol ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakoshi, Naoki; Aburano, Daisuke; Mukai, Chisato

    2005-07-22

    A highly stereoselective method for constructing a (2E)-methoxymethylidene-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane skeleton has been developed on the basis of the palladium(II)-catalyzed ring-closing reaction of the 3,4-dioxygenated-9-hydroxy-1-nonyn-5-one derivatives as a crucial step. The newly developed procedures could be successfully applied to the first total synthesis of five diacetylenic spiroacetal enol ether natural products starting from commercially available (R,R)- or (S,S)-diethyl tartrate.

  15. Thermodynamic characterization of tandem mismatches found in naturally occurring RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Martha E.; Znosko, Brent M.

    2009-01-01

    Although all sequence symmetric tandem mismatches and some sequence asymmetric tandem mismatches have been thermodynamically characterized and a model has been proposed to predict the stability of previously unmeasured sequence asymmetric tandem mismatches [Christiansen,M.E. and Znosko,B.M. (2008) Biochemistry, 47, 4329–4336], experimental thermodynamic data for frequently occurring tandem mismatches is lacking. Since experimental data is preferred over a predictive model, the thermodynamic parameters for 25 frequently occurring tandem mismatches were determined. These new experimental values, on average, are 1.0 kcal/mol different from the values predicted for these mismatches using the previous model. The data for the sequence asymmetric tandem mismatches reported here were then combined with the data for 72 sequence asymmetric tandem mismatches that were published previously, and the parameters used to predict the thermodynamics of previously unmeasured sequence asymmetric tandem mismatches were updated. The average absolute difference between the measured values and the values predicted using these updated parameters is 0.5 kcal/mol. This updated model improves the prediction for tandem mismatches that were predicted rather poorly by the previous model. This new experimental data and updated predictive model allow for more accurate calculations of the free energy of RNA duplexes containing tandem mismatches, and, furthermore, should allow for improved prediction of secondary structure from sequence. PMID:19509311

  16. Preparation and properties of natural nanocomposites based on natural rubber and naturally occurring halloysite nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooj, Sandip; Das, Amit; Thakur, Varun; Mahaling, R.N.; Bhowmick, Anil K.; Heinrich, Gert

    2010-01-01

    A 'green' composite based on natural halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) and natural rubber (NR) was prepared by mechanical mixing. A silane coupling agent, bis (triethoxysilylpropyl)-tetrasulphide, was utilized to enhance the properties of these composites. It was observed that the reinforcing activity of HNTs was superior to commercial silica coupled with the same amount of silane coupling agent. Moreover the on-set thermal degradation decomposition temperature was improved by ∼64 o C with the addition of 10 parts HNTs per hundred of rubber. Transmission electron microscopic images confirmed the good dispersion of the HNTs in the rubber matrix, whereas X-ray diffraction studies showed a little change in interlayer spacing between the two silicate layers of HNTs.

  17. Polyomavirus and Naturally Occuring Neuroglial Tumors in Raccoons (Procyon Lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Patricia A; Brostoff, Terza; Church, Molly E; Dela Cruz, Florante N; Woolard, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Polyomavirus (PyV) infections are widespread in human populations and, although generally associated with silent persistence, rarely cause severe disease. Among diseases convincingly associated with natural PyV infections of humans, there are remarkably different tissue tropisms and outcomes, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, transient or progressive nephropathy, and cancer. The variable character and unpredictable outcomes of infection attest to large gaps in our basic understanding of PyV biology. In particular, the rich history of research demonstrating the oncogenic potential of PyVs in laboratory animals begs the question of why cancer is not more often associated with infection. Raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV), discovered in 2010, is consistently identified in neuroglial tumors in free-ranging raccoons in the western United States. Exposure to RacPyV is widespread, and RacPyV is detected in tissues of raccoons without tumors. Studying the relationship of RacPyV with its natural host is a unique opportunity to uncover cogent cellular targets and protein interactions between the virus and its host. Our hypothesis is that RacPyV, as an intact episome, alters cellular pathways within neural progenitor cells and drives oncogenesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The natural radioactivity in some Nigerian foodstuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olomo, J.B. (Obafemi Awolowo Univ., Ile-Ife (Nigeria). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-12-20

    The average activity concentrations of seven locally produced food commodities that form the total diets of a baby, a teenager or an adult male in Nigeria were measued by means of a well-calibrated high-resolution lithium-drifted germanium (Ge(Li)) spectrometer system. The food commodities were collected at several centers such as a nuclear research center as well as metropolitan and industrial areas. The emission lines identified with reliable regularity belonged to the {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th decay series. The other isotope is a non-related naturally occurring radionuclide, {sup 40}K. Average total specific-activity values of 7.29+-1.08, 6.27+-1.01 and 11.23+-1.64 Bq/kg for {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K, respectively, were obtained for the seven food commodities studied. The food samples were also checked for fission-product residues ({sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr) from atmospheric weapons tests which are slowly being purged from the food chain. Their estimation revealed that they were below the minimum detectable limit determined at a two-standard deviation analytical error. (orig.).

  19. Virological and serological findings in dogs with naturally occurring distemper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Gabriella; Camero, Michele; Losurdo, Michele; Lucente, Maria Stella; Larocca, Vittorio; Martella, Vito; Decaro, Nicola; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2015-03-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. The unpredictable and variable course of CDV-related disease may hamper correct diagnosis of infection and makes it crucial the collection of samples suitable for laboratory confirmation. In the present study we were able to follow the disease in two dogs infected naturally, collecting different biological matrices during the entire period of infection. By real time RT-PCR, viral RNA was detected and quantified, suggesting that urine and rectal swabs would be useful for ante-mortem diagnosis of distemper in dogs, regardless of the clinical stage and form of the illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structures and properties of naturally occurring polyether antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Jacek; Brzezinski, Bogumil

    2013-01-01

    Polyether ionophores represent a large group of natural, biologically active substances produced by Streptomyces spp. They are lipid soluble and able to transport metal cations across cell membranes. Several of polyether ionophores are widely used as growth promoters in veterinary. Polyether antibiotics show a broad spectrum of bioactivity ranging from antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, antiviral, and tumour cell cytotoxicity. Recently, it has been shown that some of these compounds are able to selectively kill cancer stem cells and multidrug-resistant cancer cells. Thus, they are recognized as new potential anticancer drugs. The biological activity of polyether ionophores is strictly connected with their molecular structure; therefore, the purpose of this paper is to present an overview of their formula, molecular structure, and properties.

  1. Relative leach behavior of waste glasses and naturally occurring glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, P.B.

    1979-01-01

    Simulated nuclear waste glasses of the sodium-borosilicate type with a low waste loading and of the zinc-borosilicate type with a high waste loading have been compared with obsidians. The resuls indicate that the waste glasses would corrode in normal natural environments at a rate of about 0.1 μm per year at 30 0 C and about 5 μm per year at 90 0 C, compared with obsidians which seem to corrode at, or less than, about 0.01 μm per year at 30 0 C and less than 1 μm per year at 90 0 C. Activation energies for reactions of the two waste glasses with pure water are about 20 kcal/g-mol. 3 figures, 7 tables

  2. Natural radioactivity in bottled mineral water available in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.B.; Ralph, B.J.; Wilks, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    The levels of naturally-occurring radioactive elements in bottled mineral water, commercially available in Australia, have been assessed. The survey concentrated upon 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 210 Pb, radionuclides which have a high toxicity in drinking water. Detectable levels of 226 Ra were found to range from 0.02Bq/1 to 0.32Bq/1 in locally-bottled water and from 0.02Bq/1 to 0.44Bq/1 in imported brands. 210 Pb levels were found to be generally very low ( 228 Ra content of bottled water will have a similar distribution to that of 226 Ra. Concentrations of 228 Ra in excess of 0.7Bq/1 were measured in a number of samples. The radiological health implications of the consumption of bottled mineral water are discussed with reference to existing drinking water standards and also in terms of radiation exposure and the increased risk to health. It was concluded that, although some brands of water contain radioactivity in excess of the drinking-water limits recommended by Australian and overseas authorities, the annual radiation dose to an individual will be below the dose-equivalent limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for life-long exposure. The increased risk of radiation-induced fatal disease due to the consumption of bottled mineral water is estimated to be less than 10 -5 and is therefore negligible

  3. Natural radioactivity in groundwater sources in Ireland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currivan, L.; Dowdall, A.; Mcginnity, P.; Ciara, M. [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (Ireland); Craig, M. [Environmental Protection Agency (Ireland)

    2014-07-01

    The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) in collaboration with the Irish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) undertook a national survey of radioactivity in groundwater sources for compliance with parameters set out in the European Communities Drinking Water Directive. The Directive outlines the minimum requirements for the quality of drinking water and water intended for human consumption. Over two hundred samples were screened for radioactivity. Where indicated, analysis for individual radionuclide activity was undertaken and the radiation dose arising calculated. Furthermore, samples were analysed for radon concentration. This survey is the first comprehensive national survey of radioactivity in groundwater sources in Ireland. Approximately 18 per cent of drinking water in Ireland originates from groundwater and springs with the remainder from surface water. Between 2007 and 2011, water samples from a representative network of groundwater sources were analysed and assessed for compliance with the radioactivity parameters set out in the Drinking Water Directive. The assessment was carried out using the methodology for screening drinking water set out by the WHO. For practical purposes the WHO recommended screening levels for drinking water below which no further action is required of 100 mBq/l for gross alpha activity and 1000 mBq/l for gross beta activity were applied. Of the 203 groundwater sources screened for gross alpha and gross beta all met the gross beta activity criteria of less than 1000 mBq/l and 175 supplies had gross alpha activity concentrations of less than 100 mBq/l. For these sources no further analysis was required. The remaining 28 sources required further (radionuclide-specific) analysis from an alpha activity perspective. Results on ranges and distributions of radionuclide concentrations in groundwater as well as ingestion doses estimated for consumers of these water supplies will be presented. Document available in abstract

  4. Distribution Of Natural Radioactivity On Soil Size Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Van Luyen; Trinh Hoai Vinh; Thai Khac Dinh

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a distribution of natural radioactivity on different soil size particles, taken from one soil profile. On the results shows a range from 52% to 66% of natural radioisotopes such as 238 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K concentrated on the soil particles below 40 micrometers in diameter size. The remained of natural radioisotopes were distributed on a soil particles with higher diameter size. The study is available for soil sample collected to natural radioactive analyze by gamma and alpha spectrometer methods. (author)

  5. Naturally Occurring Off-Switches for CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluk, April; Amrani, Nadia; Zhang, Yan; Garcia, Bianca; Hidalgo-Reyes, Yurima; Lee, Jooyoung; Edraki, Alireza; Shah, Megha; Sontheimer, Erik J; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2016-12-15

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology would be enhanced by the ability to inhibit Cas9 function spatially, temporally, or conditionally. Previously, we discovered small proteins encoded by bacteriophages that inhibit the CRISPR-Cas systems of their host bacteria. These "anti-CRISPRs" were specific to type I CRISPR-Cas systems that do not employ the Cas9 protein. We posited that nature would also yield Cas9 inhibitors in response to the evolutionary arms race between bacteriophages and their hosts. Here, we report the discovery of three distinct families of anti-CRISPRs that specifically inhibit the CRISPR-Cas9 system of Neisseria meningitidis. We show that these proteins bind directly to N. meningitidis Cas9 (NmeCas9) and can be used as potent inhibitors of genome editing by this system in human cells. These anti-CRISPR proteins now enable "off-switches" for CRISPR-Cas9 activity and provide a genetically encodable means to inhibit CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotes. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Isolation and Spectral Analysis of Naturally Occurring Thiarubrine A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Juan; Morton, Melita; Downum, Kelsey; O'Shea, Kevin E.

    2001-06-01

    We have designed an experiment in which students isolate and characterize thiarubrine A, a pseudo-antiaromatic 1,2-dithia-3,5-cyclohexadiene derivative. Thiarubrines are an important class of compounds which have recently received attention because of their unusual reactivity, unique biological activity, and potential medicinal applications. They possess a distinctive red color and structure features that are particularly useful for demonstrating UV-vis, NMR, and IR spectral analyses. A crude mixture containing thiarubrine A is obtained by methanol (liquid-solid) extraction of the roots of short ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia. Alternatively, these compounds can be isolated from numerous taxa within the family Asteraceae. Thiarubrine A possesses alkyl, alkenyl, and alkynyl functionality, which is useful in illustrating the utility of IR and NMR in the characterization of natural products. The long wavelength UV-vis absorption band of thiarubrine is indication of the nonplanarity of dithiin ring and provides an excellent opportunity to discuss the concepts of aromaticity, conjugation, and molecular orbital theory.

  7. Mycoflora and naturally occurring mycotoxins in poultry feeds in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalcero, A; Magnoli, C; Luna, M; Ancasi, G; Reynoso, M M; Chiacchiera, S; Miazzo, R; Palacio, G

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the mycoflora and mycotoxins natural incidence in poultry feeds from 2 factories in Río Cuarto, Córdoba. One hundred and thirty samples were taken from May/1996 to May/1997. The most dominant species isolated of poultry feed samples belonged to the genera Aspergillus spp 85% and Fusarium spp 70%. From Aspergillus genus eleven species were identified and A. flavus was the most frequent. Nine species were identified from the Fusarium genus and the predominant was F. moniliforme. Penicillium ranked third in the number of isolated cases. From this genus twelve species were collected of which P. brevicompactum (15%), P. restrictum (14%) and P. purpurogenum (12%) were the most common. The most significant mycotoxin from poultry feeds was aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) found in 48% of the samples, with levels ranging from 10 to 123 ng/g. For zearalenone (ZEA) the levels were 327 to 5, 850 ng/g and DON was not detected from the samples. Due to the fact that in Argentina there is little information about this topic, these data on poultry feeds in our region would be of worldwide interest.

  8. Naturally occurring compounds affect glutamatergic neurotransmission in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Lucia Helena; Jung, Fernanda; Soares, Felix Antunes; Rotta, Liane Nanci; Vendite, Deusa Aparecida; Frizzo, Marcos Emilio dos Santos; Yunes, Rosendo A; Calixto, João Batista; Wofchuk, Susana; Souza, Diogo O

    2007-11-01

    Natural products, including those derived from plants, have largely contributed to the development of therapeutic drugs. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it is also considered a nociceptive neurotransmitter, by acting on peripheral nervous system. For this reason, in this study we investigated the effects of the hydroalcoholic extracts from Drymis winteri (polygodial and drimanial), Phyllanthus (rutin and quercetine), Jathopha elliptica (jatrophone), Hedyosmum brasiliense (13HDS), Ocotea suaveolens (Tormentic acid), Protium kleinii (alphabeta-amyrin), Citrus paradise (naringin), soybean (genistein) and Crataeva nurvala (lupeol), described as having antinociceptive effects, on glutamatergic transmission parameters, such as [(3)H]glutamate binding, [(3)H]glutamate uptake by synaptic vesicles and astrocyte cultures, and synaptosomal [(3)H]glutamate release. All the glutamatergic parameters were affected by one or more of these compounds. Specifically, drimanial and polygodial presented more broad and profound effects, requiring more investigation on their mechanisms. The putative central side effects of these compounds, via the glutamatergic system, are discussed.

  9. Potent In Vitro Antifungal Activities of Naturally Occurring Acetylenic Acids▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-Cong; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Ashfaq, M. Khalid; Babu, K. Suresh; Agarwal, Ameeta K.; ElSohly, Hala N.; Manly, Susan P.; Clark, Alice M.

    2008-01-01

    Our continuing effort in antifungal natural product discovery has led to the identification of five 6-acetylenic acids with chain lengths from C16 to C20: 6-hexadecynoic acid (compound 1), 6-heptadecynoic acid (compound 2), 6-octadecynoic acid (compound 3), 6-nonadecynoic acid (compound 4), and 6-icosynoic acid (compound 5) from the plant Sommera sabiceoides. Compounds 2 and 5 represent newly isolated fatty acids. The five acetylenic acids were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activities against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton rubrum by comparison with the positive control drugs amphotericin B, fluconazole, ketoconazole, caspofungin, terbinafine, and undecylenic acid. The compounds showed various degrees of antifungal activity against the 21 tested strains. Compound 4 was the most active, in particular against the dermatophytes T. mentagrophytes and T. rubrum and the opportunistic pathogens C. albicans and A. fumigatus, with MICs comparable to several control drugs. Inclusion of two commercially available acetylenic acids, 9-octadecynoic acid (compound 6) and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (compound 7), in the in vitro antifungal testing further demonstrated that the antifungal activities of the acetylenic acids were associated with their chain lengths and positional triple bonds. In vitro toxicity testing against mammalian cell lines indicated that compounds 1 to 5 were not toxic at concentrations up to 32 μM. Furthermore, compounds 3 and 4 did not produce obvious toxic effects in mice at a dose of 34 μmol/kg of body weight when administered intraperitoneally. Taking into account the low in vitro and in vivo toxicities and significant antifungal potencies, these 6-acetylenic acids may be excellent leads for further preclinical studies. PMID:18458131

  10. Potent in vitro antifungal activities of naturally occurring acetylenic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-Cong; Jacob, Melissa R; Khan, Shabana I; Ashfaq, M Khalid; Babu, K Suresh; Agarwal, Ameeta K; Elsohly, Hala N; Manly, Susan P; Clark, Alice M

    2008-07-01

    Our continuing effort in antifungal natural product discovery has led to the identification of five 6-acetylenic acids with chain lengths from C(16) to C(20): 6-hexadecynoic acid (compound 1), 6-heptadecynoic acid (compound 2), 6-octadecynoic acid (compound 3), 6-nonadecynoic acid (compound 4), and 6-icosynoic acid (compound 5) from the plant Sommera sabiceoides. Compounds 2 and 5 represent newly isolated fatty acids. The five acetylenic acids were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activities against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton rubrum by comparison with the positive control drugs amphotericin B, fluconazole, ketoconazole, caspofungin, terbinafine, and undecylenic acid. The compounds showed various degrees of antifungal activity against the 21 tested strains. Compound 4 was the most active, in particular against the dermatophytes T. mentagrophytes and T. rubrum and the opportunistic pathogens C. albicans and A. fumigatus, with MICs comparable to several control drugs. Inclusion of two commercially available acetylenic acids, 9-octadecynoic acid (compound 6) and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (compound 7), in the in vitro antifungal testing further demonstrated that the antifungal activities of the acetylenic acids were associated with their chain lengths and positional triple bonds. In vitro toxicity testing against mammalian cell lines indicated that compounds 1 to 5 were not toxic at concentrations up to 32 muM. Furthermore, compounds 3 and 4 did not produce obvious toxic effects in mice at a dose of 34 mumol/kg of body weight when administered intraperitoneally. Taking into account the low in vitro and in vivo toxicities and significant antifungal potencies, these 6-acetylenic acids may be excellent leads for further preclinical studies.

  11. Actinomycetes, an Inexhaustible Source of Naturally Occurring Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yōko Takahashi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Global public health faces a desperate situation, due to the lack of effective antibiotics. Coordinated steps need to be taken, worldwide, to rectify this situation and protect the advances in modern medicine made over the last 100 years. Work at Japan’s Kitasato Institute has been in the vanguard of many such advances, and work is being proactively tailored to promote the discovery of urgently needed antimicrobials. Efforts are being concentrated on actinomycetes, the proven source of most modern antibiotics. We devised a novel physicochemical screening mechanism, whereby simple physico-chemical properties, in conjunction with related detection methods, such as LC/MS, LC/UV, and polarity, could be used to identify or predict new compounds in a culture broth, simply by comparing results with existing databases. New compounds are isolated, purified, and their structure determined before being tested for any bioactivity. We used lyophilized actinomycete strains from the Kitasato Microbial Library, most more than 35 years old, and found 330 strains were producers of useful bioactive substances. We also tested organisms found in fresh samples collected in the complex environments from around plant roots, as well as from sediments of mangrove forests and oceans, resulting in the discovery of 36 novel compounds from 11 actinomycete strains. A compound, designated iminimycin, containing an iminium ion in the structure was discovered from the culture broth of Streptomyces griseus OS-3601, which had been stored for a long time as a streptomycin-producing strain. This represented the first iminium ion discovery in actinomycetes. Compounds with a cyclopentadecane skeleton containing 5,6-dihydro-4-hydroxyl-2-pyrone ring and tetrahydrofuran ring, designated mangromicins, were isolated from the culture broth of Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes K10-0216 obtained from sediment in a mangrove forest. These structures are extremely unique among natural compounds

  12. Radioactive contamination of natural and artificial materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalchuk, E.L.; Pomansky, A.A.; Smolnikov, A.A.; Temmoev, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    The gamma radiation of different materials was measured in an underground low-background chamber with extraordinary background characteristics. The excellent background conditions of the measurements enabled investigators to see the alpha-particle peaks of the internal radioactive contamination of NaI(Tl) detectors, which were especially made for these measurements. The sensitivity limit of the installation was determined by the internal contamination of the NaI(Tl) detectors alone. Any radiation background, except for three substances, tungsten, copper, and brass, could be registered

  13. Using radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The leaflet discusses the following: radioactivity; radioisotopes; uses of ionising radiations; radioactivity from (a) naturally occurring radioactive elements, and (b) artificially produced radioisotopes; uses of radioactivity in medicine, (a) clinical diagnostic, (b) therapeutic (c) sterilization of medical equipment and materials; environmental uses as tracers; industrial applications, e.g. tracers and radiography; ensuring safety. (U.K.)

  14. Natural radioactivity content in soil and indoor air of Chellanam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, S; Rajagopalan, M; Abraham, J P; Balakrishnan, D; Umadevi, A G

    2012-11-01

    Contribution of terrestrial radiation due to the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil and air constitutes a significant component of the background radiation exposure to the population. The concentrations of natural radionuclides in the soil and indoor air of Chellanam were investigated with an aim of evaluating the environmental radioactivity level and radiation hazard to the population. Chellanam is in the suburbs of Cochin, with the Arabian Sea in the west and the Cochin backwaters in the east. Chellanam is situated at ∼25 km from the sites of these factories. The data obtained serve as a reference in documenting changes to the environmental radioactivity due to technical activities. Soil samples were collected from 30 locations of the study area. The activity concentrations of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in the samples were analysed using gamma spectrometry. The gamma dose rates were calculated using conversion factors recommended by UNSCEAR [United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. UNSCEAR (2000)]. The ambient radiation exposure rates measured in the area ranged from 74 to 195 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 131 nGy h(-1). The significant radionuclides being (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K, their activities were used to arrive at the absorbed gamma dose rate with a mean value of 131 nGy h(-1) and the radium equivalent activity with a mean value of 162 Bq kg(-1). The radon progeny levels varied from 0.21 to 1.4 mWL with a mean value of 0.6 mWL. The thoron progeny varied from 0.34 to 2.9 mWL with a mean value of 0.85 mWL. The ratio between thoron and radon progenies varied from 1.4 to 2.3 with a mean of 1.6. The details of the study, analysis and results are discussed.

  15. Natural diatomite process for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal [Radioactive Waste Management Unit (RWMU), Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, Altinsehir Yolu 5 km. Halkali, 34303K Cekmece, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: Erdal.Osmanlioglu@taek.gov.tr

    2007-01-15

    Diatomite has a number of unique physical properties and has found diversified industrial utilization. The filtration characteristics are particularly significant in the purification of liquids. The purpose of this study was to test natural diatomaceous earth (diatomite) as an alternative material that could be used for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste. A pilot-scale column-type device was designed. Natural diatomite samples were ground, sieved and prepared to use as sorption media. In this study, real waste liquid was used as radioactive liquid having special conditions. The liquid waste contained three radionuclides (Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60). Following the treatment by diatomite, the radioactivity of liquid waste was reduced from the initial 2.60 Bq/ml to less than 0.40 Bq/ml. The results of this study show that most of the radioactivity was removed from the solution by processing with diatomite.

  16. Natural diatomite process for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2007-01-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physical properties and has found diversified industrial utilization. The filtration characteristics are particularly significant in the purification of liquids. The purpose of this study was to test natural diatomaceous earth (diatomite) as an alternative material that could be used for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste. A pilot-scale column-type device was designed. Natural diatomite samples were ground, sieved and prepared to use as sorption media. In this study, real waste liquid was used as radioactive liquid having special conditions. The liquid waste contained three radionuclides (Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60). Following the treatment by diatomite, the radioactivity of liquid waste was reduced from the initial 2.60 Bq/ml to less than 0.40 Bq/ml. The results of this study show that most of the radioactivity was removed from the solution by processing with diatomite

  17. Natural diatomite process for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2007-01-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physical properties and has found diversified industrial utilization. The filtration characteristics are particularly significant in the purification of liquids. The purpose of this study was to test natural diatomaceous earth (diatomite) as an alternative material that could be used for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste. A pilot-scale column-type device was designed. Natural diatomite samples were ground, sieved and prepared to use as sorption media. In this study, real waste liquid was used as radioactive liquid having special conditions. The liquid waste contained three radionuclides (Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60). Following the treatment by diatomite, the radioactivity of liquid waste was reduced from the initial 2.60 Bq/ml to less than 0.40 Bq/ml. The results of this study show that most of the radioactivity was removed from the solution by processing with diatomite.

  18. Natural radioactivity in environmental samples from an island of volcanic origin (Milos, Aegean Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florou, H.; Kritidis, P.

    1991-01-01

    Enhanced concentrations of natural radionuclides occur in volcanic islands such as Milos in the Aegean Sea. The natural gamma radiation status of the entire environment in Milos were studied using gamma radiometry. Gamma spectrometry was used to analyse ore samples, sediments and marine biota. While non-living materials showed enhanced levels of natural radioactivity, most of the marine organisms examined did not seem to reflect this radiological status. (UK)

  19. Natural radioactivity measurements at the proposed nuclear power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojuangco, J.G.; Salomon, A.Ph.

