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Sample records for nanowire structure including

  1. Nanowire structures and electrical devices

    Bezryadin, Alexey; Remeika, Mikas

    2010-07-06

    The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive segments and conductance constricting segments of a nanowire, such as metallic, superconducting or semiconducting nanowire. The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive nanowire segments and conductance constricting nanowire segments having accurately selected phases including crystalline and amorphous states, compositions, morphologies and physical dimensions, including selected cross sectional dimensions, shapes and lengths along the length of a nanowire. Further, the present invention provides methods of processing nanowires capable of patterning a nanowire to form a plurality of conductance constricting segments having selected positions along the length of a nanowire, including conductance constricting segments having reduced cross sectional dimensions and conductance constricting segments comprising one or more insulating materials such as metal oxides.

  2. Functionalised Silver Nanowire Structures

    Andrew, Piers; Ilie, Adelina

    2007-01-01

    Crystalline silver nanowires 60-100 nm in diameter and tens of micrometres in length have been fabricated using a low temperature, solution synthesis technique. We explore the potential of this method to produce functional nanowire structures using two different strategies to attach active molecules to the nanowires: adsorption and displacement. Initially, as-produced silver nanowires capped with a uniaxial-growth-inducing polymer layer were functionalised by solution adsorption of a semiconducting conjugated polymer to generate fluorescent nanowire structures. The influence of nanowire surface chemistry was investigated by displacing the capping polymer with an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer, followed by solution adsorption functionalisation. The success of molecular attachment was monitored by electron microscopy, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy. We examined how the optical properties of such adsorbed molecules are affected by the metallic nanowires, and observed transfer of excitation energy between dye molecules mediated by surface plasmons propagating on the nanowires. Non-contact dynamic force microscopy measurements were used to map the work-function of individual wires, revealing inhomogeneity of the polymer surface coverage

  3. Diamond nanowires: fabrication, structure, properties, and applications.

    Yu, Yuan; Wu, Liangzhuan; Zhi, Jinfang

    2014-12-22

    C(sp(3) )C-bonded diamond nanowires are wide band gap semiconductors that exhibit a combination of superior properties such as negative electron affinity, chemical inertness, high Young's modulus, the highest hardness, and room-temperature thermal conductivity. The creation of 1D diamond nanowires with their giant surface-to-volume ratio enhancements makes it possible to control and enhance the fundamental properties of diamond. Although theoretical comparisons with carbon nanotubes have shown that diamond nanowires are energetically and mechanically viable structures, reproducibly synthesizing the crystalline diamond nanowires has remained challenging. We present a comprehensive, up-to-date review of diamond nanowires, including a discussion of their synthesis along with their structures, properties, and applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Silicon nanowires: structure and properties

    Nezhdanov, A.V.; Mashin, A.I.; Razuvaev, A.G.; Ershov, A.V.; Ignatov, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    An attempt to grow silicon nanowires has been made by electron beam evaporation on highly oriented pyrolytic substrate. Needle-like objects are located along the normal to a substrate (density 2 x 10 11 cm -2 ). For modeling quasi-one-dimensional objects calculations of nuclear structure and energy spectra have been accomplished. A fullerene-like structure Si 24 is proposed as a basic atomic configuration of silicon nanowires [ru

  5. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2013-12-06

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  6. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    Montes Muñ oz, Enrique; Gkionis, Konstantinos; Rungger, Ivan; Sanvito, Stefano; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  7. Vibration of Piezoelectric Nanowires Including Surface Effects

    R. Ansari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, surface and piezoelectric effects on the vibration behavior of nanowires (NWs are investigated by using a Timoshenko beam model. The electric field equations and the governing equations of motion for the piezoelectric NWs are derived with the consideration of surface effects. By the exact solution of the governing equations, an expression for the natural frequencies of NWs with simply-supported boundary conditions is obtained. The effects of piezoelectricity and surface effects on the vibrational behavior of Timoshenko NWs are graphically illustrated. A comparison is also made between the predictions of Timoshenko beam model and those of its Euler-Bernoulli counterpart. Additionally, the present results are validated through comparison with the available data in the literature.

  8. Novel Crystal Structure C60 Nanowire

    Mickelson, William; Aloni, Shaul; Han, Weiqiang; Cumings, John; Zettl, Alex

    2003-03-01

    We have created insulated C60 nanowire by packing C60 molecules into the interior of insulating boron nitride (BN) nanotubes. For small-diameter BN tubes, the wire consists of a linear chain of C60's. With increasing BN tube inner diameter, novel C60 stacking configurations are obtained (including helical, hollow core, and incommensurate) which are unknown for bulk or thin film forms of C60. C60 in BN nanotubes presents a model system for studying the properties of new dimensionally-constrained "silo" crystal structures.

  9. Structural Investigations of Nanowires Using X-Ray Diffraction

    Stankevic, Tomas

    Advancements in growth of the nanowire-based devices opened another dimension of possible structures and material combinations, which nd their applications in a wide variety of elds, including everyday life. Characterization of such devices brings its own challenges and here we show that X-rays oer...

  10. Electronic Structure of Cdse Nanowires Terminated With Gold ...

    Cadmium selenide nanowires in the wurtzite bulk phase, connected to gold electrodes are studied using local density approximation. The short wire is fully metalized by metal-induced gap states. For longer wires, a gap similar to that in bare cadmium selenide nanowires is observed near the center while sub-gap structure ...

  11. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    P. Anandan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resistance shows significant improvement as the channel length decreases. The effects of thermal noise including self-heating of the device are explored. Moreover, significant reduction in noise with respect to channel thermal resistance, gate length, and biasing is analyzed.

  12. Synthesis of silicon nanowires and novel nano-dendrite structures

    Sinha, Saion; Gao Bo; Zhou, Otto

    2004-01-01

    We report a study on the effects of various parameters on the synthesis of silicon nanowires (5--50 nm in diameter) by pulsed laser ablation. A novel silicon nanodendrite structure is observed by changing some of the growth parameters abruptly. This growth mechanism is explained by a qualitative model. These nanodendrites show a promise of being used as a template in fabricating nanocircuits. Thermal quantum confinement effects were also observed on the silicon nanowires and have been reported

  13. Structural and electrochemical study of the reaction of lithium with silicon nanowires

    Chan, Candace K.; Ruffo, Riccardo; Hong, Seung Sae; Huggins, Robert A.; Cui, Yi

    2009-01-01

    The structural transformations of silicon nanowires when cycled against lithium were evaluated using electrochemical potential spectroscopy and galvanostatic cycling. During the charge, the nanowires alloy with lithium to form an amorphous Lix

  14. First-principles study of structural & electronic properties of pyramidal silicon nanowire

    Jariwala, Pinank; Thakor, P. B. [Department of Physics, Veer Narmad South Gujarat University, Surat 395 007, Gujarat (India); Singh, Deobrat; Sonvane, Y. A., E-mail: yasonvane@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395 007 (India); Gupta, Sanjeev K. [Department of Physics, St. Xavier’s College, Ahmedabad 38 0009 (India)

    2016-05-23

    We have investigated the stable structural and electronic properties of Silicon (Si) nanowires having different cross-sections with 5-7 Si atoms per unit cell. These properties of the studied Si nanowires were significantly changed from those of diamond bulk Si structure. The binding energy increases as increasing atoms number per unit cell in different SiNWs structures. All the nanowires structures are behave like metallic rather than semiconductor in bulk systems. In general, the number of conduction channels increases when the nanowire becomes thicker. The density of charge revealed delocalized metallic bonding for all studied Si nanowires.

  15. Optimal design of aperiodic, vertical silicon nanowire structures for photovoltaics.

    Lin, Chenxi; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2011-09-12

    We design a partially aperiodic, vertically-aligned silicon nanowire array that maximizes photovoltaic absorption. The optimal structure is obtained using a random walk algorithm with transfer matrix method based electromagnetic forward solver. The optimal, aperiodic structure exhibits a 2.35 times enhancement in ultimate efficiency compared to its periodic counterpart. The spectral behavior mimics that of a periodic array with larger lattice constant. For our system, we find that randomly-selected, aperiodic structures invariably outperform the periodic array.

  16. Nonlocal continuum-based modeling of breathing mode of nanowires including surface stress and surface inertia effects

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2014-05-01

    Nonlocal and surface effects significantly influence the mechanical response of nanomaterials and nanostructures. In this work, the breathing mode of a circular nanowire is studied on the basis of the nonlocal continuum model. Both the surface elastic properties and surface inertia effect are included. Nanowires can be modeled as long cylindrical solid objects. The classical model is reformulated using the nonlocal differential constitutive relations of Eringen and Gurtin-Murdoch surface continuum elasticity formalism. A new frequency equation for the breathing mode of nanowires, including small scale effect, surface stress and surface inertia is presented by employing the Bessel functions. Numerical results are computed, and are compared to confirm the validity and accuracy of the proposed method. Furthermore, the model is used to elucidate the effect of nonlocal parameter, the surface stress, the surface inertia and the nanowire orientation on the breathing mode of several types of nanowires with size ranging from 0.5 to 4 nm. Our results reveal that the combined surface and small scale effects are significant for nanowires with diameter smaller than 4 nm.

  17. Nonlocal continuum-based modeling of breathing mode of nanowires including surface stress and surface inertia effects

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2014-01-01

    Nonlocal and surface effects significantly influence the mechanical response of nanomaterials and nanostructures. In this work, the breathing mode of a circular nanowire is studied on the basis of the nonlocal continuum model. Both the surface elastic properties and surface inertia effect are included. Nanowires can be modeled as long cylindrical solid objects. The classical model is reformulated using the nonlocal differential constitutive relations of Eringen and Gurtin–Murdoch surface continuum elasticity formalism. A new frequency equation for the breathing mode of nanowires, including small scale effect, surface stress and surface inertia is presented by employing the Bessel functions. Numerical results are computed, and are compared to confirm the validity and accuracy of the proposed method. Furthermore, the model is used to elucidate the effect of nonlocal parameter, the surface stress, the surface inertia and the nanowire orientation on the breathing mode of several types of nanowires with size ranging from 0.5 to 4 nm. Our results reveal that the combined surface and small scale effects are significant for nanowires with diameter smaller than 4 nm.

  18. Nonlocal continuum-based modeling of breathing mode of nanowires including surface stress and surface inertia effects

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal, E-mail: ghavanloo@shirazu.ac.ir [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71963-16548 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71963-16548 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafii-Tabar, Hashem [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Research Center for Medical Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-05-01

    Nonlocal and surface effects significantly influence the mechanical response of nanomaterials and nanostructures. In this work, the breathing mode of a circular nanowire is studied on the basis of the nonlocal continuum model. Both the surface elastic properties and surface inertia effect are included. Nanowires can be modeled as long cylindrical solid objects. The classical model is reformulated using the nonlocal differential constitutive relations of Eringen and Gurtin–Murdoch surface continuum elasticity formalism. A new frequency equation for the breathing mode of nanowires, including small scale effect, surface stress and surface inertia is presented by employing the Bessel functions. Numerical results are computed, and are compared to confirm the validity and accuracy of the proposed method. Furthermore, the model is used to elucidate the effect of nonlocal parameter, the surface stress, the surface inertia and the nanowire orientation on the breathing mode of several types of nanowires with size ranging from 0.5 to 4 nm. Our results reveal that the combined surface and small scale effects are significant for nanowires with diameter smaller than 4 nm.

  19. Facile method for preparing superoleophobic surfaces with hierarchical microcubic/nanowire structures

    Kwak, Wonshik; Hwang, Woonbong

    2016-02-01

    To facilitate the fabrication of superoleophobic surfaces having hierarchical microcubic/nanowire structures (HMNS), even for low surface tension liquids including octane (surface tension = 21.1 mN m-1), and to understand the influences of surface structures on the oleophobicity, we developed a convenient method to achieve superoleophobic surfaces on aluminum substrates using chemical acid etching, anodization and fluorination treatment. The liquid repellency of the structured surface was validated through observable experimental results the contact and sliding angle measurements. The etching condition required to ensure high surface roughness was established, and an optimal anodizing condition was determined, as a critical parameter in building the superoleophobicity. The microcubic structures formed by acid etching are essential for achieving the formation of the hierarchical structure, and therefore, the nanowire structures formed by anodization lead to an enhancement of the superoleophobicity for low surface tension liquids. Under optimized morphology by microcubic/nanowire structures with fluorination treatment, the contact angle over 150° and the sliding angle less than 10° are achieved even for octane.

  20. Chiral gold nanowires with boerdijk-coxeter-bernal structure

    Zhu, Yihan

    2014-09-10

    A Boerdijk-Coxeter-Bernal (BCB) helix is made of linearly stacked regular tetrahedra (tetrahelix). As such, it is chiral without nontrivial translational or rotational symmetries. We demonstrate here an example of the chiral BCB structure made of totally symmetrical gold atoms, created in nanowires by direct chemical synthesis. Detailed study by high-resolution electron microscopy illustrates their elegant chiral structure and the unique one-dimensional "pseudo-periodicity". The BCB-type atomic packing mode is proposed to be a result of the competition and compromise between the lattice and surface energy.

  1. Structural and electronic properties of AlX (X = P, As, Sb) nanowires: Ab initio study

    Srivastava, Anurag; Tyagi, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Present paper discusses the structural stability and electronic properties of AlX (X = P, As and Sb) nanowires in its linear, zigzag, ladder, square and hexagonal type atomic configurations. The structural optimization has been performed in self consistence manner by using generalized gradient approximation with revised Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof type parameterization. The study observes that in all the three nanowires, the square shaped atomic configuration is the most stable one. The calculated electronic band structures and density of states profile confirms the semiconducting behaviour of linear and zigzag shaped nanowires of AlP, whereas for AlAs and AlSb nanowires are metallic. The ground state properties have also been analysed in terms of bond length, bulk modulus and pressure derivative for all the nanowires along with their bulk counterpart. The lower bulk modulus of all the linear shaped geometries of AlX nanowires in comparison to its bulk counterpart indicates softening of the material at reduced dimension. -- Graphical abstract: Figure-Electronic band structure of zigzag shaped AlP nanowire. The present electronic band structures of zigzag and linear shaped AlP nanowires are showing a clear band gap at Γ point, however others (AlAs and AlSb) in zigzag as well as in linear shape show metallic behaviour. Highlights: ► Stability analysis of five geometries of AlX (X = P, As and Sb) nanowires studied. ► Square shaped geometry of AlX nanowires is most stable. ► Linear and zigzag shaped AlP nanowires are semiconducting. ► Bulk moduli of all the linear nanowires are lower than their bulk counterpart. ► Lower bulk moduli defends the softening of material.

  2. Structural study of disordered SiC nanowires by three-dimensional rotation electron diffraction

    Li, Duan; Guo, Peng; Wan, Wei; Zou, Ji; Shen, Zhijian; Guzi de Moraes, Elisângela; Colombo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The structure of disordered SiC nanowires was studied by using the three-dimensional rotation electron diffraction (RED) technique. The streaks shown in the RED images indicated the stacking faults of the nanowire. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging was employed to support the results from the RED data. It suggested that a 2H polytype is most possible for the nanowires. (paper)

  3. Structural investigation of GaInP nanowires using X-ray diffraction

    Kriegner, D.; Persson, Johan Mikael; Etzelstorfer, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this work the structure of ternary GaxIn1−xP nanowires is investigated with respect to the chemical composition and homogeneity. The nanowires were grown by metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy. For the investigation of ensemble fluctuations on several lateral length scales, X-ray diffraction...... gradients along the sample by recording diffraction patterns at different positions. In addition, compositional variations were found also within single nanowires in X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements....

  4. Optical and field emission properties of layer-structure GaN nanowires

    Cui, Zhen [Science School, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China); School of automation and Information Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China); Li, Enling, E-mail: Lienling@xaut.edu.cn [Science School, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China); Shi, Wei; Ma, Deming [Science School, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The layer-structure GaN nanowires with hexagonal-shaped cross-sections are produced via a process based on the CVD method. • The diameter of the layer-structure GaN nanowire gradually decreases from ∼500 nm to ∼200 nm along the wire axis. • The layer-structure GaN nanowire film possesses good field emission property. - Abstract: A layer-structure gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires, grown on Pt-coated n-type Si (1 1 1) substrate, have been synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The results show: (1) SEM indicates that the geometry structure is layer-structure. HRTEM indicates that GaN nanowire’s preferential growth direction is along [0 0 1] direction. (2) The room temperature PL emission spectrum of the layer-structure GaN nanowires has a peak at 375 nm, which proves that GaN nanowires have potential application in light-emitting nano-devices. (3) Field-emission measurements show that the layer-structure GaN nanowires film has a low turn-on field of 4.39 V/μm (at room temperature), which is sufficient for electron emission devices, field emission displays and vacuum nano-electronic devices. The growth mechanism for GaN nanowires has also been discussed briefly.

  5. Imaging, structural, and chemical analysis of silicon nanowires

    Barsotti, R.J. Jr.; Fischer, J.E.; Lee, C.H.; Mahmood, J.; Adu, C.K.W.; Eklund, P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Laser ablation has been used to grow silicon nanowires with an average silicon crystal core diameter of 6.7 nm±2.9 nm surrounded by an amorphous SiO x sheath of 1-2 nm, the smallest silicon wires reported in the literature. Imaging, chemical, and structural analysis of these wires are reported. Due to the growth temperature and the presence of calcium impurities and trace oxygen, two distinct types of wires are found. They appear to grow by two different processes. One requires a metal catalyst, the other is catalyzed by oxygen. Suggestions for controlled synthesis based on these growth mechanisms are made

  6. Theoretical investigation of structural and electronic properties of ultrathin nickle nanowire

    Sing, Deobrat; Sonvane, Y. A. [Department of Applied Physics, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat, 395007 (India)

    2016-04-13

    We have performed first principles calculations for structural and electronic properties of ultrathin Nickle nanowire. We have systematically investigated the equilibrium structure and electronic properties of 4-Ni square, 5-Ni pentagonal, 5- Ni Pyramidal, 6- Ni pentagonal, 6-Ni Hexagonal and 7-Ni Hexagonal structure nanowires having different cross-sections with 4-7 Ni atoms per unit cell. The structural properties of the studied Ni nanowires were greatly different from those of face centered cubic bulk Ni. For each wire the equilibrium lattice constant was obtained. In the present result all the nanowires are found to be metallic. The density of charge revealed delocalized metallic bonding for all studied Ni nanowires.

  7. Substrate-Dependent Differences in the Crystal Structures and Optical Properties of ZnSe Nanowires

    Keumyoung Seo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical and structural properties of ZnSe nanowires directly grown on three different substrates, SiO2, ITO, and graphene, were investigated. ZnSe nanowires grown on graphene and SiO2 were found to have cubic structures, while ZnSe nanowires grown on ITO had a mixed cubic and hexagonal structure. The main peaks in the photoluminescence spectra of ZnSe nanowires grown on SiO2, ITO, and graphene were located at 459, 627, and 627/460 nm, respectively. In addition, a field-emission light-emitting device was fabricated using ZnSe nanowires as a phosphor and graphene as an electrode. The device showed a red emission peak with Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage coordinates of (0.621, 0.315.

  8. Structurally controlled deposition of silicon onto nanowires

    Wang, Weijie; Liu, Zuqin; Han, Song; Bornstein, Jonathan; Stefan, Constantin Ionel

    2018-03-20

    Provided herein are nanostructures for lithium ion battery electrodes and methods of fabrication. In some embodiments, a nanostructure template coated with a silicon coating is provided. The silicon coating may include a non-conformal, more porous layer and a conformal, denser layer on the non-conformal, more porous layer. In some embodiments, two different deposition processes, e.g., a PECVD layer to deposit the non-conformal layer and a thermal CVD process to deposit the conformal layer, are used. Anodes including the nanostructures have longer cycle lifetimes than anodes made using either a PECVD or thermal CVD method alone.

  9. Design and synthesis of diverse functional kinked nanowire structures for nanoelectronic bioprobes.

    Xu, Lin; Jiang, Zhe; Qing, Quan; Mai, Liqiang; Zhang, Qingjie; Lieber, Charles M

    2013-02-13

    Functional kinked nanowires (KNWs) represent a new class of nanowire building blocks, in which functional devices, for example, nanoscale field-effect transistors (nanoFETs), are encoded in geometrically controlled nanowire superstructures during synthesis. The bottom-up control of both structure and function of KNWs enables construction of spatially isolated point-like nanoelectronic probes that are especially useful for monitoring biological systems where finely tuned feature size and structure are highly desired. Here we present three new types of functional KNWs including (1) the zero-degree KNW structures with two parallel heavily doped arms of U-shaped structures with a nanoFET at the tip of the "U", (2) series multiplexed functional KNW integrating multi-nanoFETs along the arm and at the tips of V-shaped structures, and (3) parallel multiplexed KNWs integrating nanoFETs at the two tips of W-shaped structures. First, U-shaped KNWs were synthesized with separations as small as 650 nm between the parallel arms and used to fabricate three-dimensional nanoFET probes at least 3 times smaller than previous V-shaped designs. In addition, multiple nanoFETs were encoded during synthesis in one of the arms/tip of V-shaped and distinct arms/tips of W-shaped KNWs. These new multiplexed KNW structures were structurally verified by optical and electron microscopy of dopant-selective etched samples and electrically characterized using scanning gate microscopy and transport measurements. The facile design and bottom-up synthesis of these diverse functional KNWs provides a growing toolbox of building blocks for fabricating highly compact and multiplexed three-dimensional nanoprobes for applications in life sciences, including intracellular and deep tissue/cell recordings.

  10. Band structure analysis in SiGe nanowires

    Amato, Michele [' Centro S3' , CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Palummo, Maurizia [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) (Italy); CNR-INFM-SMC, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma, ' Tor Vergata' , via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ossicini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.ossicini@unimore.it [' Centro S3' , CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, via Campi 213/A, 41100 Modena (Italy) and Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy) and European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility - ETSF (Italy) and Centro Interdipartimentale ' En and Tech' , Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2012-06-05

    One of the main challenges for Silicon-Germanium nanowires (SiGe NWs) electronics is the possibility to modulate and engine their electronic properties in an easy way, in order to obtain a material with the desired electronic features. Diameter and composition constitute two crucial ways for the modification of the band gap and of the band structure of SiGe NWs. Within the framework of density functional theory we present results of ab initio calculations regarding the band structure dependence of SiGe NWs on diameter and composition. We point out the main differences with respect to the case of pure Si and Ge wires and we discuss the particular features of SiGe NWs that are useful for future technological applications.

  11. Band structure analysis in SiGe nanowires

    Amato, Michele; Palummo, Maurizia; Ossicini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    One of the main challenges for Silicon-Germanium nanowires (SiGe NWs) electronics is the possibility to modulate and engine their electronic properties in an easy way, in order to obtain a material with the desired electronic features. Diameter and composition constitute two crucial ways for the modification of the band gap and of the band structure of SiGe NWs. Within the framework of density functional theory we present results of ab initio calculations regarding the band structure dependence of SiGe NWs on diameter and composition. We point out the main differences with respect to the case of pure Si and Ge wires and we discuss the particular features of SiGe NWs that are useful for future technological applications.

  12. Layered structure in core–shell silicon nanowires

    Van Tuan, Pham [Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST) and International Training Institute for Materials Science Hanoi University of Science and Technology, 01 Dai Co Viet Street,Hanoi 10000,Vietnam (Viet Nam); Anh Tuan, Chu; Thanh Thuy, Tran; Binh Nam, Vu [Institute of Materials Science (IMS), Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); Toan Thang, Pham [Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST) and International Training Institute for Materials Science Hanoi University of Science and Technology, 01 Dai Co Viet Street,Hanoi 10000,Vietnam (Viet Nam); Hong Duong, Pham, E-mail: duongphamhong@yahoo.com [Institute of Materials Science (IMS), Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Street, Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); Thanh Huy, Pham, E-mail: huy.phamthanh@hust.edu.vn [Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST) and International Training Institute for Materials Science Hanoi University of Science and Technology, 01 Dai Co Viet Street,Hanoi 10000,Vietnam (Viet Nam)

    2014-10-15

    Silicon nanowires (NWs) with core–shell structures were prepared using the Vapor–Liquid–Solid (VLS) method. The wires have lengths of several hundreds of nanometers and diameters in the range of 30–50 nm. Generally, these wires are too large to exhibit the quantum confinement effect of excitons in Si nanocrystals. However, the photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectra are similar to those of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in a SiO{sub 2} matrix, in which the recombination of quantum-confined excitons plays an important role. This effect occurs only when the average size of the silicon nanocrystals is smaller than 5 nm. To understand this discrepancy, TEM images of nanowires were obtained and analyzed. The results revealed that the cores of wires have a layered Si/SiO{sub 2} structure, in which the thickness of each layer is much smaller than its diameter. The temperature dependence of the PL intensity was recorded from 11 to 300 K; the result is in good agreement with a model that takes into account the energy splitting between the excitonic singlet and triplet levels. - Highlights: • The cores of the Si NWs have a layered Si/SiO{sub 2} structure. • The Si NWs were formed due to the phase separation of Si and SiO{sub 2} and the partial oxidization by residual oxygen. • Two processes, the reaction of Si and oxygen atoms and the combination between Si atoms, occur simultaneously. • The formation of the layered structures is associated with the self-limiting oxidation phenomenon in Si nanostructures.

  13. Fabrication of Nano-Micro Hybrid Structures by Replication and Surface Treatment of Nanowires

    Yeonho Jeong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanowire structures have attracted attention in various fields, since new characteristics could be acquired in minute regions. Especially, Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO is widely used in the fabrication of nanostructures, which has many nanosized pores and well-organized nano pattern. Using AAO as a template for replication, nanowires with a very high aspect ratio can be fabricated. Herein, we propose a facile method to fabricate a nano-micro hybrid structure using nanowires replicated from AAO, and surface treatment. A polymer resin was coated between Polyethylene terephthalate (PET and the AAO filter, roller pressed, and UV-cured. After the removal of aluminum by using NaOH solution, the nanowires aggregated to form a micropattern. The resulting structure was subjected to various surface treatments to investigate the surface behavior and wettability. As opposed to reported data, UV-ozone treatment can enhance surface hydrophobicity because the UV energy affects the nanowire surface, thus altering the shape of the aggregated nanowires. The hydrophobicity of the surface could be further improved by octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS coating immediately after UV-ozone treatment. We thus demonstrated that the nano-micro hybrid structure could be formed in the middle of nanowire replication, and then, the shape and surface characteristics could be controlled by surface treatment.

  14. Electronic structure effects on stability and quantum conductance in 2D gold nanowires

    Kashid, Vikas; Shah, Vaishali; Salunke, H. G.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the stability and conductivity of unsupported, two-dimensional infinite gold nanowires using ab initio density functional theory (DFT). Two-dimensional ribbon-like nanowires with 1–5 rows of gold atoms in the non-periodic direction and with different possible structures have been considered. The nanowires with >2 rows of atoms exhibit dimerization, similar to finite wires, along the non-periodic direction. Our results show that in these zero thickness nanowires, the parallelogram motif is the most stable. A comparison between parallelogram- and rectangular-shaped nanowires of increasing width indicates that zero thickness (111) oriented wires have a higher stability over (100). A detailed analysis of the electronic structure, reveals that the (111) oriented structures show increased delocalization of s and p electrons in addition to a stronger delocalization of the d electrons and hence are the most stable. The density of states show that the nanowires are metallic and conducting except for the double zigzag structure, which is semiconducting. Conductance calculations show transmission for a wide range of energies in all the stable nanowires with more than two rows of atoms. The conductance channels are not purely s and have strong contributions from the d levels, and weak contributions from the p levels.

  15. Effects of pH on the crystallographic structure and magnetic properties of electrodeposited cobalt nanowires

    Zafar, N.; Shamaila, S.; Sharif, R.; Wali, H.; Naseem, S.; Riaz, S.; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide templates with pore diameter of 40 nm and inter pore separation of 100 nm are prepared by two step anodization in 0.3 M oxalic acid solution. These templates are used to fabricate dc-deposited Co nanowires at different pH values of acidic bath. Continuous and densely packed nanowires having length ∼8 µm are observed. The hcp configuration appeared at moderate and high pH whereas both fcc and hcp phases are observed at low pH. However the crystallinity distorted at high pH due to formation of polycrystalline structure of cobalt nanowires. Alignment of easy-axis of nanowires can be tailored by varying pH of solution. - Highlights: • Variation in the structure of dc deposited cobalt nanowires can be obtained by varying pH of acidic bath. • The hcp structure is stable at room temperature with low voltage deposition for electrodeposited Co nanowires. Co with fcc structure, is stable at temperatures above 422 °C or at pH<3 with high potential. • The hcp (100) plane is obtained with pH∼3.5 and (101) is stable at pH∼5.5 due to variation in temperature inside the pores with respect to the pH. • Alignment of easy-axis of nanowires can be tailored by varying pH of solution

  16. High thermoelectric properties of (Sb, Bi)2Te3 nanowire arrays by tilt-structure engineering

    Tan, Ming; Hao, Yanming; Deng, Yuan; Chen, Jingyi

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative tilt-structure design concept for (Sb, Bi)2Te3 nanowire array assembled by high-quality nanowires with well oriented growth, utilizing a simple vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The unusual tilt-structure (Sb, Bi)2Te3 nanowire array with a tilted angle of 45° exhibits a high thermoelectric dimensionless figure-of-merit ZT = 1.72 at room temperature. The relatively high ZT value in contrast to that of previously reported (Sb, Bi)2Te3 materials and the vertical (Sb, Bi)2Te3 nanowire arrays evidently reveals the crucial role of the unique tilt-structure in favorably influencing carrier and phonon transport properties, resulting in a significantly improved ZT value. The transport mechanism of such tilt-structure is proposed and investigated. This method opens a new approach to optimize nano-structure in thin films for next-generation thermoelectric materials and devices.

  17. Structural and elastic properties of InN nanowires

    Quddus, Ehtesham B.; Wilson, Alina; Liu, Jie; Cai, Zhihua; Veereddy, Deepak; Tao, Xinyong; Li, Xiaodong; Koley, Goutam [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Webb, Richard A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and USC Nanocenter, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Structural and elastic properties of InN nanowires (NWs) have been investigated. It was observed that the NWs bend spontaneously or upon meeting an obstacle in their growth path at angles that are multiples of 30 . Lithographically patterned trenches and barriers were found to influence the growth direction of the NWs, which depending on the angle of incidence, grew along the barrier or got deflected from it. Young's modulus of InN NWs, measured by three point bending method using a NW suspended across a trench, was found to be 266 GPa, which is in between the moduli of bulk and thin film InN. Overall, the InN NW properties were found to be very suitable for applications in nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and sensors. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Quantitative magnetometry analysis and structural characterization of multisegmented cobalt–nickel nanowires

    Cantu-Valle, Jesus [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Díaz Barriga-Castro, Enrique [Centro de Investigación de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas/Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Pedro de Alba s/n, San Nicolás de Los Garza, Nuevo León 66450 (Mexico); Vega, Víctor; García, Javier [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, Oviedo 33007 (Spain); Mendoza-Reséndez, Raquel [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica. Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Pedro de Alba s/n, San Nicolás de Los Garza, Nuevo León 66450 (Mexico); Luna, Carlos [Centro de Investigación de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas/Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Pedro de Alba s/n, San Nicolás de Los Garza, Nuevo León 66450 (Mexico); Manuel Prida, Víctor [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, Oviedo 33007 (Spain); and others

    2015-04-01

    Understanding and measuring the magnetic properties of an individual nanowire and their relationship with crystalline structure and geometry are of scientific and technological great interest. In this work, we report the localized study of the magnetic flux distribution and the undisturbed magnetization of a single ferromagnetic nanowire that poses a bar-code like structure using off-axis electron holography (EH) under Lorentz conditions. The nanowires were grown by template-assisted electrodeposition, using AAO templates. Electron holography allows the visualization of the magnetic flux distribution within and surroundings as well as its quantification. The magnetic analysis performed at individual nanowires was correlated with the chemical composition and crystalline orientation of the nanowires. - Highlights: • The structure-magnetic property relationship of CoNi nanowires is determined. • Off axis electron holography for the magnetic nanowires is used for the analysis. • The magnetization is quantitatively obtained from the retrieved phase images. • These results lead to a better comprehension of the magneto-crystalline phenomena.

  19. Quantitative magnetometry analysis and structural characterization of multisegmented cobalt–nickel nanowires

    Cantu-Valle, Jesus; Díaz Barriga-Castro, Enrique; Vega, Víctor; García, Javier; Mendoza-Reséndez, Raquel; Luna, Carlos; Manuel Prida, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and measuring the magnetic properties of an individual nanowire and their relationship with crystalline structure and geometry are of scientific and technological great interest. In this work, we report the localized study of the magnetic flux distribution and the undisturbed magnetization of a single ferromagnetic nanowire that poses a bar-code like structure using off-axis electron holography (EH) under Lorentz conditions. The nanowires were grown by template-assisted electrodeposition, using AAO templates. Electron holography allows the visualization of the magnetic flux distribution within and surroundings as well as its quantification. The magnetic analysis performed at individual nanowires was correlated with the chemical composition and crystalline orientation of the nanowires. - Highlights: • The structure-magnetic property relationship of CoNi nanowires is determined. • Off axis electron holography for the magnetic nanowires is used for the analysis. • The magnetization is quantitatively obtained from the retrieved phase images. • These results lead to a better comprehension of the magneto-crystalline phenomena

  20. Atomistic theory of excitonic fine structure in InAs/InP nanowire quantum dot molecules

    Świderski, M.; Zieliński, M.

    2017-03-01

    Nanowire quantum dots have peculiar electronic and optical properties. In this work we use atomistic tight binding to study excitonic spectra of artificial molecules formed by a double nanowire quantum dot. We demonstrate a key role of atomistic symmetry and nanowire substrate orientation rather than cylindrical shape symmetry of a nanowire and a molecule. In particular for [001 ] nanowire orientation we observe a nonvanishing bright exciton splitting for a quasimolecule formed by two cylindrical quantum dots of different heights. This effect is due to interdot coupling that effectively reduces the overall symmetry, whereas single uncoupled [001 ] quantum dots have zero fine structure splitting. We found that the same double quantum dot system grown on [111 ] nanowire reveals no excitonic fine structure for all considered quantum dot distances and individual quantum dot heights. Further we demonstrate a pronounced, by several orders of magnitude, increase of the dark exciton optical activity in a quantum dot molecule as compared to a single quantum dot. For [111 ] systems we also show spontaneous localization of single particle states in one of nominally identical quantum dots forming a molecule, which is mediated by strain and origins from the lack of the vertical inversion symmetry in [111 ] nanostructures of overall C3 v symmetry. Finally, we study lowering of symmetry due to alloy randomness that triggers nonzero excitonic fine structure and the dark exciton optical activity in realistic nanowire quantum dot molecules of intermixed composition.

  1. Predictive simulations and optimization of nanowire field-effect PSA sensors including screening

    Baumgartner, Stefan; Heitzinger, Clemens; Vacic, Aleksandar; Reed, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    We apply our self-consistent PDE model for the electrical response of field-effect sensors to the 3D simulation of nanowire PSA (prostate-specific antigen) sensors. The charge concentration in the biofunctionalized boundary layer at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface is calculated using the propka algorithm, and the screening of the biomolecules by the free ions in the liquid is modeled by a sensitivity factor. This comprehensive approach yields excellent agreement with experimental current-voltage characteristics without any fitting parameters. Having verified the numerical model in this manner, we study the sensitivity of nanowire PSA sensors by changing device parameters, making it possible to optimize the devices and revealing the attributes of the optimal field-effect sensor. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Predictive simulations and optimization of nanowire field-effect PSA sensors including screening

    Baumgartner, Stefan

    2013-05-03

    We apply our self-consistent PDE model for the electrical response of field-effect sensors to the 3D simulation of nanowire PSA (prostate-specific antigen) sensors. The charge concentration in the biofunctionalized boundary layer at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface is calculated using the propka algorithm, and the screening of the biomolecules by the free ions in the liquid is modeled by a sensitivity factor. This comprehensive approach yields excellent agreement with experimental current-voltage characteristics without any fitting parameters. Having verified the numerical model in this manner, we study the sensitivity of nanowire PSA sensors by changing device parameters, making it possible to optimize the devices and revealing the attributes of the optimal field-effect sensor. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  3. Atomistic simulations of the structures of Pd-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles and nanowires

    Yun, Kayoung; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Lee, Jaegab; Kim, Jiyoung; Nam, Ho-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Bimetallic nanoalloys such as nanoparticles and nanowires are attracting significant attention due to their vast potential applications such as in catalysis and nanoelectronics. Notably, Pd-Pt nanoparticles/nanowires are being widely recognized as catalysts and hydrogen sensors. Compared to unary systems, alloys present more structural complexity with various compositional configurations. Therefore, it is important to understand energetically preferred atomic structures of bimetallic nanoallo...

  4. Structural characterization of Fe−Pd nanowires grown by electrodeposition using an acid electrolyte

    Domenichini, P. [Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Condó, A.M. [Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Haberkorn, N., E-mail: nhaberk@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2016-07-01

    Fe{sub 70}Pd{sub 30} nanostructures have potential application in actuators due to their conventional and magnetic shape memory. Here, we report the microstructure of electrodeposition grown Fe−Pd nanowires in which the process was confined to polycarbonate membranes with a nominal pore diameter of 200 nm. We used an acid electrolyte (pH ≈ 5) in which the solution was stabilized with sulfosalicylic acid. The average chemical concentration of the nanowires can be systematically shifted from rich palladium to rich iron by changing the growth potential. The study of the microstructure by transmission electron microscopy indicates high chemical inhomogeneities due to phase coexistence between rich palladium regions (with FCC structure) and rich iron regions. The latter present a combination of BCC and amorphous phases. The average chemical composition of the nanowires can be better adjusted by using a low frequency square wave voltage excitation (alternating rich Pd and rich Fe regions). However, independently of the growth process, the nanowires morphology collapses after thermal annealing. This could be ascribed to fragile grain boundaries due to the presence of amorphous hydroxides and chemical impurities produced during the electrochemical process. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Fe−Pd nanowires by electrodeposition is reported. • Structural characterization of the nanowires by transmission electron microscopy. • The synthesis of nanowires with austenitic phase is limited by fragile grain boundaries.

