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Sample records for narrative picture books

  1. The Effect of Narrative Cues on Infants' Imitation from Television and Picture Books

    Simcock, Gabrielle; Garrity, Kara; Barr, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Infants can imitate a novel action sequence from television and picture books, yet there has been no direct comparison of infants' imitation from the 2 types of media. Varying the narrative cues available during the demonstration and test, the current experiments measured 18- and 24-month-olds' imitation from television and picture books. Infants…

  2. The effect of narrative cues on infants' imitation from television and picture books.

    Simcock, Gabrielle; Garrity, Kara; Barr, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Infants can imitate a novel action sequence from television and picture books, yet there has been no direct comparison of infants' imitation from the 2 types of media. Varying the narrative cues available during the demonstration and test, the current experiments measured 18- and 24-month-olds' imitation from television and picture books. Infants imitated from both media types when full narrative cues (Experiment 1; N = 76) or empty, meaningless narration (Experiment 2; N = 135) accompanied the demonstrations, but they imitated more from television than books. In Experiment 3 (N = 27), infants imitated from a book based on narration alone, without the presence of pictures. These results are discussed in relation to age-related changes in cognitive flexibility and infants' emerging symbolic understanding. © 2011 The Authors. Child Development © 2011 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  3. The effect of narrative cues on infants’ imitation from television and picture books

    Simcock, Gabrielle; Garrity, Kara; Barr, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Infants can imitate a novel action sequence from television and picture books; yet there has been no direct comparison of infants’ imitation from the two types of media. Varying the narrative cues available during the demonstration and test, we measured 18- and 24-month-olds’ imitation from television and picture books. Infants imitated from both media types when full narrative cues (Experiment 1; N = 76) or empty, meaningless narration (Experiment 2; N = 135) accompanied the demonstrations, but they imitated more from television than books. In Experiment 3 (N = 27), infants imitated from a book based on narration alone, without the presence of pictures. These results are discussed in relation to age-related changes in cognitive flexibility and infants’ emerging symbolic understanding. PMID:21883157

  4. Young Readers' Narratives Based on a Picture Book: Model Readers and Empirical Readers

    Hoel, Trude

    2015-01-01

    The article present parts of a research project where the aim is to investigate six- to seven-year-old children's language use in storytelling. The children's oral texts are based on the wordless picture book "Frog, Where Are You?" Which has been, and still remains, a frequent tool for collecting narratives from children. The Frog story…

  5. Storybooks aren't just for fun: narrative and non-narrative picture books foster equal amounts of generic language during mother-toddler book sharing.

    Nyhout, Angela; O'Neill, Daniela K

    2014-01-01

    Parents and children encounter a variety of animals and objects in the early picture books they share, but little is known about how the context in which these entities are presented influences talk about them. The present study investigated how the presence or absence of a visual narrative context influences mothers' tendency to refer to animals as individual characters or as members of a kind when sharing picture books with their toddlers (mean age 21.3 months). Mother-child dyads shared both a narrative and a non-narrative book, each featuring six animals and matched in terms of length and quantity of text. Mothers made more specific (individual-referring) statements about animals in the narrative books, whereas they provided more labels for animals in the non-narrative books. But, of most interest, the frequency and proportion of mothers' use of generic (kind-referring) utterances did not differ across the two different types of books. Further coding of the content of the utterances revealed that mothers provided more story-specific descriptions of states and actions of the animals when sharing narrative books and more physical descriptions of animals when sharing non-narrative books. However, the two books did not differ in terms of their elicitation of natural facts about the animals. Overall, although the two types of books encouraged different types of talk from mothers, they stimulated generic language and talk about natural facts to an equal degree. Implications for learning from picture storybooks and book genre selection in classrooms and home reading are discussed.

  6. "Once upon a time": a discussion of children's picture books as a narrative educational tool for nursing students.

    Crawley, Josephine Mary

    2009-01-01

    Narrative pedagogy influences many areas of nursing education, with emphasis on the co-constructing of narrative between students, educators, and clinicians. Little has been written about published children's literature as a basis for narrative discussion in nursing education. This article describes how narrative pedagogy already works within nursing education and explores features of children's picture books that give them value as a narrative educational tool for nursing students, providing stories that encourage self-understanding and deconstruct the multiple realities of narratives about the human condition.

  7. Reading and Reinterpreting Picture Books on Children's Television: Implications for Young Children's Narrative Literacy

    Zhang, Kunkun; Djonov, Emilia; Torr, Jane

    2016-01-01

    "Bookaboo" is a television programme aiming to promote literacy and reading among young children. In each episode, a celebrity reads a book to Bookaboo, a dog who plays the drums in a rock band, in order to help him overcome stage fright. Using the episode featuring the picture book (Cowell and Layton in "That Rabbit Belongs to…

  8. Exploring Episodic Affordance and Response in Children's Narratives Based on a Picture Book

    Hoel, Trude

    2016-01-01

    This article presents part of a research project where the aim is to investigate six- to seven-year-old children's language use in storytelling. The children's oral texts are based on the picture book "Frog, Where Are You?" The book consists of a series of episodes that more or less directly point to the plot structure. However, it also…

  9. The Progress of Students Reading Comprehension through Wordless Picture Books

    Lubis, Romaida

    2018-01-01

    Wordless picture book is an unique book that could help the young learner to get their literacy. The content of the wordless picture book must be communicated through the visual of the illustration. This research discusses a case study of how a kid of six years old produce his narrative through wordless picture book. The kid was allowed to see and…

  10. The Construction of Self in Relationships: Narratives and References to Mental States during Picture-Book Reading Interactions between Mothers and Children.

    Rollo, Dolores; Longobardi, Emiddia; Spataro, Pietro; Sulla, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that mothers vary in the way in which they discuss past experiences with their children, since they can exhibit narrative ( elaborative ) or paradigmatic ( repetitive ) styles to different extents. Given this background, the aim of the present study was to analyze differences in the mothers' use of narrative styles and mental state language (MSL), as a function of children's age and gender. Thirty dyads consisting of mothers and their 4- to 6-year-old children were observed during a picture-book reading interaction. Maternal utterances were coded according to the categories described by Tessler and Nelson (1994), classifying each mother as Narrative or Paradigmatic . Eight categories of MSL were analyzed: perceptual, emotional (positive and negative), volitional, cognitive, communicative, and moral. The results confirmed the existence of the two maternal styles observed in the earlier studies. Importantly, we found that the mothers of younger children were more narrative than paradigmatic, whereas the opposite pattern occurred for the mothers of older children (they were more paradigmatic than narrative). As concerns MSL, the results indicated that the use of communicative terms was significantly more frequent for narrative than for paradigmatic mothers, and decreased linearly with children's age. Lastly, the mothers of younger children referred their MSL more frequently to the book characters than to themselves or to the child. Taken together, these results support the idea that mothers adapt their narrative styles and MSL input to the growing abilities of their children, therefore contributing to the development of social understanding.

  11. The Construction of Self in Relationships: Narratives and References to Mental States during Picture-Book Reading Interactions between Mothers and Children

    Dolores Rollo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that mothers vary in the way in which they discuss past experiences with their children, since they can exhibit narrative (elaborative or paradigmatic (repetitive styles to different extents. Given this background, the aim of the present study was to analyze differences in the mothers’ use of narrative styles and mental state language (MSL, as a function of children’s age and gender. Thirty dyads consisting of mothers and their 4- to 6-year-old children were observed during a picture-book reading interaction. Maternal utterances were coded according to the categories described by Tessler and Nelson (1994, classifying each mother as Narrative or Paradigmatic. Eight categories of MSL were analyzed: perceptual, emotional (positive and negative, volitional, cognitive, communicative, and moral. The results confirmed the existence of the two maternal styles observed in the earlier studies. Importantly, we found that the mothers of younger children were more narrative than paradigmatic, whereas the opposite pattern occurred for the mothers of older children (they were more paradigmatic than narrative. As concerns MSL, the results indicated that the use of communicative terms was significantly more frequent for narrative than for paradigmatic mothers, and decreased linearly with children’s age. Lastly, the mothers of younger children referred their MSL more frequently to the book characters than to themselves or to the child. Taken together, these results support the idea that mothers adapt their narrative styles and MSL input to the growing abilities of their children, therefore contributing to the development of social understanding.

  12. Picture Book on Raising Children's Awareness Against Sexual Abuse

    Christy, Evelyn; Handojo, Priska Febrinia

    2015-01-01

    One of the common problems leading to the sexual abuse is that the child is not aware about it. This project aims to raise children's awareness against sexual abuse through picture book. This picture book use realistic fiction as the genre of my picture book. The purpose is to make the children familiar with the story and can relate it to their life. This picture book uses the narrative theory as the framework of the story. The narrative story is consist of abstract, orientation, complication...

  13. Analysis of book colections Great picture book for preschoolers

    Cunk, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Thesis entitled ˝Analysis of book collections Great picture book for preschoolers˝ is based on theoretical approach and empirical study. In the theoretical part I focused on the development of youth literature and the definition of the latter, furthermore I described Great picture book and definition of picture book, I presented four versions of picture books in the Slovenian area, described types of picture books and wrote translation of Maria Nikolaeva´s picture book and her point of view...

  14. Exploring Multicultural Themes through Picture Books.

    Farris, Pamela J.

    1995-01-01

    Advocates inclusion of multicultural picture books in social studies instruction to offer different outlooks and visions in a short format. Describes selection of picture books with multicultural themes and those that represent various cultures, gender equity, and religious themes. Suggests that picture books may help students develop better…

  15. Gender Stereotypes in Children's Picture Books.

    Narahara, May M.

    Research has examined how gender stereotypes and sexism in picture books affect the development of gender identity in young children, how children's books in the last decade have portrayed gender, and how researchers evaluate picture books for misrepresentations of gender. A review of the research indicated that gender development is a critical…

  16. Use of picture books to explain procedures.

    2016-10-06

    A small study conducted at a Swedish hospital on the effect of giving picture books and picture sheets to prepare children for their procedures before and during day surgery is explored in this article.

  17. Picture Books and the Art of Collage.

    Prudhoe, Catherine M.

    2003-01-01

    Explores how teachers can use picture book illustrations to teach children the art of collage. Focuses on three children's picture books and offers art activities showcasing three collage techniques: (1) cut and torn paper collage; (2) photomontage; and (3) texture collages and collage constructions. Relates each activity to the National Standards…

  18. Positioning Picture Books within the Mathematics Curriculum

    Jenkins, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Most teachers feel confident espousing the benefits of using picture books in English lessons, talking about the importance of using the illustrations to enhance the text, engaging students and fostering a love and appreciation of literature. How many teachers passionately advocate the use of these same picture books in mathematics lessons? This…

  19. The Untapped Potential of Picture Books

    Hager, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the role picture books play in helping young writers. Third-grade students were read engaging picture books for the sole purpose of noticing and naming different features they encountered during the read-alouds. Students were able to recognize the tools many authors and illustrators use such as onomatopoeia, varied font…

  20. Picture Books Peek behind Cultural Curtains.

    Marantz, Sylvia; Marantz, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    Discusses culture in picture books in three general categories: legends and histories; current life in particular areas; and the immigrant experience. Considers the translation of visual images, discusses authentic interpretations, and presents an annotated bibliography of picture books showing cultural diversity including African, Asian, Mexican,…

  1. Learning from picture books: Infants’ use of naming information

    Melanie eKhu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether naming would facilitate infants’ transfer of information from picture books to the real world. Eighteen- and 21-month-olds learned a novel label for a novel object depicted in a picture book. Infants then saw a second picture book in which an adult demonstrated how to elicit the object’s nonobvious property. Accompanying narration described the pictures using the object’s newly learnt label. Infants were subsequently tested with the real-world object depicted in the book, as well as a different-colour exemplar. Infants’ performance on the test trials was compared with that of infants in a no label condition. When presented with the exact object depicted in the picture book, 21-month-olds were significantly more likely to elicit the object’s nonobvious property than were 18-month-olds. Learning the object’s label before learning about the object’s hidden property did not improve 18-month-olds’ performance. At 21-months, the number of infants in the label condition who attempted to elicit the real-world object’s nonobvious property was greater than would be predicted by chance, but the number of infants in the no label condition was not. Neither age group nor label condition predicted test performance for the different-colour exemplar. The findings are discussed in relation to infants’ learning and transfer from picture books.

  2. Learning from picture books: Infants’ use of naming information

    Khu, Melanie; Graham, Susan A.; Ganea, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated whether naming would facilitate infants’ transfer of information from picture books to the real world. Eighteen- and 21-month-olds learned a novel label for a novel object depicted in a picture book. Infants then saw a second picture book in which an adult demonstrated how to elicit the object’s non-obvious property. Accompanying narration described the pictures using the object’s newly learnt label. Infants were subsequently tested with the real-world object depicted in the book, as well as a different-color exemplar. Infants’ performance on the test trials was compared with that of infants in a no label condition. When presented with the exact object depicted in the picture book, 21-month-olds were significantly more likely to attempt to elicit the object’s non-obvious property than were 18-month-olds. Learning the object’s label before learning about the object’s hidden property did not improve 18-month-olds’ performance. At 21-months, the number of infants in the label condition who attempted to elicit the real-world object’s non-obvious property was greater than would be predicted by chance, but the number of infants in the no label condition was not. Neither age group nor label condition predicted test performance for the different-color exemplar. The findings are discussed in relation to infants’ learning and transfer from picture books. PMID:24611058

  3. Learning from picture books: Infants' use of naming information.

    Khu, Melanie; Graham, Susan A; Ganea, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated whether naming would facilitate infants' transfer of information from picture books to the real world. Eighteen- and 21-month-olds learned a novel label for a novel object depicted in a picture book. Infants then saw a second picture book in which an adult demonstrated how to elicit the object's non-obvious property. Accompanying narration described the pictures using the object's newly learnt label. Infants were subsequently tested with the real-world object depicted in the book, as well as a different-color exemplar. Infants' performance on the test trials was compared with that of infants in a no label condition. When presented with the exact object depicted in the picture book, 21-month-olds were significantly more likely to attempt to elicit the object's non-obvious property than were 18-month-olds. Learning the object's label before learning about the object's hidden property did not improve 18-month-olds' performance. At 21-months, the number of infants in the label condition who attempted to elicit the real-world object's non-obvious property was greater than would be predicted by chance, but the number of infants in the no label condition was not. Neither age group nor label condition predicted test performance for the different-color exemplar. The findings are discussed in relation to infants' learning and transfer from picture books.

  4. Princess Picture Books: Content and Messages

    Dale, Lourdes P.; Higgins, Brittany E.; Pinkerton, Nick; Couto, Michelle; Mansolillo, Victoria; Weisinger, Nica; Flores, Marci

    2016-01-01

    Because many girls develop their understanding of what it means to be a girl from books about princesses, the researchers coded the messages and content in 58 princess books (picture, fairy tales, and fractured fairy tales). Results indicate that gender stereotypes are present in the books--the princesses were more likely to be nurturing, in…

  5. Children’s Book Illustrations: Visual Language of Picture Books

    Hladíková Hana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-quality picture books that merge text and illustration together in order to tell a story are eminent for healthy mental and social growth of children. This paper is to outline the benefits picture books bring to children between the ages three to eight, determine functions of its illustrative language, examine the process of its production, and point out a set of elements that, according to number of professional children's book illustrators, significantly contribute to the success of a picture book

  6. The Progress of Students Reading Comprehension through Wordless Picture Books

    Romaida Lubis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Wordless picture book is an unique book that could help the young learner to get their literacy. The content of the wordless picture book must be communicated through the visual of the illustration. This research discusses a case study of how a kid of six years old produce his narrative through wordless picture book. The kid allowed to see and say on the page and then write the words that he has mentioned. Practicing to read repeatedly which increase fluency will improve his reading comprehension and written expression. This research was conducted to make better understand about the sense - making process that happen when a child works with the wordless picture book. Most sentences or texts were made based on the references and experience from daily life either explicitly or implicitly. In reading wordless book, readers faced the variety of visual signs. These sign systems help reader form a type of framework that show their interpretation of the text and helps them build construction of the story. The researcher wanted to make the reader understand better about the strategies that the child use to make sense of wordless text. The reason of this study is to help how a six year old nonreader would give interpretation to visual cues in wordless picture books. Transacting with the visual text in the books helped the child to make sense of the stories. The data were analyzed based on the principles of qualitative content analysis that involve a systematic review of the data, coding, category construction and analysis. The result of this research is the wordless picture books give opportunity to the children to create the story on their own and to bring in their own understanding of the world to the text.

  7. Musicality in the Language of Picture Books

    Heald, Robin

    2008-01-01

    The authors of picture books who write especially melodic language are doing more than simply offering up work that is pleasing to the ear. They are accessing more of the whole child. In this article five picture books will be discussed for their musical attributes: "Now One Foot, Now the Other", by Tomie dePaola, "The Cat in the Hat", by Dr.…

  8. Pictures in Pictures: Art History and Art Museums in Children's Picture Books

    Yohlin, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Children's picture books that recreate, parody, or fictionalize famous artworks and introduce the art museum experience, a genre to which I will refer as "children's art books," have become increasingly popular over the past decade. This essay explores the pedagogical implications of this trend through the family program "Picture Books and Picture…

  9. Aesthetics and Children's Picture-Books

    Leddy, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Some writers on children's picture-books seem to believe that comfort and reassurance are their most important goals. Yet these books may also provide a context for imaginative adventure, and even for a journey into the dark night of the soul. As Nietzsche would put it, there is a Dionysian as well as an Apollonian element in children's…

  10. The Construction of Self in Relationships: Narratives and References to Mental States during Picture-Book Reading Interactions between Mothers and Children

    Rollo, Dolores; Longobardi, Emiddia; Spataro, Pietro; Sulla, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that mothers vary in the way in which they discuss past experiences with their children, since they can exhibit narrative (elaborative) or paradigmatic (repetitive) styles to different extents. Given this background, the aim of the present study was to analyze differences in the mothers’ use of narrative styles and mental state language (MSL), as a function of children’s age and gender. Thirty dyads consisting of mothers and their 4- to 6-year-old children were observe...

  11. Picture Books Stimulate the Learning of Mathematics

    van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; van den Boogaard, Sylvia; Doig, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe our experiences using picture books to provide young children (five- to six-year-olds) with a learning environment where they can explore and extend preliminary notions of mathematics-related concepts, without being taught these concepts explicitly. We gained these experiences in the PICO-ma project, which aimed to…

  12. Constructing Meaning in Interaction through Picture Books

    Lugossy, Réka

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study describes and analyses young language learners' spontaneous comments while sharing picture books during EFL sessions. It also explores teachers' responses to learners' comments, and considers reasons teachers may choose to ignore children's talk in their first language (L1). Data were collected from young Hungarian learners…

  13. Picture Book Soldiers: Men and Messages.

    Desai, Christina M.

    2001-01-01

    Examines children's picture books about soldiers and war, including fiction, folktales, and historical fiction, analyzing their implicit and explicit messages about war and the military, and evaluating them for gender stereotyping. Finds that the soldiers conform almost uniformly to an exaggerated male stereotype. Shows different value judgments…

  14. The (Untold) Drama of the Turning Page: The Role of Page Breaks in Understanding Picture Books

    Jacobs, Katrina Emily Bartow

    2016-01-01

    While scholars have recognized the importance of page breaks in both the construction and comprehension of narrative within picture books, there has previously been limited research that focused directly on how children discuss and make sense of these spaces in the text. Yet, because of their nature as dramatic gaps in the narrative, page breaks…

  15. Moving Picture, Lying Image: Unreliable Cinematic Narratives

    Csönge Tamás

    2015-01-01

    By coining the term “unreliable narrator” Wayne Booth hypothesized another agent in his model besides the author, the implicit author, to explain the double coding of narratives where a distorted view of reality and the exposure of this distortion are presented simultaneously. The article deals with the applicability of the concept in visual narratives. Since unreliability is traditionally considered to be intertwined with first person narratives, it works through subjective mediators. Accord...

  16. Moving Picture, Lying Image: Unreliable Cinematic Narratives

    Csönge Tamás

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available By coining the term “unreliable narrator” Wayne Booth hypothesized another agent in his model besides the author, the implicit author, to explain the double coding of narratives where a distorted view of reality and the exposure of this distortion are presented simultaneously. The article deals with the applicability of the concept in visual narratives. Since unreliability is traditionally considered to be intertwined with first person narratives, it works through subjective mediators. According to scholarly literature on the subject, the narrator has to be strongly characterized, or in other words, anthropomorphized. In the case of film, the main problem is that the narrator is either missing or the narration cannot be attributed entirely to them. There is a medial rupture where the apparatus mediates the story instead of a character’s oral or written discourse. The present paper focuses on some important but overlooked questions about the nature of cinematic storytelling through a re-examination of |the lying flashback in Alfred Hitchcock's Stage Fright. Can a character-narrator control the images the viewer sees? How can the filmic image still be unreliable without having an anthropomorphic narrator? How useful is the term focalization when we are dealing with embedded character-narratives in film?

  17. Promoting Self-Questioning through Picture Book Illustrations

    Lohfink, Gayla

    2013-01-01

    This teaching tip manuscript demonstrates how picture book illustrations can be used as an inquiry tool that facilitates one's connecting of visual investigations in a picture to the process of generating self-questions. Techniques suggested to promote self-questioning are (1) introducing young readers to an interactive picture book read aloud…

  18. Picture-books: first structured reading materials for children

    Ivana Martinović

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Early literacy has recently become a current topic, and there’s a widespread belief that literacy startsdeveloping almost as soon as the child is born, if the child is surrounded with adequate materials and persons who will motivate the development of literacy. The first structured reading materials that a child interacts with are picture-books. It is usually the first contact a child has with literature and a written word in general, and it happens during childhood, the child's most sensitive period, which is why it is important to pay special attention to the quality of picture-books. Croatian picture-books published till the early 80ies of the past century have been investigated to a some extent. However, the picture-books found on the Croatian market and in the libraries in the past 30 years have been the subject of research only sporadically. There's little data on the quality and features of this multifunctional material that is of such great importance for children. The aim of the paper is to give an overview of the relevant data found in literature on the historical development of picture-book publishing, their features, functions they help develop, their age-appropriateness, and quality. The paper presents research results stemming from the analysis of the Croatian Children's Book Centre documentation on contemporary picture-book publishing and data on the language of picture-books that are the result of a picture-book corpus study made as part of the PhD research by the author. The data on contemporary authors and illustrators was obtained by analysing the documentation of the Croatian Library Association, Commission for library services for children and youth. The language of the picture-book corpus was analysed using a computer programme, i.e. the analysis was conducted of the lexical diversity of picture-books for three-year olds. The picture-books have not been investigated from the linguistic perspective before, which makes this

  19. Effectiveness of Picture Books for Italian Instruction at Japanese Universities

    Yomo, Minoru; Uni, Kazuhito; Moore, Danièle; Kiyose, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the use of children's picture books to teach English has been increasing in Japan. An advantage of these books is the high proportion of basic vocabulary they include. Can picture books also be useful for teaching Japanese students Italian and increasing their motivation? The present study analyses the effectiveness of employing a…

  20. Visualising Cultures: The "European Picture Book Collection" Moves "Down Under"

    Cotton, Penni; Daly, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The potential for picture books in national collections to act as mirrors reflecting the reader's cultural identity, is widely accepted. This paper shows that the books in a New Zealand Picture Book Collection can also become windows into unfamiliar worlds for non-New Zealand readers, giving them the opportunity to learn more about a context in…

  1. The Picture Book of Quantum Mechanics

    Brandt, Siegmund

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this book is to explain the basic concepts and phenomena of quantum mechanics by means of visualization. Computer-generated illustrations in color are used extensively throughout the text, helping to establish the relation between quantum mechanics—wave functions, interference, atomic structure, and so forth—and classical physics—point mechanics, statistical mechanics, and wave optics. Even more important, by studying the pictures in parallel with the text, readers develop an intuition for such notoriously abstract phenomena as • the tunnel effect • excitation and decay of metastable states • wave-packet motion within a well • systems of distinguishable and indistinguishable particles • free wave packets and scattering in 3 dimensions • angular-momentum decomposition • stationary bound states in various 3-dimensional potentials • hybrid states • Kepler motion of wave packets in the Coulomb field • spin and magnetic resonance Illustrations from experiments in a variety of f...

  2. Picture Books Are for Little Kids, Aren't They? Using Picture Books with Adolescent Readers to Enhance Literacy Instruction

    Senokossoff, Gwyn W.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the benefits of using picture books with adolescent readers, describes strategies that can be taught with picture books, and provides examples of books the author has used. Some of the topics discussed include: reading comprehension, visual literacy, interactive read-aloud with facilitative talk, literary elements, and…

  3. The Popularity of Picture Books with Television Tie-in

    Patricia R. Ladd

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes circulation statistics of television tie-in picture books from the Wake County Public Library System in North Carolina to determine their popularity among patrons. Caldecott winning picture books were used as a point of comparison. This study also examined OPAC holdings from North Carolina public libraries to determine television tie-in picture book popularity among collection builders. The findings of the study show that television tie-in picture books are found to some degree in the vast majority of North Carolina public libraries, and are more popular than award winners in the Wake County system.

  4. "'Look More Closely,' Said Mum": Mothers in Anthony Browne's Picture Books

    Joosen, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Vanessa Joosen explores Anthony Browne's construction of motherhood in four of his picture books that focus on family. She focuses on the use of narratological perspective, visual point of view, and intertextual references to explain how an ideology of motherhood is evoked. While Browne makes use of child narrators and focalizers…

  5. Pictures with narration versus pictures with on-screen text during teaching Mathematics

    Panagiotis Ioannou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of two different teaching methods on students’ comprehension in Mathematics: pictures with concurrent narration versus pictures with on-screen text, during teaching triangles, a lesson in Mathematics. Forty primary school children (boys and girls selected to participate in this study. Students splitted into two experimental groups with the technique of simple random sampling. The first group consisted of students who viewed and listened (pictures with narration group, while the second group consisted of students who viewed (pictures with on-screen text a presentation of triangles. A recall test was used to evaluate students’ comprehension. The results showed that students’ comprehension was better when triangles' presentation (pictures was accompanied with spoken words, than with printed words. The pictures with narration group performed better than the pictures with on-screen text group, in recall test (M = 4.97, SD = 1.32 p<0.01. Results are consistent with the modality principle in which learners are more likely to build connections between corresponding words and pictures when words are presented in a spoken form (narration simultaneously with pictures.

  6. Evoking the World of Poetic Nonfiction Picture Books

    Kesler, Ted

    2012-01-01

    An increasingly prevalent and accessible form of hybrid nonfiction picture books blends factual information with poetry or poetic devices to create literary nonfiction. This important form of hybrid text has been sparsely examined. This article addresses three questions about poetic nonfiction picture books: first, how might we categorize picture…

  7. Child Readers and the Worlds of the Picture Book

    Baird, Adela; Laugharne, Janet; Maagerø, Eva; Tønnessen, Elise Seip

    2016-01-01

    Children as readers of picture books and the ways they respond to, and make meaning from, such texts are the focus of this article, which reports on a small-scale study undertaken in Norway and Wales, UK. The theoretical framing of the research draws on concepts of the multimodal ensemble in picture books and of the reading event as part of a…

  8. Using Picture Books as Paired Texts to Teach Educational Theories

    Gao, Yang; Bintz, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Picture books, when used thoughtfully and artfully, can teach theories to graduate students in literacy and foreign language education. In this article, the authors described how a pair of picture books is used to teach Vygotsky's "Zone of Proximal Development" and Krashen's "Input Hypothesis" in the fields of literacy…

  9. Gender Differences in Emotional Language in Children's Picture Books.

    Tepper, Clary A.; Cassidy, Kimberly Wright

    1999-01-01

    Examined gender differences in emotional language in children's picture books, using 178 books read to or by preschool children. Males had higher representations on titles, pictures, and central roles, but males and females were associated with equal amounts of emotional language and similar types of emotional words. (SLD)

  10. Multilingual children's interaction with metafiction in a postmodern picture book

    Daugaard, Line Møller; Johansen, Martin Blok

    2014-01-01

    When teachers and school librarians choose picture books for multilingual children, they often base their choice on an evaluation of linguistic comprehensibility, content familiarity and cultural appropriateness. This means that postmodern picture books may be excluded. This paper presents a case...

  11. Multilingual Children's Interaction with Metafiction in a Postmodern Picture Book

    Daugaard, Line Møller; Johansen, Martin Blok

    2014-01-01

    When teachers and school librarians choose picture books for multilingual children, they often base their choice on an evaluation of linguistic comprehensibility, content familiarity and cultural appropriateness. This means that postmodern picture books may be excluded. This paper presents a case study of multilingual children's encounter with a…

  12. Creating Science Picture Books for an Authentic Audience

    DeFauw, Danielle L.; Saad, Klodia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an authentic writing opportunity to help ninth-grade students use the writing process in a science classroom to write and illustrate picture books for fourth-grade students to demonstrate and share their understanding of a biology unit on cells. By creating a picture book, students experience the writing process, understand…

  13. Development of reading ability is facilitated by intensive exposure to a digital children's picture book.

    Masataka, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    Here the author presents preliminary evidence supporting the possibility that the reading ability of 4-year-old children can be improved as a consequence of intensive exposure to the narrative in a digital picture book over a consecutive 5-day period. When creating the digital version used here, two additional functions were provided with it. First, the entire story was voice-recorded by a professional narrator and programmed so that it was played as narration from the speaker of an iPad. Next, as the narration of each digitized page proceeded, the character exactly corresponding to that pronounced by the narrator at that moment became highlighted in red. When the subjects' literacy capability with respect to the syllabic script of the Japanese language (kana) was evaluated before and after the exposure, their performance score was found to increase after the exposure to the digital book, whereas such a change was not recorded in children who experienced exposure to the printed version of the same picture book read to them by their mother. These effects were confirmed when the children were retested 4 weeks later. Although preliminary, the current study represents the first experimental evidence for a positive effect of exposure to digital books upon any aspect of child development.

  14. The Visual Narrative: Kids, Comic Books, and Creativity.

    Hoff, Gary R.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses why junior high school students like comic books and examines how comic book art and visual narrative can be used in education. Copying comic book art can teach students several useful art techniques. Suggestions for using visual narratives to study science fiction, literature, folklore, and art history are included. (AM)

  15. Picture Books about Blacks: An Interview with Opal Moore.

    MacCann, Donnarae; Richard, Olga

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interview with Opal Moore, who discusses Black imagery in picture books published in the last four years and the institutions that circulate that imagery. Topics discussed include the issue of race pride; interracial themes; appropriate illustrations; African versus African-American books; and the roles of publishers, books reviewers,…

  16. Picture This: Young Quechua Children's Reactions to Imported Picture Books in Ayacucho, Peru

    Eck, Jennifer Rowse

    2017-01-01

    Practitioners in ECE consider picture books an effective instructional tool in early childhood programming in the developed regions of the world. However, many young children from marginalized populations in the developing world have little to no access to them and thus, the effect that picture books could have upon their emergent literacy…

  17. By the Book: An Annotated Bibliography of Music-Based Picture Books.

    Sotherden, Emily

    2002-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of music related picture books that can be used in the music classroom. Discusses the benefits of using picture books for all ages. Includes books in ten categories, such as instruments, ensembles, and styles of music. (CMK)

  18. Picture Books Featuring Literary Characters with Special Needs

    Batič Janja

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a selection of picture books that feature a person with special needs as the main literary character. The selection of the books to be showcased was based on three crucial aspects: the form of the (picture book, as we wanted to underline the visual importance of a literary character with special needs; the age limit of the readers the books are intended for (preschool and early primary school; and undisputable quality of the literary and artistic components of the picture books. The picture books we have selected based on the above criteria are Veveriček posebne sorte by Svetlana Makarovič and Marjan Manček, Mrožek dobi očala by Peter Svetina and Mojca Osojnik, and Zakaj je babica jezna by Lela B. Njatin and Alenka Sottler. Picture books about literary characters with special needs can help highly sensitive children accepting people that are different, while children with special needs can build a better self-image based on such books. Quality literary books which foster a positive attitude towards a character with special needs promote tolerance and can thus play an important role in the early childhood, with regard to awareness of an inclusive society.

  19. Picture Books in the Digital Age

    Serafini, Frank; Kachorsky, Danielle; Aguilera, Earl

    2016-01-01

    The design, publication, and features of contemporary narrative picturebooks have been impacted by the digital revolution and the emerging popularity of digital reading devices. Considering both the affordances and the limitations of digital picturebook apps can help readers, teachers, parents, and other educators make better decisions about the…

  20. Representations of deaf characters in children's picture books.

    Golos, Debbie B; Moses, Annie M

    2011-01-01

    Picture books can influence how children perceive people of different backgrounds, including people with disabilities whose cultures differ from their own. Researchers have examined the portrayal of multicultural characters with disabilities in children's literature. However, few have specifically considered the portrayal of deaf characters, despite increased inclusion of deaf characters in children's literature over the past two decades. The present study analyzed the portrayal of deaf characters in picture books for children ages 4-8 years. A content analysis of 20 children's picture books was conducted in which the books were analyzed for messages linked to pathological and cultural categories. Results indicated that these books did not portray Deaf characters from a cultural perspective but, rather, highlighted aspects of deafness as a medical condition, one that requires fixing and that perpetuates stereotypes of deafness as a disability.

  1. Grand Images: Exploring Images of Grandparents in Picture Books

    Crawford, Patricia A.; Bhattacharya, Sharika

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examined children's picture books as a source of socialization messages, specifically regarding ageism. Thus, the appearances, cultural backgrounds, and roles of grandparent characters were examined in a sample of 220 books published over a 20-year span. Findings indicate that grandparent characters have come to…

  2. Picture Books and the Digital World: Educators Making Informed Choices

    Yokota, Junko; Teale, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The book publishing industry in general and picture book materials for children in particular have undergone rapid and profound changes in recent years with the developments in the digital realm. As a result, teachers, school librarians, and literacy researchers have been largely left to their own devices to figure out basic questions related to…

  3. Celebrating Poetic Nonfiction Picture Books in Classrooms

    Kesler, Ted

    2017-01-01

    Children's literature plays an essential role in the literacy development of children. This department column focuses on the teaching and use of children's literature and provides educators with information about a wide range of books across multiple genres that are representative of the diverse world in which we live. A strong emphasis is placed…

  4. Get the picture? The effects of iconicity on toddlers' reenactment from picture books.

    Simcock, Gabrielle; DeLoache, Judy

    2006-11-01

    What do toddlers learn from everyday picture-book reading interactions? To date, there has been scant research exploring this question. In this study, the authors adapted a standard imitation procedure to examine 18- to 30-month-olds' ability to learn how to reenact a novel action sequence from a picture book. The results provide evidence that toddlers can imitate specific target actions on novel real-world objects on the basis of a picture-book interaction. Children's imitative performance after the reading interaction varied both as a function of age and the level of iconicity of the pictures in the book. These findings are discussed in terms of children's emerging symbolic capacity and the flexibility of the cognitive representation.

  5. A Comparison of Preschool Children's Discussions with Parents during Picture Book and Chapter Book Reading

    Leech, Kathryn A.; Rowe, Meredith L.

    2014-01-01

    Discussions that occur during book reading between parents and preschool children relate to children's language development, especially discussions during picture books that include extended discourse, a form of abstract language. While a recent report shows increased chapter book reading among families with preschool children, it is unknown…

  6. Effects of reading picture books on kindergartners’ mathematics performance

    van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Elia, Iliada; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a field experiment with a pretest–posttest control group design which investigated the potential of reading picture books to children for supporting their mathematical understanding. The study involved 384 children from 18 kindergarten classes in 18 schools in the Netherlands. During three months, the children in the nine experimental classes were read picture books. Data analysis revealed that, when controlled for relevant covariates, the picture book reading programme had a positive effect (d = .13) on kindergartners’ mathematics performance as measured by a project test containing items on number, measurement and geometry. Compared to the increase from pretest to posttest in the control group, the increase in the experimental group was 22% larger. No significant differential intervention effects were found between subgroups based on kindergarten year, age, home language, socio-economic status and mathematics and language ability, but a significant intervention effect was found for girls and not for boys. PMID:26855457

  7. Boy Troubles? Male Literacy Depictions in Children's Choices Picture Books

    Gritter, Kristine; Van Duinen, Deborah Vriend; Montgomery, Kimberly; Blowers, Devony; Bishop, Dan

    2017-01-01

    This article is a critical content analysis of Children's Choice award-winning picture books from 2000 to 2014. The "critical" part of the analysis consists of selecting archetypes for males presented in these texts based on applying feminist poststructuralist literacy theory that situates literacy and language at the center of gender…

  8. Representations of Deaf Characters in Children's Picture Books

    Golos, Debbie B.; Moses, Annie M.

    2011-01-01

    Picture books can influence how children perceive people of different backgrounds, including people with disabilities whose cultures differ from their own. Researchers have examined the portrayal of multicultural characters with disabilities in children's literature. However, few have specifically considered the portrayal of deaf characters,…

  9. Effects of Reading Picture Books on Kindergartners' Mathematics Performance

    van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja; Elia, Iliada; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a field experiment with a pretest-posttest control group design which investigated the potential of reading picture books to children for supporting their mathematical understanding. The study involved 384 children from 18 kindergarten classes in 18 schools in the Netherlands. During three months, the children in the nine…

  10. Picture Books for Children: Fiction, Folktales, and Poetry

    Northrup, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Providing descriptive annotations of the best children's picture books published in the last decade, this comprehensive overview is perfect for librarians, teachers, parents, daycare providers, and anyone who works with young children. It is both an excellent tool for collection development and an abundant resource for planning storytimes and…

  11. Child Illustrators: Making Meaning through Visual Art in Picture Books

    Villarreal, Alicia; Minton, Sylvia; Martinez, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    In picture books, illustrations often play a critical role in helping authors tell stories. Instruction in the elements of composition including visual, textual, and peritextual features enhances meaning for children when they are given the opportunity to become authors of their own picturebooks. This study was conducted in a fourth grade…

  12. "We're All Kids!" Picture Books and Cultural Awareness

    Harrington, Judith M.

    2016-01-01

    Picture books engage young learners across the elementary curriculum and can effectively help teach about a variety of social studies topics. Social studies may be a neglected subject in many elementary schools, but purposefully incorporating it through children's literature provides an effective means of advancing both literacy skills and social…

  13. Enhancing English Learners' Language Development Using Wordless Picture Books

    Louie, Belinda; Sierschynski, Jarek

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an approach to use wordless picture books to enhance the language development of English language learners. This approach is grounded in best practices to teach ELLs. The process starts with viewing and analyzing the visual images, engaging ELLs in discussion, and ending with students' self-authored texts. The wordless…

  14. Literature Based Science Activities in Kindergarten through Children's Picture Book.

    Cho, Boo-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Joon

    This paper suggests an alternative approach to early childhood science education that considers contemporary trends in both literature and science. The whole language approach to picture books is recommended and this strategy is described in the four sections of this report. The sections provide information on the relationship between science…

  15. The Effect of Picture Story Books on Students' Reading Comprehension

    Roslina

    2017-01-01

    As a non formal education students, PKBM (a Non-Formal Community Learning Center) Medaso Kolaka students tend to encounter some difficulties in reading such as low motivation, infrequent tutors (non-formal education teachers) coming, inappropriate teaching materials, etc. This research aimed to investigate the effects of picture story books on the…

  16. Effects of reading picture books on kindergartners’ mathematics performance

    Van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, M.; Elia, I.; Robitzsch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a field experiment with a pretest–posttest control group design which investigated the potential of reading picture books to children for supporting their mathematical understanding. The study involved 384 children from 18 kindergarten classes in 18 schools in the Netherlands.

  17. Missing!: Picture Books Reflecting Gay and Lesbian Families

    Rowell, Elizabeth H.