    1976-01-01

    Natural radioactivity measurement in the Philippines aims to establish baseline radioactivity levels in the environment of items essential to man. In this article, results of the environmental surveillance conducted in Bagac, Bataan from 1973 to 1974 are presented. Analyses were made on air parti-culates, sea and fresh water, grass, and soil samples for gross beta-gamma activities. Results obtained showed activity levels below the maximum permissible concentration recommended by the International Committee on Radiation Protection (ICRP)

  20. Assessment of natural radioactivity in the selected area of Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porubcanova, B.; Nikodemova, D.; Mojzes, A.

    2014-01-01

    Slovakia is country which has a difficult geological structure. This fact is reflected on values of natural radionuclide concentrations. A chosen area includes various types rocks which have diverse values of radioactive concentrations. Consequently these values were shown by maps which present localities with values of a radioactivity. This research was a first step which will be used like a base for a valorization and assessment of the potential radiation exposure of residents of SR where we can suppose health damage. (authors)

  1. Naturally occurring radionuclides in brown coal and copper shale mining waste and its impact on landscape mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, P.; Neitzel, P.L.; Hurst, S.; Osenbrueck, K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Extensive uranium mining and processing was widely spread in the former socialist European countries, especially former G.D.R., Romania, Hungary and Bulgaria. The exploration and the use of other radioactive contaminated mining products for energetic purposes, e.g. hard coal for uranium extraction in Eastern Germany and highly radium contaminated coal in Upper Silesia (Poland) was also a common practice. Besides uranium and coal mining activities naturally occurring radioactivity was also observed in copper shale mining. All these mining activities led to the accumulation of vast amounts of wastes and to the contamination of large areas. The wastes usually contain not only elevated concentrations of radionuclides like uranium, thorium and the relevant daughter nuclides but also other toxic chemical elements. Now these polluted areas are a permanent source of ground and surface water contamination in the mining districts. For reasons of environmental security and to avoid the uncontrolled spread of radioactive pollution, a permanent cost effective monitoring of the pollution levels is necessary as long as the wastes are deposited in interim disposal sites. With regard to the new German Radiation Protection Law established in August 2001, new waste management concepts based on in-situ mitigation are needed for these normally low radioactive contaminated wastes. Besides improved management concepts the in-situ treatment of contaminated waters is of major importance. Passive water treatment systems are possible methods for a long term cost effective treatment of waters from mine sites with naturally occurring radioactivity. For the treatment of surface waters internationally mainly constructed wetlands are in practice worldwide. On the other hand a few groundwater contaminations have been equipped with permeable walls consisting of zero valent iron. Hydrogeochemical and biogeochemical research on reactive materials is restricted on laboratory scale and there

  2. Environments with elevated radiation levels from natural radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.

    2000-01-01

    Some areas in the world have elevated levels of radioactive substances in the environment forming elevated radiation areas (ERAs) where public potential annual effective doses can exceed even the dose limit of radiation workers. Such radioactive substances are either terrestrial natural radioactivity added naturally in the soil or natural and/or man-made radioactivity from human activities added into the environment. If radioactivity is added naturally, elevated natural radiation areas (ENRAs) are formed. Based on the classification criteria introduced by the author, such regions are divided into static and dynamic areas. They are also classified in accordance with their level of potential effective dose to the public. Some main ENRAs are classified. Highlights are presented of the results of activity studies carried out in selected areas. The concepts discussed can also be applied to areas formed by human activities. The author suggests some guidelines for future studies, regulatory control and decision making, bearing in mind the need for harmonization of policies for regulatory control and remedial actions at sites to protect the public from environmental chronic exposures. (author)

  3. Natural radioactivity levels in lake sediment samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eroglu, H.; Kabadayi, O.

    2013-01-01

    The radioactivity concentrations of nuclides 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K in lake sediments collected from 15 different stations at Altinkaya dam lake and 12 different stations at Derbent dam lake in Turkey were measured using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The measurement was done using a coaxial HPGe detector system coupled to the Ortec-Dspect jr digital MCA system. The average measured activity concentrations of the nuclides 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K were found to be 19.5, 27.7 and 460 Bq kg -1 in Altinkaya dam, whereas the activity concentrations were 18.8, 25.5 and 365 Bq kg -1 in Derbent dam, respectively. The measured activity concentrations in the present study have been compared with similar measurements from different locations in the world. (authors)

  4. Naturally radioactivity in common building materials used in Thiruvannamalai city, Tamilnadu, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravisankar, R.; Vanasundari, K.; Suganya, M.; Sivakumar, S.; Senthilkumar, G.; Chandramohan, J.; Vijayagopal, P.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-01-01

    The radioactivity of some building materials used in Thiruvannamalai city has been measured using a NaI(Tl) detector based gamma ray spectrometer. The distribution of natural occurring radionuclides ( 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K) in the building materials was studied. The radium equivalent activity (Ra eq ), external hazard index (H ex ) internal radiation hazard index (H in ) and the activity utilization index (I) associated with the natural radionuclide are calculated to assess the radiation hazard of the natural radioactivity in the building materials. The present work shows that the natural radioactivity levels in the building construction materials used in Thiruvannamalai city is well below the acceptable limits. From the analysis, it was found that these materials may be safely used as construction materials and do not pose significant radiation hazards. (author)

  5. Determination of natural occurring radionuclide and heavy metals in drinking water in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Suraya Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to ascertain the activity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclide and selected heavy metals selected mineral and drinking waters sample in Malaysia. The activity concentration of natural radionuclide (mBq/ L) was determined by Gamma Spectroscopy Systems while the concentration of heavy metal (mg/ L) was determined by the Induces Couple Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The mineral and drinking water samples used in this study were Segar UKM, Giant, Ice Mountain (600 ml), Ice Mountain (1600 ml), Spritzer, Reverse Osmosis, and fresh tap water. The results of the study found 3 natural occurring radioactive materials (NORM) found for example - U-238, Ra-226 and Ra-228. The activity concentration determined was 0.00 mBq/ L to 1.71 mBq/ L for U-238, 0.00 - 32.46 mBq/ L for Ra-226 and 0.00 - 12.01 mBq/ L for Ra-228 respectively. The concentration of heavy metals Zn, Fe, As, Cl, Mn, Cu and Pb determined in this study were in the range of 0.000 - 0.003 mg/ L, 0.002-0.018 mg/ L, 0.000 - 0.007 mg/ L, 6.152 - 57.724 mg/ L, 0.000 - 0.016 μg/ L, 0.058 - 0.766 μg/ L and 0.000 - 0.380 μg/ L respectively. In general, the result of this study indicate that the activity concentration NORM and selected heavy metals in the studied mineral and drinking water samples were low and not exceed the limit set by World Organization (WHO) and Malaysian Food Regulations 1985. Thus, all the studied water samples complying the Malaysian drinking standard and safe to be consumed. (author)

  6. Natural radioactivity of thermal spring in village Banja, Municipality Fojnica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalj, A.; Saracevic, L.; Samek, D.; Gradascevic, N.; Lokmic, E.

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed in 2003 at the spring of a thermal water in the village of Banja, district of Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina. This water is used for hydrotherapy and recreation in the Centre for Medical Rehabilitation REUMAL in Fojnica. This paper describes the levels of natural radioactivity in water and in the surrounding soil. Gamma spectrometry was used to determine the most significant natural radionuclides in the water and soil. Natural radioactivity of radium in water ranged from 30.91 mBq/l for 2 28R a to 261.03 mBq/l for 2 26R a. In the soil surrounding the spring, radioactivity ranged from 31.92 Bq/kg for 2 32T h to 735.59 Bq/kg for 2 38U .(author)

  7. Natural radioactivity of building materials in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorantin, H.; Steger, F.

    1984-03-01

    About 120 samples of natural and manufactured building materials have been analyzed by gamma-spectrometry for their Thorium 232-, Radium 226- and Potassium 40 - content. Granites showed generally the greatest amounts of the above mentioned radionuclides, whereas other natural products like sand, gravels, marbles and gypsum contained only traces of radionuclides. As regards the manufactured building materials only some types of bricks and chemical gypsum showed relatively high concentrations of radionuclides, while the rest of the bricks, tiles, plaster and accessory materials fulfilled the criteria set up in the OECD-NEA report 1979. (Author)

  8. Measurement methodology of natural radioactivity in the thermal establishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameon, R.; Robe, M.C.

    2004-11-01

    The thermal baths have been identified as an activity susceptible to expose to ionizing radiations the workers through the natural sources of radon and radon 220. The new regulation obliges these facilities to realize radioactivity measurements. The principal ways of exposure are radon and its daughters inhalation,, exposure to gamma radiation, ingestion of radioelements in thermal waters. I.R.S.N. proposes two methods of measurements of the natural radioactivity in application to the regulation relative to the protection of persons and workers. Some principles to reduce exposure to radon are reminded. (N.C.)

  9. Natural radioactivity of the rocks from the Moon and planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surkov, Yu.A. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Geokhimii i Analiticheskoj Khimii)

    1982-01-01

    Tha data on natural radioactivity of rocks (U, Th and K contents) from the Moon, Venus and Mars obtained by means of cosmic means are analyzed. The Moon rock radioactivity has been measured in situ (from orbital vehicles) as well as in the samples of lunar material delivered to the Earth and as for Venus and Mars rocks - by landing vehicles. It has been found that the main specific feature of the Moon and the Earth group planets is the presence of two geomorphological types of the structure of their surface composed by two different types of the matter. The ancient continent regions are made up by feldspar rock - gabbroanorthosite at the Moon (and possibly at the Mars) and granite-metamorphic at the Earth (and possibly at the Venus). The younger ''marine'' regions are composed by basalt rock. The presence at the Moon of two types of crust (marine and continental ones) having a different nature is clearly reflected on the Moon radioactivity map where marine regions (15% of the total surface) which have high radioactivity and continental regions with a relatively low radioactivity can be seen. The discovery of rocks on the Venus surface highly enriched by U, Th and K speaks of their melting from the primary matter in the depth of the Earth. The Marsian rock by the natural radioelement content is close to igneous rocks of the Earth crust of the basic composition and lunar marine basalts.

  10. Natural radioactivity of the rocks from the Moon and planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surkov, Yu.A.

    1982-01-01

    Tha data on natural radioactivity of rocks (U, Th and K contents) from the Moon, Venus and Mars obtained by means of cosmic means are analyzed. The Moon rock radioactivity has been measured in situ (from orbital vehicles) as well as in the samples of lunar material delivered to the Earth and as for Venus and Mars rocks - by landing vehicles. It has been found that the main specific feature of the Moon and the Earth group planets is the presence of two geomorphological types of the structure of their surface composed by two different types of the matter. The ancient contineent regions are made up by feldspar rock - gabbroanorthosite at the Moon (and possibly at the Mars) and granite-metamorphic at the Earth (and possibly at the Venus). The younger ''marine'' regions are composed by basalt rock. The presence at the Moon of two types of crust (marine and continental ones) having a different nature is clearly reflected on the Moon radioactivity map where marine regions (15% of the total surface) which have high radioactivity and continental regions with a relatively low radioactivity can be seen. The discovery of rocks on the Venus surface highly enriched by U, Th and K speaks of their melting from the primary matter in the depth of the Earth. The Marsian rock by the natural radioelement content is close to igneous rocks of the Earth crust of the basic composition and lunar marine basalts

  11. Natural radioactivity product from coal burning in PLTU Pacitan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukirno; Sri Murniasih; Rosidi; Sutanto WW

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of radioactivity in the coal-fired power plant has been carried out in the CAST-NAA laboratory at 2015. Monitoring includes analysis of soil, water, fly ash, bottom ash and coal. The basic purpose of this work is the investigation of natural radionuclide contents in coal and the actual product samples in the Pacitan power plant as a first step to estimate the radioactive in the vicinity. This paper presents the results of the analysis of radioactivity in samples of coal, fly ash and bottom ash as well as environment samples of soil and water. Ra-226, Th-232, K-40, U-235, U-238, and Pb-210 Natural radionuclides are determined by gamma spectrometry with HPGe detector. Natural radionuclide in fine grain coal, bottom ash and fly ash have concentrations range (162.182 to 0.057) Bq/kg. Radioactivity contained in soil ranges (0.041 to 169.34) Bq/kg, whereas in water ranges (0.003 to 0.045) Bq/L. According Perka BAPETEN. No. 7 of 2013. On Boundary Value Environmental Radioactivity, the results of measurement analysis contained water around the power plant Pacitan still below the limit values allowed by BAPETEN. (author)

  12. Almera Proficiency Test Determination of Naturally Occurring Radionuclides in Phosphogypsum and Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Phosphogypsum is generated as a by-product of the phosphoric acid based fertilizer industry. The discharge of phosphogypsum on earth surface deposits is a potential source of enhanced natural radiation and heavy metals, and the resulting environmental impact should be considered carefully to ensure safety and compliance with environmental regulations. A reliable determination of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials in phosphogypsum is necessary to comply with the radiation protection and environmental regulations. This proficiency test (PT) is one of the series of the ALMERA network proficiency tests organised on a regular basis by the Chemistry Unit of the IAEA Terrestrial Environment Laboratory. These proficiency tests are designed to identify analytical problems, to support Member States laboratories to maintain their preparedness and to provide rapid and reliable analytical results. In this PT, the test item set consisted of six samples: one phosphogypsum (the IAEA-434 reference material) and five water samples spiked with natural radionuclides. The main task of the participating laboratories was to identify and quantify the activity levels of radionuclides present in these matrices. The tasks of IAEA were to prepare and distribute the samples to the participating laboratories, to collect and interpret analysis results and to compile a comprehensive report. The certified massic activity values of all radionuclides used in this PT were fulfilling the requirements of metrological traceability to international standards of radioactivity. In this PT, 306 test items (reference materials) were prepared and distributed to 52 participants from 40 countries in November 2008. The deadline for receiving the results from the participants was set to15 May 2009. For gross alpha/beta results the deadline was one working day from the date of sample delivery. The participating laboratories were requested to analyse Ra-226, U-234 and U-238 in water

  13. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Andra organised an International Symposium on the use of Natural and Engineered Clay-based Barriers for the Containment of Radioactive Waste hold at the Congress Centre of Tours, France, in March 2005. The symposium provided an opportunity to take stock of the potential properties of the clay-based materials present in engineered or natural barriers in order to meet the containment specifications of a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. It was intended for specialists working in the various disciplines involved with clays and clay based minerals, as well as scientists from agencies and organisations dealing with investigations on the disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste. The themes of the Symposium included geology, geochemistry, transfers of materials, alteration processes, geomechanics, as well as the recent developments regarding the characterisation of clays, as well as experiments in surface and underground laboratories. The symposium consisted of plenary sessions, parallel specialized sessions and poster sessions. (author)

  14. Determination of Natural Radioactivity in Building Materials with Gamma Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turki, Faten

    2010-01-01

    In the setting of this work, the natural radioactivity of building materials used in Tunisia has been measured by gamma spectrometry. These products have been ground and dried at 100 degree for 12 h. Then, they have been homogenized, weighed and finally conditioned during 23 days in order to reach the radioactive equilibrium. The measures' results proved that all building materials studied except bauxite and the ESC clay, possess doses lower than the acceptable limit (1 mSv.an-1). However, the possibility of reinforcement of the natural radioactivity in some industry of building can exist. To insure that the cement, the most used in the world, don't present any radiological risk on the workers' health, a survey has been made in the factory - les Ciments de Bizerte - about its manufacture's process. The results of this survey showed that this product can be considered like a healthy product.

  15. Radioactive mineral occurences of Colorado and bibliography. [2500 citations in bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson-Moore, J.L.; Collins, D.B.; Hornbaker, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    This two-part report provides an essentially complete listing of radioactive occurrences in Colorado, with a comprehensive bibliography and bibliographic cross-indexes. Part 1 lists approximately 3000 known radioactive occurrences with their locations and brief accounts of the geology, mineralogy, radioactivity, host rock, production data, and source of data for each. The occurrences are classified by host rock and plotted on U.S. Geological Survey 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ topographic quadrangle maps with a special 1 : 100,000-scale base map for the Uravan mineral belt. Part 2 contains the bibliography of approximately 2500 citations on radioactive mineral occurrences in the state, with cross-indexes by county, host rock, and the special categories of ''Front Range,'' ''Colorado Plateau,'' and ''thorium.'' The term ''occurrence'' as used in this report is defined as any site where the concentration of uranium or thorium is at least 0.01% or where the range of radioactivity is greater than twice the background radioactivity. All citations and occurrence data are stored on computer diskettes for easy retrieval, correction, and updating.

  16. A method for speciation of trace elements (stable and radioactive) in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.; Bjornstad, H.E.; Pappas, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    Radioactive nuclides and stable trace metals entering natural aquatic systems interact with naturally occurring particles through exchange and sorption processes. The extent of which depends not only on the elements and particles in question, but also on size distribution of particles being most pronounced for colloids having large surface areas to volume ratios. The interaction of radionuclides and trace metals with colloids changes their size and charge characteristics and thereby influences their transport, mobility and bioavailability

  17. Henri Becquerel and the discovery of natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barquins, M.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents the life and achievements of Henri Becquerel particularly in the domain of natural radioactivity which he discovered. In 1903 H.Becquerel was awarded the Nobel prize of physics (jointly with the Curies). The author highlights the importance of his talent but also the influence of his family background: his grand-father and father were both renowned scientists

  18. Regions with increased natural radioactivity. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansoni, B.; Matthes, W.; Schnitzler, J.

    1986-05-01

    Between May 23 and June 23, 1984, 169 specimens were taken of surface water and drinking water in the Fichtelgebirge, mainly from natural springs and wells in the granite region as well as in part from the drinking water supply. The uranium concentration was measured in the measuring van by a laser fluorimeter UA-3 (Scintrex); the water temperature, electrical conductivity, oxygen concentration and the pH value were determined by the Combibox (WTW). Furthermore, the discharge from the springs and wells was also determined. The concentration of radon-222 was emanometrically determined the following day in the field laboratory, while the radium-226 was separated overnight from the 20-l water specimens by ion exchange at manganese dioxide columns. The radium-226 was later determined emanometrically from the eluate in Juelich. Multi-element determinations by ICP atomic emission, atomic fluorescence and atomic absorption spectrometry were carried out in selected water specimens. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Gamma, radon, natural radioactivity measurements in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuardo, E.

    1997-01-01

    Different natural radiation measurements, performed since 1983, are analysed and discussed regarding the average effective population dose. A decade of absorbed gamma dose measurements in air (1983-93), were carried out using compensated TLD detectors, during long periods of integration time and with a network of 11 stations, along the country, from Arica to the Antarctic territory. An indoor Rn -222 and gamma survey dwellings, in high background zones, underground mines and drinking water was started in 1988 using different kind of detectors, including electret radon chambers. The methods, dose assessments and results are presented and discussed in the frame of worldwide average effective population doses. None of the average effective doses found over the evaluated areas, exceed the comparison levels. (author)

  20. Monitoring of natural radioactivity in Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikodemova, D; Vladar, M; Gomola, I [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, 83301 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The paper deals with two main natural sources of human exposure, i.e. the outdoor photon dose equivalent rate, H{sub x}, and the indoor volume activity [Bq/m{sup 3}]. The estimation of the radiation load from outdoor photon radiation was based on continuous measurements of dose equivalent rates using: 1)Thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD), types TLD 700 (LiF, Harshaw) in territorial monitoring network, consisting of 66 stations over Slovakia, where integral values are collected for 3 months; 2) Intelligent Environmental Dose Equivalent Proportional Detector, FHZ621B in an International Radiation Information System (IRIS). The system consists of 25 stations (16 working) over the whole Slovakia, situated uniformly at existing hydrometeorological stations. In standard operation a set of average dose equivalent rate, H{sub x}, are transferred every 24 hours into the central database of IRIS. For the measurements of equilibrium equivalent radon concentration (EEC) solid state track detectors type CR-39 (Pershore, UK) were used, exchanged in a period of 6 month during the heating season. Annual values of the effective doses from above natural sources of radiation in Slovakia range from 1.2 mSv to 3.2 mSv/year. This broad range is caused mainly by uncertaintes in calculation procedures of radon effective doses. The effective dose due to exposure radon calculated taking into account, that an annual radon gas concentration of 20 Bq/m{sup 3} is 1 mSv seems to be a very overstinated value. Therefore for protective measures the lower value of the above given range was used. This calculation methods are actually under scrutiny (J.K.). 4 figs., 3 tabs., 7 refs.

  1. Evaluating natural radiation level by existing airborne radioactive data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingkao, Hu; Changqing, Han; Jiangqi, Fang; Zhengxin, Shen

    2002-01-01

    Airborne Survey and Remote Sensing Center of Nuclear Industry, founded in the middle of 1950s, is a unique unit specialized in uranium exploration by airborne radioactive survey in China. Large numbers of airborne data of radioactivity and abundant experience have been accumulated for more than 40 years. All-round detailed investigation of environmental radiation levels in our country will not be completed in the near future. Thus, at present it is considered to evaluate natural radiation levels using the existing radioactive data. This paper introduces the results of analysis and study comparing airborne radioactive data for radiation environmental evaluation obtained from survey area in Gansu, China, in the 2001 with the measurement results by ground gamma ray radiation dose-rate instrument for environment. The air-earth inter-comparison error does not exceed 30% at radiation fields with a definite area, and the air-earth inter-comparison error does not exceed 60% at outcrop of granite. In 6km long profile that has various circumstances, such as desert, Gobi, farmland and residential area, minimum of air absorbed dose rate is 47nGy/h at an altitude of 1 meter above the soil plane, maximum is 68nGy/h. The inter-comparison errors are usually less than 20%, and maximum is 25.38%. This shows that it is feasible to obtain natural radiation levels rapidly if we could use the existing radioactive data adequately and make some correction, such as geology factor

  2. Some results of the investigation of cumuli natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styro, B.I.; Amiranashvili, A.G.

    1979-01-01

    When aircraft sounding cumuli in the eastern regions of the Georgian SSR during 1973-1977 about 70 vertical distribution profiles of radon decay products α-radioactivity for cloud drops and 50 profiles for the cloud medium were obtained. It was determined that in cumuli in a developed phase there exist 4 types of natural radionuclide vertical distribution. It was established that the accumulation of natural radioactivity takes place mainly in the lower part of the cloud, incidentally the radionuclide accumulation level appears to grow with the cloud power. The radioactivity of cloud drops on the average decreases greatly with height in the lower part of the cloud, and in the middle and upper parts it changes vertically insignificantly. The value of the specific radioactivity of the cloud water in different parts of the cloud varies on the average from (4.4+-0.9)x10 -10 up to (1.2+-0.2)x10 -10 Ci/g. The parameter of the nonradioactive removal of radioactive aerosols by drops and the effective rate of the vertical air current in cumuli clouds were calculated. Estimation of the radon current through the cloud bottom was performed

  3. Measurement of natural and {sup 137}Cs radioactivity concentrations at Izmit Bay (Marmara Sea), Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öksüz, İ., E-mail: ibrahim-ksz@yahoo.com; Güray, R. T., E-mail: tguray@kocaeli.edu.tr; Özkan, N., E-mail: nozkan@kocaeli.edu.tr; Yalçin, C., E-mail: caner.yalcin@kocaeli.edu.tr [Kocaeli University, Department of Physics, Umuttepe 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey); Ergül, H. A., E-mail: halim.ergul@kocaeli.edu.tr; Aksan, S., E-mail: serdar.aksan@kocaeli.edu.tr [Kocaeli University, Department of Biology, Umuttepe 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    In order to determine the radioactivity level at Izmit Bay Marmara Sea, marine sediment samples were collected from five different locations. The radioactivity concentrations of naturally occurring {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K isotopes and also that of an artificial isotope {sup 137}Cs were measured by using gamma-ray spectroscopy. Preliminary results show that the radioactivity concentrations of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th isotopes are lower than the average worldwide values while the radioactivity concentrations of the {sup 40}K are higher than the average worldwide value. A small amount of {sup 137}Cs contamination, which might be caused by the Chernobyl accident, was also detected.

  4. Ocean disposal option for bulk wastes containing naturally occurring radionuclides: an assessment case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stull, E.A.; Merry-Libby, P.

    1985-01-01

    There are 180,000 m 3 of slightly contaminated radioactive wastes (36 pCi/g radium-226) currently stored at the US Department of Energy's Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), near Lewiston, New York. These wastes resulted from the cleanup of soils that were contaminated above the guidelines for unrestricted use of property. An alternative to long-term management of these wastes on land is dispersal in the ocean. A scenario for ocean disposal is presented for excavation, transport, and emplacement of these wastes in an ocean disposal site. The potential fate of the wastes and impacts on the ocean environment are analyzed, and uncertainties in the development of two worst-case scenarios for dispersion and pathway analyses are discussed. Based on analysis of a worst-case pathway back to man, the incremental dose from ingesting fish containing naturally occurring radionuclides from ocean disposal of the NFSS wastes is insignificant. Ocean disposal of this type of waste appears to be a technically promising alternative to the long-term maintenance costs and eventual loss of containment associated with management in a near-surface land burial facility

  5. Previous management practices for naturally occurring radionuclide wastes: current radiological status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, W.A.; Crawford, D.J.; Haywood, F.F.; Leggett, R.Q.