  5. Potential of silicon nanowires structures as nanoscale piezoresistors in mechanical sensors

    Messina, M; Njuguna, J

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a single square millimeter 3-axial accelerometer for bio-mechanics measurements that exploit the potential of silicon nanowires structures as nanoscale piezoresistors. The main requirements of this application are miniaturization and high measurement accuracy. Nanowires as nanoscale piezoresistive devices have been chosen as sensing element, due to their high sensitivity and miniaturization achievable. By exploiting the electro-mechanical features of nanowires as nanoscale piezoresistors, the nominal sensor sensitivity is overall boosted by more than 30 times. This approach allows significant higher accuracy and resolution with smaller sensing element in comparison with conventional devices without the need of signal amplification.

  6. GISAXS and SAXS studies on the spatial structures of Co nanowire arrays

    Cheng Weidong; Xing Xueqing; Wang Dehong; Gong Yu; Mo Guang; Cai Quan; Chen Zhongjun; Wu Zhonghua

    2011-01-01

    The spatial structures of magnetic Co nanowire array embedded in anodic aluminium membranes were investigated by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and conventional small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Compared with SEM observation, the GISAXS and SAXS measurements can get more overall structural information in a large-area scale. In this study, the two-dimensional GISAXS pattern was well reconstructed by using the IsGISAXS program. The results demonstrate that the hexagonal lattice formed by the Co nanowires is distorted (a≈105 nm, b≈95 nm). These Co nanowires are isolated into many structure domains with different orientations with a size of about 2 μm. The SAXS results have also confirmed that the nanopore structures in the AAM can be retained after depositing Co nanowires although the Co nanowires can not completely but only just fill up the nanopores. These results are helpful for understanding the global structure of the Co nanowire array. (authors)

  7. Enhancement of Light Absorption in Silicon Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices with Dielectric and Metallic Grating Structures.

    Park, Jin-Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Min-Soo; Zhang, Xing; Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Jungkil; Song, Kyung-Deok; No, You-Shin; Jeong, Kwang-Yong; Cahoon, James F; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2017-12-13

    We report the enhancement of light absorption in Si nanowire photovoltaic devices with one-dimensional dielectric or metallic gratings that are fabricated by a damage-free, precisely aligning, polymer-assisted transfer method. Incorporation of a Si 3 N 4 grating with a Si nanowire effectively enhances the photocurrents for transverse-electric polarized light. The wavelength at which a maximum photocurrent is generated is readily tuned by adjusting the grating pitch. Moreover, the electrical properties of the nanowire devices are preserved before and after transferring the Si 3 N 4 gratings onto Si nanowires, ensuring that the quality of pristine nanowires is not degraded during the transfer. Furthermore, we demonstrate Si nanowire photovoltaic devices with Ag gratings using the same transfer method. Measurements on the fabricated devices reveal approximately 27.1% enhancement in light absorption compared to that of the same devices without the Ag gratings without any degradation of electrical properties. We believe that our polymer-assisted transfer method is not limited to the fabrication of grating-incorporated nanowire photovoltaic devices but can also be generically applied for the implementation of complex nanoscale structures toward the development of multifunctional optoelectronic devices.

  8. Organic Nanowires

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Al-Shamery, Katharina

    Single crystalline nanowires from fluorescing organic molecules like para-phenylenes or thiophenes are supposed to become key elements in future integrated optoelectronic devices [1]. For a sophisticated design of devices based on nanowires the basic principles of the nanowire formation have...... atomic force microscopy and from polarized far-field optical microscopy for various prototypical molecules are reproduced by electrostatic and Monte Carlo calculations. Based on the crystal structure, predictions on the growth habit from other conjugated molecules become in reach....

  9. Structural and electronic properties of Pt induced nanowires on Ge(110)

    Zhang, L.; Bampoulis, P.; Safaei, A.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Houselt, A. van, E-mail: A.vanHouselt@utwente.nl

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Deposition of Pt induces regularly spaced (1.13 nm, 1.97 nm and 3.38 nm) nanowires on Ge(110). • In the troughs between the wires spaced 6× the Ge lattice consant pentagons are observed. • Spatially resolved STS reveals a filled electronic state at −0.35 eV. • This state has its highest intensity above the pentagons. • For 2 ML Pt, nanowires coexist with PtGe clusters, which become liquid like above 1040 K. - Abstract: The structural and electronic properties of Pt induced nanowires on Ge(110) surfaces have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron microscopy. The deposition of a sub-monolayer amount of Pt and subsequent annealing at 1100 (±30) K results into nanowires which are aligned along the densely packed [1–10] direction of the Ge(110) surface. With increasing Pt coverage the nanowires form densely packed arrays with separations of 1.1 ± 0.1 nm, 2.0 ± 0.1 nm and 3.4 ± 0.1 nm. Ge pentagons reside in the troughs for nanowire separations of 3.4 nm, however for smaller nanowire separations no pentagons are found. Spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements reveal a filled electronic state at −0.35 eV. This electronic state is present in the troughs as well as on the nanowires. The −0.35 eV state has the strongest intensity on the pentagons. For Pt depositions exceeding two monolayers, pentagon free nanowire patches are found, that coexist with Pt/Ge clusters. Upon annealing at 1040 K these Pt/Ge clusters become liquid-like, indicating that we are dealing with eutectic Pt{sub 0.22}Ge{sub 0.78} clusters. Low energy electron microscopy videos reveal the formation and spinodal decomposition of these eutectic Pt/Ge clusters.

  10. Structural and electronic properties of Si1−xGex alloy nanowires

    Iori, Federico; Ossicini, Stefano; Rurali, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    We present first-principles density-functional calculations of Si 1−x Ge x alloy nanowires. We show that given the composition of the alloy, the structural properties of the nanowires can be predicted with great accuracy by means of Vegard's law, linearly interpolating the values of a pure Si and a pure Ge nanowire of the same diameter. The same holds, to some extent, also for electronic properties such as the band-gap. We also assess to what extend the band-gap varies as a function of disorder, i.e., how it changes for different random realization of a given concentration. These results make possible to tailor the desired properties of SiGe alloy nanowires starting directly from the data relative to the pristine wires.

  11. Atomic structure of self-organizing iridium induced nanowires on Ge(001)

    Kabanov, N.S., E-mail: n.kabanov@utwente.nl [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 (Russian Federation); Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands); Heimbuch, R.; Zandvliet, H.J.W. [Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands); Saletsky, A.M.; Klavsyuk, A.L. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Ir/Ge(001) structure has been studied with DFT calculations and scanning tunneling microscopy. • Ir/Ge(001) nanowires are composed of Ge atoms and Ir atoms are located in subsurface positions. • The regions in the vicinity of the nanowires are very dynamic, even at temperatures as low as 77 K. - Abstract: The atomic structure of self-organizing iridium (Ir) induced nanowires on Ge(001) is studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The Ir induced nanowires are aligned in a direction perpendicular to the Ge(001) substrate dimer rows, have a width of two atoms and are completely kink-less. Density functional theory calculations show that the Ir atoms prefer to dive into the Ge(001) substrate and push up the neighboring Ge substrate atoms. The nanowires are composed of Ge atoms and not Ir atoms as previously assumed. The regions in the vicinity of the nanowires are very dynamic, even at temperatures as low as 77 K. Time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy measurements reveal that this dynamics is caused by buckled Ge substrate dimers that flip back and forth between their two buckled configurations.

  12. Growth, structure and phase transitions of epitaxial nanowires of III-V semiconductors

    Glas, F; Patriarche, G; Harmand, J C

    2010-01-01

    We review and illustrate the impact of TEM on the study of nanowires of non-nitride III-V semiconductors, with particular emphasis on the understanding of the thermodynamics and kinetics of their formation assisted by nano-sized catalyst particles. Besides providing basic information about the morphology of the nanowires and their growth rate as a function of diameter, TEM offers insights into the peculiar crystalline structure that they adopt. We discuss the formation of the unusual wurtzite hexagonal crystalline phase and that of planar stacking defects in these nanowires and show that they are kinetically controlled. We also demonstrate the transformation of wurtzite into cubic sphalerite upon epitaxial burying of the nanowires. Nanowires are particularly interesting in that they allow the fabrication of precisely positioned quantum dots with well-defined geometries. In this respect, we discuss the formation of strained quantum-size inclusions in nanowires, their critical dimensions and the kinetic and thermodynamic factors governing the changes of the crystalline structure that sometimes occur around a hetero-interface.

  13. Structural and electrical properties of conducting diamond nanowires.

    Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Lin, Yen-Fu; Jian, Wen-Bin; Chen, Huang-Chin; Panda, Kalpataru; Sundaravel, Balakrishnan; Dong, Chung-Li; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Lin, I-Nan

    2013-02-01

    Conducting diamond nanowires (DNWs) films have been synthesized by N₂-based microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The incorporation of nitrogen into DNWs films is examined by C 1s X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and morphology of DNWs is discerned using field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electron diffraction pattern, the visible-Raman spectroscopy, and the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy display the coexistence of sp³ diamond and sp² graphitic phases in DNWs films. In addition, the microstructure investigation, carried out by high-resolution TEM with Fourier transformed pattern, indicates diamond grains and graphitic grain boundaries on surface of DNWs. The same result is confirmed by scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Furthermore, the STS spectra of current-voltage curves discover a high tunneling current at the position near the graphitic grain boundaries. These highly conducting regimes of grain boundaries form effective electron paths and its transport mechanism is explained by the three-dimensional (3D) Mott's variable range hopping in a wide temperature from 300 to 20 K. Interestingly, this specific feature of high conducting grain boundaries of DNWs demonstrates a high efficiency in field emission and pave a way to the next generation of high-definition flat panel displays or plasma devices.

  14. BiOCl nanowire with hierarchical structure and its Raman features

    Tian Ye; Guo Chuanfei; Guo Yanjun; Wang Qi; Liu Qian

    2012-01-01

    BiOCl is a promising V-VI-VII-compound semiconductor with excellent optical and electrical properties, and has great potential applications in photo-catalysis, photoelectric, etc. We successfully synthesize BiOCl nanowire with a hierarchical structure by combining wet etch (top-down) with liquid phase crystal growth (bottom-up) process, opening a novel method to construct ordered bismuth-based nanostructures. The morphology and lattice structures of Bi nanowires, β-Bi 2 O 3 nanowires and BiOCl nanowires with the hierarchical structure are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transition electron microscope (TEM). The formation mechanism of such ordered BiOCl hierarchical structure is considered to mainly originate from the highly preferred growth, which is governed by the lattice match between (1 1 0) facet of BiOCl and (2 2 0) or (0 0 2) facet of β-Bi 2 O 3 . A schematic model is also illustrated to depict the formation process of the ordered BiOCl hierarchical structure. In addition, Raman properties of the BiOCl nanowire with the hierarchical structure are investigated deeply.

  15. Growth of InAs/InP core-shell nanowires with various pure crystal structures.

    Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Heurlin, Magnus; Wernersson, Lars-Erik; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A

    2012-07-20

    We have studied the epitaxial growth of an InP shell on various pure InAs core nanowire crystal structures by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. The InP shell is grown on wurtzite (WZ), zinc-blende (ZB), and {111}- and {110}-type faceted ZB twin-plane superlattice (TSL) structures by tuning the InP shell growth parameters and controlling the shell thickness. The growth results, particularly on the WZ nanowires, show that homogeneous InP shell growth is promoted at relatively high temperatures (∼500 °C), but that the InAs nanowires decompose under the applied conditions. In order to protect the InAs core nanowires from decomposition, a short protective InP segment is first grown axially at lower temperatures (420-460 °C), before commencing the radial growth at a higher temperature. Further studies revealed that the InP radial growth rate is significantly higher on the ZB and TSL nanowires compared to WZ counterparts, and shows a strong anisotropy in polar directions. As a result, thin shells were obtained during low temperature InP growth on ZB structures, while a higher temperature was used to obtain uniform thick shells. In addition, a schematic growth model is suggested to explain the basic processes occurring during the shell growth on the TSL crystal structures.

  16. Growth of InAs/InP core–shell nanowires with various pure crystal structures

    Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Heurlin, Magnus; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the epitaxial growth of an InP shell on various pure InAs core nanowire crystal structures by metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy. The InP shell is grown on wurtzite (WZ), zinc-blende (ZB), and {111}- and {110}-type faceted ZB twin-plane superlattice (TSL) structures by tuning the InP shell growth parameters and controlling the shell thickness. The growth results, particularly on the WZ nanowires, show that homogeneous InP shell growth is promoted at relatively high temperatures (∼500 °C), but that the InAs nanowires decompose under the applied conditions. In order to protect the InAs core nanowires from decomposition, a short protective InP segment is first grown axially at lower temperatures (420–460 °C), before commencing the radial growth at a higher temperature. Further studies revealed that the InP radial growth rate is significantly higher on the ZB and TSL nanowires compared to WZ counterparts, and shows a strong anisotropy in polar directions. As a result, thin shells were obtained during low temperature InP growth on ZB structures, while a higher temperature was used to obtain uniform thick shells. In addition, a schematic growth model is suggested to explain the basic processes occurring during the shell growth on the TSL crystal structures. (paper)

  17. Atomic-scale nanowires: physical and electronic structure

    Bowler, D R

    2004-01-01

    The technology to build and study nanowires with sizes ranging from individual atoms to tens of nanometres has been developing rapidly over the last few years. We survey the motivation behind these developments, and summarize the basics behind quantized conduction. Several of the different experimental techniques and materials systems used in the creation of nanowires are examined, and the range of theoretical methods developed both for examining open systems (especially their conduction properties) and for modelling large systems are considered. We present various noteworthy example results from the field, before concluding with a look at future directions. (topical review)

  18. Effect of the template-assisted electrodeposition parameters on the structure and magnetic properties of Co nanowire arrays

    Kac, Malgorzata, E-mail: malgorzata.kac@ifj.edu.pl [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Zarzycki, Arkadiusz [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Kac, Slawomir [AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Kopec, Marek; Perzanowski, Marcin; Dutkiewicz, Erazm M.; Suchanek, Katarzyna; Maximenko, Alexey; Marszalek, Marta [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Magnetic properties of Co nanowires in polycarbonate membranes were studied. • Electrodeposition stages were illustrated by SEM images. • Electrolyte and membrane parameters were optimized for Co nanowire fabrication. • Low temperature and potential favored nanowires with high coercivity and squareness. - Abstract: We studied the magnetic properties of Co nanowires electrodeposited in polycarbonate membranes as a function of the electrodeposition and template parameters. We showed the response of the current as a function of time, for nanowires prepared in various conditions. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that nanowires have polycrystalline hcp structure with small addition of fcc phase. Magnetic properties analyzed by SQUID measurements suggest that easy axis of magnetization follows the nanowire axis with coercivity increasing with a decrease of nanowire diameter and length. The largest coercivity, equal to 850 Oe, was obtained for nanowires with the diameter of 30 nm and the length of 1.5 μm. We find the coercivity to be insensitive to pH value. Low electrodeposition temperature, low cathodic potential, and medium pH are the synthesis parameters most beneficial for large coercivity and/or magnetic anisotropy with easy axis along nanowires.

  19. LDA+U and tight-binding electronic structure of InN nanowires

    Molina-Sánchez, A.; García-Cristóbal, A.; Cantarero, A.; Terentjevs, A.; Cicero, G.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we employ a combined ab initio and tight-binding approach to obtain the electronic and optical properties of hydrogenated Indium nitride (InN) nanowires. We first discuss InN band structure for the wurtzite structure calculated at the LDA+U level and use this information to extract the parameters needed for an empirical tight-binging implementation. These parameters are then employed to calculate the electronic and optical properties of InN nanowires in a diameter range that would not be affordable by ab initio techniques. The reliability of the large nanowires results is assessed by explicitly comparing the electronic structure of a small diameter wire studied both at LDA+U and tight-binding level.

  20. Influence of ion beam irradiation induced defects on the structural, optical and electrical properties of tellurium nanowires

    Kumar, Narinder [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa, 125055 (India); Department of Physics, Haryana College of Technology & Management, Kaithal, 136027 (India); Kumar, Rajesh [Department of Physics, RN College of Engineering & Technology, Madlauda, 132104 (India); Kumar, Sushil, E-mail: sushil_phys@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa, 125055 (India); Chakarvarti, S.K. [Research and Development, Manav Rachana International University, Faridabad, 121001 (India)

    2016-11-01

    In this study, tellurium nanowires were electrodeposited into the polymer membranes from aqueous acidic bath containing HTeO{sub 2}{sup +} ions. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images confirmed the formation of uniform and straight nanowires. The influence of 110 MeV Ni{sup 8+} ion irradiation induced defects on the structural, optical and electrical properties of as–deposited tellurium nanowires were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy and current–voltage (I–V) measurements. The XRD data depicted the hexagonal phase of tellurium nanowires and further revealed a variation in the intensity of diffraction peaks of ion irradiated nanowires. Williamson–Hall (WH) analysis is used for convoluting the size and microstrain contributions to the width of diffraction peaks. Tellurium nanowires exhibited a distinct absorbance band in the visible region at 686 nm, while this was absent in bulk tellurium. Electrical properties of nanowires are explored on the basis of I–V curves, which revealed a significant increase in the electrical conductivity of irradiated nanowires. A possible mechanism for the enhanced electrical conductivity is the increase in carrier concentration due to thermally excited defects. The defects produced by ion irradiation play a vital role in modifying the properties of semiconducting nanowires. - Highlights: • 110 MeV Ni{sup 8+} ion beam induced changes in tellurium nanowires have been examined. • Nanowires were prepared using template electrodeposition method. • Irradiation improved the electrical conductivity of tellurium nanowires. • Mechanism for enhanced electrical conductivity of irradiated nanowires was discussed.

  1. Simple synthetic route to manganese-containing nanowires with the spinel crystal structure

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Yan; Hudak, Bethany M.; Wallace, Damon K.; Kim, Doo Young; Guiton, Beth S.

    2016-08-15

    This report describes a new route to synthesize single-crystalline manganese-containing spinel nanowires (NWs) by a two-step hydrothermal and solid-state synthesis. Interestingly, a nanowire or nanorod morphology is maintained during conversion from MnO{sub 2}/MnOOH to CuMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Mg{sub 2}MnO{sub 4}, despite the massive structural rearrangement this must involve. Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) curves of the products give preliminary demonstration that CuMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} NWs are catalytically active towards the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline solution, exhibiting five times the magnitude of current density found with pure carbon black. - Highlights: • Synthesis of single-crystalline manganese-containing spinel nanowires. • Binary oxide nanowire converted to ternary oxide wire through solid state reaction. • Approach to structure conversion with shape retention could be generally applicable. • Copper and Manganese display multiple oxidation states with potential for catalysis. • CuMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanowires show promise as catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction.

  2. Metal-dielectric-CNT nanowires for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Altun, Ali; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2017-10-03

    A sensor with a substrate includes nanowires extending vertically from the substrate, a hafnia coating on the nanowires that provides hafnia coated nanowires, and a noble metal coating on the hafnia coated nanowires. The top of the hafnia and noble metal coated nanowires bent onto one another to create a canopy forest structure. There are numerous randomly arranged holes that let through scattered light. The many points of contact, hot spots, amplify signals. The methods include the steps of providing a Raman spectroscopy substrate, introducing nano crystals to the Raman spectroscopy substrate, growing a forest of nanowires from the nano crystals on the Raman spectroscopy substrate, coating the nanowires with hafnia providing hafnia coated nanowires, and coating the hafnia coated nanowires with a noble metal or other metal.

  3. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  4. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  5. Coaxial-structured ZnO/silicon nanowires extended-gate field-effect transistor as pH sensor

    Li, Hung-Hsien; Yang, Chi-En; Kei, Chi-Chung; Su, Chung-Yi; Dai, Wei-Syuan; Tseng, Jung-Kuei; Yang, Po-Yu; Chou, Jung-Chuan; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2013-01-01

    An extended-gate field-effect transistor (EGFET) of coaxial-structured ZnO/silicon nanowires as pH sensor was demonstrated in this paper. The oriented 1-μm-long silicon nanowires with the diameter of about 50 nm were vertically synthesized by the electroless metal deposition method at room temperature and were sequentially capped with the ZnO films using atomic layer deposition at 50 °C. The transfer characteristics (I DS –V REF ) of such ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor exhibited the sensitivity and linearity of 46.25 mV/pH and 0.9902, respectively for the different pH solutions (pH 1–pH 13). In contrast to the ZnO thin-film ones, the ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor achieved much better sensitivity and superior linearity. It was attributed to a high surface-to-volume ratio of the nanowire structures, reflecting a larger effective sensing area. The output voltage and time characteristics were also measured to indicate good reliability and durability for the ZnO/silicon nanowires sensor. Furthermore, the hysteresis was 9.74 mV after the solution was changed as pH 7 → pH 3 → pH 7 → pH 11 → pH 7. - Highlights: ► Coaxial-structured ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET was demonstrated as pH sensor. ► EMD and ALD methods were proposed to fabricate ZnO/silicon nanowires. ► ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor achieved better sensitivity and linearity. ► ZnO/silicon nanowire EGFET sensor had good reliability and durability

  6. Structural and electrochemical study of the reaction of lithium with silicon nanowires

    Chan, Candace K.

    2009-04-01

    The structural transformations of silicon nanowires when cycled against lithium were evaluated using electrochemical potential spectroscopy and galvanostatic cycling. During the charge, the nanowires alloy with lithium to form an amorphous LixSi compound. At potentials <50 mV, a structural transformation occurs. In studies on micron-sized particles previously reported in the literature, this transformation is a crystallization to a metastable Li15Si4 phase. X-ray diffraction measurements on the Si nanowires, however, show that they are amorphous, suggesting that a different amorphous phase (LiySi) is formed. Lithium is removed from this phase in the discharge to form amorphous silicon. We have found that limiting the voltage in the charge to 70 mV results in improved efficiency and cyclability compared to charging to 10 mV. This improvement is due to the suppression of the transformation at low potentials, which alloys for reversible cycling of amorphous silicon nanowires. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Designing robust alumina nanowires-on-nanopores structures: superhydrophobic surfaces with slippery or sticky water adhesion.

    Peng, Shan; Tian, Dong; Miao, Xinrui; Yang, Xiaojun; Deng, Wenli

    2013-11-01

    Hierarchical alumina surfaces with different morphologies were fabricated by a simple one-step anodization method. These alumina films were fabricated by a new raw material: silica gel plate (aluminum foil with a low purity of 97.17%). The modulation of anodizing time enabled the formation of nanowires-on-nanopores hybrid nanostructures having controllable nanowires topographies through a self-assembly process. The resultant structures were demonstrated to be able to achieve superhydrophobicity without any hydrophobic coating layer. More interestingly, it is found that the as-prepared superhydrophobic alumina surfaces exhibited high contrast water adhesion. Hierarchical alumina film with nanowire bunches-on-nanopores (WBOP) morphology presents extremely slippery property which can obtain a sliding angle (SA) as low as 1°, nanowire pyramids-on-nanopores (WPOP) structure shows strongly sticky water adhesion with the adhesive ability to support 15 μL inverted water droplet at most. The obtained superhydrophobic alumina surfaces show remarkable mechanical durability even treated by crimping or pressing without impact on the water-repellent performance. Moreover, the created surfaces also show excellent resistivity to ice water, boiling water, high temperature, organic solvent and oil contamination, which could expand their usefulness and efficacy in harsh conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Soil-structure interaction including nonlinear soil

    Gicev, Vlado

    2008-01-01

    There are two types of models of soil-structure system depending upon the rigidity of foundation: models with rigid and models with flexible foundation. Main features of the soil-structure interaction phenomenon: -wave scattering, -radiation damping, -reduction of the system frequencies. In this presentation, the influence of interaction on the development of nonlinear zones in the soil is studied.

  9. Optical Fiber/Nanowire Hybrid Structures for Efficient Three-Dimensional Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Weintraub, Benjamin

    2009-11-09

    Wired up: The energy conversion efficiency of three-dimensional dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) in a hybrid structure that integrates optical fibers and nanowire arrays is greater than that of a two-dimensional device. Internal axial illumination enhances the energy conversion efficiency of a rectangular fiber-based hybrid structure (see picture) by a factor of up to six compared to light illumination normal to the fiber axis from outside the device.

  10. Hierarchically structured Co₃O₄@Pt@MnO₂ nanowire arrays for high-performance supercapacitors.

    Xia, Hui; Zhu, Dongdong; Luo, Zhentao; Yu, Yue; Shi, Xiaoqin; Yuan, Guoliang; Xie, Jianping

    2013-10-17

    Here we proposed a novel architectural design of a ternary MnO2-based electrode - a hierarchical Co3O4@Pt@MnO2 core-shell-shell structure, where the complemental features of the three key components (a well-defined Co3O4 nanowire array on the conductive Ti substrate, an ultrathin layer of small Pt nanoparticles, and a thin layer of MnO2 nanoflakes) are strategically combined into a single entity to synergize and construct a high-performance electrode for supercapacitors. Owing to the high conductivity of the well-defined Co3O4 nanowire arrays, in which the conductivity was further enhanced by a thin metal (Pt) coating layer, in combination with the large surface area provided by the small MnO2 nanoflakes, the as-fabricated Co3O4@Pt@MnO2 nanowire arrays have exhibited high specific capacitances, good rate capability, and excellent cycling stability. The architectural design demonstrated in this study provides a new approach to fabricate high-performance MnO2-based nanowire arrays for constructing next-generation supercapacitors.

  11. Structural and luminescence properties of GaN nanowires grown using cobalt phthalocyanine as catalyst

    Yadav, Shivesh; Rodríguez-Fernández, Carlos; de Lima, Mauricio M.; Cantarero, Andres; Dhar, Subhabrata

    2015-12-01

    Catalyst free methods have usually been employed to avoid any catalyst induced contamination for the synthesis of GaN nanowires with better transport and optical properties. Here, we have used a catalytic route to grow GaN nanowires, which show good optical quality. Structural and luminescence properties of GaN nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid technique using cobalt phthalocyanine as catalyst are systematically investigated as a function of various growth parameters such as the growth temperature and III/V ratio. The study reveals that most of the nanowires, which are several tens of microns long, grow along [ 10 1 ¯ 0 ] direction. Interestingly, the average wire diameter has been found to decrease with the increase in III/V ratio. It has also been observed that in these samples, defect related broad luminescence features, which are often present in GaN, are completely suppressed. At all temperatures, photoluminescence spectrum is found to be dominated only by a band edge feature, which comprises of free and bound excitonic transitions. Our study furthermore reveals that the bound excitonic feature is associated with excitons trapped in certain deep level defects, which result from the deficiency of nitrogen during growth. This transition has a strong coupling with the localized vibrational modes of the defects.

  12. Fabrication, morphological, structural and magnetic properties of electrodeposited Fe{sub 3}Pt nanowires and nanotubes

    Khan, U. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Adeela, N. [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Li, Wenjing; Irfan, M.; Javed, K.; Riaz, S. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Han, X.F., E-mail: xfhan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highly ordered Fe{sub 3}Pt nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) embedded in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template have been fabricated by dc electrodeposition method. Response of heat treatment on structural and magnetic properties of the samples has been studied with and without the presence of magnetic field (1 T). X-Ray Diffraction analysis shows chemically ordered L1{sub 2} face centered cubic (FCC) as the dominant phase for Fe{sub 3}Pt NWs and heat treatment improves crystallinity with retained its phase. Whereas, Fe{sub 3}Pt NTs show amorphous behavior with and without magnetic field annealing. Furthermore, magnetic properties of the samples have been investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Magnetic parameters of Fe{sub 3}Pt including magnetic coercivity, saturation magnetization, squareness and shape of MH-loops have been investigated as a result of simple and MF annealing. - Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}Pt NWs and NTs embedded into anodic alumina templates have been synthesized by dc electrodeposition method. • Structural analysis (XRD) confirmed the formation of fcc structure. • Magnetic properties have been measured as a function of simple and magnetic field annealing.

  13. Growth control, structure, chemical state, and photoresponse of CuO-CdS core-shell heterostructure nanowires.

    El Mel, A A; Buffière, M; Bouts, N; Gautron, E; Tessier, P Y; Henzler, K; Guttmann, P; Konstantinidis, S; Bittencourt, C; Snyders, R

    2013-07-05

    The growth of single-crystal CuO nanowires by thermal annealing of copper thin films in air is studied. We show that the density, length, and diameter of the nanowires can be controlled by tuning the morphology and structure of the copper thin films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering. After identifying the optimal conditions for the growth of CuO nanowires, chemical bath deposition is employed to coat the CuO nanowires with CdS in order to form p-n nanojunction arrays. As revealed by high-resolution TEM analysis, the thickness of the polycrystalline CdS shell increases when decreasing the diameter of the CuO core for a given time of CdS deposition. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy combined with transmission x-ray microscopy allows the chemical analysis of isolated nanowires. The absence of modification in the spectra at the Cu L and O K edges after the deposition of CdS on the CuO nanowires indicates that neither Cd nor S diffuse into the CuO phase. We further demonstrate that the core-shell nanowires exhibit the I-V characteristic of a resistor instead of a diode. The electrical behavior of the device was found to be photosensitive, since increasing the incident light intensity induces an increase in the collected electrical current.

  14. Electronic structure and intersubband magnetoabsorption spectra of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires

    Xiong, Wen

    2016-10-01

    The electronic structures of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires are calculated based on the effective-mass theory, and it is found that the hole states in CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires are strongly mixed, which are very different from the hole states in CdSe or CdS nanowires. In addition, we find the three highest hole states at the Γ point are almost localized in the CdSe core and the energies of the hole states in CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires can be enhanced greatly when the core radius Rc increases and the total radius R is fixed. The degenerate hole states are split by the magnetic field, and the split energies will increase when |Jh | increases from 1/2 to 7/2, while they are almost not influenced by the change of the core radius Rc. The absorption spectra of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires at the Γ point are also studied in the magnetic field when the temperature T is considered, and we find there are only two peaks will arise if the core radius Rc and the temperature T increase. The intensity of each optical absorption can be considerably enhanced by increasing the core radius Rc when the temperature T is fixed, it is due to the increase of their optical transition matrix element. Meanwhile, the intensity of each optical absorption can be decreased when the temperature T increases and the core radius Rc is fixed, and this is because the Fermi-Dirac distribution function of the corresponding hole states will increase as the increase of the temperature T.

  15. Electrochemical cell structure including an ionomeric barrier

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Hibbs, Michael

    2017-06-20

    An apparatus includes an electrochemical half-cell comprising: an electrolyte, an anode; and an ionomeric barrier positioned between the electrolyte and the anode. The anode may comprise a multi-electron vanadium phosphorous alloy, such as VP.sub.x, wherein x is 1-5. The electrochemical half-cell is configured to oxidize the vanadium and phosphorous alloy to release electrons. A method of mitigating corrosion in an electrochemical cell includes disposing an ionomeric barrier in a path of electrolyte or ion flow to an anode and mitigating anion accumulation on the surface of the anode.

  16. Liquid-phase synthesis of Ni nanowire/cellulose hybrid structure

    Rahmah Shamsuri, Siti; Shiomi, Shohei; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2018-02-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials (nanowires or nanofibers) are superior to conventional zero-dimensional (0D) nanomaterials (nanoparticles). 1D nanomaterials offer not only the benefits of 0D nanomaterials, such as a large surface area and numerous active sites, but also the capability to prepare macroscopic free-standing and flexible structures owing to their formability to form a sheet. For practical applications, it is essential to develop a simple and easy method of synthesizing 1D nanomaterials. In the present work, a nickel nanowire/cellulose hybrid structure is successfully fabricated via a single-batch liquid-phase reduction method under a magnetic field. The product is not a simple 1D or two-dimensional (2D) structure, but an intricately entangled and interconnected three-dimensional (3D) structure. Fine nickel nanowires are grown from nickel nanoparticles that are heterogeneously nucleated on the surface of a cellulose fiber by using its chemical properties that attract nickel ions.

  17. Influence of substrate orientation on the structural properties of GaAs nanowires in MOCVD

    Muhammad, R., E-mail: rosnita@utm.my; Othaman, Z., E-mail: zulothaman@gmail.com; Ibrahim, Z., E-mail: zuhairi@utm.my; Sakrani, S., E-mail: samsudi3@yahoo.com [Faculty of Science, UniversitiTeknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM, Johor (Malaysia); Wahab, Y., E-mail: wyussof@gmail.com [Razak School, UniversitiTeknologi Malaysia, 54100 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-04-19

    In this study, the effect of substrate orientation on the structural properties of GaAs nanowires grown by a metal organic chemical vapor deposition has been investigated. Gold colloids were used as catalyst to initiate the growth of nanowiresby the vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. From the field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), the growth of the nanowires were at an elevation angle of 90°, 60°, 65° and 35° with respect to the GaAs substrate for (111)B, (311)B, (110) and (100) orientations respectively. The preferential NW growth direction is always <111>B. High-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) micrograph showed the NWs that grew on the GaAs(111)B has more structural defects when compared to others. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) indicated the presence of Au, Ga and As. The bigger diameter NWs dominates the (111)B substrate surface.

  18. Structural study on Ni nanowires in an anodic alumina membrane by using in situ heating extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction techniques

    Cai Quan; Chen Xing; Chen Zhongjun; Wang Wei; Mo Guang; Wu Zhonghua; Zhang Junxi; Zhang Lide; Pan Wei

    2008-01-01

    Polycrystalline Ni nanowires have been prepared by electrochemical deposition in an anodic alumina membrane template with a nanopore size of about 60 nm. In situ heating extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction techniques are used to probe the atomic structures. The nanowires are identified as being mixtures of nanocrystallites and amorphous phase. The nanocrystallites have the same thermal expansion coefficient, of 1.7 x 10 -5 K -1 , as Ni bulk; however, the amorphous phase has a much larger thermal expansion coefficient of 3.5 x 10 -5 K -1 . Details of the Ni nanowire structures are discussed in this paper

  19. Structural characterization of selective area growth GaN nanowires by non-destructive optical and electrical techniques

    Secco, Eleonora; Minj, Albert; Garro, Núria; Cantarero, Andrés; Colchero, Jaime; Urban, Arne; Oppo, Carla Ivana; Malindretos, Joerg; Rizzi, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The growth selectivity and structural quality of GaN nanowires obtained by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on pre-patterned GaN(0001) templates are investigated by means of non-destructive techniques. Optimum control over the nanowire arrangement and size requires a pitch between the mask apertures below twice the diffusion length of Ga atoms. Lower pitches, however, seem to slightly diminish the structural quality of the material, as revealed by the increase of the Raman peak linewidths. The photoluminescence spectra of the nanowires show a considerable presence of basal plane stacking faults, whose density increases for decreasing nanowire diameter. The capabilities of Kelvin probe force microscopy for imaging these kind of defects are also demonstrated. (paper)

  20. Structural characterization of selective area growth GaN nanowires by non-destructive optical and electrical techniques

    Secco, Eleonora; Minj, Albert; Garro, Núria; Cantarero, Andrés; Colchero, Jaime; Urban, Arne; Ivana Oppo, Carla; Malindretos, Joerg; Rizzi, Angela

    2015-08-01

    The growth selectivity and structural quality of GaN nanowires obtained by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on pre-patterned GaN(0001) templates are investigated by means of non-destructive techniques. Optimum control over the nanowire arrangement and size requires a pitch between the mask apertures below twice the diffusion length of Ga atoms. Lower pitches, however, seem to slightly diminish the structural quality of the material, as revealed by the increase of the Raman peak linewidths. The photoluminescence spectra of the nanowires show a considerable presence of basal plane stacking faults, whose density increases for decreasing nanowire diameter. The capabilities of Kelvin probe force microscopy for imaging these kind of defects are also demonstrated.

  1. Structural and optical properties of silicon-carbide nanowires produced by the high-temperature carbonization of silicon nanostructures

    Pavlikov, A. V., E-mail: pavlikov@physics.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Latukhina, N. V.; Chepurnov, V. I. [Samara National Researh University (Russian Federation); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Silicon-carbide (SiC) nanowire structures 40–50 nm in diameter are produced by the high-temperature carbonization of porous silicon and silicon nanowires. The SiC nanowires are studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The X-ray structural and Raman data suggest that the cubic 3C-SiC polytype is dominant in the samples under study. The shape of the infrared reflectance spectrum in the region of the reststrahlen band 800–900 cm{sup –1} is indicative of the presence of free charge carriers. The possibility of using SiC nanowires in microelectronic, photonic, and gas-sensing devices is discussed.