    2007-01-01

    Early childhood educators carefully reflect on the messages conveyed about family diversity in the materials they select to use. Picture books depicting gay and lesbian families can enhance the curriculum and make an important contribution to young children's development. Families comprised of same-sex parents or those who have gay and lesbian…

  18. U.S. Children's Picture Books and the Homonormative Subject

    Taylor, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The author examines the role U.S. lesbian- and gay-themed children's picture books play in the deployment of a homonormative subject, how that deployment occurs, and what the consequences are of such a deployment for children; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex (LGBTQI) communities; and the larger society. The author, through…

  19. The representation of physically active girls in children's picture books.

    Roper, Emily A; Clifton, Alexandra M

    2013-06-01

    Borrowing from Tuchman's (1978) concept of symbolic annihilation, the purpose of this study was to explore the ways in which physically active females were represented in children's picture books. Employing a qualitative content analysis methodology (Hsieh & Shannon, 2005), the written and pictorial portrayals of girls' physical activities were analyzed in 10 children's picture books. A directed approach to content analysis (Hsieh & Shannon, 2005) was employed in which the researchers began with predetermined categories that were used to code the text and images. The findings indicated that the majority of the primary female characters were illustrated wearing appropriate athletic attire that would allow for physical movement. Although all of the primary female characters were depicted as excited about being physically active, 6 of the books described the movement of the primary female characters using action-oriented descriptors. The parents of the primary female characters were identified as the primary source of encouragement and peers were found to be the primary source of discouragement toward the primary female characters' physical activity or sport involvement. The physical abilities of the primary female characters were compared to male peers in 3 of the books. Although the 10 books studied provide young girls with imagery and text that encourage female physicality, it is apparent that more books are needed that focus on girls' involvement in sport and physical activity. Meaningful forms of literature that encourage physical activity and sport involvement for girls are needed.

  20. Development of reading ability is facilitated by intensive exposure to a digital children’s picture book

    Nobuo eMasataka

    2014-01-01

    Here the author presents preliminary evidence supporting the possibility that the reading ability of 4-year-old children can be improved as a consequence of intensive exposure to the narrative in a digital picture book over a consecutive 5-day period. When creating the digital version used here, two additional functions were provided with it. First, the entire story was voice-recorded by a professional narrator and programmed so that it was played as narration from the speaker of an iPad. ...

  1. Development of reading ability is facilitated by intensive exposure to a digital children’s picture book

    Nobuo eMasataka

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Here the author presents preliminary evidence supporting the possibility that the reading ability of 4-year-old children can be improved as a consequence of intensive exposure to the narrative in a digital picture book over a consecutive 5-day period. When creating the digital version used here, two additional functions were provided with it. First, the entire story was voice-recorded by a professional narrator and programmed so that it was played as narration from the speaker of an iPad. Next, as the narration of each digitized page proceeded, the character exactly corresponding to that pronounced by the narrator at that moment became highlighted in red. When the subjects’ literacy capability with respect to the syllabic script of the Japanese language (kana was evaluated before and after the exposure, their performance score was found to increase after the exposure to the digital book, whereas such a change was not recorded in children who experienced exposure to the printed version of the same picture book read to them by their mother. These effects were confirmed when the children were retested 4 weeks later. Although preliminary, the current study represents the first experimental evidence for a positive effect of exposure to digital books upon any aspect of child development.

  2. Picture book exposure elicits positive visual preferences in toddlers.

    Houston-Price, Carmel; Burton, Eliza; Hickinson, Rachel; Inett, Jade; Moore, Emma; Salmon, Katherine; Shiba, Paula

    2009-09-01

    Although the relationship between "mere exposure" and attitude enhancement is well established in the adult domain, there has been little similar work with children. This article examines whether toddlers' visual attention toward pictures of foods can be enhanced by repeated visual exposure to pictures of foods in a parent-administered picture book. We describe three studies that explored the number and nature of exposures required to elicit positive visual preferences for stimuli and the extent to which induced preferences generalize to other similar items. Results show that positive preferences for stimuli are easily and reliably induced in children and, importantly, that this effect of exposure is not restricted to the exposed stimulus per se but also applies to new representations of the exposed item.

  3. Less is More: How manipulative features affect children's learning from picture books.

    Tare, Medha; Chiong, Cynthia; Ganea, Patricia; Deloache, Judy

    2010-09-01

    Picture books are ubiquitous in young children's lives and are assumed to support children's acquisition of information about the world. Given their importance, relatively little research has directly examined children's learning from picture books. We report two studies examining children's acquisition of labels and facts from picture books that vary on two dimensions: iconicity of the pictures and presence of manipulative features (or "pop-ups"). In Study 1, 20-month-old children generalized novel labels less well when taught from a book with manipulative features than from standard picture books without such elements. In Study 2, 30- and 36-month-old children learned fewer facts when taught from a manipulative picture book with drawings than from a standard picture book with realistic images and no manipulative features. The results of the two studies indicate that children's learning from picture books is facilitated by realistic illustrations, but impeded by manipulative features.

  4. Using children's picture books for reflective learning in nurse education.

    Crawley, Josephine; Ditzel, Liz; Walton, Sue

    2012-08-01

    One way in which nursing students may build their practice is through reflective learning from stories. Stories in children's literature offer a special source of narratives that enable students to build empathy and to examine and reconstruct their personal concepts around human experience. Illustrated storybooks written for children are a particularly attractive teaching resource, as they tend to be short, interesting, colourful and easy to read. Yet, little has been written about using such books as a reflective learning tool for nursing students. In this article we describe how we use two children's books and McDrury and Alterio's (2002) 'Reflective Learning through Storytelling' model to educate first year nursing students about loss, grief and death.

  5. Examining Kindergarteners' Drawings for Their Perspectives on Picture Books' Themes and Characters

    Hsiao, Ching-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Mei

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize children's perspectives on a picture book's themes and characters by examining their drawings. The study was conducted over a five-month period in a public kindergarten in southern Taiwan, with six children aged 5-6 years. Picture book appreciation activities focused on eight picture books.…

  6. An Investigation of Teachers' Growing Understandings of the Picture Book Format

    Martinez, Miriam G.; Harmon, Janis M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a graduate course that focused on picture books on teachers' understandings of the picture book format and the ways in which these understandings influenced their self-reports of picture book use in the classroom. Findings of this qualitative investigation revealed that immersion in and analysis of the picture…

  7. The Value of Picture-Book Reading-Based Collaborative Output Activities for Vocabulary Retention

    Sun, Chia-Ho

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of three instructional modes: picture-book reading-only (PRO), picture-book reading plus vocabulary instruction (PRVI), and picture-book reading plus reading-based collaborative output activity (PRCOA) on young adult EFL (English as a foreign language) learners' vocabulary acquisition and retention. Eighty…

  8. “Surprised!” Telling the pictures. Can the illustrations in picture books promote language acquisition?

    Sandie Mourão

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo procura apresentar os resultados da re-análise dos dados recolhidos em dois projectos de investigaçãoacçãosobre a utilização de álbuns em língua inglesa nas aulas de Inglês da Educação Pré-Escolar em Portugal.Dois álbums forum usados, demonstrando diferentes interacções entre texto e imagem, ‘paralela’ e ‘interdependente’. Transcrições de gravações de horas do conto com estes livros foram categorizadas de acordo com asfalas em Inglês a que o texto ou imagem deram origem. Os resultados indicam que a linguagem que as criançasaprendem de facto, com os livros ‘inter-dependentes’ (onde a história escrita é diferente da história ilustrada émais rica e as próprias crianças tomam um papel mais activo na criação de um significado. As implicações destesresultados são discutidas.The following article presents the findings of a re-analysis of data from two action research projects investigatingthe use of English picture books in Pre-school English classes in Portugal. Two picture books were used, eachrepresenting parallel and interdependent storytelling models. Audio tapescripts of the picture book read aloudswere categorised according to the utterances prompted by the verbal and visual texts. Results show that foreignlanguage acquisition is extended when both the verbal and visual texts of a picture book are used for languageinput and that children are more actively involved in meaning making. Implications are discussed.

  9. Using Authentic Picture Books and Illustrated Books to Improve L2 Writing among 11-Year-Olds

    Birketveit, Anna; Rimmereide, Hege Emma

    2017-01-01

    The case study investigates what impact extensive reading of authentic picture books/illustrated books had on the learners' writing skills in a Norwegian EFL (English as a foreign language) classroom of 11-year-olds. Furthermore, the study also looks into the importance the pictures/illustrations had for the learners and what type of picture-text…

  10. Do Worlds Have Corners? When Children's Picture Books Invite Philosophical Questions

    Maagero, Eva; Ostbye, Guri Lorentzen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we want to present and analyse the picture book "The World has no Corners" (2006/1999) by the Norwegian author and illustrator Svein Nyhus. The book represents a new trend in Norwegian picture books for children by inviting the readers into a world of thinking and wondering about existential topics such as life and death, growing…

  11. Is "E" Really for Everybody? Picture Books for Older Readers in Public Libraries

    Smith, Mikki

    2008-01-01

    Picture books for older readers present challenges for libraries in terms of how best to provide access to them. These books often have an "E" on the spine to indicate that they are "easy" or for "everybody," and share lower shelves with a far greater number of picture books geared for the preschool and primary grade audience. However, this…

  12. Reality check: Prior exposure facilitates picture book imitation by 15-month-old infants.

    Simcock, Gabrielle; Heron-Delaney, Michelle

    2016-11-01

    We examined whether 15-month-olds could imitate a novel action sequence from a picture book, and whether or not pre-exposure to the objects before reading the book would facilitate imitation. We found that infants only imitated from a picture book above baseline when they had previously interacted with the objects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Changes in Sex-Role Stereotyping in Caldecott Medal Award Picture Books 1938-1988.

    Allen, Ann M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Caldecott Medal Award picture books were examined to determine whether the pictures and text presented children with stereotypical or gender-dependent sex-role behaviors. The books examined showed that sex-role stereotyping has decreased over time but still remains prevalent in each of the 11 categories used to evaluate the books. (TJQ)

  14. Examining the Text Quality of English/Chinese Bilingual Children's Picture Books

    Huang, Qiaoya; Chen, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    As a branch of multicultural literature, bilingual children's picture books present a special opportunity for readers to expand their horizons and knowledge of other cultures. The researchers took a closer look at the text quality of 31 English/Chinese bilingual children's picture books. These bilingual books were examined on the aspects of the…

  15. What Is an eBook? What Is a Book App? And Why Should We Care? An Analysis of Contemporary Digital Picture Books

    Sargeant, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Book apps have developed into a new format for the picture book. Given the crucial role that picture books have played in early childhood education, it seems pertinent to ascertain the ways in which they have been affected by digitisation. In response to concerns regarding a lack of models and design principles within children's digital…

  16. The Role of Book Features in Young Children's Transfer of Information from Picture Books to Real-World Contexts.

    Strouse, Gabrielle A; Nyhout, Angela; Ganea, Patricia A

    2018-01-01

    Picture books are an important source of new language, concepts, and lessons for young children. A large body of research has documented the nature of parent-child interactions during shared book reading. A new body of research has begun to investigate the features of picture books that support children's learning and transfer of that information to the real world. In this paper, we discuss how children's symbolic development, analogical reasoning, and reasoning about fantasy may constrain their ability to take away content information from picture books. We then review the nascent body of findings that has focused on the impact of picture book features on children's learning and transfer of words and letters, science concepts, problem solutions, and morals from picture books. In each domain of learning we discuss how children's development may interact with book features to impact their learning. We conclude that children's ability to learn and transfer content from picture books can be disrupted by some book features and research should directly examine the interaction between children's developing abilities and book characteristics on children's learning.

  17. The Role of Book Features in Young Children's Transfer of Information from Picture Books to Real-World Contexts

    Strouse, Gabrielle A.; Nyhout, Angela; Ganea, Patricia A.

    2018-01-01

    Picture books are an important source of new language, concepts, and lessons for young children. A large body of research has documented the nature of parent-child interactions during shared book reading. A new body of research has begun to investigate the features of picture books that support children's learning and transfer of that information to the real world. In this paper, we discuss how children's symbolic development, analogical reasoning, and reasoning about fantasy may constrain their ability to take away content information from picture books. We then review the nascent body of findings that has focused on the impact of picture book features on children's learning and transfer of words and letters, science concepts, problem solutions, and morals from picture books. In each domain of learning we discuss how children's development may interact with book features to impact their learning. We conclude that children's ability to learn and transfer content from picture books can be disrupted by some book features and research should directly examine the interaction between children's developing abilities and book characteristics on children's learning. PMID:29467690

  18. The Role of Book Features in Young Children's Transfer of Information from Picture Books to Real-World Contexts

    Gabrielle A. Strouse

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Picture books are an important source of new language, concepts, and lessons for young children. A large body of research has documented the nature of parent-child interactions during shared book reading. A new body of research has begun to investigate the features of picture books that support children's learning and transfer of that information to the real world. In this paper, we discuss how children's symbolic development, analogical reasoning, and reasoning about fantasy may constrain their ability to take away content information from picture books. We then review the nascent body of findings that has focused on the impact of picture book features on children's learning and transfer of words and letters, science concepts, problem solutions, and morals from picture books. In each domain of learning we discuss how children's development may interact with book features to impact their learning. We conclude that children's ability to learn and transfer content from picture books can be disrupted by some book features and research should directly examine the interaction between children's developing abilities and book characteristics on children's learning.

  19. Ideas for using English picture books for the new foreign languages activities in Japanese elementary schools

    Hall, James M

    2009-01-01

    In 2007 the English Department together with the Educadon Development Center(EDC)from Newton, Massachusetts in the USA workedwith 19 different elementary schools in using Endish picture books to teach about culture. EDC chose 15 picture books to use and then designed teaching guides for each book with the English Department. The project was funded by the Japan Center for Global Partnership and was called Cross Cultural Understanding using Picture Boobs (CCUP). Before the schools used the pict...

  20. Chinese Translation Errors in English/Chinese Bilingual Children's Picture Books

    Huang, Qiaoya; Chen, Xiaoning

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the Chinese translation errors in 31 English/Chinese bilingual children's picture books. While bilingual children's books make definite contributions to language acquisition, few studies have examined the quality of these books, and even fewer have specifically focused on English/Chinese bilingual books.…

  1. What a Girl! Fighting Gentleness in the Picture Book World: An Analysis of the Norwegian Picture Book "What a Girl!" by Gro Dahle and Svein Nyhus

    Maagerø, Eva; Østbye, Guri Lorentzen

    2017-01-01

    The Norwegian picture book "What a Girl!" (original title "Snill") by Gro Dahle and Svein Nyhus was published 2011 and immediately gained a large audience. The book tells the story about a girl who always behaves in the ways expected of her: she never confronts her parents, her teacher or her classmates. This behaviour makes…

  2. Two Professors Critique the Representations of Africans and African Americans in Picture Books

    Smith-D'arezzo, Wendy M.; Musgrove, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the sociocultural representations of black children in picture books. Three critical perspectives were used to examine 23 picture books containing black characters. Questions used in this critical analysis were derived from sociocultural implications of implicit messages within texts, critical literacy, and cultural and social…

  3. The Three Little Wolves Go to College: A Picture Book Lesson for Young Adult EFL Learners

    Sun, Chia-Ho

    2015-01-01

    For at least three decades, scholars have discussed the rationale for using picture books with English learners of all ages. Research on how older ESL and EFL learners can benefit from picture books, however, remains scarce. This study explored 25 Taiwanese university EFL learners' engagement in a predicting-reading-confirming-integrating plus…

  4. Portrayals of Bullying: A Content Analysis of Picture Books for Preschoolers

    Oppliger, Patrice A.; Davis, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Bullying affects a significant number of school children in the United States. Great concern for teaching children about bullying is apparent in the number of picture books published with bullying themes. The following study is a content analysis of how bullies and victims are portrayed in picture books suitable for preschoolers. Many of the…

  5. Around the World in 80 Picture Books: Teaching Ancient Civilizations through Text Sets

    Batchelor, Katherine E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce text sets of picture books that address 10 ancient civilizations commonly taught in middle school and also offer instructional strategies that could be used for critical and multicultural literacy exploration. Beginning with discussion of the importance of picture books and text sets in the middle school…

  6. Picture Books as Mentor Texts for 10th Grade Struggling Writers

    Premont, David Willett; Young, Terrell A.; Wilcox, Brad; Dean, Deborah; Morrison, Timothy G.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if picture books in high school classrooms could enhance word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions. Previous research has not fully considered employing picture books as mentor texts in high schools. Twelve participants from two low-performing 10th grade English classes were identified as low-,…

  7. Refugee-Themed Picture Books for Ethical Understanding in Curriculum English

    Dooley, Karen; Tait, Gordon; Zabarjadi Sar, Hora

    2016-01-01

    This study looked at the curricular resource potential of refugee-themed picture books for embedding an ethics of responsibility for linguistic diversity into the subject of English studied by all students in English-dominant western societies. Selected picture books were analysed in terms of a Levinasean ethics of responsibility for alterity in…

  8. Interpreting the Images in a Picture Book: Students Make Connections to Themselves, Their Lives and Experiences

    Mantei, Jessica; Kervin, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Picture books are an important and accessible form of visual art for children because they offer, among other things, opportunities for making connections to personal experiences and to the values and beliefs of families and communities. This paper reports on the use of a picture book to promote Year 4 students' making of text-to-self connections,…

  9. Teaching Spiritual Themes to African American Children: A Picture Book Approach

    Harris, Demetrius B.

    2017-01-01

    "Teaching Spiritual Themes to African American Children: A Picture Book Approach" is a research project that used picture books to teach the four spiritual themes, 1.) love, 2.) forgiveness, 3.) kindness, and 4.) perseverance. This project was conducted in an after school program at Fifth Baptist Church, on Cary St. in Richmond, VA. The…

  10. A Study of the Use of Picture Books by Preschool Educators in Outlying Islands of Taiwan

    Hsiao, Ching-Yuan; Chang, Yang-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate the current status of applying picture books when teaching children and to also compare the differences in picture book teaching between teachers with different background variables and who are from Taiwan's outlying islands. The researcher distributed 179 questionnaires, and after eliminating…

  11. Challenging Gender Stereotypes through Literature: Picture Books with Strong Female Characters.

    Chick, Kay A.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of using picture books to encourage development of gender role equity. Provides guidelines for selection of children's literature with capable female characters. Includes examples from recently published picture books. Presents discussion questions that teachers might use to help students focus on female character…

  12. Korean Culture as Portrayed in Young Children's Picture Books: The Pursuit of Cultural Authenticity

    Wee, Su-Jeong; Park, Soyeon; Choi, Joung Sun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate how contemporary Korea and its culture are portrayed in children's picture books published in the United States. Our analysis of the representation of Korean culture in text and illustrations was based on a sample of 33 picture books written in English and published in the US between 1990 and…

  13. A Comparative Study of Children's Concentration Performance on Picture Books: Age, Gender, and Media Forms

    Ma, Min-Yuan; Wei, Chun-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The reading development of children depends on various sensory stimuli, which help them construct reading contexts and facilitate active learning and exploration. This study uses sensory stimuli provided by picture books using various forms of media to improve children's concentration performance. We employ picture books using four forms of media:…

  14. Depictions and Gaps: Portrayal of U.S. Poverty in Realistic Fiction Children's Picture Books

    Kelley, Jane E.; Darragh, Janine J.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers conducted a critical multicultural analysis of 58 realistic fiction children's picture books that portray people living in poverty and compared these depictions to recent statistics from the United States Census Bureau. The picture books were examined for the following qualities: main character, geographic locale and time era, focal…

  15. "Girls Can Like Boy Toys": Junior Primary School Children's Understandings of Feminist Picture Books

    Bartholomaeus, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined children's understandings of feminist picture books, and thus their potential usefulness for disrupting dominant discourses and providing alternate storylines. This article draws on research conducted in Australia with a class of 6- and 7-year-olds, examining students' responses to four feminist picture books. The…

  16. Less is More: How manipulative features affect children’s learning from picture books

    Tare, Medha; Chiong, Cynthia; Ganea, Patricia; DeLoache, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Picture books are ubiquitous in young children’s lives and are assumed to support children’s acquisition of information about the world. Given their importance, relatively little research has directly examined children’s learning from picture books. We report two studies examining children’s acquisition of labels and facts from picture books that vary on two dimensions: iconicity of the pictures and presence of manipulative features (or “pop-ups”). In Study 1, 20-month-old children generalized novel labels less well when taught from a book with manipulative features than from standard picture books without such elements. In Study 2, 30- and 36-month-old children learned fewer facts when taught from a manipulative picture book with drawings than from a standard picture book with realistic images and no manipulative features. The results of the two studies indicate that children’s learning from picture books is facilitated by realistic illustrations, but impeded by manipulative features. PMID:20948970

  17. The role of picture books in young children’s mathematics learning

    van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, M.H.A.M; Elia, I.

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we address the role of picture books in kindergartners’ learning of mathematics. The chapter is based on various studies we carried out on this topic from different perspectives. All studies sought to provide insight into the power of picture books to contribute to the development of

  18. Topics of Stress and Abuse in Picture Books for Children

    Smith-D'Arezzo, Wendy M.; Thompson, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Numerous children face abuse at home and in the workplace. These situations of domestic and societal abuse are found depicted in children's books for younger and younger ages. This manuscript examines books in several genres, both fiction and non-fiction. The books are analyzed for the quality of the writing, the depiction of an authentic story,…

  19. Sequence Text Structure Intervention during Interactive Book Reading of Expository Picture Books with Preschool Children with Language Impairment

    Breit-Smith, Allison; Olszewski, Arnold; Swoboda, Christopher; Guo, Ying; Prendeville, Jo-Anne

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the outcomes of an interactive book reading intervention featuring expository picture books. This small-group intervention was delivered by four practitioners (two early childhood special education teachers and two speech-language pathologists) three times per week for 8 weeks to 6 preschool-age children (3 years 1 month to 4…

  20. Picture Book Exposure Elicits Positive Visual Preferences in Toddlers

    Houston-Price, Carmel; Burton, Eliza; Hickinson, Rachel; Inett, Jade; Moore, Emma; Salmon, Katherine; Shiba, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Although the relationship between "mere exposure" and attitude enhancement is well established in the adult domain, there has been little similar work with children. This article examines whether toddlers' visual attention toward pictures of foods can be enhanced by repeated visual exposure to pictures of foods in a parent-administered picture…

  1. Identifying and Using Picture Books with Quality Mathematical Content: Moving beyond "Counting on Frank" and "The Very Hungry Caterpillar"

    Marston, Jennie

    2014-01-01

    This article by Jennie Marston provides a framework to assist you in selecting appropriate picture books to present mathematical content. Jennie demonstrates the framework by applying three specific examples of picture books to the framework along with examples of activities.

  2. Developing a medical picture book for reducing venipuncture distress in preschool-aged children.

    Tsao, Ying; Kuo, Hui-Chen; Lee, Hsui-Chuan; Yiin, Shuenn-Jiun

    2017-10-01

    Distress associated with needle-related procedures is a major concern in preschool-aged children nursing. This study developed a medical picture book for supporting preschool-aged children facing a venipuncture and determined the effectiveness of such a book intervention in decreasing behavioural distress. The picture book was designed in 3 stages: developing stories on medical situations, penning the text, and drafting the book. We conducted a quasiexperimental study to examine the effectiveness of the book. The behavioural distress of the control and picture book groups were assessed before, during, and after the intervention by using the Observational Scale of Behavioral Distress-Revised (OSBD-R). We created a 12-page picture book, Sick Rui-Rui Bear, in which cartoon characters were depicted undergoing venipunctures, as a guide for vein injection and for facilitating positive venipuncture outcomes in preschool-aged children. Over time, the OSBD-R scores of the picture book group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P book be routinely read and used during venipunctures to decrease procedural distress in preschool-aged children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. A Study of the Picture Book as Storyboard.

    Spaulding, Amy

    1984-01-01

    Describes research for doctoral dissertation which divided study of 29 "storyboard books" into 2 parts: one looking at various comic-book traits (dialog balloon, sound effects shown graphically, dividing of page into frames); the other analyzing each title in terms of component parts of drama as set out by Aristotle. (EJS)

  4. Comparing Book- and Tablet-Based Picture Activity Schedules: Acquisition and Preference.

    Giles, Aimee; Markham, Victoria

    2017-09-01

    Picture activity schedules consist of a sequence of images representing the order of tasks for a person to complete. Although, picture activity schedules have traditionally been presented in a book format, recently picture activity schedules have been evaluated on technological devices such as an iPod™ touch. The present study compared the efficiency of picture activity schedule acquisition on book- and tablet-based modalities. In addition, participant preference for each modality was assessed. Three boys aged below 5 years with a diagnosis of autism participated. Participants were taught to follow the schedules using both modalities. Following mastery of each modality of picture activity schedule, a concurrent-chains preference assessment was conducted to evaluate participant preference for each modality. Differences in acquisition rates across the two modalities were marginal. Preference for book- or tablet-based schedules was idiosyncratic across participants.

  5. Picture book support for preparing children ahead of and during day surgery.

    Nilsson, Elisabeth; Svensson, Gunnar; Frisman, Gunilla Hollman

    2016-10-07

    Aim To develop and evaluate the use of a specific picture book aiming to prepare children for anaesthesia and surgery. Methods An intervention comparing two different information methods before ear, nose and throat day surgery was performed. The intervention involved using a specific information sheet and a specific picture book. Parents (n=104) of children aged 2-12 years completed open-ended questions that were analysed with qualitative content analysis. They were divided into two groups: one group received routine information and one received routine information and the intervention. Findings The picture sheet and picture book were valuable aids to prepare small children for anaesthesia and surgery by explaining the procedures that would take place. The parents expressed that knowledge of the procedures made them and the child feel secure. Conclusion Peri-operative information through pictures supports children and their parents during day surgery and may be helpful in future healthcare visits.

  6. The first picture of a dental forceps in a printed book.

    Ring, Malvin E

    2004-03-01

    Niccolo Leonico Tomeo authored numerous volumes on a variety of themes, and was principally responsible for reintroducing the works of Aristotle in the original Greek. In one of Tomeo's works, he included a picture of forceps holding an extracted tooth. This was the first time a forceps was pictured in a printed book.

  7. Leadership Characters in the Book of Ruth: A Narrative Analysis

    Yong Lu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article delineates a ground work for shaping Christian leadership characters by examining the book of Ruth, a narrative of coop­eration. First, we introduce the general Biblical wisdom, guidance, and religious precepts on leadership characters from the Bible per se. Second, we depict a synopsis and connotation of the Ruth Narrative combined with the historical background of the late Judges time when Naomi, Elimelech, Ruth and Boaz lived and the social and religious background of Moab where the family of Elimelech dwelt in for ten years. Third, based on those background analyses, the main figures’ dialogues, and their actions, we illustrate their positive servant and mentor leadership characters that include a combination of their distinguished traits and cognitive attributes, as well as some weaknesses of Naomi and Elimelech. In a nutshell, Nao­mi’s leadership characters contain loyalty to God (2:19 – 20, discovering value within (3:1 – 4, and patience and endurance (3:18. Ruth’s leadership characters incorporate faithfulness and positive self-esteem (1:16 – 17, pioneer and daring (2:2, deference (2:10, obedience (3:5, and lov­ing-kindness (3:10. Boaz’s leadership characters include respect (2:4, care (2:5, compassion (2:8 – 9, 11, empowerment (2:15 – 16, leaning on and trusting God (2:12, care (2:14; 3:15, protecting the weak (3:10 – 15, responsibility (3:12, moral integrity and justness (3:13, carefulness (3:14, formation (4:1, unselfishness and cleverness (4:3 – 5, and part­nering (4:9 – 10. While we criticize Elimelech’s risk seeking strategy to migrate their family to a pagan country (1:1 – 2 as a spiritual adventure.

  8. "Ah, I Know Why…": Children Developing Understandings through Engaging with a Picture Book

    Braid, Christine; Finch, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This article describes part of a study that explored the responses of nine- and ten-year-old children during a picture book read aloud in a small group setting in a New Zealand classroom. The read aloud was interactive, where the participants were encouraged to respond to the book and to each other throughout the session. The authors created a…

  9. Sex Roles and Cultural Diversity in Recent Award Winning Picture Books for Young Children.

    Dellmann-Jenkins, Mary; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Updated previous research on how gender is being presented in award-winning picture books for young children by replicating a study conducted by Collins, Ingoldsby, and Dellmann in 1984. This study also extended the research design used in the prior investigation by examining the books for portrayal of both androgyny and cultural diversity. (TJQ)

  10. Intellectual Pursuits of Young Children through Picture Book Literacy, Focusing on Italian Preschools

    Beltchenko, Laura

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I will examine the use of picture books as a means of supporting the intellectual pursuits of young children. Theoretical frameworks will be discussed as they pertain to the integration of these books in the Municipal Infant Toddler Centers and Preschools of Reggio Emilia and Pistoia, Italy. The pedagogical framework of these…

  11. The Portrayals of Individuals with Physical and Sensory Impairments in Picture Books

    Koc, Kevser; Koc, Yusuf; Ozdemir, Selda

    2010-01-01

    Professionals agree that book characters can be excellent role models for young children. Therefore, analyzing children's literature portraying impairments provides valuable information for educators, parents, siblings, extended family members and librarians. In this study, forty-six picture books are analyzed in order to determine the…

  12. Playing with Father: Anthony Browne's Picture Books and the Masculine.

    Bradford, Clare

    1998-01-01

    Concentrates on the father figures in Anthony Browne's books and on the ways in which gender ideologies are encoded in works dealing with family relationships, concentrating on "Zoo" and "The Big Baby," but also looking at "Gorilla" and "Piggybook." Finds that the diversity of Browne's work provides children…

  13. Gender Representation in Notable Children's Picture Books: 1995-1999.

    Gooden, Angela M.; Gooden, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Analyzed 83 Notable Books for Children regarding the gender of the main character, illustrations, and title. Results reveal that steps toward equity have advanced based on the increase in females represented as the main character. Though female representation has shown signs of significant improvement since the 1970s, gender stereotypes are still…

  14. Qualitative Analysis of Dietary Behaviors in Picture Book Fiction for 4- to 8-Year-Olds.

    Matvienko, Oksana

    2016-10-01

    Picture books may facilitate parents' efforts to decrease pickiness and other undesirable food habits in children. This study conducted a content analysis of dietary behaviors and feeding strategies featured in fictional picture books compared with those discussed in the research literature. Several databases were searched for fictional picture books about dietary behavior, published between 2000 and 2016, accessible in the US, available in print format, and designated for 4- to 8-year-olds. Messages about dietary behavior in picture book fiction. Stories were systematically coded using holistic, data-driven, and evaluation coding methods. The final set of codes was examined for themes and patterns. Of the 104 books, 50% featured a specific eating behavior, 21% lifestyle/eating patterns, 20% food-related sensations and emotions, and 9% table manners. Books about dietary behaviors are abundant but the topic coverage is unbalanced. Problem behaviors portrayed in books overlap those discussed in the research literature. However, problem-solving strategies and actions do not align with those endorsed by nutrition professionals. Messages vary in their complexity (in terms of their plot and/or language), ranging from clear and direct to vague, sophisticated, unresolved, conflicting, or controversial. Recommendations for practitioners are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tracking the Environment in Australian Children's Literature: The Children's Book Council of Australia Picture Book of the Year Awards 1955-2014

    Babb, Yeyoung May; McBurnie, Janine; Miller, Kelly K.

    2018-01-01

    Popular and accessible before television and the internet, picture books capture the context of the time they were created and influence the generations of children who consume them. Depictions of the natural world have changed across several generations of picture books as seen in illustrations of all 249 books of an influential collection, the…

  16. Emergent literacy in print and electronic contexts: The influence of book type, narration source, and attention.

    O'Toole, Kathryn J; Kannass, Kathleen N

    2018-09-01

    Young children learn from traditional print books, but there has been no direct comparison of their learning from print books and tablet e-books while controlling for narration source. The current project used a between-subjects design and examined how 4-year-olds (N = 100) learned words and story content from a print book read aloud by a live adult, a print book narrated by an audio device, an e-book read aloud by a live adult, and an e-book narrated by an audio device. Attention to the book and prior experience with tablet e-books were also measured and included in analyses. When controlling for vocabulary, the overall pattern of results revealed that children learned more words from the e-book and from the audio narrator, but story comprehension did not differ as a function of condition. Attention predicted learning, but only in some print book contexts, and significant effects of prior experience did not emerge. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Words Children Hear: Picture Books and the Statistics for Language Learning.

    Montag, Jessica L; Jones, Michael N; Smith, Linda B

    2015-09-01

    Young children learn language from the speech they hear. Previous work suggests that greater statistical diversity of words and of linguistic contexts is associated with better language outcomes. One potential source of lexical diversity is the text of picture books that caregivers read aloud to children. Many parents begin reading to their children shortly after birth, so this is potentially an important source of linguistic input for many children. We constructed a corpus of 100 children's picture books and compared word type and token counts in that sample and a matched sample of child-directed speech. Overall, the picture books contained more unique word types than the child-directed speech. Further, individual picture books generally contained more unique word types than length-matched, child-directed conversations. The text of picture books may be an important source of vocabulary for young children, and these findings suggest a mechanism that underlies the language benefits associated with reading to children. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Young children's learning and transfer of biological information from picture books to real animals.

    Ganea, Patricia A; Ma, Lili; Deloache, Judy S

    2011-01-01

    Preschool children (N = 104) read a book that described and illustrated color camouflage in animals (frogs and lizards). Children were then asked to indicate and explain which of 2 novel animals would be more likely to fall prey to a predatory bird. In Experiment 1, 3- and 4-year-olds were tested with pictures depicting animals in camouflage and noncamouflage settings; in Experiment 2, 4-year-olds were tested with real animals. The results show that by 4 years of age, children can learn new biological facts from a picture book. Of particular importance, transfer from books to real animals was found. These findings point to the importance that early book exposure can play in framing and increasing children's knowledge about the world. © 2011 The Authors. Child Development © 2011 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  19. One-at-a-time versus grouped presentation of mug book pictures: some surprising results.

    Stewart, H A; McAllister, H A

    2001-12-01

    Eyewitnesses to a simulated crime attempted to identify the perpetrator from a computerized mug book. The 208 mug book pictures were presented either 1 mug shot per page or in groups of 12 mug shots per page. Half of the mug books were arranged by similarity to the perpetrator as determined by a facial recognition algorithm, and half were randomly arranged. In contrast to past findings with photospreads, false-positive identifications were significantly higher using the one-at-a-time procedure than the grouped procedure. Results suggest that the best practice for mug books may be the use of groups of pictures per page rather than the one-at-a-time procedure long advocated by experts for use in lineups and photospreads.

  20. Frontal brain activation in young children during picture book reading with their mothers.

    Ohgi, S; Loo, K K; Mizuike, C

    2010-02-01

    This study was to measure changes in frontal brain activation in young children during picture book reading with their mothers. The cross-sectional sample consisted of 15 young Japanese children (eight girls and seven boys, mean age 23.1 +/- 3.4). Two experimental tasks were presented as follows: Task 1 (picture book reading with their mothers); Task 2 (viewing of book-on-video). Duration of task stimulus was 180-sec and the 60-sec interval was filled. Brain activation was measured using an optical topography system. Significant increases in oxy-Hb were observed in both right and left frontal areas in response to Task 1 compared with Task 2. There were significant correlations between child's brain activity and mothers' and children's verbal-nonverbal behaviours. There was greater frontal lobe activation in children when they were engaged in a picture book reading task with their mothers, as opposed to passive viewing of a videotape in which the story was read to them. Social and verbal engagement of the mother in reading picture books with her young child may mediate frontal brain activity in the child.

  1. Validation of a picture book to be used in a pan-European dietary survey.

    Vilela, Sofia; Lopes, Carla; Guiomar, Sofia; Severo, Milton; Rangelova, Lalka; Petrova, Stefka; Horváth, Zuszsanna; Cseh, Júlia; Schweter, Antje; Lindtner, Oliver; Ambrus, Árpád; Torres, Duarte

    2018-02-01

    To validate a picture book for estimation of food portion sizes using two approaches: (i) 'perception' of food portions by comparison with a series of food photos; and (ii) 'conceptualization and memory', using the same photos to estimate the amount of served food one hour after self-served food portions. Each partner developed a country-specific picture book based on the so-called EPIC-Soft picture book. Representative and common photo series were chosen achieving approximately 25 % of the original picture book (n 23). Three portions from each photo series were randomly selected. The study was performed within the Pilot study in the view of a Pan-European dietary survey - Adolescents, adults and elderly (PILOT-PANEU) project. A sample of adolescents and adults was recruited in five countries: Bulgaria (n 103), Finland (n 34), Germany (n 69), Hungary (n 62) and Portugal (n 77). Among the portions of the corresponding photo series and depending on the type of food, from 18 % (cheese) to 96 % (ratatouille) of participants chose the correct portions. In the perception study, agreement between the portions shown and reported was substantial (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0·805) and the mean difference was very low. In the memory study, agreement between the served and reported portions was lower than in the perception study (ICC=0·536). Agreement also seemed to decrease as the appearance of food on the plate differed from food in the picture. Overall, the picture series selected can be applied in future intake surveys to quantify foods similar to those depicted in the pictures.

  2. "My Heart Beats in Two Places": Immigration Stories in Korean-American Picture Books

    Yi, Joanne H.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the impact of immigration on Korean children through a content and literary analysis of 14 children's picture books. A majority of published children's literature dealing with the subject of Korean Americans or Korean immigration contains culturally specific themes common to the Korean immigration experience. These…

  3. Realities of War: Using Picture Books to Teach the Social Effects of Armed Conflicts

    Suzuki, Tadayuki; Huss, Jeanine; Fiehn, Barbara; Spencer, Roxanne Myers

    2015-01-01

    Teachers regularly evaluate children's literature for literary quality and age-appropriate information. Today's picture books address issues such as world population, homelessness, climate change, and other socially important themes, but when faced with social studies lessons on sensitive topics such as war and its reality, elementary teachers may…

  4. Preschoolers’ causal reasoning during shared picture book storytelling: A cross-case comparison descriptive study

    Reed, Helen; Hurks, Petra; Kirschner, Paul A.; Jolles, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how shared picture book storytelling within a peer-group setting could stimulate causal reasoning in children aged 4 1/2 to 6 years. Twenty-eight children from preschool classes of three schools were allocated to one of six groups (four to five children per group). Each group

  5. Turkish Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Children's Picture Books Reflecting LGBT-Related Issues

    Dedeoglu, Hakan; Ulusoy, Mustafa; Lamme, Linda L.

    2012-01-01

    This research study focuses on Turkish preservice teachers' perceptions of children's picture books containing lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues to lend support to encouraging diversity in teacher education programs and elementary school classrooms. The authors proposed that reading, listening, and responding to diverse children's…

  6. Preschoolers' Causal Reasoning during Shared Picture Book Storytelling: A Cross-Case Comparison Descriptive Study

    Reed, Helen C.; Hurks, Petra P. M.; Kirschner, Paul A.; Jolles, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how shared picture book storytelling within a peer-group setting could stimulate causal reasoning in children aged 4½ to 6 years. Twenty-eight children from preschool classes of three schools were allocated to one of six groups (four to five children per group). Each group participated in six storytelling sessions over a…

  7. Flowers, Dancing, Dresses, and Dolls: Picture Book Representations of Gender-Variant Males

    Sciurba, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Over the past fifty years, children's picture books have made great strides toward literary equity by including more perspectives from and stories about marginalized groups, such as those whose gender identities do not conform to heteronormative standards. While texts featuring gender-variant male characters engage in topics that are far too often…

  8. Exploring the Effectiveness of Picture Books for Teaching Young Children the Concepts of Environmental Protection

    Hsiao, Ching-Yuan; Shih, Pei-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the use of picture books by preschool teachers to instruct environmental concepts and their influence on resource saving by children. The study adopted qualitative research as a method to investigate 11 children aged 5-6 years in Taiwan. In addition, we used "the environmental protector" as a main…

  9. Children's Eye Movements, Miscue Analysis Patterns, and Retellings When Reading a Counterpoint Picture Book

    Liwanag, Maria Perpetua Socorro U.; Pelatti, Christina Yeager; Martens, Ray; Martens, Prisca

    2016-01-01

    This study incorporated eye movement miscue analysis to investigate two second-graders' oral reading and comprehension of a counterpoint picture book. Findings suggest the second-graders' strategies when reading the written and pictorial text affected their comprehension as opposed to the number and location of their eye movements. Specifically,…

  10. Reading Difference: Picture Book Retellings as Contexts for Exploring Personal Meanings of Race and Culture

    Lysaker, Judith; Sedberry, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    In racially and culturally homogeneous school settings, opportunities for children to interact with those who are unlike themselves are not always available. Picture book retellings provide contexts within which students are exposed to racial and cultural differences by allowing them to engage in vicarious events with people they might not…

  11. Gender Stereotyped Descriptors in Children's Picture Books: Does "Curious Jane" Exist in the Literature?

    Turner-Bowker, Diane M.