    1979-01-01

    Many installations used during the early days of the United States atomic energy program have been released in recent years for unrestricted private uses. These installations include lands and buildings used for the storage of radioactive wastes resulting from refining and processing of uranium and thorium. Waste management practices at these sites in the 1940's and 1950's were not conducted with today's emphasis on as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) principles. Consequently, many of these older waste storage areas are contaminated with naturally occurring radionuclides in concentrations which are orders of magnitude greater than those found ordinarily in the earth's crust. current and potential elevated human exposures at fifteen of these sites are due primarily to radon daughters and external-gamma radiation. A wide variety of exposure conditions may be found at these sites - ranging from slightly above background to more than thirty times the guidelines recommended for the public. Remedial actions are contemplated for a number of these sites where contamination levels or radiaion exposures exceed current guidelines

  6. Natural radioactivity in rocks from Paraiba Sertao, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damascena, Kennedy F.R.; Santos Junior, Jose A. dos; Amaral, Romilton dos S.; Bezerra, Jairo D.; Rojas, Lino V.; Medeiros, Nilson V. da S.; Silva, Alberto A. da; Santos, Josineide M. do N.; Santos Junior, Otavio P. dos, E-mail: kennedy.eng.ambiental@gmail.com, E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br, E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br, E-mail: alberto.silva@barreiros.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: linomarvic@gmail.com, E-mail: otavio.santos@vitoria.ifpe.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Barreiros, PE (Brazil); Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Dessarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-11-01

    Northeastern Brazil is a region with a large number of natural radioactive occurrences. Monitoring studies carried out over the last 30 years have identified a hundred anomalous points, especially in the State of Paraiba, more specifically the region of Serido Ocidental Paraibano, geologically characterized by the presence of rocky outcrops with radioactive materials associated with granites and pegmatites. Regions with differentiated levels of natural radioactivity and, consequently, greater radioecological relevance, have been the constant object of radiometric and dosimetric studies. Considering their relevance, the present study aimed to evaluate the levels of natural radioactivity in rocks located in the Riacho da Serra and Serra dos Porcos, previously unmonitored, located in the municipalities of Sao Jose do Sabugi and Santa Luzia, in Paraiba, Northeast of Brazil. The radiometric evaluation was performed by measuring the specific activities of U-238, Th-232 and K-40 in rock samples using a high resolution gamma spectrometry system. The mean specific activities of U-238, Th-232 and K-40 were: 2562.30 ± 672.22; 180.68 ± 672.22 and 1374.13 ± 36.90 Bq/kg, respectively. The monitored radionuclides presented high values of specific activity, being 1.6; 4.1 and 71.2 times higher than the mean values for the earth's crust. (author)

  7. Natural radioactivity in rocks from Paraiba Sertao, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damascena, Kennedy F.R.; Santos Junior, Jose A. dos; Amaral, Romilton dos S.; Bezerra, Jairo D.; Rojas, Lino V.; Medeiros, Nilson V. da S.; Silva, Alberto A. da; Santos, Josineide M. do N.; Santos Junior, Otavio P. dos

    2017-01-01

    Northeastern Brazil is a region with a large number of natural radioactive occurrences. Monitoring studies carried out over the last 30 years have identified a hundred anomalous points, especially in the State of Paraiba, more specifically the region of Serido Ocidental Paraibano, geologically characterized by the presence of rocky outcrops with radioactive materials associated with granites and pegmatites. Regions with differentiated levels of natural radioactivity and, consequently, greater radioecological relevance, have been the constant object of radiometric and dosimetric studies. Considering their relevance, the present study aimed to evaluate the levels of natural radioactivity in rocks located in the Riacho da Serra and Serra dos Porcos, previously unmonitored, located in the municipalities of Sao Jose do Sabugi and Santa Luzia, in Paraiba, Northeast of Brazil. The radiometric evaluation was performed by measuring the specific activities of U-238, Th-232 and K-40 in rock samples using a high resolution gamma spectrometry system. The mean specific activities of U-238, Th-232 and K-40 were: 2562.30 ± 672.22; 180.68 ± 672.22 and 1374.13 ± 36.90 Bq/kg, respectively. The monitored radionuclides presented high values of specific activity, being 1.6; 4.1 and 71.2 times higher than the mean values for the earth's crust. (author)

  8. Characterization of Contaminant Transport using Naturally-Occurring U-Series Disequilibria - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murrell, Michael T.; Ku, Teh-Lung

    2001-01-01

    The interactions of mixed wastes containing radionuclides with solid rock surface and the mobility of the radionuclides in aquifer systems depend not only on the chemistry of the nuclides and the physico-chemical effects of radioactive decay, but also on the site-specific hydrogeology. Thus, to characterize contaminant transport, it is best to cross-check figures derived from any small-scale laboratory experiments over limited times with that obtained from field-oriented, natural analog studies. We propose such a study using the naturally-occurring U and Th decay-series disequilibria. The work of ours and other researchers have shown that the parent/daughter disequilibrium patterns existing in groundwater systems can be modeled in terms of local nuclide mass balance to arrive at such information as the rock-water contact time (fluid flow) and rates of contaminant transport, taking into account the retardation effect due to nuclide/rock interaction contaminants at INEL by grouping them into three categories, represented by isotopes of (1) Th and Pa, (2) U and (3) Ra. Mass spectrometric measurements of these elements will be emphasized in order to minimize sample size requirements and to maximize precision. Results will form the data base for a model code for computing: (1) Fluid residence time (transport rates) in the basalt aquifers at various locations, (2) The in-situ adsorption and desorption rate constants, as well as the retardation factors, of various radionuclide wastes, and (3) Rock dissolution rate and its relation to preferential flow and contamination transport in the fractured rock

  9. Natural and Artificial Radioactivity in Drinkingwater in Malaga, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, M. C.; Duenas, C.; Gordo, E.; Canete, S. [Department of Applied Physics I, Faculty of Science, University of Malaga (Spain); Perez, M. [Department of Radiology and Health Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaga, Malaga (Spain)

    2013-07-15

    The measurement of radioactivity in drinking water permits us to determine the exposure of the population to radiation from the habitual consumption of water. An intensive study of the water supply in the city of Malaga during 2002-2010 has been carried out in order to determine the gross alpha and gross beta activities and natural and artificial radionuclides present in drinking water. A database on natural and artificial radioactivity in water was created. The results indicated that a high percentage of the water sample contains a total gross alpha and beta concentration of less than 0.10 Bq/L and 1 Bq/L, respectively. The main objectives were: (1) to analyse gross alpha and gross beta activities and to know the statistical distributions; (2) to study the levels of natural and artificial radionuclides; (3) to determine a possible mathematical correlation between the radionuclides and several factors. (author)

  10. From phenotypic to molecular polymorphisms involved in naturally occurring variation for plant development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Blanco, C.; Mendez-Vigo, B.; Koornneef, M.

    2005-01-01

    An enormous amount of naturally occurring genetic variation affecting development is found within wild and domesticated plant species. This diversity is presumably involved in plant adaptation to different natural environments or in human preferences. In addition, such intraspecific variation

  11. Natural radioactivity of Loire river sediments: relations with the lithology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patryl, L.

    2000-01-01

    This study has been carried out on request of the Loire-Bretagne water agency by the Laboratory of geology of Tours univ. (EA2100 GeEAC) in collaboration with CEA-Le Ripault. The main objective was the study of the nature and distribution of natural radioactivity in the Loire river alluvial deposits, its origin in the rocks of the surrounding basins and its links with the alluvial petrography. The radioactive flux linked with the sediments of the bottom of the river has been also determined. The Loire river and its main affluents have been the object of radiological and petrographic analyses (grain size, sands and clays mineralogy, organic matter content). The average radioactivities of 40 K, 238 U and 228 Ac in the alluvial deposits are 934.3 ± 164.7 Bq.kg -1 , 50.6 ± 30.8 Bq.kg -1 and 28.8 ± 18.1 Bq.kg -1 , respectively. The average radioactivity of 238 U, 228 Ac and their daughter products is statistically higher in Loire superieure (Massif Central mounts) than in Loire moyenne (Paris basin). The activities of 238 U and 228 Ac are mainly influenced by the grain size of the alluvial deposits and by the mineralogical composition of the sand fraction. The alluvial deposits are mainly sandy and the coarse fraction is the most abundant. The primary radioactivity is carried by the few zircons of the sediments. The activity of the uranium and thorium families increase with the feldspars content. The fixation of radioactivity seems to be linked with the presence of clay minerals inside the weathered feldspar grains which are abundant in the sands. The radioactivity of the Loire river alluvial deposits shows no important changes with respect to the substratums because of a smoothing due to the predominance of longitudinal fluxes with respect to the lateral ones. The impact of an old uranium mine on the alluvial deposits of the Besbre river is detectable along about a tenth of km s downstream only. Because of the strong variations of radioactivity with granularity, a

  12. Worldwide Open Proficiency Test: Determination of Naturally Occurring Radionuclides in Phosphogypsum and Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    A reliable determination of naturally occurring radionuclides in phosphogypsum is necessary to comply with the radiation protection and environmental regulations. This proficiency test (PT) is one of the series of the world wide proficiency tests organised every year by the IAEA Terrestrial Environment Laboratory. This series of PTs is designed to identify analytical problems, to support Member State laboratories to maintain their accreditation and to provide a forum for discussions regarding the analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides. The range of sample types available for analysis has been mainly at environmental levels. In this PT, the test item set consisted of six samples: one phosphogypsum (the IAEA-434 reference material) and five water samples spiked with natural radionuclides. The main task of the participating laboratories was to identify and traceably quantify the activity levels of radionuclides present in these matrices. The tasks of the IAEA were to prepare and distribute the samples to the participating laboratories, to collect and interpret analysis results and to compile a comprehensive report. The certified massic activity values of all radionuclides used in this PT were traceable to international standards of radioactivity. In this PT, 1800 test items (reference materials) were prepared and distributed to 300 laboratories from 76 countries in November 2008. The deadline for receiving the results from the participants was set at 15 May 2009. The participating laboratories were requested to analyse Ra-226, U-234 and U-238 in water samples 01 and 02, and gross alpha/beta in water samples 03, 04 and 05. In the phosphogypsum sample number 06 the participants were asked to analyse Pb-210, Ra-226, Th-230, U-234 and U-238. The analytical results of the participating laboratories were compared with the reference values assigned to the reference materials, and a rating system was applied. Three National Metrology Institutes (NMI) and six expert

  13. Radiation risk from natural radioactivity in oil and gas production industry. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eid, M A [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    This paper throws light on the natural radioactive materials as well as the radiation background level in Egypt and other global areas. It also describes the deposition of naturally occurring radioactivity as well as the gamma-ray exposure rate primarily due to {sub 226} Ra and daughters which concentrate as scale or sludge in oil field piping and equipment. The potential hazards arising during normal operation, maintenance, and cleaning are considered. Occupational annual personnel doses are estimated and examined relative to work function. The measures to reduce occupational radiation exposure and radioactive contamination were investigated. The data indicated that relatively higher exposure rates are associated with areas around water discharge system, separator and descaling operations where the dose rates varying between 0.02-6 m R/h. The annual collective effective dose equivalent was estimated about 4.58 man-Rem, and the mean annual dose equivalent of about 120 mrem were measured. 3 tabs.

  14. Impact of technologically natural radioactivity on marine environment in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marovic, G.; Kovac, J.; Franic, Z.; Sencar, J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with increased levels of radioactivity in the Kastela bay at the Croatian coast of the Adriatic sea, which is due to geographical characteristics sensitive to any kind of pollution including the radioactivity. In the bay is situated a coal fired power plant. Investigations of used coal as well as slag and ash originating from the normal operations of showed increased concentrations of natural radioactivity spreading over the area and to the sea. There is a coal slag and ash pile which presents a considerable environmental problem: situated close to the seaside, slag and ash are accumulating in the littoral zone or are being filled up directly into the sea. The aim of this study was to determine radioactivity level at the ash and slag deposit and to assess the risk from increased radioactivity to the employees of the plant, to the inhabitants of the area and due to a direct contact of ash and slag with the sea water, to the Adriatic sea. (authors)

  15. Distribution of natural occurring radionuclide in some industral residues used in new type wall materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yingmin; Li Fusheng; Xu Jiaang; Deng Daping; Yuan Ming; Ma Shi; Chen Yue

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the natural radioactive nuclide distribution characteristic of fly ash, gangue and various kinds of slag used in the new-type wall material and offer scientific basis for reducing the radiation dosage that the public suffers. Methods: The activity concentrations of the contents of natural radioactive nuclides of different industral waste residues have been determined by HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry. Results: The mean Raeq is successively fly ash (279.13 Bq kg -1 ), slag (225.69 Bq kg -1 ), gangue (141.26 Bq kg -1 ) from high to low and all of the samples is lower than the limit set in the OECD. The arithmetic mean activities of 236 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K in fly-ash samples are 127.88, 93.83, 221.75 Bq kg -1 ; for coal slag samples are 73.89, 97.13, 283.44 Bq kg -1 and for coal gangue samples are 47.85, 45.21, 413.56 Bq kg -1 . For the same power plant, the radioactive nuclide activity of the fly ash gathered in different time may have very great differences, the maximum can reach more than 2 times of the minimum. Conclusion: the fly ash and slag should be controlled strictly on rational proportion, which should not exceed 70% of the total mass. The mixing of the average radioactive level of the gangue is nearly equal that of to clay, it can be unrestricted in the mixing proportion in process of production. The manufacturer of new-type wall materials should often measure the radioactive level of the industrial waste residue in production. Make the content of radioactive nuclide in the products reach the rational level as low as possible. (authors)

  16. Natural background radioactivity of the earth's surface -- essential information for environmental impact studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauchid, M.; Grasty, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    An environmental impact study is basically a study of change. This change is compared to the preexisting conditions that are usually perceived to be the original one or the 'pristine' stage. Unfortunately reliable information on the 'so called' pristine stage is far from adequate. One of the essential parts of this information is a good knowledge of the earth's chemical make up, or its geochemistry. Presently available data on the geochemistry of the earth's surface, including those related to radioactive elements, are incomplete and inconsistent. The main reason why a number of regulations are judged to be too strict and disproportional to the risks that might be caused by some human activities, is the lack of reliable information on the natural global geochemical background on which environmental regulations should be based. The main objective of this paper is to present a view on the need for complete baseline information on the earth's surface environment and in particular its geochemical character. It is only through the availability of complete information, including reliable baseline information on the natural radioactivity, that an appropriate study on the potential effect of the various naturally occurring elements on human health be carried out. Presented here are a number of examples where the natural radioactivity of an entire country has been mapped, or is in progress. Also described are the ways these undertakings were accomplished. There is a general misconception that elevated radioactivity can be found only around uranium mines, nuclear power reactors and similar nuclear installations. As can be seen from some of these maps, the natural background radioactivity of the earth's surface closely reflects the underlying geological formations and their alteration products. In reality, properly regulated and managed facilities, the levels of radioactivity associated with many of these facilities are generally quite low relative to those associated with

  17. Naturally Occurring Radionuclides of Ash Produced by Coal Combustion. The Case of the Kardia Mine in Northern Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotakis, M.; Tsikritzis, L.; Tzimkas, N.; Kolovos, N.; Tsikritzi, R.

    2008-08-01

    West Macedonia Lignite Center (WMLC), located in Northwest Greece, releases into the atmosphere about 21,400 tons/year of fly ash through the stacks of four coal fired plants. The lignite ash contains naturally occurring radionuclides, which are deposited on the WMLC basin. This work investigates the natural radioactivity of twenty six ash samples, laboratory produced from combustion of lignite, which was sampled perpendicularly to the benches of the Kardia mine. The concentrations of radionuclides 40K, 235U, 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra and 232Th, were measured spectroscopically and found round one order of magnitude as high as those of lignite. Subsequently the Radionuclide Partitioning Coefficients of radionuclides were calculated and it was found that they are higher for 232Th, 228Ra and 40K, because the latter have closer affinity with the inorganic matrix of lignite. During combustion up to one third of the naturally occurring radioisotopes escape from the solid phase into the flue gases. With comparison to relative global data, the investigated ash has been found to have relatively high radioactivity, but the emissions of the WMLC radionuclides contribute only 0.03% to the mean annual absorbed dose.

  18. Naturally Occurring Radionuclides of Ash Produced by Coal Combustion. The Case of the Kardia Mine in Northern Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotakis, M.; Tsikritzis, L.; Tzimkas, N.; Kolovos, N.; Tsikritzi, R.

    2008-01-01

    West Macedonia Lignite Center (WMLC), located in Northwest Greece, releases into the atmosphere about 21,400 tons/year of fly ash through the stacks of four coal fired plants. The lignite ash contains naturally occurring radionuclides, which are deposited on the WMLC basin. This work investigates the natural radioactivity of twenty six ash samples, laboratory produced from combustion of lignite, which was sampled perpendicularly to the benches of the Kardia mine. The concentrations of radionuclides 40 K, 235 U, 238 U, 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 232 Th, were measured spectroscopically and found round one order of magnitude as high as those of lignite. Subsequently the Radionuclide Partitioning Coefficients of radionuclides were calculated and it was found that they are higher for 232 Th, 228 Ra and 40 K, because the latter have closer affinity with the inorganic matrix of lignite. During combustion up to one third of the naturally occurring radioisotopes escape from the solid phase into the flue gases. With comparison to relative global data, the investigated ash has been found to have relatively high radioactivity, but the emissions of the WMLC radionuclides contribute only 0.03% to the mean annual absorbed dose

  19. Evaluation of air pollution due to natural radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, B. A.; Lopez, M. E.

    2014-08-01

    The presence of radioactive materials in the crustal and as consequence present in the surface, originate the natural radioactive contamination in the different solid, liquid and gaseous materials; particularly in the air that we breathe. Among these radioactive materials that contribute to the environmental pollution are the presences of uranium, radio, thorium and their respective disintegration chains, as the gas radon (Rn-222) that spreads in the air; whose presence increases in areas where the seismic activity is notorious or other natural events take place, case of the Lima (Peru) City. In this work we show the measurements realized during two consecutive years in the roof of a building of three floors in the Lima City, with the purpose of establishing the fluctuations of this gassy pollutant in the surrounding air. The measurements were made using nitrocellulose detectors (Lr-115 type 2) applying the nuclear prints technique. The obtained results allowing to have an indicator of the Rn-222 presence in the air during different seasons of the year and also the presence of other possible radioactive pollutants. The use of this technique allows obtaining and studying the prints that generate the alpha particles that are emitted during the Rn-222 disintegration or by means of their descendants or predecessors; also allowing to discriminate between the short-range tracers or lineal type prints and other very different prints obtained during some of the measurements. The results analyzed according to proposed models are presented in this work. (author)

  20. Natural radioactivity of Turkish natural stones as building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaprak, Guenseli; Yasar, Oezden

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Turkey has very important natural stones potential with over 5 billion m 3 marble reserves. According to 2002 giving data the number of Turkish stones export is 303 million US Dollars. In this regards, the present study deals with 90 Turkish natural stones. The studied samples were analyzed and the concentrations in Bq/kg dry weight of radioisotopes were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using HPGe detector. The radon exhalation rates of natural stones were also measured by using solid state nuclear track detectors (LR-115 ). The radium equivalent activity varied from 183 Bq/kg to 522 Bq/kg for granite samples and from 1 Bq/kg to 37 Bq/kg for marble samples. The value of radon exhalation rate ranged from 0.003 Bq/m 2 h -1 to 0.768 Bq/m 2 h -1 for granite samples and from 0.001 Bq/m 2 h -1 to 0.02 Bq/m 2 h -1 for marble samples. The total absorbed dose rates in air ranged from 22 to 61 n Gy h -1 for one quarter utilization of granite samples. The annual effective dose rates per person indoors were determined to be between 108 and 298 μSv y -1 for of for one quarter utilization of the materials. Applying the dose criteria recently recommended by UNSCEAR for building materials, the natural stones meet the upper dose limit of 1mSvy -1 . So, there are not restrictions for use of any Turkish commercial marble as covering materials, including Turkish granites. (author)

  1. Redistribution of natural radioactive elements resulting from animal and plant life activity in regions with high radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malslov, V.I.; Maslova, K.I.; Alexakhin, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative assessment is made of the influence of plant and animal life on the migration and redistribution of naturally occurring radionuclides in several localized areas with unusually high soil concentrations of 226 Ra, 238 U, or 232 Th. In the taiga and tundra zones examined, the effects of radionuclide accumulation in certain plant species and of the feeding and burrowing habits of small mammals were particularly significant. The observed regularities have predictive applications in assessing the redistribution of radionuclides in regions of high radioactivity

  2. Distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides activity concentration in East Malaysian marine sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yii, M.W. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)], E-mail: yii@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Zaharudin, A.; Abdul-Kadir, I. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)

    2009-04-15

    Studies of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) distribution of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in East Malaysia were carried out as part of a marine coastal environment project. The results of measurements will serve as baseline data and background reference level for Malaysia coastlines. Sediments from 21 coastal locations and 10 near shore locations were collected for analyses. The samples were dried, finely ground, sealed in a container and stored for a minimum of 30 days to establish secular equilibrium between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra and their respective radioactive progenies. They were counted using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectrometer covering the respective progeny energy peak. For {sup 40}K, the presence of this was measured directly via its 1460 keV energy peak. The concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in samples obtained from coastal Sarawak ranged between 23 and 41 (mean 30{+-}2) Bq/kg, 27 and 45 (mean 39{+-}4) Bq/kg and 142 and 680 (mean 462{+-}59) Bq/kg, respectively. Meanwhile, the concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K for samples obtained from coastal Sabah ranged between 16 and 30 (mean 23{+-}2) Bq/kg, 23 and 45 (mean 35{+-}4) Bq/kg and 402 and 842 (mean 577{+-}75) Bq/kg, respectively. For the Sarawak near shore stations, the concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K ranged between 11 and 36 (mean 22{+-}2) Bq/kg, 21 and 65 (mean 39{+-}5) Bq/kg and 149 and 517 (mean 309{+-}41) Bq/kg, respectively. Meanwhile, the concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K for samples obtained from Sabah ranged between 9 and 31 (mean 14{+-}2) Bq/kg, 10 and 48 (mean 21{+-}3) Bq/kg and 140 and 580 (mean 269{+-}36) Bq/kg, respectively. The calculated external hazard values of between 0.17 and 0.33 (less than unity) showed that there is little risk of external hazard to the workers handling the sediments.

  3. Natural and artificial radioactivity in the Svalbard glaciers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinglot, J.F.; Pourchet, M.

    1994-01-01

    Natural and artificial radioactivity in the snow of 10 Svalbard glaciers has been measured from 31 ice core samples, drilled between 1981 and 1993. Of these ice cores, seven exhibit the well-known level arising from the fallout of the 1961-62 atmospheric thermonuclear tests. The second level, due to the Chernobyl accident (26 April 1986), has been detected in all the studied glaciers; the maximum 137 Cs fallout reaches 22 Bq kg -1 and shows a high variability. The natural radioactivity, mostly due to 210 Pb, shows an in-depth variation which is not governed by its half-life (22.2 years). These measurements serve many glaciological purposes: absolute dating of the snow layers; air-snow transfer and fallout studies; the determination of mean annual mass balances in the accumulation area of glaciers and their associated spatio-temporal variations. (author)

  4. Radon concentration and natural radioactivity evaluation in the Vysehrad casemates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Z.; Thinova, L.; Stepan, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Vysehrad casemates formed a part of Prague's defense system in the middle ages. The casemates consist of a large system of underground corridors (which are in direct contact with subsoils) that run around the whole Vysehrad hill. The corridors are covered by an artificially made-up ground. Although there are many vents and embrasures in the casemates, investigation of radon accumulation in the casemates is of interest. A comprehensive radon and natural radioactivity survey has been carried out on the Vysehrad hill as part of special scientific programme for secondary school students. No extreme radon concentration or extremely high natural radioactivity has been observed. The highest radon concentration were measured in the blind parts of corridors that are normally unused. The radon concentrations found can be described as health-safe

  5. Survey of naturally occurring hazardous materials in deep geologic formations: a perspective on the relative hazard of deep burial of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonnessen, K.A.; Cohen, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Hazards associated with deep burial of solidified nuclear waste are considered with reference to toxic elements in naturally occurring ore deposits. This problem is put into perspective by relating the hazard of a radioactive waste repository to that of naturally occurring geologic formations. The basis for comparison derives from a consideration of safe drinking water levels. Calculations for relative toxicity of FBR waste and light water reactor (LWR) waste in an underground repository are compared with the relative toxicity indices obtained for average concentration ore deposits. Results indicate that, over time, nuclear waste toxicity decreases to levels below those of naturally occurring hazardous materials

  6. Natural radioactive isotopes in food of Polish population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak-Lis, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The natural radioactive isotopes contamination of basic food products and water in two regions of Poland (Central Poland and Silesia Region) have been measured. The following isotopes have been taken into account: U-234, U-238, Th-228, Th-230, Th-232, Ra-226, Ra-228, Pb-210; Po-210. The annually intake of mentioned isotopes by regional population and relative doses have been assessed for typical diet of adults in Poland

  7. Distribution of natural radioactive elements in Western Carpathians granitoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katlovsky, V.

    1979-01-01

    The content of natural radioactive elements was determined using the 1024-channel analyser NTA-512 B with NaI(Tl) scintillators or with a Ge(Li) detector. The following groups of samples were processed: 1. granitoids, pegmatites and weathered rocks in the Small Carpathians; 2. acid magmatites of exotic rocks of the klippen zone; 3. granitoids of the Western Carpathians. The results of the measurements are summed up. (Ha)

  8. Natural and Artificial Radioactivity in Drinking Water in Malaga, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duenas, C.; Fernandez, M.C.; Gordo, E.; Canete, S.; Perez, M.