  2. Vertical group III-V nanowires on si, heterostructures, flexible arrays and fabrication

    Wang, Deli; Soci, Cesare; Bao, Xinyu; Wei, Wei; Jing, Yi; Sun, Ke

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the invention provide a method for direct heteroepitaxial growth of vertical III-V semiconductor nanowires on a silicon substrate. The silicon substrate is etched to substantially completely remove native oxide. It is promptly placed in a reaction chamber. The substrate is heated and maintained at a growth temperature. Group III-V precursors are flowed for a growth time. Preferred embodiment vertical Group III-V nanowires on silicon have a core-shell structure, which provides a radial homojunction or heterojunction. A doped nanowire core is surrounded by a shell with complementary doping. Such can provide high optical absorption due to the long optical path in the axial direction of the vertical nanowires, while reducing considerably the distance over which carriers must diffuse before being collected in the radial direction. Alloy composition can also be varied. Radial and axial homojunctions and heterojunctions can be realized. Embodiments provide for flexible Group III-V nanowire structures. An array of Group III-V nanowire structures is embedded in polymer. A fabrication method forms the vertical nanowires on a substrate, e.g., a silicon substrate. Preferably, the nanowires are formed by the preferred methods for fabrication of Group III-V nanowires on silicon. Devices can be formed with core/shell and core/multi-shell nanowires and the devices are released from the substrate upon which the nanowires were formed to create a flexible structure that includes an array of vertical nanowires embedded in polymer.

  3. Manipulation of Optoelectronic Properties and Band Structure Engineering of Ultrathin Te Nanowires by Chemical Adsorption.

    Roy, Ahin; Amin, Kazi Rafsanjani; Tripathi, Shalini; Biswas, Sangram; Singh, Abhishek K; Bid, Aveek; Ravishankar, N

    2017-06-14

    Band structure engineering is a powerful technique both for the design of new semiconductor materials and for imparting new functionalities to existing ones. In this article, we present a novel and versatile technique to achieve this by surface adsorption on low dimensional systems. As a specific example, we demonstrate, through detailed experiments and ab initio simulations, the controlled modification of band structure in ultrathin Te nanowires due to NO 2 adsorption. Measurements of the temperature dependence of resistivity of single ultrathin Te nanowire field-effect transistor (FET) devices exposed to increasing amounts of NO 2 reveal a gradual transition from a semiconducting to a metallic state. Gradual quenching of vibrational Raman modes of Te with increasing concentration of NO 2 supports the appearance of a metallic state in NO 2 adsorbed Te. Ab initio simulations attribute these observations to the appearance of midgap states in NO 2 adsorbed Te nanowires. Our results provide fundamental insights into the effects of ambient on the electronic structures of low-dimensional materials and can be exploited for designing novel chemical sensors.

  4. Microfibre-nanowire hybrid structure for energy scavenging.

    Qin, Yong; Wang, Xudong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2008-02-14

    A self-powering nanosystem that harvests its operating energy from the environment is an attractive proposition for sensing, personal electronics and defence technologies. This is in principle feasible for nanodevices owing to their extremely low power consumption. Solar, thermal and mechanical (wind, friction, body movement) energies are common and may be scavenged from the environment, but the type of energy source to be chosen has to be decided on the basis of specific applications. Military sensing/surveillance node placement, for example, may involve difficult-to-reach locations, may need to be hidden, and may be in environments that are dusty, rainy, dark and/or in deep forest. In a moving vehicle or aeroplane, harvesting energy from a rotating tyre or wind blowing on the body is a possible choice to power wireless devices implanted in the surface of the vehicle. Nanowire nanogenerators built on hard substrates were demonstrated for harvesting local mechanical energy produced by high-frequency ultrasonic waves. To harvest the energy from vibration or disturbance originating from footsteps, heartbeats, ambient noise and air flow, it is important to explore innovative technologies that work at low frequencies (such as wind energy and body-movement energy using fabrics.

  5. Silicon nanowire structures as high-sensitive pH-sensors

    Belostotskaya, S O; Chuyko, O V; Kuznetsov, A E; Kuznetsov, E V; Rybachek, E N

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive elements for pH-sensors created on silicon nanostructures were researched. Silicon nanostructures have been used as ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET) for the measurement of solution pH. Silicon nanostructures have been fabricated by 'top-down' approach and have been studied as pH sensitive elements. Nanowires have the higher sensitivity. It was shown, that sensitive element, which is made of 'one-dimensional' silicon nanostructure have bigger pH-sensitivity as compared with 'two-dimensional' structure. Integrated element formed from two p- and n-type nanowire ISFET ('inverter') can be used as high sensitivity sensor for local relative change [H+] concentration in very small volume.

  6. Structural and electronic properties of Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} alloy nanowires

    Iori, Federico [Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Centro Interdipartimentale Intermech and En and tech, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42122 Reggio Emilia (Italy); European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) and Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB–CSIC), Campus de Bellaterra, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Ossicini, Stefano [Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Centro Interdipartimentale Intermech and En and tech, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2 Pad. Morselli, I-42122 Reggio Emilia (Italy); “Centro S3”, CNR-Istituto di Nanoscienze, Via Campi 213/A, 41125 Modena (Italy); Rurali, Riccardo, E-mail: rrurali@icmab.es [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB–CSIC), Campus de Bellaterra, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-10-21

    We present first-principles density-functional calculations of Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} alloy nanowires. We show that given the composition of the alloy, the structural properties of the nanowires can be predicted with great accuracy by means of Vegard's law, linearly interpolating the values of a pure Si and a pure Ge nanowire of the same diameter. The same holds, to some extent, also for electronic properties such as the band-gap. We also assess to what extend the band-gap varies as a function of disorder, i.e., how it changes for different random realization of a given concentration. These results make possible to tailor the desired properties of SiGe alloy nanowires starting directly from the data relative to the pristine wires.

  7. Structural and electronic properties of InN nanowire network grown by vapor-liquid-solid method

    B. K. Barick

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth of InN nanowires have been carried out on quartz substrates at different temperatures by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS technique using different thicknesses of Au catalyst layer. It has been found that a narrow window of Au layer thickness and growth temperature leads to multi-nucleation, in which each site acts as the origin of several nanowires. In this multi-nucleation regime, several tens of micrometer long wires with diameter as small as 20 nm are found to grow along [ 11 2 ̄ 0 ] direction (a-plane to form a dense network. Structural and electronic properties of these wires are studied. As grown nanowires show degenerate n-type behavior. Furthermore, x-ray photoemission study reveals an accumulation of electrons on the surface of these nanowires. Interestingly, the wire network shows persistence of photoconductivity for several hours after switching off the photoexcitation.

  8. Structural and electronic properties of InN nanowire network grown by vapor-liquid-solid method

    Barick, B. K.; Rodríguez-Fernández, Carlos; Cantarero, Andres; Dhar, S.

    2015-05-01

    Growth of InN nanowires have been carried out on quartz substrates at different temperatures by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) technique using different thicknesses of Au catalyst layer. It has been found that a narrow window of Au layer thickness and growth temperature leads to multi-nucleation, in which each site acts as the origin of several nanowires. In this multi-nucleation regime, several tens of micrometer long wires with diameter as small as 20 nm are found to grow along [ 11 2 ¯ 0 ] direction (a-plane) to form a dense network. Structural and electronic properties of these wires are studied. As grown nanowires show degenerate n-type behavior. Furthermore, x-ray photoemission study reveals an accumulation of electrons on the surface of these nanowires. Interestingly, the wire network shows persistence of photoconductivity for several hours after switching off the photoexcitation.

  9. Structural and electronic properties of InN nanowire network grown by vapor-liquid-solid method

    Barick, B. K., E-mail: bkbarick@gmail.com, E-mail: subho-dh@yahoo.co.in; Dhar, S., E-mail: bkbarick@gmail.com, E-mail: subho-dh@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, Mumbai-400076 (India); Rodríguez-Fernández, Carlos; Cantarero, Andres [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia, PO Box 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Growth of InN nanowires have been carried out on quartz substrates at different temperatures by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) technique using different thicknesses of Au catalyst layer. It has been found that a narrow window of Au layer thickness and growth temperature leads to multi-nucleation, in which each site acts as the origin of several nanowires. In this multi-nucleation regime, several tens of micrometer long wires with diameter as small as 20 nm are found to grow along [112{sup -}0] direction (a-plane) to form a dense network. Structural and electronic properties of these wires are studied. As grown nanowires show degenerate n-type behavior. Furthermore, x-ray photoemission study reveals an accumulation of electrons on the surface of these nanowires. Interestingly, the wire network shows persistence of photoconductivity for several hours after switching off the photoexcitation.

  10. Synthesis, structure and optical properties of single-crystalline In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires

    Hadia, N.M.A., E-mail: nomery_abass@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); Mohamed, H.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); King Saud University, Teachers College, Science Department (Physics), 11148 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal and metal oxide one dimensional (1D) nanostructured materials are of crucial importance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paper deals with the synthesis of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires without the use of catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optical constants and Photoluminescence (PL) of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires were evaluated. - Abstract: Indium oxide In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires have been recently synthesized revealing interesting properties and used in various applications. In order to reduce as much as possible the influence of undesired dopants and/or impurities on the observed properties, In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires have been grown without the use of catalysts, directly from metallic indium by a vapor transport technique and a controlled oxidation with oxygen-argon mixtures. Depending on the growth conditions (temperature, vapor pressure, oxygen concentration, etc.) different results have been achieved and it has been observed that a 'proper' In condensation on the substrates may enhance the nanowires growth. Detailed structural analysis showed that the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures are single crystalline with a cubic crystal structure. The grown In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires were optically characterized in order to evaluate the absorption coefficient, optical band gap, refractive index and extinction coefficient. Room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) spectrum showed broad and intense blue emission at 375 nm.

  11. Crystal structure redetermination of ε-Ni.sub.3./sub.Si.sub.2./sub. from a single nanowire by dynamical refinement of precession electron diffraction data

    Correa, Cinthia Antunes; Klementová, Mariana; Dřínek, Vladislav; Kopeček, Jaromír; Palatinus, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 672, Jul (2016), s. 505-509 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25747S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : precession electron diffraction tomography * structure determination * nanowire * dynamical refinement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UCHP-M) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Inorganic and nuclear chemistry (UCHP-M) Impact factor: 3.133, year: 2016

  12. Compact hybrid cell based on a convoluted nanowire structure for harvesting solar and mechanical energy

    Xu, Chen; Wang, Zhong Lin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    A fully integrated, solid-state, compact hybrid cell (CHC) that comprises ''convoluted'' ZnO nanowire structures for concurrent harvesting of both solar and mechanical energy is demonstrated. The compact hybrid cell is based on a conjunction design of an organic solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and piezoelectric nanogenerator in one compact structure. The CHC shows a significant increase in output power, clearly demonstrating its potential for simultaneously harvesting multiple types of energy for powering small electronic devices for independent, sustainable, and mobile operation. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. From nanodiamond to nanowires.

    Barnard, A.; Materials Science Division

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in the fabrication and characterization of semiconductor and metallic nanowires are proving very successful in meeting the high expectations of nanotechnologists. Although the nanoscience surrounding sp{sup 3} bonded carbon nanotubes has continued to flourish over recent years the successful synthesis of the sp{sup 3} analogue, diamond nanowires, has been limited. This prompts questions as to whether diamond nanowires are fundamentally unstable. By applying knowledge obtained from examining the structural transformations in nanodiamond, a framework for analyzing the structure and stability of diamond nanowires may be established. One possible framework will be discussed here, supported by results of ab initio density functional theory calculations used to study the structural relaxation of nanodiamond and diamond nanowires. The results show that the structural stability and electronic properties of diamond nanowires are dependent on the surface morphology, crystallographic direction of the principal axis, and the degree of surface hydrogenation.

  14. Bloch-Surface-Polariton-Based Hybrid Nanowire Structure for Subwavelength, Low-Loss Waveguiding

    Weijing Kong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs have been thoroughly studied in the past decades for not only sensing but also waveguiding applications. Various plasmonic device structures have been explored due to their ability to confine their optical mode to the subwavelength level. However, with the existence of metal, the large ohmic loss limits the propagation distance of the SPP and thus the scalability of such devices. Therefore, different hybrid waveguides have been proposed to overcome this shortcoming. Through fine tuning of the coupling between the SPP and a conventional waveguide mode, a hybrid mode could be excited with decent mode confinement and extended propagation distance. As an effective alternative of SPP, Bloch surface waves have been re-investigated more recently for their unique advantages. As is supported in all-dielectric structures, the optical loss for the Bloch surface wave is much lower, which stands for a much longer propagating distance. Yet, the confinement of the Bloch surface wave due to the reflections and refractions in the multilayer structure is not as tight as that of the SPP. In this work, by integrating a periodic multilayer structure that supports the Bloch surface wave with a metallic nanowire structure, a hybrid Bloch surface wave polariton could be excited. With the proposed hybrid nanowire structure, a hybrid mode is demonstrated with the deep subwavelength mode confinement and a propagation distance of tens of microns.

  15. Toward optimized light utilization in nanowire arrays using scalable nanosphere lithography and selected area growth.

    Madaria, Anuj R; Yao, Maoqing; Chi, Chunyung; Huang, Ningfeng; Lin, Chenxi; Li, Ruijuan; Povinelli, Michelle L; Dapkus, P Daniel; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-06-13

    Vertically aligned, catalyst-free semiconducting nanowires hold great potential for photovoltaic applications, in which achieving scalable synthesis and optimized optical absorption simultaneously is critical. Here, we report combining nanosphere lithography (NSL) and selected area metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (SA-MOCVD) for the first time for scalable synthesis of vertically aligned gallium arsenide nanowire arrays, and surprisingly, we show that such nanowire arrays with patterning defects due to NSL can be as good as highly ordered nanowire arrays in terms of optical absorption and reflection. Wafer-scale patterning for nanowire synthesis was done using a polystyrene nanosphere template as a mask. Nanowires grown from substrates patterned by NSL show similar structural features to those patterned using electron beam lithography (EBL). Reflection of photons from the NSL-patterned nanowire array was used as a measure of the effect of defects present in the structure. Experimentally, we show that GaAs nanowires as short as 130 nm show reflection of <10% over the visible range of the solar spectrum. Our results indicate that a highly ordered nanowire structure is not necessary: despite the "defects" present in NSL-patterned nanowire arrays, their optical performance is similar to "defect-free" structures patterned by more costly, time-consuming EBL methods. Our scalable approach for synthesis of vertical semiconducting nanowires can have application in high-throughput and low-cost optoelectronic devices, including solar cells.

  16. Spatially resolved investigation of competing nanocluster emission in quantum-disks-in-nanowires structure characterized by nanoscale cathodoluminescence

    Prabaswara, Aditya; Stowe, David J.; Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien Khee; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Longo, Paolo; Zhao, Chao; Elafandy, Rami T.; Li, Xiaohang; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-Desouki, Munir M.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the study and characterization of nanoclusters-related recombination centers within quantum-disks-in-nanowires heterostructure by utilizing microphotoluminescence (mu-PL) and cathodoluminescence scanning transmission electron microscopy (CL-STEM). mu-PL measurement shows that the nanoclusters-related recombination center exhibits different temperature-dependent characteristics compared with the surrounding InGaN quantum-disksrelated recombination center. CL-STEM measurements reveal that these recombination centers mainly arise from irregularities within the quantum disks, with a strong, spatially localized emission when measured at low temperature. The spectra obtained from both CL-STEM and mu-PL correlate well with each other. Our work sheds light on the optical and structural properties of simultaneously coexisting recombination centers within nanowires heterostructures. (C) The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Distribution or reproduction of this work in whole or in part requires full attribution of the original publication, including its DOI.

  17. Spatially resolved investigation of competing nanocluster emission in quantum-disks-in-nanowires structure characterized by nanoscale cathodoluminescence

    Prabaswara, Aditya

    2017-06-30

    We report on the study and characterization of nanoclusters-related recombination centers within quantum-disks-in-nanowires heterostructure by utilizing microphotoluminescence (mu-PL) and cathodoluminescence scanning transmission electron microscopy (CL-STEM). mu-PL measurement shows that the nanoclusters-related recombination center exhibits different temperature-dependent characteristics compared with the surrounding InGaN quantum-disksrelated recombination center. CL-STEM measurements reveal that these recombination centers mainly arise from irregularities within the quantum disks, with a strong, spatially localized emission when measured at low temperature. The spectra obtained from both CL-STEM and mu-PL correlate well with each other. Our work sheds light on the optical and structural properties of simultaneously coexisting recombination centers within nanowires heterostructures. (C) The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Distribution or reproduction of this work in whole or in part requires full attribution of the original publication, including its DOI.

  18. Electronic Structure of Cdse Nanowires Terminated With Gold ...

    Bheema

    Owing to their unusual electronic and structural properties, SC clusters have received considerable attention ... performing molecular dynamics simulations. A similar .... Analysis of the charge density, gap, corresponding to states with energies ...

  19. Pattern analysis of aligned nanowires in a microchannel

    Jeon, Young Jin; Kang, Hyun Wook; Ko, Seung Hwan; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2013-01-01

    An image processing method for evaluating the quality of nanowire alignment in a microchannel is described. A solution containing nanowires flowing into a microchannel will tend to deposit the nanowires on the bottom surface of the channel via near-wall shear flows. The deposited nanowires generally form complex directional structures along the direction of flow, and the physical properties of these structures depend on the structural morphology, including the alignment quality. A quantitative analysis approach to characterizing the nanowire alignment is needed to estimate the useful features of the nanowire structures. This analysis consists of several image processing methods, including ridge detection, texton analysis and autocorrelation function (ACF) calculation. The ridge detection method improved the ACF by extracting nanowire frames 1–2 pixels in width. Dilation filters were introduced to permit a comparison of the ACF results calculated from different images, regardless of the nanowire orientation. An ACF based on the FFT was then calculated over a square interrogation window. The alignment angle probability distribution was obtained using texton analysis. Monte Carlo simulations of artificially generated images were carried out, and the new algorithm was applied to images collected using two types of microscopy. (paper)

  20. [INFLUENCE OF NANODIAMONDS AND CARBON NANOWIRES ON SURVIVAL AND CELLS STRUCTURE IN CHICKEN EMBRYO].

    Lavrinenko, V; Zinabadinova, S; Chaikovsky, Yu; Sokurenko, L; Shobat, L

    2016-06-01

    Aim - to determine the effect of nanodiamonds and carbon nanowires on the survival and ultrastructure of chicken embryo cells. The experiment was carried out on chicken embryos, incubated from eggs of Hy-Line breed. Control and two experimental groups were formed (total number of embryos - 100). Diamond nanoparticles and carbon nanowires were administered on day 3 of incubation as a suspension of a biocompatible dextran. Ultrastructural analysis and general study of embryos state were carried out. The most expressed pathological effects were observed in the group with the introduction of the CNW, which caused visual impairment of embryogenesis that started from the early incubation periods. As for ND we can claim their prolonged impact on the development of embryos, manifested in the gradual deterioration of the embryos condition with the manifestations of the pathology in the provisory organs and the body of embryos. The results of our study demonstrate that both types of nanostructures can cause sublethal and irreversible morphologic changes. Detection of morphological evidence of the impact of nanomaterials at significant distances from the site of administration of nanoparticles shows highly penetrating ability of nanomaterials. The presence of damages specific for each type of nanoparticles shows affinity to various tissues and cellular structures. It is demonstrated that similar, at first glance, impact of nanomaterials, such as the induction of oxidative stress might be caused by specific structural transformations. So, ND cause vacuolization of mitochondria, and the CNW - deformation of their shape and appearance of dark inclusions in them.

  1. Synthesis and structural property of Si nanosheets connected to Si nanowires using MnCl{sub 2}/Si powder source

    Meng, Erchao [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johuku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan); Ueki, Akiko [Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc., 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Meng, Xiang [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johuku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johuku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan); Itahara, Hiroshi [Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc., 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Tatsuoka, Hirokazu, E-mail: tatsuoka.hirokazu@shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Integrated Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johuku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Si nanosheets connected to Si nanowires synthesized using a MnCl{sub 2}/Si powder source with an Au catalyst avoid the use of air-sensitive SiH{sub 4} or SiCl{sub 4}. It was evident from these structural features of the nanosheets (leaf blade) with nanowires (petiole) that the nanosheets were formed by the twin-plane reentrant-edge mechanism. The feature of the observed lattice fringes of the Si(111) nanosheets was clearly explained by the interference with the extra diffraction spots that arose due to the reciprocal lattice streaking effect. - Highlights: • New Si nanosheets connected to Si nanowires were synthesized using MnCl{sub 2}/Si powders. • The synthesis method has benefits in terms of avoiding air sensitive SiH{sub 4} or SiCl{sub 4}. • Structural property and electron diffraction of the Si nanosheets were clarified. • Odd lattice fringes of the Si nanosheets observed by HRTEM were clearly explained. - Abstract: Si nanosheets connected to Si nanowires were synthesized using a MnCl{sub 2}/Si powder source with an Au catalyst. The synthesis method has benefits in terms of avoiding conventionally used air-sensitive SiH{sub 4} or SiCl{sub 4}. The existence of the Si nanosheets connected to the Si<111> nanowires, like sprouts or leaves with petioles, was observed, and the surface of the nanosheets was Si{111}. The nanosheets were grown in the growth direction of <211> perpendicular to that of the Si nanowires. It was evident from these structural features of the nanosheets that the nanosheets were formed by the twin-plane reentrant-edge mechanism. The feature of the observed lattice fringes, which do not appear for Si bulk crystals, of the Si(111) nanosheets obtained by high resolution transmission electron microscopy was clearly explained due to the extra diffraction spots that arose by the reciprocal lattice streaking effect.

  2. Geometrical and band-structure effects on phonon-limited hole mobility in rectangular cross-sectional germanium nanowires

    Tanaka, H.; Mori, S.; Morioka, N.; Suda, J.; Kimoto, T.

    2014-01-01

    We calculated the phonon-limited hole mobility in rectangular cross-sectional [001], [110], [111], and [112]-oriented germanium nanowires, and the hole transport characteristics were investigated. A tight-binding approximation was used for holes, and phonons were described by a valence force field model. Then, scattering probability of holes by phonons was calculated taking account of hole-phonon interaction atomistically, and the linearized Boltzmann's transport equation was solved to calculate the hole mobility at low longitudinal field. The dependence of the hole mobility on nanowire geometry was analyzed in terms of the valence band structure of germanium nanowires, and it was found that the dependence was qualitatively reproduced by considering an average effective mass and the density of states of holes. The calculation revealed that [110] germanium nanowires with large height along the [001] direction show high hole mobility. Germanium nanowires with this geometry are also expected to exhibit high electron mobility in our previous work, and thus they are promising for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) applications

  3. Multishell structure formation in Ni nanowire under uniaxial strain along <0 0 1> crystallographic direction: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Wang Li, E-mail: wanglihxf@sdu.edu.c [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Shandong University at Weihai, 180 Wenhuaxi Road, Weihai 264209 (China); Peng Chuanxiao [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Gong Jianhong [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Shandong University at Weihai, 180 Wenhuaxi Road, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations based upon embedded-atom-method potential are employed to explore the fracture behavior of Ni nanowire along <0 0 1> crystallographic direction at temperature of 300 K. We find the formation of (5,5) multishell structure (MS), which is transformed from (6,5) MS at the necking region of nanowire under the strain rate of 0.02%ps{sup -1}. A reorientation transformation from <0 0 1> to <1 1 0> is first detected before formation of (6,5) MS. The formed (5,5) MS is more stable and can be tensioned longer as lower strain rate is loaded.

  4. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of carbon doped boron nitride nanowire: Ab initio study

    Jalilian, Jaafar, E-mail: JaafarJalilian@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Kermanshah Br anch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box: 6718997551, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kanjouri, Faramarz, E-mail: kanjouri@khu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Kharazmi University, University Square, P.O. Box: 3197937551, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we demonstrated that carbon doped boron nitride nanowire (C-doped BNNW) has diverse electronic and magnetic properties depending on position of carbon atoms and their percentages. Our results show that only when one carbon atom is situated on the edge of the nanowire, C-doped BNNW is transformed into half-metal. The calculated electronic structure of the C-doped BNNW suggests that doping carbon can induce localized edge states around the Fermi level, and the interaction among localized edge states leads to semiconductor to half-metal transition. Overall, the bond reconstruction causes of appearance of different electronic behavior such as semiconducting, half-metallicity, nonmagnetic metallic, and ferromagnetic metallic characters. The formation energy of the system shows that when a C atom is doped on surface boron site, system is more stable than the other positions of carbon impurity. Our calculations show that C-doped BNNW may offer unique opportunities for developing nanoscale spintronic materials.

  5. Wearable, wireless gas sensors using highly stretchable and transparent structures of nanowires and graphene

    Park, Jihun; Kim, Joohee; Kim, Kukjoo; Kim, So-Yun; Cheong, Woon Hyung; Park, Kyeongmin; Song, Joo Hyeb; Namgoong, Gyeongho; Kim, Jae Joon; Heo, Jaeyeong; Bien, Franklin; Park, Jang-Ung

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we report the fabrication of a highly stretchable, transparent gas sensor based on silver nanowire-graphene hybrid nanostructures. Due to its superb mechanical and optical characteristics, the fabricated sensor demonstrates outstanding and stable performances even under extreme mechanical deformation (stable until 20% of strain). The integration of a Bluetooth system or an inductive antenna enables the wireless operation of the sensor. In addition, the mechanical robustness of the materials allows the device to be transferred onto various nonplanar substrates, including a watch, a bicycle light, and the leaves of live plants, thereby achieving next-generation sensing electronics for the `Internet of Things' area.Herein, we report the fabrication of a highly stretchable, transparent gas sensor based on silver nanowire-graphene hybrid nanostructures. Due to its superb mechanical and optical characteristics, the fabricated sensor demonstrates outstanding and stable performances even under extreme mechanical deformation (stable until 20% of strain). The integration of a Bluetooth system or an inductive antenna enables the wireless operation of the sensor. In addition, the mechanical robustness of the materials allows the device to be transferred onto various nonplanar substrates, including a watch, a bicycle light, and the leaves of live plants, thereby achieving next-generation sensing electronics for the `Internet of Things' area. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01468b

  6. Advanced Optoelectronic Devices based on Si Quantum Dots/Si Nanowires Hetero-structures

    Xu, J; Zhai, Y Y; Cao, Y Q; Chen, K J

    2017-01-01

    Si quantum dots are currently extensively studied since they can be used to develop many kinds of optoelectronic devices. In this report, we review the fabrication of Si quantum dots (Si QD) /Si nanowires (Si NWs) hetero-structures by deposition of Si QDs/SiO 2 or Si QDs/SiC multilayers on Si NWs arrays. The electroluminescence and photovoltaic devices based on the formed hetero-structures have been prepared and the improved performance is confirmed. It is also found that the surface recombination via the surface defects states on the Si NWs, especially the ones obtained by the long-time etching, may deteriorate the device properties though they exhibit the better anti-reflection characteristics. The possible surface passivation approaches are briefly discussed. (paper)

  7. MOCVD growth and structural characterization of In-Sb-Te nanowires

    Selmo, S.; Fanciulli, M.; Cecchi, S.; Cecchini, R.; Wiemer, C.; Longo, M.; Rotunno, E.; Lazzarini, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the self-assembly of In 3 Sb 1 Te 2 and In-doped Sb 4 Te 1 nanowires (NWs) for phase change memories application was achieved by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, coupled with vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, catalyzed by Au nanoparticles. Single crystal In 3 Sb 1 Te 2 and In-doped Sb 4 Te 1 NWs were obtained for different reactor pressures at 325 C. The parameters influencing the NW self-assembly were studied and the compositional, morphological, and structural analysis of the grown structures was performed, also comparing the effect of the used substrate (crystalline Si and SiO 2 ). In both cases, NWs of several micrometer in length and with diameters as small as 15 nm were obtained. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Current-voltage characteristics of the semiconductor nanowires under the metal-semiconductor-metal structure

    Wen, Jing; Zhang, Xitian; Gao, Hong; Wang, Mingjiao

    2013-12-01

    We present a method to calculate the I-V characteristics of semiconductor nanowires under the metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) structure. The carrier concentration as an important parameter is introduced into the expression of the current. The subband structure of the nanowire has been considered for associating it with the position of the Fermi level and circumventing the uncertainties of the contact areas in the contacts. The tunneling and thermionic emission currents in the two Schottky barriers at the two metal-semiconductor contacts are discussed. We find that the two barriers have different influences on the I-V characteristics of the MSM structure, one of which under the forward bias plays the role of threshold voltage if its barrier height is large and the applied voltage is small, and the other under the reverse bias controls the shapes of I-V curves. Our calculations show that the shapes of the I-V curves for the MSM structure are mainly determined by the barrier heights of the contacts and the carrier concentration. The nearly identical I-V characteristics can be obtained by using different values of the barrier heights and carrier concentration, which means that the contact type conversion can be ascribed not only to the changes of the barrier heights but also that of the carrier concentration. We also discuss the mechanisms of the ohmic-Schottky conversions and clarify the ambiguity in the literature. The possibility about the variation of the carrier concentration under the applied fields has been confirmed by experimental results.

  9. Three-dimensional vertical Si nanowire MOS capacitor model structure for the study of electrical versus geometrical Si nanowire characteristics

    Hourdakis, E.; Casanova, A.; Larrieu, G.; Nassiopoulou, A. G.

    2018-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Si surface nanostructuring is interesting towards increasing the capacitance density of a metal-oxidesemiconductor (MOS) capacitor, while keeping reduced footprint for miniaturization. Si nanowires (SiNWs) can be used in this respect. With the aim of understanding the electrical versus geometrical characteristics of such capacitors, we fabricated and studied a MOS capacitor with highly ordered arrays of vertical Si nanowires of different lengths and thermal silicon oxide dielectric, in comparison to similar flat MOS capacitors. The high homogeneity and ordering of the SiNWs allowed the determination of the single SiNW capacitance and intrinsic series resistance, as well as other electrical characteristics (density of interface states, flat-band voltage and leakage current) in relation to the geometrical characteristics of the SiNWs. The SiNW capacitors demonstrated increased capacitance density compared to the flat case, while maintaining a cutoff frequency above 1 MHz, much higher than in other reports in the literature. Finally, our model system has been shown to constitute an excellent platform for the study of SiNW capacitors with either grown or deposited dielectrics, as for example high-k dielectrics for further increasing the capacitance density. This will be the subject of future work.

  10. Electrical and Optical Characterization of Nanowire based Semiconductor Devices

    Ayvazian, Talin

    and optimize the electrical and optical properties of two types of nanoscale devices; in first type lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) method has been utilized to fabricate nanowire field effect transistors (NWFET) and second type involved the development of light emitting semiconductor nanowire arrays (NWLED). Field effect transistors (NWFETs) have been prepared from arrays of polycrystalline cadmium selenide (pc-CdSe) nanowires using a back gate configuration. pc-CdSe nanowires were fabricated using the lithographically patterned nanowire electrode- position (LPNE) process on SiO2 /Si substrates. After electrodeposition, pc-CdSe nanowires were thermally annealed at 300 °C x 4 h either with or without exposure to CdCl2 in methanol- a grain growth promoter. The influence of CdCl2 treatment was to increase the mean grain diameter as determined by X-ray diffraction pattern and to convert the crystal structure from cubic to wurtzite. Transfer characteristics showed an increase of the field effect mobility (mueffclose to the band gap of CdSe (1.7eV). To enhance the intensity of the emitted light and the external quantum efficiency (EQE), the distance between the contacts were reduced from 5 mum to less than 1 mum which increased the efficiency by an order of magnitude. Also, increasing the annealing temperature of nanowires from 300 °C x4 h to 450 °C x 1h enhanced grain growth confirmed by structural characterization including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman Spectroscopy. Correspondingly the light emission intensity and EQE improved due to this grain growth. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was utilized to understand mechanism of light emission in CdSe nanowires. Arrays of CdTe nanowires were electrodeposited using LPNE process where the elec- trodeposition of pc-CdTe was carried out at two temperatures: 20 °C (cold) and 55 °C (hot). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD

  11. Structural and photoluminescence investigation on the hot-wire assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition growth silicon nanowires

    Chong, Su Kong; Goh, Boon Tong; Wong, Yuen-Yee; Nguyen, Hong-Quan; Do, Hien; Ahmad, Ishaq; Aspanut, Zarina; Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat; Dee, Chang Fu; Rahman, Saadah Abdul

    2012-01-01

    High density of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were synthesized by a hot-wire assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. The structural and optical properties of the as-grown SiNWs prepared at different rf power of 40 and 80 W were analyzed in this study. The SiNWs prepared at rf power of 40 W exhibited highly crystalline structure with a high crystal volume fraction, X C of ∼82% and are surrounded by a thin layer of SiO x . The NWs show high absorption in the high energy region (E>1.8 eV) and strong photoluminescence at 1.73 to 2.05 eV (red–orange region) with a weak shoulder at 1.65 to 1.73 eV (near IR region). An increase in rf power to 80 W reduced the X C to ∼65% and led to the formation of nanocrystalline Si structures with a crystallite size of <4 nm within the SiNWs. These NWs are covered by a mixture of uncatalyzed amorphous Si layer. The SiNWs prepared at 80 W exhibited a high optical absorption ability above 99% in the broadband range between 220 and ∼1500 nm and red emission between 1.65 and 1.95 eV. The interesting light absorption and photoluminescence properties from both SiNWs are discussed in the text. - Highlights: ► Growth of random oriented silicon nanowires using hot-wire assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. ► Increase in rf power reduces the crystallinity of silicon nanowires. ► High density and nanocrystalline structure in silicon nanowires significant enhance the near IR light absorption. ► Oxide defects and silicon nanocrystallites in silicon nanowires reveal photoluminescence in red–orange and red regions.

  12. Dramatically enhanced ultraviolet photosensing mechanism in a n-ZnO nanowires/i-MgO/n-Si structure with highly dense nanowires and ultrathin MgO layers

    Kim, Dong Chan; Jung, Byung Oh; Cho, Hyung Koun; Lee, Ju Ho; Lee, Jeong Yong; Lee, Jun Hee

    2011-01-01

    This study reports that the visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) photodetecting properties of ZnO nanowire based photodetectors were remarkably improved by introducing ultrathin insulating MgO layers between the ZnO nanowires and Si substrates. All layers were grown without pause by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and the density and vertical arrangement of the ZnO nanowires were strongly dependent on the thickness of the MgO layers. The sample in which an MgO layer with a thickness of 8 nm was inserted had high density nanowires with a vertical alignment and showed dramatically improved UV photosensing performance (photo-to-dark current ratio = 1344.5 and recovery time = 350 ms). The photoresponse spectrum revealed good visible-blind UV detectivity with a sharp cut off at 378 nm and a high UV/visible rejection ratio. A detailed discussion regarding the developed UV photosensing mechanism from the introduction of the i-MgO layers and highly dense nanowires in the n-ZnO nanowires/i-MgO/n-Si substrates structure is presented in this work.

  13. VLS growth of alternating InAsP/InP heterostructure nanowires for multiple-quantum-dot structures.

    Tateno, Kouta; Zhang, Guoqiang; Gotoh, Hideki; Sogawa, Tetsuomi

    2012-06-13

    We investigated the Au-assisted growth of alternating InAsP/InP heterostructures in wurtzite InP nanowires on InP(111)B substrates for constructing multiple-quantum-dot structures. Vertical InP nanowires without stacking faults were obtained at a high PH(3)/TMIn mole flow ratio of 300-1000. We found that the growth rate changed largely when approximately 40 min passed. Ten InAsP layers were inserted in the InP nanowire, and it was found that both the InP growth rate and the background As level increased after the As supply. We also grew the same structure using TBAs/TBP and could reduce the As level in the InP segments. A simulation using a finite-difference time-domain method suggests that the nanowire growth was dominated by the diffusion of the reaction species with long residence time on the surface. For TBAs/TBP, when the source gases were changed, the formed surface species showed a short diffusion length so as to reduce the As background after the InAsP growth.

  14. Facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with nanowire structures on nickel foil

    Zhang, Xia, E-mail: zx@henu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China); Guo, Yonggang [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450007 (China); Liu, Yue; Yang, Xue; Pan, Jieqiong; Zhang, Pingyu [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China)

    2013-12-15

    A simple solution immersion method was developed for the preparation of superhydrophobic surface with nanowire structures on magnetic nickel substrate. The morphology feature, chemical composition and superhydrophobicity of the resultant surface were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectrum and water contact angle measurements, respectively. The surface wettability could be easily changed from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic by a simple chemical modification with stearic acid. It is confirmed that the synergic effect of the surface microstructure and surface free energy contribute to the unique water repellence. Interestingly, the superhydrophobic nickel foil can be used to fabricate a miniature magnetic boat with a controlled movement on water surface.

  15. Structure and field emission of graphene layers on top of silicon nanowire arrays

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Chan, Hui-Wen; Jou, Shyankay; Chen, Guan-Yu; Kuo, Hsiu-An; Song, Wan-Jhen

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared graphene on top of silicon nanowires by transfer-print technique. • Graphene changed from discrete flakes to a continuous by repeated transfer-print. • The triple-layer graphene had high electron field emission due to large edge ratio. - Abstract: Monolayer graphene was grown on copper foils and then transferred on planar silicon substrates and on top of silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays to form single- to quadruple-layer graphene films. The morphology, structure, and electron field emission (FE) of these graphene films were investigated. The graphene films on the planar silicon substrates were continuous. The single- to triple-layer graphene films on the SiNW arrays were discontinuous and while the quadruple-layer graphene film featured a mostly continuous area. The Raman spectra of the graphene films on the SiNW arrays showed G and G′ bands with a singular-Lorentzian shape together with a weak D band. The D band intensity decreased as the number of graphene layers increased. The FE efficiency of the graphene films on the planar silicon substrates and the SiNW arrays varied with the number of graphene layers. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on planar silicon substrates were 4.3, 3.7, 3.5 and 3.4 V/μm, respectively. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on SiNW arrays decreased to 3.9, 3.3, 3.0 and 3.3 V/μm, respectively. Correlation of the FE with structure and morphology of the graphene films is discussed.