    1996-01-01

    Subtle effects of gender stereotyping in children's literature were studied in 30 noted children's books from 1984 through 1994. Results show more males in titles and pictures, with no difference in central roles. Males were described as more active, but adjectives used for females were more positively evaluated. (SLD)

  12. Gender Equity in Picture Books in Preschool Classrooms: An Exploratory Study.

    Patt, Michelle B.; McBride, Brent A.

    A study examined the frequency with which males and females are represented in picture books available in preschool classrooms. Three areas were examined: pronoun usage and gender of characters; the frequency of gender-neutral pronouns and characters; and written text compared to teachers' wording when reading aloud. The study involved 11 head and…

  13. Are Augmented Reality Picture Books Magic or Real for Preschool Children Aged Five to Six?

    Yilmaz, Rabia M.; Kucuk, Sevda; Goktas, Yuksel

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine preschool children's attitudes towards augmented reality picture books (ARPB), their story comprehension performance (SCP) and the relationships between these variables. The sample consisted of 92 five- and six-year-olds (49 boys, 43 girls). An attitude form, story comprehension test and interview form were…

  14. Gender Schema and Prejudicial Recall: How Children Misremember, Fabricate, and Distort Gendered Picture Book Information

    Frawley, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Children's perceptions of gender are greatly influenced by the illustrations/text they encounter in picture books. While transacting with authentic literature, children build gender schema that guide processing of subsequent information. This knowledge can bias memory to a point where children misremember or distort information to make it fit…

  15. Using Children's Picture Books about Autism as Resources in Inclusive Classrooms

    Sigmon, Miranda L.; Tackett, Mary E.; Azano, Amy Price

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on developing teacher understanding of how to carefully select and use children's picture books about autism as a tool for teaching awareness, empathy, and acceptance in an elementary classroom setting. We describe how the increased rate of autism and growing practice of inclusive educational settings affect classroom practice…

  16. Teacher Candidates Implementing Universal Design for Learning: Enhancing Picture Books with QR Codes

    Grande, Marya; Pontrello, Camille

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if teacher candidates could gain knowledge of the principles of Universal Design for Learning by enhancing traditional picture books with Quick Response (QR) codes and to determine if the process of making these enhancements would impact teacher candidates' comfort levels with using technology on both…

  17. Teaching University Students Cultural Diversity by Means of Multi-Cultural Picture Books in Taiwan

    Wu, Jia-Fen

    2017-01-01

    In a pluralistic society, learning about foreign cultures is an important goal in the kind of multi-cultural education that will lead to cultural competency. This study adopted a qualitative dominant mixed-method approach to examine the effectiveness of the multi-cultural picture books on: (1) students' achieving awareness towards cultural…

  18. Co-Sleeping and the Importation of Picture Books about Bedtime

    Chou, Wan-Hsiang

    2009-01-01

    In mainstream Western cultures where bedtime means isolation and separation from adults, picture books about bedtime are cultural artifacts created especially for this transitional process of separation. In a culture such as Taiwan where children often sleep with their parents, siblings, or other caregivers until elementary school, the need for…

  19. Preschoolers’ causal reasoning during shared picture-book storytelling. A cross-case comparison descriptive study

    Reed, H.C.; Hurks, P.P.M.; Kirschner, P.A.; Jolles, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how shared picture book storytelling within a peer-group setting could stimulate causal reasoning in children aged 4 1/2 to 6 years. Twenty-eight children from preschool classes of three schools were allocated to one of six groups (four to five children per group). Each group

  20. A Critical Content Analysis of Korean-to-English and English-to-Korean Translated Picture Books

    Chang, Mi-Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    This study explores cultural representations and cultural adaptations made by translators in translated children's picture books. This study has two focuses. In the first part of this study, which is a critical content analysis, I examine the cultural representations depicted in Korean-to-English and English-to-Korean translated picture books,…

  1. Kindergartners' Spontaneous Focusing on Numerosity in Relation to Their Number-Related Utterances during Numerical Picture Book Reading

    Rathé, Sanne; Torbeyns, Joke; Hannula-Sormunen, Minna M.; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between kindergartners' Spontaneous Focusing on Numerosity (SFON) and their number-related utterances during numerical picture book reading. Forty-eight 4- to 5-year-olds were individually interviewed via a SFON Imitation Task and a numerical picture book reading activity. We expected differences in the…

  2. Examining a Reader's Meaning-Making Process of Picture Books Using Eye Movement Miscue Analysis

    Liwanag, Maria Perpetua Socorro U.; Martens, Prisca; Martens, Ray; Pelatti, Christina Yeager

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this case study was to examine a second grader's reading of picture books using eye movement miscue analysis as a method to further understand reading as a meaning-making process. Two picture books with different relationships (e.g., enhanced and counterpoint) were selected because they elicit varied ways of presenting meaning and thus…

  3. Special Learners: Using Picture Books in Music Class to Encourage Participation of Students with Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    Hagedorn, Victoria S.

    2004-01-01

    Many autistic students think and learn in pictures, not language. Visual representation of tasks, objects, and songs can greatly assist the autistic student. Using picture books in the music class is a popular strategy for many teachers. This article provides a list of books that a teacher has used with success in classes for children with…

  4. Food depictions in picture books for preschool children: Frequency, centrality, and affect.

    Goldman, Jane A; Descartes, Lara

    2016-01-01

    The food content and messages depicted in popular children's picture books were examined using a set of 100 "Favorite Books for Preschoolers." Sixty-nine of these books depicted food and comprised the sample. Examined were: the types and frequencies of food depicted in the text and/or illustrations of the books; the centrality (central, background); and the affect (positive, neutral, or negative) of those depictions. Each food item was counted, categorized by type, and where possible, coded for centrality and affect. Fruit was the most frequently depicted food, followed by sweetened baked goods, dairy, and vegetables. However, centrality and affect differed for these foods. For example, sweet baked goods were high in both centrality and affect. In contrast vegetables were relatively high in centrality but most often neutral in affect. Ice cream, although not in many books, always was associated with positive outcomes. Results were compared to findings in the literature on food messages presented in children's television programs. The ratio of healthy foods to nutrient-poor foods was higher in the books. However, as in television, the books emphasized the desirability of sweetened foods. The results point to the need for detailed analyses of the types of presentations associated with different foods presented in books for children, as well as for continued investigations into food messages in the growing range of media available to young children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Parent-child picture-book reading, mothers' mental state language and children's theory of mind.

    Adrian, Juan E; Clemente, Rosa A; Villanueva, Lidon; Rieffe, Carolien

    2005-08-01

    This study focuses on parent-child book reading and its connection to the development of a theory of mind. First, parents were asked to report about frequency of parent-child storybook reading at home. Second, mothers were asked to read four picture-books to thirty-four children between 4;0 and 5;0. Both frequency of parent-child storybook reading at home, and mother's use of mental state terms in picture-books reading tasks were significantly associated with success on false belief tasks, after partialling out a number of potential mediators such as age of children, verbal IQ, paternal education, and words used by mothers in joint picture-book reading. Among the different mental state references (cognitive terms, desires, emotions and perceptions), it was found that the frequency and variety of cognitive terms, but also the frequency of emotional terms correlated positively with children's false belief performance. Relationships between mental state language and theory of mind are discussed.

  6. Picturebooks 2.0: Transmedial Features across Narrative Platforms

    Serafini, Frank; Kachorsky, Dani; Aguilera, Earl

    2015-01-01

    Like other multimodal texts, the design, publication, and delivery of contemporary picture-books have been impacted by the digital revolution and the affordances of digital reading devices. Print-based picture-books are being published alongside digital narratives, and new digital picture-books are being created that no long begin as print-based…

  7. Parent-Toddler Behavior and Language Differ When Reading Electronic and Print Picture Books.

    Strouse, Gabrielle A; Ganea, Patricia A

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the language and behaviors that typically occur when adults read electronic books with infants and toddlers, and which are supportive of learning. In this study, we report differences in parent and child behavior and language when reading print versus electronic versions of the same books, and investigate links between behavior and vocabulary learning. Parents of 102 toddlers aged 17-26 months were randomly assigned to read two commercially available electronic books or two print format books with identical content with their toddler. After reading, children were asked to identify an animal labeled in one of the books in both two-dimensional (pictures) and three-dimensional (replica objects) formats. Toddlers who were read the electronic books paid more attention, made themselves more available for reading, displayed more positive affect, participated in more page turns, and produced more content-related comments during reading than those who were read the print versions of the books. Toddlers also correctly identified a novel animal labeled in the book more often when they had read the electronic than the traditional print books. Availability for reading and attention to the book acted as mediators in predicting children's animal choice at test, suggesting that electronic books supported children's learning by way of increasing their engagement and attention. In contrast to prior studies conducted with older children, there was no difference between conditions in behavioral or off-topic talk for either parents or children. More research is needed to determine the potential hazards and benefits of new media formats for very young children.

  8. Parent–Toddler Behavior and Language Differ When Reading Electronic and Print Picture Books

    Strouse, Gabrielle A.; Ganea, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the language and behaviors that typically occur when adults read electronic books with infants and toddlers, and which are supportive of learning. In this study, we report differences in parent and child behavior and language when reading print versus electronic versions of the same books, and investigate links between behavior and vocabulary learning. Parents of 102 toddlers aged 17–26 months were randomly assigned to read two commercially available electronic books or two print format books with identical content with their toddler. After reading, children were asked to identify an animal labeled in one of the books in both two-dimensional (pictures) and three-dimensional (replica objects) formats. Toddlers who were read the electronic books paid more attention, made themselves more available for reading, displayed more positive affect, participated in more page turns, and produced more content-related comments during reading than those who were read the print versions of the books. Toddlers also correctly identified a novel animal labeled in the book more often when they had read the electronic than the traditional print books. Availability for reading and attention to the book acted as mediators in predicting children’s animal choice at test, suggesting that electronic books supported children’s learning by way of increasing their engagement and attention. In contrast to prior studies conducted with older children, there was no difference between conditions in behavioral or off-topic talk for either parents or children. More research is needed to determine the potential hazards and benefits of new media formats for very young children. PMID:28559858

  9. Parent–Toddler Behavior and Language Differ When Reading Electronic and Print Picture Books

    Gabrielle A. Strouse

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the language and behaviors that typically occur when adults read electronic books with infants and toddlers, and which are supportive of learning. In this study, we report differences in parent and child behavior and language when reading print versus electronic versions of the same books, and investigate links between behavior and vocabulary learning. Parents of 102 toddlers aged 17–26 months were randomly assigned to read two commercially available electronic books or two print format books with identical content with their toddler. After reading, children were asked to identify an animal labeled in one of the books in both two-dimensional (pictures and three-dimensional (replica objects formats. Toddlers who were read the electronic books paid more attention, made themselves more available for reading, displayed more positive affect, participated in more page turns, and produced more content-related comments during reading than those who were read the print versions of the books. Toddlers also correctly identified a novel animal labeled in the book more often when they had read the electronic than the traditional print books. Availability for reading and attention to the book acted as mediators in predicting children’s animal choice at test, suggesting that electronic books supported children’s learning by way of increasing their engagement and attention. In contrast to prior studies conducted with older children, there was no difference between conditions in behavioral or off-topic talk for either parents or children. More research is needed to determine the potential hazards and benefits of new media formats for very young children.

  10. Parent--child joint picture-book reading among children with ADHD.

    Leonard, Melinda A; Lorch, Elizabeth P; Milich, Richard; Hagans, Neomia

    2009-01-01

    Children with AD/HD exhibit two disparate areas of difficulty: disrupted interactions with parents and significant problems in story comprehension. This study links these two difficulties by examining parent-child joint picture-book reading to determine whether there were diagnostic group differences in parent and child storytelling. Parents of 25 children with ADHD and 39 comparison children (mean age = 7.5 years) told their children a story based on a wordless picture-book, and children then retold the story to an examiner from memory. Parents in both groups told stories of similar length and complexity and demonstrated similar affective and responsive quality. The length of the child's retell of the parent's story did not differ across groups but children with ADHD included fewer goal-based events. RESULTS are discussed in terms of implications for enhancing the quality and frequency of parent-child storytelling among children with ADHD.

  11. Selecting Children's Picture Books with Positive Chinese, Japanese, and Other Asian and Asian-American Fathers and Father Figures.

    Heller, Craig; Cunningham, Bruce; Lee, Ginny; Heller, Hannah M.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses distinctive children's picture books that depict Asian fathers and other men who play significant roles in the lives of children. Books are grouped by theme, such as fairly tale versus real life, Asian immigration to North America, and discipline. Includes guidelines for selecting and evaluating books and appropriate classroom teaching…

  12. Place-Based Picture Books as an Adult Learning Tool: Supporting Agricultural Learning in Papua New Guinea

    Simoncini, Kym; Pamphilon, Barbara; Mikhailovich, Katja

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the rationale, development, and outcomes of two place-based, dual-language picture books with agricultural messages for women farmers and their families in Papua New Guinea. The purpose of the books was to disseminate better agricultural and livelihood practices to women farmers with low literacy. The books were designed and…

  13. The words children hear: Picture books and the statistics for language learning

    Montag, Jessica L.; Jones, Michael N.; Smith, Linda B.

    2015-01-01

    Young children learn language from the speech they hear. Previous work suggests that the statistical diversity of words and of linguistic contexts is associated with better language outcomes. One potential source of lexical diversity is the text of picture books that caregivers read aloud to children. Many parents begin reading to their children shortly after birth, so this is potentially an important source of linguistic input for many children. We constructed a corpus of 100 children’s pict...

  14. Queering the politics of lambda picture book finalists: challenging creeping neoliberalism through curricular innovations.

    Shimanoff, Susan B; Elia, John P; Yep, Gust A

    2012-01-01

    In many instances, adults serve as gatekeepers for what books children are permitted to explore. Unfortunately, this means that most children have limited access to picture books with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) characters. In this article, we use queer pedagogy and observations about neoliberalism to provide a qualitative analysis of LGBTQ characters in picture books which were finalists for a Lambda Literary Award during 2000-2005. We examined the ways in which LGBTQ identities and relationships are negotiated and how sexual prejudice is treated. While it is improbable that the books we analyze would be embraced by proponents of neoliberalism, we also briefly consider some ways in which they may be inadvertently consistent with that perspective. The article closes with recommendations regarding discussion questions, additional readings, and educational activities aimed at guiding children, and adults, to appreciate a diversity of multidimensional identities and family structures, to develop strategies to respond constructively to emotional and physical violence, and to promote the public wellbeing. We hope that this analysis will lead to more frequent, productive, and expansive discussions of this literature among adults and children.

  15. Do cavies talk? The effect of anthropomorphic picture books on children's knowledge about animals.

    Ganea, Patricia A; Canfield, Caitlin F; Simons-Ghafari, Kadria; Chou, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    Many books for young children present animals in fantastical and unrealistic ways, such as wearing clothes, talking and engaging in human-like activities. This research examined whether anthropomorphism in children's books affects children's learning and conceptions of animals, by specifically assessing the impact of depictions (a bird wearing clothes and reading a book) and language (bird described as talking and as having human intentions). In Study 1, 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children saw picture books featuring realistic drawings of a novel animal. Half of the children also heard factual, realistic language, while the other half heard anthropomorphized language. In Study 2, we replicated the first study using anthropomorphic illustrations of real animals. The results show that the language used to describe animals in books has an effect on children's tendency to attribute human-like traits to animals, and that anthropomorphic storybooks affect younger children's learning of novel facts about animals. These results indicate that anthropomorphized animals in books may not only lead to less learning but also influence children's conceptual knowledge of animals.

  16. Reading Narratives of Childhood: The Worlds We Create for Young Readers.

    Marshall, Elizabeth; Rogers, Theresa; Tyson, Cynthia; Enciso, Patricia; Jenkins, Christine; Brown, Jackie; Core, Elizabeth; Cordova, Carmen; Youngsteadt-Parish, Denise; Robinson, Dwan

    1999-01-01

    Offers brief descriptions of 16 children's books published between 1997 and 1999 (discussing them in tandem with landmark children's books), focusing on the wide range of narratives about the world and about childhood that adults create for children through children's literature. Discusses picture books, poetry in picture books, and books for…

  17. Listened To Any Good Books Lately? The Prosodic Analysis of Audio Book Narration

    Smiljana Komar

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The popularity of audio books is increasing. In the USA fewer people are reading books but many more are listening to them on tapes, CD’s and in MP3 format. The phenomenon is redefining the notion of reading. The purpose of the paper is to present some pros and cons of listening to books instead of reading them. The conclusions have been reached on the basis of a linguistic analysis of parts of two audio books belonging to two different literary genres: a crime novel (Dan Brown, The Da Vinci Code and a comic one (Helen Fielding, Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason.

  18. The research of 4th grade mathematical curriculum electronic picture book construction and development in integrating indigenous culture

    Chen, Yen Ting; Hsin Wang, Juei

    2017-02-01

    This research aimed at integrating Seediq culture and mathematical course design for fourth-grade elementary school, and then transforming this mathematical course into an electronic picture book. During the process of electronic book development, the researchers collected videos of six participants engaged in discussion, reflection minutes after the meeting written by the attendants, the researchers' observation and review journals, and conversations with the participants. Then, researchers utilized Content Analysis to explore, try, review and retry steps of electronic book making process. The main findings: There are four periods of electronic book making process, research occurrence period, curriculum design period, electronic book transformation period, and result evaluation period. The picture book included the White Stone Legend born from Seediq seniors, historical battle for hunting field between tribes, and concepts of approximation, angle, triangle, and quadrangle features. At last, with the research result, this article presents the corroboration of related works, and then proposes suggestions of electronic book teaching and follow-up studies.

  19. A Study on Gendered Portrayals in Children's Picture Books with Mathematical Content

    Patricia R. Ladd

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes sexism in children's picture books that incorporate mathematical problems and problem-solving into the plot to determine if children's earliest reading material is affecting the achievement gap between males and females in this subject area. The study focused not just on overall totals of male and female characters, but also analyzed which genders most often portrayed gender stereotyped behaviors and personality traits and which characters were most often shown with mathematical skills. The findings of the study show that there were twice as many male as female characters, and the math problem-solving was generally done by males in the majority of titles.

  20. Musical Memories: translating evidence-based gerontological nursing into a children's picture book.

    Gerdner, Linda A; Buckwalter, Kathleen C

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often cared for within multigenerational families. More specifically, 26% of family caregivers have children younger than 18 living with them. This article describes an innovative model for translation of an evidence-based intervention into an engaging, realistic picture book that serves as a teaching tool for children and their families. The book, Musical Memories, focuses on the relationship between a granddaughter and her grandmother who has AD. The story applies basic principles of the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold model to explain the underlying cause of grandmother's behaviors and models the evidence-based guideline "Individualized Music for Elders with Dementia" to empower the granddaughter in maintaining a relationship with her grandmother. Musical Memories is intended to serve as a valuable resource for families and the gerontological nurses who serve them. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Graphic Narratives and Cancer Prevention: A Case Study of an American Cancer Society Comic Book.

    Krakow, Melinda

    2017-05-01

    As the interest in graphic medicine grows, health communicators have started engaging readers with compelling visual and textual accounts of health and illness, including via comic books. One context where comics have shown promise is cancer communication. This brief report presents an early example of graphic medicine developed by the American Cancer Society. "Ladies … Wouldn't It Be Better to Know?" is a comic book produced in the 1960s to provide the public with lay information about the Pap test for cervical cancer prevention and detection. An analysis of a key narrative attribute, plot development, illustrates the central role that perceived barriers played in this midcentury public health message, a component that remains a consideration of cancer communication design today. This case study of an early graphic narrative identifies promising cancer message features that can be used to address and refute barriers to cervical cancer screening and connects contemporary research with historical efforts in public health communication.

  2. Let’s look at leeks! Picture books increase toddlers’ willingness to look at, taste and consume unfamiliar vegetables

    Philippa eHeath

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Repeatedly looking at picture books about fruits and vegetables with parents enhances young children’s visual preferences towards the foods in the book (Houston-Price et al, 2009 and influences their willingness to taste these foods (Houston-Price, Butler & Shiba, 2009. This article explores whether the effects of picture book exposure are affected by infants' initial familiarity with and liking for the foods presented. In two experiments parents of 19- to 26-month-old toddlers were asked to read a picture book about a liked, disliked or unfamiliar fruit or vegetable with their child every day for two weeks. The impact of the intervention on both infants’ visual preferences and their eating behaviour was determined by the initial status of the target food, with the strongest effects for foods that were initially unfamiliar. Most strikingly, toddlers consumed more of the unfamiliar vegetable they had seen in their picture book than of a matched control vegetable. Results confirm the potential for picture books to play a positive role in encouraging healthy eating in your children.

  3. Let's look at leeks! Picture books increase toddlers' willingness to look at, taste and consume unfamiliar vegetables

    Heath, Philippa; Houston-Price, Carmel; Kennedy, Orla B.

    2013-01-01

    Repeatedly looking at picture books about fruits and vegetables with parents enhances young children's visual preferences toward the foods in the book (Houston-Price et al., 2009a) and influences their willingness to taste these foods (Houston-Price et al., 2009b). This article explores whether the effects of picture book exposure are affected by infants' initial familiarity with and liking for the foods presented. In two experiments parents of 19- to 26-month-old toddlers were asked to read a picture book about a liked, disliked or unfamiliar fruit or vegetable with their child every day for 2 weeks. The impact of the intervention on both infants' visual preferences and their eating behavior was determined by the initial status of the target food, with the strongest effects for foods that were initially unfamiliar. Most strikingly, toddlers consumed more of the unfamiliar vegetable they had seen in their picture book than of a matched control vegetable. Results confirm the potential for picture books to play a positive role in encouraging healthy eating in young children. PMID:24653709

  4. Let's look at leeks! Picture books increase toddlers' willingness to look at, taste and consume unfamiliar vegetables.

    Heath, Philippa; Houston-Price, Carmel; Kennedy, Orla B

    2014-01-01

    Repeatedly looking at picture books about fruits and vegetables with parents enhances young children's visual preferences toward the foods in the book (Houston-Price et al., 2009a) and influences their willingness to taste these foods (Houston-Price et al., 2009b). This article explores whether the effects of picture book exposure are affected by infants' initial familiarity with and liking for the foods presented. In two experiments parents of 19- to 26-month-old toddlers were asked to read a picture book about a liked, disliked or unfamiliar fruit or vegetable with their child every day for 2 weeks. The impact of the intervention on both infants' visual preferences and their eating behavior was determined by the initial status of the target food, with the strongest effects for foods that were initially unfamiliar. Most strikingly, toddlers consumed more of the unfamiliar vegetable they had seen in their picture book than of a matched control vegetable. Results confirm the potential for picture books to play a positive role in encouraging healthy eating in young children.

  5. A prospective randomised control study: reduction of children's pain expectation using a picture book during blood withdrawal.

    Zieger, B; Praskova, M; Busse, E; Barth, M

    2013-05-01

    Blood drawings are very painful and stressful for children. In a prospective control group study we investigated if using a picture book could reduce the children's pain expectation. In addition, the children's pain experience and the observed pain behaviour was monitored. Block-randomization were used and 120 children at the age of 6-12 years who were visiting the general pediatric and coagulation outpatient clinics were included in this study. Pain expectation and experience were assessed with the Face-Pain-Scale-Revised and the pain behavior with the Faces-Legs-Activity-Cry-Consolability Scale. Multivariate covariance analysis was used for data analysis. The results showed that with statistical controlling the influence of the primary pain expectation (baseline) the pain expectation before blood withdrawal was reduced significantly (p=0.001) and effectively (ES=0.56) using the picture book. Children who received no local anaesthesia reported that they felt less pain during blood drawing after reading the picture book. The few children with local anaesthesia reported no benefit from the picture book. The observed use of local anaesthesia was very heterogeneous. The results recommend the usage of this picture book in everyday practice, if the use of local anaesthesia could not be used in an appropriate way. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Developmental changes in the effect of inversion: using a picture book to investigate face recognition.

    Brace, N A; Hole, G J; Kemp, R I; Pike, G E; Van Duuren, M; Norgate, L

    2001-01-01

    A novel child-oriented procedure was used to examine the face-recognition abilities of children as young as 2 years. A recognition task was embedded in a picture book containing a story about two boys and a witch. The story and the task were designed to be entertaining for children of a wide age range. In eight trials, the children were asked to pick out one of the boys from amongst eight distractors as quickly as possible. Response-time data to both upright and inverted conditions were analysed. The results revealed that children aged 6 years onwards showed the classic inversion effect. By contrast, the youngest children, aged 2 to 4 years, were faster at recognising the target face in the inverted condition than in the upright condition. Several possible explanations for this 'inverted inversion effect' are discussed.

  7. Picture book of nucleon--nucleon scattering: amplitudes, models, double- and triple-spin observables

    Field, R.D.; Stevens, P.R.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive study of nucleon-nucleon scattering is presented with particular emphasis on the underlying amplitude structure. The five complex NN amplitudes are determined as a function of energy and momentum transfer from existing pp, anti pp, and np elastic scattering data and np and anti pp CHEX data. Some constraints determined from meson-baryon fits are imposed. The resulting amplitudes are used to make predictions of forthcoming double- and triple-spin measurements, and are also compared with the model amplitudes of Kane and Seidl. In addition, the usefulness of transversity amplitudes in NN scattering is discussed, the status of our present knowledge concerning them is examined, and model predictions of these amplitudes are displayed. The paper is presented in a ''picture book'' form so that the reader can get a good overview of NN scattering by studying the figures and reading the tables and figure captions

  8. Brave new world: Myth and migration in recent Asian-Australian picture books

    Wenche Ommundsen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available From Exodus to the American Dream, from Terra Nullius to the Yellow Peril to multicultural harmony, migration has provided a rich source of myth throughout human history. It engenders dreams, fears and memories in both migrant and resident populations; giving rise to hope for a new start and a bright future, feelings of exile and alienation, nostalgia for lost homelands, dreams of belonging and entitlement, fears of invasion, dispossession and cultural extinction. It has inspired artists and writers from the time of the Ancient Testament to the contemporary age of globalisation and mass migration and it has exercised the minds of politicians from Greek and Roman times to our era of detention centres and temporary visas. This reading of Asian-Australian picture books will focus on immigrants’ perception of the ‘new worlds’ of America and Australia. The Peasant Prince, a picture-book version of Li Cunxin’s best-selling autobiography Mao’s Last Dancer, sets up tensions between individual ambition and belonging, illustrated by contrasts between the Chinese story ‘The Frog in the Well’ and the Western fairy-tale of Cinderella, to which Li Cunxin’s own trajectory from poor peasant boy in a Chinese village to international ballet star is explicitly related. Shaun Tan’s The Lost Thing and The Arrival trace the journey from alienation to belonging by means of fantasy worlds encompassing both utopic and dystopic visions. By way of a conclusion, the paper considers the nature of myth as evoked and dramatised in these texts, contrasting the idea of myth as eternal truth with Roland Barthes’ insistence that myth is a mechanism which transforms history into nature.

  9. Japanese mothers' utterances about agents and actions during joint picture-book reading.

    Murase, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    This study extended the research on the scaffolding provided by mothers while reading picture books with their children from a focus on conversational styles related to labeling to a focus on those related to agents and actions to clarify the process by which language develops from the one-word to the syntactic stage. We clarified whether mothers decreased the degree of scaffolding in their initiation of conversations, in the responses to their children's utterances, and in the choice of referential ranges of their utterances. We also investigated whether maternal conversational styles contributed to the development of their children's vocabularies. Eighteen pairs of Japanese mothers and their children were longitudinally observed when the children were 20 and 27 months of age. The pairs were given a picture book depicting 24 animals engaged in everyday behavior. The mothers shifted their approach in the initiation of conversation from providing to requesting information as a function of their children's age. The proportion of maternal elaborative information-seeking responses was positively correlated with the size of their children's productive vocabulary. In terms of referential choices, mothers broadened the range of their references as their children aged. In terms of the contribution of maternal conversational styles to children's vocabulary development, the use of a maternal elaborative information-seeking style when the children were 20 months of age predicted the size of the children's productive vocabulary at 27 months. These results indicate that mothers decrease the degree of scaffolding by introducing more complex information into the conversations and transferring the role of actively producing information to their children by requesting information as their children develop. The results also indicate that these conversational styles promote the development of children's vocabularies during the transition from the one-word to the syntactic stage.

  10. Japanese mothers’ utterances about agents and actions during joint picture-book reading

    Murase, Toshiki

    2013-01-01

    This study extended the research on the scaffolding provided by mothers while reading picture books with their children from a focus on conversational styles related to labeling to a focus on those related to agents and actions to clarify the process by which language develops from the one-word to the syntactic stage. We clarified whether mothers decreased the degree of scaffolding in their initiation of conversations, in the responses to their children’s utterances, and in the choice of referential ranges of their utterances. We also investigated whether maternal conversational styles contributed to the development of their children’s vocabularies. Eighteen pairs of Japanese mothers and their children were longitudinally observed when the children were 20 and 27 months of age. The pairs were given a picture book depicting 24 animals engaged in everyday behavior. The mothers shifted their approach in the initiation of conversation from providing to requesting information as a function of their children’s age. The proportion of maternal elaborative information-seeking responses was positively correlated with the size of their children’s productive vocabulary. In terms of referential choices, mothers broadened the range of their references as their children aged. In terms of the contribution of maternal conversational styles to children’s vocabulary development, the use of a maternal elaborative information-seeking style when the children were 20 months of age predicted the size of the children’s productive vocabulary at 27 months. These results indicate that mothers decrease the degree of scaffolding by introducing more complex information into the conversations and transferring the role of actively producing information to their children by requesting information as their children develop. The results also indicate that these conversational styles promote the development of children’s vocabularies during the transition from the one-word to the

  11. Japanese mothers’ utterances about agents and actions during joint picture-book reading

    Toshiki eMURASE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study extended the research on the scaffolding provided by mothers while reading picture books with their children from a focus on conversational styles related to labeling to a focus on those related to agents and actions to clarify the process by which language develops from the one-word to the syntactic stage. We clarified whether mothers decreased the degree of scaffolding in their initiation of conversations, in the responses to their children’s utterances, and in the choice of referential ranges of their utterances. We also investigated whether maternal conversational styles contributed to the development of their children’s vocabularies. Eighteen pairs of Japanese mothers and their children were longitudinally observed when the children were 20 and 27 months of age. The pairs were given a picture book depicting 24 animals engaged in everyday behavior. The mothers shifted their approach in the initiation of conversation from providing to requesting information as a function of their children’s age. The proportion of maternal elaborative information-seeking responses was positively correlated with the size of their children’s productive vocabulary. In terms of referential choices, mothers broadened the range of their references as their children aged. In terms of the contribution of maternal conversational styles to children’s vocabulary development, the use of a maternal elaborative information-seeking style when the children were 20 months of age predicted the size of the children’s productive vocabulary at 27 months. These results indicate that mothers decrease the degree of scaffolding by introducing more complex information into the conversations and transferring the role of actively producing information to their children by requesting information as their children develop. The results also indicate that these conversational styles promote the development of children’s vocabularies during the transition from the one

  12. [Understanding a hospitalized, school-aged child's stress in the PICU: the application of picture books in nursing care].

    Wang, Pei-Ju; Feng, Jui-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Hospitalization in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) can be a very stressful and sometimes traumatic experience for school-aged children due to illness, painful procedures, unfamiliar environment, and separation from family. We incorporated picture books into PICU nursing care to explore the stress response in a school-aged child with compartment syndrome who was hospitalized in the PICU. Observation, interview and communication with the patient were used to assess her psychological reactions and emotional and behavioral responses to stress related to hospitalization and medical treatment. Autonomy and control were provided and strengthened by giving the patient choices and purposive life plans. Picture books were used to establish rapport and help the patient express her feelings, needs, and desires for parental love and company. This case report highlights the importance of nurses' awareness of children's stresses and needs during hospitalization in the PICU as well as the value of picture books or other age-appropriate tools for this patient population.

  13. Johannes Amos Comenius (1592-1670) and his depiction of lenses and spectacles in the first children's picture book.

    Goss, David A

    2009-01-01

    Johannes Amos Comenius (1592-1670) was a Moravian clergyman, teacher, and author. He is recognized as introducing several concepts of modern education. He advanced the views that education should be appropriate to age and development levels and that teaching should make use of everyday sensory experience. One of his many books, Orbis Pictus, followed those concepts. Orbis Pictus, first published in 1657, is hailed as the first children's picture book. Among the many commonplace objects he included in the book were a mirror, spectacles, a telescope, a magnifying lens, and a burning glass.

  14. Teachers' Orientation to Kindergartners' Different Interactional Competences: Telling Personal Experiences during Shared Readings of Picture Books

    Gosen, Myrte N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is centered around 106 tellings of personal experiences during shared readings of picture books in kindergarten classrooms. It is shown that teachers orient to different interactional storytelling competences of their pupils. Teachers are found to contribute to pupils' tellings by inviting them, by showing recipiency, by asking…

  15. Two Daddy Tigers and a Baby Tiger: Promoting Understandings about Same Gender Parented Families Using Picture Books

    Kelly, Janette

    2012-01-01

    There is a small body of work examining how picture books can be used with young children and their families to develop understandings of contemporary issues including diversity and practices towards inclusion. This article describes a study in one New Zealand kindergarten that explored teachers' interpretations of children's responses to a…

  16. Pre-Service Teachers' Perception of and Technology Competency at Creating and Using E-Picture Books

    Park, Yong Joon; Yang, Youjin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated pre-service teachers' perception of and technology competency in creating and using e-picture books in their future classrooms. Participants were 114 pre-service teachers in a required Early Childhood Education undergraduate course at a mid-western university in the United States. As part of the course assignments,…

  17. When Names and Schools Collide: Critically Analyzing Depictions of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children Negotiating Their Names in Picture Books

    Keller, Tina; Franzak, Judith K.

    2016-01-01

    Names and experiences in schools are often tied together in a child's identity formation. This is true for all children, but becomes an increasingly important topic as classrooms in the United States are becoming more diverse. In this study, we seek to explore the idea of names as identity in picture books depicting minority children. In doing so,…

  18. "Keep Telling until Someone Listens": Understanding Prevention Concepts in Children's Picture Books Dealing with Child Sexual Abuse

    Lampert, Jo; Walsh, Kerryann

    2010-01-01

    Children's picture books dealing with the topic of child sexual abuse appeared in the 1980s with the aim of addressing the need for age-appropriate texts to teach sexual abuse prevention concepts and to provide support for young children who may be at risk of or have already experienced sexual abuse. Despite the apparent potential of children's…

  19. Nuclear power - a (too) pat solution. An energy picture book. Das faule Ei des Kolumbus. Ein Energiebilderbuch

    Vester, F

    1979-01-01

    This popular book in 'window' form attempts to give a picture of the complex economic and social consequences of a further development of nuclear power utilisation. The advantages of nuclear power are listed, and a critical balance is established for the negative consequences of an all-nuclear energy use for economy, environment, and society.

  20. Selecting Picture Books Featuring Characters with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Recommendations for Teachers

    Gaffney, Meredith; Wilkins, Julia

    2016-01-01

    We read 48 children's books featuring characters with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to determine which books would be appropriate for use during read-alouds in early childhood classrooms. We conducted a search on Amazon for children's books on ASD published after 2010 and identified 50 books that met the following criteria: (a) the book was a…

  1. Exploring the utility of narrative analysis in diagnostic decision making: picture-bound reference, elaboration, and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    Thorne, John C; Coggins, Truman E; Carmichael Olson, Heather; Astley, Susan J

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate classification accuracy and clinical feasibility of a narrative analysis tool for identifying children with a fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Picture-elicited narratives generated by 16 age-matched pairs of school-aged children (FASD vs. typical development [TD]) were coded for semantic elaboration and reference strategy by judges who were unaware of age, gender, and group membership of the participants. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to examine the classification accuracy of the resulting set of narrative measures for making 2 classifications: (a) for the 16 children diagnosed with FASD, low performance (n = 7) versus average performance (n = 9) on a standardized expressive language task and (b) FASD (n = 16) versus TD (n = 16). Combining the rates of semantic elaboration and pragmatically inappropriate reference perfectly matched a classification based on performance on the standardized language task. More importantly, the rate of ambiguous nominal reference was highly accurate in classifying children with an FASD regardless of their performance on the standardized language task (area under the ROC curve = .863, confidence interval = .736-.991). Results support further study of the diagnostic utility of narrative analysis using discourse level measures of elaboration and children's strategic use of reference.

  2. The Power of the Picture: How Narrative Film Captures Attention and Disrupts Goal Pursuit.

    Cohen, Anna-Lisa; Shavalian, Elliot; Rube, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Narrative transportation is described as a state of detachment that arises when one becomes immersed in the narrative of a story. Participants viewed either an intact version of an engaging 20 min film, "Bang You're Dead!," (1961) by Alfred Hitchcock (contiguous condition), or a version of the same film with scenes presented out of order (noncontiguous condition). In this latter condition, the individual scenes were intact but were presented out of chronological order. Participants were told a cover story that we were interested in the amount of gun violence depicted in films. Both groups were given the goal to remember to lift their hand every time they heard the word "gun" spoken during the film. Results revealed that participants were significantly less likely to remember to execute their goal in the contiguous condition, presumably because this narrative transported viewers' attention and thereby "hijacked" processing resources away from internal goals.

  3. Comparison of Preschoolers' Narratives, the Classroom Book Environment, and Teacher Attitudes toward Literacy Practices in Korea and the United States

    Lee, Young-Ja; Lee, Jeehyun; Han, Myae; Schickedanz, Judith A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated Korean and U.S. preschoolers' personal and fictional narratives, their classroom book environments, and their teachers' attitudes about reading aloud. The participants were 70 Korean and American 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in 2 university lab preschools and their 4 teachers. The structures and content of the preschoolers'…

  4. Generalization of learning from picture books to novel test conditions by 18- and 24-month-old children.

    Simcock, Gabrielle; Dooley, Megan

    2007-11-01

    Researchers know little about whether very young children can recognize objects originally introduced to them in a picture book when they encounter similar looking objects in various real-world contexts. The present studies used an imitation procedure to explore young children's ability to generalize a novel action sequence from a picture book to novel test conditions. The authors found that 18-month-olds imitated the action sequence from a book only when the conditions at testing matched those at encoding; altering the test stimuli or context disrupted imitation (Experiment 1A). In contrast, the 24-month-olds imitated the action sequence with changes to both the test context and stimuli (Experiment 1B). Moreover, although the 24-month-olds exhibited deferred imitation with no changes to the test conditions, they did not defer imitation with changes to the context and stimuli (Experiment 2). Two factors may account for the pattern of results: age-related changes in children's ability to utilize novel retrieval cues as well as their emerging ability to understand the representational nature of pictures. (c) 2007 APA.