    2011-01-01

    Water has a vast importance for numerous human activities, so that securing supplies of drinking water of a standard quality is becoming more and more difficult. The measurement of radioactivity in drinking water permits us to determine the exposure of the population to radiation from the habitual consumption of water. The occurrence of radionuclides in drinking water gives rise to internal exposure of humans, directly on the decay of radionuclides taken into the body through ingestion and inhalation and indirectly when they are incorporated as part of the food-chain The measurement of radioactivity in drinking water permits us to determine the exposure of population to radiation from the habitual consumption of water. An intensive study of the water supply in the city of Malaga during 2002-2010 has been carried out in order to determine the gross alpha activities, gross beta activities and natural and artificial radionuclides present in drinking water. A data base on natural and artificial radioactivity in water was produced. The results indicated that a high percentage of the water sample contains a total gross alpha and beta less than 0.10 Bq/l and 1 Bq/l respectively. The main objectives were: 1) to analyses gross alpha and gross beta activities and to know the statistical distributions. 2) to study the levels of natural and artificial radionuclides 3) to determine a possible mathematical correlation between the radionuclides and several factors.

  9. Content of naturally occurring radionuclides in samples taken from world historical sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, J.; Jankovic, M.; Todorovic, D.; Sarap, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation of naturally occurring radionuclides content in different samples taken from the historical sites in Iran, China, Syria and Jordan. Samples contained different natural materials used in masonry, for making artefacts for personal use as well as water, sand and mud from the Dead sea. The aim was to ascertain the content of naturally occurring radionuclides, calculation of hazard indexes and their comparison to the values recommended and obtained in modern days materials [sr

  10. Avoiding radioactive accidents in Israel 1996-1997: summary of incidents occurred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keren, M.; Neeman, E.; Rosental, J.J.; Brenner, S. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Medical School

    1997-12-31

    Radiation Safety Division of the Ministry of the Environment is responsible for radiation protection of the Israeli public and environment from radiation hazards. Notification, justification, registration and ALARA principles are important requirements to get license to use radioactive materials or instrumentation. Some incidents investigated from January 96 to the end of June 97 by the Chief National Radiation Safety Officer (CNRSO) of the division are reported 1 tab,; e-mail: envirad at post.tau.ac.il; env{sub r}ad.netvision.net.il

  11. Natural radioactivity in granite stones and their radiological aspects as building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumaravel, S.; Sunil, C.N.; Narashimha Nath, V.; Raghunath, T.; Prashanth Kumar, M.; Ramakrishna, V.; Nair, B.S.K.; Purohit, R.G.; Tripati, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Natural radioactivity in building and building decorating materials comes mainly from natural radioactive series like 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K. India is one of the leading users of granite stones as it is preferred by decorators and architects. The knowledge of presence of natural radioactivity in these materials is required for the assessment of radiation exposure due to them. The objective of this study is to determine the natural radioactivity and radiological aspects of granite stones as building material

  12. Low-level radioactive gas monitor for natural gas operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, F.E.

    1969-11-01

    A portable radioactivity detection system for monitoring the tritium content of natural gas under field conditions has been developed. The sensing device employed is a complex proportional counting assembly operated without the use of massive shielding previously employed with such low-level radiation detectors. The practical limit of detection for the system is a tritium content of 10 -9 microcurie per cc of natural gas. All components of the system are packaged in three waterproof cases weighing slightly less than 30 kg each. Power requirement is 500 watts of 120 volt, 60 Hz current. Operation is fully automatic with a printed record produced at predetermined time intervals

  13. Natural radioactivity survey in Al-Jabal Al-Gharbi Mountain Region Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askouri, N.A.; Hussain, M.O.; Al-Ojaily, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of natural radioactivity in a given region or country is essential to provide a reference base-line map to follow up a possible variation in future. In order to perform such measurement, the natural radioactivity was measured in different locations. The locations (50 sites) were distributed over Al-Jabal Al-Gharbi Mountain, starting from the city Al-Azeeziah in the eastern part to Wazen on the Tunisian border in the west. The measurements showed obvious variation from one site to another. The levels were fluctuating from (12.8 counts/minute) in Bir-Ayad to (45.7 counts/minute) in Gherian. In order to investigate the cause for such variation, samples were collected from (27) sites for detailed study. The levels of natural radioactivity were determined in the laboratory, and were ranging from (58.7 Bq/kg) in Bir-Ayad to (102.1 Bq/kg) in Gherian. The variation in measured radioactivity was related to the geological structures taken in six perpendicular sections, namely, Gharian, Yevren, Zintan, Nalut, Wazen and Al-Azeeziah taking the naturally occurred radioisotopes concentration of 4 0K, 232 Th and 238 U present in consideration.

  14. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  15. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  16. The Poco de Caldas project: Natural analogues of processes in a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.A.; McKinley, I.G.; Shea, M.E.; Smellie, J.A.T.

    1993-01-01

    The safe disposal of radioactive wastes by burial in deep geologic formations requires long-term predictions of the future behavior of the wastes nd their engineered repository. Such predictions can be tested by evaluating processes analogous to those which will occur in a repository, which have been long active in the natural geochemical environment. The title project is a comprehensive study of two ore deposits in Minas Gerais, Brasil, aimed at looking at uranium and thorium series radionuclide and rare earth element mobility, the development and movement of redox fronts, and the nature of natural groundwater colloids. A multidisciplinary team of experts from 27 laboratories carried out a fully integrated study of the geology, geomorphology, hydrogeology, geochemistry, hydrochemistry and geomicrobiology of the two sited for nearly four years. This book contains 20 papers covering the detailed findings, with particular emphasis on their significance for radioactive waste disposal, especially on the use of the data in testing models of radionuclide movement

  17. The natural radioactivity in Guarani aquifer groundwater, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonotto, D M; Bueno, T O

    2008-10-01

    The measurements of gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity in groundwater samples from Guarani aquifer in Brazil are reported in this paper together with the activity concentration of the natural dissolved radionuclides (40)K, (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra, (222)Rn, (210)Po, (210)Pb, (232)Th, (228Th), and (228)Ra. Most of the gross alpha radioactivity values were below the critical level of detection corresponding to 1 mBq/L, however, the whole data set for the gross beta radioactivity and radionuclides (40)K, (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra, (222)Rn, (210)Po, (210)Pb, and (228)Ra was submitted to a statistical treatment, considering class intervals arranged in geometric progression, because of the great variability of the activity. The analysis indicated lognormal distribution of the data, as usually observed in samples taken from the natural context. An inverse relationship between the gross alpha and gross beta activity has been identified and is related to an increase in the K content in the water. The mobility coefficient has been estimated for (238)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (228)Ra in Guarani aquifer and the results indicated that the radioelement solubility in the studied system varies according to the following order: radium>uranium>thorium. The implications of the data obtained in terms of standards established for defining the drinking water quality have also been discussed.

  18. The natural radioactivity in Guarani aquifer groundwater, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonotto, D.M. [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. 24-A No. 1515, C.P. 178, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: danielbonotto@yahoo.com.br; Bueno, T.O. [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. 24-A No. 1515, C.P. 178, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-10-15

    The measurements of gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity in groundwater samples from Guarani aquifer in Brazil are reported in this paper together with the activity concentration of the natural dissolved radionuclides {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 210}Po, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 232}Th, {sup 228Th}, and {sup 228}Ra. Most of the gross alpha radioactivity values were below the critical level of detection corresponding to 1 mBq/L, however, the whole data set for the gross beta radioactivity and radionuclides {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 210}Po, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 228}Ra was submitted to a statistical treatment, considering class intervals arranged in geometric progression, because of the great variability of the activity. The analysis indicated lognormal distribution of the data, as usually observed in samples taken from the natural context. An inverse relationship between the gross alpha and gross beta activity has been identified and is related to an increase in the K content in the water. The mobility coefficient has been estimated for {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 228}Ra in Guarani aquifer and the results indicated that the radioelement solubility in the studied system varies according to the following order: radium>uranium>thorium. The implications of the data obtained in terms of standards established for defining the drinking water quality have also been discussed.

  19. Natural radioactivity associated with bituminous coal mining in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogun, F.A.; Mokobia, C.E.; Fasasi, M.K.; Ogundare, F.O.

    2003-01-01

    Gamma spectroscopic method was used to determine the natural radioactivity associated with the mining of Nigerian bituminous coal for the purpose of determining the radiological implications of coal mining in the country. The activity concentrations of the radionuclides detected range from 0.20±0.002 to 48.42±5.32 Bq kg -1 . The overall natural radionuclide contribution to the radioactivity of the environment was found to be 404.16±23.44 Bq kg -1 . Of this, coal waste (tailing) alone contributed 49.5% representing the largest contribution. Coal contributed just 5.5%. A comparison of the concentrations obtained in this work for coal with those from other parts of the world indicates that the radioactivity content of the Nigerian bituminous coal is not significantly different. The outdoor and indoor exposure rates in air 1 m above the ground are estimated to be (6.31±1.20)x10 -8 and (7.57±1.20) x10 -8 Gy h -1 , respectively, for the mining environment. These values compare very well with the global values reported by UNSCEAR: 5x10 -8 and 6x10 -8 Gy h -1 , respectively. The resulting annual effective dose equivalent estimated is (4.49±0.74)x10 -4 Sv yr -1 . This also compares favourably with the global value -4x10 -4 Sv yr -1 , reported by UNSCEAR

  20. Natural radioactivity and radon specific exhalation rate of zircon sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righi, S.; Verita, S.; Bruzzi, L.; Albertazzi, A.

    2006-01-01

    The study focuses on the radon emanation from zircon sands and their derivatives, which are widely used in many sectors of industry. In particular, the results obtained by experimental measurements on samples of zircon sands and zircon flours commonly used in Italian ceramic industries are reported. Zircon sands contain a significant concentration of natural radioactivity because Th and U may substitute zirconium in the zircon crystal lattice. The relevant routes of exposure of workers to T.E.N.O.R.M. from zircon materials are external radiation and internal exposure, either by inhalation of aerosols in dusty working conditions or by inhalation of radon in workplaces. The main objective of this investigation is to provide experimental data able to better calculate the internal exposure of workers due to radon inhalation. Zircon samples were surveyed for natural radioactivity, radon specific exhalation rate and emanation fraction. Measurements of radioactivity concentration were carried out using γ-spectrometry. Methods used for determining radon consisted in determining the 222 Rn activity accumulated in a vessel after a given accumulation build-up time. The average activity concentrations of 238 U and 232 Th in samples result about 2600 and 550 Bq kg-1, respectively; these concentrations are significantly higher than the world average noticed in soils, rocks and Earth crust. The 222 Rn specific exhalation rates result very low probably due to the low porosity of the material and the consequent difficulty for radon to be released from the zircon crystal lattice. (author)

  1. Natural radioactivity levels in different mineral waters from Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenova-Totzeva, R.; Kotova, R.; Tenev, J.; Ivanova, G.; Badulin, V. [Public Exposure Monitoring Laboratory, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-07-01

    The total radioactivity content of 76 mineral waters from different districts in Bulgaria was determined. Natural radioactivity levels resulting from uranium, radium-226, gross alpha and gross beta activity were measured. The results show that the specific activity range from < 0.02 Bq/l to 1.34 (12) Bq/l and from 0.068 (23) Bq/l to 2.60 (50) Bq/l for gross alpha and gross beta activity respectively. For natural Uranium the results vary between 0.020 (5) μg/l and 180(50) μg/l. Radium-226 content is between < 0.03 Bq/l to 0.296 (75) Bq/l. Due to differences in the geological structure of the aquifer, a large difference in values of the radioactive content was mSv/year. Excluding one value, TID do not exceed the permissible limit of 0.10 mSv/year. The correlations between investigated isotopes and Total Dissolved observed. The estimated Total Indicative Dose (TID) ranged from 0.0113 (57) mSv/year to 0.1713 (481) Solvents (TDS) in water were carried out. The results do not show a strong correlation between TDS values and dissolved radionuclides. (author)

  2. Natural radioactivity in soil samples of Kocaeli basin, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakelle, B.; Oeztuerk, N.; Erkol, A.Y.; Koese, A.; Varinlioglu, A.; Yilmaz, F.

    2002-01-01

    The city of Kocaeli is in the western part of Anatolia in Turkey and has a population of approximately 1.000.000. There is no information about radioactivity in the Kocaeli soils samples so far. For this reason, the concentrations of the natural radionuclides in soil samples from 27 different sampling stations in Kocaeli Basin and its surroundings have been determined. The results have been compared with other radioactivity measurements in different country's soils. The typical concentrations of 137 Cs, 238 U, 40 K, 226 Ra, 232 Th found in surface soil samples ranged from 2 ± 0.6 to 25 ± 6 Bq/kg, from 11 ± 4 to 49 ± 10 Bq/kg, from 161 ± 30 to 964 ± 127 Bq/kg, from 10 ± 4 to 58 ± 11 Bq/kg, and from 11 ± 3 to 65 ± 13 Bq/kg, respectively. (author)

  3. Natural radioactivity in hot and mineral waters in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Abbass, M.; Kattan, Z.

    1994-08-01

    A study of water chemistry and radioactivity of hot and mineral ground waters was conducted in Syria in order to determine the natural radioactivity levels as well as the mobility process of major radionuclides in the studied systems. The water samples were collected generally from carbonate and basaltic aquifer systems. The chemistry of groundwaters was a reflection of the rock type, while no relationship was found between the radionuclide activities and water temperatures. The increase of 222 Rn concentration in hot and mineral waters was accompanied by a similar increase of the concentration of its patent radionuclides (U t ot and 226 Ra). In parallel, the relative increase of 222 Rn concentration was correlated significantly with the presence of the large faults systems prevailing in the studied areas (Palmyrides and Great African Faults Systems). In all the cases, the radionuclide activity levels were below the maximum contaminant levels given for drinking water and health effects. (author). 11 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Natural radioactivity of building materials coming from a volcanic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, V.; Pugliese, M.; Sabbarese, C.; D'Onofrio, A.; Lubritto, C.; Terrasi, F.; Ermice, A.; Inglima, I.; Migliore, G.

    2004-01-01

    Radioactivity was found to be very high in tuff and other materials originating from volcanic lava. Emanation of radon from such materials is appreciably higher than from materials of other origin. This work allowed us to obtain a first complete database of natural radioactivity concentrations in building materials from this region. Measurements were carried out by means of a gamma spectrometry system. Gamma emitting daughter products of 222 Rn were measured to determine 226 Ra. The samples, after a routine treatment, were accommodated in sealed metallic containers for a time sufficient for the equilibrium to establish. The determination of the radon emanation power was carried out by using an electrostatic monitor. Alpha spectroscopy of radon daughters was used to evaluate the content of radon coming from the sample

  5. Areas with higher levels of natural radioactivity. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansoni, B.; Technische Univ. Muenchen, Freising

    1989-12-01

    The maple source I delivers 'radon containing water' for possible cure applications with sufficiently high radon concentrations of about 40 nCi Rn-222/l, extremely low concentration of radium and other solution containing materials, and is exceptional among radon medicinal baths used up to now for radon medicinal cures in the Federal Republic of Germany. Radon balneology is especially important for rheumatic diseases. It concerns a stimulation therapy also for chronic diseases which otherwise do not have any effect on it. From the view of radiation protection, medicinal cures with radon become justifiable if standpoints of radiation protection for artificial radioactivity is transferred correspondingly to natural radioactivity which has not been laid down by legislation up to now. Balneology and medicine are to prove the usefulness of medicinal cures with radon in a way that can stand the limits of statistics. Spa doctor and spa staff have to subject to a normal control for radiation protection. (orig./HSCH) [de

  6. Radioactivity. Death prinicple in nature; Radioaktivitaet. Das Todesprinzip in der Natur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, W.; Russell, L.

    2006-07-01

    Walter Russell's knowledge of the two basic Principles of the material universe, concentration and radiation, strongly suggests that the radioactivity is the ''death principle'' of creation. In its natural environment, radioactive radiation is vital for the overall balance, however, when spread out across the entire world, it causes massive global warming and turns planet earth into a hot desert. Part I: What is Atomic Energy?; How Radioactivity Kills; The World Voice. Part II: The True Nature of This Mind and Motion Universe; Prelude - The Transformation of Man; We Define God; The True Nature of Electricity and Gravitation; Our Eternal Universe; The Oneness of Gravity and Magnetism; The Mind Nucleus of the Atom; The Material Nucleus of the Atom. Part III: The Bridge Between Man and God. (orig./GL)

  7. Radon-222 as communication and information tool about natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelliccione, Nina Beatriz B.; Gouvea, Rita de Cassia S.; Kelecom, Alphonse; Gouvea, Vandir A.

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear area still suffers from the psychological impact caused by the atomic bombs detonated at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and also from the Chernobyl plant explosion. This situation results from two main reasons: manipulation of public opinion and lack of suitable information. In general, knowledge about radioactivity is very superficial, impregnated by preconceived notions transmitted by the media or by pacific organizations and ecologic groups. Rejection attitudes are observed among most of the general public that expresses an opinion although it does not know the subject. To change this situation has been the major challenge of the nuclear sector and needs to better communication with people at large. To teach is fundamental. This work reports on a didactic experiment carried out with 130 under graduating and graduating students in Biology and Environmental Science from the Fluminense Federal University. The goal was to try to perceive the existence of a natural radioactivity, hence not related to human activities, through radon-222 dosage. This practice complements the theoretical lessons, as it illustrates properties of ionizing radiation, and can easily be transposed to the general public. The monitoring equipment works detecting nuclear tracks. It is an easy to handle small and light device - hence friendly, to be put in the most used room of each one's house. It is taught how to use it and how to give correct information to interested people. Radon measurements are discussed with the students, and at the same time they perceive the existence of natural radioactivity, present everywhere, they start to change their own perception of radioactivity, which turns to be very different from their original nuclear imaginary. (author)

  8. Naturally occurring and radiation-induced tumors in SPF mice, and genetic influence in radiation leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, T.

    1979-01-01

    The data obtained so far in this study point to a strong genetic influence not only on the types and incidence of naturally occurring and radiation-induced tumors but also on radiation leukemogenesis. (Auth.)

  9. APPLICATION OF THE NATURALLY-OCCURRING DEUTERIUM ISOTOPE TO TRACING THE CAPILLARY FRINGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturally-occurring deuterium is a useful tracer of subsurface hydrologic processes. A possible application includes the identification of capillary fringes in the vadose zone. Multiple and discontinuous water tables persist in many temperate regions, under various hydrogeologi...

  10. Synthesis of the naturally occurring prenylated coumarins balsamiferone and cedrelopsin by domino reactions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patre, R.E.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Tilve, S.G.

    Regioselective one step synthesis of naturally occurring prenyl coumarin balsamiferone is described using domino Wittig reaction, 3,3-sigmatropic rearrangements and deprenylation, while regioselective synthesis of cedrelopsin is described via domino...

  11. Estimates of naturally occurring pools of thorium, uranium and iodine in boreal forests of southeast Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loefgren, A.; Kautsky, U.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution patterns of naturally occurring radionuclides or their stable isotopes have been used to study the long-term behaviour of the radionuclides that may originate from nuclear waste. The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company is performing investigations at two potential sites for nuclear waste disposal in southern Sweden. Here is the distribution and total content of the three naturally occurring radionuclides/stable isotopes, thorium, uranium and iodine, described for six forest localities at those sites. (LN)

  12. Detection of Naturally Occurring Gear and Bearing Faults in a Helicopter Drivetrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Detection of Naturally Occurring Gear and Bearing Faults in a Helicopter Drivetrain by Kelsen E. LaBerge, Eric C. Ames, and Brian D. Dykas...5066 ARL-TR-6795 January 2014 Detection of Naturally Occurring Gear and Bearing Faults in a Helicopter Drivetrain Kelsen E. LaBerge...ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kelsen E. LaBerge, Eric C. Ames, and Brian D. Dykas 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER

  13. Natural radioactivity (40K) measurement in common food grains using indigenous technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Pradeep; Sahani, R.M.; Damor, S.L.; D'Souza, P.M.

    2018-01-01

    Ingestion of contaminated food is one of the major causes of internal doses received in various human organs. As there being no material free from radioactivity on this globe; knowledge of natural radioactivity concentration in common food items is very important for judging the origin of contamination due to nuclear emergency or other man-made activities. An indigenous technology for radioactivity measurement in food/bulk items has been developed and tested using live radioactive sources. This has also been explored for natural radioactivity measurement in common food grains consumed by Indian population. This paper reports the measured natural radioactivity ( 40 K) in common Indian food grains using the developed technology

  14. Natural Radioactivity of Soil in Sabah and Sarawak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail Sulaiman; Muhamat Omar; Mohd Suhaimi Elias

    2015-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from 40 locations throughout Sabah and Sarawak and were analysed for natural radionuclides concentration. The mean soil concentrations of "2"3"8U, "2"3"2Th, "2"2"6Ra and "4"0K in Sabah were 22, 18, 24 and 216 Bq kg"-"1 respectively while corresponding values in Sarawak were 25, 25, 38 and 305 Bq kg"-"1 respectively. This study showed that the concentration of natural radionuclides (except "4"0K) in soil in Sabah and Sarawak were about one third of the respective values in Peninsular Malaysia. The results of the study can be used as baseline data of natural radioactivity for East Malaysia. (Author)

  15. Selection of radioactive waste disposal site considering natural processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.

    1991-01-01

    To dispose the radioactive waste, it is necessary to consider the transfer of material in natural environment. The points of consideration are 1) Long residence time of water 2) Independence of biosphere from the compartment containing the disposal site in the natural hydrologic cycle 3) Dilution with the natural inactive isotope or the same group of elements. Isotope dilution for 129 I and 14 C can be expected by proper selection of the site. 241 Am and 239 Pu will be homogenized into soil or sediment with insoluble elements such as iron and aluminium. For 237 Np and 99 Tc anionic condition is important for the selection. From the point of view of hydrologic cycle, anoxic dead water zone avoiding beneath mountain area is preferable for the disposal site. (author)

  16. Exposure to radiation from the natural radioactivity in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    Radiation exposure of members of the public can be increased appreciably by the use of building materials containing above-normal levels of natural radioactivity. This phenomenon has attracted attention in recent years, and in this review, an attempt is made to the quantify exposures incurred under various circumstances. The second section of the review is a general survey of those building materials, mostly industrial wastes, that have aroused interest in Member countries. The probability that environmental pressures may cause such wastes to be used more and more by building industries may lead to similar situations in the future. Other review material of a relevant nature is described in the third section. Primordial radionuclides only are considered here. They are: potassium-40 (K-40); radium-226 (Ra-226) and its decay products; the series headed by thorium-232 (Th-232). The important radiological consequences of the natural radioactivity in building materials are two-fold, irradiation of the body by gamma rays and irradiation of the lung tissues by radon-222 (Rn-222) decay products or daughters. These consequences cannot be explored quantitatively except in relation to the specific activities of the nuclides of interest, and the approach adopted in this review is to assess the consequences in terms of the incremental radiation exposures that would be incurred by occupants of substantial dwellings entirely constructed of materials with various specific activities or combinations thereof. Gamma rays are dealt with in the fourth section and radon daughters in the fifth

  17. Natural analogues, paradigm for manmade repositories for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelescu, M.; Pavelescu, A.

    2004-01-01

    Natural analogues are given by nature. They show the results of natural processes which have lasted thousands or millions of years. They provide an excellent example of what could happen in an underground site, offering in the same time the opportunity to test by observation and measurement, many of the geochemical processes that are expected to influence in a realistic and appropriate way, the predicted reliability of the radioactive waste repository over long periods of geological time. The natural analogue studies attempt to understand the multiprocessing complexity of the natural system, which contrasts with the limitations of the laboratory experiments and bring arguments to overcome the difficult time scale issue. By this the natural analogues are a useful paradigm for manmade repository for radioactive wastes. The paper discusses the implicit link in the public mind between natural analogues and manmade waste repository with an accent of the positive impact on public acceptance. It is also discussed the decisive qualities of the natural analogues concerning providing valid long term data and increasing the confidence of the public for manmade repositories. The debate is conducting in terms of sustainable development, having at base high-level principles in order to protect humans and their environment, both now and in the future, from potential hazards arising from such wastes. Safe radwaste management involves the application of technology and resources in a regulated manner so that the public, workers and the environment are protected in accordance with the accepted national and international standards. There are at least seven high-level principles which are mentioned in the paper. It is presented the general concept of the deep geological repository, very important for an acceptable solution for the management of nuclear waste, what is a prerequisite for a renewal of nuclear power. Further are introduced natural and archaeological (manufactured) analogue

  18. Natural radioactivity in lignite samples from open pit mines "Kolubara", Serbia--risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ðurašević, M; Kandić, A; Stefanović, P; Vukanac, I; Sešlak, B; Milošević, Z; Marković, T

    2014-05-01

    Coal as fossil fuel mainly contains naturally occurring radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series and (40)K. Use of coal, primarily in industry, as a result has dispersion of radioactive material from coal in and through air and water. The aim of this study was to determine the activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in coal samples from open pit mines "Kolubara" and to evaluate its effect on population health. The results showed that all measured and calculated values were below the limits recommended in international legislation. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Occupational exposure to natural radioactivity in a zircon sand milling plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros, Luisa; Zarza, Isidoro; Ortiz, Josefina; Serradell, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Raw zirconium sand is one of the substances (naturally occurring radioactive material, NORM) which is widely used in the ceramic industry. This sand contains varying concentrations of natural radionuclides: mostly U-238 but also Th-232 and U-235, together with their daughters, and therefore may need to be regulated by Directive 96/29/EURATOM. This paper describes the method used to perform the radiological study on a zircon sand milling plant and presents the results obtained. Internal and external doses were evaluated using radioactivity readings from sand, airborne dust, intermediate materials and end products. The results on total effective dose show the need for this type of industry to be carefully controlled, since values near to 1 mSv were obtained

  20. Occupational exposure to natural radioactivity in a zircon sand milling plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros, Luisa [Laboratorio de Radioactividad Ambiental, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: lballest@upvnet.upv.es; Zarza, Isidoro [Laboratorio de Radioactividad Ambiental, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: iszarpe@upvnet.upv.es; Ortiz, Josefina [Laboratorio de Radioactividad Ambiental, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jortiz@iqn.upv.es; Serradell, Vicente [Laboratorio de Radioactividad Ambiental, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: vserradell@iqn.upv.es

    2008-10-15

    Raw zirconium sand is one of the substances (naturally occurring radioactive material, NORM) which is widely used in the ceramic industry. This sand contains varying concentrations of natural radionuclides: mostly U-238 but also Th-232 and U-235, together with their daughters, and therefore may need to be regulated by Directive 96/29/EURATOM. This paper describes the method used to perform the radiological study on a zircon sand milling plant and presents the results obtained. Internal and external doses were evaluated using radioactivity readings from sand, airborne dust, intermediate materials and end products. The results on total effective dose show the need for this type of industry to be carefully controlled, since values near to 1 mSv were obtained.