  16. Structure and field emission of graphene layers on top of silicon nanowire arrays

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Chan, Hui-Wen [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Jou, Shyankay, E-mail: sjou@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Guan-Yu [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Hsiu-An; Song, Wan-Jhen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared graphene on top of silicon nanowires by transfer-print technique. • Graphene changed from discrete flakes to a continuous by repeated transfer-print. • The triple-layer graphene had high electron field emission due to large edge ratio. - Abstract: Monolayer graphene was grown on copper foils and then transferred on planar silicon substrates and on top of silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays to form single- to quadruple-layer graphene films. The morphology, structure, and electron field emission (FE) of these graphene films were investigated. The graphene films on the planar silicon substrates were continuous. The single- to triple-layer graphene films on the SiNW arrays were discontinuous and while the quadruple-layer graphene film featured a mostly continuous area. The Raman spectra of the graphene films on the SiNW arrays showed G and G′ bands with a singular-Lorentzian shape together with a weak D band. The D band intensity decreased as the number of graphene layers increased. The FE efficiency of the graphene films on the planar silicon substrates and the SiNW arrays varied with the number of graphene layers. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on planar silicon substrates were 4.3, 3.7, 3.5 and 3.4 V/μm, respectively. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on SiNW arrays decreased to 3.9, 3.3, 3.0 and 3.3 V/μm, respectively. Correlation of the FE with structure and morphology of the graphene films is discussed.

  17. Nanowire Electrodes for Advanced Lithium Batteries

    Lei eHuang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs in the past two decades, rechargeable LIBs have become widespread power sources for portable devices used in daily life. However, current demands require higher energy density and power density of batteries. The electrochemical energy storage performance of LIBs could be improved by applying nanomaterial electrodes, but their fast capacity fading is still one of the key limitations and the mechanism needs to be clearly understood. Single nanowire electrode devices are considered as a versatile platform for in situ probing the direct relationship between electrical transport, structure change, and other properties of the single nanowire electrode along with the charge/discharge process. The results indicate the conductivity decrease of the nanowire electrode and the structural disorder/destruction during electrochemical reactions which limit the cycling performance of LIBs. Based on the in situ observations, some feasible structure architecture strategies, including prelithiation, coaxial structure, nanowire arrays and hierarchical structure architecture, are proposed and utilized to restrain the conductivity decrease and structural disorder/destruction. Further, the applications of nanowire electrodes in some beyond Li-ion batteries, such as Li-S and Li-air battery, are also described.

  18. WPG-Controlled Quantum BDD Circuits with BDD Architecture on GaAs-Based Hexagonal Nanowire Network Structure

    Hong-Quan ZHao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional nanowire quantum devices and basic quantum logic AND and OR unit on hexagonal nanowire units controlled by wrap gate (WPG were designed and fabricated on GaAs-based one-dimensional electron gas (1-DEG regular nanowire network with hexagonal topology. These basic quantum logic units worked correctly at 35 K, and clear quantum conductance was achieved on the node device, logic AND circuit unit, and logic OR circuit unit. Binary-decision-diagram- (BDD- based arithmetic logic unit (ALU is realized on GaAs-based regular nanowire network with hexagonal topology by the same fabrication method as that of the quantum devices and basic circuits. This BDD-based ALU circuit worked correctly at room temperature. Since these quantum devices and circuits are basic units of the BDD ALU combinational circuit, the possibility of integrating these quantum devices and basic quantum circuits into the BDD-based quantum circuit with more complicated structures was discussed. We are prospecting the realization of quantum BDD combinational circuitries with very small of energy consumption and very high density of integration.

  19. Hierarchically Structured Co3O4@Pt@MnO2 Nanowire Arrays for High-Performance Supercapacitors

    Xia, Hui; Zhu, Dongdong; Luo, Zhentao; Yu, Yue; Shi, Xiaoqin; Yuan, Guoliang; Xie, Jianping

    2013-10-01

    Here we proposed a novel architectural design of a ternary MnO2-based electrode - a hierarchical Co3O4@Pt@MnO2 core-shell-shell structure, where the complemental features of the three key components (a well-defined Co3O4 nanowire array on the conductive Ti substrate, an ultrathin layer of small Pt nanoparticles, and a thin layer of MnO2 nanoflakes) are strategically combined into a single entity to synergize and construct a high-performance electrode for supercapacitors. Owing to the high conductivity of the well-defined Co3O4 nanowire arrays, in which the conductivity was further enhanced by a thin metal (Pt) coating layer, in combination with the large surface area provided by the small MnO2 nanoflakes, the as-fabricated Co3O4@Pt@MnO2 nanowire arrays have exhibited high specific capacitances, good rate capability, and excellent cycling stability. The architectural design demonstrated in this study provides a new approach to fabricate high-performance MnO2-based nanowire arrays for constructing next-generation supercapacitors.

  20. Structure and magnetic properties of CoxCu1−x nanowires in self-assembled arrays

    Almasi Kashi, M.; Ramazani, A.; Adelnia Najafabadi, F.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Role of non-magnetic Cu on the microstructure and magnetic properties of Co x Cu 1−x nanowires. ► Composition variation through ac pulse electrodeposition. ► Replacement of Co with Cu by electroless phenomenon during the off-time between pulses. - Abstract: CoCu alloy nanowire arrays were ac-pulse electrodeposited into porous anodic aluminum oxide. The effect of off-time between pulses and Cu concentration on the magnetic properties, crystalline structure and weight percentage of Co x Cu 1−x alloy nanowires have been studied by alternating gradient force magnetometer (AGFM), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and energy dispersed spectrometry (EDS), respectively. Increasing the off-time between pulses decreased the weight percentage of Co in the range of (x = 0.84 − 0.24). Results of EDS were in accordance with saturation magnetization per unit area of the samples. Coexistence of a moderate off-time and Cu concentration provided excellent conditions for fabrication of the composite nanowires which were proved by XRD patterns.

  1. Influence of oxygen incorporation on the defect structure of GaN microrods and nanowires. An XPS and CL study

    Guzmán, G; Herrera, M; Silva, R; Vásquez, G C; Maestre, D

    2016-01-01

    We report a cathodoluminescence (CL) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of the influence of oxygen incorporation on the defect structure of GaN microrods and nanowires. The micro- and nanostructures were synthesized by a thermal evaporation method, which enables us to incorporate oxygen at different concentrations by varying the growth temperature. HR-TEM measurements revealed that oxygen generates stacking fault defects and edge dislocations along the GaN nanowires. Amorphous GaO x N y compounds were segregated on the surface of the nanowires. XPS, XRD and CL measurements suggests that the microrods and nanowires were composed of amorphous oxynitride compounds at their surface and GaN at their inner region. CL measurements revealed that the nanostructures generated an emission of 2.68 eV that increased in intensity proportionally to their oxygen content. We have attributed this emission to electronic transitions between donor substitutional-oxygen (O N ) and acceptor interstitial-oxygen (O i ) state levels. (paper)

  2. Reliability evaluation of containments including soil-structure interaction

    Pires, J.; Hwang, H.; Reich, M.

    1985-12-01

    Soil-structure interaction effects on the reliability assessment of containment structures are examined. The probability-based method for reliability evaluation of nuclear structures developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is extended to include soil-structure interaction effects. In this method, reliability of structures is expressed in terms of limit state probabilities. Furthermore, random vibration theory is utilized to calculate limit state probabilities under random seismic loads. Earthquake ground motion is modeled by a segment of a zero-mean, stationary, filtered Gaussian white noise random process, represented by its power spectrum. All possible seismic hazards at a site, represented by a hazard curve, are also included in the analysis. The soil-foundation system is represented by a rigid surface foundation on an elastic halfspace. Random and other uncertainties in the strength properties of the structure, in the stiffness and internal damping of the soil, are also included in the analysis. Finally, a realistic reinforced concrete containment is analyzed to demonstrate the application of the method. For this containment, the soil-structure interaction effects on; (1) limit state probabilities, (2) structural fragility curves, (3) floor response spectra with probabilistic content, and (4) correlation coefficients for total acceleration response at specified structural locations, are examined in detail. 25 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs

  3. Nanowire Electrodes for Advanced Lithium Batteries

    Huang, Lei; Wei, Qiulong; Sun, Ruimin; Mai, Liqiang, E-mail: mlq518@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, WUT-Harvard Joint Nano Key Laboratory, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2014-10-27

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) in the past two decades, rechargeable LIBs have become widespread power sources for portable devices used in daily life. However, current demands require higher energy density and power density of batteries. The electrochemical energy storage performance of LIBs could be improved by applying nanomaterial electrodes, but their fast capacity fading is still one of the key limitations and the mechanism need to be clearly understood. Single nanowire electrode devices are considered as a versatile platform for in situ probing the direct relationship between electrical transport, structure change, and other properties of the single nanowire electrode along with the charge/discharge process. The results indicate that the conductivity decrease of the nanowire electrode and the structural disorder/destruction during electrochemical reaction limit the cycling performance of LIBs. Based on the in situ observations, some feasible optimization strategies, including prelithiation, coaxial structure, nanowire arrays, and hierarchical structure architecture, are proposed and utilized to restrain the conductivity decrease and structural disorder/destruction. Further, the applications of nanowire electrodes in some “beyond Li-ion” batteries, such as Li-S and Li-air batteries are also described.

  4. Nanowire Electrodes for Advanced Lithium Batteries

    Huang, Lei; Wei, Qiulong; Sun, Ruimin; Mai, Liqiang

    2014-01-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) in the past two decades, rechargeable LIBs have become widespread power sources for portable devices used in daily life. However, current demands require higher energy density and power density of batteries. The electrochemical energy storage performance of LIBs could be improved by applying nanomaterial electrodes, but their fast capacity fading is still one of the key limitations and the mechanism need to be clearly understood. Single nanowire electrode devices are considered as a versatile platform for in situ probing the direct relationship between electrical transport, structure change, and other properties of the single nanowire electrode along with the charge/discharge process. The results indicate that the conductivity decrease of the nanowire electrode and the structural disorder/destruction during electrochemical reaction limit the cycling performance of LIBs. Based on the in situ observations, some feasible optimization strategies, including prelithiation, coaxial structure, nanowire arrays, and hierarchical structure architecture, are proposed and utilized to restrain the conductivity decrease and structural disorder/destruction. Further, the applications of nanowire electrodes in some “beyond Li-ion” batteries, such as Li-S and Li-air batteries are also described.

  5. Single Nanostructure Electrochemical Devices for Studying Electronic Properties and Structural Changes in Lithiated Si Nanowires

    McDowell, Matthew T.; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured Si is a promising anode material for the next generation of Li-ion batteries, but few studies have focused on the electrical properties of the Li-Si alloy phase, which are important for determining power capabilities and ensuring sufficient electrical conduction in the electrode structure. Here, we demonstrate an electrochemical device framework suitable for testing the electrical properties of single Si nanowires (NWs) at different lithiation states and correlating these properties with structural changes via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We fi nd that single Si NWs usually exhibit Ohmic I - V response in the lithiated state, with conductivities two to three orders of magnitude higher than in the delithiated state. After a number of sequential lithiation/delithiation cycles, the single NWs show similar conductivity after each lithiation step but show large variations in conductivity in the delithiated state. Finally, devices with groups of NWs in physical contact were fabricated, and structural changes in the NWs were observed after lithiation to investigate how the electrical resistance of NW junctions and the NWs themselves affect the lithiation behavior. The results suggest that electrical resistance of NW junctions can limit lithiation. Overall, this study shows the importance of investigating the electronic properties of individual components of a battery electrode (single nanostructures in this case) along with studying the nature of interactions within a collection of these component structures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Single Nanostructure Electrochemical Devices for Studying Electronic Properties and Structural Changes in Lithiated Si Nanowires

    McDowell, Matthew T.

    2011-07-19

    Nanostructured Si is a promising anode material for the next generation of Li-ion batteries, but few studies have focused on the electrical properties of the Li-Si alloy phase, which are important for determining power capabilities and ensuring sufficient electrical conduction in the electrode structure. Here, we demonstrate an electrochemical device framework suitable for testing the electrical properties of single Si nanowires (NWs) at different lithiation states and correlating these properties with structural changes via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We fi nd that single Si NWs usually exhibit Ohmic I - V response in the lithiated state, with conductivities two to three orders of magnitude higher than in the delithiated state. After a number of sequential lithiation/delithiation cycles, the single NWs show similar conductivity after each lithiation step but show large variations in conductivity in the delithiated state. Finally, devices with groups of NWs in physical contact were fabricated, and structural changes in the NWs were observed after lithiation to investigate how the electrical resistance of NW junctions and the NWs themselves affect the lithiation behavior. The results suggest that electrical resistance of NW junctions can limit lithiation. Overall, this study shows the importance of investigating the electronic properties of individual components of a battery electrode (single nanostructures in this case) along with studying the nature of interactions within a collection of these component structures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Combustion synthesis of AlB2-Al2O3 composite powders with AlB2 nanowire structures

    Yang, Pan; Xiao, Guoqing; Ding, Donghai; Ren, Yun; Yang, Shoulei; Lv, Lihua; Hou, Xing

    2018-05-01

    Using of Al and B2O3 powders as starting materials, and Mg-Al alloy as additives, AlB2-Al2O3 composite powders with AlB2 nanowire structures were successfully fabricated via combustion synthesis method in Ar atmosphere at a pressure of 1.5 MPa. The effect of different amount of Mg-Al alloy on the phase compositions and morphology of the combustion products was investigated. The results revealed that AlB2 and Al2O3 increased, whereas Al decreased with the content of Mg-Al alloy increasing. The impurities MgAl2O4 and AlB12 would exist in the sample with adding of 18 wt% Mg-Al alloy. Interestingly, FESEM/TEM/EDS results showed that AlB2 nanowires were observed in the products when the content of Mg-Al alloy is 6 wt% and 12 wt%. The more AlB2 nanowires can be found as the content of Mg-Al alloy increased. And the yield of AlB2 nanowires with the diameter of about 200 nanometers (nm) and the length up to several tens of micrometers (μm) in the combustion product is highest when the content of Mg-Al alloy is 12 wt%. The vapor, such as Mg-Al (g), B2O2 (g), AlO (g) and Al2O (g), produced during the process of combustion synthesis, reacted with each other to yield AlB2 nanowires by vapor-solid (VS) mechanism and the corresponding model was also proposed.

  8. Structure and optical properties of cored wurtzite (Zn,Mg)O heteroepitaxial nanowires

    Heo, Y.W.; Abernathy, C.; Pruessner, K.; Sigmund, W.; Norton, D.P.; Overberg, M.; Ren, F.; Chisholm, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    The synthesis, structure, and optical properties of one-dimensional heteroepitaxial cored (Zn,Mg)O semiconductor nanowires grown by a catalyst-driven molecular beam epitaxy technique are discussed. The structures form spontaneously in a Zn, Mg and O 2 /O 3 flux, consisting of a single crystal, Zn-rich Zn 1-x Mg x O(x 1-y Mg y O(y>>0.02) sheath. High resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy shows core diameters as small as 4 nm. The cored structure forms spontaneously under constant flux due to a bimodal growth mechanism in which the core forms via bulk like vapor-liquid-solid growth, while the outer sheath grows as a heteroepitaxial layer. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence shows a slight blueshift in the near band edge peak, which is attributed to a few percent Mg doping in the nanoscale ZnO core. The catalyst-driven molecular beam epitaxy technique provides for site-specific nanorod growth on arbitrary substrates

  9. EDITORIAL: Nanowires for energy Nanowires for energy

    LaPierre, Ray; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2012-05-01

    This special issue of Nanotechnology focuses on studies illustrating the application of nanowires for energy including solar cells, efficient lighting and water splitting. Over the next three decades, nanotechnology will make significant contributions towards meeting the increased energy needs of the planet, now known as the TeraWatt challenge. Nanowires in particular are poised to contribute significantly in this development as presented in the review by Hiralal et al [1]. Nanowires exhibit light trapping properties that can act as a broadband anti-reflection coating to enhance the efficiency of solar cells. In this issue, Li et al [2] and Wang et al [3] present the optical properties of silicon nanowire and nanocone arrays. In addition to enhanced optical properties, core-shell nanowires also have the potential for efficient charge carrier collection across the nanowire diameter as presented in the contribution by Yu et al [4] for radial junction a-Si solar cells. Hybrid approaches that combine organic and inorganic materials also have potential for high efficiency photovoltaics. A Si-based hybrid solar cell is presented by Zhang et al [5] with a photoconversion efficiency of over 7%. The quintessential example of hybrid solar cells is the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) where an organic absorber (dye) coats an inorganic material (typically a ZnO nanostructure). Herman et al [6] present a method of enhancing the efficiency of a DSSC by increasing the hetero-interfacial area with a unique hierarchical weeping willow ZnO structure. The increased surface area allows for higher dye loading, light harvesting, and reduced charge recombination through direct conduction along the ZnO branches. Another unique ZnO growth method is presented by Calestani et al [7] using a solution-free and catalyst-free approach by pulsed electron deposition (PED). Nanowires can also make more efficient use of electrical power. Light emitting diodes, for example, will eventually become the

  10. The influence of thermal annealing on structure and oxidation of iron nanowires

    Krajewski Marcin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy as well as Mössbauer spectroscopy were applied in order to study the phase composition of iron nanowires and its changes, caused by annealing in a neutral atmosphere at several temperatures ranging from 200°C to 800°C. As-prepared nanowires were manufactured via a simple chemical reduction in an external magnetic field. Both experimental techniques proved formation of the surface layer covered by crystalline iron oxides, with phase composition dependent on the annealing temperature (Ta. At higher Ta, hematite was the dominant phase in the nanowires.

  11. Thermal-treatment effect on the photoluminescence and gas-sensing properties of tungsten oxide nanowires

    Sun, Shibin; Chang, Xueting; Li, Zhenjiang

    2010-01-01

    Single-crystalline non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide nanowires were initially prepared using a simple solvothermal method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) investigations indicate that the tungsten oxide nanowires exhibit various crystal defects, including stacking faults, dislocations, and vacancies. A possible defect-induced mechanism was proposed to account for the temperature-dependent morphological evolution of the tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing. Due to the high specific surface areas and non-stoichiometric crystal structure, the original tungsten oxide nanowires were highly sensitive to ppm level ethanol at room temperature. Thermal treatment under dry air condition was found to deteriorate the selectivity of room-temperature tungsten oxide sensors, and 400 o C may be considered as the top temperature limit in sensor applications for the solvothermally-prepared nanowires. The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of tungsten oxide nanowires were also strongly influenced by thermal treatment.

  12. Thermal-treatment effect on the photoluminescence and gas-sensing properties of tungsten oxide nanowires

    Sun, Shibin [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China); Chang, Xueting [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, Shandong (China); Li, Zhenjiang, E-mail: zjli126@126.com [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China)

    2010-09-15

    Single-crystalline non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide nanowires were initially prepared using a simple solvothermal method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) investigations indicate that the tungsten oxide nanowires exhibit various crystal defects, including stacking faults, dislocations, and vacancies. A possible defect-induced mechanism was proposed to account for the temperature-dependent morphological evolution of the tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing. Due to the high specific surface areas and non-stoichiometric crystal structure, the original tungsten oxide nanowires were highly sensitive to ppm level ethanol at room temperature. Thermal treatment under dry air condition was found to deteriorate the selectivity of room-temperature tungsten oxide sensors, and 400 {sup o}C may be considered as the top temperature limit in sensor applications for the solvothermally-prepared nanowires. The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of tungsten oxide nanowires were also strongly influenced by thermal treatment.

  13. Catalyst-free fabrication of novel ZnO/CuO core-Shell nanowires heterojunction: Controlled growth, structural and optoelectronic properties

    Khan, Muhammad Arif; Wahab, Yussof; Muhammad, Rosnita; Tahir, Muhammad; Sakrani, Samsudi

    2018-03-01

    Development of controlled growth and vertically aligned ZnO/CuO core-shell heterojunction nanowires (NWs) with large area by a catalyst free vapor deposition and oxidation approach has been investigated. Structural characterization reveals successful fabrication of a core ZnO nanowire having single crystalline hexagonal wurtzite structure along [002] direction and CuO nanostructure shell with thickness (8-10 nm) having polycrystalline monoclinic structure. The optical property analysis suggests that the reflectance spectrum of ZnO/CuO heterostructure nanowires is decreased by 18% in the visible range, which correspondingly shows high absorption in this region as compared to pristine ZnO nanowires. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of core-shell heterojunction nanowires measured by conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) shows excellent rectifying behavior, which indicates the characteristics of a good p-n junction. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has confirmed the sharp junction interface between the core-shell heterojunction nanowire arrays. The valence band offset and conduction band offset at ZnO/CuO heterointerfaces are measured to be 2.4 ± 0.05 and 0.23 ± 0.005 eV respectively, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and a type-II band alignment structure is found. The results of this study contribute to the development of new advanced device heterostructures for solar energy conversion and optoelectronics applications.

  14. Meta-structure and tunable optical device including the same

    Han, Seunghoon; Papadakis, Georgia Theano; Atwater, Harry

    2017-12-26

    A meta-structure and a tunable optical device including the same are provided. The meta-structure includes a plurality of metal layers spaced apart from one another, an active layer spaced apart from the plurality of metal layers and having a carrier concentration that is tuned according to an electric signal applied to the active layer and the plurality of metal layers, and a plurality of dielectric layers spaced apart from one another and each having one surface contacting a metal layer among the plurality of metal layers and another surface contacting the active layer.

  15. MOCVD growth and structural characterization of In-Sb-Te nanowires

    Selmo, S.; Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Unita di Agrate Brianza (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Cecchi, S.; Cecchini, R.; Wiemer, C.; Longo, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Unita di Agrate Brianza (Italy); Rotunno, E.; Lazzarini, L. [IMEM-CNR, Parma (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    In this work, the self-assembly of In{sub 3}Sb{sub 1}Te{sub 2} and In-doped Sb{sub 4}Te{sub 1} nanowires (NWs) for phase change memories application was achieved by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, coupled with vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, catalyzed by Au nanoparticles. Single crystal In{sub 3}Sb{sub 1}Te{sub 2} and In-doped Sb{sub 4}Te{sub 1} NWs were obtained for different reactor pressures at 325 C. The parameters influencing the NW self-assembly were studied and the compositional, morphological, and structural analysis of the grown structures was performed, also comparing the effect of the used substrate (crystalline Si and SiO{sub 2}). In both cases, NWs of several micrometer in length and with diameters as small as 15 nm were obtained. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Transport and structural characterization of solution-processable doped ZnO nanowires

    Noriega, Rodrigo; Goris, Ludwig; Rivnay, Jonathan; Scholl, Jonathan; Thompson, Linda M.; Palke, Aaron C.; Stebbins, Jonathan F.; Salleo, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    The use of ZnO nanowires has become a widespread topic of interest in optoelectronics. In order to correctly assess the quality, functionality, and possible applications of such nanostructures it is important to accurately understand

  17. Transport and structural characterization of solution-processable doped ZnO nanowires

    Noriega, Rodrigo

    2009-08-18

    The use of ZnO nanowires has become a widespread topic of interest in optoelectronics. In order to correctly assess the quality, functionality, and possible applications of such nanostructures it is important to accurately understand their electrical and optical properties. Aluminum- and gallium-doped crystalline ZnO nanowires were synthesized using a low-temperature solution-based process, achieving dopant densities of the order of 1020 cm-3. A non-contact optical technique, photothermal deflection spectroscopy, is used to characterize ensembles of ZnO nanowires. By modeling the free charge carrier absorption as a Drude metal, we are able to calculate the free carrier density and mobility. Determining the location of the dopant atoms in the ZnO lattice is important to determine the doping mechanisms of the ZnO nanowires. Solid-state NMR is used to distinguish between coordination environments of the dopant atoms.

  18. Structural evolution of self-assisted GaAs nanowires grown on Si(111)

    Biermanns, Andreas; Davydok, Anton; Pietsch, Ullrich [University of Siegen, Solid State Physics Group, Walter-Flex-Str. 3, 57072 Siegen (Germany); Breuer, Steffen; Geelhaar, Lutz [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    GaAs nanowires are grown on Si(111) by self-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, and the ratio between wurtzite and zinc-blende phases is determined as function of nanowire length using asymmetric X-ray diffraction. We show that under the applied growth conditions, nanowires grow in both phases during the initial stage of growth, whereas the zinc-blende content increases with growth time and dominates in long nanowires. Compared to the zinc-blende units, the vertical lattice parameter of the wurtzite segments is 0.7% larger, as measured by the positions of respective diffraction peaks. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure modeling, including pseudoknots.

    Hajdin, Christine E; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Huggins, Wayne; Leonard, Christopher W; Mathews, David H; Weeks, Kevin M

    2013-04-02

    A pseudoknot forms in an RNA when nucleotides in a loop pair with a region outside the helices that close the loop. Pseudoknots occur relatively rarely in RNA but are highly overrepresented in functionally critical motifs in large catalytic RNAs, in riboswitches, and in regulatory elements of viruses. Pseudoknots are usually excluded from RNA structure prediction algorithms. When included, these pairings are difficult to model accurately, especially in large RNAs, because allowing this structure dramatically increases the number of possible incorrect folds and because it is difficult to search the fold space for an optimal structure. We have developed a concise secondary structure modeling approach that combines SHAPE (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) experimental chemical probing information and a simple, but robust, energy model for the entropic cost of single pseudoknot formation. Structures are predicted with iterative refinement, using a dynamic programming algorithm. This melded experimental and thermodynamic energy function predicted the secondary structures and the pseudoknots for a set of 21 challenging RNAs of known structure ranging in size from 34 to 530 nt. On average, 93% of known base pairs were predicted, and all pseudoknots in well-folded RNAs were identified.

  20. Control of Nanofilament Structure and Observations of Quantum Point Contact Behavior in Ni/NiO Nanowire Junctions

    Oliver, Sean; Fairfield, Jessamyn; Lee, Sunghun; Bellew, Allen; Stone, Iris; Ruppalt, Laura; Boland, John; Vora, Patrick

    Resistive switching is ideal for use in non-volatile memory where information is stored in a metallic or insulating state. Nanowire junctions formed at the intersection of two Ni/NiO core/shell nanowires have emerged as a leading candidate structure where resistive switching occurs due to the formation and destruction of conducting filaments. However, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the conduction mechanisms as measurements are typically only performed at room temperature. Here, we combine temperature-dependent current-voltage (IV) measurements from 15 - 300 K with magnetoresistance studies and achieve new insight into the nature of the conducting filaments. We identify a novel semiconducting state that behaves as a quantum point contact and find evidence for a possible electric-field driven phase transition. The insulating state exhibits unexpectedly complex IV characteristics that highlight the disordered nature of the ruptured filament while we find clear signs of anisotropic magnetoresistance in the metallic state. Our results expose previously unobserved behaviors in nanowire resistive switching devices and pave the way for future applications where both electrical and magnetic switching can be achieved in a single device. This work was supported by ONR Grant N-00014-15-1-2357.

  1. Mechanical behaviour of cracked welded structures including mismatch effect

    Hornet, P.

    2002-01-01

    The most important parameters for predicting more precisely the fracture behaviour of welded structures have been identified. In particular, the plasticity development at the crack tip in the ligament appeared as a major parameter to evaluate the yield load of such a complex structure. In this way defect assessments procedures have been developed or modified to take into account the mismatch effect that is to say the mechanical properties of the different material constituting the weld joint. This paper is a synthesis of the work done in the past at Electricite de France on this topic in regards with other work done in France or around the World. The most important parameters which control the plasticity development at the crack tip and so mainly influence the fracture behaviour of welded structures are underlined: the mismatch ratio (weld to base metal yield strength ratio), the mismatch ratio (weld to base metal yield strength ratio), the ligament size and the weld width. Moreover, commonly used fracture toughness testing procedures developed in case of homogeneous specimens cannot be used in a straight forward manner and so has to be modified to take into account the mismatch effect. Number or defect assessment procedures taking into account the mismatch effect by considering the yield load of the welded structure are shortly described. Then, the 'Equivalent Material Method' developed at EDF which allows a good prediction of the applied J-Integral at the crack tip is more detailed. This procedure includes not only both weld and base metal yield strength, the structure geometry, the crack size and the weld dimension using the yield load of the real structures but also includes the effect of both weld and base metal strain hardening exponents. Some validations of this method are proposed. Finally, the ability of finite element modelling to predict the behaviour of such welded structures is demonstrated by modelling real experiments: crack located in the middle of

  2. Magnetic properties and crystalline structures of Fe{sub 21}Ni{sub 79} nanowire arrays

    Lee, Kwan Hyi; Lee, Woo Young; Lee, Hwa Young; Jeung, Won Young [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-01

    Fe{sub 21}Ni{sub 79} nanowire arrays have been fabricated by the electroforming method using AAO (anodic aluminum oxide) as a template, which was prepared by anodizing the pure aluminum foil. According to the magnetic property of Fe{sub 21}Ni{sub 79} nanowire prepared, it was found to have the coercivity more than 1 kOe due to the shape anisotropy and squareness (Mr/Ms) very close to 1. Especially, it could be noted that Fe{sub 21}Ni{sub 79} nanowire showed the preferred crystallographic orientation of (220). Annealing treatment of Fe{sub 21}Ni{sub 79} nanowire at 500 degree C resulted in the enhancement of coercivity by 18% while the squareness was not varied by annealing treatment. However, the random orientation of Fe{sub 21}Ni{sub 79} disk and the preferred orientation of nanowire arrays were maintained without respect to the annealing treatment up to 500 degree C.

  3. Electronic structure and quantum transport properties of metallic and semiconducting nanowires

    Simbeck, Adam J.

    The future of the semiconductor industry hinges upon new developments to combat the scaling issues that currently afflict two main chip components: transistors and interconnects. For transistors this means investigating suitable materials to replace silicon for both the insulating gate and the semiconducting channel in order to maintain device performance with decreasing size. For interconnects this equates to overcoming the challenges associated with copper when the wire dimensions approach the confinement limit, as well as continuing to develop low-k dielectric materials that can assure minimal cross-talk between lines. In addition, such challenges make it increasingly clear that device design must move from a top-down to a bottom-up approach in which the desired electronic characteristics are tailored from first-principles. It is with such fundamental hurdles in mind that ab initio calculations on the electronic and quantum transport properties of nanoscale metallic and semiconducting wires have been performed. More specifically, this study seeks to elaborate on the role played by confinement, contacts, dielectric environment, edge decoration, and defects in altering the electronic and transport characteristics of such systems. As experiments continue to achieve better control over the synthesis and design of nanowires, these results are expected to become increasingly more important for not only the interpretation of electronic and transport trends, but also in engineering the electronic structure of nanowires for the needs of the devices of the future. For the metallic atomic wires, the quantum transport properties are first investigated by considering finite, single-atom chains of aluminum, copper, gold, and silver sandwiched between gold contacts. Non-equilibrium Green's function based transport calculations reveal that even in the presence of the contact the conductivity of atomic-scale aluminum is greater than that of the other metals considered. This is

  4. Electrochemical synthesis of highly crystalline copper nanowires

    Kaur, Amandeep; Gupta, Tanish; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Sanjeev; Singh, Karamjeet; Thakur, Anup

    2015-01-01

    Copper nanowires were fabricated within the pores of anodic alumina template (AAT) by template synthesis method at pH = 2.9. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the structure, morphology and composition of fabricated nanowires. These characterizations revealed that the deposited copper nanowires were highly crystalline in nature, dense and uniform. The crystalline copper nanowires are promising in application of future nanoelectronic devices and circuits

  5. Structural and morphological TEM characterization of GaAs based nanowires

    Soda, Marcello

    2012-02-03

    The question of a structural and morphological characterization of GaAs based nanowires is the research interest of this thesis. For this purpose standard and analytical transmission electron microscopy techniques were employed. New investigation methodologies are introduced in order to obtain a reliable interpretation of the results. The principal motivation on developing a new investigation method is the necessity to relate the results of crystal structure and morphology characterizations to microscopic and NW-specific parameters and not to macroscopic and general growth parameters. This allows a reliable comparison of NW characteristics and enhances the comprehension of their growth mechanism.The analysis of the results on crystal structure investigations, assuming this new perspective, delivers the fundamental finding that the axial growth of Au-assisted GaAs NWs can change in a pseudo Ga-assisted growth due to a non steady-state regime of the Ga accumulation process in the liquid droplet. The attempt to associate the observed crystal structures to one of these two growth modes reveals that zinc blende segments are most probably generated when a pseudo Ga-assisted growth occurs. This experimental evidence is in accordance with investigations developed by Glas et al. and Spirkoska et al. and with the current understanding of the NW growth mechanism and unifies the interpretation of catalytic growth of GaAs NWs. A Mn doped GaAs shell deposited at low temperature on core GaAs NWs is characterized for the first time. The growth is found to be epitaxial and to confer the quality of the core crystal to the shell crystal. As a consequence a high stacking fault density of the core NW limits the temperature of the shell growth due to the formation of clusters. Cross sections of (Ga,Mn)As shells are investigated. Simple kinetic and thermodynamical considerations lead to the conclusion of morphological instability of the low temperature radial growth. Analytical

  6. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Al(Ga)N nanowire deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lasers

    Mi, Z; Zhao, S; Djavid, M; Liu, X; Kang, J; Woo, S Y; Bugnet, M; Botton, G A; Kong, X; Guo, H; Ji, W; Liu, Z

    2016-01-01

    We report on the detailed molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Al(Ga)N nanowire heterostructures on Si and their applications for deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lasers. The nanowires are formed under nitrogen-rich conditions without using any metal catalyst. Compared to conventional epilayers, Mg-dopant incorporation is significantly enhanced in nearly strain- and defect-free Al(Ga)N nanowire structures, leading to efficient p -type conduction. The resulting Al(Ga)N nanowire LEDs exhibit excellent performance, including a turn-on voltage of ∼5.5 V for an AlN nanowire LED operating at 207 nm. The design, fabrication, and performance of an electrically injected AlGaN nanowire laser operating in the UV-B band is also presented. (paper)

  7. Dynamic Analysis of Wind Turbines Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    Harte, M.; Basu, B.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the along-wind forced vibration response of an onshore wind turbine. The study includes the dynamic interaction effects between the foundation and the underlying soil, as softer soils can influence the dynamic response of wind turbines. A Multi-Degree-of-Freedom (MDOF......) horizontal axes onshore wind turbine model is developed for dynamic analysis using an Euler–Lagrangian approach. The model is comprised of a rotor blade system, a nacelle and a flexible tower connected to a foundation system using a substructuring approach. The rotor blade system consists of three rotating...... for displacement of the turbine system are obtained and the modal frequencies of the combined turbine-foundation system are estimated. Simulations are presented for the MDOF turbine structure subjected to wind loading for different soil stiffness conditions. Steady state and turbulent wind loading, developed using...

  8. Hysteresis and compensation behaviors of mixed spin-2 and spin-1 hexagonal Ising nanowire core–shell structure

    Masrour, R., E-mail: rachidmasrour@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, 63 46000 Safi (Morocco); Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Jabar, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Benyoussef, A. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco); Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Hassan II Academy of Science and Technology, Rabat (Morocco); Hamedoun, M. [Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, MAScIR, Rabat (Morocco); Bahmad, L. [Laboratoire de Magnétisme et Physique des Hautes Energies L.M.P.H.E.URAC 12, Université Mohammed V, Faculté des Sciences, B.P. 1014 Rabat (Morocco)

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic behaviors of a mixed spins (2-1) hexagonal Ising nanowire with core–shell structure are investigated by using the Monte Carlo simulations. The thermal magnetizations, the magnetic susceptibilities and the transition temperatures of core–shell are studied for different values of crystal field and exchange interactions. The thermal and magnetic hysteresis cycles are given for different values of the crystal field. - Highlights: • Critical temperature increase when exchange interaction increasing in core-shell. • Hysteresis loop areas decrease at above transition temperature. • Magnetic coercive field decrease when crystal field increasing. • Magnetic coercive field increase when exchange interaction increasing.

  9. Porous Silicon Nanowires

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    In this minreview, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures — single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion battery, gas sensor and drug delivery. PMID:21869999

  10. Effect of postgrowth heat treatment on the structural and optical properties of InP/InAsP/InP nanowires

    Cirlin, G. E.; Tchernycheva, M.; Patriarche, G.; Harmand, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the postgrowth annealing of InP/InAsP/InP heterostructural nanowires produced by molecular-beam epitaxy on their structural and optical properties is studied. It is shown that the procedure of short-term (1 min) annealing in an argon atmosphere provides a means for increasing the emission intensity of InAsP quantum dots, suppressing the emission from InAsP quantum wells formed as a result of lateral growth, and substantially reducing the density of structural defects in the nanowires.

  11. Structure, interface abruptness and strain relaxation in self-assisted grown InAs/GaAs nanowires

    Frigeri, Cesare, E-mail: frigeri@imem.cnr.it [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parma (Italy); Scarpellini, David [L–NESS and Dept. Materials Science, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Department of Industrial Engineering University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Fedorov, Alexey [LNESS and CNR-IFN, Como (Italy); Bietti, Sergio; Somaschini, Claudio [L–NESS and Dept. Materials Science, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Grillo, Vincenzo [CNR-IMEM Institute, Parma (Italy); CNR-S3-NANO Center, Modena (Italy); Esposito, Luca; Salvalaglio, Marco; Marzegalli, Anna; Montalenti, Francesco [L–NESS and Dept. Materials Science, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Sanguinetti, Stefano [L–NESS and Dept. Materials Science, University of Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); LNESS and CNR-IFN, Como (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • We study 2 critical issues (interface abruptness and strain release) in InAs/GaAs NWs. • Structural and chemical interface sharpness ≤1.5 nm, better than in previous reports. • Simultaneous elastic and plastic relaxation is shown that agrees with FEM simulations. • Structural, chemical and strain release investigations were performed by STEM. • New MBE self-seeded method whereby InAs is grown by splitting In and As depositions. - Abstract: The structure, interface abruptness and strain relaxation in InAs/GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy in the Ga self-catalysed mode on (111) Si have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The nanowires had the zincblende phase. The InAs/GaAs interface was atomically and chemically sharp with a width around 1.5 nm, i.e. significantly smaller than previously reported values. This was achieved by the consumption of the Ga droplet and formation of a flat top facet of the GaAs followed by the growth of InAs by splitting the depositions of In and As. Both elastic and plastic strain relaxation took place simultaneously. Experimental TEM results about strain relaxation very well agree with linear elasticity theory calculations by the finite element methods.