  5. Deaf Children Building Narrative Texts. Effect of Adult-Shared vs. Non-Shared Perception of a Picture Story

    Tarwacka-Odolczyk Agata

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the communicative competence of deaf children. It illustrates the process in which such children build narrative texts in interaction with a deaf teacher, and presents the diversity of this process due to the shared vs. non-shared perception of a picture - the source of the topic. Detailed analyses focus on the formal and semantic aspect of the stories, including the length of the text in sign language, the content selected, information categories, and types of answers to the teacher’s questions. This text is our contribution in memory of Professor Grace Wales Shugar, whose idea of dual agentivity of child-adult interaction inspired the research presented here.

  6. Properties of the Narrative Scoring Scheme Using Narrative Retells in Young School-Age Children

    Heilmann, John; Miller, Jon F.; Nockerts, Ann; Dunaway, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical utility of the narrative scoring scheme (NSS) as an index of narrative macrostructure for young school-age children. Method: Oral retells of a wordless picture book were elicited from 129 typically developing children, ages 5-7. A series of correlations and hierarchical regression equations were completed using…

  7. Ibn Hibban and The Mudallisin’s Narrations in his Book al-Sahih: Rule, Motive and Methodology

    Muhammad Rozaimi Ramle

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tadlis i.e concealing the narrators is an illlah i.e. a concealed flaws that is an obstruction for a Hadith to be classified as authentic in the science of Hadith,. A Hadith, which has Tadlis in its sanad (the chain of narration will be classified as dhaif (weak. Ibn Hibban was one of the muhaddithin who has compiled authentic hadiths in his book al-Taqasim wa al-Anwa’. In this book, he has put conditions in accepting the authenticity of Hadith narrated by a mudallis. After the study has been carried out, it shows that Ibn Hibban not only stipulated rules for the narrations of mudallisin, but he also has his own motive when putting them in his book and methodology while dealing with them. Hence, this research is intended to explain this matter. An analytical and critical methods will be utilized for the purpose of this study. It also focuses on the definition of tadlis according to Ibn Hibban and its comparison to other scholars of hadith.

  8. How Picture Books on the National Science Teacher's Association Recommend List Portray Scientists

    Farland-Smith, Donna; Finson, Kevin D.; Arquette, Cecile M.

    2017-01-01

    This study utilized the Draw-A-Scientist Test Checklist (DAST-C) to assess the illustrations of scientists in the most recent three years of NSTA Recommends book lists. A total of 15,778 images were contained in the 148 books from those lists, of which 1,676 were of scientists. ANOVA procedures revealed no significant differences in stereotypical…

  9. Reading Pictures for Story Comprehension Requires Mental Imagery Skills

    Boerma, Inouk E; Mol, Suzanne E; Jolles, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    We examined the role of mental imagery skills on story comprehension in 150 fifth graders (10- to 12-year-olds), when reading a narrative book chapter with alternating words and pictures (i.e., text blocks were alternated by one- or two-page picture spreads). A parallel group design was used, in

  10. Validation of a food quantification picture book targeting children of 0-10 years of age for pan-European and national dietary surveys.

    Trolle, Ellen; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Ruprich, Jiří; Ege, Majken; Dofková, Marcela; de Boer, Evelien; Ocké, Marga

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to validate thirty-eight picture series of six pictures each developed within the PANCAKE (Pilot study for the Assessment of Nutrient intake and food Consumption Among Kids in Europe) project for portion size estimation of foods consumed by infants, toddlers and children for future pan-European and national dietary surveys. Identical validation sessions were conducted in three European countries. In each country, forty-five foods were evaluated; thirty-eight foods were the same as the depicted foods, and seven foods were different, but meant to be quantified by the use of one of the thirty-eight picture series. Each single picture within a picture series was evaluated six times by means of predefined portions. Therefore, thirty-six pre-weighed portions of each food were evaluated by convenience samples of parents having children aged from 3 months to 10 years. The percentages of participants choosing the correct picture, the picture adjacent to the correct picture or a distant picture were calculated, and the performance of individual pictures within the series was assessed. For twenty foods, the picture series performed acceptably (mean difference between the estimated portion number and the served portion number less than 0.4 (SD picture series were acceptable for inclusion in the PANCAKE picture book. However, the picture series of baby food, salads and cakes either can only be used for foods that are very similar to those depicted or need to be substituted by another quantification tool.

  11. The Utility of School-Age Narrative Microstructure Indices: INMIS and the Proportion of Restricted Utterances

    Hoffman, LaVae M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This research investigated the applicability of the index of narrative microstructure (INMIS; L. M. Justice et al., 2006) system for narratives that were elicited through a wordless picture book context. In addition, the viability of an alternative, simpler metric was explored. Method: Narrative transcripts using the "Frog, Where Are…

  12. An Examination of Picture Story Books that Teach Children about Appalachia (Part 1).

    Owens, William T.

    2001-01-01

    Clarifies the term "Appalachia" by discussing the economic and geographic points of reference related to the term, along with the difference between rural and urban Appalachia, and considers the culture of Appalachia. Focuses on teaching about Appalachia with picture storybooks. Includes an annotated bibliography. (CMK)

  13. The Texas Production Manual: A Source Book for the Motion Picture and Video Industry. Fourth Edition.

    Kuttruff, Alma J., Ed.

    This manual is a cross-referenced directory to film industry personnel and services available in the State of Texas. The Who's Who section contains an alphabetical listing of companies and individuals in the state engaged in some aspect of motion picture or video production. These listings include brief summaries of each company and individuals'…

  14. Botany in children's literature: A content analysis of plant-centered children's picture books that have a plot and characters

    Goins, Sheila Lewis

    This content analysis study examined 36 plant-centered children's science picture books that have a plot and characters published from 1950 to present. Botanical subject matter and learning opportunities offered by these books were analyzed, along with the range and frequency of the National Science Education Standards-consistent and age-appropriate plant science concepts and principles. The science graphics, artistic innovations, and story plot of these books were also examined. Rubrics and research-based recommendations were developed to offer parents, teachers, and librarians assistance in identifying, evaluating, and using such books to help children of ages 4--8 learn about plants and enjoy plant science. This genre of children's literature was identified and selected primarily through extensive research at four major, nationally recognized children's literature collections: The Kerlan Collection, The de Grummond Collection, The Center for Children's Books, and The Central Children's Room at the Donnell Library. This study determined that there was a substantial increase in the number of books written in this genre of children's literature from 1990 to 2000. Botanical subject-matter knowledge and learning opportunities offered by these books include biodiversity of plants; characteristics of plants; life cycles of plants; economic botany, ecology, and ethnobotany. The range and frequency of National Standards-consistent and age-appropriate plant science concepts and principles identified within these books, in part, though not exclusively, included the emergent categories of the process of photosynthesis; basic needs of plants; plant structures; external signals affecting plant growth; environmental stress to plants; biodiversity of plants; plants as animal habitats; and common uses of plants. With regard to plant science graphics, 13 books were identified as presenting some type of science graphic, beyond simple illustrations. The most frequently used

  15. Enhancing children's vegetable consumption using vegetable-promoting picture books. The impact of interactive shared reading and character-product congruence

    Droog, S.M. de; Buijzen, M.A.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated whether and how a picture book promoting carrots can increase young children's carrot consumption. One hundred and four children (aged 4-6 years) participated in shared reading sessions using the book on five consecutive days in school. These children were assigned

  16. Lexical and Acoustic Features of Maternal Utterances Addressing Preverbal Infants in Picture Book Reading Link to 5-Year-Old Children's Language Development

    Liu, Huei-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: I examined the long-term association between the lexical and acoustic features of maternal utterances during book reading and the language skills of infants and children. Maternal utterances were collected from 22 mother-child dyads in picture book-reading episodes when children were ages 6-12 months and 5 years. Two aspects of…

  17. Enhancing children's vegetable consumption using vegetable-promoting picture books: the impact of interactive shared reading and character-product congruence

    de Droog, S.M.; Buijzen, M.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated whether and how a picture book promoting carrots can increase young children’s carrot consumption. One hundred and four children (aged 4-6 years) participated in shared reading sessions using the book on five consecutive days in school. These children were assigned

  18. Mobility in pictures: a participatory photovoice narrative study exploring powered mobility provision for children and families.

    Feldner, Heather A; Logan, Samuel W; Galloway, James C

    2018-03-09

    Rehabilitation professionals are increasingly recognizing mobility as a basic human right and endorsing the efficacy of early powered mobility for children with mobility impairments to foster independence, promote socialization with peers and facilitate participation in family and community life. However, the relationship between mobility and technology provision, when considered in the context of lived experiences of children with mobility impairments and their families, is complex and understudied. Perceptions of these experiences from children's own points of view are especially limited, as is the use of participatory research methods in describing these experiences. The purpose of this study was to empower children and families as co-researchers, investigating their experiences and perspectives of powered mobility provision processes and early use of their mobility technology in their own words and images.  Methods: Two families in a major Midwest metropolitan area- one who was receiving a powered wheelchair and one who was receiving a modified powered ride-on toy car- participated as co-researchers from 2015-2016, documenting their experiences with a research camera and narrating their photos to describe meaningful or important aspects of their respective powered mobility provision processes and early use of their devices. Four themes emerged: (1) Dys/Function of Mobility Technology; (2) Daily Life, Play and Participation; (3) Emerging Self/Advocacy and (4) Complex Family/Industry Interplay.  Conclusions: These themes and experiences may inform further innovation in powered mobility practices, generate new hypotheses about the role of technology in shaping disability identity and demonstrate the feasibility and impact of using participatory methods more broadly in rehabilitation research. Implications for Rehabilitation Participatory methods may be a useful and underutilized research tool in describing the impact of powered mobility provision processes on

  19. Gender Bias in Children's Picture Books: A Look at Teachers' Choice of Literature.

    Narahara, May

    A study investigated whether some books read by kindergarten teachers to their students represent a higher proportion of female or male characters in text and imagery, and whether there was a higher proportion of female characters or male characters portrayed in stereotypical activities and roles. Subjects were four kindergarten teachers at Gauer…

  20. Power, Gender Scripts, and Boy Codes: Possibilities and Limitations in Picture Books.

    Pace, Barbara G.; Lowery, Ruth M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates questions of conventional stereotypes and power structures by describing how a book such as "Dulcie Dando, Soccer Star" sustains deep-level stereotypes of gender, despite its surface features. Explores how these stereotypes are reinforced when conventional ways of being female and male emerge as powerful elements in this…

  1. Using Picture Books to Provide Archetypes to Young Boys: Extending the Ideas of William Brozo

    Zambo, Debby

    2007-01-01

    In his book "To Be a Boy, To Be a Reader: Engaging Teen and Preteen Boys in Active Literacy," William Brozo suggested that many adolescent boys have become mentally and academically detached from school. While Brozo acknowledges that a solution to these problems is multifaceted, he asserts that engaging boys in literature that makes use of…

  2. Narratives of Girls and Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Gender Differences in Narrative Competence and Internal State Language

    Kauschke, Christina; van der Beek, Bettina; Kamp-Becker, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Since gender differences in the symptomatology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are not well understood, the current study examines the communicative skills of males and females with ASD. Narrative competence and internal state language (ISL) was investigated using narrations elicited by a wordless picture book. 11 girls and 11 boys with ASD and…

  3. Verbal and action-based measures of kindergartners' SFON and their associations with number-related utterances during picture book reading.

    Rathé, Sanne; Torbeyns, Joke; De Smedt, Bert; Hannula-Sormunen, Minna M; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2017-11-20

    Young children's spontaneous focusing on numerosity (SFON) as measured by experimental tasks is related to their mathematics achievement. This association is hypothetically explained by children's self-initiated practice in number recognition during everyday activities. As such, experimentally measured SFON should be associated with SFON exhibited during everyday activities and play. However, prior studies investigating this assumed association provided inconsistent findings. We aimed to address this issue by investigating the association between kindergartners' SFON as measured by two different experimental tasks and the frequency of their number-related utterances during a typical picture book reading activity. Participants were 65 4- to 6-year-olds in kindergarten (before the start of formal education). Kindergartners individually participated in two sessions. First, they completed an action-based SFON Imitation task and a verbal SFON Picture task, with a short visuo-motor task in between. Next, children were invited to spontaneously comment on the pictures of a picture book during a typical picture book reading activity. Results revealed a positive association between children's SFON as measured by the Picture task and the frequency of their number-related utterances during typical picture book reading, but no such association for the Imitation task. Our findings indicate that children with higher SFON as measured by a verbal experimental task also tend to focus more frequently on number during verbal everyday activities, such as picture book reading. In view of the divergent associations between our SFON measures under study with everyday number activities, the current data suggest that SFON may not be a unitary construct and/or might be task-dependent. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Validation of a food quantification picture book and portion sizes estimation applying perception and memory methods.

    Szenczi-Cseh, J; Horváth, Zs; Ambrus, Á

    2017-12-01

    We tested the applicability of EPIC-SOFT food picture series used in the context of a Hungarian food consumption survey gathering data for exposure assessment, and investigated errors in food portion estimation resulted from the visual perception and conceptualisation-memory. Sixty-two participants in three age groups (10 to foods. The results were considered acceptable if the relative difference between average estimated and actual weight obtained through the perception method was ≤25%, and the relative standard deviation of the individual weight estimates was food items were rated acceptable. Small portion sizes were tended to be overestimated, large ones were tended to be underestimated. Portions of boiled potato and creamed spinach were all over- and underestimated, respectively. Recalling the portion sizes resulted in overestimation with larger differences (up to 60.7%).

  5. Cognitive intervention through a training program for picture book reading in community-dwelling older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Kuraoka, Masataka; Yasunaga, Masashi; Nonaka, Kumiko; Sakurai, Ryota; Takeuchi, Rumi; Murayama, Yoh; Ohba, Hiromi; Fujiwara, Yoshinori

    2014-11-21

    Non-pharmacological interventions are expected to be important strategies for reducing the age-adjusted prevalence of senile dementia, considering that complete medical treatment for cognitive decline has not yet been developed. From the viewpoint of long-term continuity of activity, it is necessary to develop various cognitive stimulating programs. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of a cognitive intervention through a training program for picture book reading for community-dwelling older adults. Fifty-eight Japanese older participants were divided into the intervention and control groups using simple randomization (n =29 vs 29). In the intervention group, participants took part in a program aimed at learning and mastering methods of picture book reading as a form of cognitive training intervention. The control group listened to lectures about elderly health maintenance. Cognitive tests were conducted individually before and after the programs. The rate of memory retention, computed by dividing Logical Memory delayed recall by immediate recall, showed a significant interaction (p < .05) in analysis of covariance. Simple main effects showed that the rate of memory retention of the intervention group improved after the program completion (p < .05). In the participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) examined by Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA-J) (n =14 vs 15), significant interactions were seen in Trail Making Test-A (p < .01), Trail Making Test-B (p < .05), Kana pick-out test (p < .05) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (p < .05). The intervention effect was found in delayed verbal memory. This program is also effective for improving attention and executive function in those with MCI. The short-term interventional findings suggest that this program might contribute to preventing a decline in memory and executive function. UMIN000014712 (Date of ICMJE and WHO compliant trial information

  6. Quantifying narrative ability in autism spectrum disorder: a computational linguistic analysis of narrative coherence.

    Losh, Molly; Gordon, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by serious difficulties with the social use of language, along with impaired social functioning and ritualistic/repetitive behaviors (American Psychiatric Association in Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-5, 5th edn. American Psychiatric Association, Arlington, 2013). While substantial heterogeneity exists in symptom expression, impairments in language discourse skills, including narrative (or storytelling), are universally observed in autism (Tager-Flusberg et al. in Handbook on autism and pervasive developmental disorders, 3rd edn. Wiley, New York, pp 335-364, 2005). This study applied a computational linguistic tool, Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA), to objectively characterize narrative performance in high-functioning individuals with autism and typically-developing controls, across two different narrative contexts that differ in the interpersonal and cognitive demands placed on the narrator. Results indicated that high-functioning individuals with autism produced narratives comparable in semantic content to those produced by controls when narrating from a picture book, but produced narratives diminished in semantic quality in a more demanding narrative recall task. This pattern is similar to that detected from analyses of hand-coded picture book narratives in prior research, and extends findings to an additional narrative context that proves particularly challenging for individuals with autism. Results are discussed in terms of the utility of LSA as a quantitative, objective, and efficient measure of narrative ability.

  7. Educating young children about asthma: comparing the effectiveness of a developmentally appropriate asthma education video tape and picture book.

    Holzheimer, L; Mohay, H; Masters, I B

    1998-01-01

    Asthma self-management programmes have been shown to increase children's knowledge about asthma and improve their management practices and health status. However, existing programmes have rarely addressed the unique learning needs of very young children. This study aimed to develop and assess the effectiveness of a video tape and picture book designed to teach children about the prevention and management of acute episodes of asthma. The information content of the educational resources was determined by analysis of relevant medical information and asthma management skills. Social Learning Theory and consideration of the developmental stage of the target population informed the format and style of presentation of the resources. Eighty children aged between 2 and 5 years who had been diagnosed with asthma by their medical practitioner and who required daily asthma medication participated in a controlled experimental study. The study evaluated the impact of the asthma education resources on children's knowledge about asthma, compliance with medication regimens and health status. Children were randomly allocated to one of three experimental groups. Children in these groups were exposed to either the video tape alone, the book alone or both the video tape and book, or to a control group who viewed materials unrelated to asthma. The results for the three experimental groups were compared with the control group who did not receive exposure to any of the asthma education resources. The results showed that children in each experimental group had significantly greater gains in asthma-related knowledge than children in the control group and children exposed to both resources showed the greatest increases in knowledge. Children in each of the three experimental groups also had better compliance and health than children in the control group. These findings indicate that carefully designed asthma education resources are useful for providing even the youngest children with

  8. Picture-book reading as an intervention to teach the use of line drawings for communication with students with severe intellectual disabilities.

    Stephenson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Picture-book reading provides an effective intervention context for young children learning spoken language and may also be appropriate for teaching the use of augmentative and alternative communication to children with severe intellectual disabilities. This study reports on a group intervention using a semiscripted book reading routine implemented by a teacher in a classroom for students with severe intellectual disabilities. Student use of line drawings was observed over the course of the intervention. Students' abilities to match words, line drawings, book illustrations, and real objects were assessed weekly. There were differences between baseline and intervention performances for all students, and these differences were particularly noticeable for one student.

  9. Responsiveness and Attention during Picture-Book Reading in 18-Month-Old to 24-Month-Old Toddlers at Risk

    Fletcher, Kathryn L.; Perez, Andreina; Hooper, Corrie; Claussen, Angelika H.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the spontaneous responsiveness and attention during picture-book reading in 18-month-old to 24-month-old children from at-risk backgrounds. Twenty-five, 18-month-old children in an early intervention program were randomly assigned to a read condition or play condition for six months. At each seventh…

  10. Expanding the Horizons for Critical Literacy in a Bilingual Preschool Classroom: Children's Responses in Discussions with Gender-Themed Picture Books

    Kim, So Jung

    2016-01-01

    The current study explores how picture books can be used in bilingual classrooms to support more critical understandings of gender stereotypes by preschool children. The research uses a reader-response perspective that stresses the importance of the reader's role in interpreting texts as well as sociocultural theory to analyze the social dynamics…

  11. Using Spanish-English Cognates in Children's Choices Picture Books to Develop Latino English Learners' Linguistic Knowledge

    Hernández, Anita C.; Montelongo, José A.; Herter, Roberta J.

    2016-01-01

    Educators can take advantage of Latino English learners' linguistic backgrounds by teaching Spanish-English cognate vocabulary using the Children's Choices picture books. Cognates are words that have identical or nearly identical spellings and meanings in two languages because of their Latin and Greek origins. Students can learn to recognize…

  12. An Analysis of the Relationship of Illustration and Text in Picture-Story Books as Indicated by the Oral Responses of Young Children.

    Curtis, William J.

    Tape-recordings of five first-grade boys retelling three picture-story books were analyzed to determine the effects of illustration and text in cueing children's oral responses to literature and to explore research methodologies in the area of children's literature. "Where the Wild Things Are,""Whistle for Willie," and "Randy's Dandy Lions" were…

  13. Just Because It's Digital, Doesn't Mean It's Good: Evaluating Digital Picture Books

    McGeehan, Catherine; Chambers, Sandra; Nowakowski, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    At the current time, the reviews of digital picture books are not based on the reading comprehension process or framed in the context of how readers achieve critical reading comprehension. Rather these reviews, often completed by technology specialists, focus on features that are "attractive" and "entertaining" to readers…

  14. Book Review: The Social Life of Stories: Narrative and Knowledge in ...

    Cruikshank, Julie. 1998. The Social Life of Stories: Narrative and Knowledge in the Yukon Territory. Columbia: UBC Press. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons ...

  15. Resimli Çocuk Kitaplarında Hayvan Karakter Kullanımı Using Animal Characters in Children Picture Books

    Seyit Battal UĞURLU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Relationship between human and animals has a widespreadrepresentation both in cultural history of humanity and in literature.The close relationship of various kinds of animals with human beingconstitutes the axis of different kinds of narratives. These narrativesthat emerged under the certain practices and conditions are evidence ofexchanges between human and nonhuman forms of agency; and thedocumentation of shifts in the emotional and affective engagementsbetween human and other animals reflects cultural dimensions of thetopic. On the other hand, anthropomorphism has been an instrumentof adult narrations for a long period of history. The usage of this tool inchildren’s literature distinguishes the genre from didactic ones.In early childhood, animals have a power to set ties betweenchildhood and nature which gives a highly flexible area for children’ssocialization in society and plays powerful role in their educational,sentimental and cognitive development.The picture itself mainlycorresponds a form of reading at early childhood ages. At 3-6 ages,which consists vital phase for personality development, reading picturebook, also assists to children’s mental power. They verbally listenspicture books and visually ‘read’ the pictures vith the help of parents.The pictures, that consists of animal characters, gives a new sensitivityof a new and different world’s to the childreen. A comparison of howand why we came to make use of this potent tool as a cultural heritagetransforming into children’s world in picture books has been the chieffocus at our concern in this study. İnsan hayvan etkileşimi, insanlığın kültürel tarihi içinde ve özellikle edebiyatta, farklı biçimlerde, oldukça yaygın şekilde temsil edilmiştir. Değişik türdeki hayvanlarla insanoğlunun yakın etkileşimi, belirli anlatı türlerinin temel malzemesini oluşturmuştur. Tarihsel süreç içinde belirli pratikler ve koşullar altında şekillenen bu anlat

  16. Reworking the Grand Narrative. A Review of Recent Books on the Dutch Revolt

    Laura Cruz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay provides an overview of three recent works on the Dutch Revolt; Peter Arnade’s Beggars, Iconoclasts & Civic Patriots. The Political Culture of the Dutch Revolt (Ithaca, New York [etc.] 2008; S. Groenveld e.a.’s De Tachtigjarige Oorlog (Zutphen 2008; and Oscar Gelderblom’s The Political Economy of the Dutch Republic (Farnham 2009. The essay discusses their contributions to the evolving grand narrative of Dutch history in the world.

  17. Complexity in Picture Books

    Sierschynski, Jarek; Louie, Belinda; Pughe, Bronwyn

    2015-01-01

    One of the key requirements of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts is that students are able to read and access complex texts across all grade levels. The CCSS authors emphasize both the limitations and lack of accuracy in the current CCSS model of text complexity, calling for the development of new frameworks. In response…

  18. Barbie Princesses and Dinosaur Dragons: Narration as a Way of Doing Gender

    Anggard, Eva

    2005-01-01

    In this article, young children's narration in words and pictures is discussed from a gender perspective. The article is based on a project in which eight pre-school children made their own books. In their stories, the children reused narratives picked up from different media, both traditional fairytales and popular cultural products. The reuse of…

  19. Linguistic and Socio-Cognitive Predictors of School-Age Children's Narrative Evaluations about Jealousy

    Aldrich, Naomi J.; Brooks, Patricia J.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated children's narrative evaluations about jealousy in relation to performance on a higher-order perspective-taking task and assessments of receptive vocabulary and nonverbal intelligence. Eighty children (5;0-11;11) narrated a wordless picture book about a jealous frog, answered probe questions about the plot, and generated a…

  20. Enhancing children's vegetable consumption using vegetable-promoting picture books. The impact of interactive shared reading and character-product congruence.

    de Droog, Simone M; Buijzen, Moniek; Valkenburg, Patti M

    2014-02-01

    The present study investigated whether and how a picture book promoting carrots can increase young children's carrot consumption. One hundred and four children (aged 4-6years) participated in shared reading sessions using the book on five consecutive days in school. These children were assigned randomly to one of four experimental conditions. In a 2×2 between-subjects design, the reading style and character in the book were manipulated. The reading style was either passive (listening to the story) or interactive (also answering questions about the story). The character in the book fitted either conceptually well with carrots (a rabbit) or not (a turtle). Compared to a baseline group of 56 children who were not exposed to the book, the children in the experimental groups consumed almost twice as much carrots (in proportion to other foods consumed), F(1,159)=7.08, ppicture books are particularly effective when children are actively involved, answering questions about the story. Young children seem to enjoy this interactive shared reading style, triggering positive feelings that increase children's liking and consumption of the healthy food promoted in the book. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of maternal language to infants during a picture book task in the home: Family SES, child characteristics and the parenting environment☆

    Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Pancsofar, Nadya; Willoughby, Mike; Odom, Erica; Quade, Alison; Cox, Martha

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of child characteristics and parenting environment to the relationship between family SES/demographic characteristics and maternal language to infants.1157 children were drawn from a representative sample of 1292 infants born to mothers in rural Appalachian counties and rural counties in southern minority U.S. communities. Mothers and their 6–8 month old babies were videotaped at home while talking about a wordless picture book. Mothers' language outpu...

  2. Bi-directional effects of depressed mood in the postnatal period on mother-infant non-verbal engagement with picture books.

    Reissland, Nadja; Burt, Mike

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to examine the bi-directional nature of maternal depressed mood in the postnatal period on maternal and infant non-verbal behaviors while looking at a picture book. Although, it is acknowledged that non-verbal engagement with picture books in infancy plays an important role, the effect of maternal depressed mood on stimulating the interest of infants in books is not known. Sixty-one mothers and their infants, 38 boys and 23 girls, were observed twice approximately 3 months apart (first observation: mean age 6.8 months, range 3-11 months, 32 mothers with depressed mood; second observation: mean age 10.2 months, range 6-16 months, 17 mothers with depressed mood). There was a significant effect for depressed mood on negative behaviors: infants of mothers with depressed mood tended to push away and close books more often. The frequency of negative behaviors (pushing the book away/closing it on the part of the infant and withholding the book and restraining the infant on the part of the mother) were behaviors which if expressed during the first visit were more likely to be expressed during the second visit. Levels of negative behaviors by mother and infant were strongly related during each visit. Additionally, the pattern between visits suggests that maternal negative behavior may be the cause of her infant negative behavior. These results are discussed in terms of the effects of maternal depressed mood on the bi-directional relation of non-verbal engagement of mother and child. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Where The Wild Seafloor Scientists Are: Using Interactive Picture Books To Educate Children About Sub-seafloor Science

    Kurtz, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-seafloor scientific research has the power to spark the imaginations of elementary age children with its mysterious nature, cutting-edge research, and its connections to kid friendly science topics, such as volcanoes, the extinction of dinosaurs and the search for extraterrestrial life. These factors have been utilized to create two interactive eBooks for elementary students and teachers, integrating high quality science information, highly engaging and age-appropriate illustrations, and rhyming text. One book introduces children to the research and discoveries of the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. The second focuses on the discoveries of microbial life in the sub-seafloor. The eBooks present information as traditional, linear, illustrated children's books, but the eBook format allows the book to be available online for free to anyone and allows teachers to project the book on a classroom screen so all students can easily see the illustrations. The iPad versions also provide an interactive, learner-led educational experience, where cognitively appropriate videos, photos and other forms of information can be accessed with the tap of a finger to answer reader questions and enrich their learning experience. These projects provide an example and model of the products that can result from high level and meaningful partnerships between scientists, educators, artists and writers.

  4. Mothers' use of cognitive state verbs in picture-book reading and the development of children's understanding of mind: a longitudinal study.

    Adrián, Juan E; Clemente, Rosa Ana; Villanueva, Lidón

    2007-01-01

    Mothers read stories to their children (N=41) aged between 3.3 years and 5.11 years old, and children then completed two false-belief tasks. One year later, mothers read a story to 37 of those children who were also given four tasks to assess their advanced understanding of mental states. Mothers' early use of cognitive verbs in picture-book reading correlated with their children's later understanding of mental states. Some pragmatic aspects of maternal input correlated with children's later outcomes. Two different factors in mothers' cognitive discourse were identified, suggesting a zone of proximal development in children's understanding of mental states.

  5. Parent picture-book reading to infants in the neonatal intensive care unit as an intervention supporting parent-infant interaction and later book reading.

    Lariviere, Janice; Rennick, Janet E

    2011-01-01

    To examine the effects of a parent book reading intervention in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) on parent-infant interaction and on the incidence of parents reading to their infants 3 months post-NICU discharge. A nonrandomized, participant blinded intervention study using a historical control group (CG) was conducted. The intervention group (IG: n = 59) consisted of parents of infants admitted to the NICU after the introduction of the parent reading program. The CG (n = 57) consisted of parents of infants discharged from the NICU in the 3-month period before the introduction of the reading program. Questionnaires were mailed to participants 3 months after their infant's discharge and completed verbally, over the telephone. Groups were compared on parenting activities and reading. In addition, a thematic analysis of qualitative descriptive data provided insight into the parents' experiences with reading to their infants. Sixty-nine percent of IG parents reported that reading helped them feel closer to their baby, and 86% reported it was enjoyable. Parents reported an increased sense of control and normalcy and increased intimacy with their infant. Twice as many parents in the IG reported reading 3 or more times a week to their infants (55.9% IG; 23.3% CG). Study results support the use of a parent book-reading intervention in the NICU to enhance parent-infant interactions and promote reading.

  6. "Talking like a Book?" Socioeconomic Differences of Maternal Conversational Styles in Co-Constructing Personal Narratives with Young Taiwanese Children

    Lai, Wen-Feng

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated how Taiwanese mothers with different socioeconomic statuses (SES) co-constructed personal experience with their children in narrative conversations. Forty dyads recruited in Taiwan participated in the study, half from middle-class families and half from the working-class. Narrative conversations in Mandarin Chinese were…

  7. The Use of Target-Story Picture Media for Improving the Students’ Narrative Monologue Skills at the Grade XI-IA 2 of the Public Senior High School 7 Malang

    misianto misianto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A narrative monologue skill is required by the students learning English. This is instructed by the English Curriculum of Senior High School. The existing method of narrative monologue learning implemented so far is memorization which makes the students find it difficult to develop and improve their own ideas. This Classroom Action Research was aimed at developing an innovative learning model of narrative monologue by using a Target-Story Picture media for improving the students’ narrative monologue skills. Based on the collected data, the use of Target-Story Picture media proved effective in improving the students’ narrative monologue skills. The results of the study were as follows: (1 Cycle 1: pertinent to developing main idea (content, there were 4 students (13% who got the score of 3, 27 students (87% getting the score of 4; in terms of organizing the ideas (coherence, 1 student (3% got the score of 3, 30 students (97% getting the score of 4; in a matter of fluency, there were 18 students (58% who got the score of 3, 13 students (42% getting the score of 4; in terms of pronunciation, 15 students (48% got the score of 3, 16 students (52% getting the score of 4; and pertinent to diction, 20 students (65% got the score of 3, 11 students (35% getting the score of 4.

  8. Anthony Davenport. Medieval Narrative – An Introduction

    Richard TRIM

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This latest book by Tony Davenport represents not only a very useful guide to the different types of narrative associated with the Middle Ages but also succinctly describes their origins in Antiquity as well as linking up the various genres of medieval story-telling to present-day fiction in prose and film. The introductory pages thus give a global picture of narrative both before and after the medieval period and the Middle Ages are thereby not left in a vacuum. Although the focus is on Engl...

  9. Picturing science: The who, what, and where of images in children's award-winning science trade books

    Neutze, Donna Lee

    Educators, students, and parents are among those who have stereotypical preconceived ideas about science and scientists. The study reports on a content analysis of graphic images in 303 of the "Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12" from the years 1973 through 2005. Using quantitative and qualitative content analysis, all of the images in these books were analyzed according to the presence of humans, the characteristics of those humans (gender, race, age) the style of the graphics, the setting of the images, and the actions performed in the images. The results reveal that Caucasian males are still presented most frequently as scientists. Males appear in more total illustrations than do females (66% to 44%); the main characters are more often male than female (48 to 24); and biographies are most often written about males than females (75% to 25%). Images of Caucasians appear in more books than do people of color (54.5% to 45.5%); Caucasians appear in more total images than do people of color (84.3% to 15.7%); more main characters are Caucasians than people of color (87.5% to 12.5%); and more Caucasians are the subject of biographies than are people of color (72 to 7). Children appear in less than half of the total images, although they make up over 50% of the main characters in the sample. The images found in the sampled texts are wide-ranging as far as the setting in which science takes place; they definitely dispel the stereotype of science only occurring in a laboratory. Moreover, as a body of images, there are illustrations or photographs which capture people engaged in active scientific processes such as making observations, measuring, gathering data and samples, experimenting, and recording information.

  10. Preliminary Analyses of Transmedia Adaptations of Pictorial Narratives and Aesthetic Pole Interpretations: Reflections on Theory

    Yu-Chai Lai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transmedia narratives are a key topic of communication research. Transmedia adaptations occur when a narrator transposes an original work by using various media platforms. Considering pictorial turn, this study employed the intermediality of an animated work that was adapted from an award-winning picture book as an example to propose an analysis for theory building. After examining the literature on transmedia narratives, intermediality, and aesthetic communication, this study proposed analyses for the dimensions of transmedia adaptations of pictorial narratives and aesthetic pole interpretations. Focusing on the three layers of the artistic pole, aesthetic pole, and interactions and effects, this study cited the cases of award-winning picture books and adapted animated works as the basis for reflecting on aesthetic communication. The artistic pole of transmedia adaptation was used as an example of how a narrator employs intermediality by citing the pictures, plot, or art forms from an original work to reinvent structures and then adapts them according to intermediality. If the aesthetic pole views the adapted animated work after reading the picture book or forms an expectation of the adaptation because of intermediality, then when the audience watches the adapted animated work, their imagination could be stimulated by the intermediality (i.e., picture book graphics and scene depictions. For transmedia narrative interaction, the aesthetic pole must “fill blanks” or “negate” to continue to view the adaptation. For filling blanks, because of intermediality, the aesthetic pole must construct an “intracompositional intermediality” to connect with the visual and audio links of the same work or construct “extracompositional intermedialtiy” to associate the original work with the transmedia adaptation. For negation, when viewing the adaptation (i.e., presentation of picture book graphics, added music, or theme song, the aesthetic pole

  11. Narrative work? What on earth?

    J. Woudenberg; L. Bobbink; E. Geurts; M. Pelzer; H. Degen-Nijeboer

    2013-01-01

    This book is about narrative methods and narrative research. The word narrativity derives from the Latin word narrare, which means ‘to tell’. Narratives are present everywhere. They come in the form of fairy tales, drama, drawings, art, history, biography, myths and legends. Narratives can be found

  12. Predictors of maternal language to infants during a picture book task in the home: Family SES, child characteristics and the parenting environment.

    Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Pancsofar, Nadya; Willoughby, Mike; Odom, Erica; Quade, Alison; Cox, Martha

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of child characteristics and parenting environment to the relationship between family SES/demographic characteristics and maternal language to infants.1157 children were drawn from a representative sample of 1292 infants born to mothers in rural Appalachian counties and rural counties in southern minority U.S. communities. Mothers and their 6-8 month old babies were videotaped at home while talking about a wordless picture book. Mothers' language output and complexity were analyzed. Child temperament, age, and parenting environment (knowledge of child development and observed mother-child engagement) were predictors of maternal language. Furthermore, their inclusion reduced the magnitude of the association between demographic characteristics and maternal language. Tests of mediation suggested that the parenting environment partially mediates the relationship between SES/demographic characteristics and maternal language. Findings are discussed with respect to identifying proximal processes that explain how SES may exert its influence on the language of young children.

  13. The effect of two different visual presentation modalities on the narratives of mainstream grade 3 children.

    Klop, D; Engelbrecht, L

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated whether a dynamic visual presentation method (a soundless animated video presentation) would elicit better narratives than a static visual presentation method (a wordless picture book). Twenty mainstream grade 3 children were randomly assigned to two groups and assessed with one of the visual presentation methods. Narrative performance was measured in terms of micro- and macrostructure variables. Microstructure variables included productivity (total number of words, total number of T-units), syntactic complexity (mean length of T-unit) and lexical diversity measures (number of different words). Macrostructure variables included episodic structure in terms of goal-attempt-outcome (GAO) sequences. Both visual presentation modalities elicited narratives of similar quantity and quality in terms of the micro- and macrostructure variables that were investigated. Animation of picture stimuli did not elicit better narratives than static picture stimuli.

  14. Narrative absorption

    Narrative Absorption brings together research from the social sciences and Humanities to solve a number of mysteries: Most of us will have had those moments, of being totally absorbed in a book, a movie, or computer game. Typically we do not have any idea about how we ended up in such a state. No...

  15. Development and Use of English Evaluative Expressions in Narratives of Chinese-English Bilinguals

    Chen, Liang; Yan, Ruixia

    2011-01-01

    This study compares the development and use of evaluative expressions in the English narratives elicited from 80 Chinese-English bilinguals and 80 American monolingual peers at four ages--five, eight, ten, and young adults--using the wordless picture book "Frog, where are you?" (Mayer, 1969). Results revealed both similarities and differences…

  16. U.S. Families' Adoption of Chinese Daughters: A Narrative Analysis of Family Themes in Children's Books

    Fitzpatrick, Jacki; Kostina-Ritchey, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the ways in which family formation processes were presented in international children's adoption books. Guided by Pinderhughes' (1996) adoptive family development model, we conducted a content analysis for the representation of two developmental phases (anticipation and accommodation). A total…

  17. Humor in Children's Picture Books

    Serafini, Frank; Coles, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Humorous literature for children has been around since Randolph Caldecott first started writing and illustrating picturebooks. In the article, the authors try to understand what makes picturebooks funny and discuss ways to use humor in the classroom. Many examples of humorous picturebooks are cited to provide teachers with resources for their…

  18. Narrative organisation at encoding facilitated children's long-term episodic memory.

    Wang, Qi; Bui, Van-Kim; Song, Qingfang

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of narrative organisation at encoding on long-term episodic memory in a sample of five- to seven-year-old children (N = 113). At an initial interview, children were asked to narrate a story from a picture book. Six months later, they were interviewed again and asked to recall the story and answer a series of direct questions about the story. Children who initially encoded more information in narrative and produced more complete, complex, cohesive and coherent narratives remembered the story in greater detail and accuracy following the six-month interval, independent of age and verbal skills. The relation between narrative organisation and memory was consistent across culture and gender. These findings provide new insight into the critical role of narrative in episodic memory.

  19. The Enhancement of Narrative Writing Skills through the Use of Accordion Book for 1st Grade Students in Lesanpuro 1 Elementary School, Malang

    Ratna Trieka Agustina

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the interviews with the 1 st -grade teachers at Lesanpuro 1 Elementary School, it is found that the students have difficulties in writing a narrative story. Due to the learning activity that is not concrete, students tend to have difficulty to produce ideas because the teachers seldom use the help of media and writing example. So, from this study, it is important to do an action by using the accordion book. In this case, teachers become the model of writing by using the accordion book as its media. This research outlines two cycles in the observation. The results from the first cycle revealed that the writing ability of students who are above average is increased by 31,33 % and 37,33 % for the average students, then, as for the students who are considered to be below average, their writing skills are increased by 29 %. Furthermore, the second cycle showed that the writing ability of students who are below average is increased by 41,67 %, average students by 35,67 %, and above average by 39,67 %. Thus, it is expected that the teachers could create an interesting and innovative media so that students will enjoy the learning activity.