  1. Natural radioactivity levels of some medical plants used in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tettey-Larbi, L.

    2012-07-01

    The presence of natural radioactivity in plants constitutes pathway of exposure to human via the food chain. The natural radioactivity concentrations in some selected medicinal plants used in Ghana from the Centre for Scientific Research into Plant Medicine were investigated to determine the activity concentration and the annual committed effective dose due to primodial radionuclide series of 238 U, 232 Th, and the non-serial 40 K. The plants were sampled based on their therapeutic purposes for which they are commonly used. The activity concentration was determined using gamma spectrometry. The results of the analysis indicated an average activity concentration of 238 U, 232 Th, and 40 K in the medicinal plants to be 31.78±2.80 Bq kg -1 , 56.16±2.32 Bq kg -1 and 839.80±11.86 Bq kg -1 respectively. Khaya ivorensis recorded the highest concerntration of 238 U and 232 Th while Lippia multiflora recorded the highest concentration of 40 K. The total annual committed effective doses due to 238 U, 232 Th, and 40 K in medicinal plant samples ranged from 0.026±0.001 to 0.042±0.002 mSv a -1 with an average value of 0.035±001 mSv a -1 . The average annual committed effective dose due to ingestion of the natural radionuclides in the medicinal plant samples were far below the world average annual effective dose of 0.3 mSv a -1 for ingestion of natural radionuclide provided in UNSCEAR 2000 report. Therefore, the radiological hazard associated with intake of the natural radionuclides in the medicinal plants is insignificant. (author)

  2. Determination of distribution coefficient (Kd's) of some artificial and naturally occurring radionuclide in fresh and marine coastal water sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Mamish, S; Haleem, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    Distribution coefficients of artificial and natural radionuclides in fresh and marine water sediment are used in modeling radionuclide dispersion in water system, and the radiation risk and environmental investigating of impact of radioactive emissions, due to routine operations of nuclear plants or disposal and burial of radioactive waste in the environment. In the present work, distribution coefficient of uranium, lead, polonium, radium (naturally occurring radionuclides that may be emitted into the Syrian environment by the phosphate and oil industry with relatively high concentrations) and caesium 137 and strontium 85, in fresh water sediment (Euphrates River, Orantos River and Mzzerib Lake) and marine coastal water (Lattakia, Tartous and Banias). Distribution coefficients were found to vary between (5.8-17.18)*10 3 , (2.2-8.11)*10 3 , (0.22-2.08)*10 3 , (0.16-0.19)*10 3 , (0.38-0.69)*10 3 and 49-312 for polonium, lead, uranium, radium, cesium and strontium respectively. Results have indicated that most measurement distribution coefficients in the present study were lower than those values reported in IAEA documents for marine coastal sediment. In addition, variations of Kd's with aqueous phase composition and sediment elemental and mineralogical composition and its total organic materials content have been studied, where liner correlation coefficients for each isotope with different parameters have been determined. The obtained data reported in this study can be used for radioactive contaminants dispersion and transfer in Syrian river, lake and coast to assess risks to public due to discharges of the phosphate and oil industry into the Syrian environment. (Authors)

  3. Contribution to the understanding and to the simulation of processes occurring at the vicinity of a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotignon, L.

    2004-04-01

    The author gives an overview of his research activities between 1986 and 2004. These activities were focused on the observation, analysis and simulation of solid-solution interactions, with application to radioactive waste storage in deep geologic formations. More precisely, these works dealt with the evolution of rock porosity (dissolution-crystallization under stress), the aqueous corrosion of nuclear glasses, the redox transient (how and at which rate a disturbance related to dissolved oxygen intrusion will be resorbed), and the transport-chemistry simulation and natural analogues

  4. Natural Radioactivity Pattern of Surabaya Water Environmental Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosidi; Agus Taftazani

    2007-01-01

    The gross β radioactivity and natural radionuclide of Surabaya environmental samples pattern have been evaluated. The environmental samples were chosen randomly at 12 locations. The environment samples were water (fresh, estuary and coastal), sediment, eichhornia crassipes (Mart) Solms, Mangrove (Rhizophora stylosa), (Moolgarda delicatus) fish and (Johnius (Johnieops) borneensis) (Sharpnose hammer croaker) fish. The water sample was evaporated; the sediment sample was dried and ground; the biotic samples was burnt at the temperature 500 °C ; The gross β measurement using GM detector and the radionuclides has been identified by γ spectrometer. From the investigation results could be concluded that the natural radioactivity of environmental samples was very low. gross-β of water samples were lower than the threshold value of local government regulation of Surabaya no: 2 year 2004 (1 Bq/L). The distribution of gross-β activity of eichhornia crassipes (Mart) Solms was higher than the other biotic, water and sediment samples as well as the accumulation of radionuclides in the water organism was taken place. The result of identification using γ spectrometer has detected 7 of radionuclides, i.e 210 Pb, 212 Pb, 214 Pb, 208 Tl, 214 Bi, 228 Ac, and 40 K in all sample. The distribution factor of sediment F D was less than bioaccumulation factor of biotic F B and it indicates that there the radionuclide accumulation migration follows the pattern of water - sediment - biotic sample. (author)

  5. Natural radioactivity level of main building materials in Baotou, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Caifeng; Lu Xinwei; Li Nan; Yang Guang

    2012-01-01

    A survey was done on natural radioactivity level and annual effective dose rate of main building materials in Baotou, China. The natural radionuclides of 40 K, 232 Th and 226 Ra in main building materials collected from Baotou were measured using NaI γ-ray spectrometry and the measured data were analyzed according to the national standards and radiological protection principles of the European Commission. The specific activities of 40 K, 232 Th and 226 Ra in the building materials samples were 218.82-1145.92, 19.75-1.32.50 and 11.46-82.66 Bq/kg, respectively. The internal and external exposure indexes of building materials were 0.06-0.41 and 0.28-0.70, respectively. The annual effective dose equivalent was 0.41-0.97 mSv/y. This justifies the production and sale of the main building materials, as both the internal and external exposure indexes of building materials are less than 1. The effective dose rate of ash brick is 0.97 mSv/y, while the maximum acceptable value is 1 mSv/y. Therefore, it is necessary to control the amount of industrial waste residue in building materials to avoid unnecessary radioactive exposure to residents. (authors)

  6. Natural radioactivity concentration of peanuts in Osmaniye-Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkurt, Iskender; Guenoglu, Kadir; Mavi, Betuel; Kara, Ayhan [Suleyman Demirel University Isparta (Turkey); Amasya University Amasya (Turkey); Osmaniye Korkut Ata University Osmaniye (Turkey)

    2012-09-06

    The peanut is grown in Osmaniye where located in southern Turkey. Due to it is grown underground, the measurements of natural radioactivity of peanuts become important. For this reason some peanut samples have been collected from different places of Osmaniye and the measurements of natural activity concentrations for {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th in some peanuts samples have been carried out using a NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometer. Activity of {sup 40}K was measured from its intensive line at 1460 keV, for {sup 226}Ra activity peak from {sup 214}Bi at 1760 keV and {sup 232}Th activity, peak from {sup 208}Tl at energy of 2610 keV was used.

  7. Studies on natural radioactivity of some egyptian building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, E. A.; El-Khayat, A.; Ashmawy, L.; Hassan, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Using high-resolution y-rays spectrometry, the natural radioactivity of 14 samples of natural and o manufactured Egyptian building materials have been investigated. The samples were collected from local market and construction sites. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, specific activities were determined. The radium equivalent activity in each sample was estimated. Radiological evaluations of these materials indicate that all materials meet the external gamma-ray dose limitation. Calculation of concentration indices by assuming a Markkanen room model is constructed from these materials, to find the excess gamma-ray dose taken over that received from the outdoors. The Austrian Standard ONORM S 5200 is used in testing the building materials

  8. Natural radioactivity measurements of building materials in Baotou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Caifeng; Lu, Xinwei; Li, Nan; Yang, Guang

    2012-12-01

    Natural radioactivity due to (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in the common building materials collected from Baotou city of Inner Mongolia, China was measured using gamma-ray spectrometry. The radiation hazard of the studied building materials was estimated by the radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), internal hazard index (H(in)) and annual effective dose (AED). The concentrations of the natural radionuclides and Ra(eq) in the studied samples were compared with the corresponding results of other countries. The Ra(eq) values of the building materials are below the internationally accepted values (370 Bq kg(-1)). The values of H(in) in all studied building materials are less than unity. The AEDs of all measured building materials are at an acceptable level.

  9. Naturally occurring BRCA2 alternative mRNA splicing events in clinically relevant samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fackenthal, James D; Yoshimatsu, Toshio; Zhang, Bifeng

    2016-01-01

    patterns and thereby disrupt gene function. mRNA analyses are therefore among the tests used to interpret the clinical significance of some genetic variants. However, these could be confounded by the appearance of naturally occurring alternative transcripts unrelated to germline sequence variation...... to characterise the spectrum of naturally occurring BRCA2 mRNA alternate-splicing events. METHODS: mRNA was prepared from several blood and breast tissue-derived cells and cell lines by contributing ENIGMA laboratories. cDNA representing BRCA2 alternate splice sites was amplified and visualised using capillary...... or agarose gel electrophoresis, followed by sequencing. RESULTS: We demonstrate the existence of 24 different BRCA2 mRNA alternate-splicing events in lymphoblastoid cell lines and both breast cancer and non-cancerous breast cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: These naturally occurring alternate-splicing events...

  10. Natural radioactivity of coal and fly ash at the Nikola Tesla B TPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisić Dragica M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Serbian thermal power plants (TPPs produce siliceous fly ash from lignite in the quantity of approximately 6 million tons per year. The potential market for the use of fly ash is operational, but for the time being, only used by cement producers. Fly ash radioactivity could be one of the major points of concern when larger use of fly ash is planned, particularly in the Serbian construction industry. Radioactivity measurements have been conducted regularly for decades. This paper presents the results of a ten-year fly ash radioactivity measurements at the Nikola Tesla B TPP located in Obrenovac. In addition, the paper compares the natural radionuclides coal content data combusted by the Nikola Tesla B TPP boilers coming from the Kolubara Basin and ash created during coal combustion. Fly ash created in the Nikola Tesla TPPs boilers is characterised by the increased concentration of the natural radionuclides content compared to coal. This is the so-called technologically enhanced natural radioactivity (Technologically Enhanced Occurring Radioactive Material - TENORM of industrial waste, whereas the average specific activities: 232Th in coal amount to 25.2 Bq/kg, and in fly ash and coal 84.2 Bq/kg and 238U 38.3 Bq/kg, respectively. Following the obtained natural radionuclides content results it may be concluded that the Nikola Tesla B TPP ash may be disposed into the environment. Ash may be used also in the construction industry (civil engineering. In building construction applications, ash share as the additive to other building materials depends from its physical and chemical characteristics, as well as from the radionuclides activity: 266Ra, 232Th and 40K. Unlike the thermal power plants regularly (once a year testing the specific natural radionuclides activity in the combusted coal and boiler fly ash, Electric Power Industry of Serbia has not performed large-scale investigations of the natural radionuclides content in coal within the Kolubara

  11. Investigation of the environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides in the processing of sulfide ores for gold using gamma spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gbadago, J K; Darko, E O [Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, PO Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Faanhof, A [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation, PO Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Schandorf, C, E-mail: jgbada@yahoo.com [School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra (Ghana)

    2011-09-01

    The possible environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides on workers and a critical community, as a result of milling and processing sulfide ores for gold by a mining company at Bogoso in the western region of Ghana, have been investigated using gamma spectroscopy. Indicative doses for the workers during sulfide ore processing were calculated from the activity concentrations measured at both physical and chemical processing stages. The dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent, radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, and radioactivity level index for tailings, for the de-silted sediments of run-off from the vicinity of the tailings dam through the critical community, and for the soils of the critical community's basic schools were calculated and found to be lower than their respective permissible limits. The environmental impact of the radionuclides is therefore expected to be low in this mining environment.

  12. Investigation of the environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides in the processing of sulfide ores for gold using gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gbadago, J K; Darko, E O; Faanhof, A; Schandorf, C

    2011-01-01

    The possible environmental impacts of naturally occurring radionuclides on workers and a critical community, as a result of milling and processing sulfide ores for gold by a mining company at Bogoso in the western region of Ghana, have been investigated using gamma spectroscopy. Indicative doses for the workers during sulfide ore processing were calculated from the activity concentrations measured at both physical and chemical processing stages. The dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent, radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, and radioactivity level index for tailings, for the de-silted sediments of run-off from the vicinity of the tailings dam through the critical community, and for the soils of the critical community's basic schools were calculated and found to be lower than their respective permissible limits. The environmental impact of the radionuclides is therefore expected to be low in this mining environment.

  13. Elemental and Microscopic Analysis of Naturally Occurring C-O-Si Hetero-Fullerene-Like Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullavarad, Nilima V; Hullavarad, Shiva S; Fochesatto, Javier

    2015-03-01

    Carbon exhibits an ability to form a wide range of structures in nature. Under favorable conditions, carbon condenses to form hollow, spheroid fullerenes in an inert atmosphere. Using high resolution FESEM, we have concealed the existence of giant hetero-fullerene like structures in the natural form. Clear, distinct features of connected hexagons and pentagons were observed. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis depth-profile of natural fullerene structures indicates that Russian-doll-like configurations composed of C, 0, and Si rings exist in nature. The analysis is based on an outstanding molecular feature found in the size fraction of aerosols having diameters 150 nm to 1.0 µm. The fullerene like structures, which are ~ 150 nm in diameter, are observed in large numbers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct detailed observation of natural fullerene-like structures. This article reports inadvertent observation of naturally occurring hetero-fullerene-like structures in the Arctic.

  14. Standardization of sequential separation of naturally occurring radionuclides in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Madhu G.; Rao, D.D.; Sathyapriya, R.S.; Sarkar, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Human are constantly exposed to radiation originating from natural or manmade sources. The main contribution for internal dose is due to radionuclides from uranium and thorium series in drinking water. The distribution of these elements varies depending on the geological and physiological characteristics of the aquifer. With increased concern for radiological safety of public, it is necessary to evaluate the naturally occurring radionuclides in the drinking water

  15. Natural radioactivity in ground water near the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, V. Jr.; Michel, J.

    1990-08-01

    A study of natural radioactivity in groundwater on and adjacent to the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken (SC) was conducted to determine the spatial and temporal variations in the concentration of specific radionuclides. All available measurements for gross alpha particle activity, gross beta activity, uranium, Ra-226, Ra-228, and radon were collated. Relatively few radionuclide-specific results were found. Twenty samples from drinking water supplies in the area were collected in October 1987 and analyzed for U-238, U-234, Ra-226, Ra-228, and Rn-222. The aquifer type for each public water supply system was determined, and statistical analyses were conducted to detect differences among aquifer types and geographic areas defined at the country level. For samples from the public water wells and distribution systems on and adjacent to the site, most of the gross alpha particle activity could be attributed to Ra-226. Aquifer type was an important factor in determining the level of radioactivity in groundwater. The distribution and geochemical factors affecting the distribution of each radionuclide for the different aquifer types are discussed in detail. Statistical analyses were also run to test for aerial differences, among counties and the site. For all types of measurements, there were no differences in the distribution of radioactivity among the ten counties in the vicinity of the site or the site itself. The mean value for the plant was the lowest of all geographic areas for gross alpha particle activity and radon, intermediate for gross beta activity, and in the upper ranks for Ra-226 and Ra-228. It is concluded that the drinking water quality onsite is comparable with that in the vicinity. 19 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Natural radioactivity in drinking water in private wells in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterbacka, P.; Maekaeinen, I.; Arvela, H.

    2005-01-01

    Natural radioactivity in drinking water was determined in population-based random study of 472 private wells. The mean concentrations of 222 Rn, 226 Ra, 234 U, 238 U, 210 Pb and 210 Po in drilled wells were 460, 0.05, 0.35, 0.26, 0.04 and 0.05 Bq l -1 , and in wells dug in the soil were 50, 0.016, 0.02, 0.015, 0.013 and 0.007 Bq l -1 , respectively. Approximately 10% of the drilled wells exceeded a radon concentration of 1000 Bq l -1 and 18% a uranium concentration of 15 μg l -1 . The mean annual effective dose from natural radionuclides for a drilled well user was 0.4 mSv and 0.05 mSv for a user of a well dug in the soil. The effective dose arising from 222 Rn was 75% of the total of all natural radionuclides for drilled well users. As regards long-lived radionuclides, 210 Po and 210 Pb caused the largest portion of the effective dose. The dose arising from 238 U, 234 U and 226 Ra was only 8% of the total of all natural radionuclides. (authors)

  17. Radioactivity of natural and artificial building materials - a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Zs; Völgyesi, P; Nagy, H É; Szabó, Cs; Kis, Z; Csorba, O

    2013-04-01

    Building materials and their additives contain radioactive isotopes, which can increase both external and internal radioactive exposures of humans. In this study Hungarian natural (adobe) and artificial (brick, concrete, coal slag, coal slag concrete and gas silicate) building materials were examined. We qualified 40 samples based on their radium equivalent, activity concentration, external hazard and internal hazard indices and the determined threshold values of these parameters. Absorbed dose rate and annual effective dose for inhabitants living in buildings made of these building materials were also evaluated. The calculations are based on (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K activity concentrations determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Measured radionuclide concentrations and hence, calculated indices and doses of artificial building materials show a rather disparate distribution compared to adobes. The studied coal slag samples among the artificial building materials have elevated (226)Ra content. Natural, i.e. adobe and also brick samples contain higher amount of (40)K compared to other artificial building materials. Correlation coefficients among radionuclide concentrations are consistent with the values in the literature and connected to the natural geochemical behavior of U, Th and K elements. Seven samples (coal slag and coal slag concrete) exceed any of the threshold values of the calculated hazard indices, however only three of them are considered to be risky to use according to the fact that the building material was used in bulk amount or in restricted usage. It is shown, that using different indices can lead to different conclusions; hence we recommend considering more of the indices at the same time when building materials are studied. Additionally, adding two times their statistical uncertainties to their values before comparing to thresholds should be considered for providing a more conservative qualification. We have defined radon hazard portion to point

  18. Natural radioactivity of beach sand samples in Port Sudan, red sea state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kambal, Wala Haider Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Natural radioactivity is a source of continuous exposure to human beings. In Port Sudan city, the main port of Sudan, data on the levels of natural radioactivity in soil is required. The aim of this study was to measure the activity concentration as well as the absorbed dose and annual effective dose of the naturally occurring radionuclides 238 U, 232 Th, and 40 K in soil samples collected from different locations around Red Sea costa areas in Port Sudan city. Activity concentrations were measured using gamma ray spectrometry (Nal) detector. Results showed that the average activity concentration of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K were found to be 21.86, 17.55, 85.50 Bqkg 1 , respectively, with an average absorbed dose of 10.42, 9.40 and 3.57 nGyh 1 , respectively. The average annual effective dose values were found to be 11.89, 11.54 and 4.37 μSvy 1 for 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K, respectively. The measured values were comparable with other global radioactivity measurements and found to be safe for public and environment.(Author)

  19. Natural radioactivity measurements and dosimetric evaluations in soil samples with a high content of NORM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridi, F.; Marguccio, S.; Durante, G.; Trozzo, R.; Fullone, F.; Belvedere, A.; D'Agostino, M.; Belmusto, G.

    2017-01-01

    In this article natural radioactivity measurements and dosimetric evaluations in soil samples contaminated by Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) are made, in order to assess any possible radiological hazard for the population and for workers professionally exposed to ionizing radiations. Investigated samples came from the district of Crotone, Calabria region, South of Italy. The natural radioactivity investigation was performed by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. From the measured gamma spectra, activity concentrations were determined for 226Ra , 234-mPa , 224Ra , 228Ac and 40K and compared with their clearance levels for NORM. The total effective dose was calculated for each sample as due to the committed effective dose for inhalation and to the effective dose from external irradiation. The sum of the total effective doses estimated for all investigated samples was compared to the action levels provided by the Italian legislation (D.Lgs.230/95 and subsequent modifications) for the population members (0.3mSv/y) and for professionally exposed workers (1mSv/y). It was found to be less than the limit of no radiological significance (10μSv/y).

  20. Natural Radioactivity Accumulated in the Arctic from Long-range Atmospheric Transport - Observations in Canadian Monitoring Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Weihua [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 775 Brookfield Road, Ottawa K1A 1C1 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In the environment, the main sources of naturally occurring radionuclides come from radionuclides in the uranium decay series. Activity concentrations of uranium decay series radionuclides may vary considerably from place to place depending on the geological characteristics at the location. Their releases to the atmosphere are mainly through radon ({sup 222}Rn), a radioactive noble gas occurring naturally as an indirect decay product of uranium in soils and rocks. Due to the abundance of uranium, radon continuously emanates from continental land masses. With radon as the main source of naturally occurring radioactivity in the environment, one would think that the Arctic should be an area of low background radiation, because a considerable area of the Arctic is covered by glaciers and permafrost, and radon emanation rate has been reported to be negligible from those glacier and permafrost areas. However, available data have shown the opposite. The elevated level of naturally occurring radioactivity in the Arctic is due to natural sources outside of the Arctic, mainly through long-range atmospheric transport of radon and radon progeny. In some cases, natural radioactivity can accumulate to relatively high levels and become a health concern or a limiting factor of country food consumption. By definition, contaminants are undesirable substances which can cause harm to the environment, the biota, and humans. We can call these naturally accumulating radiological burdens to the Arctic 'natural contaminants' to distinguish them from the traditional meaning of contamination, the 'artificial contaminants' which are attributable to industrial or man-made sources. This paper reviews information available in the literature, analyses long-term atmospheric monitoring data in the Canadian high Arctic, sub-Arctic and mid-latitude sites, and provides discussion on research needed to address questions, such as how heavily the Arctic has been impacted by the

  1. Naturally occurring products of proglucagon 111-160 in the porcine and human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, T; Thim, L; Kofod, Hans

    1988-01-01

    to release proglucagon 111-123 (designated spacer peptide 2), which, like proglucagon 126-158 must be considered a potential hormonal entity. By isocratic high pressure liquid chromatography human spacer peptide 2 was indistinguishable from synthetic proglucagon 111-122 amide, suggesting...... that this is the structure of the naturally occurring human peptide....

  2. What Are Naturally Occurring School Lotteries and How Do We Identify Them? Reflections on Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterman, Rebecca

    2018-01-01

    This post is one in a series highlighting MDRC's methodological work. In the past decade, rapid growth in the number of charter schools and school district choice systems has provided education researchers with exciting opportunities to use naturally occurring pockets of randomization to rigorously study the effects of policy-relevant education…

  3. Annual effective dose due to natural radioactivity in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padma Savithri, P.; Srivastava, S.K.; Balbudhe, A.Y.; Vishwa Prasad, K.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Natural radioactivity concentration in drinking water supply in and round Hyderabad, Secunderabad was determined. The observed gross alpha activity found in water samples vary from 0.027±0.014 Bq/L to 0.042±0.015 Bq/L with average 0.035 Bq/L while beta activity in all the samples are less than 0.076 Bq/l. Contributions of the drinking water samples to total annual effective dose equivalent from 238 U, 234 U, 230 Th, 26 Ra, 210 Po, 232 Th, 228 Th 210 Pb and 228 Ra are 1.14, 1.24, 5.30, 7.07, 30.3, 5.81, 1.82, 38.3 and 38.3 μSvy -1 for adults. The results indicate that the annual effective doses are below the WHO recommended reference level for α and β in food and drinking samples. (author)

  4. Natural and artificial radioactivity determination of some medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desideri, Donatella; Meli, Maria Assunta; Roselli, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Several medicinal plants used in Italy were analysed to determine natural and artificial radioactivity in those parts (leaves, fruits, seeds, roots, peduncles, flowers, barks, berries, thallus) used generally as remedies. The radionuclides were determined by alpha ( 238 U, 210 Po) and gamma ( 214 Pb-Bi, 210 Pb, 40 K and 137 Cs) spectrometry. 238 U ranged between dry -1 ; 210 Po between dry -1 ; 214 Pb- 214 Bi between dry -1 ; 210 Pb between dry -1 ; 40 K between 66.2 and 3582.0 Bq kg dry -1 ; 137 Cs between dry -1 . The percentage of 210 Po extraction in infusion and decoction was also determined; the arithmetical mean value of percentage of 210 Po extraction resulted 20.7 ± 7.5.