  12. Structure, interface abruptness and strain relaxation in self-assisted grown InAs/GaAs nanowires

    Frigeri, Cesare; Scarpellini, David; Fedorov, Alexey; Bietti, Sergio; Somaschini, Claudio; Grillo, Vincenzo; Esposito, Luca; Salvalaglio, Marco; Marzegalli, Anna; Montalenti, Francesco; Sanguinetti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We study 2 critical issues (interface abruptness and strain release) in InAs/GaAs NWs. • Structural and chemical interface sharpness ≤1.5 nm, better than in previous reports. • Simultaneous elastic and plastic relaxation is shown that agrees with FEM simulations. • Structural, chemical and strain release investigations were performed by STEM. • New MBE self-seeded method whereby InAs is grown by splitting In and As depositions. - Abstract: The structure, interface abruptness and strain relaxation in InAs/GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy in the Ga self-catalysed mode on (111) Si have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The nanowires had the zincblende phase. The InAs/GaAs interface was atomically and chemically sharp with a width around 1.5 nm, i.e. significantly smaller than previously reported values. This was achieved by the consumption of the Ga droplet and formation of a flat top facet of the GaAs followed by the growth of InAs by splitting the depositions of In and As. Both elastic and plastic strain relaxation took place simultaneously. Experimental TEM results about strain relaxation very well agree with linear elasticity theory calculations by the finite element methods.

  13. Semiconducting silicon nanowires for biomedical applications

    Coffer, JL

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical applications have benefited greatly from the increasing interest and research into semiconducting silicon nanowires. Semiconducting Silicon Nanowires for Biomedical Applications reviews the fabrication, properties, and applications of this emerging material. The book begins by reviewing the basics, as well as the growth, characterization, biocompatibility, and surface modification, of semiconducting silicon nanowires. It goes on to focus on silicon nanowires for tissue engineering and delivery applications, including cellular binding and internalization, orthopedic tissue scaffol

  14. Optical study of the band structure of wurtzite GaP nanowires

    Assali, S.; Greil, J.; Zardo, I.; Belabbes, A.; de Moor, M.W.A.; Kölling, S.; Koenraad, P.M.; Bechstedt, F.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Haverkort, J.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the optical properties of wurtzite (WZ) GaP nanowires by performing photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL measurements in the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K, together with atom probe tomography to identify residual impurities in the nanowires. At low temperature, the WZ GaP luminescence shows donor-acceptor pair emission at 2.115 eV and 2.088 eV, and Burstein-Moss band-filling continuum between 2.180 and 2.253 eV, resulting in a direct band gap above 2.170 eV. Sharp...

  15. A Hierarchical Phosphorus Nanobarbed Nanowire Hybrid: Its Structure and Electrochemical Properties.

    Zhao, Dan; Li, Beibei; Zhang, Jinying; Li, Xin; Xiao, Dingbin; Fu, Chengcheng; Zhang, Lihui; Li, Zhihui; Li, Jun; Cao, Daxian; Niu, Chunming

    2017-06-14

    Nanostructured phosphorus-carbon composites are promising materials for Li-ion and Na-ion battery anodes. A hierarchical phosphorus hybrid, SiC@graphene@P, has been synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition of phosphorus on the surfaces of barbed nanowires, where the barbs are vertically grown graphene nanosheets and the cores are SiC nanowires. A temperature-gradient vaporization-condensation method has been used to remove the unhybridized phosphorus particles formed by homogeneous nucleation. The vertically grown barb shaped graphene nanosheets and a high concentration of edge carbon atoms induced a fibrous red phosphorus (f-RP) growth with its {001} planes in parallel to {002} planes of nanographene sheets and led to a strong interpenetrated interface interaction between phosphorus and the surfaces of graphene nanosheets. This hybridization has been demonstrated to significantly enhance the electrochemical performances of phosphorus.

  16. Alignment control and atomically-scaled heteroepitaxial interface study of GaN nanowires.

    Liu, Qingyun; Liu, Baodan; Yang, Wenjin; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Xinglai; Labbé, Christophe; Portier, Xavier; An, Vladimir; Jiang, Xin

    2017-04-20

    Well-aligned GaN nanowires are promising candidates for building high-performance optoelectronic nanodevices. In this work, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of well-aligned GaN nanowires on a [0001]-oriented sapphire substrate in a simple catalyst-assisted chemical vapor deposition process and their alignment control. It is found that the ammonia flux plays a key role in dominating the initial nucleation of GaN nanocrystals and their orientation. Typically, significant improvement of the GaN nanowire alignment can be realized at a low NH 3 flow rate. X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy studies further verified the preferential orientation of GaN nanowires along the [0001] direction. The growth mechanism of GaN nanowire arrays is also well studied based on cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) characterization and it is observed that GaN nanowires have good epitaxial growth on the sapphire substrate following the crystallographic relationship between (0001) GaN ∥(0001) sapphire and (101[combining macron]0) GaN ∥(112[combining macron]0) sapphire . Most importantly, periodic misfit dislocations are also experimentally observed in the interface region due to the large lattice mismatch between the GaN nanowire and the sapphire substrate, and the formation of such dislocations will favor the release of structural strain in GaN nanowires. HRTEM analysis also finds the existence of "type I" stacking faults and voids inside the GaN nanowires. Optical investigation suggests that the GaN nanowire arrays have strong emission in the UV range, suggesting their crystalline nature and chemical purity. The achievement of aligned GaN nanowires will further promote the wide applications of GaN nanostructures toward diverse high-performance optoelectronic nanodevices including nano-LEDs, photovoltaic cells, photodetectors etc.

  17. Self-assembled quantum dot structures in a hexagonal nanowire for quantum photonics.

    Yu, Ying; Dou, Xiu-Ming; Wei, Bin; Zha, Guo-Wei; Shang, Xiang-Jun; Wang, Li; Su, Dan; Xu, Jian-Xing; Wang, Hai-Yan; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Sun, Bao-Quan; Ji, Yuan; Han, Xiao-Dong; Niu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-05-01

    Two types of quantum nanostructures based on self-assembled GaAs quantumdots embedded into GaAs/AlGaAs hexagonal nanowire systems are reported, opening a new avenue to the fabrication of highly efficient single-photon sources, as well as the design of novel quantum optics experiments and robust quantum optoelectronic devices operating at higher temperature, which are required for practical quantum photonics applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Multiband model of the valence-band electronic structure in cylindrical GaAs nanowires

    Čukarić Nemanja A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We compute the hole states in the GaAs free-standing nanowires, and in the GaAs/(Al,GaAs core-shell nanowires of type I-s, which are grown along the [100] direction. The hole states are extracted from the 4-band Luttinger-Kohn Hamiltonian, which explicitly takes into account mixing between the light and heavy holes. The axial aproximation is adopted, which allowed classification of states according to the total angular monentum (fz when expressed in units of the Planck constant. The envelope functions are expanded in Bessel functions of the first kind. The dispersion relations of the subbands E(kz obtained by the devised method do not resemble parabolas, which is otherwise a feature of the dispersion relations of the conduction subbands. Furthermore, the energy levels of holes whose total orbital momentum is fz=1/2 are shown to cross for a free-standing wire. The low energy fz=1/2 states are found to anticross, but these anticrossings turn into crossings when the ratio of the inner and outer radius of the core-shell wire takes a certain value. The influence of the geometric parameters on the dispersion relations is considered for both free standing and core-shell nanowires.

  19. The electronic structure of radial p-n junction silicon nanowires

    Chiou, Shan-Haw; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2007-03-01

    Silicon nanowires with radial p-n junctions have recently been suggested for photovoltaic applications because incident light can be absorbed along the entire length of the wire, while photogenerated carriers only need to diffuse a maximum of one radius to reach the p-n junction. If the differential of the potential is larger than the binding energy of the electron-hole pair and has a range larger than the Bohr radius of electron-hole pair, then the charge separation mechanism will be similar to traditional silicon solar cells. However, in the small-diameter limit, where quantum confinement effects are prominent, both the exciton binding energy and the potential drop will increase, and the p-n junction itself may have a dramatically different character. We present ab initio calculations based on the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of silicon nanowires with 2-3 nm diameter in the [111] growth direction. A radial p-n junction was formed by symmetrically doping boron and phosphorous at the same vertical level along the axis of the nanowire. The competition between the slope and character of the radial electronic potential and the exciton binding energy will presented in the context of a charge separation mechanism.

  20. Gold nanowires and the effect of impurities

    Novaes Frederico

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMetal nanowires and in particular gold nanowires have received a great deal of attention in the past few years. Experiments on gold nanowires have prompted theory and simulation to help answer questions posed by these studies. Here we present results of computer simulations for the formation, evolution and breaking of very thin Au nanowires. We also discuss the influence of contaminants, such as atoms and small molecules, and their effect on the structural and mechanical properties of these nanowires.

  1. Unit cell structure of the wurtzite phase of GaP nanowires : X-ray diffraction studies and density functional theory calculations

    Kriegner, D.; Assali, S.; Belabbes, A.; Etzelstorfer, T.; Holy, V.; Schülli, T.U.; Bechstedt, F.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Bauer, G.; Stangl, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present structural characterization of the wurtzite crystal structure of GaP nanowires, which were recently shown to have a direct electronic band gap. The structural parameters of the wurtzite phase do consist of two lattice parameters and one internal degree of freedom, determining the Ga-P bond length along the c direction. Using density functional theory calculations, we study the influence of the internal degree of freedom on the band structure. By synchrotron x-ray diffraction studie...

  2. Two-dimensional nanowires on homoepitaxial interfaces: Atomic-scale mechanism of breakdown and disintegration

    Michailov, Michail; Ranguelov, Bogdan

    2018-03-01

    We present a model for hole-mediated spontaneous breakdown of ahomoepitaxial two-dimensional (2D) flat nanowire based exclusively on random, thermally-activated motion of atoms. The model suggests a consecutive three-step mechanism driving the rupture and complete disintegration of the nanowire on a crystalline surface. The breakdown scenario includes: (i) local narrowing of a part of the stripe to a monatomic chain, (ii) formation of a recoverable single vacancy or a 2D vacancy cluster that causes temporary nanowire rupture, (iii) formation of a non-recoverable 2D hole leading to permanent nanowire breakdown. These successive events in the temporal evolution of the nanowire morphology bring the nanowire stripe into an irreversible unstable state, leading to a dramatic change in its peculiar physical properties and conductivity. The atomistic simulations also reveal a strong increase of the nanowire lifetime with an enlargement of its width and open up a way for a fine atomic-scale control of the nanowire lifetime and structural, morphological and thermodynamic stability.

  3. Solution-processed core-shell nanowires for efficient photovoltaic cells.

    Tang, Jinyao; Huo, Ziyang; Brittman, Sarah; Gao, Hanwei; Yang, Peidong

    2011-08-21

    Semiconductor nanowires are promising for photovoltaic applications, but, so far, nanowire-based solar cells have had lower efficiencies than planar cells made from the same materials, even allowing for the generally lower light absorption of nanowires. It is not clear, therefore, if the benefits of the nanowire structure, including better charge collection and transport and the possibility of enhanced absorption through light trapping, can outweigh the reductions in performance caused by recombination at the surface of the nanowires and at p-n junctions. Here, we fabricate core-shell nanowire solar cells with open-circuit voltage and fill factor values superior to those reported for equivalent planar cells, and an energy conversion efficiency of ∼5.4%, which is comparable to that of equivalent planar cells despite low light absorption levels. The device is made using a low-temperature solution-based cation exchange reaction that creates a heteroepitaxial junction between a single-crystalline CdS core and single-crystalline Cu2S shell. We integrate multiple cells on single nanowires in both series and parallel configurations for high output voltages and currents, respectively. The ability to produce efficient nanowire-based solar cells with a solution-based process and Earth-abundant elements could significantly reduce fabrication costs relative to existing high-temperature bulk material approaches.

  4. Structures that Include a Semi-Outdoor Space

    Papachristou, C.; Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2016-01-01

    The thermal environment of buildings with a second "skin" and semi-outdoor space is examined in the present study. A literature review was conducted on similar structures and only a few studies were found focusing on the thermal environment. Two different building case studies were chosen with di...

  5. Electronic transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanowires

    Bloemers, Christian

    2012-10-19

    Throughout this work the electronic transport properties of InAs, InN, and GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires have been analyzed. This includes the analysis of specific resistivity at room temperature and low temperatures as well as the breakdown of resistivity by a contribution of mobility and carrier concentration using gate measurements. While the InN nanowires showed homogeneous transport properties, there was a large statistical spread in the properties of InAs nanowires. Differing crystal structures and the surface conditions are identified to be the main reasons for the statistical spread. Both quantities of influence have been pointed out by comparing the transport parameters before and after a surface treatment (electron irradiation and long time ambient air exposure), and by comparing the transport parameters of wires grown by different growth methods which exhibit different kinds of crystal structure. In particular, the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed different activation energies in nanowires with differing crystal structures. An explanation has been suggested in terms of stacking fault induced potential barriers. A field-effect measurement setup has been utilized to determine the nanowire mobility and carrier concentration. Even though this method is widely used for nanowires, it is subject to a serious disadvantage concerning the influence of surface and interface states on the measurements. As an alternative method which does not suffer from this drawback, Hall measurements have been successfully performed on InAs nanowires for the first time. These measurements became possible because of the utilization of a new electron beam lithographic procedure with an alignment accuracy in the 5 nm range. Carrier concentration values could be determined and compared to the ones obtained from conventional field-effect measurements. The results of the Hall measurements revealed a methodical overestimation of the carrier concentrations obtained

  6. Electronic transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanowires

    Bloemers, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Throughout this work the electronic transport properties of InAs, InN, and GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires have been analyzed. This includes the analysis of specific resistivity at room temperature and low temperatures as well as the breakdown of resistivity by a contribution of mobility and carrier concentration using gate measurements. While the InN nanowires showed homogeneous transport properties, there was a large statistical spread in the properties of InAs nanowires. Differing crystal structures and the surface conditions are identified to be the main reasons for the statistical spread. Both quantities of influence have been pointed out by comparing the transport parameters before and after a surface treatment (electron irradiation and long time ambient air exposure), and by comparing the transport parameters of wires grown by different growth methods which exhibit different kinds of crystal structure. In particular, the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed different activation energies in nanowires with differing crystal structures. An explanation has been suggested in terms of stacking fault induced potential barriers. A field-effect measurement setup has been utilized to determine the nanowire mobility and carrier concentration. Even though this method is widely used for nanowires, it is subject to a serious disadvantage concerning the influence of surface and interface states on the measurements. As an alternative method which does not suffer from this drawback, Hall measurements have been successfully performed on InAs nanowires for the first time. These measurements became possible because of the utilization of a new electron beam lithographic procedure with an alignment accuracy in the 5 nm range. Carrier concentration values could be determined and compared to the ones obtained from conventional field-effect measurements. The results of the Hall measurements revealed a methodical overestimation of the carrier concentrations obtained

  7. Semiconductor nanowires and templates for electronic applications

    Ying, Xiang

    2009-07-15

    This thesis starts by developing a platform for the organized growth of nanowires directly on a planar substrate. For this, a method to fabricate horizontal porous alumina membranes is studied. The second part of the thesis focuses on the study of nanowires. It starts by the understanding of the growth mechanisms of germanium nanowires and follows by the structural and electrical properties at the single nanowire level. Horizontally aligned porous anodic alumina (PAA) was used as a template for the nanowire synthesis. Three PAA arrangements were studied: - high density membranes - micron-sized fingers - multi-contacts Membranes formed by a high density of nanopores were obtained by anodizing aluminum thin films. Metallic and semiconducting nanowires were synthesized into the PAA structures via DC deposition, pulsed electro-depostion and CVD growth. The presence of gold, copper, indium, nickel, tellurium, and silicon nanowires inside PAA templates was verified by SEM and EDX analysis. Further, room-temperature transport measurements showed that the pores are completely filled till the bottom of the pores. In this dissertation, single crystalline and core-shell germanium nanowires are synthesized using indium and bismuth as catalyst in a chemical vapor deposition procedure with germane (GeH{sub 4}) as growth precursor. A systematic growth study has been performed to obtain high aspect-ratio germanium nanowires. The influence of the growth conditions on the final morphology and the crystalline structure has been determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In the case of indium catalyzed germanium nanowires, two different structures were identified: single crystalline and crystalline core-amorphous shell. The preferential growth axis of both kinds of nanowires is along the [110] direction. The occurrence of the two morphologies was found to only depend on the nanowire dimension. In the case of bismuth

  8. The Self- and Directed Assembly of Nanowires

    Smith, Benjamin David

    alignment with respect to nearest neighbor particles. All experiments showed order parameters indicating a slight preference for orientational ordering that was relatively insensitive to segment size, nanowire size, and nanowire coating. Monte Carlo simulations pointed towards this alignment as a consequence of small differences in the van der Waals attractions between the segments. Experimentally, ordering might to be limited by the large size of the nanowires, which results in kinetically trapped structures. In an attempt to obtain better ordering within rows, silica coated nanowires with partial Au cores were made. The synthesis involved silica-coating the nanowires and selectively etching a Ag segment. These particles have extremely different VDWs attractions between their segments, as the Au cores are much more attractive than the solvent-filled etched ends. The assembly of these partially etched nanowires (PENs) is detailed in Chapters 4, 5, and 6. When allowed to self-assemble, we observed the formation of either vertically or horizontally oriented arrays depending on PEN composition. The formation of vertically oriented arrays of anisotropic particles is important, since not many methods to produce these structures are currently available for particles of this size. We examined the effects of PEN length, PEN diameter, and the size, number, and location of the core segments. Our findings showed a large etched segment at one end (which resulted in a large offset in the center of mass and concentrated the VDWs attractions to one end of the particle) resulted in the best columnar assemblies. These vertically orientated arrays formed in a two part process. First, after PENs sedimented, they fell flat and oriented parallel to the surface. These PENs then sampled many orientations, including rotating out of the surface plane. When higher surface concentrations of particles built as more PENs fell to the surface of the cover slip, neighboring particles stabilized vertical

  9. The ethylene glycol template assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Co3O4 nanowires; structural characterization and their application as glucose non-enzymatic sensor

    Khun, K.; Ibupoto, Z.H.; Liu, X.; Beni, V.; Willander, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ethylene glycol assisted Co 3 O 4 nanowires were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The grown Co 3 O 4 nanowires were used for sensitive non-enzymatic glucose sensor. • The proposed glucose sensor shows a wide linear range with fast response. • The Co 3 O 4 modified electrode is a highly specific enzyme-less glucose sensor. - Abstract: In the work reported herein the ethylene glycol template assisted hydrothermal synthesis, onto Au substrate, of thin and highly dense cobalt oxide (Co 3 O 4 ) nanowires and their characterization and their application for non-enzymatic glucose sensing are reported. The structure and composition of Co 3 O 4 nanowires have been fully characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The synthesized Co 3 O 4 nanowires resulted to have high purity and showed diameter of approximately 10 nm. The prepared Co 3 O 4 nanowires coated gold electrodes were applied to the non-enzymatic detection of glucose. The developed sensor showed high sensitivity (4.58 × 10 1 μA mM −1 cm −2 ), a wide linear range of concentration (1.00 × 10 −4 –1.2 × 10 1 mM) and a detection limit of 2.65 × 10 −5 mM. The developed glucose sensor has also shown to be very stable and selective over interferents such as uric acid and ascorbic acid. Furthermore, the proposed fabrication process was shown to be highly reproducible response (over nine electrodes)

  10. Synthesis, structural and optical properties of pure and rare-earth ion doped TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays by a facile hydrothermal technique

    Bandi, Vengala Rao; Raghavan, Chinnambedu Murugesan; Grandhe, Bhaskar kumar; Kim, Sang Su [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Kiwan, E-mail: kwjang@changwon.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong-Soo [Department of Chemistry, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Soung-Soo [Department of Photonics, Silla University, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jung-Hyun [Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-29

    Single crystalline pure and rare-earth metal ions (Eu{sup 3+} and Ce{sup 3+}) doped TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays were prepared on conductive fluorine doped indium tin oxide substrates by a facile hydrothermal method. Initially the conditions and parameters were optimized to prepare the high quality TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays in the absence of organic additives. The average diameter and length of the TiO{sub 2} nanowire were found to be ∼ 30–50 nm and ∼ 0.5–1.5 μm, respectively. The formations of rutile phase structure in all the samples were confirmed by x-ray diffractometric analysis while the transmission electron microscopy confirms the single crystallinity and the maximum orientation of growth direction along [001] for the as-grown TiO{sub 2} nanowire. The optical properties of all the samples were analyzed using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photocatalytic properties of the pure and doped TiO{sub 2} were investigated for the decomposition of organic toludine blue-O dye under ultraviolet irradiation. The result demonstrates that the Ce{sup 3+}: TiO{sub 2} decomposed almost 90% of the organic dye within 80 min. - Highlights: • Rare-earth (RE) doped TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays were prepared by hydrothermal method • RE doping enhanced the growth rate of TiO{sub 2} nanowire arrays • The catalysts used to check their photocatalytic activity by toludine blue-O dye • RE doped TiO2 act as unprecedented photocatalyst for organic dye decomposition.

  11. The ethylene glycol template assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires; structural characterization and their application as glucose non-enzymatic sensor

    Khun, K., E-mail: kimleang.khun@liu.se [Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-60174 Norrköping (Sweden); Ibupoto, Z.H. [Dr M.A. Kazi Institute of Chemistry, University of Sindh Jamshoro, Sindh Jamshoro (Pakistan); Liu, X. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping (Sweden); Beni, V. [Biosensors and Biolelectronics Centre, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping (Sweden); Willander, M. [Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, SE-60174 Norrköping (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Ethylene glycol assisted Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The grown Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires were used for sensitive non-enzymatic glucose sensor. • The proposed glucose sensor shows a wide linear range with fast response. • The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} modified electrode is a highly specific enzyme-less glucose sensor. - Abstract: In the work reported herein the ethylene glycol template assisted hydrothermal synthesis, onto Au substrate, of thin and highly dense cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanowires and their characterization and their application for non-enzymatic glucose sensing are reported. The structure and composition of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires have been fully characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The synthesized Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires resulted to have high purity and showed diameter of approximately 10 nm. The prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanowires coated gold electrodes were applied to the non-enzymatic detection of glucose. The developed sensor showed high sensitivity (4.58 × 10{sup 1} μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}), a wide linear range of concentration (1.00 × 10{sup −4}–1.2 × 10{sup 1} mM) and a detection limit of 2.65 × 10{sup −5} mM. The developed glucose sensor has also shown to be very stable and selective over interferents such as uric acid and ascorbic acid. Furthermore, the proposed fabrication process was shown to be highly reproducible response (over nine electrodes)

  12. Track structure for low energy ions including charge exchange processes

    Uehara, S.; Nikjoo, H.

    2002-01-01

    The model and development is described of a new generation of Monte Carlo track structure codes. The code LEAHIST simulates full slowing down of low-energy proton history tracks in the range 1 keV-1 MeV and the code LEAHIST simulates low-energy alpha particle history tracks in the range 1 keV-8 MeV in water. All primary ion interactions are followed down to 1 keV and all electrons to 1 eV. Tracks of secondary electrons ejected by ions were traced using the electron code KURBUC. Microdosimetric parameters derived by analysis of generated tracks are presented. (author)

  13. Structural and magnetic characterization of as-prepared and annealed FeCoCu nanowire arrays in ordered anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Rodríguez-González, B., E-mail: jbenito@uvigo.es [CACTI, University of Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, INL. Av. Mestre J. Veiga, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Bran, C.; Warnatz, T.; Vazquez, M. [Institute of Materials Science of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Rivas, J. [International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, INL. Av. Mestre J. Veiga, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-04-07

    Herein, we report on the preparation, structure, and magnetic characterization of FeCoCu nanowire arrays grown by DC electrodeposition inside self-assembled ordered nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide templates. A systematic study of their structure has been performed both in as-prepared samples and after annealing in the temperature range up to 800 °C, although particular attention has been paid to annealing at 700 °C after which maximum magnetic hardening is achieved. The obtained nanowires have a diameter of 40 nm and their Fe{sub 0.28}Co{sub 0.67}Cu{sub 0.05} composition was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Focused ion-beam lamellas of two samples (as-prepared and annealed at 700 °C) were prepared for their imaging in the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) perpendicularly to the electron beam, where the obtained EDS compositional mappings show a homogeneous distribution of the elements. X-ray diffraction analysis, and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns confirm that nanowires exhibit a bcc cubic structure (space group Im-3m). In addition, bright-dark field images show that the nanowires have a polycrystalline structure that remains essentially the same after annealing, but some modifications were observed: (i) an overall increase and sharpening of recrystallized grains, and (ii) an apparent shrinkage of the nanowires diameter. Obtained SAED patterns also show strong textured components with determined <111> and <112> crystalline directions parallel to the wires growth direction. The presence of both directions was also confirmed in the HRTEM images doing Fourier transform analyses. Magnetic measurements show strong magnetic anisotropy with magnetization easy axis parallel to the nanowires in as-prepared and annealed samples. The magnetic properties are tuned by suitable thermal treatments so that, maximum enhanced coercivity (∼2.7 kOe) and normalized remanence (∼0.91 Ms) values are

  14. Structural and magnetic characterization of as-prepared and annealed FeCoCu nanowire arrays in ordered anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Rodríguez-González, B.; Bran, C.; Warnatz, T.; Vazquez, M.; Rivas, J.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we report on the preparation, structure, and magnetic characterization of FeCoCu nanowire arrays grown by DC electrodeposition inside self-assembled ordered nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide templates. A systematic study of their structure has been performed both in as-prepared samples and after annealing in the temperature range up to 800 °C, although particular attention has been paid to annealing at 700 °C after which maximum magnetic hardening is achieved. The obtained nanowires have a diameter of 40 nm and their Fe 0.28 Co 0.67 Cu 0.05 composition was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Focused ion-beam lamellas of two samples (as-prepared and annealed at 700 °C) were prepared for their imaging in the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) perpendicularly to the electron beam, where the obtained EDS compositional mappings show a homogeneous distribution of the elements. X-ray diffraction analysis, and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns confirm that nanowires exhibit a bcc cubic structure (space group Im-3m). In addition, bright-dark field images show that the nanowires have a polycrystalline structure that remains essentially the same after annealing, but some modifications were observed: (i) an overall increase and sharpening of recrystallized grains, and (ii) an apparent shrinkage of the nanowires diameter. Obtained SAED patterns also show strong textured components with determined and crystalline directions parallel to the wires growth direction. The presence of both directions was also confirmed in the HRTEM images doing Fourier transform analyses. Magnetic measurements show strong magnetic anisotropy with magnetization easy axis parallel to the nanowires in as-prepared and annealed samples. The magnetic properties are tuned by suitable thermal treatments so that, maximum enhanced coercivity (∼2.7 kOe) and normalized remanence (∼0.91 Ms) values are achieved after annealing at

  15. Quasiparticle semiconductor band structures including spin-orbit interactions.

    Malone, Brad D; Cohen, Marvin L

    2013-03-13

    We present first-principles calculations of the quasiparticle band structure of the group IV materials Si and Ge and the group III-V compound semiconductors AlP, AlAs, AlSb, InP, InAs, InSb, GaP, GaAs and GaSb. Calculations are performed using the plane wave pseudopotential method and the 'one-shot' GW method, i.e. G(0)W(0). Quasiparticle band structures, augmented with the effects of spin-orbit, are obtained via a Wannier interpolation of the obtained quasiparticle energies and calculated spin-orbit matrix. Our calculations explicitly treat the shallow semicore states of In and Ga, which are known to be important in the description of the electronic properties, as valence states in the quasiparticle calculation. Our calculated quasiparticle energies, combining both the ab initio evaluation of the electron self-energy and the vector part of the pseudopotential representing the spin-orbit effects, are in generally very good agreement with experimental values. These calculations illustrate the predictive power of the methodology as applied to group IV and III-V semiconductors.

  16. Piezo-phototronic UV/visible photosensing with optical-fiber-nanowire hybridized structures.

    Wang, Zhaona; Yu, Ruomeng; Pan, Caofeng; Liu, Ying; Ding, Yong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-03-04

    An optical-fiber-nanowire hybridized UV-visible photodetector (PD) is reported. The PD is designed to allow direct integration in optical communication systems without requiring the use of couplers via fiber-welding technology. The PD works in two modes: axial and off-axial illumination mode. By using the piezo-phototronic effect, the performance of the PD is enhanced/optimized by up to 718% in sensitivity and 2067% in photoresponsivity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Unit Cell Structure of Crystal Polytypes in InAs and InSb Nanowires

    Kriegner, Dominik; Panse, Christian; Mandl, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The atomic distances in hexagonal polytypes of III−V compound semiconductors differ from the values expected from simply a change of the stacking sequence of (111) lattice planes. While these changes were difficult to quantify so far, we accurately determine the lattice parameters of zinc blende......, wurtzite, and 4H polytypes for InAs and InSb nanowires, using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results are compared to density functional theory calculations. Experiment and theory show that the occurrence of hexagonal bilayers tends to stretch the distances of atomic layers...

  18. Defect induced structural inhomogeneity, ultraviolet light emission and near-band-edge photoluminescence broadening in degenerate In2O3 nanowires

    Mukherjee, Souvik; Sarkar, Ketaki; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Schaller, Richard D.; Gosztola, David J.; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate here defect induced changes on the morphology and surface properties of indium oxide (In2O3) nanowires and further study their effects on the near-band-edge (NBE) emission, thereby showing the significant influence of surface states on In2O3 nanostructure based device characteristics for potential optoelectronic applications. In2O3 nanowires with cubic crystal structure (c-In2O3) were synthesized via carbothermal reduction technique using a gold-catalyst-assisted vapor-liquid-solid method. Onset of strong optical absorption could be observed at energies greater than 3.5 eV consistent with highly n-type characteristics due to unintentional doping from oxygen vacancy ({V}{{O}}) defects as confirmed using Raman spectroscopy. A combination of high resolution transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and valence band analysis on the nanowire morphology and stoichiometry reveals presence of high-density of {V}{{O}} defects on the surface of the nanowires. As a result, chemisorbed oxygen species can be observed leading to upward band bending at the surface which corresponds to a smaller valence band offset of 2.15 eV. Temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was used to study the nature of the defect states and the influence of the surface states on the electronic band structure and NBE emission has been discussed. Our data reveals significant broadening of the NBE PL peak consistent with impurity band broadening leading to band-tailing effect from heavy doping.

  19. Hydrogen Generation using non-polar coaxial InGaN/GaN Multiple Quantum Well Structure Formed on Hollow n-GaN Nanowires.

    Park, Ji-Hyeon; Mandal, Arjun; Kang, San; Chatterjee, Uddipta; Kim, Jin Soo; Park, Byung-Guon; Kim, Moon-Deock; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2016-08-24

    This article demonstrates for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the merits of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown on hollow n-GaN nanowires (NWs) as a plausible alternative for stable photoelectrochemical water splitting and efficient hydrogen generation. These hollow nanowires are achieved by a growth method rather not by conventional etching process. Therefore this approach becomes simplistic yet most effective. We believe relatively low Ga flux during the selective area growth (SAG) aids the hollow nanowire to grow. To compare the optoelectronic properties, simultaneously solid nanowires are also studied. In this present communication, we exhibit that lower thermal conductivity of hollow n-GaN NWs affects the material quality of InGaN/GaN MQWs by limiting In diffusion. As a result of this improvement in material quality and structural properties, photocurrent and photosensitivity are enhanced compared to the structures grown on solid n-GaN NWs. An incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) of around ~33.3% is recorded at 365 nm wavelength for hollow NWs. We believe that multiple reflections of incident light inside the hollow n-GaN NWs assists in producing a larger amount of electron hole pairs in the active region. As a result the rate of hydrogen generation is also increased.

  20. Defect induced structural inhomogeneity, ultraviolet light emission and near-band-edge photoluminescence broadening in degenerate In 2 O 3 nanowires

    Mukherjee, Souvik; Sarkar, Ketaki; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Schaller, Richard D.; Gosztola, David J.; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate here defect induced changes on the morphology and surface properties of indium oxide (In2O3) nanowires and further study their effects on the near-band-edge (NBE) emission, thereby showing the significant influence of surface states on In2O3 nanostructure based device characteristics for potential optoelectronic applications. In2O3 nanowires with cubic crystal structure (c-In2O3) were synthesized via carbothermal reduction technique using a gold-catalyst-assisted vapor–liquid–solid method. Onset of strong optical absorption could be observed at energies greater than 3.5 eV consistent with highly n-type characteristics due to unintentional doping from oxygen vacancy (VO) defects as confirmed using Raman spectroscopy. A combination of high resolution transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and valence band analysis on the nanowire morphology and stoichiometry reveals presence of high-density of VO defects on the surface of the nanowires. As a result, chemisorbed oxygen species can be observed leading to upward band bending at the surface which corresponds to a smaller valence band offset of 2.15 eV. Temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was used to study the nature of the defect states and the influence of the surface states on the electronic band structure and NBE emission has been discussed. Our data reveals significant broadening of the NBE PL peak consistent with impurity band broadening leading to band-tailing effect from heavy doping.

  1. Structural integrity of LMFBRs including leak before break

    Vinzens, K.; Laue, H.; Hosemann, B.

    1990-01-01

    Th German Basis Safety Concept is an approach which allows the possibility of catastrophic failures to be excluded. It was developed in Germany to render the probabilistic approach unnecessary for safety cases relating to nuclear power plants. The process of evaluation started in 1972, and in 1979 the Basis Safety Concept was officially published and thus became a legal requirement for LWR plants. With appropriate modifications in regard of the particular features of LMFBR, this concept has also been applied to SNR 300. The 'Structural Integrity Demonstration Concept' of SNR 300 is based on five principles: Principle of quality by design and fabrication, Principle of multiple examination, Principle of worst case consideration, Principle of operating surveillance and documentation, Principle of verification and continuous development. The same principles are taken over for SNR 2. The specific requirements on the components relevant to safety have to be defined at an early stage so that the components can be designed appropriately to the feasibility of the measures required by the concept. (orig.)

  2. Nuclear matter descriptions including quark structure of the hadrons

    Huguet, R.

    2008-07-01

    It is nowadays well established that nucleons are composite objects made of quarks and gluons, whose interactions are described by Quantum chromodynamics (QCD). However, because of the non-perturbative character of QCD at the energies of nuclear physics, a description of atomic nuclei starting from quarks and gluons is still not available. A possible alternative is to construct effective field theories based on hadronic degrees of freedom, in which the interaction is constrained by QCD. In this framework, we have constructed descriptions of infinite nuclear matter in relativistic mean field theories taking into account the quark structure of hadrons. In a first approach, the in medium modifications of mesons properties is dynamically obtained in a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) quark model. This modification is taken into account in a relativistic mean field theory based on a meson exchange interaction between nucleons. The in-medium modification of mesons masses and the properties of infinite nuclear matter have been studied. In a second approach, the long and short range contributions to the in-medium modification of the nucleon are determined. The short range part is obtained in a NJL quark model of the nucleon. The long range part, related to pions exchanges between nucleons, has been determined in the framework of Chiral Perturbation theory. These modifications have been used to constrain the couplings of a point coupling relativistic mean field model. A realistic description of the saturation properties of nuclear matter is obtained. (author)

  3. In-Depth View of the Structure and Growth of SnO2 Nanowires and Nanobrushes.

    Stuckert, Erin P; Geiss, Roy H; Miller, Christopher J; Fisher, Ellen R

    2016-08-31

    Strategic application of an array of complementary imaging and diffraction techniques is critical to determine accurate structural information on nanomaterials, especially when also seeking to elucidate structure-property relationships and their effects on gas sensors. In this work, SnO2 nanowires and nanobrushes grown via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) displayed the same tetragonal SnO2 structure as revealed via powder X-ray diffraction bulk crystallinity data. Additional characterization using a range of electron microscopy imaging and diffraction techniques, however, revealed important structure and morphology distinctions between the nanomaterials. Tailoring scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes combined with transmission electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) techniques afforded a more detailed view of the SnO2 nanostructures. Indeed, upon deeper analysis of individual wires and brushes, we discovered that, despite a similar bulk structure, wires and brushes grew with different crystal faces and lattice spacings. Had we not utilized multiple STEM diffraction modes in conjunction with t-EBSD, differences in orientation related to bristle density would have been overlooked. Thus, it is only through a methodical combination of several structural analysis techniques that precise structural information can be reliably obtained.

  4. Fabrication of amorphous silica nanowires via oxygen plasma treatment of polymers on silicon

    Chen, Zhuojie; She, Didi; Chen, Qinghua; Li, Yanmei; Wu, Wengang

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate a facile non-catalytic method of fabricating silica nanowires at room temperature. Different polymers including photoresists, parylene C and polystyrene are patterned into pedestals on the silicon substrates. The silica nanowires are obtained via the oxygen plasma treatment on those pedestals. Compared to traditional strategies of silica nanowire fabrication, this method is much simpler and low-cost. Through designing the proper initial patterns and plasma process parameters, the method can be used to fabricate various regiment nano-scale silica structure arrays in any laboratory with a regular oxygen-plasma-based cleaner or reactive-ion-etching equipment.