  20. Perspective taking in children's narratives about jealousy.

    Aldrich, Naomi J; Tenenbaum, Harriet R; Brooks, Patricia J; Harrison, Karine; Sines, Jennie

    2011-03-01

    This study explored relationships between perspective-taking, emotion understanding, and children's narrative abilities. Younger (23 5-/6-year-olds) and older (24 7-/8-year-olds) children generated fictional narratives, using a wordless picture book, about a frog experiencing jealousy. Children's emotion understanding was assessed through a standardized test of emotion comprehension and their ability to convey the jealousy theme of the story. Perspective-taking ability was assessed with respect to children's use of narrative evaluation (i.e., narrative coherence, mental state language, supplementary evaluative speech, use of subjective language, and placement of emotion expression). Older children scored higher than younger children on emotion comprehension and on understanding the story's complex emotional theme, including the ability to identify a rival. They were more advanced in perspective-taking abilities, and selectively used emotion expressions to highlight story episodes. Subjective perspective taking and narrative coherence were predictive of children's elaboration of the jealousy theme. Use of supplementary evaluative speech, in turn, was predictive of both subjective perspective taking and narrative coherence. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Creative and Stylistic Devices Employed by Children During a Storybook Narrative Task: A Cross-Cultural Study

    Gorman, Brenda K.; Fiestas, Christine E.; Peña, Elizabeth D.; Clark, Maya Reynolds

    2018-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of culture on the creative and stylistic features children employ when producing narratives based on wordless picture books. Method Participants included 60 first- and second-grade African American, Latino American, and Caucasian children. A subset of narratives based on wordless picture books collected as part of a larger study was coded and analyzed for the following creative and stylistic conventions: organizational style (topic centered, linear, cyclical), dialogue (direct, indirect), reference to character relationships (nature, naming, conduct), embellishment (fantasy, suspense, conflict), and paralinguistic devices (expressive sounds, exclamatory utterances). Results Many similarities and differences between ethnic groups were found. No significant differences were found between ethnic groups in organizational style or use of paralinguistic devices. African American children included more fantasy in their stories, Latino children named their characters more often, and Caucasian children made more references to the nature of character relationships. Conclusion Even within the context of a highly structured narrative task based on wordless picture books, culture influences children’s production of narratives. Enhanced understanding of narrative structure, creativity, and style is necessary to provide ecologically valid narrative assessment and intervention for children from diverse cultural backgrounds. PMID:21278258

  2. The Discovery of Brazil Suites by Villa-Lobos and the Soundtrack of the Motion Picture by Humberto Mauro: Bricolage and Sequentiality in the Construction of an Audiovisual Narrative

    Tatyana de Alencar Jacques

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to understand the procedures used by Villa-Lobos and Humberto Mauro to construct the soundtrack for the motion picture Discovery of Brazil (1937. Based on archival research and a comparison of a description left by Villa-Lobos, the scores of the Suites, and the music in the film, the hypothesis supported here is that, despite information shared within musical and intellectual circles, the suites entitled Discovery of Brazil were not composed for Mauro’s film. I argue that the Suites are later works resulting from a long process of returning to and reworking the themes and ideas that reverberate in Villa-Lobos’ work for the film. Accordingly, to understand the poetics of the motion picture, the conception and creation of its soundtrack are contextualized in a moment shortly after the advent of sound cinema when codes and audiovisual poetics were being widely discussed and different possibilities emerge in constructing auditory imagery in narratives. I conclude that the music in the film is primarily used for constituting narrative sequences and point out that the procedures used by Mauro to construct the soundtrack for Discovery of Brazil are intimately related to the bricolage dynamics that characterize Villa-Lobos’ own creative process.

  3. The Role of Book Familiarity and Book Type on Mothers' Reading Strategies and Toddlers' Responsiveness

    Fletcher, Kathryn L.; Finch, W. Holmes

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine how maternal reading strategies and book type would impact on toddlers' responsiveness as they became familiar with three books. Eleven mothers and their 2- to 3-year-olds were recorded reading the same set of three different books (i.e. word book, narrative book and no narrative book) on four…

  4. Preliminary Investigation of Transmedia Narratives and the Process of Narrative Brand Expansion: Transmedia Adaptation in Picturebooks

    Yu-Chai Lai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmedia narrators can use the intermediacy of images and text as a foundation to develop story networks. These narrators can also use various forms of technology to recreate a variety of aesthetic responses in readers. In this study, we analyzed the narrative strategies of adaptation in examples of transmedia adaptation among winners of international picture book awards. In artistic terms, the horizons of expectation of adapters, the readers of fiction, and the inviting structures extended from intermediacy play key roles in aesthetic communication. How adapters use the materials of intermediacy as filler or to expand on negative speculation also influences the relaying process. In this study, we clarified that in addition to considering aesthetic judgments, adaptation must also adhere to the economy of aesthetics.

  5. Validation of a food quantification picture book targeting children of 0–10 years of age for pan-European and national dietary surveys

    Trolle, Ellen; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Ruprich, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    and children for future pan-European and national dietary surveys. Identical validation sessions were conducted in three European countries. In each country, forty-five foods were evaluated; thirty-eight foods were the same as the depicted foods, and seven foods were different, but meant to be quantified......The aim of the present study was to validate thirty-eight picture series of six pictures each developed within the PANCAKE (Pilot study for the Assessment of Nutrient intake and food Consumption Among Kids in Europe) project for portion size estimation of foods consumed by infants, toddlers...... by the use of one of the thirty-eight picture series. Each single picture within a picture series was evaluated six times by means of predefined portions. Therefore, thirty-six pre-weighed portions of each food were evaluated by convenience samples of parents having children aged from 3 months to 10 years...

  6. Rich man's food, poor man's food in "The mansions and the shanties": A narrative review of the book written by Gilberto Freyre

    Francisco de Assis Guedes de VASCONCELOS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to perform a narrative review of the book "The mansions and the shanties" written by the Brazilian sociologist Gilberto Freyre, published for the first time in 1936. The study analyzed Gilberto Freyre's contribution to the process of interpreting the formation and modification of the eating habits and patterns of the Brazilian society. The analysis is limited to a review, from a dietician's perspective, of text clippings where Freyre seeks to reconstruct and interpret the process of formation and modification of eating habits and patterns in the context of a patriarchal society. The text will try to answer the questions: what, how much, how, when, where, and with whom were the dwellers of mansions and shanties eating? Comparison of the eating habits of the rural patriarchal society with those of the emerging urban patriarchal society has shown Freyre's clear trend of aversion to the "Europeanization" of eating habits and his affection for traditional culinary values. The new eating habits of mansions and plantation houses were portrayed with disdain, denoting an author who remained stuck to the culinary traditions of a rural patriarchal society, to taste memories, especially of the sweets, cakes, and desserts created, adapted, and savored in Pernambuco state sugar mills.

  7. Visual Narrative Structure

    Cohn, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Narratives are an integral part of human expression. In the graphic form, they range from cave paintings to Egyptian hieroglyphics, from the Bayeux Tapestry to modern day comic books (Kunzle, 1973; McCloud, 1993). Yet not much research has addressed the structure and comprehension of narrative images, for example, how do people create meaning out…

  8. Narrating Peoplehood amidst Diversity

    Böss, Michael

    In Narrating Peoplehood amidst Diversity, 16 internationally renowned scholars reflect on the nature and history of peoplehood and discuss how narratives inform national identities, public culture and academic historiography. The book is a timely contribution to the ongoing debate on belonging...

  9. Picture languages formal models for picture recognition

    Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1979-01-01

    Computer Science and Applied Mathematics: Picture Languages: Formal Models for Picture Recognition treats pictorial pattern recognition from the formal standpoint of automata theory. This book emphasizes the capabilities and relative efficiencies of two types of automata-array automata and cellular array automata, with respect to various array recognition tasks. The array automata are simple processors that perform sequences of operations on arrays, while the cellular array automata are arrays of processors that operate on pictures in a highly parallel fashion, one processor per picture element. This compilation also reviews a collection of results on two-dimensional sequential and parallel array acceptors. Some of the analogous one-dimensional results and array grammars and their relation to acceptors are likewise covered in this text. This publication is suitable for researchers, professionals, and specialists interested in pattern recognition and automata theory.

  10. When all children comprehend: increasing the external validity of narrative comprehension development research

    Burris, Silas E.; Brown, Danielle D.

    2014-01-01

    Narratives, also called stories, can be found in conversations, children's play interactions, reading material, and television programs. From infancy to adulthood, narrative comprehension processes interpret events and inform our understanding of physical and social environments. These processes have been extensively studied to ascertain the multifaceted nature of narrative comprehension. From this research we know that three overlapping processes (i.e., knowledge integration, goal structure understanding, and causal inference generation) proposed by the constructionist paradigm are necessary for narrative comprehension, narrative comprehension has a predictive relationship with children's later reading performance, and comprehension processes are generalizable to other contexts. Much of the previous research has emphasized internal and predictive validity; thus, limiting the generalizability of previous findings. We are concerned these limitations may be excluding underrepresented populations from benefits and implications identified by early comprehension processes research. This review identifies gaps in extant literature regarding external validity and argues for increased emphasis on externally valid research. We highlight limited research on narrative comprehension processes in children from low-income and minority populations, and argue for changes in comprehension assessments. Specifically, we argue both on- and off-line assessments should be used across various narrative types (e.g., picture books, televised narratives) with traditionally underserved and underrepresented populations. We propose increasing the generalizability of narrative comprehension processes research can inform persistent reading achievement gaps, and have practical implications for how children learn from narratives. PMID:24659973

  11. When All Children Comprehend: Increasing the External Validity of Narrative Comprehension Development Research

    Silas E. Burris

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Narratives, also called stories, can be found in conversations, children’s play interactions, reading material, and television programs. From infancy to adulthood, narrative comprehension processes interpret events and inform our understanding of physical and social environments. These processes have been extensively studied to ascertain the multifaceted nature of narrative comprehension. From this research we know that three overlapping processes (i.e., knowledge integration, goal structure understanding, and causal inference generation proposed by the constructionist paradigm are necessary for narrative comprehension, narrative comprehension has a predictive relationship with children’s later reading performance, and comprehension processes are generalizable to other contexts. Much of the previous research has emphasized internal and predictive validity; thus, limiting the generalizability of previous findings. We are concerned these limitations may be excluding underrepresented populations from benefits and implications identified by early comprehension processes research. This review identifies gaps in extant literature regarding external validity and argues for increased emphasis on externally valid research. We highlight limited research on narrative comprehension processes in children from low-income and minority populations, and argue for changes in comprehension assessments. Specifically, we argue both on- and off-line assessments should be used across various narrative types (e.g., picture books, televised narratives with traditionally underserved and underrepresented populations. We propose increasing the generalizability narrative comprehension processes research can inform persistent reading achievement gaps, and have practical implications for how children learn from narratives.

  12. Book Review

    Angela

    The book in review tells many tales of looting, rape and murder of prominent. Nuba figures as well as ordinary Nuba folk. As the government is increasing pressure on them, the Nuba are proving to be more resilient than ever to ensure their posterity. The picture that dominates the front cover may easily be overlooked by.

  13. Book review

    The book ends with a section on the most sought-after bird of. Ethiopia, a brief discussion of the best sites where to find them, and a complete, indexed list of the country's birds. The keen combination of text, maps, lists and superb pictures makes 'Birding Ethiopia' an outstanding birding site guide that deserves a place on ...

  14. Who Does the Reading, Who the Talking? Low-Income Fathers and Mothers in the US Interacting with Their Young Children around a Picture Book

    Duursma, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Bookreading is known to benefit young children's language and literacy development. However, research has demonstrated that how adults interact around a book with a child is probably even more important than reading the complete text. Dialogic or interactive reading strategies can promote children's language development more specifically. Little…

  15. Book Reviews Boekbesprekings

    Book Reviews. HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES. Hypothalamic Hypophysiotropic Hormones. Physiological and clinical studies. Proceedings of the Conference .... tricians, it certainly succeeds in its aim. 'A book is of little use if it has no pictures', thought Alice. This book has many. Of particular interest is the last chapter in ...

  16. Mothers' Complex Talk When Sharing Books with Their Toddlers: Book Genre Matters

    Nyhout, Angela; O'Neill, Daniela K.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of book genre (narrative or didactic) on mothers' language use during a book sharing interaction with their 18- to 25-month-olds. Mother-child dyads were videotaped sharing both a narrative and a didactic book, adapted from two commercially available books, and matched in terms of length, quantity of text, and…

  17. Humans (really are animals: Picture-book reading influences five-year-old urban children’s construal of the relation between humans and non-human animals

    Sandra R Waxman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available What is the relation between humans and nonhuman animals? From a biological perspective, we view humans as one species among many, but in the fables and films we create for children, we often offer an anthropocentric perspective, imbuing nonhuman animals with human-like characteristics. What are the consequences of these distinctly different perspectives on children’s reasoning about the natural world? Some have argued that children universally begin with an anthropocentric perspective and that acquiring a biological perspective requires a basic conceptual change (cf. Carey 1985. But recent work reveals that this anthropocentric perspective, evidenced in urban five-year-olds, is not evident in three-year-olds (Herrmann et al. 2010. This indicates that the anthropocentric perspective is not an obligatory first step in children’s reasoning about biological phenomena. In the current paper, we introduced a priming manipulation to assess whether five-year-olds’ reasoning about a novel biological property is influenced by the perspectives they encounter in children’s books. Just before participating in a reasoning task, each child read a book about bears with an experimenter. What varied was whether bears were depicted from an anthropomorphic (Berenstain Bears or biological perspective (Animal Encyclopedia. The priming had a dramatic effect. Children reading the Berenstain Bears showed the standard anthropocentric reasoning pattern, but those reading the Animal Encyclopedia adopted a biological pattern. This offers evidence that urban five-year-olds can adopt either a biological or a human-centered stance, depending upon the context. Thus, children’s books and other media are double-edged swords. Media may (inadvertently support human-centered reasoning in young children, but may also be instrumental in redirecting children’s attention to a biological model.

  18. Humans (really) are animals: picture-book reading influences 5-year-old urban children's construal of the relation between humans and non-human animals.

    Waxman, Sandra R; Herrmann, Patricia; Woodring, Jennie; Medin, Douglas L

    2014-01-01

    What is the relation between humans and non-human animals? From a biological perspective, we view humans as one species among many, but in the fables and films we create for children, we often offer an anthropocentric perspective, imbuing non-human animals with human-like characteristics. What are the consequences of these distinctly different perspectives on children's reasoning about the natural world? Some have argued that children universally begin with an anthropocentric perspective and that acquiring a biological perspective requires a basic conceptual change (cf. Carey, 1985). But recent work reveals that this anthropocentric perspective, evidenced in urban 5-year-olds, is not evident in 3-year-olds (Herrmann etal., 2010). This indicates that the anthropocentric perspective is not an obligatory first step in children's reasoning about biological phenomena. In the current paper, we introduced a priming manipulation to assess whether 5-year-olds' reasoning about a novel biological property is influenced by the perspectives they encounter in children's books. Just before participating in a reasoning task, each child read a book about bears with an experimenter. What varied was whether bears were depicted from an anthropomorphic (Berenstain Bears) or biological perspective (Animal Encyclopedia). The priming had a dramatic effect. Children reading the Berenstain Bears showed the standard anthropocentric reasoning pattern, but those reading the Animal Encyclopedia adopted a biological pattern. This offers evidence that urban 5-year-olds can adopt either a biological or a human-centered stance, depending upon the context. Thus, children's books and other media are double-edged swords. Media may (inadvertently) support human-centered reasoning in young children, but may also be instrumental in redirecting children's attention to a biological model.

  19. Humans (really) are animals: picture-book reading influences 5-year-old urban children’s construal of the relation between humans and non-human animals

    Waxman, Sandra R.; Herrmann, Patricia; Woodring, Jennie; Medin, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    What is the relation between humans and non-human animals? From a biological perspective, we view humans as one species among many, but in the fables and films we create for children, we often offer an anthropocentric perspective, imbuing non-human animals with human-like characteristics. What are the consequences of these distinctly different perspectives on children’s reasoning about the natural world? Some have argued that children universally begin with an anthropocentric perspective and that acquiring a biological perspective requires a basic conceptual change (cf. Carey, 1985). But recent work reveals that this anthropocentric perspective, evidenced in urban 5-year-olds, is not evident in 3-year-olds (Herrmann etal., 2010). This indicates that the anthropocentric perspective is not an obligatory first step in children’s reasoning about biological phenomena. In the current paper, we introduced a priming manipulation to assess whether 5-year-olds’ reasoning about a novel biological property is influenced by the perspectives they encounter in children’s books. Just before participating in a reasoning task, each child read a book about bears with an experimenter. What varied was whether bears were depicted from an anthropomorphic (Berenstain Bears) or biological perspective (Animal Encyclopedia). The priming had a dramatic effect. Children reading the Berenstain Bears showed the standard anthropocentric reasoning pattern, but those reading the Animal Encyclopedia adopted a biological pattern. This offers evidence that urban 5-year-olds can adopt either a biological or a human-centered stance, depending upon the context. Thus, children’s books and other media are double-edged swords. Media may (inadvertently) support human-centered reasoning in young children, but may also be instrumental in redirecting children’s attention to a biological model. PMID:24672493

  20. Visual narrative structure.

    Cohn, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Narratives are an integral part of human expression. In the graphic form, they range from cave paintings to Egyptian hieroglyphics, from the Bayeux Tapestry to modern day comic books (Kunzle, 1973; McCloud, 1993). Yet not much research has addressed the structure and comprehension of narrative images, for example, how do people create meaning out of sequential images? This piece helps fill the gap by presenting a theory of Narrative Grammar. We describe the basic narrative categories and their relationship to a canonical narrative arc, followed by a discussion of complex structures that extend beyond the canonical schema. This demands that the canonical arc be reconsidered as a generative schema whereby any narrative category can be expanded into a node in a tree structure. Narrative "pacing" is interpreted as a reflection of various patterns of this embedding: conjunction, left-branching trees, center-embedded constituencies, and others. Following this, diagnostic methods are proposed for testing narrative categories and constituency. Finally, we outline the applicability of this theory beyond sequential images, such as to film and verbal discourse, and compare this theory with previous approaches to narrative and discourse. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  1. More than Comic Books

    Boerman-Cornell, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Graphic novels (book-length fiction or nonfiction narratives told using the conventions of a comic book) bring together text and image in a way that seems to capture students' imaginations. Right now, there is little more than anecdotal research about how graphic novels can be used within specific middle school and high school disciplines. As…

  2. 異與同:兩本繪本在新移民課程與教學上的應用 Differences and Similarities: The Application of Two Picture Books to the Curriculum and Instruction for New Immigrants

    何青蓉 Ching-Jung Ho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available 本研究從多元文化教育的核心概念─「差異與相同」出發,以《其實你我都一樣!Nillepu》和《橘色奇蹟》兩繪本為例,論析其內涵、特色與意義,並說明其在課程與教學上的應用。在繪本的內涵上,係就主題、人物、情節、圖畫及語文技巧等五個元素分析;在繪本的特性上,就可讀性、趣味性、經驗性、隱喻性,以及創造與想像性等五個向度分析;最後,在繪本的意義上,則就理性的啟發與心靈的觸動兩層面分析。本研究結論指出,《其實你我都一樣!Nillepu》從差異中彰顯相同,有助於增進人與人之間的互利共生關係;《橘色奇蹟》從相同中彰顯差異,並呈現個人的主體性並不妨礙群體的認同,有助於協助讀者建立獨特性與主體性。在繪本特性上,兩書均呈現可讀性、趣味性、經驗性、隱喻性,以及創造與想像性,都是兼具理性和感性的好書。在課程與教學設計上,可從學習者經驗出發,扣緊故事軸線發展教學活動;藉由三層次的反省,逐步導入上位的差異和相同的概念。最後,本研究提出具體建議,讓繪本在課程與教學上發揮更大的作用。 Based on a core concept of the multicultural education – “Differences and similarities,” this article analyzes two picture books: Nillepu and The Big Orange Splot to explore their connotation, characteristics and significances. Further, it provides examples for applying these two picture books to the curriculum and instruction for new immigrants. In terms of the connotation of the picture books, it is analyzed by their themes, characters, plots, pictures and language skills. In terms of their characteristics, it is analyzed by the books’ readability, interest, experience, metaphors, and creation and imagination. At last, through the examination of their rational inspiration and spiritual sympathy

  3. Narrative performance of gifted African American school-aged children from low-income backgrounds.

    Mills, Monique T

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated classroom differences in the narrative performance of school-age African American English (AAE)-speaking children in gifted and general education classrooms. Forty-three children, Grades 2-5, each generated fictional narratives in response to the book Frog, Where Are You? (Mayer, 1969). Differences in performance on traditional narrative measures (total number of communication units [C-units], number of different words, and mean length of utterance in words) and on AAE production (dialect density measure) between children in gifted and general education classrooms were examined. There were no classroom-based differences in total number of C-units, number of different words, and mean length of utterance in words. Children in gifted education classrooms produced narratives with lower dialect density than did children in general educated classrooms. Direct logistic regression assessed whether narrative dialect density measure scores offered additional information about giftedness beyond scores on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Fourth Edition (Dunn & Dunn, 2007), a standard measure of language ability. Results indicated that a model with only Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Fourth Edition scores best discriminated children in the 2 classrooms. African American children across gifted and general education classrooms produce fictional narratives of similar length, lexical diversity, and syntax complexity. However, African American children in gifted education classrooms may produce lower rates of AAE and perform better on standard measures of vocabulary than those in general education classrooms.

  4. Narrative Performance of Gifted African American School-Aged Children From Low-Income Backgrounds

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated classroom differences in the narrative performance of school-age African American English (AAE)-speaking children in gifted and general education classrooms. Method Forty-three children, Grades 2–5, each generated fictional narratives in response to the book Frog, Where Are You? (Mayer, 1969). Differences in performance on traditional narrative measures (total number of communication units [C-units], number of different words, and mean length of utterance in words) and on AAE production (dialect density measure) between children in gifted and general education classrooms were examined. Results There were no classroom-based differences in total number of C-units, number of different words, and mean length of utterance in words. Children in gifted education classrooms produced narratives with lower dialect density than did children in general educated classrooms. Direct logistic regression assessed whether narrative dialect density measure scores offered additional information about giftedness beyond scores on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test–Fourth Edition (Dunn & Dunn, 2007), a standard measure of language ability. Results indicated that a model with only Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test–Fourth Edition scores best discriminated children in the 2 classrooms. Conclusion African American children across gifted and general education classrooms produce fictional narratives of similar length, lexical diversity, and syntax complexity. However, African American children in gifted education classrooms may produce lower rates of AAE and perform better on standard measures of vocabulary than those in general education classrooms. PMID:25409770

  5. Building the Foundation of Acceptance Book by Book: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and/or Transgender-Themed Books for Grades K-5 Multicultural Libraries

    Knoblauch, Dee

    2016-01-01

    This article is an analysis of picture books and chapter books involving lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender characters. Over 30 picture and chapter books were reviewed, each of which would be appropriate for use in elementary classrooms. For grades K-2, several picture books highlight different types of families, including families that…

  6. Narrative Language Competence in Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    Marie Moore Channell

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine the narrative language abilities of children and adolescents with Down syndrome in comparison to same-age peers with fragile X syndrome and younger typically developing children matched by nonverbal cognitive ability levels. Participants produced narrative retells from a wordless picture book. Narratives were analyzed at the macrostructural (i.e., their internal episodic structure and the microstructural (i.e., rate of use of specific word categories levels. Mean length of utterance, a microstructural metric of syntactic complexity, was used as a control variable. Participants with Down syndrome produced fewer episodic elements in their narratives (i.e., their narratives were less fully realized than the typically developing participants, although mean length of utterance differences accounted for the macrostructural differences between participant groups. At the microstructural level, participants with Down syndrome displayed a lower rate of verb use than the groups with fragile X syndrome and typical development, even after accounting for mean length of utterance. These findings reflect both similarities and differences between individuals with Down syndrome or fragile X syndrome and contribute to our understanding of the language phenotype of Down syndrome. Implications for interventions to promote language development and academic achievement are discussed.

  7. Narrative teorier

    Bank, Mads

    2014-01-01

    kapitlet omhandler Narrative psykologiske teorier i et personlighedspsykologisk og socio-kulturelt perspektiv.......kapitlet omhandler Narrative psykologiske teorier i et personlighedspsykologisk og socio-kulturelt perspektiv....

  8. The Organization and Anatomy of Narrative Comprehension and Expression in Lewy Body Spectrum Disorders

    Ash, Sharon; Xie, Sharon; Gross, Rachel Goldmann; Dreyfuss, Michael; Boller, Ashley; Camp, Emily; Morgan, Brianna; O’Shea, Jessica; Grossman, Murray

    2012-01-01

    Objective Patients with Lewy body spectrum disorders (LBSD) such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), Parkinson’s disease with dementia (PDD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) exhibit deficits in both narrative comprehension and narrative expression. The present research examines the hypothesis that these impairments are due to a material-neutral deficit in organizational executive resources rather than to impairments of language per se. We predicted that comprehension and expression of narrative would be similarly affected and that deficits in both expression and comprehension of narrative would be related to the same anatomic distribution of prefrontal disease. Method We examined 29 LBSD patients and 26 healthy seniors on their comprehension and expression of narrative discourse. For comprehension, we measured accuracy and latency in judging events with high and low associativity from familiar scripts such as “going fishing.” The expression task involved maintaining the connectedness of events while narrating a story from a wordless picture book. Results LBSD patients were impaired on measures of narrative organization during both comprehension and expression relative to healthy seniors. Measures of organization during narrative expression and comprehension were significantly correlated with each other. These measures both correlated with executive measures but not with neuropsychological measures of lexical semantics or grammar. Voxel-based morphometry revealed overlapping regressions relating frontal atrophy to narrative comprehension, narrative expression, and measures of executive control. Conclusions Difficulty with narrative discourse in LBSD stems in part from a deficit of organization common to comprehension and expression. This deficit is related to prefrontal cortical atrophy in LBSD. PMID:22309984

  9. DIGITAL NARRATIVES IN FUTURE UKRAINIAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE TEACHERS TRAINING

    Olena Semenoh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article on the basis of analyzing theoretical sources and practical experience some scientists’ works are disclosed, which deal with using and designing digital narratives in future Ukrainian language and literature teachers’ training, to develop a personality’s information and digital competence. It is reported that the themes, which are focused on postgraduate students’ acquainting with digital technologies of studying linguistic subjects at university, in specialized classes in secondary school, and a new type of educational institutions, should be introduced into language and methodological training. The author emphasizes on the relevance and importance of using digital narratives for democratization and humanization, the inspiration of the educational process. Narratives (stories in literary works, letters, confessions, biographies, diaries, comments, portrait sketches, pedagogical aphorisms, scripts, summaries of lessons with notes in the margins and others, biographical and pedagogical narratives provide information about the events, situations, taking into account individual reflexed experience of outstanding teachers. If students have an opportunity to develop skills of making narratives, they will gradually get communicative competences and feeling of confidence in their own ability that are necessary in the life. The works by M. Leshchenko and L. Tymchuk that are devoted to studying biography narratives are overviewed. The author suggests her own works of studying biography narratives of outstanding personalities (O. Zakharenko, I. Ziaziun, N. Voloshyna, L. Matsko and others. Digital narrative is characterized as a dynamic means of sending information messages in which a word, an image and sound are expressed in a joint digital code; as multimedia project that combines text, a picture, audio and video files in a short video clip. It is spoken in detail that digital narratives that are used or made together with students

  10. Narrative Finality

    Armine Kotin Mortimer

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The cloturai device of narration as salvation represents the lack of finality in three novels. In De Beauvoir's Tous les hommes sont mortels an immortal character turns his story to account, but the novel makes a mockery of the historical sense by which men define themselves. In the closing pages of Butor's La Modification , the hero plans to write a book to save himself. Through the thrice-considered portrayal of the Paris-Rome relationship, the ending shows the reader how to bring about closure, but this collective critique written by readers will always be a future book. Simon's La Bataille de Pharsale , the most radical attempt to destroy finality, is an infinite text. No new text can be written. This extreme of perversion guarantees bliss (jouissance . If the ending of De Beauvoir's novel transfers the burden of non-final world onto a new victim, Butor's non-finality lies in the deferral to a future writing, while Simon's writer is stuck in a writing loop, in which writing has become its own end and hence can have no end. The deconstructive and tragic form of contemporary novels proclaims the loss of belief in a finality inherent in the written text, to the profit of writing itself.

  11. Migration, Narration, Identity

    Leese, Peter

    (co-editor with Carly McLaughlin and Wladyslaw Witalisz) This book presents articles resulting from joint research on the representations of migration conducted in connection with the Erasmus Intensive Programme entitled «Migration and Narration» taught to groups of international students over...

  12. Book Review: MACBETH, Danielle. Realizing Reason: A Narrative of Truth and Knowing. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, 494 pp., $99.00 (hbk, ISBN 9780198704751

    Matheus Valente

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We review Danielle Macbeth's book Realizing Reason, published by Oxford University Press in 2014. This extensive book is composed by nine chapters in which Macbeth critically presents the development of mathematical practices in the Western world - from its founding in Ancient Greece's diagrammatic practices to the apogee of mathematical logic in the nineteenth and twentieth-centuries - while offering a revaluation of its present stage by means of a reconsideration of Gottlob Frege's philosophical contributions. In this review, we present a summary of each chapter's contents and make general considerations about them.

  13. The effect of methylphenidate-OROS® on the narrative ability of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Tessa L. Rausch

    2017-02-01

    Method: In a single group off–on medication test design, narratives were obtained from 12 children with ADHD, aged 7–13 years, using wordless picture books. For microstructure, number of words, type–token ratio and mean length of utterance were derived from narrative samples using Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts conventions. For macrostructure, the narratives were coded according to the Narrative Scoring Scheme, which includes seven narrative characteristics, as well as a composite score reflecting the child’s overall narrative ability. Results: The administration of MPH-OROS® resulted in a significant difference in certain aspects of language macrostructure: cohesion and overall narrative ability. Little effect was noted in microstructure elements. Conclusion: We observed a positive effect of stimulant medication on the macrostructure, but not on the microstructure, of narrative production. Although stimulant medication improves attention and concentration, it does not improve all aspects of language abilities in children with ADHD. Language difficulties associated with ADHD related to language content and use may be more responsive to stimulant medication than language form, which is likely to be affected by cascading effects of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity beginning very early in life and to progress over a more protracted period. Therefore, a combination of treatments is advocated to ensure that children with ADHD are successful in reaching their full potential.

  14. Det narrative og narrative undervisningsformer

    2010-01-01

    I denne power point gennem grundtrækkene i den narrative vending og der kommes med eksempler på narrative undervisningsformer.......I denne power point gennem grundtrækkene i den narrative vending og der kommes med eksempler på narrative undervisningsformer....

  15. Selecting "App"ealing and "App"ropriate Book Apps for Beginning Readers

    Cahill, Maria; McGill-Franzen, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Beginning with a brief rationale for selecting quality digital picture book apps for beginning readers, the authors describe the elements of digital picture books and provide a brief review of the instructional benefits of digital picture book use for beginning readers. They then present a detailed taxonomy for selecting quality picture book apps.…

  16. Picture perfect

    Pless, Mette; Sørensen, Niels Ulrik

    Picture perfect’ – when perfection becomes the new normal This paper draws on perspectives from three different studies. One study, which focuses on youth life and lack of well-being (Sørensen et al 2011), one study on youth life on the margins of society (Katznelson et al 2015) and one study...

  17. Picture Postage

    Osterer, Irv

    2009-01-01

    With the popularity of e-mail cutting into revenues, Canada Post is always searching for a marketing strategy that would encourage people to use the mail. "Picture Postage" is such an initiative. This popular program allows individuals to create their own stamps for family and friends. This opportunity also provides a vehicle for…

  18. Narrative ethics for narrative care.

    Baldwin, Clive

    2015-08-01

    Narrative permeates health care--from patients' stories taken as medical histories to the development of health policy. The narrative approach to health care has involved the move from narratives in health care as objects of study to the lens through which health care is studied and, more recently, to narrative as a form of care. In this paper, I argue that narrative care requires a move in the field of ethics--from a position where narratives are used to inform ethical decision making to one in which narrative is the form and process of ethical decision making. In other words, I argue for a narrative ethics for narrative care. The argument is relatively straightforward. If, as I argue, humans are narrative beings who make sense of themselves, others, and the world in and through narrative, we need to see our actions as both narratively based and narratively contextual and thus understanding the nature, form, and content of the narratives of which we are a part, and the process of narrativity, provides an intersubjective basis for ethical action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pictures of technology

    Huber, J.

    1989-01-01

    The first part of the book describes the development of a polarised spectrum of attitudes towards science and technology over the last two decades. Positivistic attitudes that emerged from the materialistic branch of the period of Enlightenment are shown in contrast to the attitudes that stem from the philosophical line of Rousseau-romanticism-vitalism. The second part of the book presents the results of an empirical study, providing evidence for the existence of the different attitudes towards technology and the environment. The study is based on a representative opinion poll among civil servants, engineering professions, social workers, and artists. Engineers and social workers are shown to represent the two antipodes in terms of the 'dual-culture' theory. In addition, sex-specific and age-specific differences are explained, and the different pictures of technology drawn by personalities characterised by an attitude of active control in contrast to those characterised by an attitude of intuitive faith. (orig.) [de

  20. Considering Fine Art and Picture Books

    Serafini, Frank

    2015-01-01

    There has been a close association between picturebook illustrations and works of fine art since the picturebook was first conceived, and many ways these associations among works of fine art and picturebook illustrations and design play out. To make sense of all the various ways picturebook illustrations are associated with works of fine art,…

  1. Immigrants as Portrayed in Children's Picture Books

    Lamme, Linda Leonard; Fu, Danling; Lowery, Ruth McKoy

    2004-01-01

    America is a nation of immigrants, many of whom came as part of families, who left their home countries for different reasons to settle here. In the late nineteenth century, immigrants came from Northern Europe and then from Southern Europe, but recent immigrants tend to come from Eastern Europe (mostly old Soviet Union countries), Hispanic, and…

  2. Hamsters, Picture Books, and Engineering Design

    Tank, Kristina; Pettis, Christy; Moore, Tamara; Fehr, Abby

    2013-01-01

    With the integration of engineering into science instruction, teachers have been seeking ways to add engineering in their classrooms. This article presents a primary (K-2) STEM unit that took place in a half-day kindergarten classroom as a way to address the scientific and engineering practices (dimension 1, p.41) and the disciplinary core idea…

  3. TREsPASS Book 1: Picturing Risk

    Coles-Kemp, Lizzie; Hall, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Information security threats to organisations have changed immensely over the last decade, due to the complexity and dynamic nature of infrastructure and attacks. Successful attacks cost society billions a year, impacting vital services and the economy. Examples include StuxNet, in which infected

  4. Asthma Picture Book - Why is Coco Orange?

    Coco the chameleon can't change colors, and his asthma is acting up. Read how Coco and his friends at Lizard Lick Elementary solve this mystery as they learn about air quality and how to stay healthy when the air quality is bad.

  5. The book, the stories, the people: an ongoing dialogic narrative inquiry study combining a practice development project. Part 2: the practice development context.

    Grant, A; Biley, F C; Leigh-Phippard, H; Walker, H

    2012-12-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-article practice development report. It builds on the first part by introducing and discussing a Writing for Recovery practice development project, conducted at two UK sites. The paper begins by briefly describing the project within the context of helping mental health users, carers and survivors develop skills in creative writing in order to engage in the process of narrative re-storying in line with preferred identity. A selective overview of broad and focal background literature relevant to the project is then provided in order to position it within a values-based mental health nursing practice. Following this, the specific plan for running the project is briefly summarized, covering actual and anticipated ethical issues. The paper ends with a discussion of dissemination aims. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  6. Religious narrative

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2013-01-01

    Denne artikel er en introduktion til et temanummer i religionslærernes tidsskrift i USA. Den er et udtræk af mit kapitel "Religious Narrative, Cognition and Culture: Approaches and Definitions" udgivet i Religious Narrative, Cognition and Culture: Image and Word in the mind of Narrative, redigeret...

  7. The relationship between mother narrative style and child memory.

    Kayıran, Sinan Mahir; Cure, Sena

    2011-07-26

    The question of whether children and infants have memory capabilities similar to adults has long been of interest. Until recently, it was thought that compared to adults, infants have very limited memory processing abilities. Knowledge about factors affecting a child's memory abilities can help families (specifically mothers) behave in a manner that best benefits their children in language and memory skills. The present study examines one factor that may underlie a child's memory capabilities; namely the mother's narrative style. Convenience sampling was used to select participants. Forty healthy children (mean age of 31.55 months, range 25-37 months) and their mothers were entered into the study. All participants were native Turkish speakers, from similar socioeconomic status backgrounds. Memory was assessed by a modified version of the Magic Shrinking Machine. Narrative style was assessed by the mother "reading" a Frog Story; a picture book with no words in it. Children were then grouped according to their mother's level of narrative style. Children's language skills were measured via the Turkish form of the CDI (Communicative Development Inventory) which was translated to Turkish as TIGE. To explore the relationships between mothers' narrative styles and children's memory and language skills and between children's language skills and memory capabilities, linear regressions were run. There were no significant correlations among any comparisons (P > 0.05). Children's language skills do not improve according to their mothers' narrative styles, and children do not show better memory abilities when mothers use more words and longer sentences. In order to have a better understanding of these relationships, future research that includes several more variables is needed. Child; Mother; Memory; Narrative style.

  8. Animals, Kids & Books: A Guide for Putting Humane Books into the Hands of Children.

    Freedman, Barbara

    This guide for choosing humane children's books (i.e., books in which animals are not eaten, expolited, or treated with cruelty) presents reviews of over 100 books for children up to age 7. Both subtle and blatant examples of animal exploitation portrayed in children's picture books are examined. Reviews are grouped into 3 categories: kind books,…

  9. The book, the stories, the people: an ongoing dialogic narrative inquiry study combining a practice development project. Part 1: the research context.

    Grant, A; Biley, F C; Leigh-Phippard, H; Walker, H

    2012-11-01

    This paper, part one of a two paper report, describes key aspects of the research context of an ongoing practice development project, conducted on two UK sites. The paper begins with a discussion of the project's origins within a community of people working in the recovery paradigm, including the contributory strand of the first author's recovery and survivor writing. The discussion then turns to three inter-related areas within which the research component sits and which provide it with philosophical, theoretical and conceptual coherence. Each area will be unpacked and its significance explained. This will provide a platform for discussing the focus, methodology and methods of the research, and related assumptions governing both data collection and analysis. The paper concludes with a research commitment to a mental health nursing practice allied to recovery as narrative healing. Links are made to the second paper which describes the context and specifics of a Writing for Recovery project for users, survivors and carers. This shares with, and builds on, the overall project's research context and its assumptions. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  10. Animation with concurrent narration versus narration in physical education lesson

    Ioannou Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of two different teaching methods on students' comprehension during Physical Education lesson: narration versus animation with concurrent narration, during teaching shot put event. Thirty primary school children (boys and girls volunteered to participate in this study. In experiment students listened (narration and viewed (animation with narration the presentation of two shot putting styles. A problem-solving and a retention test were used to evaluate students' comprehension. Results showed that students' comprehension was better when shot putting styles were presented through a mixed model (animation and narration group than a single (narration. The animation with concurrent narration group performed better than the narration group, in problem-solving (M = 4.91, SD = 1.36 and in retention test (M = 5.98, SD = 1.28 t(28 = 1.89 p<0.01. An instructional implication is that pictures with words is more effective way of teaching when they occur continuingly in time, than only words during Physical Education lesson.