  5. Natural radioactivity in soils from Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, H. de.

    1988-01-01

    Using high resolution gamma spectrometry, the specific radioactivity of soils and rocks from Piracicaba, SP (Brazil) was determined. For this purpose, the Ra, Th and Ac natural series and some other nuclides such as sup(40)K and sup(137)Cs were considered. Soil samples representing the main Soil Groups were collected at 60-cm depth. Typical rock samples were also collected. After initial sample preparation, the sealed sample were allowed to rest until reaching the conditions approaching the secular equilibrium. Thereafter, counting was carried out, peak areas being the measurements basis. The mean ponderated values for soil specific activity were 24.1 and 34.8 Bq.kg sup(-1) for the sup(226)Ra and sup(232)Th, respectively. (author)

  6. Natural radioactivity in building materials used in Changzhi, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, G.; Lu, X.; Zhao, C.; Li, N.

    2013-01-01

    The natural radioactivity levels of the commonly used building materials collected from Changzhi, China was analysed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in the investigated building materials range from 14.6 to 131.2, from 9.9 to 138.8 and from 96.1 to 819.0 Bq kg -1 , respectively. The results were compared with the reported data of other countries and with the worldwide mean activity of soil. The external and internal hazard indices and gamma index were calculated to assess the radiation hazard to residents. The external hazard index of all building materials are less than unity, while the internal hazard and gamma indexes of hollow brick and gravel aggregate exceed unity. The study shows that the investigated hollow brick and gravel aggregate are not suitable for use as building materials in dwellings. (authors)

  7. Natural radioactivity in building materials used in Changzhi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Lu, Xinwei; Zhao, Caifeng; Li, Nan

    2013-08-01

    The natural radioactivity levels of the commonly used building materials collected from Changzhi, China was analysed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in the investigated building materials range from 14.6 to 131.2, from 9.9 to 138.8 and from 96.1 to 819.0 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The results were compared with the reported data of other countries and with the worldwide mean activity of soil. The external and internal hazard indices and gamma index were calculated to assess the radiation hazard to residents. The external hazard index of all building materials are less than unity, while the internal hazard and gamma indexes of hollow brick and gravel aggregate exceed unity. The study shows that the investigated hollow brick and gravel aggregate are not suitable for use as building materials in dwellings.

  8. Baseline data of naturally occurring radionuclides in some native vegetables and fruits in Southern Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranrod, C.; Chanyotha, S.; Sriploy, P.; Pornnumpa, C.; Kritsananuwat, R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide the baseline data information on natural radioactivities in vegetables and fruits produced and consumed locally in the areas of potential nuclear power plant sites in Thailand. Four provinces (Prajuab-Kirikhan, Chumphon, Surat-Thani and Nakhon-Si-thammarat) were selected for collection of native vegetables and fruits samples, together with their corresponding soils. The activities of 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 40 K and 210 Po were determined in all these samples. The obtained results for 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 40 K and 210 Po for all vegetable and fruit samples were in the range of 1-34, 1-108, 32-4392 and 0.2-47 Bq kg -1 , respectively, which were much lower than those obtained for their corresponding soils. (authors)

  9. Predicting Emotions in Facial Expressions from the Annotations in Naturally Occurring First Encounters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarretta, Costanza

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the automatic identification of emotions from the manual annotations of the shape and functions of facial expressions in a Danish corpus of video recorded naturally occurring first encounters. More specifically, a support vector classified is trained on the corpus annotations...... to identify emotions in facial expressions. In the classification experiments, we test to what extent emotions expressed in naturally-occurring conversations can be identified automatically by a classifier trained on the manual annotations of the shape of facial expressions and co-occurring speech tokens. We...... also investigate the relation between emotions and the communicative functions of facial expressions. Both emotion labels and their values in a three dimensional space are identified. The three dimensions are Pleasure, Arousal and Dominance. The results of our experiments indicate that the classifiers...

  10. Natural radioactivity assessment of surface sediments in the Yangtze Estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jinlong; Du, Jinzhou; Bi, Qianqian

    2017-01-01

    The activities of the natural radionuclides ( 238 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K) of the surface sediments in the Yangtze Estuary were determined and used to evaluate radiation hazards in the study area. The of activities of 238 U, 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K ranges from 14.1 to 62.3, 26.1 to 71.9, 13.7 to 52.3, and 392 to 898 Bq kg −1 , respectively, which were comparable to values of other regions in China. The activities of 232 Th, 40 K and 226 Ra were clearly different from the global recommended values. The radium equivalent activity was less than the recommended limit of 370 Bq kg −1 ; therefore, the sediment in this area can be safely used for reclamation. The external hazard index values were less than one. The average absorbed gamma dose rate and annual effective dose equivalent values were slightly greater than the world average value. 226 Ra/ 238 U and 232 Th/ 238 U ratios could potentially be applied for tracing sediment source. - Highlights: • The natural radioactivity of surface sediments in the Yangtze Estuary was observed. • The radiological hazards of the sediments are insignificant in this study area. • The ratios of natural radionuclides can potentially be applied for sediment source.

  11. Natural radioactivity in zirconia-based dental ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, Augusto; Gerstmann, Udo; La Porta, Caterina; Cantone, Marie C.; Veronese, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics are being increasingly used in dental prosthetics in substitution of metal cores, which are known to induce local toxic reactions and delayed allergic responses in the oral tissues. Some concerns have been however raised about the use of zirconia, since it is known that unpurified zirconia materials may contain non negligible levels of natural radionuclides of the U/Th series. Combined measurements of alpha and gamma spectrometry as well as beta dosimetry were conducted on zirconia samples used for dental applications. Samples were available in form of powder and/or solid blocks. The results showed that the beta dose rate in zirconia ceramics was on average only slightly higher than the levels measured in natural teeth, and generally lower than the values measured in feldspatic and glass ceramics. These materials are indeed known to deliver a beta dose significantly higher than that measured from natural teeth, due to the relatively high levels of 40 K (between 2 and 3 kBq·kg -1 ). The content of radionuclides of the U/Th series in the zirconia sample was estimated to be lower than 15 Bq·kg -1 , i.e. doubtlessly below the exclusion level of 1 kBq·kg -1 recommended by IAEA in the Safety Standard Series. Beta dosimetry measurements, however, gave indications of possible inhomogeneous clusters of radioactivity, which might give rise to local doses above the background. (author)

  12. Intake of natural radioactivity through dietary items: a prelude to preoperational environmental survey at Kudankulam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varughese, K.G.; Kumar, M.; George, Thomas; Sunder Rajan, P.; Vijay Kumar, B.; Rajan, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    High background radiation are found in nature at some parts of Australia, Brazil, China, Iran, India etc. Kanyakumari district in the southern peninsular India is such a NHBRA (Natural high background radiation area) having monazite placers along the coast. Although general radiation levels in this area has been investigated by many researchers in the past, the impact of this high background radioactivity on the flora and fauna is scarce. In the present investigations radiation survey has been done at high background areas with special attention to vegetables and crops grown in this area. The studies are centered at the 2x1000 MWe, Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project site which is about 25 km from Kanyakumari. Samples of soil, sand, vegetations and other food items are collected from the 30 km radial zone of KKNPP site and analysed for naturally occurring radionuclides such as 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K. The intake of natural radioactivity through food items produced in this area is found to be very small, and the internal dose to general population staying at this high natural background area is insignificant. (author)

  13. Natural radioactive anomalies: social impacts in a small city in the northeast of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado, Lais C.; Silva, Arykerne N.C. da

    2017-01-01

    In 1972 the National Commission of Nuclear Energy in conjunction with the Committee on Mineral Resources Research, through geological studies, found a reserve of U_3O_8, initially estimated at 10,000 tons, in the region of Sao Jose de Espinharas, in the state of Paraiba, Northeast of Brazil. Other studies, in nearby regions, after the discovery of uranium, found soils rich in heavy rare earth elements, making the region the focus of research of several public and private companies. Currently, it is not occurring mineral exploration in the region, but the rumors about the presence of rocks and stones that cause cancer are always present in the everyday life of the population. Periodically, researchers are visiting Sao Jose de Espinharas to obtain samples of water, soil, and rock, and then new comments arise on the likely transference of the population due to uranium occurrence in urban and rural areas. Urban and the rural area inhabitants hamper or obstruct the work of collection due to ignorance about the phenomenon of natural radioactivity. The main objective of this work is to promote the necessary to highlight the need to develop knowledge about local environmental radioactivity and the benefits and problems due to the existence of uranium ore. There are still no results about public awareness on the subject in the region, but it is expected that in a few months can be assessed the implemented actions as multipliers of knowledge of the region to disseminate basic knowledge about natural radioactivity. (author)

  14. Assessment of Natural Radioactivity and its Radiological Impact in Ortum Region in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanjala, F.O.; Otwoma, D.; Kitao, T.F.; Hashim, N.O.

    2015-01-01

    The earth contains natural background radiations originating from terrestrial and cosmic sources. This study aims at assessing the levels of background radiation in air, soil and water and its associated radiological impact and also determines the elemental concentration of the rocks and soils around Ortum hills and quarry. 100 points will be measured for radioactivity in the air and 40 soil and 10 water samples will be collected for laboratory analysis using both grid and purposive sampling methods. Radioactivity in the field will be determined using the hand held Red Eye and Radiagem radiation survey meters. The levels of naturally occurring radionuclide Uranium-238 ( 238 U), Thorium-232 ( 232 Th) and Potassium-40 ( 40 K) in the soil and rocks will be determined using High Pure Germanium (HPGe) detector; the Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC) will be used for analysis of water samples while the Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (EDXRF) will be used to determine the elemental composition in the rocks and soil. The Residual Radioactivity (RESRAD) program will be used to analyze and assess the doses and risks associated with radiation exposure in Ortum region. (author)

  15. Natural radioactive anomalies: social impacts in a small city in the northeast of Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casado, Lais C.; Silva, Arykerne N.C. da, E-mail: laiscamposcasado@gmail.com, E-mail: ary_casado@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    In 1972 the National Commission of Nuclear Energy in conjunction with the Committee on Mineral Resources Research, through geological studies, found a reserve of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, initially estimated at 10,000 tons, in the region of Sao Jose de Espinharas, in the state of Paraiba, Northeast of Brazil. Other studies, in nearby regions, after the discovery of uranium, found soils rich in heavy rare earth elements, making the region the focus of research of several public and private companies. Currently, it is not occurring mineral exploration in the region, but the rumors about the presence of rocks and stones that cause cancer are always present in the everyday life of the population. Periodically, researchers are visiting Sao Jose de Espinharas to obtain samples of water, soil, and rock, and then new comments arise on the likely transference of the population due to uranium occurrence in urban and rural areas. Urban and the rural area inhabitants hamper or obstruct the work of collection due to ignorance about the phenomenon of natural radioactivity. The main objective of this work is to promote the necessary to highlight the need to develop knowledge about local environmental radioactivity and the benefits and problems due to the existence of uranium ore. There are still no results about public awareness on the subject in the region, but it is expected that in a few months can be assessed the implemented actions as multipliers of knowledge of the region to disseminate basic knowledge about natural radioactivity. (author)

  16. Interaction of flavonoids, the naturally occurring antioxidants with different media: A UV-visible spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Bushra; Shah, S. W. H.; Hasan, Aurangzeb; Sakhawat Shah, S.

    2010-04-01

    Quantitative parameters for interaction of flavonoids—the naturally occurring antioxidants, with solvents and surfactants are determined using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The availability of flavonoids; kaempferol, apigenin, kaempferide and rhamnetin in micelles of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is reflected in terms of partition coefficient, Kc. Thermodynamic calculations show that the process of transfer of flavonoid molecules to anionic micelles of SDS is energy efficient. A distortion in flavonoid's morphology occurs in case of kaempferol and apigenin in surfactant and water, exhibited in terms of a new band in the UV region of electronic spectra of these flavonoids. The partition coefficients of structurally related flavonoids are correlated with their antioxidant activities.

  17. Natural radioactive environment of urban soils in Shihezi, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Benwei; Liu Anna

    2009-01-01

    Radionuclides, such as 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K, can be found in urban soil. To evaluate the natural radioactivity in the environment, soil samples were collected form Shihezi city and radioisotope concentrations were determined by X-ray fluorescence. The dose rate of urban soil (mGy per year, mGy/a) was calculated. The results indicate that the U, Th and K concentrations of the urban soils were, respectively, 1.2-3.2 mg/kg, 6.4-12.3 mg/kg and 2.05%-2.24%, with the mean values of 2.47 mg/kg, 10.47 mg/kg and 2.16 %. Dose rates of urban soils were 10.04-19.55 mGy/a with the mean value of 16.31 mGy/a. This dose rate is the perfect and maximum value of natural radiation in soil and different with the air absorbed dose rate from terrestrial γ-rays. The mean value of air absorbed dose rate was about 57.42 nGy/h. The annual effective dose rate in air was about 0.07 mSv/a and the average value of Ra eq in urban soil was 120.37 Bq/kg. The relative contribution of α particle to the dose rate is higher than that derived from β- and γ-rays in the urban soils. (authors)

  18. Mutagenic potential assessment associated with human exposure to natural radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alexandre Endres; Navoni, Julio Alejandro; de Oliveira Galvão, Marcos Felipe; Garcia, Anuska Conde Fagundes Soares; do Amaral, Viviane Souza; Petta, Reinaldo Antônio; Campos, Thomas Ferreira da Costa; Panosso, Renata; Quinelato, Antônio Luiz; de Medeiros, Sílvia Regina Batistuzzo

    2017-01-01

    Lucrécia city, known to harbor a high cancer rate, is located in a semiarid region characterized by the presence of mineral reservoirs, facing a high exposure to metal and natural radioactivity. The present study aimed to assess the environmental scenario at a semiarid region located in Northeastern Brazil. Metal concentration, alpha and beta radiation, and cyanobacteria content in tap water along with indoor radon and gamma emitters (U, K and Th) concentrations were measured. In addition, mutagenic and nuclear instability effects were assessed using buccal micronucleus cytome assay. The study included five samplings corresponding to a period between 2007 and 2009. Drinking water from Lucrécia city presented levels of Mn, Ni and Cr along with cyanobacteria in concentrations one to four times higher than regulatory guidelines considered. Furthermore, high levels of all the tested radionuclides were found. A high percentage of the houses included in this study presented indoor radon concentrations over 100 Bq m -3 . The mean annual effective dose from Lucrécia houses was six times higher than observed in a control region. The levels of exposure in most of the Lucrécia houses were classified as middle to high. A significant mutagenic effect, represented as an increase of micronuclei (MN) frequency and nuclear abnormalities as nuclear buds (NB), binucleated cells (BN), and pyknotic cells (PYC) were found. The results obtained highlight the role of high background radioactivity on the observed mutagenic effect and could help to explain the exacerbated cancer rate reported in this locality. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rate in Brazilian igneous rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, C.L.; Artur, A.C. [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, Instituto de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. 24-A No. 1515, C.P. 178, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bonotto, D.M., E-mail: danielbonotto@yahoo.com.b [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, Instituto de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. 24-A No. 1515, C.P. 178, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Guedes, S. [Departamento de Cronologia e Raios Cosmicos, Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Rua Sergio Buarque de Holanda No. 777, CEP 13083-859, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Martinelli, C.D. [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, Instituto de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. 24-A No. 1515, C.P. 178, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    This paper reports the natural radioactivity of Brazilian igneous rocks that are used as dimension stones, following the trend of other studies on the evaluation of the risks to the human health caused by the rocks radioactivity as a consequence of their use as cover indoors. Gamma-ray spectrometry has been utilized to determine the {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th activity concentrations in 14 rock types collected at different quarries. The following activity concentration range was found: 12.18-251.90 Bq/kg for {sup 226}Ra, 9.55-347.47 Bq/kg for {sup 232}Th and 407.5-1615.0 Bq/kg for {sup 40}K. Such data were used to estimate Ra{sub eq}, H{sub ex} and I{sub {gamma}}, which were compared with the threshold limit values recommended in literature. They have been exceeded for Ra{sub eq} and H{sub ex} in five samples, where the highest indices corresponded to a rock that suffered a process of ductile-brittle deformation that caused it a microbrecciated shape. The exhalation rate of Rn and daughters has also been determined in slabs consisting of rock pieces {approx}10 cm-long, 5 cm-wide and 3 cm-thick. It ranged from 0.24 to 3.93 Bq/m{sup 2}/h and exhibited significant correlation with eU (={sup 226}Ra), as expected. The results indicated that most of the studied rocks did not present risk to human health and may be used indoors, even with low ventilation. On the other hand, igneous rocks that yielded indices above the threshold limit values recommended in literature may be used outdoors without any restriction or indoors with ample ventilation.

  20. Natural radioactivity in lignite samples from open pit mines “Kolubara”, Serbia – risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Đurašević, M.; Kandić, A.; Stefanović, P.; Vukanac, I.; Šešlak, B.; Milošević, Z.; Marković, T.

    2014-01-01

    Coal as fossil fuel mainly contains naturally occurring radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series and 40 K. Use of coal, primarily in industry, as a result has dispersion of radioactive material from coal in and through air and water. The aim of this study was to determine the activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in coal samples from open pit mines “Kolubara” and to evaluate its effect on population health. The results showed that all measured and calculated values were below the limits recommended in international legislation. - Highlights: • Activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in coal samples were determined. • Effect on population health due to the activity of these radionuclides was estimated. • All samples were collected at different locations of the open pit mines “Kolubara”. • All measured and calculated values were below the recommended limits. • There is no enhanced radiation hazard for population nearby open pit mines

  1. Assessment of radiological significance of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil and rock matrices around Kakrapar environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, A.K.; Jaison, T.J.; Baburajan, A.; Hegde, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    The activity and gamma-absorbed dose rate due to the naturally occurring radionuclides in the terrestrial environment such as 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K were determined in soil and rock samples collected around Kakrapar Atomic Power Plant site, using gamma-ray spectrometry. The mean concentration levels measured in Kakrapar soil from naturally occurring radioisotopes such as 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K are lower than the corresponding global average values obtained in worldwide soil. The external hazard index (Hex) and absorbed gamma dose rate in air outdoors is observed to be 0.04-0.18 and 3.1-14.1 nGy h -1 , respectively. (authors)

  2. Left atrial volume and function in dogs with naturally occurring myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höllmer, M.; Willesen, J. L.; Tolver, A.

    2017-01-01

    stroke volume increased, whereas LA reservoir and contractile function decreased with increasing disease severity. A maximal LA volume heart failure in dogs with chronic MMVD with a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 100......%. An active LA emptying fraction heart failure in dogs with chronic MMVD with a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 89% and a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 82%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Dogs with MMVD appear to have larger LA...... of cardiac compensation. Left atrial function in dogs with naturally occurring MMVD remains largely unexplored. The objective of this study was to evaluate LA volume and function in dogs with naturally occurring MMVD. ANIMALS: This prospective study included 205 client-owned dogs of different breeds, 114...

  3. Behavioral changes in freestall-housed dairy cows with naturally occurring clinical mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogsgaard, Katrine Kop; Bennedsgaard, Torben Werner; Herskin, Mette S

    2015-01-01

    Dairy cows exhibit classic signs of sickness behavior during mastitis. However, knowledge about the consequences of naturally occurring mastitis in freestall-housed dairy cows, milked in automatic milking systems, is lacking. The aim of the present study was to describe the behavior of dairy cows...... after diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of mastitis. In the days before and after antibiotic treatment, the milking behavior, feeding, and activity were examined in 30 mastitic and 30 control Danish Holstein-Friesian cows kept in freestalls and milked by an automatic milking system. Sickness behavior...... milking, as seen by a higher frequency of tripping and kicking. Mastitic cows continued to show increased kicking during milking even after the antibiotic treatment period. These results show that the behavioral changes induced by naturally occurring mastitis persisted beyond the days of antibiotic...

  4. A theoretical model of naturally occurring cell death in the nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Galli, Resta; Resta, Giovanni

    1991-01-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, the formation of the nervous system involves the elimination of many cells, soon after their generation. This phenomenon, known as naturally occurring cell death, has precise time schedules, is observed in the vast majority of nervous structures and causes the 1oss of 15 - 85% of the neurones generated initially. Elimination of erroneous projections, as well as proper size matching between connecting structures can be achieved through cell death. However if elim...

  5. Individual and collective dose rates from naturally-occurring radionuclides in seafood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentreath, R.J.; Camplin, W.C.; Allington, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Although seafoods are not a large item in the UK diet, they are of interest because of the above-average quantities of naturally-occurring radionuclides which they contain -particularly shellfish. The single most important contributor is 210 Po; studies have therefore been made to examine the contribution which this nuclide makes to the dose received, both collectively and to individual high-rate consumers of shellfish. (author)

  6. Benford’s Law and Naturally Occurring Prices in Certain ebaY Auctions

    OpenAIRE

    David E. Giles

    2005-01-01

    We show that certain the winning bids for certain ebaY auctions obey Benford’s Law. One implication of this is that it is unlikely that these bids are subject to collusion among bidders, or “shilling” on the part of sellers. Parenthetically, we also show that numbers from the naturally occurring Fibonacci and Lucas sequences also obey Benford’s Law.

  7. Inhibition and kinetic studies of lignin degrading enzymes of Ganoderma boninense by naturally occurring phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Arthy; Siddiqui, Yasmeen; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Ali, Nusaibah Syd; Manickam, Sivakumar

    2018-05-22

    Lignolytic (Lignin degrading) enzyme, from oil palm pathogen Ganoderma boninense Pat. (Syn G. orbiforme (Ryvarden), is involved in the detoxification and the degradation of lignin in the oil palm and is the rate-limiting step in the infection process of this fungus. Active inhibition of lignin degrading enzymes secreted by G. boninense by various naturally occurring phenolic compounds and estimation of efficiency on pathogen suppression was aimed at. In our work, ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory potential towards the lignolytic enzymes of G.boninense. Additionally, the lignin degrading enzymes were characterised. Most of the peholic compounds exhibited an uncompetitive inhibition towards the lignin degrading enzymes. Benzoic acid was the superior inhibitor to the production of lignin degrading enzymes, when compared between the ten phenolic compounds. The inhibitory potential of the phenolic compounds toward the lignin degrading enzymes are higher than that of the conventional metal ion inhibitor. The lignin degrading enzymes were stable in a wide range of pH but were sensitive to higher to temperature. The study demonstrated the inhibitor potential of ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds toward the lignin degrading enzymes of G. boninense with different efficacies. The study has shed a light towards a new management strategy to control BSR in oil palm. It serves as replacement for the existing chemical control. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Finding the traces of behavioral and cognitive processes in big data and naturally occurring datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Alexandra; Griffiths, Thomas L

    2017-10-01

    Today, people generate and store more data than ever before as they interact with both real and virtual environments. These digital traces of behavior and cognition offer cognitive scientists and psychologists an unprecedented opportunity to test theories outside the laboratory. Despite general excitement about big data and naturally occurring datasets among researchers, three "gaps" stand in the way of their wider adoption in theory-driven research: the imagination gap, the skills gap, and the culture gap. We outline an approach to bridging these three gaps while respecting our responsibilities to the public as participants in and consumers of the resulting research. To that end, we introduce Data on the Mind ( http://www.dataonthemind.org ), a community-focused initiative aimed at meeting the unprecedented challenges and opportunities of theory-driven research with big data and naturally occurring datasets. We argue that big data and naturally occurring datasets are most powerfully used to supplement-not supplant-traditional experimental paradigms in order to understand human behavior and cognition, and we highlight emerging ethical issues related to the collection, sharing, and use of these powerful datasets.

  9. Comparative genome and evolutionary analysis of naturally occurring Beilong virus in brown and black rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Wong, Annette Y P; Wong, Beatrice H L; Lam, Carol S F; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-11-01

    Recently, we reported the presence of Beilong virus in spleen and kidney samples of brown rats and black rats, suggesting that these rodents could be natural reservoirs of Beilong virus. In this study, four genomes of Beilong virus from brown rats and black rats were sequenced. Similar to the Beilong virus genome sequenced from kidney mesangial cell line culture, those of J-virus from house mouse and Tailam virus from Sikkim rats, these four genomes from naturally occurring Beilong virus also contain the eight genes (3'-N-P/V/C-M-F-SH-TM-G-L-5'). In these four genomes, the attachment glycoprotein encoded by the G gene consists of 1046 amino acids; but for the original Beilong virus genome sequenced from kidney mesangial cell line, the G CDS was predicted to be prematurely terminated at position 2205 (TGG→TAG), resulting in a 734-amino-acid truncated G protein. This phenomenon of a lack of nonsense mutation in naturally occurring Beilong viruses was confirmed by sequencing this region of 15 additional rodent samples. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the cell line and naturally occurring Beilong viruses were closely clustered, without separation into subgroups. In addition, these viruses were further clustered with J-virus and Tailam virus, with high bootstrap supports of >90%, forming a distinct group in Paramyxoviridae. Brown rats and black rats are natural reservoirs of Beilong virus. Our results also supports that the recently proposed genus, Jeilongvirus, should encompass Beilong virus, J-virus and Tailam virus as members. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Natural analogues to the conditions around a final repository for high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, J.A.T.

    1984-12-01

    This report documents the proceedings resulting from a Workshop held at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, USA, from 1-3 October, 1984. The theme of the Workshop was entitled 'Natural analogues to the conditions around a final repository for high-level radioactive waste', and was restricted to ultimate disposal in a crystalline bedrock environment. The Workshop provided an important first step in co-ordinating and focussing different national and individual interests and approaches towards natural analogue studies. One of the points highlighted at the concluding forum of the meeting was the necessity to first define the geochemical processes which are assumed to occur after disposal of the radioactive waste, and then locate suitable analogue systems which can be used to test the mechanisms of one, or a simple combination of these geochemical processes. Even accepting that the choice of which geochemical process(es) to be selected for validation will be sensitive to individual national disposal strategies, farfield radionuclide retardation mechanisms in the geosphere were considered to be a central topic of importance, and should therefore be given high priority. At this early stage in the development of natural analogue studies it was not possible to cover all the important aspects. In retrospect, the role of the models should have received more attention; bridging the gap between geoscientists and the modellers was seen as being of prime importance in future meetings of this nature. (author)

  11. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO 2 geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  12. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  13. Natural radioactivity around the coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, J.; Bajlo, M.