  5. A scalable route to prepare core–shell structured ZnO@PEDOT nanowires and PEDOT nanotubes and their properties as electrode materials

    Wang, Fang, E-mail: 270220943@qq.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang, Xianhong, E-mail: zxh_0507@126.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yang, Le, E-mail: 13613513412@126.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Xu, Dehong, E-mail: dedehenry@qq.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Ma, Yuhong, E-mail: mayh@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen, Dong, E-mail: chendong@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Li, E-mail: lwang@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhao, Changwen, E-mail: zhaocw@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yang, Wantai, E-mail: yangwt@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • ZnO@PEDOT nanowires and PEDOT nanotubes synthesized by chemical oxidation polymerization. • By controlling the ratio of ZnO/EDOT, ZnO@PEDOT formed different structures. • The maximum specific capacitance of PEDOT can reach 101.34 F/g. - Abstract: A composite of a core–shell structured nanowires with ZnO as a core and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as a shell was prepared. At first, the hexagonal ZnO nanowires, with diameter of about 80–100 nm and length 4–5 μm, were fabricated by hydrothermal synthesis process. Then a thick layer of poly(trifluoroethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (PTFEMA-b-PSSNa) was grafted from the surface of ZnO nanowires via atom transfer free radical polymerization. At last, with the ZnO@PTFEMA-b-PSSNa as a template and the PSSNa chain as the counterion dopant, PEDOT was precipitated onto the surface of the template to form the composite of ZnO@PEDOT/PSSNa. With the evaluation of the EDOT polymerization, the thickness of the PEDOT layer increased steadily. However, as the ratio of EDOT/ZnO was greater than 1:2, the ZnO nanowires templates were dissolved at last and then PEDOT particles were produced due to increasing of the acidity during the oxidation polymerization of EDOT. In this case, the product was the mixture of the nanotubes and particles of PEDOT/PPSNa. The electrochemical capacitances of the composites with different structures were investigated with cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge–discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques with three-electrode cell configuration. The maximum specific capacitance of ZnO@PEDOT electrode can reach 101.34 F/g at 20 mV/s.

  6. Optical study of the band structure of wurtzite GaP nanowires

    Assali, S.

    2016-07-25

    We investigated the optical properties of wurtzite (WZ) GaP nanowires by performing photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL measurements in the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K, together with atom probe tomography to identify residual impurities in the nanowires. At low temperature, the WZ GaP luminescence shows donor-acceptor pair emission at 2.115 eV and 2.088 eV, and Burstein-Moss band-filling continuum between 2.180 and 2.253 eV, resulting in a direct band gap above 2.170 eV. Sharp exciton α-β-γ lines are observed at 2.140–2.164–2.252 eV, respectively, showing clear differences in lifetime, presence of phonon replicas, and temperature-dependence. The excitonic nature of those peaks is critically discussed, leading to a direct band gap of ∼2.190 eV and to a resonant state associated with the γ-line ∼80 meV above the Γ8C conduction band edge.

  7. Optical study of the band structure of wurtzite GaP nanowires

    Assali, S.; Greil, J.; Zardo, I.; Belabbes, Abderrezak; de Moor, M. W. A.; Koelling, S.; Koenraad, P. M.; Bechstedt, F.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Haverkort, J. E. M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the optical properties of wurtzite (WZ) GaP nanowires by performing photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL measurements in the temperature range from 4 K to 300 K, together with atom probe tomography to identify residual impurities in the nanowires. At low temperature, the WZ GaP luminescence shows donor-acceptor pair emission at 2.115 eV and 2.088 eV, and Burstein-Moss band-filling continuum between 2.180 and 2.253 eV, resulting in a direct band gap above 2.170 eV. Sharp exciton α-β-γ lines are observed at 2.140–2.164–2.252 eV, respectively, showing clear differences in lifetime, presence of phonon replicas, and temperature-dependence. The excitonic nature of those peaks is critically discussed, leading to a direct band gap of ∼2.190 eV and to a resonant state associated with the γ-line ∼80 meV above the Γ8C conduction band edge.

  8. Methods for synthesizing metal oxide nanowires

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kumar, Vivekanand; Kim, Jeong H.; Clark, Ezra Lee

    2016-08-09

    A method of synthesizing a metal oxide nanowire includes the steps of: combining an amount of a transition metal or a transition metal oxide with an amount of an alkali metal compound to produce a mixture; activating a plasma discharge reactor to create a plasma discharge; exposing the mixture to the plasma discharge for a first predetermined time period such that transition metal oxide nanowires are formed; contacting the transition metal oxide nanowires with an acid solution such that an alkali metal ion is exchanged for a hydrogen ion on each of the transition metal oxide nanowires; and exposing the transition metal oxide nanowires to the plasma discharge for a second predetermined time period to thermally anneal the transition metal oxide nanowires. Transition metal oxide nanowires produced using the synthesis methods described herein are also provided.

  9. Nanowire Lasers

    Couteau C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs, solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  10. Hierarchically structured MnO2 nanowires supported on hollow Ni dendrites for high-performance supercapacitors

    Sun, Zhipeng; Firdoz, Shaik; Ying-Xuan Yap, Esther; Li, Lan; Lu, Xianmao

    2013-05-01

    We report a hierarchical Ni@MnO2 structure consisting of MnO2 nanowires supported on hollow Ni dendrites for high-performance supercapacitors. The Ni@MnO2 structure, which was prepared via a facile electrodeposition method, is highly porous and appears like a forest of pine trees grown vertically on a substrate. At a MnO2 mass loading of 0.35 mg cm-2, the Ni@MnO2 electrode demonstrated a specific capacitance of 1125 F g-1 that is close to the theoretical value. In addition, a remarkable high-rate performance (766 F g-1 at a discharge current density of 100 A g-1) was achieved. Electrochemical tests in a two-electrode configuration for the Ni@MnO2 structure with a high MnO2 loading of 3.6 mg cm-2 showed a low equivalent series resistance (ESR) of 1 Ω and a high specific power of 72 kW kg-1. This superior performance can be attributed to the highly porous and hierarchical structure of Ni@MnO2 that favors rapid diffusion of an electrolyte, highly conductive pathway for electron transport, and efficient material utilization.We report a hierarchical Ni@MnO2 structure consisting of MnO2 nanowires supported on hollow Ni dendrites for high-performance supercapacitors. The Ni@MnO2 structure, which was prepared via a facile electrodeposition method, is highly porous and appears like a forest of pine trees grown vertically on a substrate. At a MnO2 mass loading of 0.35 mg cm-2, the Ni@MnO2 electrode demonstrated a specific capacitance of 1125 F g-1 that is close to the theoretical value. In addition, a remarkable high-rate performance (766 F g-1 at a discharge current density of 100 A g-1) was achieved. Electrochemical tests in a two-electrode configuration for the Ni@MnO2 structure with a high MnO2 loading of 3.6 mg cm-2 showed a low equivalent series resistance (ESR) of 1 Ω and a high specific power of 72 kW kg-1. This superior performance can be attributed to the highly porous and hierarchical structure of Ni@MnO2 that favors rapid diffusion of an electrolyte, highly

  11. Electric Conductivity of Phosphorus Nanowires

    Jing-Xiang, Zhang; Hui, Li; Xue-Qing, Zhang; Kim-Meow, Liew

    2009-01-01

    We present the structures and electrical transport properties of nanowires made from different strands of phosphorus chains encapsulated in carbon nanotubes. Optimized by density function theory, our results indicate that the conductance spectra reveal an oscillation dependence on the size of wires. It can be seen from the density of states and current-voltage curves that the structure of nanowires affects their properties greatly. Among them, the DNA-like double-helical phosphorus nanowire exhibits the distinct characteristic of an approximately linear I – V relationship and has a higher conductance than others. The transport properties of phosphorus nanowires are highly correlated with their microstructures. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  12. Structural and electrochemical properties of single crystalline MoV 2O8 nanowires for energy storage devices

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2013-05-01

    We report the synthesis of MoV2O8 nanowires of high quality using spin coating followed by the thermal annealing process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals the average diameter of synthesized nanowire about 100 nm, and average length ranges from 1 to 5 μm. The TEM analysis further confirms the <001> growth direction of MoV 2O8 nanowires. The electrochemical properties of synthesized nanowires using cyclic voltammetry show the specific capacitance 56 Fg-1 at the scan rate of 5 mV s-1 that remains 24 Fg -1 at 100 mV s-1. The electrochemical measurements suggest that the MoV2O8 nanowires can be used as a material for the future electrochemical capacitors (energy storage devices). © 2012 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural and electrochemical properties of single crystalline MoV 2O8 nanowires for energy storage devices

    Shahid, Muhammad; Liu, Jingling; Ali, Zahid; Shakir, Imran; Warsi, Muhammad Farooq

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of MoV2O8 nanowires of high quality using spin coating followed by the thermal annealing process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals the average diameter of synthesized nanowire about 100 nm, and average length ranges from 1 to 5 μm. The TEM analysis further confirms the <001> growth direction of MoV 2O8 nanowires. The electrochemical properties of synthesized nanowires using cyclic voltammetry show the specific capacitance 56 Fg-1 at the scan rate of 5 mV s-1 that remains 24 Fg -1 at 100 mV s-1. The electrochemical measurements suggest that the MoV2O8 nanowires can be used as a material for the future electrochemical capacitors (energy storage devices). © 2012 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermal expansion behavior study of Co nanowire array with in situ x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption fine structure techniques

    Mo, Guang; Cai, Quan; Jiang, Longsheng; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Kunhao; Cheng, Weidong; Xing, Xueqing; Chen, Zhongjun; Wu, Zhonghua

    2008-10-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption fine structure techniques were used to study the structural change of ordered Co nanowire array with temperature. The results show that the Co nanowires are polycrystalline with hexagonal close packed structure without phase change up until 700 °C. A nonlinear thermal expansion behavior has been found and can be well described by a quadratic equation with the first-order thermal expansion coefficient of 4.3×10-6/°C and the second-order thermal expansion coefficient of 5.9×10-9/°C. The mechanism of this nonlinear thermal expansion behavior is discussed.

  15. Template-based fabrication of nanowire-nanotube hybrid arrays

    Ye Zuxin; Liu Haidong; Schultz, Isabel; Wu Wenhao; Naugle, D G; Lyuksyutov, I

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication and structure characterization of ordered nanowire-nanotube hybrid arrays embedded in porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes are reported. Arrays of TiO 2 nanotubes were first deposited into the pores of AAO membranes by a sol-gel technique. Co nanowires were then electrochemically deposited into the TiO 2 nanotubes to form the nanowire-nanotube hybrid arrays. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements showed a high nanowire filling factor and a clean interface between the Co nanowire and the TiO 2 nanotube. Application of these hybrids to the fabrication of ordered nanowire arrays with highly controllable geometric parameters is discussed

  16. Fabrication of ZnO Nanowire Based Piezoelectric Generators and Related Structures

    Opoku, Charles; Dahiya, Abhishek Singh; Oshman, Christopher; Cayrel, Frederic; Poulin-Vittrant, Guylaine; Alquier, Daniel; Camara, Nicolas

    Using vertically grown hydrothermal ZnO nanowires, we demonstrate the assembly of fully functional piezoelectric energy harvesters on plastics substrates. A seedless hydrothermal process is employed for the growth of single crystalline vertically orientated ZnO NWs at around 100oC. Flexible NG are assembled using ∼7 μm thick PDMS polymer matrix on a 3x3cm substrate. A representative device with an active area of 4cm2 is characterised revealing average output voltage generation of ∼22mV (±1.2) and -32mV (±0.16) in the positive and negative cycles after 3-4mm periodic deflection at 20Hz. A power density of ∼288nW/cm3 is estimated for the device. It is envisaged that such energy scavengers may find potential applications targeting self-powered systems, sensors and on-body charging of electronics.

  17. Intrinsic Ge nanowire nonvolatile memory based on a simple core–shell structure

    Chen, Wen-Hua; Liu, Chang-Hai; Li, Qin-Liang; Sun, Qi-Jun; Liu, Jie; Gao, Xu; Sun, Xuhui; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsic Ge nanowires (NWs) with a Ge core covered by a thick Ge oxide shell are utilized to achieve nanoscale field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories, which show a large memory window and a high ON/OFF ratio with good retention. The retainable surface charge trapping is considered to be responsible for the memory effect, and the Ge oxide shell plays a key role as the insulating tunneling dielectric which must be thick enough to prevent stored surface charges from leaking out. Annealing the device in air is demonstrated to be a simple and effective way to attain thick Ge oxide on the Ge NW surface, and the Ge-NW-based memory corresponding to thick Ge oxide exhibits a much better retention capability compared with the case of thin Ge oxide. (paper)

  18. Synthesis, structure and photoelectrochemical properties of single crystalline silicon nanowire arrays

    Dalchiele, E.A.; Martin, F.; Leinen, D.; Marotti, R.E.; Ramos-Barrado, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, n-type silicon nanowire (n-SiNW) arrays have been synthesized by self-assembly electroless metal deposition (EMD) nanoelectrochemistry. The synthesized n-SiNW arrays have been submitted to scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and optical studies. Initial probes of the solar device conversion properties and the photovoltaic parameters such as short-circuit current, open-circuit potential, and fill factor of the n-SiNW arrays have been explored using a liquid-junction in a photoelectrochemical (PEC) system under white light. Moreover, a direct comparison between the PEC performance of a polished n-Si(100) and the synthesized n-SiNW array photoelectrodes has been done. The PEC performance was significantly enhanced on the n-SiNWs photoelectrodes compared with that on polished n-Si(100).

  19. Magnetostatic Interaction in Fe-Co Nanowires

    Laura Elbaile

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrays of Fe-Co alloy nanowires with diameter around 35 nm and several micrometers in length have been synthesized by codepositing Fe and Co into porous anodic alumina. The morphology, structure, and magnetic properties of the nanowires (hysteresis loops and remanence curves were characterized by SEM, TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and VSM, respectively. The XRD patterns indicate that the Fe-Co nanowires present a body-centered cubic (bcc structure and a preferred (110 orientation perpendicular to the template surface. From the hysteresis loops obtained with the magnetic field applied in the axis direction of the nanowires, we can observe that the coercive field slightly decreases when the nanowire length increases. This magnetic behaviour is analyzed considering the shape anisotropy and the dipolar interactions among nanowires.

  20. Structural, electronic, optical and vibrational properties of nanoscale carbons and nanowires: a colloquial review.

    Cole, Milton W; Crespi, Vincent H; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Dresselhaus, Gene; Fischer, John E; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Kojima, K; Mahan, Gerald D; Rao, Apparao M; Sofo, Jorge O; Tachibana, M; Wako, K; Xiong, Qihua

    2010-08-25

    This review addresses the field of nanoscience as viewed through the lens of the scientific career of Peter Eklund, thus with a special focus on nanocarbons and nanowires. Peter brought to his research an intense focus, imagination, tenacity, breadth and ingenuity rarely seen in modern science. His goal was to capture the essential physics of natural phenomena. This attitude also guides our writing: we focus on basic principles, without sacrificing accuracy, while hoping to convey an enthusiasm for the science commensurate with Peter's. The term 'colloquial review' is intended to capture this style of presentation. The diverse phenomena of condensed matter physics involve electrons, phonons and the structures within which excitations reside. The 'nano' regime presents particularly interesting and challenging science. Finite size effects play a key role, exemplified by the discrete electronic and phonon spectra of C(60) and other fullerenes. The beauty of such molecules (as well as nanotubes and graphene) is reflected by the theoretical principles that govern their behavior. As to the challenge, 'nano' requires special care in materials preparation and treatment, since the surface-to-volume ratio is so high; they also often present difficulties of acquiring an experimental signal, since the samples can be quite small. All of the atoms participate in the various phenomena, without any genuinely 'bulk' properties. Peter was a master of overcoming such challenges. The primary activity of Eklund's research was to measure and understand the vibrations of atoms in carbon materials. Raman spectroscopy was very dear to Peter. He published several papers on the theory of phonons (Eklund et al 1995a Carbon 33 959-72, Eklund et al 1995b Thin Solid Films 257 211-32, Eklund et al 1992 J. Phys. Chem. Solids 53 1391-413, Dresselhaus and Eklund 2000 Adv. Phys. 49 705-814) and many more papers on measuring phonons (Pimenta et al 1998b Phys. Rev. B 58 16016-9, Rao et al 1997a Nature

  1. Structural, electronic, optical and vibrational properties of nanoscale carbons and nanowires: a colloquial review

    Cole, Milton W; Crespi, Vincent H; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Dresselhaus, Gene; Fischer, John E; Gutierrez, Humberto R; Kojima, K; Wako, K; Mahan, Gerald D; Rao, Apparao M; Sofo, Jorge O; Tachibana, M; Xiong Qihua

    2010-01-01

    This review addresses the field of nanoscience as viewed through the lens of the scientific career of Peter Eklund, thus with a special focus on nanocarbons and nanowires. Peter brought to his research an intense focus, imagination, tenacity, breadth and ingenuity rarely seen in modern science. His goal was to capture the essential physics of natural phenomena. This attitude also guides our writing: we focus on basic principles, without sacrificing accuracy, while hoping to convey an enthusiasm for the science commensurate with Peter's. The term 'colloquial review' is intended to capture this style of presentation. The diverse phenomena of condensed matter physics involve electrons, phonons and the structures within which excitations reside. The 'nano' regime presents particularly interesting and challenging science. Finite size effects play a key role, exemplified by the discrete electronic and phonon spectra of C 60 and other fullerenes. The beauty of such molecules (as well as nanotubes and graphene) is reflected by the theoretical principles that govern their behavior. As to the challenge, 'nano' requires special care in materials preparation and treatment, since the surface-to-volume ratio is so high; they also often present difficulties of acquiring an experimental signal, since the samples can be quite small. All of the atoms participate in the various phenomena, without any genuinely 'bulk' properties. Peter was a master of overcoming such challenges. The primary activity of Eklund's research was to measure and understand the vibrations of atoms in carbon materials. Raman spectroscopy was very dear to Peter. He published several papers on the theory of phonons (Eklund et al 1995a Carbon 33 959-72, Eklund et al 1995b Thin Solid Films 257 211-32, Eklund et al 1992 J. Phys. Chem. Solids 53 1391-413, Dresselhaus and Eklund 2000 Adv. Phys. 49 705-814) and many more papers on measuring phonons (Pimenta et al 1998b Phys. Rev. B 58 16016-9, Rao et al 1997a Nature

  2. Quantum optics with nanowires (Conference Presentation)

    Zwiller, Val

    2017-02-01

    Nanowires offer new opportunities for nanoscale quantum optics; the quantum dot geometry in semiconducting nanowires as well as the material composition and environment can be engineered with unprecedented freedom to improve the light extraction efficiency. Quantum dots in nanowires are shown to be efficient single photon sources, in addition because of the very small fine structure splitting, we demonstrate the generation of entangled pairs of photons from a nanowire. By doping a nanowire and making ohmic contacts on both sides, a nanowire light emitting diode can be obtained with a single quantum dot as the active region. Under forward bias, this will act as an electrically pumped source of single photons. Under reverse bias, an avalanche effect can multiply photocurrent and enables the detection of single photons. Another type of nanowire under study in our group is superconducting nanowires for single photon detection, reaching efficiencies, time resolution and dark counts beyond currently available detectors. We will discuss our first attempts at combining semiconducting nanowire based single photon emitters and superconducting nanowire single photon detectors on a chip to realize integrated quantum circuits.

  3. Crystalline α-Sm2S3 nanowires: Structure and optical properties of an unusual intrinsically degenerate semiconductor

    Marin, Chris M.; Wang, Lu; Brewer, Joseph R.; Mei, Wai-Ning; Cheung, Chin Li

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Developed a rapid synthetic method to generate thin films of α-Sm 2 S 3 nanowires. ► Calculated the electronic structure of α-Sm 2 S 3 by density functional theory. ► Predicted that α-Sm 2 S 3 is an intrinsically degenerate p-type semiconductor. ► Found that the gap in the band states of α-Sm 2 S 3 could be engineered to 1.3 eV via sulfur vacancy. -- Abstract: The lanthanide sulfides have long been a promising class of semiconductors because of their infrared-to-visible range band gaps and excellent thermoelectric properties. However, their applications have been limited due to their time consuming conventional synthetic processes and the lack of sufficient understanding of their electronic properties. To address these shortcomings, here we report a rapid, chemical vapor deposition route which results in thin films of crystalline α-phase samarium sesquisulfide (α-Sm 2 S 3 ) nanowires within a few hours, rather than the typical 4–7 days required in previous synthetic processes. In addition, density functional theory was, for the first time, utilized to calculate the electronic band structure of α-Sm 2 S 3 in order to shed insight into the interpretation of their UV–Vis absorption spectrum. We found that the theoretical direct gap in the band states of α-Sm 2 S 3 is 1.7 eV. Computation results suggest that this gap can be tuned to a solar optimal ∼1.3 eV via systematic sulfur vacancy sites engineered into the crystal structure. Most significantly, the degenerate semiconductor-like behavior long observed in lanthanide sulfide samples have been shown to be present even in the ideal α-Sm 2 S 3 structure, suggesting that the observed heavily p-type behavior is an unusual intrinsic property of the material resulting from the Fermi level being located significantly below the optically active 1.7 eV band edge

  4. Improved seedless hydrothermal synthesis of dense and ultralong ZnO nanowires

    Tian Jinghua; Hu Jie; Li Sisi; Zhang Fan; Liu Jun; Shi Jian; Li Xin; Chen Yong; Tian Zhongqun

    2011-01-01

    Seedless hydrothermal synthesis has been improved by introducing an adequate content of ammonia into the nutrient solution, allowing the fabrication of dense and ultralong ZnO nanowire arrays over large areas on a substrate. The presence of ammonia in the nutrient solution facilitates the high density nucleation of ZnO on the substrate which is critical for the nanowire growth. In order to achieve an optimal growth, the growth conditions have been studied systematically as a function of ammonia content, growth temperature and incubation time. The effect of polyethyleneimine (PEI) has also been studied but shown to be of no benefit to the nucleation of ZnO. Ultradense and ultralong ZnO nanowires could be obtained under optimal growth conditions, showing no fused structure at the foot of the nanowire arrays. Due to different reaction kinetics, four growth regimes could be attributed, including the first fast growth, equilibrium phase, second fast growth and final erosion. Combining this simple method with optical lithography, ZnO nanowires could be grown selectively on patterned areas. In addition, the as-grown ZnO nanowires could be used for the fabrication of a piezoelectric nanogenerator. Compared to the device of ZnO nanowires made by other methods, a more than twice voltage output has been obtained, thereby proving an improved performance of our growth method.

  5. Towards an elastic model of wurtzite AlN nanowires

    Mitrushchenkov, A; Chambaud, G; Yvonnet, J; He, Q-C

    2010-01-01

    Starting with ab initio calculations of AlN wurtzite [0001] nanowires with diameters up to 4 nm, a finite element method is developed to deal with larger nanostructures/nanoparticles. The ab initio calculations show that the structure of the nanowires can be well represented by an internal part with AlN bulk elastic properties, and one atomic surface layer with its own elastic behavior. The proposed finite element method includes surface elements with their own elastic properties using surface elastic coefficients deduced from the ab initio calculations. The elastic properties obtained with the finite element model compare very well with those obtained with the full ab initio calculations.

  6. Manipulation of morphology and structure of the top of GaAs nanowires grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Li, Lixia; Pan, Dong; Yu, Xuezhe; So, Hyok; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-10-01

    Self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires (NWs) are grown on Si (111) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy. The effect of different closing sequences of the Ga and As cell shutters on the morphology and structural phase of GaAs NWs is investigated. For the sequences of closing the Ga and As cell shutters simultaneously or closing the As cell shutter 1 min after closing the Ga cell shutter, the NWs grow vertically to the substrate surface. In contrast, when the As cell shutter is closed first, maintaining the Ga flux is found to be critical for the following growth of GaAs NWs, which can change the growth direction from [111] to . The evolution of the morphology and structural phase transition at the tips of these GaAs NWs confirm that the triple-phase-line shift mode is at work even for the growth with different cell shutter closing sequences. Our work will provide new insights for better understanding of the growth mechanism and realizing of the morphology and structure control of the GaAs NWs. Project supported partly by the MOST of China (No. 2015CB921503), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61504133, 61334006, 61404127), and Youth Innovation Promotion Association, CAS (No. 2017156).

  7. Nanowire Structured Hybrid Cell for Concurrently Scavenging Solar and Mechanical Energies

    Xu, Chen

    2009-04-29

    Conversion cells for harvesting solar energy and mechanical energy are usually separate and independent entities that are designed and built following different physical principles. Developing a technology that harvests multiple-type energies in forms such as sun light and mechanical around the clock is desperately desired for fully utilizing the energies available in our living environment. We report a hybrid cell that is intended for simultaneously harvesting solar and mechanical energies. Using aligned ZnO nanowire arrays grown on surfaces of a flat substrate, a dye-sensitized solar cell is integrated with a piezoelectric nanogenerator. The former harvests solar energy irradiating on the top, and the latter harvests ultrasonic wave energy from the surrounding. The two energy harvesting approaches can work simultaneously or individually, and they can be integrated in parallel and serial for raising the output current and voltage, respectively, as well as power. It is found that the voltage output from the solar cell can be used to raise the output voltage of the nanogenerator, providing an effective approach for effectively storing and utilizing the power generated by the nanogenerator. Our study demonstrates a new approach for concurrently harvesting multiple types of energies using an integrated hybrid cell so that the energy resources can be effectively and complementary utilized whenever and wherever one or all of them is available. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  8. Special structures and properties of hydrogen nanowire confined in a single walled carbon nanotube at extreme high pressure

    Yueyuan Xia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that hydrogen can be confined in single walled carbon nanotubes to form high density and high pressure H2 molecular lattice, which has peculiar shell and axial structures depending on the density or pressure. The band gap of the confined H2 lattice is sensitive to the pressure. Heating the system at 2000K, the H2 lattice is firstly melted to form H2 molecular liquid, and then some of the H2 molecules dissociate accompanied by drastic molecular and atomic reactions, which have essential effect on the electronic structure of the hydrogen system. The liquid hydrogen system at 2000K is found to be a particular mixed liquid, which consists of H2 molecules, H atoms, and H-H-H trimers. The dissociated H atoms and the trimers in the liquid contribute resonance electron states at the Fermi energy to change the material properties substantially. Rapidly cooling the system from 2000K to 0.01 K, the mixed liquid is frozen to form a mixed solid melt with a clear trend of band gap closure. It indicates that this solid melt may become a superconducting nanowire when it is further compressed.

  9. Structural and magnetic properties of nickel nanowires grown in porous anodic aluminium oxide template by electrochemical deposition technique

    Nugraha Pratama, Sendi; Kurniawan, Yudhi; Muhammady, Shibghatullah; Takase, Kouichi; Darma, Yudi

    2018-03-01

    We study the formation of nickel nanowires (Ni NWs) grown in porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) template by the electrochemical deposition technique. Here, the initial AAO template was grown by anodization of aluminium substrate in sulphuric acid solution. The cross-section, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of Ni NWs system were characterized by field-emission SEM, XRD, and SQUID. As a result, the highly-ordered Ni NWs are observed with the uniform diameter of 27 nm and the length from 31 to 163 nm. Based on XRD spectra analysis, Ni NWs have the face-centered cubic structure with the lattice parameter of 0.35 nm and average crystallite size of 17.19 nm. From SQUID measurement at room temperature, by maintaining the magnetic field perpendicular to Ni NWs axis, the magnetic hysteresis of Ni NWs system show the strong ferromagnetism with the coercivity and remanence ratio of ∼148 Oe and ∼0.23, respectively. The magnetic properties are also calculated by means of generalized gradient approximation methods. From the calculation result, we show that the ferromagnetism behavior comes from Ni NWs without any contribution from AAO template or the substrate. This study opens the potential application of Ni NWs system for novel functional magnetic devices.

  10. Structure and photoluminescence properties of ZnS-core/In2O3-shell one-dimensional nanowires

    Park, Sunghoon; Lee, Jungkeun; Jeong, Bongyong; Lee, Wan In; Lee, Chongmu

    2011-12-01

    ZnS-core/In2O3-shell nanowires have been prepared by using a two-step process: the thermal evaporation of ZnS powders on Si(100) substrates coated with Au thin films and the sputter-deposition of In2O3. The ZnS nanowires were a few tens to a few hundreds of nanometers in diameter and up to a few hundreds of micrometers in length. ZnS nanowires have an emission band centered at around 570 nm in the yellow region. The yellow emission has been enhanced in intensity by coating the ZnS nanowires with In2O3 and further enhanced by annealing in a reducing atmosphere, but it is degraded by annealing in an oxidative atmosphere.

  11. Earthquake analysis of structures including structure-soil interaction by a substructure method

    Chopra, A.K.; Guttierrez, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A general substructure method for analysis of response of nuclear power plant structures to earthquake ground motion, including the effects of structure-soil interaction, is summarized. The method is applicable to complex structures idealized as finite element systems and the soil region treated as either a continuum, for example as a viscoelastic halfspace, or idealized as a finite element system. The halfspace idealization permits reliable analysis for sites where essentially similar soils extend to large depths and there is no rigid boundary such as soil-rock interface. For sites where layers of soft soil are underlain by rock at shallow depth, finite element idealization of the soil region is appropriate; in this case, the direct and substructure methods would lead to equivalent results but the latter provides the better alternative. Treating the free field motion directly as the earthquake input in the substructure method eliminates the deconvolution calculations and the related assumption -regarding type and direction of earthquake waves- required in the direct method. The substructure method is computationally efficient because the two substructures-the structure and the soil region- are analyzed separately; and, more important, it permits taking advantage of the important feature that response to earthquake ground motion is essentially contained in the lower few natural modes of vibration of the structure on fixed base. For sites where essentially similar soils extend to large depths and there is no obvious rigid boundary such as a soil-rock interface, numerical results for earthquake response of a nuclear reactor structure are presented to demonstrate that the commonly used finite element method may lead to unacceptable errors; but the substructure method leads to reliable results

  12. Zn-dopant dependent defect evolution in GaN nanowires

    Yang, Bing; Liu, Baodan; Wang, Yujia; Zhuang, Hao; Liu, Qingyun; Yuan, Fang; Jiang, Xin

    2015-10-01

    Zn doped GaN nanowires with different doping levels (0, doping on the defect evolution, including stacking fault, dislocation, twin boundary and phase boundary, has been systematically investigated by transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Undoped GaN nanowires show a hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) structure with good crystallinity. Several kinds of twin boundaries, including (101&cmb.macr;3), (101&cmb.macr;1) and (202&cmb.macr;1), as well as Type I stacking faults (...ABABC&cmb.b.line;BCB...), are observed in the nanowires. The increasing Zn doping level (GaN nanowires. At high Zn doping level (3-5 at%), meta-stable cubic zinc blende (ZB) domains are generated in the WZ GaN nanowires. The WZ/ZB phase boundary (...ABABAC&cmb.b.line;BA...) can be identified as Type II stacking faults. The density of stacking faults (both Type I and Type II) increases with increasing the Zn doping levels, which in turn leads to a rough-surface morphology in the GaN nanowires. First-principles calculations reveal that Zn doping will reduce the formation energy of both Type I and Type II stacking faults, favoring their nucleation in GaN nanowires. An understanding of the effect of Zn doping on the defect evolution provides an important method to control the microstructure and the electrical properties of p-type GaN nanowires.Zn doped GaN nanowires with different doping levels (0, doping on the defect evolution, including stacking fault, dislocation, twin boundary and phase boundary, has been systematically investigated by transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Undoped GaN nanowires show a hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) structure with good crystallinity. Several kinds of twin boundaries, including (101&cmb.macr;3), (101&cmb.macr;1) and (202&cmb.macr;1), as well as Type I stacking faults (...ABABC&cmb.b.line;BCB...), are observed in the nanowires. The increasing Zn doping level (GaN nanowires. At high Zn doping level (3-5 at%), meta

  13. Room temperature NO2 gas sensing of Au-loaded tungsten oxide nanowires/porous silicon hybrid structure

    Wang Deng-Feng; Liang Ji-Ran; Li Chang-Qing; Yan Wen-Jun; Hu Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report an enhanced nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) gas sensor based on tungsten oxide (WO 3 ) nanowires/porous silicon (PS) decorated with gold (Au) nanoparticles. Au-loaded WO 3 nanowires with diameters of 10 nm–25 nm and lengths of 300 nm–500 nm are fabricated by the sputtering method on a porous silicon substrate. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) micrographs show that Au nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the surfaces of WO 3 nanowires. The effect of the Au nanoparticles on the NO 2 -sensing performance of WO 3 nanowires/porous silicon is investigated over a low concentration range of 0.2 ppm–5 ppm of NO 2 at room temperature (25 °C). It is found that the 10-Å Au-loaded WO 3 nanowires/porous silicon-based sensor possesses the highest gas response characteristic. The underlying mechanism of the enhanced sensing properties of the Au-loaded WO 3 nanowires/porous silicon is also discussed. (paper)

  14. Superwetting nanowire membranes for selective absorption.

    Yuan, Jikang; Liu, Xiaogang; Akbulut, Ozge; Hu, Junqing; Suib, Steven L; Kong, Jing; Stellacci, Francesco

    2008-06-01

    The construction of nanoporous membranes is of great technological importance for various applications, including catalyst supports, filters for biomolecule purification, environmental remediation and seawater desalination. A major challenge is the scalable fabrication of membranes with the desirable combination of good thermal stability, high selectivity and excellent recyclability. Here we present a self-assembly method for constructing thermally stable, free-standing nanowire membranes that exhibit controlled wetting behaviour ranging from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic. These membranes can selectively absorb oils up to 20 times the material's weight in preference to water, through a combination of superhydrophobicity and capillary action. Moreover, the nanowires that form the membrane structure can be re-suspended in solutions and subsequently re-form the original paper-like morphology over many cycles. Our results suggest an innovative material that should find practical applications in the removal of organics, particularly in the field of oil spill cleanup.

  15. Earthquake analysis of structures including structure-soil interaction by a substructure method

    Chopra, A.K.; Guttierrez, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A general substructure method for analysis of response of nuclear power plant structures to earthquake ground motion, including the effects of structure-soil interaction, is summarized. The method is applicable to complex structures idealized as finite element systems and the soil region treated as either a continuum, for example as a viscoelastic halfspace, or idealized as a finite element system. The halfspace idealization permits reliable analysis for sites where essentially similar soils extend to large depths and there is no rigid boundary such as soil-rock interface. For sites where layers of soft soil are underlain by rock at shallow depth, finite element idealization of the soil region is appropriate; in this case, the direct and substructure methods would lead to equivalent results but the latter provides the better alternative. Treating the free field motion directly as the earthquake input in the substructure eliminates the deconvolution calculations and the related assumption-regarding type and direction of earthquake waves-required in the direct method. (Auth.)

  16. TiO2 nanowire-templated hierarchical nanowire network as water-repelling coating

    Hang, Tian; Chen, Hui-Jiuan; Xiao, Shuai; Yang, Chengduan; Chen, Meiwan; Tao, Jun; Shieh, Han-ping; Yang, Bo-ru; Liu, Chuan; Xie, Xi

    2017-12-01

    Extraordinary water-repelling properties of superhydrophobic surfaces make them novel candidates for a great variety of potential applications. A general approach to achieve superhydrophobicity requires low-energy coating on the surface and roughness on nano- and micrometre scale. However, typical construction of superhydrophobic surfaces with micro-nano structure through top-down fabrication is restricted by sophisticated fabrication techniques and limited choices of substrate materials. Micro-nanoscale topographies templated by conventional microparticles through surface coating may produce large variations in roughness and uncontrollable defects, resulting in poorly controlled surface morphology and wettability. In this work, micro-nanoscale hierarchical nanowire network was fabricated to construct self-cleaning coating using one-dimensional TiO2 nanowires as microscale templates. Hierarchical structure with homogeneous morphology was achieved by branching ZnO nanowires on the TiO2 nanowire backbones through hydrothermal reaction. The hierarchical nanowire network displayed homogeneous micro/nano-topography, in contrast to hierarchical structure templated by traditional microparticles. This hierarchical nanowire network film exhibited high repellency to both water and cell culture medium after functionalization with fluorinated organic molecules. The hierarchical structure templated by TiO2 nanowire coating significantly increased the surface superhydrophobicity compared to vertical ZnO nanowires with nanotopography alone. Our results demonstrated a promising strategy of using nanowires as microscale templates for the rational design of hierarchical coatings with desired superhydrophobicity that can also be applied to various substrate materials.

  17. Low temperature synthesis of seed mediated CuO bundle of nanowires, their structural characterisation and cholesterol detection.