  11. School Library Journal's Best Books 2008

    Jones, Trevelyn; Toth, Luann; Charnizon, Marlene; Grabarek, Daryl; Fleishhacker, Joy

    2008-01-01

    Of the more than 5000 books reviewed in "School Library Journal's" ("SLJ's") pages in 2008, the 67 books listed in this article stood out as having distinctive voices, singular vision, and/or innovative approaches. They include books for toddlers and preschoolers, terrific picture books and easy readers, and some highly original novels. Fantasy,…

  12. Narrative approaches

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Narrative coaching is representative of the new wave – or third generation – of coaching practice . The theory and practice of narrative coaching takes into account the social and cultural conditions of late modern society, and must be seen as intertwined with them. Some initial conceptualizations...... of narrative coaching were developed by David Drake (2006, 2007, 2008, 2009) in the USA and Australia, by Ho Law in the UK (Law, 2007a + b; Law & Stelter, 2009) and by Reinhard Stelter (2007, 2009, 2012, in preparation; Stelter & Law, 2010) in Denmark. In the following chapter the aim is to present coaching...... as a narrative-collaborative practice, an approach that is based on phenomenology, social constructionism and narrative theory. Seeing narrative coaching as a collaborative practice also leads to reflecting on the relationship between coach and coachee(s) in a new way, where both parts contribute to the dialogue...

  13. Classic Classroom Activities: The Oxford Picture Dictionary Program.

    Weiss, Renee; Adelson-Goldstein, Jayme; Shapiro, Norma

    This teacher resource book offers over 100 reproducible communicative practice activities and 768 picture cards based on the vocabulary of the Oxford Picture Dictionary. Teacher's notes and instructions, including adaptations for multilevel classes, are provided. The activities book has up-to-date art and graphics, explaining over 3700 words. The…

  14. Science Books & Films, Volume XIV, Number 4.

    Finch, Shari, Ed.

    This document contains reviews of books for adults, children's books, and films. The materials are rated for accuracy of scientific information, scope or completeness, clarity of writing or narration, quality of illustrations or cinematic quality, and value of book or film when compared to other titles. Each review is accompanied by a coded…

  15. Project Narrative

    Driscoll, Mary C. [St. Bonaventure University, St Bonaventure, NY(United States)

    2012-07-12

    The Project Narrative describes how the funds from the DOE grant were used to purchase equipment for the biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics departments. The Narrative also describes how the equipment is being used. There is also a list of the positive outcomes as a result of having the equipment that was purchased with the DOE grant.

  16. Narrative udvidelser

    Skøtt, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Dette pilotstudies ambition er at undersøge, hvordan og hvorfor narrative elementer lejlighedsvist aktiveres af aktører i deres kontakt med bibliotekarer i folkebiblioteker. Ved hjælp af en kulturanalytisk tilgang studeres forskellige aktørers narrative udvidelser af referenceinterviewet. Teoretisk....... Pilotstudiet bekræfter de 2 indledende antagelser: 1) at nogle aktører anvender narrative udvidelser, fordi de vælger at betone den mellemmenneskelige relation mellem aktør og bibliotekar, som om det var enhver anden social relation og derved ignorerer andre, mere repræsentative dele af bibliotekarernes...... funktioner. Og 2) at nogle aktører anvender narrative udvidelser i bestræbelserne på at legitimere egne sociale positioner og identitetsdannelse gennem kritisk refleksion over bibliotekarernes og folkebibliotekets institutionelle position og magt. Gennem den narrative udvidelse formår disse aktører...

  17. Book Review: Book review

    Manohar, C. S.

    2015-02-01

    The subject of the theory of vibrations has carried an aesthetic appeal to generations of engineering students for its richness of ideas, and for the intellectual challenges it offers. Also, the diverse range of its applications (covering civil, mechanical, automotive, and aerospace structures) has provided obvious motivations for its study. For most students, the subject provides, perhaps, the first encounter in substantial application of mathematical tools (differential equations, calculus of variations, Fourier/Laplace transforms, and matrix algebra) to engineering problems. The intimate relationship that the subject of mechanics has with mathematics strikes home probably for the first time. While teaching this subject, the instructor is spoilt for choice in selecting a text book and so are the students who wish to pursue a self-study of the subject. Many luminaries in the field have offered their own exposition of the subject: starting from the classics of Rayleigh, Timoshenko, Den Hartog, Bishop and Johnson, and the works of more recent vintage (e.g., the books by Meirovich, Clough, and Penzien, and works with computational flavour, such as, those by Bathe and Petyt), several works easily come to one's mind. Given this milieu, it requires a distinctive conviction to write a new book on this subject. And, here we have a book, written by a practitioner, which aims to deal with fundamental aspects of vibrations of engineering systems. The scepticism that this reviewer had on the need for having one more such book vanished as he browsed through the book and read selectively a few sections. The author's gift for elegant explanations is immediately noticeable even in such a preliminary reading. After a more careful reading, the reviewer has found this book to be insightful and he considers the book to be a welcome addition to the family of books on vibration engineering. The author has struck a fine balance between physical explanations, mathematical niceties

  18. Story and Discourse: Narrative Structure in Fiction and Film.

    Chatman, Seymour

    The purpose of this book is to provide a reasoned account of narrative structure, the elements of storytelling, and their combination and articulation. As explained in the introductory chapter, the "what" of narrative is the story, its events (actions, happenings) and existents (characters and settings); the "way" of narrative is discourse, or…

  19. Dimensions of Counter-Narratives

    2019-01-01

    The book welcomes proposals for chapter contributions on a wide array of topics related to the narratological notion of counter-narratives. By way of example, the topic has hitherto been treated by disciplines and subjects such as literature studies, organization studies, corporate communication...

  20. Peak Oil and the Everyday Complexity of Human Progress Narratives

    John C. Pruit

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The “big” story of human progress has polarizing tendencies featuring the binary options of progress or decline. I consider human progress narratives in the context of everyday life. Analysis of the “little” stories from two narrative environments focusing on peak oil offers a more complex picture of the meaning and contours of the narrative. I consider the impact of differential blog site commitments to peak oil perspectives and identify five narrative types culled from two narrative dimensions. I argue that the lived experience complicates human progress narratives, which is no longer an either/or proposition.

  1. Narrative interviewing.

    Anderson, Claire; Kirkpatrick, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Narrative interviews place the people being interviewed at the heart of a research study. They are a means of collecting people's own stories about their experiences of health and illness. Narrative interviews can help researchers to better understand people's experiences and behaviours. Narratives may come closer to representing the context and integrity of people's lives than more quantitative means of research. Methodology Researchers using narrative interview techniques do not set out with a fixed agenda, rather they tend to let the interviewee control the direction, content and pace of the interview. The paper describes the interview process and the suggested approach to analysis of narrative interviews, We draw on the example from a study that used series of narrative interviews about people's experiences of taking antidepressants. Limitations Some people may find it particularly challenging to tell their story to a researcher in this way rather than be asked a series of questions like in a television or radio interview. Narrative research like all qualitative research does not set out to be generalisable and may only involve a small set of interviews.

  2. Children’s Books as Pedagogical Tools to Minimize Latrophobia

    Motz Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Latrophobia, defined as the morbid and irrational fear of doctors or hospitals, makes medical or hospital visits extremely challenging for those who suffer from it. For many people, the cause of Latrophobia or its milder forms, including dislike and anxiety, is often rooted in childhood. Therefore, a large number of children's books deal with and illustrate the topic of a “doctor’s visit”, in order to reduce the anxiety through pedagogical methods combined in the narrative. The aim of the study is to investigate the extent to which selected children's books highlight latrophobia and try to reduce it by educational means. One focus is an analysis and an evaluation of the individual works combined with a comparison of the different methods of individual books. The main aim is to prove that children’s books can have the capability to reduce latrophobia. Materials and methods. The research examines 10 international children’s books dealing with doctor (dental visits. A field test covering 63 children (21 with potential latrophobia provides information for pedagogical values within these books. Furthermore, a subjective assessment combined with the ongoing survey filters (unvaluable methods and approaches. Results. More than half of the 21 children showed improved results concerning their feeling of being afraid before and after reading the book(s. Nevertheless, the assessment of the books showed that there are strong differences concerning the approach of “anxiety”. The methods used in the stories to reduce anxiety are numerous, debatable (in terms of success, and even frightening (from the perspective of child readers. The pictures and the atmosphere of the story can be pointed out as major factors for pedagogically valuable content. Conclusions. Although a major part of the examined books leveraged to reduce latrophobia, there are also some books which showed no or even worse effect. Due to the depicted representations of anxiety in

  3. Connecting Readers and Writers with Books: Weaving Literature into the School Community.

    Harwayne, Shelley; Mandel, Amy; Mayer, Pam; Rhodes, Roberta Pantal; Siegman, Lisa; Werner, Pat

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the best books will inspire children to pause and think deeply about their own lives and lives of others. Offers brief descriptions of 37 books for children and young readers, including: picture books that promote rich classroom conversations; poetry collections; books to grow up on; picture books for the youngest students; historical…

  4. Do Illustrations Enhance Preschoolers' Memories for Stories? Age-Related Change in the Picture Facilitation Effect

    Greenhoot, Andrea Follmer; Semb, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether illustrations facilitate story recall in preschoolers (N = 58) 46 to 63 months of age. Each child was exposed to either a verbal story narrative with illustrations (Verbal and Picture condition), the narrative alone (Verbal Only condition), the narrative with uninformative illustrations (Verbal and Irrelevant…

  5. Narrative konstruktioner

    Kristiansen, Claus Krogholm

    The dissertation deals with narrative as a cognitive structure - as a way of handling experience in the modern world. The question is: What is man when he is not created in god's image. Some recent scandinavian novels are analysed as examples.......The dissertation deals with narrative as a cognitive structure - as a way of handling experience in the modern world. The question is: What is man when he is not created in god's image. Some recent scandinavian novels are analysed as examples....

  6. The Appearance of Gender in Award-Winning Children's Books.

    Creany, Anne Drolett

    The likelihood that books can shape children's gender role attitudes and transmit gender role stereotypes increases the need for non-sexist children's literature. This paper explores the appearance of gender in Caldecott Award winning children's books. Picture books, trade books, content books and basal readers were inspected in the 1970s for the…

  7. Books Received

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Books Received. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 118-118 Books Received. Books Received · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 120-120 Books Received. Books Received.

  8. Trace of nuclear energy with pictures

    1992-05-01

    This book traces the history of development over nuclear energy with pictures, which contains preface, development history of the world, development history of Korea, nuclear power plant in Kori, nuclear power plant in Wolseong, nuclear power plant in Yeonggwang, nuclear power plant in Uljin, nuclear fuel, using of radiation and radioactive isotope, development of nuclear energy in the world and a Chronological table of nuclear energy. This book is written to record the development history of Korea through pictures of the nuclear power plants in Korea.

  9. Book Review: Book review

    Wang, Christina Yan

    2017-02-01

    The world class Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide deposits associated with the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC) are quite unique on earth in the sense that the energy source and origin were triggered by a large meteorite impact event. The ore deposits in the SIC make up one of the largest Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide deposit camps in the world and have now been mined for over 100 years. This is the first complete reference book that focuses entirely on the SIC and covers the fields of economic geology, petrology, geochemistry and geophysics. The purpose of this book is to explore the linkage between sulfide and silicate magmas generated by the 1.85 Ga Sudbury impact event and to unite an understanding of the process of crustal melt sheet evolution with the formation of the magmatic sulfide mineralization. The author, Peter Lightfoot, has been based in Sudbury for 25 years. As a top scientist on magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide deposits and a Chief Geologist with the Brownfield Exploration group at Vale Base Metals, Peter has been positioned to develop and assemble the ideas presented in this book, which are perfectly balanced between industry and academia.

  10. Book Review: Book review

    Wegener, Daan

    Writing a biography of a complex personality and mastermind like Albert Einstein is a daunting task for any historian of science. Yet the sheer temptation of writing his biography has apparently helped to overcome scholarly scruples, as biographies of Einstein have appeared quite regularly on the market. One of them is Einstein: his Life and Universe by journalist Walter Isaacson. It is a best-seller, which is one of the reasons the book deserves a critical evaluation. Isaacson is a man of considerable repute: he has been the chairman of CNN and managing editor of Time magazine. Isaacson's Einstein is written in a style that is accessible to a wide audience. Scholars who are already familiar with Einstein's physics may still enjoy the parts of the book that deal with the relation between Einstein and the press. Indeed, the breadth of its scope is the book's major merit, as it connects the personal, scientific, public and political dimensions of Einstein's life. In this review, I discuss Isaacson's treatment of these dimensions one-by-one.

  11. Book Review: Book review

    Martínez, Alberto A.

    The title Einstein's Generation immediately suggests names such as Ehrenfest, Ritz, Kaufmann, Born, Laue, and Laub. Staley's book discusses these individuals, but it actually has a broader scope. Both the title and the subtitle are not quite appropriate. A much more fitting title would be Michelson, Electrons, and the Rise of "Modern" Physics. The emphasis on Albert Michelson is evident in the Index: almost four columns on him, compared to just one and a half on Einstein. Likewise, "Einstein's generation" includes, for Staley, many other physicists who were quite older than Einstein, such as Lorentz, Planck, Poincaré, and Minkowski. The book exhibits a composite character because it includes and expands upon four articles that Staley had published earlier on Michelson, relativity, and the co-creation of modern and classical physics. Hence the book is partly a bridging work; it ambitiously connects areas in the history of physics, from the 1880s until 1911. Staley identifies how diverse interests produced crossfertilization, and how various disciplinary boundaries were crossed. He wants to discuss material culture, experiment, and theory, all on the same footing. Every page of the introduction seems to quadruple the scope; he writes about individuals and communities, consolidation and diversification, power and weakness, memory and neglect, the cultural and the material, the classical and the modern, and the absolute and the relative.

  12. Internal State Language in the Storybook Narratives of Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder: Investigating Relations to Theory of Mind Abilities.

    Siller, Michael; Swanson, Meghan R; Serlin, Gayle; George, Ann

    2014-05-01

    The current study examines narratives elicited using a wordless picture book, focusing on language used to describe the characters' thoughts and emotions (i.e., internal state language, ISL). The sample includes 21 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and 24 typically developing controls, matched on children's gender, IQ, as well as receptive and expressive vocabulary. This research had three major findings. First, despite equivalent performance on standardized language assessments, the volume of children's narratives (i.e., the number of utterances and words, the range of unique verbs and adjectives) was lower in children with ASD than in typically developing controls. Second, after controlling for narrative volume, the narratives of children with ASD were less likely to reference the characters' emotions than was the case for typically developing controls. Finally, our results revealed a specific association between children's use of emotion terms and their performance on a battery of experimental tasks evaluating children's Theory of Mind abilities. Implications for our understanding of narrative deficits in ASD as well as interventions that use narrative as a context for improving social comprehension are discussed.

  13. Narrative Absence

    Kaur, Ravinder

    2008-01-01

    examples of successful refugee resettlement and national self-assertion. Within the master narrative of Partition migration history, however, the experiences of forced movement and resettlement suffered by the ‘Untouchables' are obscured. Popular accounts of violence, forced movement and suffering...

  14. Narrative coaching

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    is presented to give a concrete example of this narrative, community psychological oriented intervention, a process which helps people to develop a sense of personal or cultural identity and an understanding of their doing as being in correspondence with their values and intentions. The overarching focus...

  15. Book Review: Book review

    da Costa, Newton C. A.; Krause, Décio

    This book contains a representative selection of Erhard Scheibe's writings on the philosophy of physics. It encompasses eight sections, with 38 papers, distributed as follows: (I) Between Rationalism and Empiricism (five papers from 1969 to 1994); (II) The Philosophy of the Physicists (five papers from 1988 to 1995); (III) Reconstruction (four papers, from 1979 to 1988); (IV) Laws of Nature (five papers, from 1989 to 1998); (V) Reduction (five papers from 1973 to 1995); (VI) Foundations of Quantum Mechanics (six papers from 1985 to 1993); (VII) Spacetime, Invariance, Covariance (four papers from 1982 to 1994), and (VIII) Mathematics and Physics (four papers from 1977 to 1997).

  16. A picture dictionary of electric glossary

    NONE

    1974-01-15

    This book has a lot of explanations on electric glossary with picture, which include basic important glossaries like nuclear, current theory, measuring, electro genesis, power transmission, supply of electric power, a rotary machine, application of electromotive force, electronic engineering, automatic control, electronic calculator, T.V and communication, material of electricity, electrochemistry, traffic, electric work, lighting and electric heater, regulations and standard.

  17. A picture dictionary of electric glossary

    1974-01-01

    This book has a lot of explanations on electric glossary with picture, which include basic important glossaries like nuclear, current theory, measuring, electro genesis, power transmission, supply of electric power, a rotary machine, application of electromotive force, electronic engineering, automatic control, electronic calculator, T.V and communication, material of electricity, electrochemistry, traffic, electric work, lighting and electric heater, regulations and standard.

  18. Book Review:

    Borcherds, P.

    2005-03-01

    superb quotations to include all of them in this review, but one of Bragg's Golden Rules for newcomers to his laboratory should be on the door of every experimental laboratory: 'Never be afraid to carry on an experiment which is declared stupid by the theorists [sic] of the laboratory'. This book is, as its subtitle implies, about Bragg and about his science. Hunter has skilfully and seamlessly interwoven the two strands. At one minute you are reading about the man and at the next you realize you are reading about the science. In writing about the science, Hunter writes knowledgeably and expects the reader to make an effort to understand. In this he is following the precept of Bragg who, when advised to avoid technical terms when lecturing to a lay audience, ridiculed this attitude with a telling metaphor: 'What could be more technical than a description of a football match? To picture the scientist's plight, one must imagine the sports expert being told to describe the match using as little as possible such terms as "ball'' or "goal'', and of course avoiding the very complex ideas involved in "try'' or "offside'' '. Bragg made several major contributions to crystallography and these are described, as already mentioned. One has to concentrate quite hard to follow but the effort is worthwhile and Hunter manages not only to convey the excitement felt by Bragg and his colleagues but also to let the reader feel it too. Bragg interacted strongly with other crystallographers, not least with his father, but also with Pauling. At times there was a close race between Bragg and Pauling, which is fully discussed. Bragg succeeded Rutherford at Cambridge. The appointment was controversial. Under Rutherford the Cavendish Laboratory concentrated on nuclear physics, while Bragg was a crystallographer, with little interest in nuclear physics. However the crystallographic work Bragg encouraged on haemoglobin and DNA led to several Nobel prizes. Bragg's activities in canvassing for Nobel

  19. Ekphrasis as Experiential Narrative: The Case of Virgil’s Aeneid

    Marko Marinčič

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In most interpretations of Virgil’s Aeneid inspired by structuralist theory (and by the New Criticism in the anglophone world, the scholarly reader/interpreter sees himself confronted with the text as a self-sufficient cryptic system to be deciphered. As typical examples of “narrative pause”, descriptions of works of art are often seen as interpretive clues revealing the deeper meaning of the narrative. Even in cases of ekphrases that are not only focalised by a character, but explicitly narrated through his eyes, the response of the character is often superseded by the zeal of the interpreter in a search for the hidden meanings of what is described. A good example is Aeneas’ emotional response to the pictures in Juno’s temple at Carthage (1.453–495, which the hero reads as an expression of universal compassion. According to a number of recent interpretations, Aeneas the “ekphrast” is victim of a fatal delusion, as he is unaware of the fact that the temple is dedicated to his enemy Juno, and that the Fall of Troy is represented on the murals as a triumph of the goddess; the real meaning of the depiction is to be revealed in the Punic Wars. Yet those future events are external to the narrative of the Aeneid: except for Dido’s prophecy of the birth of the avenger Hannibal, they do not play a role in the narrative. This paper suggests that Aeneas is not only meant to be autonomous as the focaliser of the pictures, but that a number of intratextual links to this ekphrasis later in the poem have a clear psychological logic. The description is mediated through the personal experience of the character, the retrospective narrative in Book 2 reveals the motives for his response to the images, and the meeting with Dido in the Underworld recalls, through a character-focalised citation, Aeneas’ experience in front of the pictures in the temple of Juno.

  20. Cosmopolitan Narratives

    Bondebjerg, Ib

    universal dimensions of human life and cultural differences in a more and more mediatized global media culture. How do individuals and groups imagine each other in this new, global media culture, in what Appadurai (1996) has called a new post-national political world with an emerging diasporic public sphere......Cosmopolitan Narratives: Documentary Perspectives on Afghanistan Cosmopolitanism is a concept discussed in relation to globalization in contemporary societies by sociologists, anthropologists and media scholars (Beck 2006, Delanty 2006, Appadurai 1996). The concept indicates the dialectic between...... close others in our everyday life. But the media play an increasingly strong and important role in developing a cosmopolitan imaginary through narratives that bring us closer to the various distant, global others. Through migration those earlier distant others are also more and more mixed in our daily...

  1. Preliminary norms in the selection of children's books for translation ...

    This paper presents the results of a macrotextual and paratextual analysis of a sample of 42 English and Afrikaans children's books (21 source texts and their translations). The sample consists of books for the age group six to 12, and includes readers and picture books, and books of South African as well as international ...

  2. Book Review:

    Barbour, J. B.

    2007-02-01

    These colloquium proceedings will be valuable, the blurb says, for graduate students and researchers in cosmology and theoretical astrophysics. Specifically, the book 'looks at both the strengths and weaknesses of the current big bang model in explaining certain puzzling data' and gives a 'comprehensive coverage of the expanding field of cosmology'. The reality is rather different. Conference proceedings rarely compare in value with a solid monograph or good review articles, and Current Issues in Cosmology is no exception. The colloquium was convened by the two editors, who have both long harboured doubts about the big bang, and was held in Paris in June 2004. The proceedings contain 19 presented papers and relatively brief summary comments by four panel speakers. The questions and answers at the end of each talk and a general discussion at the end were recorded and transcribed but contain little of interest. The nature of the colloquium is indicated by panellist Francesco Bertola's comment: 'While in the 1950s it was possible to speak of rival theories in cosmology, now the big-bang picture has no strong rivals. This is confirmed by the fact that out of 1500 members of the IAU Division VIII (Galaxies and the Universe) only a dozen, although bright people, devote their time to the heterodox views.' This was largely a platform for them to give their views. At least half of the dozen, all the 'usual suspects', were present: Geoffery and Margaret Burbidge, Jayant Narlikar, Halton Arp, Chandra Wickramasinghe and, in spirit only but playing a role somewhat like the ghost of Hamlet's father, the late Fred Hoyle. Doubters presented 12 of the 19 papers. Orthodoxy should certainly be challenged and the sociology of science questioned, but I found two main problems with this book. The papers putting the orthodox view are too short, even perfunctory. The most that a serious graduate student would get out of them is a reference to a far better review article or book on modern

  3. Associations From Pictures.

    Pettersson, Rune

    A picture can be interpreted in different ways by various persons. There is often a difference between a picture's denotation (literal meaning), connotation (associative meaning), and private associations. Two studies were conducted in order to observe the private associations that pictures awaken in people. One study deals with associations made…

  4. Interactive digital narrative history, theory and practice

    Koenitz, Hartmut; Haahr, Mads; Sezen, Digdem; Sezen, Tonguç Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The book is concerned with narrative in digital media that changes according to user input-Interactive Digital Narrative (IDN). It provides a broad overview of current issues and future directions in this multi-disciplinary field that includes humanities-based and computational perspectives. It assembles the voices of leading researchers and practitioners like Janet Murray, Marie-Laure Ryan, Scott Rettberg and Martin Rieser. In three sections, it covers history, theoretical perspectives and varieties of practice including narrative game design, with a special focus on changes in the power rela

  5. moriam Books

    This slim, plastic covered, 'pocket' book comprises a total of 144 pages. It is written in text book form with a user- friendly indexing system. The book has a number of special features: • It is brief, contains core material, yet does not omit discussion on problems of definition and classification. • It straddles both ICD 10 and DSM ...

  6. The Contribution of Executive Functions to Narrative Writing in Fourth Grade Children

    Drijbooms, Elise; Groen, Margriet A.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the contribution of executive functions to narrative writing in fourth grade children, and evaluated to what extent executive functions contribute differentially to different levels of narrative composition. The written skills of 102 Dutch children in fourth grade were assessed using a narrative picture-elicitation…

  7. Highcrop picture tool

    Fog, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Pictures give other impulses than words and numbers. With images, you can easily spot new opportunities. The Highcrop-tool allows for optimization of the organic arable farm based on picture-cards. The picture-cards are designed to make it easier and more inspiring to go close to the details of production. By using the picture-cards you can spot the areas, where there is a possibility to optimize the production system for better results in the future. Highcrop picture cards can be used to:...

  8. Ubiquitous picture-rich content representation

    Wang, Wiley; Dean, Jennifer; Muzzolini, Russ

    2010-02-01

    The amount of digital images taken by the average consumer is consistently increasing. People enjoy the convenience of storing and sharing their pictures through online (digital) and offline (traditional) media. A set of pictures can be uploaded to: online photo services, web blogs and social network websites. Alternatively, these images can be used to generate: prints, cards, photo books or other photo products. Through uploading and sharing, images are easily transferred from one format to another. And often, a different set of associated content (text, tags) is created across formats. For example, on his web blog, a user may journal his experiences of his recent travel; on his social network website, his friends tag and comment on the pictures; in his online photo album, some pictures are titled and keyword-tagged. When the user wants to tell a complete story, perhaps in a photo book, he must collect, across all formats: the pictures, writings and comments, etc. and organize them in a book format. The user has to arrange the content of his trip in each format. The arrangement, the associations between the images, tags, keywords and text, cannot be shared with other formats. In this paper, we propose a system that allows the content to be easily created and shared across various digital media formats. We define a uniformed data association structure to connect: images, documents, comments, tags, keywords and other data. This content structure allows the user to switch representation formats without reediting. The framework under each format can emphasize (display or hide) content elements based on preference. For example, a slide show view will emphasize the display of pictures with limited text; a blog view will display highlighted images and journal text; and the photo book will try to fit in all images and text content. In this paper, we will discuss the strategy to associate pictures with text content, so that it can naturally tell a story. We will also list

  9. The Power of Pictures : Vertical Picture Angles in Power Pictures

    Giessner, Steffen R.; Ryan, Michelle K.; Schubert, Thomas W.; van Quaquebeke, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that variations in vertical picture angle cause the subject to appear more powerful when depicted from below and less powerful when depicted from above. However, do the media actually use such associations to represent individual differences in power? We argue that the

  10. The power of pictures: Vertical picture angles in power pictures

    S.R. Giessner (Steffen); M.K. Ryan (Michelle); T.W. Schubert (Thomas); N. van Quaquebeke (Niels)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Conventional wisdom suggests that variations in vertical picture angle cause the subject to appear more powerful when depicted from below and less powerful when depicted from above. However, do the media actually use such associations to represent individual differences in

  11. Kids Writing Comic Books: Lessons from the Professionals.

    Chilcoat, George W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Provides tips for comic book writing that have been gathered from actual comic book authors and can be used in minilessons for writing workshops in the classroom. Focuses on five specific components of comic book writing: plot development, layout, drawing, narration, and the cover page. (MG)

  12. Book review

    mother's reaction on seeing the police with her handcuffed son, his ... intensification of the campaign for his release by international professional .... mystery. Mapanje's narrative style, especially his use of the present tense, his poetic language ...

  13. Reformed Narration

    Roesen, Tine

    2008-01-01

    thought. Furthermore, it is argued that a central role in the structuring of this mental text is played by an overwhelming amount of brackets. The article suggests a categorisation of the different types of parenthetic remarks in the novel according to their function in the textual, would-be narrative...... construct, and concludes that Makanin's use of brackets in Andegraund, the most extensive use in his oeuvre so far, is crucial to the extreme processuality of the novel's text and its paradoxical, solipsistic addressivity. Udgivelsesdato: October...

  14. Exploring Children's Picture Storybooks with Adult and Adolescent EFL Learners

    Malu, Kathleen F.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical framework to support the use of children's picture storybooks in teaching EFL to adults and adolescents. The author presents ways to use these books, addresses the twin goals of teaching mechanics and culture, and includes a list of books and a wide variety of activities that EFL teachers can use to effectively…

  15. Metaphor in pictures.

    Kennedy, J M

    1982-01-01

    Pictures can be literal or metaphoric. Metaphoric pictures involve intended violations of standard modes of depiction that are universally recognizable. The types of metaphoric pictures correspond to major groups of verbal metaphors, with the addition of a class of pictorial runes. Often the correspondence between verbal and pictorial metaphors depends on individual features of objects and such physical parameters as change of scale. A more sophisticated analysis is required for some pictorial metaphors, involving juxtapositions of well-known objects and indirect reference.

  16. Automated Selection Of Pictures In Sequences

    Rorvig, Mark E.; Shelton, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    Method of automated selection of film or video motion-picture frames for storage or examination developed. Beneficial in situations in which quantity of visual information available exceeds amount stored or examined by humans in reasonable amount of time, and/or necessary to reduce large number of motion-picture frames to few conveying significantly different information in manner intermediate between movie and comic book or storyboard. For example, computerized vision system monitoring industrial process programmed to sound alarm when changes in scene exceed normal limits.

  17. Narratives in Two Languages: Storytelling of Bilingual Cantonese-English Preschoolers.

    Rezzonico, Stefano; Goldberg, Ahuva; Mak, Katy Ka-Yan; Yap, Stephanie; Milburn, Trelani; Belletti, Adriana; Girolametto, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare narratives generated by 4-year-old and 5-year-old children who were bilingual in English and Cantonese. The sample included 47 children (23 who were 4 years old and 24 who were 5 years old) living in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, who spoke both Cantonese and English. The participants spoke and heard predominantly Cantonese in the home. Participants generated a story in English and Cantonese by using a wordless picture book; language order was counterbalanced. Data were transcribed and coded for story grammar, morphosyntactic quality, mean length of utterance in words, and the number of different words. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed higher story grammar scores in English than in Cantonese, but no other significant main effects of language were observed. Analyses also revealed that older children had higher story grammar, mean length of utterance in words, and morphosyntactic quality scores than younger children in both languages. Hierarchical regressions indicated that Cantonese story grammar predicted English story grammar and Cantonese microstructure predicted English microstructure. However, no correlation was observed between Cantonese and English morphosyntactic quality. The results of this study have implications for speech-language pathologists who collect narratives in Cantonese and English from bilingual preschoolers. The results suggest that there is a possible transfer in narrative abilities between the two languages.

  18. Lesson 6. Picture unsharpness

    Chikirdin, Eh.G.

    1999-01-01

    Lecture concerning the picture sharpness in biomedical radiography is presented. Notion of picture sharpness and visual acuity as an analyser of picture sharpness is specified. Attention is paid to the POX-curve as a statistical method for assessment of visual acuity. Conceptions of the sensitivity of using X-ray image visualization system together with specificity and accuracy are considered. Among indices of sharp parameters of visualization system the resolution, resolving power, picture unsharpness are discussed. It is shown that gradation and sharp characteristics of the image closely correlate that need an attention in practice to factors determining them [ru

  19. BOOK REVIEWS BOEKRESE ISlES

    colour-picture ever must be that of Lactrodactu mactans (black widow spider); incidentally the button pider is mi ing. Altogether this book must be considered one of the best general text-books of medicine. It is of particular use to student, and for the most part the articles can be recommended as being highly authoritative. P.l..

  20. Teaching with Children's Books: The "Wow" Factor

    Von Drasek, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    No classroom teacher needs convincing of the benefits of using children's picture books in his or her math program. As Marilyn Burns, the creator and founder of Math Solutions Professional Development, and the author of "The Greedy Triangle" (Scholastic, 1996), says, "Evidence shows that teaching math through children's books motivates children to…

  1. Architectural Narratives

    Kiib, Hans

    2010-01-01

    a functional framework for these concepts, but tries increasingly to endow the main idea of the cultural project with a spatially aesthetic expression - a shift towards “experience architecture.” A great number of these projects typically recycle and reinterpret narratives related to historical buildings......In this essay, I focus on the combination of programs and the architecture of cultural projects that have emerged within the last few years. These projects are characterized as “hybrid cultural projects,” because they intend to combine experience with entertainment, play, and learning. This essay...... and architectural heritage; another group tries to embed new performative technologies in expressive architectural representation. Finally, this essay provides a theoretical framework for the analysis of the political rationales of these projects and for the architectural representation bridges the gap between...

  2. Narrative Therapies with Children and Adolescents.

    Smith, Craig, Ed.; Nylund, David, Ed.

    Through transcripts and case examples this book explores how drama, art, play, and humor can be used to engage children of different ages in therapy and to honor their idiosyncratic language, knowledge, and perspectives. Chapters are: (1) "Introduction: Comparing Traditional Therapies with Narrative Approaches" (C. Smith); (2) "'I…

  3. Texts, Transmissions, Receptions. Modern Approaches to Narratives

    Lardinois, A.P.M.H.; Levie, S.A.; Hoeken, H.; Lüthy, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    The papers collected in this volume study the function and meaning of narrative texts from a variety of perspectives. The word 'text' is used here in the broadest sense of the term: it denotes literary books, but also oral tales, speeches, newspaper articles and comics. One of the purposes of this

  4. Improved Vocabulary Production after Naming Therapy in Aphasia: Can Gains in Picture Naming Generalise to Connected Speech?

    Conroy, Paul; Sage, Karen; Ralph, Matt Lambon

    2009-01-01

    Background: Naming accuracy for nouns and verbs in aphasia can vary across different elicitation contexts, for example, simple picture naming, composite picture description, narratives, and conversation. For some people with aphasia, naming may be more accurate to simple pictures as opposed to naming in spontaneous, connected speech; for others,…

  5. TEACHING AND TRAINING WITH MOTION PICTURES (MAGNETIC SOUND).

    Bell and Howell Co., Lincolnwood, IL.

    THE PREPARATION OF A MAGNETIC-SOUND TRACK FOR 16 MM. MOTION PICTURE FILMS IS DESCRIBED. IN SCRIPT PREPARATION, THE SCRIPT SHOULD BE WRITTEN IN NARRATIVE FORM TO INCLUDE ALL SHOTS NEEDED AND TO SUPPLEMENT AND GIVE INFORMATION NOT IN THE FILM. LANGUAGE SHOULD BE KEPT SIMPLE, AND UNAVOIDABLE TECHNICAL TERMS SHOULD BE EXPLAINED. IN REWRITING THE…

  6. Stories of Smartness and Whiteness in School Pictures and Yearbooks

    Bybee, Eric Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the way that discourses of smartness and whiteness are produced and reproduced in schooling. Using an approach grounded in narrative research, I explore the convergences and contradictions between my own educational autobiography and the representations of schooling found in my school pictures and yearbooks. In my analysis, I…

  7. Pictures in Training

    Miller, Elmo E.

    1973-01-01

    Pictures definitely seem to help training, but a study for the military finds these pictures need not be in moving form, such as films or videotape. Just how the pictorial techniques should be employed and with how much success depends on individual trainee and program differences. (KP)

  8. book reviews

    book reviews. Self-testing in ... This book is a useful tool for registrar trainees and practising psy- chiatrists alike. ... sultation service and is a Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard. Medical ... It is recommended as a study aid and provides the ideal ...

  9. Book Review

    user

    2004-12-02

    Dec 2, 2004 ... Book Review. World Health Organization 2003. Price Not Available. ISBN 9241545755. This is a paperback book updating three earlier WHO publications namely: • General Surgery at the District Hospital,. • Surgery at the District Hospital,. • Obstetric/Gynecology, Orthopedics/Traumatology, and Anesthesia ...

  10. Book Reviews.

    Powicke, J. C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews of 10 recent books and one new journal ("Catalyst: A Journal of Policy Debate") are provided. Topics of the books reviewed include: economics in modern Britain, world economics, the mixed economy, Milton Friedman's thought, British industry, economic issues, and London as a financial center. (JDH)

  11. Book Review

    Adrian Brown

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phillip M. Morse and Herman Feshbach, Professors of Physics at the MIT, published their biblical-sized textbook ‘Methods of Theoretical Physics’ with McGraw-Hill in May 1953. At 1978 pages and published in two books, it is an intimidating twin tome that should still be atop the reading lists or the bookshelves of every mathematical physicist. What material is covered in this book? In the most concise of terms, this book is devoted to the study of differential equations and associated boundary conditions that describe physical fields. The thirteen chapters address what circumstances warrant the use of which differential equations, and most often addresses the question of coordinate system transformations, for example, how do Green's functions for Laplace's Equation transform under different coordinate systems? Under what circumstances the solutions can be expected to be separable? Many examples are covered to illustrate these points. Why is this book relevant to Software Programmers? This book is part of the background that any scientific programmer is likely to need in dealing with physical fields. This book was written before personal computers became ubiquitous, however it is still an outstanding effort to tie the methods of solving differential equations governing fields together in one book. The book never received a second edition, however, it was reprinted to an outstanding standard by Feshbach Publishing since 2004, run by the children of Herman Feshbach. Their website is feshbachpublishing.com. The majority of this review is a mini-commentary of the book showing what is covered in a very terse fashion, which may be useful as a summary even for those who have already read the full text. I then give a brief analysis of the approach to mathematical physics taken by the book. Finally, I will discuss who will benefit from reading this magnificent treatise, nearly 60 years after it was first published.

  12. Nye narrative gleder?

    Bondebjerg, Ib

    2008-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Anne Mangen: New Narrative Pleasures? A Cognitive-Phenomenological Study of the Experience of Reading Digital Narrative Fictions.......Anmeldelse af Anne Mangen: New Narrative Pleasures? A Cognitive-Phenomenological Study of the Experience of Reading Digital Narrative Fictions....

  13. Book Reviews

    Redactie KITLV

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available -Stephen J. Appold, Heidi Dahles ,Tourism and small entrepreneurs; Development, national policy, and entrepreneurial culture: Indonesian cases. Elmsford, New York: Cognizant Communication Corporation, 1999, vi + 165 pp., Karin Bras (eds -Jean-Pascal Bassino, Peter Boothroyd ,Socioeconomic renovation in Vietnam; The origin, evolution and impact of Doi Moi. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2001, xv + 175 pp., Pham Xuan Nam (eds -Peter Boomgaard, Patrick Vinton Kirch, The wet and the dry; Irrigation and agricultural intensification in Polynesia. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1994, xxii + 385 pp. -A.Th. Boone, Chr.G.F. de Jong, De Gereformeerde Zending in Midden-Java 1931-1975; Een bronnenpublicatie. Zoetermeer: Boekencentrum, 1997, xxiv + 890 pp. [Uitgaven van de Werkgroep voor de Geschiedenis van de Nederlandse Zending en Overzeese Kerken, Grote Reeks 6.] -Okke Braadbaart, Colin Barlow, Institutions and economic change in Southeast Asia; The context of development from the 1960s to the 1990s. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, xi + 204 pp. -Freek Colombijn, Abidin Kusno, Behind the postcolonial; Architecture, urban space, and political cultures in Indonesia. London: Routledge, 2000, xiv + 250 pp. -Raymond Corbey, Michael O'Hanlon ,Hunting the gatherers; Ethnographic collectors, agents and agency in Melanesia, 1870s -1930s. Oxford: Bergahn Books, 2000, xviii + 286 pp. [Methodology and History in Anthropology 6.], Robert L. Welsch (eds -Olga Deshpande, Hans Penth, A brief histroy of Lan Na; Civilizations of North Thailand. Chiang Mai: Silkworm Books, 2000, v + 74 pp. -Aone van Engelenhoven, I Ketut Artawa, Ergativity and Balinese syntax. Jakarta: Badan Penyelenggaran Seri NUSA, Universitas Katolik Indonesia Atma Jaya, 1998, v + 169 pp (in 3 volumes. [NUSA Linguistic Studies of Indonesian and Other Languages in Indonesia 42, 43, 44.] -Rens Heringa, Jill Forshee, Between the folds; Stories of cloth, lives, and travels from Sumba

  14. Becoming Trivial: The Book Trailer

    Kati Voigt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the introduction of audiobooks and e-books, printed stories still are in high demand. However, in a globalized world which is more and more ruled by mass media and technology, it is increasingly difficult for writers and publishers to promote their books. The solution is almost ironic: popular media, which is assumed to decrease readership, is turned into a tool to increase the number of readers. In 2002 the book trailer emerged as a new web-based marketing strategy for the launch of new books. Since then the appearance of the book trailer has changed considerably. The article examines specific examples and highlights methods that establish the relationship between the content of the book and its representation in the book trailer. Although guidelines apply for the production of book trailers, such as constraints relating to time and content, there are no limitations for the imagination of the producers. A book trailer may be simple, supported only by music and pictures, but they may also be as complex as short films. Additionally, book trailers are not limited to the promotion of one specific genre or age group. Depending on the viral potential of social networks such as YouTube, Facebook, and Tumblr book trailers reach a global audience and, therefore, open up new markets. It can be argued, while book trailers have not yet reached the realm of the everyday, they will gradually come to the attention of academics and this article wants to present a starting point for this development.