    1996-01-01

    By far the greatest part of the radiation received by the worlds population comes from natural sources, in some situations the exposure to natural radiation sources is enhanced as a result of technological developments. Burning of coal is one source of enhanced radiation exposure to naturally occurring elements, particularly radium, thorium and uranium. Extensive investigations have been performed in the coal-fired power plant (CFPP) Plomin in Croatia, using an anthracite coal with a higher than usual uranium content and normal thorium content. A network of TL dosimeters (TLD), working levels (WL) measurements, air pollution monitoring and monitoring of waste pile were organized. Some of the measurements have been repeated, and the results have shown decreased contamination. (author)

  14. Genetic radiation effects and natural radioactivity of human population in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire-Maia, A.

    1972-01-01

    A study on areas of natural radioactivity is done, covering the genetic effects on human population. The study is done in depth dealing with aspecto such as radioactive area involved, discussion of materials and methods, errors and fallacies, influential factors, models, buildup and natural radioactivity, hypotheses, results and perspectives, etc. It covers 24 localites, 8.572 couples and 43.930 pregnancy cases [pt

  15. Naturally Occurring Radionuclides and Rare Earth Elements Pattern in Weathered Japanese Soil Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, S.K.; Hosoda, M.; Takahashi, H.; Sorimachi, A.; Ishikawa, T.; Tokonami, S.; Uchida, S.

    2011-01-01

    From the viewpoint of radiation protection, determination of natural radionuclides e.g. thorium and uranium in soil samples are important. Accurate methods for determination of Th and U is gaining importance. The geochemical behavior of Th, U and rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively close to one another while compared to other elements in geological environment. Radioactive elements like 232 Th and 238 U along with their decay products (e.g. 226 Ra) are present in most of the environmental matrices and can be transferred to living bodies by different pathways that can lead to sources of exposure of man. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor these natural radionuclides in weathered soil samples to assess the possible hazards. The activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 228 Th, and 40 K in soils have been measured using a g γ-ray spectroscopy system with high purity germanium detector. The thorium, uranium and REEs were determined from the same sample using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Granitic rocks contain higher amounts of Th, U and light REEs compared to other igneous rocks such as basalt and andesites. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the interaction between REEs and nature of soils, as soils are complex heterogeneous mixture of organic and inorganic solids, water and gases. In this paper, we have discussed about distribution pattern of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 238 U along with REEs in soil samples of weathered acid rock (granite and ryolite) collected from two prefectures in Japan: 1. Gifu and 2. Okinawa. (author)

  16. Gamma ray doses proceeding from natural occurring radionuclides in closed environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Vitor Angelo P. de; Medina, Nilberto H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. Guazzelli da; Moreira, Ramon H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the application of gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from terrestrial natural elements present in building materials such as sand, cement, lime (CaO) and milled granitic stones. The major contribution to annual gamma-ray radiation effective dose is due to the natural occurring radionuclides 40 K, 232 Th and 238 U. Two spectrometry systems were employed to measure the gamma radiation: one with a 60% efficient GeHP detector and the second one with a 2''x2'' NaI(Tl) scintillator. The estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms assumed is 0.63 mSv/yr, proceeding from terrestrial natural elements. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks. (author)

  17. Natural and artificial radioactivity in commercial food for domestic animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    The levels of natural radioactivity throughout the planet and their eventual consequences are studied by Environmental Radioprotection. Over the past years, the international agencies concerned with radiation protection have debated over the practices conducted so far, regarding the protection of the fauna and ora, which believed that the recommendations implemented for human beings assured that other species were also protected. Thus, assessments of the activity concentration of different radionuclides in the environment, as well as the absorbed doses for species from different ecosystems, due to internal and external exposures, are needed. Brazil holds the second largest dog and cat population in the world and annually produces over 2 million tons of feed. The present work has investigated the radioactivity levels in commercial brands of dry dog and cat food, using high resolution gamma spectrometry. The results have shown activity concentrations for artificial radionuclides below the detector's Minimum Detectable Activity and also, low concentration levels for the natural radionuclides, varying from 0,9 ± 0,3 Bq/kg up to 5,1 ± 0,7 Bq/kg for 226 Ra, from 1,2 ± 0,4 Bq/kg up to 11,1 ± 1,0 Bq/kg for 232 Th and from 156 ± 7 Bq/kg up to 410± 19 Bq/kg for 40 K. In order to verify the mineral content in pet food, EDXRF technique was applied and, using multivariate statistics, correlations between the mineral and radionuclide content were verified. The good correlation observed between concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and calcium could be associated with meat and bone our used in feed manufacturing. The internal dose for some organs were inferred by Monte Carlo method and the results were no higher than 1 μGy/day. In summary, results have shown that the activity levels found in the pet food are low enough to conclude that the brands evaluated carry no radiological risks for the animals that consume them. (author)

  18. Investigation of natural radioactivity level of the waters in the tibet autonomous region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tianhua; Li Yankun; Yao Ke; Pan Chengchang

    1995-01-01

    The investigation results of natural radioactivity level in river, lake, spring, well and tap water in the Tibet Autonomous Region is reported. There were totally 46 samples collected from 53 measuring points. The results show that the radioactivity level of water bodies of the Tibet Autonomous region was within normal natural background

  19. Investigation of natural radioactivity level of the waters in Inner Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Xuelin; Li Wenyuan; Fu Su

    1993-01-01

    The authors reports the investigation results of natural radioactivity level in rivers, lakes, reservoirs, springs, wells and tap water in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. There were totally 326 samples collected from 178 measuring points. The results show that the radioactivity level of varied water bodies of the region was within normal natural background

  20. Investigation of natural radioactivity level of the waters in Guangxi Zhuangzu Autonomous Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Mingshen; Ming Chuanbao; Dai Guozhi; Liang Runping; Chen Xiuyu; Yang Gang; Jin Mei

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the investigation results of natural radioactivity level in river, lake reservoir, spring, well and tap water in Guangxi Zhuangzu Autonomous Region. There were totally 194 samples collected from 143 measuring points. The results show that the radioactivity level of varied water bodies of the region was within normal natural background

  1. Investigation of natural radioactivity level of the waters in the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Yupei; Wang Li; Tian Yi; Ai Xianyuan; Liang Ningbu

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the investigation results of natural radioactivity level in river, lake, reservoir, spring, well and tap water in the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region. There were totally 117 samples collected from 84 measuring points. The results show that the radioactivity level of varied water bodies of the region was within normal natural background

  2. Determination of geochemical and natural radioactivity characteristics in Bilecik Marble, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerel Kandemir, Suheyla; Ozbay, Nurgul

    2014-05-01

    Natural stones are one of the oldest known building materials. There are more than 400 natural stone in Turkey. Recently, the demand for the natural stone types in markets has been increasing rapidly. For this reason, the geochemical and natural radioactivity characteristics of natural stone are very important. Bilecik province is located at the northwest part of Turkey and it is surrounded by Sakarya, Bursa, Eskisehir and Kutahya city. Bilecik is one of the important marble industry regions of Turkey. Thus, the geochemical and natural radioactivity characteristics of Bilecik marble are very important. In this study, Bilecik marble was collected to determine the geochemistry and natural radioactivity. Then, analyses of geochemical and natural radioactivity in the marble samples are interpreted. ACKNOWLEDGMENT This study is supported by Bilecik Seyh Edebali University scientific project (Project Number =2011-02-BIL.03-04).

  3. Measurement of natural radioactivity and elemental analysis in plant samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Pooja; Chauhan, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactivity is a major source of worldwide human exposure to ionizing radiation, a fraction of which results from such anthropogenic activities that are not subjected to regulatory radiological safety standards. In addition to being the main source of continuous radiation exposure to the human, soil acts as a medium of migration for transfer of radio nuclides to the biological systems and hence, it is the basic indicator of radiological contamination in the environment. Soil to plant is major pathway for accumulation of radionuclide to human being. The specific metabolic character of the plant species may lead to accumulation of radio-nuclides in their organs which may further depend upon the physico-chemical characteristics of the soil. A fraction of these heavy metals in soil can transfer to plant through various metabolic activities occurring in plants. Heavy metal-contaminated soil is one of the widespread global problems. Migration and accumulation of contaminants in the soil-plant system is complex, and assessment models commonly utilize a soil-plant concentration ratio, referred to as a transfer factor (TF), to estimate the transportation of radionuclides through the food chain. This ratio describes the amount of radionuclide expected to enter a plant from soil. (author)

  4. Natural radioactivity levels in Khammam district of Andhra Pradesh, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, K.V.K.; Reddy, C.G.; Reddy, P.Y.; Reddy, K.R.; Reddy, B.S.; Sagar, D.V.

    2006-01-01

    For the past few years, there has been a great deal of concern and awareness all over the world about the exposure from environmental radiation and its perceived detrimental effects. Therefore, it becomes mandatory to estimate the radiation levels not only for the purpose of prospecting for nuclear fuels but also for determination of safe human habitat regions. In the present study, an attempt is made to estimate the natural radioactivity levels in the soils of Khammam district of Andhra Pradesh, India using NaI(Tl) gamma scintillation spectrometer. The mean uranium, thorium and potassium concentrations in soils of the district are found to be 27±17, 81±51 and 726±289 Bq Kg -1 , respectively. The gamma dose rates are calculated using conversion factors recommended by UNSCEAR 2000. The gamma radiation dose in air is also measured directly by using thermoluminescence dosimetry and G.M.(Geiger - Muller) tube based survey meter. The correlation between the dose rates derived from these two techniques is discussed. The dose variation with the geology has been analysed. (authors)

  5. Investigation of natural radioactivity levels using gamma dosimetry outdoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Josineide M.N.; Santos Júnior, José A.; Amaral, Romilton S.; Silva, Arykerne N.C.; Santos Junior, Otávio P.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Fernández, Zahily H.; Rojas, Lino A.V.

    2017-01-01

    Radiometric studies have been increasingly needed as an alternative to evaluate possible effects of natural radioactivity in humans, considering that the responses to health problems, in the main, depart from the environment of individuals, survival practices and human development. The present study aimed at the realization of the outdoor radiometry in the municipality of Paraíba, Brazil, to determine a value that can express and guide a reference for radiometry local, making it possible to describe some impact on the health of the population. The results were obtained by 'in situ' measurements using a gamma detector, calibrated to measure the dosimetric quantity of the effective environmental dose rate. Monitoring data ranged from 0.06 to 0.38 mSv/y, with a mean and deviation of 0.20 ± 0.04 mSv/y, whose trend measurement can be assumed to be representative of the effective dose rate of the environment outdoor, characterizing the area as low background radiation, whose parameter dosimetric and means evaluated, did not provide justification to impact on the increase in the occurrences of diseases in the local population. (author)

  6. Investigation of natural radioactivity levels using gamma dosimetry outdoors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Josineide M.N.; Santos Júnior, José A.; Amaral, Romilton S.; Silva, Arykerne N.C.; Santos Junior, Otávio P.; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Fernández, Zahily H.; Rojas, Lino A.V., E-mail: josineide.santos@ufpe.br, E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br, E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br, E-mail: ary_casado@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: zahily.herrerofernandez@ufpe.br, E-mail: lino.valcarcel@ufpe.br, E-mail: otavio.santos@vitoria.ifpe.edu.br [Center for Applied Technology and Nuclear Development, Havana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    Radiometric studies have been increasingly needed as an alternative to evaluate possible effects of natural radioactivity in humans, considering that the responses to health problems, in the main, depart from the environment of individuals, survival practices and human development. The present study aimed at the realization of the outdoor radiometry in the municipality of Paraíba, Brazil, to determine a value that can express and guide a reference for radiometry local, making it possible to describe some impact on the health of the population. The results were obtained by 'in situ' measurements using a gamma detector, calibrated to measure the dosimetric quantity of the effective environmental dose rate. Monitoring data ranged from 0.06 to 0.38 mSv/y, with a mean and deviation of 0.20 ± 0.04 mSv/y, whose trend measurement can be assumed to be representative of the effective dose rate of the environment outdoor, characterizing the area as low background radiation, whose parameter dosimetric and means evaluated, did not provide justification to impact on the increase in the occurrences of diseases in the local population. (author)

  7. Natural radioactivity in private water supplies in Devon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, D.; Davis, J.; Rainey, M.

    2000-01-01

    This report details a study of the occurrence of natural radioactivity in private water Supplies in West Devon. Supplies sourced from wells, springs boreholes and a small number surface supplies were sampled. The findings of a laboratory simulation of the radon content in drinks such as tea, coffee and squash are also presented. Of supplies sampled in phase one of the work approximately 8% of tap water and 9% of samples directly from the supply contained radon at concentrations exceeding the draft European Union Commission Recommendation action level of 1000 Bq/I for individual and public water supplies. In a small number of supplies 238 U is present at levels exceeding 2 μg/I, the World Health Organisation (WHO) provisional guideline value for uranium in drinking water. The final aspect of the study looked at seasonal variation in the radon content of selected supplies. This showed considerable variability in radon concentration over the course of a week and between studies carried out several months apart. (author)

  8. Activity, specificity, and titer of naturally occurring canine anti-DEA 7 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Eva; Proverbio, Daniela; Baggiani, Luciana; Canzi, Ilaria; Perego, Roberta

    2016-11-01

    The reported prevalence of naturally occurring anti-dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA) 7 antibodies in DEA 7-negative dogs is as high as 50%. Characterization of these antibodies may better define their importance in canine transfusion medicine. We determined in vitro activity, specificity, and titer of anti-DEA 7 antibodies in DEA 7-negative dogs. Plasma samples from 317 DEA 7-negative dogs were cross-matched with DEA 7-positive red blood cells (RBCs) using gel column technology. Agglutination occurred with DEA 7-positive RBCs but not with DEA 7-negative RBCs in 73 samples (23%), which were hence classified as containing anti-DEA 7 antibodies. These samples were evaluated for hemolytic and agglutinating activity, strength of agglutination, and antibody specificity and titers. All samples showed agglutination but none showed hemolysis. Gel agglutination was graded as 1+ for 20 samples (27%), 2+ for 49 samples (67%), 3+ for 4 samples (6%); no samples were graded 4+. The agglutination titer was DEA 7 antibodies were found in 23% of DEA 7-negative dogs. The presence of naturally occurring anti-DEA 7 antibodies suggests that cross-matching of canine blood recipients is advisable, even at first transfusion, to minimize delayed transfusion reactions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Differentiation of naturally-occurring vs. artificial hydrocarbons in a landfill groundwater investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaver, J.L.; Hartness, J.A.; Breeding, L.B.; Buchanan, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Interpretation of groundwater sampling data at a large municipal/industrial landfill indicates contamination by both artificial and naturally-occurring hydrocarbons. Site hydrogeology consists of three different water bearing zones. The uppermost (shallow) aquifer is an unconfined unit consisting of silt, clay, and sand deposits. An intermediate depth semiconfined aquifer underlies the unconfined unit, and consists of a chert rubble zone and the upper portion of a fractured and solution-enhanced limestone formation. A regionally-extensive organic-rich shale underlies the semiconfined aquifer and separates it from the deep confined aquifer, which also consists of limestone. Groundwater investigations at the landfill have detected chlorinated and non-chlorinated hydrocarbons in the different aquifer intervals. Chlorinated hydrocarbons detected include tetrachloroethene, dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride and occur almost exclusively in the shallow aquifer. Aromatic hydrocarbons detected include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) and-occur in the intermediate and deep aquifers. The landfill was originally interpreted as the source of the contaminants. The observation of free-phase liquid hydrocarbons in the intermediate aquifer at the site, and high dissolved BTEX levels in the deep and intermediate aquifers upgradient of the landfill suggest that the aromatics were derived from a source other than the landfill. A potential source of BTEX contamination may be abandoned (pre-1930) natural gas wells located near the landfill. An additional BTEX source may be the organic-rich shale formation (a documented petroleum source rock)

  10. Naturally occurring arsenic in the groundwater at the Kansas City Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes an investigation concerning the presence of arsenic in concentrations exceeding 0.4 mg/L in the groundwater under the Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant (KCP). The study consisted of four distinct phases: a thorough review of the technical literature, a historical survey of arsenic use at the facility, a laboratory study of existing techniques for determining arsenic speciation, and a field program including water, soil, and sediment sampling. The historical survey and literature review demonstrated that plant activities had not released significant quantities of arsenic to the environment but that similar occurrences of arsenic in alluvial groundwater are widespread in the midwestern United States. Laboratory studies showed that a chromatographic separation technique was necessary to accurately determine arsenic speciation for the KCP groundwater samples. Field studies revealed that naturally occurring reducing conditions prevalent in the subsurface are responsible for dissolving arsenic previously sorbed by iron oxides. Indeed, the data demonstrated that the bulk arsenic concentration of site subsoils and sediments is {approximately}7 mg/kg, whereas the arsenic content of iron oxide subsamples is as high as 84 mg/kg. Literature showed that similar concentrations of arsenic in sediments occur naturally and are capable of producing the levels of arsenic found in groundwater monitoring wells at the KCP. The study concludes, therefore, that the arsenic present in the KCP groundwater is the result of natural phenomena. 44 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. Preclinical characterization of naturally occurring polyketide cyclophilin inhibitors from the sanglifehrin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Matthew A; Bobardt, Michael; Obeid, Susan; Chatterji, Udayan; Coates, Nigel J; Foster, Teresa; Gallay, Philippe; Leyssen, Pieter; Moss, Steven J; Neyts, Johan; Nur-e-Alam, Mohammad; Paeshuyse, Jan; Piraee, Mahmood; Suthar, Dipen; Warneck, Tony; Zhang, Ming-Qiang; Wilkinson, Barrie

    2011-05-01

    Cyclophilin inhibitors currently in clinical trials for hepatitis C virus (HCV) are all analogues of cyclosporine (CsA). Sanglifehrins are a group of naturally occurring cyclophilin binding polyketides that are structurally distinct from the cyclosporines and are produced by a microorganism amenable to biosynthetic engineering for lead optimization and large-scale production by fermentation. Preclinical characterization of the potential utility of this class of compounds for the treatment of HCV revealed that the natural sanglifehrins A to D are all more potent than CsA at disrupting formation of the NS5A-CypA, -CypB, and -CypD complexes and at inhibition of CypA, CypB, and CypD isomerase activity. In particular, sanglifehrin B (SfB) was 30- to 50-fold more potent at inhibiting the isomerase activity of all Cyps tested than CsA and was also shown to be a more potent inhibitor of the 1b subgenomic replicon (50% effective concentrations [EC50s] of 0.070 μM and 0.16 μM in Huh 5-2 and Huh 9-13 cells, respectively). Physicochemical and mouse pharmacokinetic analyses revealed low oral bioavailability (F5 h). These data demonstrate that naturally occurring sanglifehrins are suitable lead compounds for the development of novel analogues that are less immunosuppressive and that have improved metabolism and pharmacokinetic properties.

  12. Preclinical Characterization of Naturally Occurring Polyketide Cyclophilin Inhibitors from the Sanglifehrin Family▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Matthew A.; Bobardt, Michael; Obeid, Susan; Chatterji, Udayan; Coates, Nigel J.; Foster, Teresa; Gallay, Philippe; Leyssen, Pieter; Moss, Steven J.; Neyts, Johan; Nur-e-Alam, Mohammad; Paeshuyse, Jan; Piraee, Mahmood; Suthar, Dipen; Warneck, Tony; Zhang, Ming-Qiang; Wilkinson, Barrie

    2011-01-01

    Cyclophilin inhibitors currently in clinical trials for hepatitis C virus (HCV) are all analogues of cyclosporine (CsA). Sanglifehrins are a group of naturally occurring cyclophilin binding polyketides that are structurally distinct from the cyclosporines and are produced by a microorganism amenable to biosynthetic engineering for lead optimization and large-scale production by fermentation. Preclinical characterization of the potential utility of this class of compounds for the treatment of HCV revealed that the natural sanglifehrins A to D are all more potent than CsA at disrupting formation of the NS5A-CypA, -CypB, and -CypD complexes and at inhibition of CypA, CypB, and CypD isomerase activity. In particular, sanglifehrin B (SfB) was 30- to 50-fold more potent at inhibiting the isomerase activity of all Cyps tested than CsA and was also shown to be a more potent inhibitor of the 1b subgenomic replicon (50% effective concentrations [EC50s] of 0.070 μM and 0.16 μM in Huh 5-2 and Huh 9-13 cells, respectively). Physicochemical and mouse pharmacokinetic analyses revealed low oral bioavailability (F 5 h). These data demonstrate that naturally occurring sanglifehrins are suitable lead compounds for the development of novel analogues that are less immunosuppressive and that have improved metabolism and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:21383094

  13. Investigation of the resistance of some naturally occurring and synthetic inorganic ion exchangers against gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilchi, A.; Khanchi, A.; Ghanadi Maragheh, M.; Bagheri, A.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of various doses of gamma radiation on the ion-exchange capacity, distribution coefficient values, elution behaviour, physical effect, pH titration and infrared spectra of some synthetic inorganic ion exchangers, namely the cerium substituted phosphates; and naturally occurring inorganic ion exchangers, zeolites from different parts of Iran, have been studied systematically. No significant change has been observed in the ion-exchange capacity (with the exception of CeP(Na), CeP(Di·Na) and zeolite 5 (deposits of arababad talas)), elution behaviour, physical effect, chemical stability and the infrared spectra of the synthetic ion exchangers irradiated up to a total dose of 200 kGy, while a change has been observed in the pH-titration and distribution behaviour. The increase in pH is sharper for irradiated samples with divalent cations than for the normal samples. Furthermore, the K d values, and hence the selectivity towards certain cations increase with the total dose absorbed, reaching its optimum selectivity with the dose of 50-100 kGy. The natural zeolites chosen for these studies, show, similar pattern to those of synthetic ion exchangers, and in some cases an extremely high selectivity toward certain cations, like Be II . These make, zeolites, which are naturally occurring ion exchangers more viable economically, and extremely useful alternative in this industry

  14. Environmental radioactivity from natural, industrial, and military sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenbud, M.

    1987-01-01

    This document is the third edition of a book generally considered a standard in the field of radioactive materials in the environment. Topics include radiation protection standards, transport mechanisms, terrestrial and aquatic pathways, reprocessing of nuclear fuels, radioactive waste management, the fallout from nuclear explosions, nuclear accidents, and risk assessment

  15. Applicability of monitored natural attenuation at radioactively contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-01-15

    grouped into three categories: non-intervention, containment and removal. This report discusses in detail the necessary prerequisites, processes involved and applicability of non-intervention as a strategy for dealing with radioactive contamination. Particular emphasis is put on modelling tools as integral elements of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). It provides a comprehensive critique of, and explores the limits of, the applicability of MNA. While MNA is de facto relied upon in many instances where contamination cannot be completely removed from an engineered repository, it is emphasized that non-intervention is not equivalent to a 'do nothing' option. In order to rely on MNA safely, a thorough understanding of the site and the migration behaviour of the contaminants in the given environment is needed. This is gained from a comprehensive site investigation. This report complements other recent reports on remediation techniques and strategies with a less invasive concept. An extensive body of references including relevant web sites will help the reader to find more detailed or more up-to-date information.

  16. Applicability of monitored natural attenuation at radioactively contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    grouped into three categories: non-intervention, containment and removal. This report discusses in detail the necessary prerequisites, processes involved and applicability of non-intervention as a strategy for dealing with radioactive contamination. Particular emphasis is put on modelling tools as integral elements of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). It provides a comprehensive critique of, and explores the limits of, the applicability of MNA. While MNA is de facto relied upon in many instances where contamination cannot be completely removed from an engineered repository, it is emphasized that non-intervention is not equivalent to a 'do nothing' option. In order to rely on MNA safely, a thorough understanding of the site and the migration behaviour of the contaminants in the given environment is needed. This is gained from a comprehensive site investigation. This report complements other recent reports on remediation techniques and strategies with a less invasive concept. An extensive body of references including relevant web sites will help the reader to find more detailed or more up-to-date information

  17. Natural radioactivity measurements in the central region of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes, M. L.; Mendoza, E. F.; Cristancho, F.

    2009-01-01

    The natural radionuclides 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K are the most important γ ray emitters present in the earth crust and its concentration depends mainly on the processes of mineralization and geological formation that occur in nature. The determination of such concentrations is important because it allow us to know the radiation exposure of human beings in different regions and thus monitor the dose levels received by the population. In this work the concentrations of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K for two different places in the central region of Colombia are presented. The obtained values for 238 U concentration are between 20 and 30 ppm, for 232 Th between 70 and 130 ppm and for 40 K between 5 - 7 %. These values are comparable with other works, but further measurements are needed to characterize the radionuclides concentrations in Colombia. (Author)

  18. Research on the reliability of measurement of natural radioactive nuclide concentration of U-238

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seok Ki; Kim, Gee Hyun [Dept. of Nuclear engineering, Univ. of SeJong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Sun Dong; Lee, Hoon [KoFONS, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Naturally occurred radioactive materials (NORM) can be found all around us and people are exposed to this no matter what they do or where they live. In this study, two indirect measurement methods of NORM U-238 has been reviewed; one that has used HPGe on the basis of the maintenance, and the other is disequilibrium theory of radioactive equilibrium relationships of mother and daughter nuclide at Decay-chain of NORM U-238. For this review, complicated pre-processing process (Breaking->Fusion->Chromatography->Electron deposit) has been used , and then carried out a comparative research with direct measurement method that makes use of and measures Alpha spectrometer. Through the experiment as above, we could infer the daughter nuclide whose radioactive equilibrium has been maintained with U-238. Therefore, we could find out that the daughter nuclide suitable to be applied to Gamma indirect measurement method was Th-234. Due to Pearson Correlation statistics, we could find out the reliability of the result value that has been analyzed by using Th-234.