    Ibupoto, Z H; Khun, K; Liu, X; Willander, M

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we have successfully synthesised CuO bundle of nanowires using simple, cheap and low temperature hydrothermal growth method. The growth parameters such as precursor concentration and time for duration of growth were optimised. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) has demonstrated that the CuO bundles of nanowires are highly dense, uniform and perpendicularly oriented to the substrate. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has demonstrated that the CuO nanostructures consist of bundle of nanowires and their growth pattern is along the [010] direction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique described that CuO bundle of nanowires possess the monoclinic crystal phase. The surface and chemical composition analyses were carried out with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique and the obtained results suggested the pure crystal state of CuO nanostructures. In addition, the CuO nanowires were used for the cholesterol sensing application by immobilising the cholesterol oxidase through electrostatic attraction. The infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy study has also revealed that CuO nanostructures are consisting of only CuO bonding and has also shown the possible interaction of cholesterol oxidase with the sharp edge surface of CuO bundle of nanowires. The proposed cholesterol sensor has demonstrated the wide range of detection of cholesterol with good sensitivity of 33.88±0.96 mV/decade. Moreover, the CuO bundle of nanowires based sensor electrode has revealed good repeatability, reproducibility, stability, selectivity and a fast response time of less than 10s. The cholesterol sensor based on the immobilised cholesterol oxidase has good potential applicability for the determination of cholesterol from the human serum and other biological samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. High-resolution TEM characterization of ZnO core-shell nanowires for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Divitini, G; Ducati, C [Department of Materials Science, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Plank, N O V; Welland, M E [Nanoscience Centre, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, CB3 0FF (United Kingdom); Snaith, H J, E-mail: gd322@cam.ac.u [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Recently ZnO nanowire films have been used in very promising and inexpensive dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). It was found that the performance of the devices can be enhanced by functionalising the nanowires with a thin metal oxide coating. This nm-scale shell is believed to tailor the electronic structure of the nanowire, and help the absorption of the dye. Core-shell ZnO nanowire structures are synthesised at low temperature (below 120{sup 0}C) by consecutive hydrothermal growth steps. Different materials are investigated for the coating, including Mg, Al, Cs and Zr oxides. High resolution TEM is used to characterise the quality of both the nanowire core and the shell, and to monitor the thickness and the degree of crystallisation of the oxide coating. The interface between the nanowire core and the outer shell is investigated in order to understand the adhesion of the coating, and give valuable feedback for the synthesis process. Nanowire films are packaged into dye-sensitised solar cell prototypes; samples coated with ZrO{sub 2} and MgO show the largest enhancement in the photocurrent and open-circuit voltage and look very promising for further improvement.

  19. High performance and durability of order-structured cathode catalyst layer based on TiO_2@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Meng; Yang, Zhaoyi; Wang, Xindong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • TiO_2@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays were prepared and applied as catalyst support. • As-prepared Pt-TiO_2@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays were applied as order-structured cathode catalyst layer. • The novel cathode catalyst structure without Nafion"® ionomer enhance the performance and durability of PEMFC. - Abstract: In this paper, an order-structured cathode catalyst layer consisting of Pt-TiO_2@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays that in situ grown on commercial gas diffusion layer (GDL) are prepared and applied to membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In order to prepare the TiO_2@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays with suitable porosity and prominent conductivity, the morphologies of the TiO_2 nanoarray and electrochemical polymerization process of aniline are schematically investigated. The MEA with order-structured cathode catalyst layer is assembled in the single cell to evaluate the electrochemical performance and durability of PEMFC. As a result, the PEMFC with order-structured cathode catalyst layer shows higher peak power density (773.54 mW cm"−"2) than conventional PEMFC (699.30 mW cm"−"2). Electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) and charge transfer impedance (R_c_t) are measured before and after accelerated degradation test (ADT), and the corresponding experimental results indicate the novel cathode structure exhibits a better stability with respect to conventional cathode. The enhanced electrochemical performance and durability toward PEMFC can be ascribed to the order-structured cathode nanoarray structure with high specific surface area increases the utilization of catalyst and reduces the tortuosity of transport pathways, and the synergistic effect between TiO_2@PANI support and Pt nanoparticles promotes the high efficiency of electrochemical reaction and improves the stability of catalyst. This research provides a facile and controllable method to prepare order-structured

  20. High performance and durability of order-structured cathode catalyst layer based on TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Meng; Yang, Zhaoyi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Xindong, E-mail: echem@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 College Road, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays were prepared and applied as catalyst support. • As-prepared Pt-TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays were applied as order-structured cathode catalyst layer. • The novel cathode catalyst structure without Nafion{sup ®} ionomer enhance the performance and durability of PEMFC. - Abstract: In this paper, an order-structured cathode catalyst layer consisting of Pt-TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays that in situ grown on commercial gas diffusion layer (GDL) are prepared and applied to membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In order to prepare the TiO{sub 2}@PANI core-shell nanowire arrays with suitable porosity and prominent conductivity, the morphologies of the TiO{sub 2} nanoarray and electrochemical polymerization process of aniline are schematically investigated. The MEA with order-structured cathode catalyst layer is assembled in the single cell to evaluate the electrochemical performance and durability of PEMFC. As a result, the PEMFC with order-structured cathode catalyst layer shows higher peak power density (773.54 mW cm{sup −2}) than conventional PEMFC (699.30 mW cm{sup −2}). Electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) and charge transfer impedance (R{sub ct}) are measured before and after accelerated degradation test (ADT), and the corresponding experimental results indicate the novel cathode structure exhibits a better stability with respect to conventional cathode. The enhanced electrochemical performance and durability toward PEMFC can be ascribed to the order-structured cathode nanoarray structure with high specific surface area increases the utilization of catalyst and reduces the tortuosity of transport pathways, and the synergistic effect between TiO{sub 2}@PANI support and Pt nanoparticles promotes the high efficiency of electrochemical reaction and improves the stability of catalyst. This research provides a facile and

  1. Improving emission uniformity and linearizing band dispersion in nanowire arrays using quasi-aperiodicity

    Anderson, P. Duke [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Ming Hsieh Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Koleske, Daniel D. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Povinelli, Michelle L. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Ming Hsieh Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Subramania, Ganapathi [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    For this study, we experimentally investigate a new class of quasi-aperiodic structures for improving the emission pattern in nanowire arrays. Efficient normal emission, as well as lasing, can be obtained from III-nitride photonic crystal (PhC) nanowire arrays that utilize slow group velocity modes near the Γ-point in reciprocal space. However, due to symmetry considerations, the emitted far-field pattern of such modes are often ‘donut’-like. Many applications, including lighting for displays or lasers, require a more uniform beam profile in the far-field. Previous work has improved far-field beam uniformity of uncoupled modes by changing the shape of the emitting structure. However, in nanowire systems, the shape of nanowires cannot always be arbitrarily changed due to growth or etch considerations. Here, we investigate breaking symmetry by instead changing the position of emitters. Using a quasi-aperiodic geometry, which changes the emitter position within a photonic crystal supercell (2x2), we are able to linearize the photonic bandstructure near the Γ-point and greatly improve emitted far-field uniformity. We realize the III-nitride nanowires structures using a top-down fabrication procedure that produces nanowires with smooth, vertical sidewalls. Comparison of room-temperature micro-photoluminescence (µ-PL) measurements between periodic and quasi-aperiodic nanowire arrays reveal resonances in each structure, with the simple periodic structure producing a donut beam in the emitted far-field and the quasi-aperiodic structure producing a uniform Gaussian-like beam. We investigate the input pump power vs. output intensity in both systems and observe the simple periodic array exhibiting a non-linear relationship, indicative of lasing. We believe that the quasi-aperiodic approach studied here provides an alternate and promising strategy for shaping the emission pattern of nanoemitter systems.

  2. Failure mechanisms and electromechanical coupling in semiconducting nanowires

    Peng B.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One dimensional nanostructures, like nanowires and nanotubes, are increasingly being researched for the development of next generation devices like logic gates, transistors, and solar cells. In particular, semiconducting nanowires with a nonsymmetric wurtzitic crystal structure, such as zinc oxide (ZnO and gallium nitride (GaN, have drawn immense research interests due to their electromechanical coupling. The designing of the future nanowire-based devices requires component-level characterization of individual nanowires. In this paper, we present a unique experimental set-up to characterize the mechanical and electromechanical behaviour of individual nanowires. Using this set-up and complementary atomistic simulations, mechanical properties of ZnO nanowires and electromechanical properties of GaN nanowires were investigated. In ZnO nanowires, elastic modulus was found to depend on nanowire diameter decreasing from 190 GPa to 140 GPa as the wire diameter increased from 5 nm to 80 nm. Inconsistent failure mechanisms were observed in ZnO nanowires. Experiments revealed a brittle fracture, whereas simulations using a pairwise potential predicted a phase transformation prior to failure. This inconsistency is addressed in detail from an experimental as well as computational perspective. Lastly, in addition to mechanical properties, preliminary results on the electromechanical properties of gallium nitride nanowires are also reported. Initial investigations reveal that the piezoresistive and piezoelectric behaviour of nanowires is different from bulk gallium nitride.

  3. Moessbauer study of Fe-Co nanowires

    Chen Ziyu [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China)]. E-mail: chenzy@lzu.edu.cn; Zhan Qingfeng; Xue Desheng; Li Fashen [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China); Zhou Xuezhi; Kunkel, Henry; Williams, Gwyn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, the University of Manitoba (Canada)

    2002-01-28

    Arrays of Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x} (0.0{<=}x{<=}0.92) nanowires have been prepared by an electrochemical process, co-depositing Fe and Co atoms into the pores of anodic aluminium; their compositions were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscope results show that the nanowires are regularly spaced and uniform in shape with lengths of about 7.5 {mu}m and diameters of 20 nm. The x-ray diffraction indicates a texture in the deposited nanowires. For the composition below 82 at.% cobalt, the nanowires had a body-centred-cubic structure with a [110] preferred orientation. For the 92 at.% cobalt sample, the alloy exhibited a mixture of bcc and face-centred-cubic structure. The room temperature {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra of the arrays of Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x} nanowires have second and fifth absorption lines of the six-line pattern with almost zero intensity, indicating that the internal magnetic field in the nanowires lies along the long axis of the nanowire. The maximum values of the hyperfine field (B{sub hf} 36.6{+-}0.1 T) and isomer shift (IS=0.06{+-}0.01 mm s-1) occur for 44 at.% cobalt. The variations of the isomer shift and the linewidths with composition indicate that the Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x} alloy nanowires around the equiatomic composition are in an atomistic disordered state. (author)

  4. An impedance function approach for soil-structure interaction analyses including structure-to-structure interaction effects

    Gantayat, A.; Kamil, H.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic soil-structure and structure-to-structure interaction effects may be determined in one of the two ways: by modeling the entire soil-structure system by a finite-element model, or by using a frequency-dependent (or frequency-independent) impedance function approach. In seismic design of nuclear power plant structures, the normal practice is to use the first approach because of its simplicity and easy availability of computer codes to perform such analyses. However, in the finite-element approach, because of the size and cost restrictions, the three-dimensional behavior of the entire soil-structure system and the radiation damping in soil are only approximately included by using a two-dimensional finite-element mesh. In using the impedance function approach, the soil-structure analyses can be performed in four steps: (a) determination of the dynamic properties of the fixed base superstructure, (b) determination of foundation and structure impedance matrices and input motions, (c) evaluation of foundation motion, (d) analysis of the fixed base superstructure using computed foundation motion. (orig./RW)

  5. Vertically aligned nanowires from boron-doped diamond.

    Yang, Nianjun; Uetsuka, Hiroshi; Osawa, Eiji; Nebel, Christoph E

    2008-11-01

    Vertically aligned diamond nanowires with controlled geometrical properties like length and distance between wires were fabricated by use of nanodiamond particles as a hard mask and by use of reactive ion etching. The surface structure, electronic properties, and electrochemical functionalization of diamond nanowires were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as electrochemical techniques. AFM and STM experiments show that diamond nanowire etched for 10 s have wire-typed structures with 3-10 nm in length and with typically 11 nm spacing in between. The electrode active area of diamond nanowires is enhanced by a factor of 2. The functionalization of nanowire tips with nitrophenyl molecules is characterized by STM on clean and on nitrophenyl molecule-modified diamond nanowires. Tip-modified diamond nanowires are promising with respect to biosensor applications where controlled biomolecule bonding is required to improve chemical stability and sensing significantly.

  6. Low temperature synthesis of seed mediated CuO bundle of nanowires, their structural characterisation and cholesterol detection

    Ibupoto, Z.H., E-mail: zafar.hussin.ibupoto@liu.se [Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, SE-60174 Norrköping (Sweden); Khun, K. [Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, SE-60174 Norrköping (Sweden); Liu, X. [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, 58183 Linköping Sweden (Sweden); Willander, M. [Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, SE-60174 Norrköping (Sweden)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we have successfully synthesised CuO bundle of nanowires using simple, cheap and low temperature hydrothermal growth method. The growth parameters such as precursor concentration and time for duration of growth were optimised. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) has demonstrated that the CuO bundles of nanowires are highly dense, uniform and perpendicularly oriented to the substrate. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has demonstrated that the CuO nanostructures consist of bundle of nanowires and their growth pattern is along the [010] direction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique described that CuO bundle of nanowires possess the monoclinic crystal phase. The surface and chemical composition analyses were carried out with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique and the obtained results suggested the pure crystal state of CuO nanostructures. In addition, the CuO nanowires were used for the cholesterol sensing application by immobilising the cholesterol oxidase through electrostatic attraction. The infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy study has also revealed that CuO nanostructures are consisting of only Cu-O bonding and has also shown the possible interaction of cholesterol oxidase with the sharp edge surface of CuO bundle of nanowires. The proposed cholesterol sensor has demonstrated the wide range of detection of cholesterol with good sensitivity of 33.88 ± 0.96 mV/decade. Moreover, the CuO bundle of nanowires based sensor electrode has revealed good repeatability, reproducibility, stability, selectivity and a fast response time of less than 10 s. The cholesterol sensor based on the immobilised cholesterol oxidase has good potential applicability for the determination of cholesterol from the human serum and other biological samples. - Highlights: • This study describes the synthesis of bundle of CuO nanowires by hydrothermal method. • CuO nanostructures exhibit good alignment and

  7. Low temperature synthesis of seed mediated CuO bundle of nanowires, their structural characterisation and cholesterol detection

    Ibupoto, Z.H.; Khun, K.; Liu, X.; Willander, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have successfully synthesised CuO bundle of nanowires using simple, cheap and low temperature hydrothermal growth method. The growth parameters such as precursor concentration and time for duration of growth were optimised. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) has demonstrated that the CuO bundles of nanowires are highly dense, uniform and perpendicularly oriented to the substrate. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has demonstrated that the CuO nanostructures consist of bundle of nanowires and their growth pattern is along the [010] direction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique described that CuO bundle of nanowires possess the monoclinic crystal phase. The surface and chemical composition analyses were carried out with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique and the obtained results suggested the pure crystal state of CuO nanostructures. In addition, the CuO nanowires were used for the cholesterol sensing application by immobilising the cholesterol oxidase through electrostatic attraction. The infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy study has also revealed that CuO nanostructures are consisting of only Cu-O bonding and has also shown the possible interaction of cholesterol oxidase with the sharp edge surface of CuO bundle of nanowires. The proposed cholesterol sensor has demonstrated the wide range of detection of cholesterol with good sensitivity of 33.88 ± 0.96 mV/decade. Moreover, the CuO bundle of nanowires based sensor electrode has revealed good repeatability, reproducibility, stability, selectivity and a fast response time of less than 10 s. The cholesterol sensor based on the immobilised cholesterol oxidase has good potential applicability for the determination of cholesterol from the human serum and other biological samples. - Highlights: • This study describes the synthesis of bundle of CuO nanowires by hydrothermal method. • CuO nanostructures exhibit good alignment and

  8. PREFACE: Synthesis and integration of nanowires

    Samuelson, L.

    2006-06-01

    The field of semiconductor nanowires has attracted much attention in recent years, from the areas of basic materials science, advanced characterization and technology, as well as from the perspective of the applications of nanowires. Research on large-sized whiskers and wires had already begun in the 1960s with the pioneering work of Wagner, as well as by other researchers. It was, however, in the early 1990s that Kenji Hiruma at Hitachi Central Research Laboratories in Japan first succeeded in developing methods for the growth of nanowires with dimensions on the scale of 10-100 nm, thereby initiating the field of growth and applications of nanowires, with a strong emphasis on epitaxial nucleation of nanowires on a single-crystalline substrate. Starting from the mid-1990s, the field developed very rapidly with the number of papers on the subject growing from ten per year to several thousand papers on the subject published annually today, although with a rather generous definition of the concept of nanowires. With this rapid development we have seen many new and different approaches to the growth of nanowires, technological advances leading to a more well-controlled formation of nanowires, new innovative methods for the characterization of structures, as well as a wealth of approaches towards the use of nanowires in electronics, photonics and sensor applications. This issue contains contributions from many different laboratories, each adding significant detail to the development of the field of research. The contributions cover issues such as basic growth, advanced characterization and technology, and application of nanowires. I would like to acknowledge the shared responsibilities for this special issue of Nanotechnology on the synthesis and integration of nanowires with my co-Editors, S Tong Lee and M Sunkara, as well as the highly professional support from Dr Nina Couzin, Dr Ian Forbes and the Nanotechnology team from the Institute of Physics Publishing.

  9. Interactions of Cells with Magnetic Nanowires and Micro Needles

    Perez, Jose E.

    2017-12-01

    The use of nanowires, nano and micro needles in biomedical applications has markedly increased in the past years, mainly due to attractive properties such as biocompatibility and simple fabrication. Specifically, these structures have shown promise in applications including cell separation, tumor cell capture, intracellular delivery, cell therapy, cancer treatment and as cell growth scaffolds. The work proposed here aims to study two platforms for different applications: a vertical magnetic nanowire array for mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and a micro needle platform for intracellular delivery. First, a thorough evaluation of the cytotoxicity of nanowires was done in order to understand how a biological system interacts with high aspect ratio structures. Nanowires were fabricated through pulsed electrodeposition and characterized by electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Studies of biocompatibility, cell death, cell membrane integrity, nanowire internalization and intracellular dissolution were all performed in order to characterize the cell response. Results showed a variable biocompatibility depending on nanowire concentration and incubation time, with cell death resulting from an apoptotic pathway arising after internalization. A vertical array of nanowires was then used as a scaffold for the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Using fluorescence and electron microscopy, the interactions between the dense array of nanowires and the cells were analyzed, as well as the biocompatibility of the array and its effects on cell differentiation. A magnetic field was additionally applied on the substrate to observe a possible differentiation. Stem cells grown on this scaffold showed a cytoskeleton and focal adhesion reorganization, and later expressed the osteogenic marker osteopontin. The application of a magnetic field counteracted this outcome. Lastly, a micro needle platform was fabricated

  10. Structural and electronic properties of the adsorbed and defected Cu nanowires: A density-functional theory study

    Duan, Ying-Ni [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China); Department of Medical Engineering and Technology, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China); Zhang, Jian-Min, E-mail: jianm_zhang@yahoo.com [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China); Fan, Xiao-Xi [Department of Medical Engineering and Technology, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China); Xu, Ke-Wei [College of Physics and Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Xian University of Arts and Science, Xian 710065, Shaanxi (China)

    2014-12-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory, we systematically investigate the influence of adsorbates (CO molecule and O atom) and defects (adsorb one extra Cu atom and monovacancy) on the structural and electronic properties of Cu{sub 5-1}NW and Cu{sub 6-1}NW. For both nanowires, CO molecule prefers to adsorb on the top site, while O atom prefers to adsorb on the center site. The hybridization between the CO and Cu states is dominated by the donation–backdonation process, which leads to the formation of bonding/antibonding pairs, 5σ{sub b}/5σ{sub a} and 2π{sub b}{sup ⁎}/2π{sub a}{sup ⁎}. The larger adsorption energies, larger charge transfers to O adatom and larger decrease in quantum conductance 3G{sub 0} for an O atom adsorbed on the Cu{sub 5-1}NW and Cu{sub 6-1}NW show both Cu{sub 5-1}NW and Cu{sub 6-1}NW can be used as an O sensor. Furthermore, the decrease in quantum conductance 1G{sub 0} for a CO molecule adsorbed on the Cu{sub 6-1}NW also shows the Cu{sub 6-1}NW can be used to detect CO molecule. So we expect these results may have implications for CuNW based chemical sensing. High adsorption energy of one extra Cu atom and relatively low formation energy of a monovacancy suggest that these two types of defects are likely to occur in the fabrication of CuNWs. One extra Cu atom does not decrease the quantum conductance, while a Cu monovacancy leads to a drop of the quantum conductance.

  11. Structural and photoluminescence properties of silicon nanowires extracted by means of a centrifugation process from plasma torch synthesized silicon nanopowder

    Le Borgne, Vincent; Agati, Marta; Boninelli, Simona; Castrucci, Paola; De Crescenzi, Maurizio; Dolbec, Richard; El Khakani, My Ali

    2017-07-01

    We report on a method for the extraction of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) from the by-product of a plasma torch based spheroidization process of silicon. This by-product is a nanopowder which consists of a mixture of SiNWs and silicon particles. By optimizing a centrifugation based process, we were able to extract substantial amounts of highly pure Si nanomaterials (mainly SiNWs and Si nanospheres (SiNSs)). While the purified SiNWs were found to have typical outer diameters in the 10-15 nm range and lengths of up to several μm, the SiNSs have external diameters in the 10-100 nm range. Interestingly, the SiNWs are found to have a thinner Si core (2-5 nm diam.) and an outer silicon oxide shell (with a typical thickness of ˜5-10 nm). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations revealed that many SiNWs have a continuous cylindrical core, whereas others feature a discontinuous core consisting of a chain of Si nanocrystals forming a sort of ‘chaplet-like’ structures. These plasma-torch-produced SiNWs are highly pure with no trace of any metal catalyst, suggesting that they mostly form through SiO-catalyzed growth scheme rather than from metal-catalyzed path. The extracted Si nanostructures are shown to exhibit a strong photoluminescence (PL) which is found to blue-shift from 950 to 680 nm as the core size of the Si nanostructures decreases from ˜5 to ˜3 nm. This near IR-visible PL is shown to originate from quantum confinement (QC) in Si nanostructures. Consistently, the sizes of the Si nanocrystals directly determined from HRTEM images corroborate well with those expected by QC theory.

  12. Silicon nanowire transistors

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the n and p-channel Silicon Nanowire Transistor (SNT) designs with single and dual-work functions, emphasizing low static and dynamic power consumption. The authors describe a process flow for fabrication and generate SPICE models for building various digital and analog circuits. These include an SRAM, a baseband spread spectrum transmitter, a neuron cell and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in the digital domain, as well as high bandwidth single-stage and operational amplifiers, RF communication circuits in the analog domain, in order to show this technology’s true potential for the next generation VLSI. Describes Silicon Nanowire (SNW) Transistors, as vertically constructed MOS n and p-channel transistors, with low static and dynamic power consumption and small layout footprint; Targets System-on-Chip (SoC) design, supporting very high transistor count (ULSI), minimal power consumption requiring inexpensive substrates for packaging; Enables fabrication of different types...

  13. The electronic properties of phosphorus-doped GaN nanowires from first-principle calculations

    Fu, Nannan; Li, Enling; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yulong; Song, Sha; Lin, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The P impurities tend to enrich at the surface of GaN nanowires. • The lattice parameters of GaN nanowires are changed by the P impurity. • Donor impurity level appears when the P impurity substitutes for the Ga atom. • The band gap decreases slightly when the P impurity substitutes for the N atom. - Abstract: The electronic properties of phosphorus-doped unsaturated and saturated gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires have been investigated from first-principles using the ultrasoft pseudopotential method. The results of these calculations indicate that the P impurities are enriched at the surface of gallium nitride nanowires, and that the structural symmetry of GaN nanowires is broken due to changes in the lattice parameters. When the P impurity substitutes for the Ga atom, the width of band gap increases at the Γ point, a donor impurity level appears in the band gap, and the P impurity and adjacent N atoms exists covalent interaction. Moreover, when the P impurity substitutes for the N atom, the width of the band gap decreases slightly at the Γ point, there is no obvious impurity level in the band gap, and P–Ga covalent bonds are formed, including those composed of ionic bonds. These conclusions indicate that the incorporation of P impurities can improve the field emission performance of GaN nanowires, which is consistent with the experimental results

  14. The electronic properties of phosphorus-doped GaN nanowires from first-principle calculations

    Fu, Nannan; Li, Enling, E-mail: Lienling@xaut.edu.cn; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yulong; Song, Sha; Lin, Jie

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • The P impurities tend to enrich at the surface of GaN nanowires. • The lattice parameters of GaN nanowires are changed by the P impurity. • Donor impurity level appears when the P impurity substitutes for the Ga atom. • The band gap decreases slightly when the P impurity substitutes for the N atom. - Abstract: The electronic properties of phosphorus-doped unsaturated and saturated gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires have been investigated from first-principles using the ultrasoft pseudopotential method. The results of these calculations indicate that the P impurities are enriched at the surface of gallium nitride nanowires, and that the structural symmetry of GaN nanowires is broken due to changes in the lattice parameters. When the P impurity substitutes for the Ga atom, the width of band gap increases at the Γ point, a donor impurity level appears in the band gap, and the P impurity and adjacent N atoms exists covalent interaction. Moreover, when the P impurity substitutes for the N atom, the width of the band gap decreases slightly at the Γ point, there is no obvious impurity level in the band gap, and P–Ga covalent bonds are formed, including those composed of ionic bonds. These conclusions indicate that the incorporation of P impurities can improve the field emission performance of GaN nanowires, which is consistent with the experimental results.

  15. Nanowire-decorated microscale metallic electrodes

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Antohe, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication of metallic nanowire patterns within anodic alumina oxide (AAO) membranes on top of continuous conducting substrates are discussed. The fabrication protocol is based on the realization of nanowire patterns using supported nanoporous alumina templates (SNAT) prepared on top...... of lithographically defined metallic microelectrodes. The anodization of the aluminum permits electroplating only on top of the metallic electrodes, leading to the nanowire patterns having the same shape as the underlying metallic tracks. The variation in the fabricated structures between the patterned and non......-patterned substrates can be interpreted in terms of different behavior during anodization. The improved quality of fabricated nanowire patterns is clearly demonstrated by the SEM imaging and the uniform growth of nanowires inside the alumina template is observed without any significant height variation....

  16. Excitonic terahertz photoconductivity in intrinsic semiconductor nanowires

    Yan, Jie-Yun

    2018-06-01

    Excitonic terahertz photoconductivity in intrinsic semiconductor nanowires is studied. Based on the excitonic theory, the numerical method to calculate the photoconductivity spectrum in the nanowires is developed, which can simulate optical pump terahertz-probe spectroscopy measurements on real nanowires and thereby calculate the typical photoconductivity spectrum. With the help of the energetic structure deduced from the calculated linear absorption spectrum, the numerically observed shift of the resonant peak in the photoconductivity spectrum is found to result from the dominant exciton transition between excited or continuum states to the ground state, and the quantitative analysis is in good agreement with the quantum plasmon model. Besides, the dependence of the photoconductivity on the polarization of the terahertz field is also discussed. The numerical method and supporting theoretical analysis provide a new tool for experimentalists to understand the terahertz photoconductivity in intrinsic semiconductor nanowires at low temperatures or for nanowires subjected to below bandgap photoexcitation, where excitonic effects dominate.

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Tin Oxide Nanowires

    A. Kabiri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is preparation of SnO2 nanowires by means of Thermal chemical reaction vapor transport deposition (TCRVTD method from SnO powders. The morphology, chemical composition and microstructure properties of the nanowires are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM, EDS, and XRD. The XRD diffraction patterns reveal that the SnO2 nanowires have been grown in the form of tetragonal crystal structures with the lattice parameter of a=b=0.440 nm, and c=0.370 nm. The SEM images reveal that SnO2 nanowires have successfully been grown on the Si substrate. The EDS patterns show that only elements of Sn, O and Au are detected. Prior to the VLS process the substrate is coated by a thin layer of Au. The diameter of nanowires is measured to be something between 20-100 nm.

  18. Superconductive silicon nanowires using gallium beam lithography.

    Henry, Michael David; Jarecki, Robert Leo,

    2014-01-01

    This work was an early career LDRD investigating the idea of using a focused ion beam (FIB) to implant Ga into silicon to create embedded nanowires and/or fully suspended nanowires. The embedded Ga nanowires demonstrated electrical resistivity of 5 m-cm, conductivity down to 4 K, and acts as an Ohmic silicon contact. The suspended nanowires achieved dimensions down to 20 nm x 30 nm x 10 m with large sensitivity to pressure. These structures then performed well as Pirani gauges. Sputtered niobium was also developed in this research for use as a superconductive coating on the nanowire. Oxidation characteristics of Nb were detailed and a technique to place the Nb under tensile stress resulted in the Nb resisting bulk atmospheric oxidation for up to years.

  19. Electron Transport Properties of Ge nanowires

    Hanrath, Tobias; Khondaker, Saiful I.; Yao, Zhen; Korgel, Brian A.

    2003-03-01

    Electron Transport Properties of Ge nanowires Tobias Hanrath*, Saiful I. Khondaker, Zhen Yao, Brian A. Korgel* *Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Dept. of Physics, Texas Materials Institute, and Center for Nano- and Molecular Science and Technology University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1062 e-mail: korgel@mail.che.utexas.edu Germanium (Ge) nanowires with diameters ranging from 6 to 50 nm and several micrometer in length were grown via a supercritical fluid-liquid-solid synthesis. Parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS) was employed to study the band structure and electron density in the Ge nanowires. The observed increase in plasmon peak energy and peak width with decreasing nanowire diameter is attributed to quantum confinement effects. For electrical characterization, Ge nanowires were deposited onto a patterned Si/SiO2 substrate. E-beam lithography was then used to form electrode contacts to individual nanowires. The influence of nanowire diameter, surface chemistry and crystallographic defects on electron transport properties were investigated and the comparison of Ge nanowire conductivity with respect to bulk, intrinsic Ge will be presented.

  20. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    Rollins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  1. Superconductivity in nanowires

    Bezryadin, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The importance and actuality of nanotechnology is unabated and will be for years to come. A main challenge is to understand the various properties of certain nanostructures, and how to generate structures with specific properties for use in actual applications in Electrical Engineering and Medicine.One of the most important structures are nanowires, in particular superconducting ones. They are highly promising for future electronics, transporting current without resistance and at scales of a few nanometers. To fabricate wires to certain defined standards however, is a major challenge, and so i

  2. Ballistic superconductivity in semiconductor nanowires

    Zhang, Hao; Gül, Önder; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Nowak, Michał P.; Wimmer, Michael; Zuo, Kun; Mourik, Vincent; de Vries, Folkert K.; van Veen, Jasper; de Moor, Michiel W. A.; Bommer, Jouri D. S.; van Woerkom, David J.; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sébastien R; Bakkers, Erik P.A.M.; Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Cassidy, Maja C.; Koelling, Sebastian; Goswami, Srijit; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have opened new research avenues in quantum transport owing to their confined geometry and electrostatic tunability. They have offered an exceptional testbed for superconductivity, leading to the realization of hybrid systems combining the macroscopic quantum properties of superconductors with the possibility to control charges down to a single electron. These advances brought semiconductor nanowires to the forefront of efforts to realize topological superconductivity and Majorana modes. A prime challenge to benefit from the topological properties of Majoranas is to reduce the disorder in hybrid nanowire devices. Here we show ballistic superconductivity in InSb semiconductor nanowires. Our structural and chemical analyses demonstrate a high-quality interface between the nanowire and a NbTiN superconductor that enables ballistic transport. This is manifested by a quantized conductance for normal carriers, a strongly enhanced conductance for Andreev-reflecting carriers, and an induced hard gap with a significantly reduced density of states. These results pave the way for disorder-free Majorana devices. PMID:28681843

  3. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of framed structures including soil-structure interaction effects

    Mahmood, M.N.; Ahmed, S.Y.

    2008-01-01

    The role of oil-structure interaction on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete structures is investigated in this paper. A finite element approach has been adopted to model the interaction system that consists of the reinforced concrete plane frame, soil deposit and interface which represents the frictional between foundation of the structure and subsoil. The analysis is based on the elasto-plastic behavior of the frame members (beams and columns) that is defined by the ultimate axial force-bending moment interaction curve, while the cap model is adopted to govern the elasto-plastic behavior of the soil material. Mohr-Coulomb failure law is used to determine the initiation of slippage at the interface, while the separation is assumed to determine the initiation of slippage at the interface, while the separation is assumed to occur when the stresses at the interface becomes tension stresses. New-Mark's Predictor-Corrector algorithm is adopted for nonlinear dynamic analysis. The main aim of present work is to evaluate the sensitivity of structures to different behavior of the soil and interface layer when subjected to an earthquake excitation. Predicted results of the dynamic analysis of the interaction system indicate that the soil-structure interaction problem can have beneficial effects on the structural behavior when different soil models (elastic and elasto-plastic) and interface conditions (perfect bond and permitted slip)are considered. (author)

  4. Rare earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces

    Wanke, Martina

    2008-01-01

    The growth, structure and electronic properties of rare earth silicide nanowires are investigated on planar and vicinal Si(001) und Si(111) surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). On all surfaces investigated within this work hexagonal disilicides are grown epitaxially with a lattice mismatch of -2.55% up to +0.83% along the hexagonal a-axis. Along the hexagonal c-axis the lattice mismatch is essentially larger with 6.5%. On the Si(001)2 x 1 surface two types of nanowires are grown epitaxially. The socalled broad wires show a one-dimensional metallic valence band structure with states crossing the Fermi level. Along the nanowires two strongly dispersing states at the anti J point and a strongly dispersing state at the anti Γ point can be observed. Along the thin nanowires dispersing states could not be observed. Merely in the direction perpendicular to the wires an intensity variation could be observed, which corresponds to the observed spacial structure of the thin nanowires. The electronic properties of the broad erbium silicide nanowires are very similar to the broad dysprosium silicide nanowires. The electronic properties of the DySi 2 -monolayer and the Dy 3 Si 5 -multilayer on the Si(111) surface are investigated in comparison to the known ErSi 2 /Si(111) and Er 3 Si 5 /Si(111) system. The positions and the energetic locations of the observed band in the surface Brillouin zone will be confirmed for dysprosium. The shape of the electron pockets in the vector k parallel space is elliptical at the anti M points, while the hole pocket at the anti Γ point is showing a hexagonal symmetry. On the Si(557) surface the structural and electronic properties depend strongly on the different preparation conditions likewise, in particular on the rare earth coverage. At submonolayer coverage the thin nanowires grow in wide areas of the sample surface, which are oriented

  5. Characterization of III-V nanowires for photovoltaic devices using advanced electron microscopy techniques

    Persson, Johan Mikael

    In this work, the crystal structure of epitaxially grown semiconductor nanowires has been analysed using electron microscopy and to some extent X-ray diffractometry. The goal of the EU project which this work was a part of was to build multi-junction solar cells with nanowires as the main building...... of the crystal structure at the junction. This thesis also comments on some unusual properties and _ndings of the examined nanowires: Some nanowires sported a droplet-like protrusion of the catalyst gold particle reaching into the solid center of the nanowire. This feature can be discussed in terms of nanowire...

  6. Improve the surface of silver nanowire transparent electrode using a double-layer structure for the quantum-dot light-emitting diodes

    Cho, Seok Hyeon; Been Heo, Su; Kang, Seong Jun

    2018-03-01

    We developed a double-layer structured transparent electrode for use in flexible quantum-dot light-emitting diodes (QLEDs). Silver nanowires (AgNWs) and highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) were coated on a transparent substrate to obtain a highly conductive and flexible transparent electrode. The highly conductive PEDOT:PSS improved the surface roughness of the AgNWs transparent electrode film as well as the surface coverage area of the film. The double-layer structured transparent electrode showed superior mechanical properties than conventional indium-tin oxide (ITO) and AgNWs transparent electrodes. QLEDs with the double-layer structured transparent electrode also showed good reliability under cyclic bending conditions. These results indicate that the double-layer structured AgNWs/PEDOT:PSS transparent electrode described here is a feasible alternative to ITO transparent electrodes for flexible QLEDs.

  7. Nanowires of silicon carbide and 3D SiC/C nanocomposites with inverse opal structure

    Emelchenko, G.A.; Zhokhov, A.A.; Masalov, V.M.; Kudrenko, E.A.; Tereshenko, A.N.; Steinman, E.A.; Khodos, I.I.; Zinenko, V.I.; Agafonov, Yu.A.

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis, morphology, structural and optical characteristics of SiC NWs and SiC/C nanocomposites with an inverse opal lattice have been investigated. The samples were prepared by carbothermal reduction of silica (SiC NWs) and by thermo-chemical treatment of opal matrices (SiC/C) filled with carbon compounds which was followed by silicon dioxide dissolution. It was shown that the nucleation of SiC NWs occurs at the surface of carbon fibers felt. It was observed three preferred growth direction of the NWs: [111], [110] and [112]. HRTEM studies revealed the mechanism of the wires growth direction change. SiC/C- HRTEM revealed in the structure of the composites, except for silicon carbide, graphite and amorphous carbon, spherical carbon particles containing concentric graphite shells (onion-like particles).

  8. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-11-30

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. We find that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K.

  9. Optical Properties of Rotationally Twinned Nanowire Superlattices

    Bao, Jiming; Bell, David C.; Capasso, Federico

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a technique so that both transmission electron microscopy and microphotoluminescence can be performed on the same semiconductor nanowire over a large range of optical power, thus allowing us to directly correlate structural and optical properties of rotationally twinned zinc...... a heterostructure in a chemically homogeneous nanowire material and alter in a major way its optical properties opens new possibilities for band-structure engineering....

  10. Micro-size antenna structure with vertical nanowires for wireless power transmission and communication.

    Kang, Jong-Gu; Jeong, Yeri; Shin, Jeong Hee; Choi, Ji-Woong; Sohn, Jung Inn; Cha, Seung Nam; Jang, Jae Eun

    2014-11-01

    For biomedical implanted devices, a wireless power or a signal transmission is essential to protect an infection and to enhance durability. In this study, we present a magnetic induction technique for a power transmission without any wire connection between transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) in a micro scale. Due to a micro size effect of a flat spiral coil, a magnetic inductance is not high. To enhance the magnetic inductance, a three dimensional magnetic core is added to an antenna structure, which is consisted of ZnO nano wires coated by a nickel (Ni) layer. ZnO nano wires easily supply a large effective surface area with a vertical structural effect to the magnetic core structure, which induces a higher magnetic inductance with a ferro-magnetic material Ni. The magnetic induction antenna with the magnetic core shows a high inductance value, a low reflection power and a strong power transmission. The power transmission efficiencies are tested under the air and the water medium are almost the same values, so that the magnetic induction technique is quite proper to body implanted systems.