  15. BOOK MANAGERS CHOICE BOOKS RECEIVED

    The receipt of these books is acknowledged, and this listing must be regarded as sufficient return for the courtesy of the sender. Books that appear to be of particular interest will be reviewed as space permits. The SAMJ does not publish unsolicited reviews. ABO-incompatible Kidney Transplantation... By Kota. Takahashi.

  16. Book Review:

    Fulling, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    own. In particular, it has never completely escaped from the arena of scattering theory, the paradigm of conventional particle physics. One is naturally led to study matrix elements between an 'in-vacuum' and an 'out-vacuum' though such concepts are murky in situations, such as big bangs and black holes, where the ambient geometry is not asymptotically static in the far past and future. The newest material in the treatise appears in two chapters in part II devoted to the interpretation of quantum theory, incorporating some unpublished work of David Deutsch on the meaning of probability in physics. Such discussions are unavoidably polemical; DeWitt takes a firm stand ('Everett's ['many worlds'] interpretation has been adopted by the author out of practical necessity: he knows of no other [acceptable one]'), but he acknowledges that 'each physicist has his own manner of understanding quantum mechanics', and the philosophical differences have little import for how theories are applied in practice. In the end DeWitt's many-world theory comes out very similar to the more recent 'decoherent histories' approach, which (in some versions, at least) attributes physical reality to quantities whose measurements can be predicted with certainty—thereby having as much kinship with hidden-variable theories as with the extreme Everett view. I recall a conversation with Bryce in which he said (in paraphrase) 'there is a deeper reality underneath the quantum reality. [In that sense Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen were right.] But it is not the classical reality. [That is, a naive hidden-variable picture does not apply at the microscopic level.]' This occurred probably in the late 1970s, long after DeWitt became a public partisan of the Everett interpretation and long before this book, so I do not believe that it represents a wavering of his faith in many worlds, just a nuance in what that meant to him. Parts III through V apply the formalism in depth to successively more difficult

  17. Ontology of postmodern theory of story and narration

    Aleksić Slađana M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A story is one of the forms of human communication, and one of the oldest ways of understanding the world and exchanging knowledge. The story is told through words, images and movement, and therefore the phenomenon of narration cannot be limited to verbal expression only. One can narrate about real or imaginary events in order to convey a message, provide knowledge or entertainment, and also to create an art form as well as achieve aesthetic communication. The process by means of which the inner world is built within a literary work is certainly the story or narrative. Modern theory of narration enumerates a number of forms of narration indifferent media: in folklore and art, oral or written linguistic narrative form, in pantomime, picture, vitrage, and film. This paper discusses various contemporary narratological ideas.

  18. Learning Vocabulary through E-Book Reading of Young Children with Various Reading Abilities

    Lee, Sung Hee

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that young children learn novel word meanings by simply reading and listening to a printed book. In today's classroom, many children's e-books provide audio narration support so young readers can simply listen to the e-books. The focus of the present study is to examine the effect of e-book reading with audio narration…

  19. 台灣兒童圖畫書出版產業之困境與願景:從插畫創作者之角度檢視 The Dilemma and Vision of the Children’s Picture Book Industry in Taiwan: A Perspective of Illustrators

    Bin I

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available 本研究主要針對55位台灣兒童圖畫書插畫創作者之問卷調查以及其中10位成名插畫家的訪談,調查研究台灣兒童圖畫書插畫創作者所面臨之問題。研究結果發現:台灣市場狹小導致自製圖畫書風險太高,出版社必須以進口圖畫書出版為主力,造成插畫創作舞台變小,插畫家收入無保障,自然影響創作品質,而政府徒有創意產業的口號,卻忽略重要的插畫領域,缺乏具體計畫與政策。研究對政府提出建議為:政策上整體規劃、獎勵出版社自製圖畫書開拓國際市場、民間與官方保持密切合作關係、獎勵與輔導機制提升插畫家創作品質、輔導成立插畫家團體,出版年鑑、輔導成立商業性的台灣插畫影像資料庫。對出版社的建議為:尊重插畫專業、提供合理及時的創作報酬、具備專業編輯和完整企劃、主動把關圖畫書之整體美感、提升行銷能力擴大市場。對教育單位的建議為:以積極培育優良的插畫人才。對插畫家建議為:不斷提升專業知識技能與態度,發揚個人與文化的獨特性,以及建立經紀人制度。The present research investigate the difficulties that illustrator is facing through questionnairing 55 illustrators of children’s picture book (cpb and interviewing 10 famous ones of them. The results indicate that the small market of Taiwan results in high risk of domestic publication of cpb, and the publishers turned to buy copyright from other countries. The domestic illustrators therefore had less opportunities of creation and less income. The quality of illustration could be limited because part time jobs distracted the illustrators. Recently, Taiwan government is showing high interest in “culture and creative industries but ironically ignore the very important one — illustration picture book, and has no other practical plan and policy about it. The study

  20. Reading Personalized Books with Preschool Children Enhances Their Word Acquisition

    Kucirkova, Natalia; Messer, David; Sheehy, Kieron

    2014-01-01

    This study examines whether books that contain personalized content are better facilitators of young children's word acquisition than books which are not personalized for a child. In a repeated-measures experimental design, 18 children (mean age 3;10) were read a picture book which contained both personalized and non-personalized sections, with…

  1. Characterization of Mental Retardation and Autism in Children's Books.

    Dyches, Tina Taylor; Prater, Mary Anne; Cramer, Sharon F.

    2001-01-01

    A study involving 12 books, six picture books and six chapter books, examined how individuals with mental retardation and autism are depicted in children's literature. Results indicate characters were portrayed as making more choices in their lives and were educated in more inclusive environments than in an earlier study. (Contains references.)…

  2. Orange Book

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence (Orange Book or OB) is a list of drugs approved under Section 505 of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act...

  3. Book review

    feminist scholarly circles, who acted as editors, consulting editors, project co- ... The organization of the book posed numerous difficulties to the editors, ... informs the reader, Mvemve was "keen to have Western science confirm the efficacy.

  4. Book Review

    Adrian Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The second edition of Computational Physics by Rubin Landau, Manuel Paez and Cristian C. Bordeianu (published by Wiley hit bookshelves in 2007, and is steadily making its way into physics classrooms across the United States. Your reviewer first encountered the book at the Stanford Campus Book Store, where it is presumably being put to good use by students and faculty. The first edition was published in 1997 with Landau and Paez as authors [Computational Physics, 1st edn, Wiley, New York, 1997]. Rubin Landau is a very experienced computational physicist and staff member of the Oregon State University in Corvallis, where he directs the Computational Physics for Undergraduates course and teaches using this book. Landau is an incredibly active teacher to put it mildly – the code for the book is supplied in an accompanying DVD and he also posts applets and video lectures for his courses on his web page (http://www.physics.orst.edu/~rubin/.

  5. Book Review

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    Book Review. Water Resources Management in Ethiopia: Implications for the Nile Basin. ... general to specific issues within the Ethiopian context. ... properly made with regard to water source, ... of those of Tanzania, Kenya, Burundi, Rwanda,.

  6. Book Review

    Clevers, Jan G. P. W.

    2018-05-01

    This book provides a comprehensive and timely overview on all aspects of hyperspectral remote sensing combined with various applications. As such, it is an excellent book of reference for both students and professionals active in the field of optical remote sensing. It deals with all aspects of retrieving quantitative information on biophysical properties of the Earth's surface, the data corrections needed and the range of analysis approaches available.

  7. Book Reviews

    Matić, Ninoslav; Motik, Boris; Šribar, Julijan; Bažant, Alen; Kos, Mladen; Glavinić, Vlado

    1996-01-01

    The PC System Architecture Series of books from MindShare, one of the leading technical training companies in the hardware industry, includes the following titles: ISA System Architecture, EISA System Architecture, 486 System Architecture, Pentium Processor System Architecture, Plug&Play System Architecture, Power PC System Architecture, PCI System Architecture, PCMCIA SystemArchitecture. Each of them is a powerful reference book for one particular type of chip or hardware, with the character...

  8. Book review

    Budi Hermawan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pictures, or image texts as a more scientifically term we can now use, are often thought of being worth a thousand words. They can be interpreted in many different ways by different people. As there are too many possible interpretation for a single picture then how can we come to justified and grounded meaning(s of the picture? How can we understand the basic structure of an image text? There should be this underlying structure that people can rely on in their efforts to make meaningful and justified meaning(s of image texts for there seems to be nothing, even in what people find abstract or absurd, which is without pattern, hence, structure.

  9. BOOK MANAGER'S CHOICE BOOKS RECEIVED

    progression from qualitative to quantitative methods. He begins with an ethnography of concepts of mental illness held by care providers from both the ... research methods for the southern African context. I heartily recommend this book.

  10. Electronic book – paperless book

    Mateja Ločniškar-Fidler

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the electronic book, which is accessible on the Internet, with particularities and drawbacks that the present and future users and librarians may encounter.It also presents devices (such as scanners and hand-helds and software required for reading and designing electronic books, as well as the details we should pay attention to when buying and using the above mentioned devices. Some of the most significant web pages dedicated to the selling and promoting of electronic books are also presented. The protection of authors’ works, distributed via the Internet and digital media, is gaining importance. In September 1999, Slovenia also joined the international agreement on the protection of copyrights. It is expected that electronic books will gradually become part of the collection of all types of libraries. Therefore, libraries will need appropriate technical equipment as well as trained personnel for the usage of this new medium.

  11. Book Reviews

    R. de Ridder

    1986-01-01

    (50 pp. - R. de Ridder, Dennis Tedlock, The spoken word and the work of interpretation, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1983. ix + 365 pp., 8 ill. - R. de Ridder, Dennis Tedlock, Popol Vuh, The definitive edition of the Mayan Book of the Dawn of Life and the Glories of Gods and Kings, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1985. 380 pp., 32 ill. - G. van Roon, Dietmar Rothermund, Die Peripherie in der Weltwirtschaftskrise: Afrika, Asien und Lateinamerika 1929-1939, Paderborn: Ferdinand Schýningh, 1983, 295 pp. - Thilo C. Schadeberg, Gýnter Dabitz, Geschichte der erforschung der Nuba-Berge, Arbeiten aus dem Seminar fýr Výlkerkunde der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitýt Frankfurt am Main, Band 17, Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner Verlag, 1985. 280 pp., maps, tables, illus. - L. van Vroonhoven, Ger van Roon, Derde Wereld in depressie, Leiden: Nijhoff, 1985, 139 p. - Wim van Zanten, Nigel Phillips, Sijobang, sung narrative poetry of West Sumatra, Cambridge Studies in Oral and Literate Culture, no. 1, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981. xi + 255 pp., photos, texts and translations, short glossary of Minangkabau words, Bibliography, index.

  12. Narrative and embodiment

    Køster, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Recent work on the relation between narrative and selfhood has emphasized embodiment as an indispensable foundation for selfhood. This has occasioned an interesting debate on the relation between embodiment and narrative. In this paper, I attempt to mediate the range of conflicting intuitions......) strictly is or is not; rather, we need to see narrative as an attribute admitting of degrees. I suggest that the relation between narrative and embodiment should be seen along these lines, proposing three levels of the narrativity of embodied experiencing: 1) the unnarratable, 2) the narratable and 3...

  13. The Cinematic Narrator: The Logic and Pragmatics of Impersonal Narration.

    Burgoyne, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Describes "impersonal narration," an approach that defends the concept of the cinematic narrator as a logical and pragmatic necessity. Compares this approach with existing theories of the cinematic narrator, addressing disagreements in the field of film narrative theory. (MM)

  14. Discover the Atlantic Ocean: An Exciting Coloring Book of Fish and Shellfish.

    Flick, George J.

    This coloring book contains pictures of more than 79 fish and shellfish found on the Atlantic Coast. Captions give information on habitats, behavior, or commercial uses of the species pictured. Indexes of both common and scientific names are given. (BB)

  15. Book reviews

    Tore Ahlbäck

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Four book reviews are included in this issue of Approaching Religion:The Process of Buddhist-Christian Dialogue (2009 by Paul O. Ingram is reviewed by Dr Teuvo Laitila. The book deals with contemporary dialogues between Buddhists and Christians, mainly in the West, by applying a three-part perspective denoted conceptual, engaged and internal.Producing Islamic Knowledge. Transmission and Dissemination in Western Europe (2010 by Martin van Bruinessen and Stefano Allievi is reviewed by Dr Jeanette Jouili. The book investigates into Islamic knowledge production taking place in the contemporary European context, from a theoretical as well as from a richly varied empirical perspective.Grounding Religion. A Field Guide to the Study of Religion and Ecology (2011 by Whitney A. Bauman, Richard R. Bohannon II and Kevin J. O’Brien is reviewed by MA Laura Wickström. The book provides an introduction to the field of religion and ecology with special emphasis on interreligious co-operation.Mirakel, mysterier och moraliteter. Från puritanism till New Age – en religionshistorisk studie av Helen Shucman och A Course in Miracles (2010 is reviewed by Dr Tore Ahlbäck. The book is a doctoral thesis analysing the history of creation behind the highly influential spiritual guide A Course in Miracles (1965–72 and its originator Helen Shucman.

  16. Malory's Magic Book

    McCausland, Elly

    This book interrogates the complex connection between children and the Arthurian legend that has existed since J. T. Knowles’s first adaptation of Thomas Malory’s Morte Darthur for a juvenile audience in 1862, and which remains strong today. Between 1862 and 1980 in Britain and America, adaptations...... of the Morte for children participated in cultural dialogues relating to the nature and relevance of the ‘medieval’, the role of risk in society, masculine development and mental health through their reworking of the Arthurian narrative. Against the backdrop of Victorian medievalism, empire, the rise of child...... psychology and two world wars, the diverse ways in which Malory’s text was adapted with a child reader in mind reveals changing ideas regarding the relevance of King Arthur, and the complex relationship between authors and their imagined juvenile readers. Covering texts by J. T. Knowles, Sidney Lanier...

  17. Lithuanian narrative language at preschool age

    Ingrida Balčiūnienė

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the main linguistic indications of Lithuanian preschoolers’ narratives. The analysis is based on experimental data of 24 typically developing monolingual Lithuanian children (6–7 years of age from middle-class families, attending a state kindergarten in Kaunas (Lithuania. During the experiment, the children were asked to tell a story according to the Cat Story (Hickmann 1993 picture sequence. The stories were recorded, transcribed and annotated for an automatic analysis using CHILDES software. During the analysis, the syntactic complexity, lexical diversity, and general productivity (MLUw and type/token ratio of the narratives were investigated. The results indicated the main microstructural tendencies of Lithuanian narrative language at preschool age.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5128/ERYa8.02

  18. Automatic digital photo-book making system

    Wang, Wiley; Teo, Patrick; Muzzolini, Russ

    2010-02-01

    The diversity of photo products has grown more than ever before. A group of photos are not only printed individually, but also can be arranged in specific order to tell a story, such as in a photo book, a calendar or a poster collage. Similar to making a traditional scrapbook, digital photo book tools allow the user to choose a book style/theme, layouts of pages, backgrounds and the way the pictures are arranged. This process is often time consuming to users, given the number of images and the choices of layout/background combinations. In this paper, we developed a system to automatically generate photo books with only a few initial selections required. The system utilizes time stamps, color indices, orientations and other image properties to best fit pictures into a final photo book. The common way of telling a story is to lay the pictures out in chronological order. If the pictures are proximate in time, they will coincide with each other and are often logically related. The pictures are naturally clustered along a time line. Breaks between clusters can be used as a guide to separate pages or spreads, thus, pictures that are logically related can stay close on the same page or spread. When people are making a photo book, it is helpful to start with chronologically grouped images, but time alone wont be enough to complete the process. Each page is limited by the number of layouts available. Many aesthetic rules also apply, such as, emphasis of preferred pictures, consistency of local image density throughout the whole book, matching a background to the content of the images, and the variety of adjacent page layouts. We developed an algorithm to group images onto pages under the constraints of aesthetic rules. We also apply content analysis based on the color and blurriness of each picture, to match backgrounds and to adjust page layouts. Some of our aesthetic rules are fixed and given by designers. Other aesthetic rules are statistic models trained by using

  19. Sammelrezension: Unreliable Narration

    Orth, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    Eva Laass: Broken Taboos, Subjective Truths. Forms and Functions of Unreliable Narration in Contemporary American Cinema. A Contribution to Film NarratologyVolker Ferenz: Don’t believe his lies. The unreliable narrator in contemporary American cinema

  20. READING ENGAGEMENT: A COMPARISON BETWEEN E-BOOKS AND TRADITIONAL PRINT BOOKS IN AN ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM

    Troy Jones

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Electronic books (e-books are gaining popularity for personal reading. Options for access to a large selection of book titles and “anytime/anywhere” reading choices have added to the increased use of e-books. For this study, 22 third-grade students completed satisfaction surveys and reading comprehension tests on three separate reading sessions: one traditional print-based and two e-book titles. Indicators of reading engagement included motivation for independent reading and comprehension as measured by standardized tests on the print book and both e-books. Results showed that format was not as important as students’ identification with setting, characters, and theme of the book. Students did, however, indicate a preference for e-books when given the option of a wide selection of titles and the freedom to choose their own e-book. Students further indicated a preference for the amenities associated with e-book reading such as pop-up definitions and pronunciations of words, automatic page turning, and the option of read-aloud narration. The authors concluded that children quickly become comfortable with e-books and welcomed the technology. However, they are not completely ready to disregard print books.

  1. Becoming a vampire without being bitten: the narrative collective-assimilation hypothesis.

    Gabriel, Shira; Young, Ariana F

    2011-08-01

    We propose the narrative collective-assimilation hypothesis--that experiencing a narrative leads one to psychologically become a part of the collective described within the narrative. In a test of this hypothesis, participants read passages from either a book about wizards (from the Harry Potter series) or a book about vampires (from the Twilight series). Both implicit and explicit measures revealed that participants who read about wizards psychologically became wizards, whereas those who read about vampires psychologically became vampires. The results also suggested that narrative collective assimilation is psychologically meaningful and relates to the basic human need for connection. Specifically, the tendency to fulfill belongingness needs through group affiliation moderated the extent to which narrative collective assimilation occurred, and narrative collective assimilation led to increases in life satisfaction and positive mood, two primary outcomes of belonging. The implications for the importance of narratives, the need to belong to groups, and social surrogacy are discussed.

  2. Book Reviews • • Boekbesprekings

    Book Reviews •. • Boekbesprekings. BLOOD DISEASES. Arias ot Haematology. 3rd ed. By G. A. McDonald, M.D.. (Aberd.), M.RC.P. (Glasg.), M.RC. Path., T. C. Dodds,. F.I.M.L.T., F.I.I.P.. F.R.P.S. and B. Cruickshank, ... tumours of lymphoid tissues, consisting of pictures of lymph node histology correlated with the blood and ...

  3. A Narrative Enrichment Programme in literacy development of ...

    Kate H

    to influence other facets of a person's life, be they academic, social or economic. This study .... of communication. 2. Research aims and .... 4.1 Research design. The research is .... The layout is that of a normal picture book, in which pictures ...

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Supergravity Supergravity

    Gregory, Ruth

    2013-02-01

    students of supergravity. One of the strengths of the book is that it includes many exercises; these are designed to both reinforce the material covered, as well as to elucidate technical issues. They back up the process of learning, and feel part of the narrative rather than a test. If diligently followed, the reader will acquire a great deal of expertise by being guided through these critical learning processes. Another striking feature of the book is its inherent user friendliness. Not only is the layout of the book visually pleasing -- with plenty of margin space to scribble in if so inspired -- but the language of the authors is very accessible, and the gentle humour leavens the material being presented. When asked to work through the manipulations in the previous paragraphs forwards, then backwards, then forwards again, one tends to smile rather than give up! The authors are very aware that this can be challenging material, and have taken every effort to bring it to the reader in an appealing form. To sum up: this is a definitive text on the topic of supergravity. It contains all the relevant material one needs, or signposts clearly where the discussion has been `executive' and one might need to consult more detailed material depending on background. It is rather high level for a beginning graduate student, who has probably not met field theory or general relativity before, but for a more experienced student or researcher, the book is spot on. I found it more like a companion than a teacher, and heartily recommend it to anyone wanting to learn or revisit this fascinating, if technical, topic.

  5. Beyond the Investment Narrative

    Moss, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The current policy interest in early childhood education and care is driven by an investment narrative, a story of quality and high returns emerging from a dominant neoliberal political economy. This short note expresses deep reservations about this narrative, and hints at another narrative that foregrounds democracy, experimentation and…

  6. Narrative, Preaching, and Formation

    Finney, Mark David

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the place of narrative in the transformational encounter that can take place between hearers of sermons and God. Chapter 1 surveys the history and development of contemporary scholarship related to narrative preaching. It argues that most homileticians consider narrative either as a way of structuring sermons, or as a…

  7. Modeling Narrative Discourse

    Elson, David K.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes new approaches to the formal modeling of narrative discourse. Although narratives of all kinds are ubiquitous in daily life, contemporary text processing techniques typically do not leverage the aspects that separate narrative from expository discourse. We describe two approaches to the problem. The first approach considers…

  8. The Divorce Culture and Picture Books for Young Children

    Mo, Weimin

    2007-01-01

    In the past thirty years or so, divorce has been widespread in many countries. Globally the percentage of marriages that end up in divorce has increased dramatically even in countries where religious and legal impediments are strong. Divorce occurs most often within the first ten years of marriage. That means children of most couples who are…

  9. Respectful Representations of Disability in Picture Books

    Pennell, Ashley E.; Wollak, Barbara; Koppenhaver, David A.

    2018-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of making available in classrooms a range of children's literature offering authentic and meaningful representations of characters with disabilities. The focus is not only on reading inclusive literature with typically developing students but also on the importance of making inclusive literature available to…

  10. Family Literacy Project: Bilingual Picture Books by English Learners

    Louie, Belinda; Davis-Welton, Karlyn

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a family literacy project involving a partnership of school-aged children and their families with in-service and pre-service teachers enrolled in a university course on literacy instruction for English language learners. This project consists of family members sharing their stories with their children to…

  11. The Prints: A Picture Book for Pre-Formal Geometry

    Skoumpourdi, Chrysanthi; Mpakopoulou, Ifigenia

    2011-01-01

    A pre-test questionnaire was conducted in a kindergarten and it showed that, although the children were able to give various examples of objects, from their everyday lives, that are similar to solid shapes, the examples they gave for plane figures were also tangible objects. Since it is suggested that geometry instruction has to begin early,…

  12. Writing with Parents in Response to Picture Book Read Alouds

    DeFauw, Danielle L.

    2017-01-01

    High-quality writing instruction needs to permeate elementary students' in- and outside-of-school experiences. The aim of this research was to explore how teaching writing to parents may support home-school literacy connections. This qualitative case study explored parents' experiences in interactive writing sessions. The descriptive coding and…

  13. Children's Voices: Reactions to a Criminal Justice Issue Picture Book

    Oslick, Mary Ellen

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the issue of children with incarcerated parents within the broader topic of criminal justice in multicultural children's literature. The sheer magnitude of culture of children with incarcerated parents makes it necessary for their stories to be included in children's literature. Children with an incarcerated parent need to…

  14. DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder Symptomology in Fictional Picture Books

    Kelley, Jane E.; Cardon, Teresa A.; Algeo-Nichols, Dana

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, schools have seen an increasing number of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the current estimated average of children in the United States who are diagnosed with an ASD is one out of 68 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014). One way for educators and elementary students to learn about ASD is through…

  15. Book reviews

    NN,

    2004-01-01

    Since the publication of the first edition of this book, important developments in biotechnology and mushroom production made a new, revised version necessary. As it is written for the mushroom industry, it emphasizes on nutritional, medical, and cultivating aspects of edible and medicinal fungi. A

  16. Book Reviews

    Matthews, Alan; Goldin, Ian; Colman, David; Bickerton, Thomas W.; Beghin, John C.; Croci-Angelini, Elisabetta

    1992-01-01

    Books reviewed include: Principles of Agricultural Economics by D. Colman and T. Young; World Agriculture: Toward 2000 by Nikos Alexandratos; Food Subsidies in Developing Countries: Costs, Benefits and Policy Options; Elasticities in International Agricultural Trade by Colin A. Carter and W. H. Gardiner; Macroeconomics, Agriculture and Exchange Rates; Government and Agriculture in Western Europe, 1880-1988 by M. Tracy

  17. Book review

    NN,

    2003-01-01

    This book is entirely dedicated to the functional role of fungi in all kind of ecosystems, and it attempts to show how the world would function if fungi were not there. It is conceived as an introduction to the subject for students in mycology and ecology. The introductory chapters deal with

  18. Book reviews

    publication of the Ethiopian atlas (see below). There is no serious competition for this book for the countries it covers, but I suspect it will become invaluable for many strictly East African birders too, given the high degree of overlap, the improved illustrations and the coverage of some potential vagrants to the south.

  19. BOOK REVIEWS

    This is a story of the marvel of human life from conception to birth. Although the book was designed for young readers, it is suitable for use by anybody who wishes to know about our conception, development and birth. It can be appreciated at several levels. Firstly, it is a fascinating story, told simply and with wise.

  20. Book review

    Book review. * Professor of Higher Education Studies, Centre for Higher and Adult Education, University of Stellenbosch. Email: mfourie@sun.ac.za. Worldwide, the composition of the student population in higher education has over the past two decades changed dramatically. With larger numbers of previously underserved.

  1. Book Review

    Pace, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    At the turn of the millennium, a new phenomenon emerged: conservatives, who just decades before had rejected the expanding human rights culture, began to embrace human rights in order to advance their political goals. In this book, Nicola Perugini and Neve Gordon account for how human rights--gen...

  2. BOOKS JBOEKE

    This book is about the poor in South Africa and how to achieve some redistribution ... nature of the zero-sum-game economic wars and plunder- ing ofthe 16th - 18th ..... no course in basic neurosciences taught to the level where this would be ...

  3. Book Reviews.

    Coates, Elizabeth; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews three books: (1) "Jeux Populaires Traditionnels pour les Enfants d'aujourd'hui" (Traditional Popular Games for Today's Children) (Jacqueline Theriault and Denise Garon); "Early Childhood Education" (B. Persky and L. Golubchick, editors); and "Playing to Learn: The Young Child, Teacher and the Classroom" (Weininger and Daniel). (AC)

  4. Thin book

    En lille bog om teater og organisationer, med bidrag fra 19 teoretikere og praktikere, der deltog i en "Thin Book Summit" i Danmark i 2005. Bogen bidrager med en state-of-the-art antologi om forskellige former for samarbejde imellem teater og organisationer. Bogen fokuserer både på muligheder og...

  5. Book review

    EC Thomas

    1978-11-01

    Full Text Available This book appears to the present reviewer to be, if not the, at least a definitive volume for students of work motivation, whether organizational behaviourists or practising managers. This field has grown rapidly as the main focus of Organizational Psychology since Vroom's (1964 enunciation of a tenable theory of work motivation and satisfaction.

  6. Book review

    Book review. * Dr Birgit Schreiber is the Director of the Centre for Student Support Services at the University of the. Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa. Email: bschreiber@uwc.ac.za. Manuel Castells (2001), who is regarded as one of the most influential social scientists commenting on the role of higher education in ...

  7. Electronic Books

    Clyde, Laurel A.

    2005-01-01

    Terje Hillesund points out that "information technology and especially the Internet have profoundly changed the ways of publishing." Recently, the book publishing industry has started to catch up, making digitized texts--including multimedia texts--available for sale through online bookstores, and in some cases, available for free downloading.…

  8. Book review

    NN,

    2003-01-01

    The Mycena specialist Robich, known from many publications, created his magnum opus with the present book, which, according to the title, covers all species known from Europe. Although many of his observations are based on southern European collections, his studies extended to other parts of Europe

  9. Banning Books.

    Trede, Mildred

    1991-01-01

    The "Game of Decisions" is presented to encourage students to consider the consequences of banning books and/or ideas. The game involves story writing, creating probability graphs, writing a letter protesting censorship from a chosen historical period, and examining a controversial science issue. Three thesis statements for generating group…

  10. Books received

    Books. Outcomes into Clinical Practice. Ed. by Tony Delamothe. Pp. xii + 164. Illustrated. London: BMJ. 1994. ISBN 0-7279-0888-X. At a recent conference which attracted a range of health professionals from the private and public sectors and examined South Africa's current and future health options, an eminent Australian ...

  11. Digital books.

    Wink, Diane M

    2011-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use the Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes digital books.

  12. Book review

    contributions to the authoritative bibliography of the scholarly writings on the literatures of the English - speaking world. As he states in the preface to the book, Abodunrin's aim in doing this is to make a compendium of reviews of. "scholarly writing on all aspects of African literature in English'' available to students, teachers ...

  13. Book notice

    Adema, Frits

    1999-01-01

    FOCKO WEBERLING & WILHELM TROLL: Die Infloreszenzen Band II, Teil 2, Monotele und polytele Synfloreszenzen. Gustav Fischer Verlag, Jena, Germany, 1998. 483 pp., illus. ISBN 3-437-35436-1. Price: DEM 238. A new volume in the monumental series of books on inflorescences in the tradition of Troll’s

  14. Book review

    The work under review is Jack Mapanje's third volume of verse after Of Chameleons ... with which the new book opens, 'The Following Dawn the Boots', talks about the first ... 'St Margaret Chitherow of York', the poet acknowledges that his host country too has ... primary audience and learn to adjust his sights accordingly.

  15. Book fair

    2006-01-01

    The Swiss academic publishing house 'Presses Polytechniques Universitaires Romandes'will be presenting its most recent scientific and technical publications at a book fair in the lobby of the Main Building (60) from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday 28 September 2006.

  16. BOOK REVIEW

    as middlemen between writers and readers through lack of creativity and aggressiveness. Authors are not used to promote the sales of their books, and there is no attempt on the part of the publisher to take advantage of such forms of popular advertisement as newspapers, radio and television. Besides, there is a general ...

  17. book review

    organisational structures and institutional policy. A number of universities in Africa have started to conduct student engagement/student experience surveys. This volume provides the theoretical underpinning for it while outlining how these theories were arrived at in the first place. However, a potential weak point of the book ...

  18. Book Reviews

    Barlow, Colin; Harvey, D. R.; Lane, S.

    1988-01-01

    Books Reviewed: The Economics of Oil Palm; Agricultural Policy Formation in the European Community: The Birth of Milk Quotas and CAP Reform by M. Petit, M. de Benedictis, D. Britton, M. de Groot, W. Henrichsmeyer, and F. Lechi; Agriculture's Future: America's Food System by T. L. Wallace

  19. Example book

    Donnat, Ph.; Treimany, C.; Gouedard, C.; Morice, O.

    1998-06-01

    This document presents some examples which were used for debugging the code. It seemed useful to write these examples onto a book to be sure the code would not regret; to give warranties for the code's functionality; to propose some examples to illustrate the possibilities and the limits of Miro. (author)

  20. Book Reviews.

    Joyner, Christopher C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Scholarly reviews of nine books are presented. Topics include nuclear deterrence, urban planning in France, human rights in the Republic of China, the United States' support of Israel, U. S. military policy, an analysis of Rousseau's social contract, political influences on the U. S. presidency, the state and political theory, and the loss of…

  1. Narrative-critical approach as hermeneutical framework for a creative dialogue between biblical sources and secular extra-biblical sources: The Lord of the Rings as an entry into the Book of Revelation

    R. Meylahn

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay is motivated by the challenge that biblical texts have very often lost their affective power to address and transform the lives of readers today, because they are either not read at all or they are not fully understood as the world of the text is too far removed from the world of the reader. There are however wonderful contemporary texts that do affect readers� lives and the question arose if the contemporary texts cannot be read together with the biblical texts, to bring them �to life� again?A hermeneutical approach needed to be found that could create the necessary space for non-biblical literary texts to be used to interpret and elucidate biblical texts. The narrative approach provides this space for the two texts to enter into creative dialogue, given that the two texts coincide sufficiently in the significance for the two implied authors, the reference of the texts and in the situation of the implied readers.

  2. Touch design and narrative interpretation

    Zhao, Sumin; Unsworth, Len

    2016-01-01

    and the Bottle in depth, and illustrate how interactive design elements help to create an interpretative possibility of the story. We suggest that a better understanding of interactive touch design would promote more effective adult-child interactions around mobile applications....... of technology, but also a resource for meaning making. We distinguish two basic types of interactivity—intra-text and extra-text—incorporated in the touch design, and explore the different functions they perform in a broad range of picture book apps. In particular, we look at the app version of The Heart...

  3. SESAME 2017 (360 pictures)

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2018-01-01

    The Synchrotron-Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (SESAME) is an independent laboratory located in Allan in the Balqa governorate of Jordan, created under the auspices of UNESCO on 30 May 2002. December 2017, Jordan Picture: Noemi Caraban

  4. Landscape as World Picture

    Wamberg, Jacob

    from Palaeolithic cave paintings through to 19th-century modernity. A structuralist comparison between this pattern and three additional fields of analysis - self-consciousness, socially-determined perception of nature, and world picture - reveals a fascinating insight into culture's macrohistorical...

  5. Narrative and Institutional Economics

    Vyacheslav V. Volchik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses a range of questions associated with the occurrence of a new field of study – narrative economics, which is considered in the context of modern institutionalism. Pioneering works of R. Shiller, G. Akerlof and D. Snower spotlighted the importance of analyzing narratives and narrative influence when studying economic processes. In this paper, a qualitative study of narratives is seen through the prism of an answer to the question: «How do prescribed narratives influence institutions and change them? ». Narratives have much in common with institutions since very often, explicitly or implicitly, they contain value judgements about social interactions or normative aspects shaping behavioral patterns. The identification of dominating narratives enables us to understand better how institutions influence economic (social action. Repeated interactions among social actors are structured through understanding and learning the rules. Understanding of social rules comes from the language – we articulate and perceive the rules drawing on common narratives. Narratives and institutions are helpful when actors gain knowledge about various forms of social communication. Digital technologies, mass media and social networking sites facilitate the spread of narratives, values and beliefs; this process is characterized by increasing returns. Studying narratives and institutions is crucial for modern economic theory because it helps to improve qualitative and quantitative methods of analyzing empirical evidence and enables researchers to understand complex economic processes.

  6. A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words: Using Visual Images To Improve Comprehension for Middle School Struggling Readers.

    Hibbing, Anne Nielsen; Rankin-Erickson, Joan L.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses teacher and student drawings in the classroom, illustrations in texts, picture books, and movies as external image-based tools that support reading comprehension. Presents a summary of points practitioners will want to consider when using sketches, illustrations, picture books, and movies with reluctant and low-ability middle school…

  7. Cut and paste pictures in surrealism

    Todić Milanka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Proceeding from the idea of the readymade, Marko Ristić’s, Vane Bor’s and Dušan Matić’s collages regroup readymade pictorial and textual matrices according to the rules of free associative syntax. Everything that they collected cut out and pasted bears the hallmark of personal choice, i.e. objective chance, as the Surrealists would say. In the new structure of the collage, picture and text were of equal importance. However, we should not forget that both picture and text were only fragments, of different origin so that they could not function as autonomous elements in their own right nor could they establish logical interlinks. Cut and paste picture in Surrealism are primarily registered as visual wholes, in which the former principle of harmony has been substituted by the principle of discontinuity. In fact, they do not aspire to establish closed and unambiguous semantic structures either on a single paper or within a cycle, disregarding as they do conventional narrative and illustrative order in representing reality.

  8. Book Review:

    Chrusciel, P. T.

    2006-06-01

    Most of us sometimes have to face a student asking: 'What do I need to get started on this'. (In my case 'this' would typically be a topic in general relativity.) After thinking about it for quite a while, and consulting candidate texts again and again, a few days later I usually end up saying: read this chapter in book I (but without going too much detail), then that chapter in book II (but ignore all those comments), then the first few sections of this review paper (but do not try to work out equations NN to NNN), and then come back to see me. In the unlikely event that the student comes back without changing the topic, there follows quite a bit of explaining on a blackboard over the following weeks. From now on I will say: get acquainted with the material covered by this book. As far as Isham's book is concerned, 'this' in the student's question above can stand for any topic in theoretical physics which touches upon differential geometry (and I can only think of very few which do not). Said plainly: this book contains most of the introductory material necessary to get started in general relativity, or those branches of mathematical physics which require differential geometry. A student who has mastered the notions presented in the book will have a solid basis to continue into specialized topics. I am not aware of any other book which would be as useful as this one in terms of the spectrum of topics covered, stopping at the right place to get sufficient introductory insight. According to the publisher, these lecture notes are the content of an introductory course on differential geometry which is taken by first-year theoretical physics PhD students, or by students attending the one-year MSc course 'Quantum Fields and Fundamental Forces' at Imperial College, London. The volume is divided into six chapters: An Introduction to Topology Differential Manifolds Vector Fields and n-Forms Lie Groups Fibre Bundles Connections in a Bundle. It is a sad reflection on current

  9. A Longitudinal Investigation of Mandarin-speaking Preschoolers' Relation of Events in Narratives: From Unrelated to Related Events

    Wen-hui Sah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the way preschoolers relate events in a story. Twelve Mandarin-speaking preschoolers served as subjects; their narratives were elicited through the use of a picture book, Frog, where are you? Our data suggest that children’s progression from treating single, unrelated events to related ones requires proper linguistic and cognitive capacities. The data also support earlier findings that most 5-year-olds are not able to relate a chain of events well. Additionally, it is found that there is dissociation in abilities for producing linguistic expressions and for inferring relations between events. We try to interpret the dissociation in terms of Karmiloff-Smith’s problem-solving model.

  10. Narrative-Based Intervention for Word-Finding Difficulties: A Case Study

    Marks, Ian; Stokes, Stephanie F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Children with word-finding difficulties manifest a high frequency of word-finding characteristics in narrative, yet word-finding interventions have concentrated on single-word treatments and outcome measures. Aims: This study measured the effectiveness of a narrative-based intervention in improving single-word picture-naming and…

  11. Narrative Competence and "Internal State Language" of Children with Asperger Syndrome and ADHD

    Rumpf, Anna-Lena; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Becker, Katja; Kauschke, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The central question of the present study was whether there are differences between children with Asperger Syndrome (AS), children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and healthy controls (HC) with respect to the organization of narratives and their verbalization of internal states. Oral narrations of a wordless picture book…

  12. Developmental Differences in the Use of Tense Aspect Modality in Narratives

    Mehmet, Ozcan

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates how/whether the emergence and function of Turkish Tense Aspect Modality (TAM) markers that are used in narratives by children from 3 to 9 plus 13-year-olds show differences relative to the age of the narrator both quantitatively and qualitatively. The data were collected, by using Mayer's (1969) wordless picture book…

  13. Book Reviews

    Horner, Joseph L.