  19. The nature and position of processing determines why forgetting occurs in working memory tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrold, Christopher; Tam, Helen; Baddeley, Alan D; Harvey, Caroline E

    2010-12-01

    The effect of potentially distracting processing within working memory was examined by varying the nature and position of processing across conditions of a Brown-Peterson-like task. Separate groups of participants carried out verbal or visuospatial processing operations on identical stimuli, while retaining lists of to-be-remembered words. The number of words presented either before or after the processing interval was varied systematically. Results showed that although verbal processing was no more demanding than visuospatial processing, it led to greater forgetting. However, forgetting was confined to items presented prior to processing, and the difference in degree of forgetting shown by the two groups was maximal when four items occurred before processing. Temporal isolation effects were more marked in the verbal processing group. These findings indicate that individuals can keep active a limited number of items in primary memory during processing, unless processing blocks rehearsal, in which case retrieval occurs from secondary memory.

  20. Interaction of flavonoids, the naturally occurring antioxidants with different media: a UV-visible spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Bushra; Shah, S W H; Hasan, Aurangzeb; Sakhawat Shah, S

    2010-04-01

    Quantitative parameters for interaction of flavonoids-the naturally occurring antioxidants, with solvents and surfactants are determined using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The availability of flavonoids; kaempferol, apigenin, kaempferide and rhamnetin in micelles of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is reflected in terms of partition coefficient, K(c). Thermodynamic calculations show that the process of transfer of flavonoid molecules to anionic micelles of SDS is energy efficient. A distortion in flavonoid's morphology occurs in case of kaempferol and apigenin in surfactant and water, exhibited in terms of a new band in the UV region of electronic spectra of these flavonoids. The partition coefficients of structurally related flavonoids are correlated with their antioxidant activities. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Antioxidant effect of naturally occurring xanthines on the oxidative damage of DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, A.J.S.C.; Telo, J.P.; Pereira, H.F.; Patrocinio, P.F.; Dias, R.M.B.

    1999-01-01

    The repair of the oxidised radicals of adenine and guanosine by several naturally occurring xanthines was studied. Each pair of DNA purine/xanthine was made to react with the sulphate radical and the decrease of the concentration of both compounds was measured by HPLC as a function of irradiation time. The results show that xanthine efficiently prevents the oxidation of the two DNA purines. Theophylline and para-xanthine repair the oxidizes radical of adenine but not the one from guanosine. Theobromine and caffeine to do not show any protecting effect. An order of the oxidation potentials of all the purines studied is proposed. (authors)

  2. Bacteremia and bacterial translocation in the naturally occurring canine gastric dilatation-volvulus patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Kevin P; Greenfield, Cathy L; Schaeffer, David J

    2003-01-01

    This prospective study was performed to determine the prevalence of bacteremia in the naturally occurring gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) patient, the possible relationship between bacteremia and survival, and whether bacteremia was a result of translocation from the stomach. Blood cultures were collected from each patient. Bacterial cultures were collected from the liver, mesenteric lymph node, and stomach. Forty-three percent of the GDV cases and 40% of the controls developed positive blood cultures. Gram-negative rods were the most frequently isolated organisms. Evidence of bacterial translocation from the stomach could not be demonstrated in GDV patients, and survival was not affected by the presence of bacteremia.

  3. Corrected simulations for one-dimensional diffusion processes with naturally occurring boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiey, Hassan; Gan, Xinjun; Waxman, David

    2017-11-01

    To simulate a diffusion process, a usual approach is to discretize the time in the associated stochastic differential equation. This is the approach used in the Euler method. In the present work we consider a one-dimensional diffusion process where the terms occurring, within the stochastic differential equation, prevent the process entering a region. The outcome is a naturally occurring boundary (which may be absorbing or reflecting). A complication occurs in a simulation of this situation. The term involving a random variable, within the discretized stochastic differential equation, may take a trajectory across the boundary into a "forbidden region." The naive way of dealing with this problem, which we refer to as the "standard" approach, is simply to reset the trajectory to the boundary, based on the argument that crossing the boundary actually signifies achieving the boundary. In this work we show, within the framework of the Euler method, that such resetting introduces a spurious force into the original diffusion process. This force may have a significant influence on trajectories that come close to a boundary. We propose a corrected numerical scheme, for simulating one-dimensional diffusion processes with naturally occurring boundaries. This involves correcting the standard approach, so that an exact property of the diffusion process is precisely respected. As a consequence, the proposed scheme does not introduce a spurious force into the dynamics. We present numerical test cases, based on exactly soluble one-dimensional problems with one or two boundaries, which suggest that, for a given value of the discrete time step, the proposed scheme leads to substantially more accurate results than the standard approach. Alternatively, the standard approach needs considerably more computation time to obtain a comparable level of accuracy to the proposed scheme, because the standard approach requires a significantly smaller time step.

  4. Investigation on natural radioactive nuclide contents of rock products in Xi'an construction materials market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chunlin; Han Feng; Shang Aiguo; Li Tiantuo; Guo Huiping; Yie Lichao; Li Guifang

    2001-01-01

    The author reports the investigation results on natural radioactive nuclide contents of rock products from Xi'an construction materials market. The products were classified according to the national standard. The results show that natural radioactive nuclide contents in sampled rock products are in normal radioactive background levels. The radio-activity ranges of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K are 2.7 - 181.8, 0.92 - 271.0, 0.63 - 148.0, 1.8 - 1245 Bq·kg -1 , respectively. According to the national standard (JC 518-93), the application of some rock products must be limited

  5. Beneficial Effects of Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Naturally Occurring Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger Kenneth Whealands; Werling, Natalie Jayne; Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Alam, Rafiqul; Goodship, Allen E.; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries are a common age-related degenerative condition where current treatment strategies fail to restore functionality and normal quality of life. This disease also occurs naturally in horses, with many similarities to human tendinopathy making it an ideal large animal model for human disease. Regenerative approaches are increasingly used to improve outcome involving mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), supported by clinical data where injection of autologous bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) suspended in marrow supernatant into injured tendons has halved the re-injury rate in racehorses. We hypothesized that stem cell therapy induces a matrix more closely resembling normal tendon than the fibrous scar tissue formed by natural repair. Twelve horses with career-ending naturally-occurring superficial digital flexor tendon injury were allocated randomly to treatment and control groups. 1X107 autologous BM-MSCs suspended in 2 ml of marrow supernatant were implanted into the damaged tendon of the treated group. The control group received the same volume of saline. Following a 6 month exercise programme horses were euthanized and tendons assessed for structural stiffness by non-destructive mechanical testing and for morphological and molecular composition. BM-MSC treated tendons exhibited statistically significant improvements in key parameters compared to saline-injected control tendons towards that of normal tendons and those in the contralateral limbs. Specifically, treated tendons had lower structural stiffness (ptendon repair in enhancing normalisation of biomechanical, morphological, and compositional parameters. These data in natural disease, with no adverse findings, support the use of this treatment for human tendon injuries. PMID:24086616

  6. Molecular- and nm-scale Investigation of the Structure and Compositional Heterogeneity of Naturally Occurring Ferrihydrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismasu, C.; Michel, F. M.; Stebbins, J. F.; Tcaciuc, A. P.; Brown, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    Ferrihydrite is a hydrated Fe(III) nano-oxide that forms in vast quantities in contaminated acid mine drainage environments. As a result of its high surface area, ferrihydrite is an important environmental sorbent, and plays an essential role in the geochemical cycling of pollutant metal(loid)s in these settings. Despite its environmental relevance, this nanomineral remains one of the least understood environmental solids in terms of its structure (bulk and surface), compositional variations, and the factors affecting its reactivity. Under natural aqueous conditions, ferrihydrite often precipitates in the presence of several inorganic compounds such as aluminum, silica, arsenic, etc., or in the presence of organic matter. These impurities can affect the molecular-level structure of naturally occurring ferrihydrite, thus modifying fundamental properties that are directly correlated with solid-phase stability and surface reactivity. Currently there exists a significant gap in our understanding of the structure of synthetic vs. natural ferrihydrites, due to the inherent difficulties associated to the investigation of these poorly crystalline nanophases. In this study, we combined synchrotron- and laboratory-based techniques to characterize naturally occurring ferrihydrite from an acid mine drainage system situated at the New Idria mercury mine in California. We used high-energy X-ray total scattering and pair distribution function analysis to elucidate quantitative structural details of these samples. We have additionally used scanning transmission X-ray microscopy high resolution imaging (30 nm) to evaluate the spatial relationship of major elements Si, Al, and C within ferrihydrite. Al, Si and C K-edge near- edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to obtain short-range structural information. By combining these techniques we attain the highest level of resolution permitted by current analytical

  7. The natural radioactivity of plants, animals and humans. 3. enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schewtschenko, I.N.; Danilenko, A.I.

    2007-01-01

    The natural radioactivity of plants, animals and humans are of important scientific relevance for radiobiology and medicine. The possible effects of micro doses during life span are still controversially discussed. Part I of the book (the natural radioactivity of plants, animals and humans for the normal case and in case of pathological changes) covers the following topics: the natural radioisotopes in living organisms (plants, animals, humans) and their environment; methodologies of qualitative and quantitative determination of beta-activity in biological objects; the radioactivity of atmospheric precipitations; the beta-activity of plants; the beta-activity of animals; beta-activity of human organs and tissues. Part II (dynamics of radionuclides in the biological chains in the period 1960 to 2007): the modern conceptions on the biological role of natural radioactive elements, biological indications during early stages of low-dose ionizing irradiation; the radioactivity of the human blood; radiation and carcerogenesis

  8. Evaluation of the natural gamma radioactivity in the interior and exterior of housings in the Cusco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warthon, J. L.; Olarte, A.

    2012-10-01

    The natural radioactivity is present in our environment and in all moment what indicates that the human beings are exposed to this radiation type. In the Cusco city (Peru) measurements of the environmental radioactivity levels have been realized by Umeres F. and Sajo L., who contributed valuable information about the natural radioactivity in several places of the Cusco city; these studies have motivated to continue the measurement of the natural radioactivity in this locality, inside and outside of constructions, these measurements also were made like part of the courses of Electromagnetism II and Experimental Physics (graduate degree) that imparts the Academic Physics Department of the National University of San Antonio Abad of the Cusco city, also the measurements were taken in different dates, what demonstrated that the measured values are inside of a radioactivity dose interval and their averages are approximate to the half world value for natural exposition (2.4 mSv per year). (Author)

  9. Natural radioactivity in volcanic ash from Mt. Pinatubo eruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, E.B.; De Vera, C.M.; Garcia, T.Y.; Dela Cruz, F.M.; Esguerra, L.V.; Castaneda, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    Last June 15, 1991, a major pyroclastic eruption occurred from Mt. Pinatubo volcano located in Zambales, Central Luzon. The radiological impact of this eruption was assessed based on the concentrations of the principal naturally occurring radionuclides observed in volcanic ash. The volcanic ash samples were collected from locations which are within 50-km radius of Mt. Pinatubo at various times after the eruption. The mean activity concentrations in Bq/kg wet weight of the natural radionuclides in volcanic ash were as follows: 12.6 for 238 U, 14.0 for 232 Th and 330 for 40 K. These values are significantly higher than the mean activity concentrations of these radionuclides observed in topsoil in the same provinces before the eruption. This suggests that with the deposition of large quantities of volcanic ash and lahar in Central Luzon and concomitant topographic changes, the distribution and quantities of radionuclides which gave rise to terrestrial radiation may have also changed. Outdoor radon concentrations measured three days and later after the eruption were within normal background values. (auth.). 4 refs.; 5 tabs.; 1 fig

  10. Content of heavy metals and naturally occurring radioactive material in Leucaena leucocaphala (Lam.) de wit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Sareeza Azidin

    2012-01-01

    This research was done to determine the content of heavy metals in Leucaena leucocaphala (Lam.) de Wit (Petai Belalang) at 5 different areas. Those areas were in the middle of city, former mining area, industrial area, domestic waste disposal area, and on expressway roadside. Heavy metal poisoning can happen if the concentration is too high and will cause severe damage to human health. For instance, it may cause gene mutation, cancer and damage to the human body systems. This plant was selected for the study of heavy metals and radionuclide content in the soil. The reason of selecting this plant is because this plant can live in extreme conditions, and perhaps able to absorb those elements better than other legumes. The aim of this study was to determine the content of toxic heavy metals in leaves, stems and roots of Leucaena leucocaphala including the soil where it is grown. The second objective was determine NORM in the soil where the plant grew and the last objective was to determine the transfer factor of heavy metals by the plant. The content analysis of toxic heavy metals for example Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb were determined by using the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Gamma ray spectrometry on the other hand, was used to determine K-40, Ra-226, U-238 and Th-232 in the soil where the plant was sampled. The activity concentration of Ra-226, K-40, U-238 and Th-232 determined were 7.47 ± 3.03 Bq/ kg - 256.92 ± 164.36 Bq/ kg, 95.55 ± 72.62 Bq/ kg - 435.60 ± 88.32 Bq/ kg, 21.83 ± 8.83 Bq/ kg - 165.28 ± 109.61 Bq/ kg dan 43.41 ± 7.06 Bq/ kg - 91.19 ± 11.13 Bq/ kg respectively. In general, the former mining area recorded the highest heavy metal concentration for Cu (28.20 ± 32.54 mg/ kg), Zn (114.67 ± 75,61 mg/ kg), Cd (0.31 ± 0.11 mg/ kg) and Pb (48.08 ± 33.60 mg/ kg). Whereas the highest concentration of As recorded was on the roadside (261.92 ± 132.64) and Hg (0.44 ± 0.36 mg/kg) in the middle of the city. (author)

  11. Characterization of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) in Oil and Gas Industry Equipment and Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.; White, G.J.

    1999-10-07

    This Sampling and Analysis (S and A) Plan was developed for the NORM Characterization Program, and describes the information to be gained through the program, how the required information is to be collected, and the anticipated form and content of the final data. The S and A Plan provides detailed procedures describing the work to be performed, how and why the work will be performed, and who will be responsible for conducting the various aspects of the work. The S and A Plan has been prepared with input from all parties involved with the program. Where appropriate, portions of the procedures described in the S and A Plan will be field tested by personnel of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Grand Junction Project Office (GJPO), as well as representatives of the cosponsor organizations prior to their use in the field.

  12. Scenarios identified internationally for occupational and public exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Bejarano, Gladys

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the exposure of workers; exposure limits, and the delegation of responsibilities and special measures of compensation, protection and security. Likewise, monitoring, personal exposure assessments, externally and internally, are analyzed [es

  13. Application of naturally occurring isotopes and artificial radioactive tracer for monitoring water flooding in oil field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Khan, I.H.; Farooq, M.; Tasneem, M.A.; Rafiq, M.; Din, U.G.; Gul, S.

    2002-03-01

    Water flooding is an important operation to enhance oil recovery. Water is injected in the oil formation under high pressure through an injection well. Movement of the injected water is needed to be traced to test the performance of water flood, investigate unexpected anomalies in flow and verify suspected geological barriers or flow channels, etc. In the present study environmental isotopes and artificial radiotracer (tritium) were used at Fimkassar Oil Field of Oil and Gas Development Company Limited (OGDCL) where water flooding was started in March 1996 in Sakessar formation to maintain its pressure and enhance the oil recovery. Environmental isotopes: /sup 18/O, /sup 2/H and /sup 3/H, and chloride contents were used to determine the breakthrough/transit time and contribution of fresh injected water. Water samples were collected from the injection well, production well and some other fields for reference indices of Sakessar Formation during June 1998 to August 1999. These samples were analyzed for the /sup 18/O, /sup 2/H and /sup 3/H, and chloride contents. Results show that the water of production well is mixture of fresh water and formation water. The fresh water contribution varied from 67% to 80%, while remaining component was the old recharged formation water. This percentage did not change significantly from the time of break-through till the last sampling which indicates good mixing in the reservoir and absence of any quick channel. The initial breakthrough time was 27 months as the fresh water contributed significantly in the first appearance of water in the production well in June 1998. Tritium tracer, which was injected in November 1998, appeared in the production well after 8 months. It show that breakthrough time decreased with the passage of time. /sup 14/C of inorganic carbon in the water in Chorgali and Sakessar Formations was also analyzed which indicates that the water is at least few thousand years old. (author)

  14. Evaluation of Landfill Site Candidate for Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Norm) and Hazardous Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucipta; Hadi Suntoko; Bunawas

    2007-01-01

    Refers to co-location concept, Kabil site, where located at the southeast end of low hills in Batam Island, will be sited as an integrated industrial waste management center including landfill. So that, it is necessary an evaluation of the landfill site candidate for NORM and hazardous waste. The evaluation includes geological and non-geological aspects, to determine the suitability or capability in supporting the function as landfill facility. The site candidate was evaluated by serial sreps as follows: 1) criteria formulation; 2) selecting the parameter for evaluation; 3) Positive screening or evaluation of the land having potentiality for landfill site by descriptive method: and 4) determine the land suitability or capability for landfill site. The evaluation of geological and non- geological aspects include topography, litology, seismicity, groundwater and surface water, climate, hydro-oceanography, flora and fauna, spatial pattern and transportation system. The most of the parameters evaluated show the fulfilling to the site criteria, and can be mentioned that the land is suitable for landfill site. Some parameters are not so suitable for that purpose, especially on permeability and homogeneity of the rocks/soils, distance to surface water body, depth of groundwater, the flow rate of groundwater, precipitation, and humidity of the air. The lack of suitability showed by some parameters can be compensated by improving the appropriate engineered barrier in order to fulfill the landfill performance in providing the supporting capacity, long live stability and waste containment. (author)

  15. Evaluation of gamma activities of naturally occurring radioactive materials in uncontaminated surface soils of Jamaica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurice Miller; Mitko Voutchkov

    2014-01-01

    In this study a geological, lithological or pedogenesis analysis is used to explain the values and distribution of the primordial specific gamma activities in the Jamaican soil environment. A random systematic sampling method resulted in Jamaica being divided into 50 square grids with a maximum sampling density of 225 square meters per sample. The resulting sixty-eight (68) samples were measured on a Canberra HPGe detector for 24 h and the photopeaks for the primordial gammas of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K analyzed. Spearman's correlation was used to investigate the relationships between the primordial specific activities and the geological features of the soil samples collected and the geographic information system, ArcGIS v10.1 used to graphically depict the gamma profile of the primordials across the island. The Kruskal-Wallis test indicated that in general the variations of the primordial gamma specific activities over the underlying soil geologies were statistically significant. However, the pairwise Post-Hoc test results did not suggest a significant variation in mean specific for any of the primordial with all the underlying geology even when the unadjusted p value was used. This result along with the Spearman's coefficient correlation values suggested a moderate to weak relationship between the gamma profile of the top soil and its underlying geology. With the exception of a weak correlation with 232 Th (-0.295) no other primordial radionuclide correlated with the UNESCO/FAO soil categories for the island. The most significant correlations for soil characteristics and gamma activities were organic matters which were positive for 232 Th (0.518), 238 U (0.481) but negative for 40 K (-0.284). (author)

  16. Natural radioactivity in Swedish agricultural soils and crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Ake; Rosen, K.

    2000-01-01

    In this work we report on investigations in Sweden of the natural radioactivity of 40 K, 226 Ra and 232 Th in the agricultural soils and of 226 Ra in the crops. In addition information is given on factors important for the plant availability of these nuclides to the crop plants. Also, from a number of works, background data on the transfer from soils to plants in different environments are presented. These works show that there is a large variation depending on local conditions and crop type in the accumulation of natural radioactive elements by the plants. Thus, concentration ratios (plant/soil) calculated for fresh crop weight and dry soil weight showed for 238 U in forage crops and in grain a range 0.001-0.005, for 226 Ra a range 0.001-0.03 and for 210 Pb a range 0.0004-0.2. The higher value was limit for vegetative plant parts and the lower value limit for generative parts, seeds and grain. In Swedish early studies, evidence was found that in field crops on the same soils the radium/calcium-ratio in grain was reduced according to the following order winter wheat>spring wheat> barley>oats. Variation among the crops on different soils showed ranges from 1-0.1 to 1-0.4. The radium/calcium-ratio in straw was 4 to 7 times higher than in grain. Also field experiments showed that proper liming on acid soils could reduce the radium/calcium ratio by 40 per cent. Our study shows that the average contents of the nuclides 226 Ra and 232 Th in Bq per kg dry weight is of the same size of order, 40, 50 and 80 Bq per kg in the southern, in the western and in the middle regions of Sweden, respectively. The difference between regions is not occasional. It depends on the type of the mother material and on the different clay contents of the soils, as is indicated also by the potassium content. Considering also the daughters of the nuclide series it is found that the total nuclide activity will reach a sum of 300-600 kBq per square meter of the plough layer. The total activity may

  17. Induction of interleukin 1 by synthetic and naturally occurring muramyl peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinarello, C A; Krueger, J M

    1986-10-01

    Like bacterial lipopolysaccharides (endotoxins), synthetic muramyl peptides (MPs) are thought to exert many of their biological effects by inducing the production of various mediators from host cells. Both synthetic muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and naturally occurring sleep factor (SF), which contains an MP structure, stimulate human monocytes to produce interleukin 1 (IL 1). IL 1 is a family of unique polypeptides that mediate a variety of host defense functions and possess several biological properties, many of which are shared with MPs. Endotoxins are potent inducers of IL 1, but polymyxin B, which blocks endotoxin's biological activities, has no effect on MP-induced IL 1 production. SF purified from human urine and SF isolated from the peritoneal fluid of patients undergoing chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) induce IL 1 when incubated with human mononuclear cells in vitro. SF from urine or CAPD fluid induces IL 1 production in the picrogram per milliliter range whereas synthetic MDP requires microgram per milliliter concentrations. Thus, both synthetic and naturally occurring MPs exert their biological effects, in part, by inducing IL 1.

  18. Harnessing naturally occurring tumor immunity: a clinical vaccine trial in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayu O Frank

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of patients with paraneoplastic neurologic disorders (PND have revealed that apoptotic tumor serves as a potential potent trigger for the initiation of naturally occurring tumor immunity. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety, and immunogenicity of an apoptotic tumor-autologous dendritic cell (DC vaccine.We have modeled PND tumor immunity in a clinical trial in which apoptotic allogeneic prostate tumor cells were used to generate an apoptotic tumor-autologous dendritic cell vaccine. Twenty-four prostate cancer patients were immunized in a Phase I, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study to assess the safety and immunogenicity of this vaccine. Vaccinations were safe and well tolerated. Importantly, we also found that the vaccine was immunogenic, inducing delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH responses and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation, with no effect on FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. A statistically significant increase in T cell proliferation responses to prostate tumor cells in vitro (p = 0.002, decrease in prostate specific antigen (PSA slope (p = 0.016, and a two-fold increase in PSA doubling time (p = 0.003 were identified when we compared data before and after vaccination.An apoptotic cancer cell vaccine modeled on naturally occurring tumor immune responses in PND patients provides a safe and immunogenic tumor vaccine.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00289341.

  19. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase by kaempferol and related naturally occurring flavonoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thors, L; Belghiti, M; Fowler, C J

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Recent studies have demonstrated that the naturally occurring isoflavone compounds genistein and daidzein inhibit the hydrolysis of anandamide by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in the low micromolar concentration range. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether this property is shared by flavonoids. Experimental approach: The hydrolysis of anandamide in homogenates and intact cells was measured using the substrate labelled in the ethanolamine part of the molecule. Key results: Twenty compounds were tested. Among the commonly occurring flavonoids, kaempferol was the most potent, inhibiting FAAH in a competitive manner with a Ki value of 5 μM. Among flavonoids with a more restricted distribution in nature, the two most active toward FAAH were 7-hydroxyflavone (IC50 value of 0.5–1 μM depending on the solvent used) and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone (IC50 value 2.2 μM). All three compounds reduced the FAAH-dependent uptake of anandamide and its metabolism by intact RBL2H3 basophilic leukaemia cells. Conclusions and implications: Inhibition of FAAH is an additional in vitro biochemical property of flavonoids. Kaempferol, 7-hydroxyflavone and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone may be useful as templates for the synthesis of novel compounds, which target several systems that are involved in the control of inflammation and cancer. PMID:18552875

  20. Doses to the Norwegian population from naturally occuring radiation and from the Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, T.

    1987-01-01

    The doses to the Norwegian population from naturally occuring radiation are extensively reviewed. The annual population weighted average dose equivalent to the Norwegian population from 222 Rn and its daughters is estimated to be between 3.5 and 4.5 mSv. The average concentration of 220 Rn daughters in Norwegian dwellings is most probably between 1.0 and 1.5 Bq m -3 . The corresponding effective dose equivalent for 220 Rn and its daughters is estimated to be between 0.4 and 0.6 mSv. The total annual collective dose equivalent from naturally occuring radiation in Norway is found to be between 21000 and 27000 man Sv. The doses to the Norwegian population from the Chernobyl fallout are briefly discussed. Based on the results of a ''food basket'' project and supplementary data from about 30000 measurements on food samples the first year after the reactor accident, the total annual effective dose equivalent from foodstuffs to an average Norwegian consumer during this first year is estimated to be 0.15 +-0.002 m Sv at the 95% confidence level. The per caput effective dose equivalent from external fallout gamma radiation in the first year after the Chernobyl accident, is approximately 82 μSv in Norway