    1987-04-01

    Progress in the fields of integrated optics and fiber optics is continuing at a rapid pace. Recognizing this trend, the goal of the author is to provide an introductory textbook on time-harmonic electromagnetic theory, with an emphasis on optical rather than microwave technologies. The book is appropriate for an upper-level undergraduate or graduate course. Each chapter includes examples of problems. The book focuses on several areas of prime importance to intergrated optics. These include dielectric waveguide analysis, couple-mode thoery, Bragg scattering, and prism coupling There is very little coverage of active components such as electro-optic modulators and switches. The author assumes the reader has a working knowledge of vector calculus and is familiar with Maxwell's equations.

  14. Book Review

    Salvatore Filippone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The book by Arjen Markus is a veritable tour de force among the possibilities opened up by the latest incarnation of Fortran, the longest-lived programming language on the planet and still one of the favourites by scientific programmers. It is not an introduction to the syntax and semantics of the latest language standard: it is more of a gourmet cookbook showing off a wide range of examples of what the new features allow a daring programmer to do.

  15. Book reviews

    NN

    2004-01-01

    Since the publication of the first edition of this book, important developments in biotechnology and mushroom production made a new, revised version necessary. As it is written for the mushroom industry, it emphasizes on nutritional, medical, and cultivating aspects of edible and medicinal fungi. A short introduction deals with a definition of fungi and the world of fungi, including edible and poisonous species, and the relation between fungi and man. Two chapters deal with edible and medicin...

  16. Book Reviews

    Redactie KITLV

    2004-01-01

    -Bill Maurer, Mimi Sheller, Consuming the Caribbean: From Arawaks to Zombies. New York: Routledge, 2003. ix + 252 pp. -Norman E. Whitten, Jr., Richard Price ,The root of roots: Or, how Afro-American anthropology got its start. Chicago: Prickly Paradigm Press/University of Chicago Press, 2003. 91 pp., Sally Price (eds) -Holly Snyder, Paolo Bernardini ,The Jews and the expansion of Europe to the West, 1450-1800. New York: Berghahn Books, 2001. xv + 567 pp., Norman Fiering (eds) -Bridget Brereto...

  17. Book Reviews

    Elena Mancusi-Materi

    2002-01-01

    Book reviews: Helmore, K. and N. Singh, Sustainable Livelihoods – Building on the Wealth of the poor (reviewed by Elena Mancusi-Materi); Scoones, I (ed.), Dinamics and Diversity: Soil fertility and farming livelihoods in africa (reviewed by Elena Mancusi-Materi); Uphoff, N. (ed.), Agroecological Innovations – Increasing Food Production with Pariciatory Development (reviewed by Elena Mancusi-Materi); Marten, G.G., Human Ecology, Basic Concepts for Sustianable Development (reviewed by Siobhán K...

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Complete Physics

    Carson, Simon

    2000-03-01

    This book contains all the essential concepts for GCSE (or equivalent) physics courses or for general science courses at Key Stage 4. It claims to be ideal for use as a bridging resource for those intending to take physics beyond GCSE: it is no surprise, then, that the book is written at a level above that of the average Key Stage 4 student. It includes material not included in many GCSE syllabuses; this is clearly identified in the contents pages. It would be a useful resource for more able students at GCSE or for beginning A-level students. The layout of the book is attractive. It is well illustrated and colourful. Some of the illustrations are striking: each of the 12 main sections of the book begins with a title page that includes some unusual photographs illustrating physical ideas. Section 2, Forces and Motion, has a photograph of a bungee jumper leaping from the Sky Tower in New Zealand, taken at night looking along the length of the tower from its foot. Section 9, Magnets and Currents, has a computer-generated picture of the magnetic field in a fusion generator. These pictures, as well as contributing to the attractiveness of the book, could be used to initiate discussions of some of the physics. However, there are pictures that serve little useful purpose: a photograph of a recording station for seismic waves looks like any other building lit up at night. A photograph of a rock band in the middle of a section on sound carries no explanatory caption at all and is purely decorative. Other illustrations - in a variety of styles - do illustrate some physical ideas very well: the diagrams of motors and generators, for instance, are far clearer than my efforts on the blackboard! The book is divided into 14 sections with titles reflecting the traditional divisions of physics syllabuses, together with a beginning section on measurement and units and two final sections, `History of Key Ideas' and `Experimental Physics'. The first section, `Measurement and Units

  19. Book Review:

    Folacci, Antoine; Jensen, Bruce

    2003-12-01

    Thanks to its impressive success in the second half of the 20th century, both in high-energy physics and in critical phenomena, quantum field theory has enjoyed an abundant literature. We therefore greet yet another book on this subject with caution: what can a monograph on quantum field theory bring now that is new, either conceptually or pedagogically? But when it is written by a physicist such as Bryce DeWitt, who has made his own contribution to the collection of field theory books with The Global Approach to Quantum Field Theory, all suspicion is naturally abandoned. One knows in advance that this book can only lead to a genuine enrichment of the literature. DeWitt has made a formidable contribution to various areas of physics: general relativity, the interpretation of quantum mechanics, and most of all the quantization of non-Abelian gauge theories and quantum gravity. In addition, his pedagogical publications, especially the Les Houches schools of 1963 and 1983 [1, 2], have had a great impact on quantum field theory. All this makes the reader keen to pick up his new work and a deeper reading confirms the reviewer's initial enthusiasm. We must begin by alerting the potential readers of this book that it cannot be compared to any other book in the field (unless of course we are talking about references [1] and [2], of which the book under review is an extension and reworking). This uniqueness applies to both the scientific content and the way the ideas are presented. A quick description of this book and a brief explanation of its title should convince the reader of the book's unique quality. For DeWitt, a central concept of field theory is that of `space of histories'. For a field varphii defined on a given spacetime M, the set of all varphii(x) for all x in all charts of M defines its history. It is the space Phi of all possible histories (dynamically allowed or not) of the fields defined on M which is called the `space of histories' by DeWitt. If only

  20. Book Reviews

    Jan Nederveen Pieterse; Gert Oostindie; Nancy Eberhardt; Niels Mulder; Akira Suehiro; C.L.J. van der Meer; W.A.I.M. Segers; Thomas Lindblad; Jeffrey C. Alexander; L. Laeyendecker; Jowa Imre Kis-Jovak; Nico de Jonge; Thomas Höllman; Huub de Jonge; K. Epskamp

    1991-01-01

    - Walter E.A. van Beek, Ph. Quarles van Ufford, Religion and development; Towards an integrated approach, Amsterdam: Free University Press, 1988., M. Schoffeleers (eds.) - J.H. de Beer, H.F. Tillema, A journey among the people of Central Borneo in word and picture, edited and with an introduction by Victor T. King, Singapore: Oxford University Press, 1989. 268 pp. - Chris de Beet, Richard Price, Alabi’s world. Baltimore and London: The John Hopkins University Press, 1990. xx + 444 pp. - G. Bo...

  1. The book and reading in the space of performance: the case of Jane Austen Book Club

    Carmen Irene Correa de Oliveira

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose to discuss the role of filmic narratives with the book as an object of representation in the context of the imaginary of shapes and types of knowledge, of ways of reading organization and of practices that have the book as object. Finally, we have the dialogical perspective of the works, its time, the subject readers and its context. For this project, we bring the filmic text The Jane Austen Book Club (2007, based on a book (The Jane Austen book club by Karen Joy Fowler, which focuses on personal and intimate dramas from people at different times of sharing, unfolding for six months, and that presents individual experiences which are mixed with the characters’ plots from the books of the English author. We highlight in the film, book and reading as narrative elements, characters accomplices of small dramas. In The Jane Austen Book Club, we perform an extrapolation in order to put the two moments - the performance and reading - in the practices developed by the participants of the club. They find the work of Austen in individual reading and in the performance that puts everyone in a continuous space of action and transformation. We believe, finally, that individual reading and the club meetings make it possible to think of the reception (individual reading and performance (reading/collective analysis in a combination that allows a constant revitalization of the work, in the case of Jane Austen.

  2. Picture a Protest: Analyzing Media Images Tweeted From Ferguson

    Holly S. Cowart; Lynsey M. Saunders; Ginger E. Blackstone

    2016-01-01

    This content analysis examines media depiction of events in Ferguson, Missouri, following the shooting of the unarmed teenager Michael Brown by a police officer. Using images from the Twitter feeds of nine major media outlets in the month following the shooting, it identifies themes present in those images. Descriptive statistics reveal differences in the roles of people who appear to be White and those who appear to be Black. The two groups are rarely pictured together. The visual narrative ...

  3. The conventional quark picture

    Dalitz, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    For baryons, mesons and deep inelastic phenomena the ideas and the problems of the conventional quark picture are pointed out. All observed baryons fit in three SU(3)-multiplets which cluster into larger SU(6)-multiplets. No mesons are known which have quantum numbers inconsistent with belonging to a SU(3) nonet or octet. The deep inelastic phenomena are described in terms of six structure functions of the proton. (BJ) [de

  4. Producing colour pictures from SCAN

    Robichaud, K.

    1982-01-01

    The computer code SCAN.TSK has been written for use on the Interdata 7/32 minicomputer which will convert the pictures produced by the SCAN program into colour pictures on a colour graphics VDU. These colour pictures are a more powerful aid to detecting errors in the MONK input data than the normal lineprinter pictures. This report is intended as a user manual for using the program on the Interdata 7/32, and describes the method used to produce the pictures and gives examples of JCL, input data and of the pictures that can be produced. (U.K.)

  5. Who speaks? Who looks? Who feels? Point of view in autobiographical narratives.

    Habermas, Tilmann

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, the author aims to substantiate Freud's claim that neurotic illness creates gaps in autobiographical narratives in terms of the narrator's stating and inducing perspectives. He sketches out the role of narrative perspective and the joint taking of a shared perspective by analyst and patient in psychoanalytic therapy. He introduces four ways of representing perspectives in narratives. Three degrees of narrative distortion are exemplified by three excerpts from life narratives and explored in terms of narrative perspective representation. The most comprehensive perspective representation is achieved in the first example by explicitly stating the present perspective of the narrator as well as the past perspective of the story's protagonist by use of mental verbs. In the second narrative, exclusive use of linguistic forms for inducing the protagonist's perspective both overwhelms the narrator and gives the listener an incomplete picture of what happened. Inconsistent motives, denial of responsibility and omission of detail render the third narrative even more difficult to follow. The author discusses the clinical significance of this exploratory analysis of perspectives in narratives in terms of claiming responsibility for one's past action and of level of defence mechanisms, and by highlighting the emotional impact on listeners, which the author suggests is the stronger the more perspectives are left out. He discusses analogies to countertransference. The analysis of narrative perspectives offers an approach for systematic research in psychoanalytic practice.

  6. The Development of Narrative Productivity, Syntactic Complexity, Referential Cohesion and Event Content in Four- to Eight-Year-Old Finnish Children

    Mäkinen, Leena; Loukusa, Soile; Nieminen, Lea; Leinonen, Eeva; Kunnari, Sari

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the development of narrative structure and the relationship between narrative productivity and event content. A total of 172 Finnish children aged between four and eight participated. Their picture-elicited narrations were analysed for productivity, syntactic complexity, referential cohesion and event content. Each measure…

  7. Book Review:

    Vespignani, A.

    2004-09-01

    Networks have been recently recognized as playing a central role in understanding a wide range of systems spanning diverse scientific domains such as physics and biology, economics, computer science and information technology. Specific examples run from the structure of the Internet and the World Wide Web to the interconnections of finance agents and ecological food webs. These networked systems are generally made by many components whose microscopic interactions give rise to global structures characterized by emergent collective behaviour and complex topological properties. In this context the statistical physics approach finds a natural application since it attempts to explain the various large-scale statistical properties of networks in terms of local interactions governing the dynamical evolution of the constituent elements of the system. It is not by chance then that many of the seminal papers in the field have been published in the physics literature, and have nevertheless made a considerable impact on other disciplines. Indeed, a truly interdisciplinary approach is required in order to understand each specific system of interest, leading to a very interesting cross-fertilization between different scientific areas defining the emergence of a new research field sometimes called network science. The book of Dorogovtsev and Mendes is the first comprehensive monograph on this new scientific field. It provides a thorough presentation of the forefront research activities in the area of complex networks, with an extensive sampling of the disciplines involved and the kinds of problems that form the subject of inquiry. The book starts with a short introduction to graphs and network theory that introduces the tools and mathematical background needed for the rest of the book. The following part is devoted to an extensive presentation of the empirical analysis of real-world networks. While for obvious reasons of space the authors cannot analyse in every detail all the

  8. Book Review:

    Arimondo, Ennio

    2004-07-01

    For many years the Institute of Physics has published books on hot topics based on a collection of reprints from different journals, including some remarks by the editors of each volume. The book on Optical Angular Momentum, edited by L Allen, S M Barnett and M J Padgett, is a recent addition to the series. It reproduces forty four papers originally published in different journals and in a few cases it provides direct access to works not easily accessible to a web navigator. The collection covers nearly a hundred years of progress in physics, starting from an historic 1909 paper by Poynting, and ending with a 2002 paper by Padgett, Barnett and coworkers on the measurement of the orbital angular momentum of a single photon. The field of optical angular momentum has expanded greatly, creating an interdisciplinary attraction for researchers operating in quantum optics, atomic physics, solid state physics, biophysics and quantum information theory. The development of laser optics, especially the control of single mode sources, has made possible the specific design of optical radiation modes with a high degree of control on the light angular momentum. The editors of this book are important figures in the field of angular momentum, having contributed to key progress in the area. L Allen published an historical paper in 1999, he and M J Padgett (together with M Babiker) produced few years ago a long review article which is today still the most complete basic introduction to the angular momentum of light, while S M Barnett has contributed several high quality papers to the progress of this area of physics. The editors' choice provides an excellent overview to all readers, with papers classified into eight different topics, covering the basic principles of the light and spin and orbital angular momentum, the laboratory tools for creating laser beams carrying orbital angular momentum, the optical forces and torques created by laser beams carrying angular momentum on

  9. When Commas Meet Kryptonite: Classroom Lessons from the Comic Book Project. Language and Literacy Series

    Bitz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This definitive book presents the newest research linking graphic narratives and literacy learning, as well as the tools teachers will need to make comic book projects a success in their classrooms. The Comic Book Project (www.comicbookproject.org) is an internationally celebrated initiative where children plan, write, design, and publish original…

  10. Book Review: Galactic Encounters

    Balasis, Georgios, E-mail: gbalasis@noa.gr [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2016-05-23

    “Galactic Encounters” by Sheehan and Conselice provides a view of galaxies telling the story of how astronomers have pieced together what is known about the modern view of the Universe. The book helps the reader to understand “why” we know what we do, not simply “what,” starting with the development of the telescope that coincides with the modern picture of the Universe. William Sheehan is a noted historian of astronomy but also a Doctor of Medicine, specializing in psychiatry. In this perspective, he has a unique insight into the personalities of the pioneering figures of the history of science. Christopher Conselice is a Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Nottingham, who studies the formation of galaxies, addressing the issue of “how” rather than “when” galaxies form. Reading the book, amateur astronomers would have been able to feel what actually drives them: “it is the desire to participate in this vast universe, in their own small way,…and not let the experts do everything for them.” I have to admit that I have also quite enjoyed the author's remark pertinent to the history and philosophy of science about the distinction, nowadays, between “polymaths” and “monomaths.”.

  11. Proofs from THE BOOK

    Aigner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This revised and enlarged fifth edition features four new chapters, which contain highly original and delightful proofs for classics such as the spectral theorem from linear algebra, some more recent jewels like the non-existence of the Borromean rings and other surprises. From the Reviews "... Inside PFTB (Proofs from The Book) is indeed a glimpse of mathematical heaven, where clever insights and beautiful ideas combine in astonishing and glorious ways. There is vast wealth within its pages, one gem after another. ... Aigner and Ziegler... write: "... all we offer is the examples that we have selected, hoping that our readers will share our enthusiasm about brilliant ideas, clever insights and wonderful observations." I do. ... " Notices of the AMS, August 1999 "... This book is a pleasure to hold and to look at: ample margins, nice photos, instructive pictures, and beautiful drawings ... It is a pleasure to read as well: the style is clear and entertaining, the level is close to elementary, the necessary b...

  12. Book Review: Galactic Encounters

    Balasis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    “Galactic Encounters” by Sheehan and Conselice provides a view of galaxies telling the story of how astronomers have pieced together what is known about the modern view of the Universe. The book helps the reader to understand “why” we know what we do, not simply “what,” starting with the development of the telescope that coincides with the modern picture of the Universe. William Sheehan is a noted historian of astronomy but also a Doctor of Medicine, specializing in psychiatry. In this perspective, he has a unique insight into the personalities of the pioneering figures of the history of science. Christopher Conselice is a Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Nottingham, who studies the formation of galaxies, addressing the issue of “how” rather than “when” galaxies form. Reading the book, amateur astronomers would have been able to feel what actually drives them: “it is the desire to participate in this vast universe, in their own small way,…and not let the experts do everything for them.” I have to admit that I have also quite enjoyed the author's remark pertinent to the history and philosophy of science about the distinction, nowadays, between “polymaths” and “monomaths.”

  13. Book Review

    Adrian Brown

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available “Numerical Methods for Special Functions” by Gil, Seguar and Temme is a collection of methods and approaches for finding the most efficient and accurate ways of computing values of functions that have no general definition. “Numerical Methods for Special Functions” might appear at first glance to be a boring and perhaps dry subject for non-mathematicians, and indeed it is a little difficult to approach without being an expert in the area, but if you do find yourself in need of some hints for the best implementations available, this book might be a life saver.

  14. Golden book

    2004-01-01

    On 19 October, CERN reached the climax of its Jubilee with the official celebration in the presence of very high representatives of the Member and Observer States. Above, one of the high moments of the day: the signing of the golden book by the King of Spain, Juan Carlos, and at his right the Director-General of CERN, Robert Aymar, the President of the Swiss Confederation, Joseph Deiss, and the President of the Republic of France, Jacques Chirac. A complete report of this event will be in the next issue of the Bulletin.

  15. Best Books 1982.

    School Library Journal, 1982

    1982-01-01

    This annotated bibliography lists 45 children's books and 29 young adult books selected by School Library Journal's Book Review staff and Young Adult Review committee, respectively. Arrangement is alphabetical by author with the grade level indicated for children's books. (EJS)

  16. Organizational Remembering as Narrative

    Musacchio Adorisio, Anna Linda

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on organizational remembering in banking. To provide an alternative to the repository image of memory in organization, organizational remembering is conceptualized as narrative, where narrative represents a way to organize the selection and interpretation of the past....... The narrative perspective deals with both the experiential and contextual nature of remembering by addressing concerns raised by critiques of organizational memory studies, namely, the subjective experience of remembering and the social and historical context in which remembering takes place. Antenarrative...... the narrative perspective reveals ruptures and ambiguities that characterize organizational remembering that would remain hidden in the organizational memory studies approach....

  17. Book Review

    Kragh, Helge

    2015-11-01

    Ever since the days of William Blake there has been an underground resistance against the soulless yet triumphant science and its unholy alliance with money, technology and political power. With the nearly undisputed hegemony that science and technological innovation has attained in the post-World War II era, this kind of resistance has resulted in numerous books and articles that in different ways warn against the dark sides of science and the socio-economic system that nourishes a science in degeneration. Classical examples include Herbert Marcuse's One-Dimensional Man (1964), Jacques Ellul's The Technological Society (1965), Theodore Roszak's The Making of a Counter Culture (1968), and Paul Feyerabend's Science in a Free Society (1978). A fair part of the literature written by sociologists and philosophers is not only critical to trends in modern science, but tends to or is overtly anti-science. The book under review belongs in some respects to this heterogeneous literary tradition, but Twilight of the Scientific Age is primarily directed against the institutional system of science and its associated ideology and not against science itself. Indeed, the author is himself a practicing scientist, an astrophysicist, and he emphasizes several times that he firmly believes in science, even that he loves it. He is not a "stupid cultural relativist," he asserts (p. 11), but a critical freethinker independent of dogmatic beliefs.

  18. Book Review:

    Webb, Steve

    2008-11-01

    The Polish physicist Józio (Joseph, Josh, Jo) Rotblat was catapulted into the public eye when he (and the 'Pugwash Conferences' organization) received the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize. His life prior to that had been most distinguished but conducted well out of the public eye. Born and raised as a Jewish physicist in pre-World War II Poland, and thus potentially educationally disadvantaged, he battled away for education and scientific achievement. He came to Liverpool University just before the outbreak of World War II, worked in James Chadwick's laboratory on the early beginnings of neutron fission physics, moved to Los Alamos to take part in the US-UK collaborative Manhattan Project to build a nuclear bomb and was motivated by a desire to rid Poland of Nazi 'racial cleansing'. On realizing the US-UK goal was somewhat wider, he resigned this work and dedicated his life to the peaceful uses of radiation and the campaigns to rid the world of the potential world-eliminating possibility of nuclear war. For this purpose he interacted with Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell, and in July 1957 founded the 'Pugwash Conferences', named for a small fishing village in Nova Scotia, Canada where the first was held. Along the way his personal life was no less dramatic. Cruel events conspired, and his wife Tola remained in Poland and was killed in the Nazi extermination camp at Majdanek. He grieved for his beloved Poland and those left behind or unaccounted for. He was suspected by some Americans of being a spy and had his personal papers and family artefacts impounded. After the war he was Professor of Medical Physics at St Bartholomew's Hospital, London for 30 years up to retirement. After John Roberts, he was the second editor of this journal Physics in Medicine and Biology from 1961-72 (see e.g. Bob Burns' paper in our 50th birthday issue, 2006. Kit Hill's little book which chronicles the life and times of Rotblat weaves together the key events in his personal and professional

  19. Book Review:

    Poisson, E.

    2006-09-01

    The motion of a charged particle interacting with its own electromagnetic field is an area of research that has a long history; this problem has never ceased to fascinate its investigators. On the one hand the theory ought to be straightforward to formulate: one has Maxwell's equations that tell the field how to behave (given the motion of the particle), and one has the Lorentz-force law that tells the particle how to move (given the field). On the other hand the theory is fundamentally ambiguous because of the field singularities that necessarily come with a point particle. While each separate sub-problem can easily be solved, to couple the field to the particle in a self-consistent treatment turns out to be tricky. I believe it is this dilemma (the theory is straightforward but tricky) that has been the main source of the endless fascination. For readers of Classical and Quantum Gravity, the fascination does not end there. For them it is also rooted in the fact that the electromagnetic self-force problem is deeply analogous to the gravitational self-force problem, which is of direct relevance to future gravitational wave observations. The motion of point particles in curved spacetime has been the topic of a recent Topical Review [1], and it was the focus of a recent Special Issue [2]. It is surprising to me that radiation reaction is a subject that continues to be poorly covered in the standard textbooks, including Jackson's bible [3]. Exceptions are Rohrlich's excellent text [4], which makes a very useful introduction to radiation reaction, and the Landau and Lifshitz classic [5], which contains what is probably the most perfect summary of the foundational ideas (presented in characteristic terseness). It is therefore with some trepidation that I received Herbert Spohn's book, which covers both the classical and quantum theories of a charged particle coupled to its own field (the presentation is limited to flat spacetime). Is this the text that graduate students

  20. Radiodiagnosis of lung picture changes

    Kamenetskij, M.S.; Lezova, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    The roentgenological picture of changes of the lung picture in the case of different pathological states in the lungs and the heart, is described. A developed diagnostic algorithm for the syndrome of lung picture change and the rules of its application are given. 5 refs.; 9 figs

  1. Book Review:

    Poisson, E.

    2005-10-01

    The ever growing relevance of general relativity to astrophysics and cosmology continues to motivate the publication of new textbooks which put the theory in a fresh perspective informed by recent developments. In the last few years we have witnessed the appearance of two new books which reflect this trend, and which stand proud among the classic relativity texts. While the 1970s were the decade of Weinberg [1] and Misner et al [2], and the 80s the decade of Schutz [3] and Wald [4], this is clearly the decade of Hartle [5] and Carroll. Hartle has introduced a novel pedagogical approach to teaching general relativity, which he convincingly argues [6] should be done in the standard undergraduate physics curriculum. His 'physics-first approach' emphasizes physical phenomena and minimizes mathematical formalism. Hartle achieves a lot by introducing only the spacetime metric and the geodesic equation, which are the main tools needed to explore curved spacetime and extract physical consequences. To be sure, to explain how the metric is obtained in the first place does require a background of differential geometry and the formulation of the Einstein field equations. But in Hartle's book this material is wisely presented at a later stage, after an ample sampling of the physics of curved spacetime has motivated the need for the advanced mathematics. Carroll follows instead the traditional route, what Hartle calls the 'math-first approach', in which one introduces first the required mathematical formalism and only then derives the physical consequences. He is, of course, in good company, as this is the method followed in all existing textbooks (with Hartle's being the sole exception). Carroll's approach may not be original, but it is tried and true, and the result of Carroll's efforts is an excellent introduction to general relativity. The book covers the standard topics that would be found in virtually all textbooks (differential geometry, the field equations, linearized

  2. The polycentric picture

    Flensborg, Ingelise

    2008-01-01

    The polycentric picture The presentation introduces a dynamic view on children's drawings inspired by J.J.Gibson's ecological approach to visual perception. Empirical research in children's drawings will be the basis for the documentation of the fact that children's drawings contain several...... viewpoints and can be characterized as polycentric. I will talk about children's perception of environmental space and about the relations and the orientation they are establishing, which are used in the organisation of the pictorial space. The presentation serves the purpose to point out ontological...

  3. Book Review:

    Kiefer, C.

    2005-10-01

    The most difficult unsolved problem in fundamental theoretical physics is the consistent implementation of the gravitational interaction into a quantum framework, which would lead to a theory of quantum gravity. Although a final answer is still pending, several promising attempts do exist. Despite the general title, this book is about one of them - loop quantum gravity. This approach proceeds from the idea that a direct quantization of Einstein's theory of general relativity is possible. In contrast to string theory, it presupposes that the unification of all interactions is not needed as a prerequisite for quantum gravity. Usually one divides theories of quantum general relativity into covariant and canonical approaches. Covariant theories employ four-dimensional concepts in its formulation, one example being the path integral approach. Canonical theories start from a classical Hamiltonian version of the theory in which spacetime is foliated into spacelike hypersurfaces. Loop quantum gravity is a variant of the canonical approach, the oldest being quantum geometrodynamics where the fundamental configuration variable is the three-metric. Loop quantum gravity has developed from a new choice of canonical variables introduced by Abhay Ashtekar in 1986, the new configuration variable being a connection defined on a three-manifold. Instead of the connection itself, the loop approach employs a non-local version in which the connection is integrated over closed loops. This is similar to the Wilson loops used in gauge theories. Carlo Rovelli is one of the pioneers of loop quantum gravity which he started to develop with Lee Smolin in two papers written in 1988 and 1990. In his book, he presents a comprehensive and competent overview of this approach and provides at the same time the necessary technical background in order to make the treatment self-contained. In fact, half of the book is devoted to 'preparations' giving a detailed account of Hamiltonian mechanics, quantum

  4. Book Review:

    Walcher, J.

    2006-10-01

    This book is a find. Mariño meets the challenge of filling in less than 200 pages the need for an accessible review of topological gauge / gravity duality. He is one of the pioneers of the subject and a clear expositor. It is no surprise that reading this book is a great pleasure. The existence of dualities between gauge theories and theories of gravity remains one of the most surprising recent discoveries in mathematical physics. While it is probably fair to say that we do not yet understand the full reach of such a relation, the impressive amount of evidence that has accumulated over the past years can be regarded as a substitute for a proof, and will certainly help to delineate the question of what is the most fundamental quantum mechanical theory. As has been the case in the past, it is in the context of Witten's 'topological' quantum theories that the mathematical framework is well enough established to firmly ground, and fully benefit from, the development of the physical theories. This book makes an important contribution to this new chapter in the math / physics interaction. There are two main instances of topological gauge/gravity duality. In the A-model, Chern Simons gauge theory on the 3-sphere is related to the closed topological string theory on the local Calabi Yau 3-fold {\\mathcal O}_{{\\mathbb P}^1}(-1) \\oplus{\\mathcal O}_{{\\mathbb P}^1} (-1), also known as the resolved conifold (Gopakumar-Vafa duality). In the B-model, certain types of matrix models are related on the gravity side to topological strings on certain cousins of the deformed conifold (Dijkgraaf-Vafa duality). In both cases, and similarly to the more physical AdS/CFT correspondence, the duality can be discovered by realizing the gauge theory as the target space theory of open strings ending on particular D-branes in a geometry closely related to the closed string background of the gravity theory. The A-branes supporting Chern Simons theory are wrapped on the Lagrangian three

  5. Cultural adaptation of the Test of Narrative Language (TNL) into Brazilian Portuguese.

    Rossi, Natalia Freitas; Lindau, Tâmara de Andrade; Gillam, Ronald Bradley; Giacheti, Célia Maria

    To accomplish the translation and cultural adaptation of the Test of Narrative Language (TNL) into Brazilian Portuguese. The TNL is a formal instrument which assesses narrative comprehension and oral narration of children between the ages of 5-0 and 11-11 (years-months). The TNL translation and adaptation process had the following steps: (1) translation into the target language; (2) summary of the translated versions; (3) back-translation; (4) checking of the conceptual, semantics and cultural equivalence process and (5) pilot study (56 children within the test age range and from both genders). The adapted version maintained the same structure as the original version: number of tasks (both, three comprehension and oral narration), narrative formats (no picture, sequenced pictures and single picture) and scoring system. There were no adjustments to the pictures. The "McDonald's Story" was replaced by the "Snack Bar History" to meet the semantic and experiential equivalence of the target population. The other stories had semantic and grammatical adjustments. Statistically significant difference was found when comparing the raw score (comprehension, narration and total) of age groups from the adapted version. Adjustments were required to meet the equivalence between the original and the translated versions. The adapted version showed it has the potential to identify differences in oral narratives of children in the age range provided by the test. Measurement equivalence for validation and test standardization are in progress and will be able to supplement the study outcomes.

  6. Book Review:

    Israel, W.

    2006-07-01

    The evaporation of a black hole formed by the collapse of matter is a nonunitary process involving loss of information. At least, this is how it appears in Hawking's semiclassical description, in which gravity is not quantized and the emergent radiation appears thermal. Since unitarity is one of the pillars of quantum mechanics there has been an understandable reluctance to accept this as an ironclad conclusion. Conformal field theories in flat space are manifestly unitary, and the AdS/CFT correspondence therefore suggests that the information trapped in the depths of the hole must find some way to escape—a conclusion almost universally accepted today, at least among particle theorists. Just how it could escape remains a mystery, however, since nothing can escape without violating causality until the black hole has shrunk too far to hold much information. Gerard 't Hooft and the senior author of this book, Leonard Susskind, have been vocal advocates of the view that the information paradox poses a real crisis for physics requiring significant paradigm shifts. They suggest that locality must be given up as an objective property of physical phenomena (even on large scales) and replaced by a new principle of 'black hole complementarity'. Specifically, there are two very different ways to view the process of collapse and evaporation. To a free-falling observer, nothing unusual happens at the horizon and matter and information fall deep into the hole. To a stationary observer hovering just outside the hole it appears instead that the matter and information are deposited on the horizon (which he experiences as very hot because of his large acceleration), to be eventually re-emitted from there as Hawking radiation. According to 't Hooft and Susskind, these must be viewed as equally valid, 'complementary' descriptions of the same process. Black hole complementarity is essentially the statement (supported by operational arguments) that their simultaneous validity cannot

  7. Neutrino book

    Spiro, Michel

    1995-01-01

    André Rousset's book (in French - Gargamelle et les Courants Neutres - Ecole des Mines de Paris) tells the story of Gargamelle and the discovery at CERN in 1973 of neutral currents, the cornerstone of the electroweak theory. This vital discovery helped to give credence to the Standard Model of particle physics. Rousset is both an observer and one of the key figures in the story. His book is lively and well documented; in it he uses archive material to ensure the accuracy of his information on dates, choices and decisions. After an introduction to particle physics which puts into perspective the electroweak theory unifying weak and electromagnetic interactions, Rousset comes straight to the point. From the late 1950s onwards he was involved in the construction of the first heavy liquid bubble chambers by the BP1, BP2 and BP3 teams at the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris. For Gargamelle a bigger laboratory was needed, and it was at the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission) in Saclay that the chamber was designed by teams from the Saturne accelerator and the Ecole Polytechnique. However, the decision to build Gargamelle was taken in 1965 through the impetus of André Lagarrigue, in defiance of the normal CERN procedures. Gargamelle was then in competition with the other big bubble chamber project, BEBC; was it really necessary to build two big chambers? The decision by Francis Perrin and the CEA to contribute ''generously'' to the project was probably what swung the decision. Construction took five years, during which many problems were encountered, right up to the fault in the main part of the chamber which caused delays and, a few years later, was to prove fatal to the detector. As Rousset correctly states, Gargamelle was probably the first big detector designed to be built on industrial lines, in direct cooperation with industry. The reward: the first neutrino interaction was photographed on 28 January 1971

  8. Confronting History: Holocaust Books for Children (Practical Reflections).

    Rudman, Masha Kabakow; Rosenberg, Susan P.

    1991-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive picture of current Holocaust literature, largely for readers age 10 and older. Describes books that look at individual responsibility, group responsibility, non-Jewish perspectives, and Jewish resistance and survivors' stories. Explores nonfiction works for varying ages, and closes with a special book that takes the form…

  9. Diseño de una escala de valoración de álbumes ilustrados para educación infantil: una experiencia para la formación de futuros maestros como mediadores / Designing a picture-book rating scale for preschool education: an experience training future teachers as mediators

    Ana Martín-Macho Harrison

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Partiendo de la importancia del mediador en la educación literaria, se presenta una experiencia realizada con 46 estudiantes del Grado de Maestro en Educación Infantil de dos universidades (Castilla-La Mancha y Oviedo. Se pretendió desarrollar su capacidad para valorar lecturas literarias para el aula de infantil, así como detectar carencias formativas. Utilizando una metodología de investigación-acción, se diseñó un plan de acción que se evaluó teniendo en cuenta: un cuestionario inicial, la observación participante, las tareas realizadas y unos cuestionarios finales de estudiantes y docentes. Siguiendo un enfoque de clase invertida, los participantes se documentaron y elaboraron colaborativamente una escala de valoración de álbumes que aplicaron posteriormente en una selección de obras. Los resultados indican que se ejercitó el pensamiento crítico de los estudiantes y se mejoró su formación como mediadores, aunque persisten algunas ideas erróneas sobre literatura infantil que confirman la necesidad de profundizar en este tipo de experiencias. mediator in literary education, this paper presents an experience carried out with 46 students of the Degree in Preschool Education at two Spanish universities (Castilla-La Mancha and Oviedo. The aim was to develop their ability to value literary reads for the preschool classroom, as well as to detect their training needs. By using an action research method, an action plan was designed and subsequently assessed taking into account: an initial questionnaire, participant observation, tasks carried out and both students’ and lecturers’ final questionnaires. Following a flipped classroom approach, participants read and collaboratively elaborated a rating scale for picture books which they then applied to a selection of works. Results indicate that students’ critical thinking was exercised and that their training as mediators improved. Nevertheless, some erroneous ideas

  10. Narrative, history and self

    Køster, Allan

    There is a strong tradition in psychology and philosophy, claiming that the self is a narrative construction. The paper examines this idea and concludes that the narrative self is not a viable theoretical construct, but that we should opt for an adjacent idea of a historical self. The aim is to e...

  11. Narrativity in Teaching Materials

    Poulsen, Jens Aage

    2010-01-01

    Analyse af narrative strukturer i nordiske læremidler om historie- og nordiske læreres forståelse og brug af læremidlerne i undervisningen......Analyse af narrative strukturer i nordiske læremidler om historie- og nordiske læreres forståelse og brug af læremidlerne i undervisningen...

  12. Narrative accounting disclosures

    Aerts, Walter; Clubb, C.; Imam, S.

    2015-01-01

    Narrative accounting disclosures are an integral part of the corporate financial reporting package. They are deemed to provide a view of the company “through the eyes of management”. The narratives represent management's construal of corporate events and are largely discretionary. Research in

  13. Narrative Processes across Childhood

    Mulvaney, Matthew Keefe

    2011-01-01

    According to the narrative perspective on personality development, personality is constructed largely by interpreting and representing experience in story format (scripts) over the course of the lifespan. The focus of this paper is to describe briefly the narrative perspective on personality development during childhood and adolescence, to discuss…

  14. Teaching about Narrative.

    Davies, Gill

    1978-01-01

    Raises issues involved in the study and teaching of narrative, with reference to both literature and film. Considers the function of realism in narrative fiction and the teaching of theory and practice of those writers and filmmakers who have challenged the realist text by alternative strategies. (JMF)

  15. Narrative History and Theory

    Tamura, Eileen H.

    2011-01-01

    While narrative history has been the prevailing mode in historical scholarship, its preeminence has not gone unquestioned. In the 1980s, the role of narrative in historical writing was "the subject of extraordinarily intense debate." The historical backdrop of this debate can be traced to the preceding two decades, when four groups of thinkers…

  16. An Education in Narratives

    Gallagher, Shaun

    2014-01-01

    I argue for a broad education in narratives as a way to address several problems found in moral psychology and social cognition. First, an education in narratives will address a common problem of narrowness or lack of diversity, shared by virtue ethics and the simulation theory of social cognition. Secondly, it also solves the "starting…

  17. Picture CSS3

    David, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    See how you can use Cascading Style Sheets 3, or CSS3, to quickly and easily increase your control over visual Web page design.   HTML 5, is the first major update to the core language of the Web in over a decade The focus of this book is on innovations that most directly effect Web site design and multimedia integration The companion Web site features working demonstrations and tutorial media for hands-on practice

  18. Narrating psychological distress

    Zinken, Jörg; Blakemore, Caroline; Zinken, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Psychological research has emphasized the importance of narrative for a person's sense of self. Building a coherent narrative of past events is one objective of psychotherapy. However, in guided self-help therapy the patient has to develop this narrative autonomously. Identifying patients......' narrative skills in relation to psychological distress could provide useful information about their suitability for self-help. The aim of this study was to explore whether the syntactic integration of clauses into narrative in texts written by prospective psychotherapy patients was related to mild...... to moderate psychological distress. Cross-clausal syntax of texts by 97 people who had contacted a primary care mental health service was analyzed. Severity of symptoms associated with mental health difficulties was assessed by a standardized scale (Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation outcome measure...

  19. Personal history, beyond narrative

    Køster, Allan

    2017-01-01

    on a distinction between history and narrative, I outline an account of historical becoming through a process of sedimentation and a rich notion of what I call historical selfhood on an embodied level. Five embodied existentials are suggested, sketching a preliminary understanding of how selves are concretely......Narrative theories currently dominate our understanding of how selfhood is constituted and concretely individuated throughout personal history. Despite this success, the narrative perspective has recently been exposed to a range of critiques. Whilst these critiques have been effective in pointing...... out the shortcomings of narrative theories of selfhood, they have been less willing and able to suggest alternative ways of understanding personal history. In this article, I assess the criticisms and argue that an adequate phenomenology of personal history must also go beyond narrative. Drawing...

  20. Narrator-in-Chief

    Herron, Mark A.

    . The use of narratives of and by presidents in the White House can be seen as an essential part of the ceremonial role of the presidency. This use of narratives in epideictic speech has increased with modern day interests in the domestic life of the president, and the use of visual mass media......The dissertation Narrator-in-Chief: The Narrative Rhetoric of Barack Obama seeks to show how the concept of “narrative” can be used in rhetorical criticism of presidential speeches, particularly when considering the speeches and the biographical text, Dreams from My Father (1995), of Barack Obama...... as a communication platform for the president. While this has been described as a negative development (Stuckey, 1991; Salmon, 2010) this dissertation argues that narrative rhetoric should not be seen only as a negative part of political rhetoric, but also as a possibly vital way to educate the audience on issues...