  11. Manipulation and Investigation of Uniformly-Spaced Nanowire Array on a Substrate via Dielectrophoresis and Electrostatic Interaction

    U Hyeok Choi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Directed-assembly of nanowires on the dielectrics-covered parallel electrode structure is capable of producing uniformly-spaced nanowire array at the electrode gap due to dielectrophoretic nanowire attraction and electrostatic nanowire repulsion. Beyond uniformly-spaced nanowire array formation, the control of spacing in the array is beneficial in that it should be the experimental basis of the precise positioning of functional nanowires on a circuit. Here, we investigate the material parameters and bias conditions to modulate the nanowire spacing in the ordered array, where the nanowire array formation is readily attained due to the electrostatic nanowire interaction. A theoretical model for the force calculation and the simulation of the induced charge in the assembled nanowire verifies that the longer nanowires on thicker dielectric layer tend to be assembled with a larger pitch due to the stronger nanowire-nanowire electrostatic repulsion, which is consistent with the experimental results. It was claimed that the stronger dielectrophoretic force is likely to attract more nanowires that are suspended in solution at the electrode gap, causing them to be less-spaced. Thus, we propose a generic mechanism, competition of dielectrophoretic and electrostatic force, to determine the nanowire pitch in an ordered array. Furthermore, this spacing-controlled nanowire array offers a way to fabricate the high-density nanodevice array without nanowire registration.

  12. Photonic nanowires for quantum optics

    Munsch, M.; Claudon, J.; Bleuse, J.

    Photonic nanowires (PWs) are simple dielectric structures for which a very efficient and broadband spontaneous emission (SE) control has been predicted [1]. Recently, a single photon source featuring a record high efficiency was demonstrated using this geometry [2]. Using time-resolved micro-phot...

  13. A detailed study of magnetization reversal in individual Ni nanowires

    Vidal, Enrique Vilanova; Ivanov, Yurii P.; Mohammed, Hanan; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanowires have emerged as essential components for a broad range of applications. In many cases, a key property of these components is the switching field, which is studied as a function of the angle between the field and the nanowire. We found remarkable differences of up to 100% between the switching fields of different nanowires from the same fabrication batch. Our experimental results and micromagnetic simulations indicate that the nanowires exhibit a single domain behavior and that the switching mechanism includes vortex domain wall motion across the nanowire. The differences between the switching fields are attributed to different cross-sections of the nanowires, as found by electron microscopy. While a circular cross-section yields the smallest switching field values, any deviation from this shape results in an increase of the switching field. The shape of the nanowires' cross-sections is thus a critical parameter that has not been previously taken into account.

  14. A detailed study of magnetization reversal in individual Ni nanowires

    Vidal, Enrique Vilanova

    2015-01-19

    Magnetic nanowires have emerged as essential components for a broad range of applications. In many cases, a key property of these components is the switching field, which is studied as a function of the angle between the field and the nanowire. We found remarkable differences of up to 100% between the switching fields of different nanowires from the same fabrication batch. Our experimental results and micromagnetic simulations indicate that the nanowires exhibit a single domain behavior and that the switching mechanism includes vortex domain wall motion across the nanowire. The differences between the switching fields are attributed to different cross-sections of the nanowires, as found by electron microscopy. While a circular cross-section yields the smallest switching field values, any deviation from this shape results in an increase of the switching field. The shape of the nanowires\\' cross-sections is thus a critical parameter that has not been previously taken into account.

  15. Bismuth alloying properties in GaAs nanowires

    Ding, Lu [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Lu, Pengfei, E-mail: photon.bupt@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Cao, Huawei; Cai, Ningning; Yu, Zhongyuan [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Gao, Tao [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Shumin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Photonics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    First-principles calculations have been performed to investigate the structural, electronic and optical properties of bismuth alloying in GaAs nanowires. A typical model of Ga{sub 31}As{sub 31} nanowires is introduced for its reasonable band gap. The band gap of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} shrinks clearly with the increasing Bi concentration and the band edge shifts when spin–orbit coupling (SOC) is considered. The insertion of Bi atom leads to hybridization of Ga/As/Bi p states which contributes a lot around Fermi level. Scissor effect is involved. The optical properties are presented, including dielectric function, optical absorption spectra and reflectivity, which are also varied with the increasing of Bi concentrations. - Graphical abstract: Top view of Bi-doped GaAs nanowires. Ga, As, and Bi atoms are denoted with grey, purple and red balls, respectively. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A typical model of Ga{sub 31}As{sub 31} nanowires is introduced for its reasonable band gap. • The band gap of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} shrinks clearly with the increasing Bi concentration. • The band edge shifts when spin–orbit coupling (SOC) is considered. • The insertion of Bi atom leads to hybridization of Ga/As/Bi p states.

  16. Design and Characterisation of III-V Semiconductor Nanowire Lasers

    Saxena, Dhruv

    The development of small, power-efficient lasers underpins many of the technologies that we utilise today. Semiconductor nanowires are promising for miniaturising lasers to even smaller dimensions. III-V semiconductors, such as Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) and Indium Phosphide (InP), are the most widely used materials for optoelectronic devices and so the development of nanowire lasers based on these materials is expected to have technologically significant outcomes. This PhD dissertation presents a comprehensive study of the design of III-V semiconductor nanowire lasers, with bulk and quantum confined active regions. Based on the design, various III-V semiconductor nanowire lasers are demonstrated, namely, GaAs nanowire lasers, GaAs/AlGaAs multi-quantum well (MQW) nanowire lasers and InP nanowire lasers. These nanowire lasers are shown to operate at room temperature, have low thresholds, and lase from different transverse modes. The structural and optoelectronic quality of nanowire lasers are characterised via electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopic techniques. Lasing is characterised in all these devices by optical pumping. The lasing characteristics are analysed by rate equation modelling and the lasing mode(s) in these devices is characterised by threshold gain modelling, polarisation measurements and Fourier plane imaging. Firstly, GaAs nanowire lasers that operate at room temperature are demonstrated. This is achieved by determining the optimal nanowire diameter to reduce threshold gain and by passivating nanowires to improve their quantum efficiency (QE). High-quality surface passivated GaAs nanowires of suitable diameters are grown. The growth procedure is tailored to improve both QE and structural uniformity of nanowires. Room-temperature lasing is demonstrated from individual nanowires and lasing is characterised to be from TM01 mode by threshold gain modelling. To lower threshold even further, nanowire lasers with GaAs/AlGaAs coaxial multi

  17. Charging effects and surface potential variations of Cu-based nanowires

    Nunes, D., E-mail: daniela.gomes@fct.unl.pt [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Calmeiro, T.R.; Nandy, S.; Pinto, J.V.; Pimentel, A.; Barquinha, P. [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, P.A. [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, PB 124 Blindern, NO-0314, Oslo (Norway); CeFEMA, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal); Walmsley, J.C. [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, Materials and Nanotechnology, Høgskoleringen 5, 7034 Trondheim (Norway); Fortunato, E., E-mail: emf@fct.unl.pt [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Martins, R., E-mail: rm@uninova.pt [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2016-02-29

    The present work reports charging effects and surface potential variations in pure copper, cuprous oxide and cupric oxide nanowires observed by electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). The copper nanowires were produced by wet synthesis, oxidation into cuprous oxide nanowires was achieved through microwave irradiation and cupric oxide nanowires were obtained via furnace annealing in atmospheric conditions. Structural characterization of the nanowires was carried out by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. During the EFM experiments the electrostatic field of the positive probe charged negatively the Cu-based nanowires, which in turn polarized the SiO{sub 2} dielectric substrate. Both the probe/nanowire capacitance as well as the substrate polarization increased with the applied bias. Cu{sub 2}O and CuO nanowires behaved distinctively during the EFM measurements in accordance with their band gap energies. The work functions (WF) of the Cu-based nanowires, obtained by KPFM measurements, yielded WF{sub CuO} > WF{sub Cu} > WF{sub Cu{sub 2O}}. - Highlights: • Charge distribution study in Cu, Cu{sub 2}O and CuO nanowires through electrostatic force microscopy • Structural/surface defect role on the charge distribution along the Cu nanowires • Determination of the nanowire work functions by Kelvin probe force microscopy • Three types of nanowires give a broad idea of charge behavior on Cu based-nanowires.

  18. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  19. Vertical nanowire architectures

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfl-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires and statistics: A statistical process for reading ultradense arrays of nanostructured materials is presented (see image). The experimental realization is achieved through selective nanowire growth using porous alumina templates. The statistical patterning approach is found to provide ri...

  20. Structural and electronic properties of copper nanowires inside zigzag carbon nanotubes

    Duan, Ying-Ni [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China); Department of Medical Engineering and Technology, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China); Zhang, Jian-Min, E-mail: jianm_zhang@yahoo.com [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China); Wei, Xiu-Mei [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China); Fan, Xiao-Xi [Department of Medical Engineering and Technology, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China); Xu, Ke-Wei [College of Physics and Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Xian University of Arts and Science, Xian 710065, Shaanxi (China); Ji, Vincent [ICMMO/LEMHE, Université Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-08-15

    We present a systematic study of the structural and electronic properties of Cu{sub N}@(n,0) (N=1, 2, 4 for n=6, 7, 8 and N=12, 16 for n=10) combined systems using the first-principle calculations. We find that CuNWs encapsulated inside the (6,0) CNTs prefer to form a single linear chain on the tube axis, while those in (7,0) and (8,0) CNTs tend to form a zigzag chain. The smaller formation energies of −2.265 eV for Cu{sub 12}@(10,0) combined system and −2.271 eV for Cu{sub 16}@(10,0) combined system indicate that these two systems are more stable than the other systems studied here, and more complex configurations of CuNWs are expected encapsulating into broader CNTs. Besides having high stability, the Cu{sub 16}@(10,0) combined system with quantum conductance of 3G{sub 0} is under the protection of the outer (10,0) CNT from oxidation, thus can be expected to have potential applications in building nanodevices. The asymmetry distribution of the down-spin and up-spin channels results in a net magnetic moment of 0.59μB for the Cu{sub 2}@(7,0) combined system. - Highlights: • A linear [zigzag] Cu chain is preferred inside the (6,0) [(7,0) and (8,0)] CNTs. • The highest stability and quantum conductance make Cu{sub 16}@(10,0) a potential application. • Among all Cu{sub N}@(n,0), only Cu{sub 2}@(7,0) has a net magnetic moment of 0.59μB.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of straight and stacked-sheet AlN nanowires with high purity

    Lei, M.; Yang, H.; Li, P.G.; Tang, W.H.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale AlN nanowires with hexagonal crystal structure were synthesized by the direct nitridation method at high temperatures. The experimental results indicate that these single-crystalline AlN nanowires have high purity and consist of straight and stacked-sheet nanowires. It is found that straight AlN nanowire grows along [1, 1, -2, 0] direction, whereas the stacked-sheet nanowire with hexagonal cross section is along [0 0 0 1] direction. It is thought that vapor-solid (VS) mechanism should be responsible for the growth of AlN nanowires

  2. Epitaxy of advanced nanowire quantum devices

    Gazibegovic, Sasa; Car, Diana; Zhang, Hao; Balk, Stijn C.; Logan, John A.; de Moor, Michiel W. A.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Schmits, Rudi; Xu, Di; Wang, Guanzhong; Krogstrup, Peter; Op Het Veld, Roy L. M.; Zuo, Kun; Vos, Yoram; Shen, Jie; Bouman, Daniël; Shojaei, Borzoyeh; Pennachio, Daniel; Lee, Joon Sue; van Veldhoven, Petrus J.; Koelling, Sebastian; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Palmstrøm, Chris J.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are ideal for realizing various low-dimensional quantum devices. In particular, topological phases of matter hosting non-Abelian quasiparticles (such as anyons) can emerge when a semiconductor nanowire with strong spin-orbit coupling is brought into contact with a superconductor. To exploit the potential of non-Abelian anyons—which are key elements of topological quantum computing—fully, they need to be exchanged in a well-controlled braiding operation. Essential hardware for braiding is a network of crystalline nanowires coupled to superconducting islands. Here we demonstrate a technique for generic bottom-up synthesis of complex quantum devices with a special focus on nanowire networks with a predefined number of superconducting islands. Structural analysis confirms the high crystalline quality of the nanowire junctions, as well as an epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor interface. Quantum transport measurements of nanowire ‘hashtags’ reveal Aharonov-Bohm and weak-antilocalization effects, indicating a phase-coherent system with strong spin-orbit coupling. In addition, a proximity-induced hard superconducting gap (with vanishing sub-gap conductance) is demonstrated in these hybrid superconductor-semiconductor nanowires, highlighting the successful materials development necessary for a first braiding experiment. Our approach opens up new avenues for the realization of epitaxial three-dimensional quantum architectures which have the potential to become key components of various quantum devices.

  3. Platinum boride nanowires: Synthesis and characterization

    Ding Zhanhui; Qiu Lixia; Zhang Jian; Yao Bin; Cui Tian; Guan Weiming; Zheng Weitao; Wang Wenquan; Zhao Xudong; Liu Xiaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Platinum boride nanowires have been synthesized via the direct current arc discharge method. ► XRD, TEM and SAED indicate that the nanowires are single-crystal PtB. ► Two broad photoluminescence emission peaks at about 586 nm and 626 nm have been observed in the PL spectroscopy of PtB nanowires. - Abstract: Platinum boride (PtB) nanowires have been successfully fabricated with direct current arc discharge method using a milled mixture of platinum (Pt) and boron nitride (BN) powders. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the compositions, morphology, and structures of the samples. The results show that PtB nanowires are 30–50 nm thick and 20–30 μm long. TEM and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns identify that the PtB nanowires are single-crystalline in nature. A growth mechanism based on vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) process is proposed for the formation of nanowires.

  4. Investigation of CuInSe2 nanowire arrays with core-shell structure electrodeposited at various duty cycles into anodic alumina templates

    Cheng, Yu-Song; Wang, Na-Fu; Tsai, Yu-Zen; Lin, Jia-Jun; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2017-02-01

    Copper indium selenide (CuInSe2) nanowire (NW) arrays were prepared at various electrolyte duty cycles by filling anodic alumina templates through the pulsed electrodeposition technique. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the nucleation mechanism of CuInSe2 NW arrays was affected by the electrodeposition duty cycle. Moreover, SEM images showed that the diameter and length of the NWs were 80 nm and 2 μm, respectively. Furthermore, PEDOT/CuInSe2 NW core-shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe2 NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that a core-shell structure was achieved. Current-voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe2 NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core-shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63.

  5. X-ray investigation of the interface structure of free standing InAs nanowires grown on GaAs[ anti 1 anti 1 anti 1]{sub B}

    Bauer, Jens; Gottschalch, Volker; Wagner, Gerald [Universitaet Leipzig, Halbleiterchemie, Leipzig (Germany); Pietsch, Ullrich; Davydok, Anton; Biermanns, Andreas [Universitaet Siegen, Festkoerperphysik, Siegen (Germany); Grenzer, Joerg [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institut fuer Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Dresden (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    The heteroepitaxial growth process of InAs nanowires (NW) on GaAs[ anti 1 anti 1 anti 1]{sub B} substrate was investigated by X-ray grazing-incidence diffraction using synchrotron radiation. For crystal growth we applied the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism via gold seeds. The general sample structure was extracted from various electron microscopic and X-ray diffraction experiments. We found a closed Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x} As graduated alloy layer at the substrate to NW interface which was formed in the initial stage of VLS growth with a Au-Ga-In liquid alloy. With ongoing growth time a transition from this VLS layer growth to the conventional VLS NW growth was observed. The structural properties of both VLS grown crystal types were examined. Furthermore, we discuss the VLS layer growth process. (orig.)

  6. Designing and building nanowires: directed nanocrystal self-assembly into radically branched and zigzag PbS nanowires

    Xu Fan; Ma Xin; Gerlein, L Felipe; Cloutier, Sylvain G

    2011-01-01

    Lead sulfide nanowires with controllable optoelectronic properties would be promising building blocks for various applications. Here, we report the hot colloidal synthesis of radically branched and zigzag nanowires through self-attachment of star-shaped and octahedral nanocrystals in the presence of multiple surfactants. We obtained high-quality single-crystal nanowires with uniform diameter along the entire length, and the size of the nanowire can be tuned by tailoring the reaction parameters. This slow oriented attachment provides a better understanding of the intricacies of this complex nanocrystal assembly process. Meanwhile, these self-assembled nanowire structures have appealing lateral conformations with narrow side arms or highly faceted edges, where strong quantum confinement can occur. Consequently, the single-crystal nanowire structures exhibit strong photoluminescence in the near-infrared region with a large blue-shift compared to the bulk material.

  7. Optical Binding of Nanowires

    Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Zemánek, Pavel; Marago, O.M.; Jones, P.H.; Hanna, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2017), s. 3485-3492 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) CNR-16-12 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical binding nanowires * Brownian motion * self-organization * non-equilibrium thermodynamics * non-equilibrium steady state * spin-orbit coupling * emergent phenomena Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  8. Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material

    Fox, Robert V [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-06

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  9. Electrodeposition of rhenium-tin nanowires

    Naor-Pomerantz, Adi; Eliaz, Noam; Gileadi, Eliezer

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Rhenium-tin nanowires were formed electrochemically, without using a template. → The nanowires consisted of a crystalline-Sn-core/amorphous-Re-shell structure. → The effects of bath composition and operating conditions were investigated. → A mechanism is suggested for the formation of the core/shell structure. → The nanowires may be attractive for a variety of applications. - Abstract: Rhenium (Re) is a refractory metal which exhibits an extraordinary combination of properties. Thus, nanowires and other nanostructures of Re-alloys may possess unique properties resulting from both Re chemistry and the nanometer scale, and become attractive for a variety of applications, such as in catalysis, photovoltaic cells, and microelectronics. Rhenium-tin coatings, consisting of nanowires with a core/shell structure, were electrodeposited on copper substrates under galvanostatic or potentiostatic conditions. The effects of bath composition and operating conditions were investigated, and the chemistry and structure of the coatings were studied by a variety of analytical tools. A Re-content as high as 77 at.% or a Faradaic efficiency as high as 46% were attained. Ranges of Sn-to-Re in the plating bath, applied current density and applied potential, within which the nanowires could be formed, were determined. A mechanism was suggested, according to which Sn nanowires were first grown on top of Sn micro-particles, and then the Sn nanowires reduced the perrhenate chemically, thus forming a core made of crystalline Sn-rich phase, and a shell made of amorphous Re-rich phase. The absence of mutual solubility of Re and Sn may be the driving force for this phase separation.

  10. Fabrication of multilayer nanowires

    Kaur, Jasveer, E-mail: kaurjasveer89@gmail.com; Singh, Avtar; Kumar, Davinder [Department of Physics, Punjabi University Patiala, 147002, Punjab (India); Thakur, Anup; Kaur, Raminder, E-mail: raminder-k-saini@yahoo.com [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Punjabi University Patiala, 147002, Punjab (India)

    2016-05-06

    Multilayer nanowires were fabricated by potentiostate ectrodeposition template synthesis method into the pores of polycarbonate membrane. In present work layer by layer deposition of two different metals Ni and Cu in polycarbonate membrane having pore size of 600 nm were carried out. It is found that the growth of nanowires is not constant, it varies with deposition time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to study the morphology of fabricated multilayer nanowires. An energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results confirm the composition of multilayer nanowires. The result shows that multilayer nanowires formed is dense.

  11. Fabrication of multilayer nanowires

    Kaur, Jasveer; Singh, Avtar; Kumar, Davinder; Thakur, Anup; Kaur, Raminder

    2016-01-01

    Multilayer nanowires were fabricated by potentiostate ectrodeposition template synthesis method into the pores of polycarbonate membrane. In present work layer by layer deposition of two different metals Ni and Cu in polycarbonate membrane having pore size of 600 nm were carried out. It is found that the growth of nanowires is not constant, it varies with deposition time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to study the morphology of fabricated multilayer nanowires. An energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results confirm the composition of multilayer nanowires. The result shows that multilayer nanowires formed is dense.

  12. Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaics

    Holm, Jeppe Vilstrup

    Solar cells commercial success is based on an efficiency/cost calculation. Nanowire solar cells is one of the foremost candidates to implement third generation photo voltaics, which are both very efficient and cheap to produce. This thesis is about our progress towards commercial nanowire solar...... cells. Resonance effects between the light and nanowire causes an inherent concentration of the sunlight into the nanowires, and means that a sparse array of nanowires (less than 5% of the area) can absorb all the incoming light. The resonance effects, as well as a graded index of refraction, also traps...... the light. The concentration and light trapping means that single junction nanowire solar cells have a higher theoretical maximum efficiency than equivalent planar solar cells. We have demonstrated the built-in light concentration of nanowires, by growing, contacting and characterizing a solar cell...

  13. First principles investigations on the electronic structure of anchor groups on ZnO nanowires and surfaces

    Dominguez, A.; Lorke, M.; Rosa, A. L.; Frauenheim, Th.; Schoenhalz, A. L.; Dalpian, G. M.; Rocha, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We report on density functional theory investigations of the electronic properties of monofunctional ligands adsorbed on ZnO-(1010) surfaces and ZnO nanowires using semi-local and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. We consider three anchor groups, namely thiol, amino, and carboxyl groups. Our results indicate that neither the carboxyl nor the amino group modify the transport and conductivity properties of ZnO. In contrast, the modification of the ZnO surface and nanostructure with thiol leads to insertion of molecular states in the band gap, thus suggesting that functionalization with this moiety may customize the optical properties of ZnO nanomaterials.

  14. Role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of copper nanowire under tensile load: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsiao, Chun-I.; Hsu, Wen-Dung

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have used atomistic simulations to investigate the role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of nanowires. In particular, we have performed computational investigation on single crystal face-centered cubic copper nano-wires with diameters ranging from 2 to 20 nm. The wire axis for all the nanowires are considered along the [0 0 1] direction. Characterization of the initial optimized structures revealed clear differences in interatomic spacing, stress, and potential energy in all the nanowires. The mechanical properties with respect to wire diameter are evaluated by applying tension along the [0 0 1] direction until yielding. We have discussed the stress–strain relationships, Young's modulus, and the variation in potential energy from surface to the center of the wire for all the cases. Our results indicate that the mechanical response (including yield strain, Young's modulus, and resilience) is directly related to the proportion of surface to bulk type atoms present in each nanowire. Thus the size-dependent mechanical properties of single crystal copper nanowire within elastic region are attributed to the surface to volume ratio (surface effect). Using the calculated response, we have formulated a mathematical relationship, which predicts the nonlinear correlation between the mechanical properties and the diameter of the wire.

  15. Dielectrophoretic alignment of metal and metal oxide nanowires and nanotubes: a universal set of parameters for bridging prepatterned microelectrodes.

    Maijenburg, A W; Maas, M G; Rodijk, E J B; Ahmed, W; Kooij, E S; Carlen, E T; Blank, D H A; ten Elshof, J E

    2011-03-15

    Nanowires and nanotubes were synthesized from metals and metal oxides using templated cathodic electrodeposition. With templated electrodeposition, small structures are electrodeposited using a template that is the inverse of the final desired shape. Dielectrophoresis was used for the alignment of the as-formed nanowires and nanotubes between prepatterned electrodes. For reproducible nanowire alignment, a universal set of dielectrophoresis parameters to align any arbitrary nanowire material was determined. The parameters include peak-to-peak potential and frequency, thickness of the silicon oxide layer, grounding of the silicon substrate, and nature of the solvent medium used. It involves applying a field with a frequency >10(5) Hz, an insulating silicon oxide layer with a thickness of 2.5 μm or more, grounding of the underlying silicon substrate, and the use of a solvent medium with a low dielectric constant. In our experiments, we obtained good results by using a peak-to-peak potential of 2.1 V at a frequency of 1.2 × 10(5) Hz. Furthermore, an indirect alignment technique is proposed that prevents short circuiting of nanowires after contacting both electrodes. After alignment, a considerably lower resistivity was found for ZnO nanowires made by templated electrodeposition (2.2-3.4 × 10(-3) Ωm) compared to ZnO nanorods synthesized by electrodeposition (10 Ωm) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) (500 Ωm). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of copper nanowire under tensile load: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Liu, Wei-Ting [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Chun-I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China); Promotion Center for Global Materials Research, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wen-Dung, E-mail: wendung@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China); Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China); Promotion Center for Global Materials Research, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101 Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    In this study we have used atomistic simulations to investigate the role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of nanowires. In particular, we have performed computational investigation on single crystal face-centered cubic copper nano-wires with diameters ranging from 2 to 20 nm. The wire axis for all the nanowires are considered along the [0 0 1] direction. Characterization of the initial optimized structures revealed clear differences in interatomic spacing, stress, and potential energy in all the nanowires. The mechanical properties with respect to wire diameter are evaluated by applying tension along the [0 0 1] direction until yielding. We have discussed the stress–strain relationships, Young's modulus, and the variation in potential energy from surface to the center of the wire for all the cases. Our results indicate that the mechanical response (including yield strain, Young's modulus, and resilience) is directly related to the proportion of surface to bulk type atoms present in each nanowire. Thus the size-dependent mechanical properties of single crystal copper nanowire within elastic region are attributed to the surface to volume ratio (surface effect). Using the calculated response, we have formulated a mathematical relationship, which predicts the nonlinear correlation between the mechanical properties and the diameter of the wire.

  17. Self-bridging of vertical silicon nanowires and a universal capacitive force model for spontaneous attraction in nanostructures.

    Sun, Zhelin; Wang, Deli; Xiang, Jie

    2014-11-25

    Spontaneous attractions between free-standing nanostructures have often caused adhesion or stiction that affects a wide range of nanoscale devices, particularly nano/microelectromechanical systems. Previous understandings of the attraction mechanisms have included capillary force, van der Waals/Casimir forces, and surface polar charges. However, none of these mechanisms universally applies to simple semiconductor structures such as silicon nanowire arrays that often exhibit bunching or adhesions. Here we propose a simple capacitive force model to quantitatively study the universal spontaneous attraction that often causes stiction among semiconductor or metallic nanostructures such as vertical nanowire arrays with inevitably nonuniform size variations due to fabrication. When nanostructures are uniform in size, they share the same substrate potential. The presence of slight size differences will break the symmetry in the capacitive network formed between the nanowires, substrate, and their environment, giving rise to electrostatic attraction forces due to the relative potential difference between neighboring wires. Our model is experimentally verified using arrays of vertical silicon nanowire pairs with varied spacing, diameter, and size differences. Threshold nanowire spacing, diameter, or size difference between the nearest neighbors has been identified beyond which the nanowires start to exhibit spontaneous attraction that leads to bridging when electrostatic forces overcome elastic restoration forces. This work illustrates a universal understanding of spontaneous attraction that will impact the design, fabrication, and reliable operation of nanoscale devices and systems.

  18. Oxygen deficiency in MoO{sub 3} polycrystalline nanowires and nanotubes

    Varlec, Ana, E-mail: ana.varlec@ijs.si [Condensed Matter Physics, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Arčon, Denis [Condensed Matter Physics, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska cesta 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Škapin, Srečo D. [Advanced Materials Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Remškar, Maja [Condensed Matter Physics, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-02-15

    We report on the synthesis of polycrystalline molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 3}) nanowires via oxidation of molybdenum-sulfur-iodine (Mo{sub 6}S{sub 2}I{sub 8}) nanowires. This unique synthesis route results in an interesting morphology comprising porous nanowires and nanotubes. We found the nanowires to have the orthorhombic MoO{sub 3} structure. The structure is slightly oxygen deficient which results in the appearance of a new resonant Raman band (1004 cm{sup −1}) and paramagnetic defects (Mo{sup 5+}) of both the point and crystallographic shear plane nature. - Highlights: • Polycrystalline MoO{sub 3} nanowires were obtained via oxidation of Mo{sub 6}S{sub 2}I{sub 8} nanowires. • Nanowires are porous and tubular with either filled or empty interior. • Nanowires are slightly oxygen deficient which leads to a new Raman band.

  19. Electrospinning synthesis of superconducting BSCCO nanowires

    Duarte, Edgar A.; Quintero, Pedro A.; Meisel, Mark W.; Nino, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x nanowires 150 nm to 250 nm thick are synthesized using the electrospinning. •Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x nanowires are obtained after a heat treatment at 850 °C. •Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x nanowires show a T c = 78.7 K consistent with bulk superconductor behavior. -- Abstract: This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x superconducting nanowires. Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x nanowires with a T c = 78.7 K are synthesized using the electrospinning process employing sol–gel precursors. A sol–gel methodology is used to obtain a homogeneous PVP solution containing Bi, Sr, Ca, and Cu acetates. Mats of randomly oriented nanowires and aligned nanowires are also collected. After a heat treatment at 850 °C in ambient atmosphere using heating rates of 100 and 400 °C/h, fully crystallized Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x nanowires are obtained. The morphology, microstructure, and crystal structure of these nanowires are then examined to reveal a rectangular morphology having typical wire thickness in the range of 150–250 nm, and a wire width between 400 and 600 nm. DC magnetization studies are conducted to investigate the critical transition temperature (T c ) of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x nanowires and to compare their magnetic properties to those of bulk Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x powder. The T c for the commercial powder is observed at 78.6 K, and that of the obtained nanowires at 78.7 K. These results point to the superconducting nature of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x nanowires, and the potential of the electrospinning process for the synthesis of this superconductor material

  20. Synthesis of SERS active Au nanowires in different noncoordinating solvents

    Hou Xiaomiao; Zhang Xiaoling, E-mail: zhangxl@bit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, School of Science (China); Fang Yan, E-mail: fangyan@mail.cnu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Nano-Photonics and Nano-Structure (NPNS), Capital Normal University (China); Chen Shutang; Li Na; Zhou Qi [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, School of Science (China)

    2011-06-15

    Au nanowires with length up to micrometers were synthesized through a simple and one-pot solution growth method. HAuCl{sub 4} was reduced in a micellar structure formed by 1-octadecylamine and oleic acid in hexane, heptane, toluene and chloroform, respectively. As the non-polarity of noncoordinating solvents can affect the nucleation and growth rates of Au nanostructures, Au nanowires with different diameters could be obtained by changing the noncoordinating solvents in the synthetic process. The influences of the solvents on the morphology of Au nanowires were systematically studied. When using hexane as reaction solvent, the product turned to be high portion of Au nanowires with more uniform size than the others. Furthermore, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum of 2-thionaphthol was obtained on the Au nanowire-modified substrate, indicating that the as-synthesized Au nanowires have potential for highly sensitive optical detection application.

  1. Pd nanowire arrays as electrocatalysts for ethanol electrooxidation

    Wang, Hong; Cheng, Faliang [Dongguan University of Technology, Dongguan 523106 (China); Xu, Changwei; Jiang, Sanping [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2007-05-15

    Highly ordered Pd nanowire arrays were prepared by template-electrodeposition method using anodic aluminum oxide template. The Pd nanowire arrays, in this paper, have high electrochemical active surface and show excellent catalytic properties for ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline media. The activity of Pd nanowire arrays for ethanol oxidation is not only higher that of Pd film, but also higher than that of commercial E-TEK PtRu(2:1 by weight)/C. The micrometer sized pores and channels in nanowire arrays act as structure units. They make liquid fuel diffuse into and products diffuse out of the catalysts layer much easier, therefore, the utilization efficiency of catalysts gets higher. Pd nanowire arrays are stable catalysts for ethanol oxidation. The nanowire arrays may be a great potential in direct ethanol fuel cells and ethanol sensors. (author)

  2. Band structure of Si/Ge core-shell nanowires along the [110] direction modulated by external uniaxial strain

    Peng Xihong; Tang Fu; Logan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Strain modulated electronic properties of Si/Ge core-shell nanowires along the [110] direction were reported, on the basis of first principles density-functional theory calculations. In particular, the energy dispersion relationship of the conduction/valence band was explored in detail. At the Γ point, the energy levels of both bands are significantly altered by applied uniaxial strain, which results in an evident change of the band gap. In contrast, for the K vectors far away from Γ, the variation of the conduction/valence band with strain is much reduced. In addition, with a sufficient tensile strain (∼1%), the valence band edge shifts away from Γ, which indicates that the band gap of the Si/Ge core-shell nanowires experiences a transition from direct to indirect. Our studies further showed that effective masses of charge carriers can also be tuned using the external uniaxial strain. The effective mass of the hole increases dramatically with tensile strain, while strain shows a minimal effect on tuning the effective mass of the electron. Finally, the relation between strain and the conduction/valence band edge is discussed thoroughly in terms of site-projected wavefunction characters.

  3. Surface saturation effect on mechanical and optical properties of ZnO nanowires

    S Yazdani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, on the basis of density functional theory and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA we optimized the electronic structure of the unsaturated and hydrogen saturated ZnO nanowires with [0001] orientation. Studying the effects of a uniaxial strain on the nanowires, we calculated the Young’s modulus and the effective piezoelectric coefficient of the nanowires. Furthermore, the effect of this uniaxial strain on the imaginary part of dielectric function of the nanowires was investigated.

  4. Optimizing the top profile of a nanowire for maximum forward emission

    Wang Dong-Lin; Yu Zhong-Yuan; Liu Yu-Min; Guo Xiao-Tao; Cao Gui; Feng Hao

    2011-01-01

    The optimal top structure of a nanowire quantum emitter single photon source is significant in improving performance.Based on the axial symmetry of a cylindrical nanowire,this paper optimizes the top profile of a nanowire for the maximum forward emission by combining the geometry projection method and the finite element method.The results indicate that the nanowire with a cambered top has the stronger emission in the forward direction,which is helpful to improve the photon collection efficiency.

  5. Magnetic properties of mosaic nanocomposites composed of nickel and cobalt nanowires

    Castillo-Sepúlveda, S.; Corona, R.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Altbir, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Escrig, J., E-mail: juan.escrig@usach.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), 9170124 Santiago (Chile)

    2016-10-15

    Mosaic nanocomposites composed of nickel and cobalt nanowires arranged in different configurations were investigated using Monte Carlo simulations and a simple model that considers single-domain structures including length corrections due to the shape anisotropy. Our results showed that for an ordered array both the coercivity and the remanence decrease linearly as a function of the concentration of nickel nanowires. Besides, we obtained that the magnetic properties of an array of a certain hard magnetic material (cobalt) will not change, unless we have more than 50% of nanowires of other soft magnetic material (nickel) in the array. In principle the second material could be other soft magnetic material, but could also be a nonmagnetic material or could even be a situation in which some of the pore arrays were not filled by electrodeposition. Therefore, our results allow us to predict the behavior of magnetic mosaic nanocomposites that are promising candidates for functional electrodes, sensors, and model catalysts. - Highlights: • Mosaic nanocomposites composed of magnetic nanowires were investigated. • Magnetic properties can be adjusted by varying the concentration of nanowires. • Our results allow us to predict the behavior of magnetic mosaic nanocomposites.

  6. ZnO Nanowires Synthesized by Vapor Phase Transport Deposition on Transparent Oxide Substrates

    Taylor Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Zinc oxide nanowires have been synthesized without using metal catalyst seed layers on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO substrates by a modified vapor phase transport deposition process using a double-tube reactor. The unique reactor configuration creates a Zn-rich vapor environment that facilitates formation and growth of zinc oxide nanoparticles and wires (20–80 nm in diameter, up to 6 μm in length, density <40 nm apart at substrate temperatures down to 300°C. Electron microscopy and other characterization techniques show nanowires with distinct morphologies when grown under different conditions. The effect of reaction parameters including reaction time, temperature, and carrier gas flow rate on the size, morphology, crystalline structure, and density of ZnO nanowires has been investigated. The nanowires grown by this method have a diameter, length, and density appropriate for use in fabricating hybrid polymer/metal oxide nanostructure solar cells. For example, it is preferable to have nanowires no more than 40 nm apart to minimize exciton recombination in polymer solar cells.

  7. Quantum-confined nanowires as vehicles for enhanced electrical transport

    Mohammad, S Noor

    2012-01-01

    Electrical transport in semiconductor nanowires taking quantum confinement and dielectric confinement into account has been studied. A distinctly new route has been employed for the study. The fundamental science underlying the model is based on a relationship between the quantum confinement and the structural disorder of the nanowire surface. The role of surface energy and thermodynamic imbalance in nanowire structural disorder has been described. A model for the diameter dependence of energy bandgap of nanowires has been developed. Ionized impurity scattering, dislocation scattering and acoustic phonon scattering have been taken into account to study carrier mobility. A series of calculations on silicon nanowires show that carrier mobility in nanowires can be greatly enhanced by quantum confinement and dielectric confinement. The electron mobility can, for example, be a factor of 2–10 higher at room temperature than the mobility in a free-standing silicon nanowire. The calculated results agree well with almost all experimental and theoretical results available in the literature. They successfully explain experimental observations not understood before. The model is general and applicable to nanowires from all possible semiconductors. It is perhaps the first physical model highlighting the impact of both quantum confinement and dielectric confinement on carrier transport. It underscores the basic causes of thin, lowly doped nanowires in the temperature range 200 K ≤ T ≤ 500 K yielding very high carrier mobility. It suggests that the scattering by dislocations (stacking faults) can be very detrimental for carrier mobility. (paper)

  8. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    Goldman, Allen M.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO_3. The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  9. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    Goldman, Allen M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-08-16

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO3. The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  10. Biotemplated synthesis of PZT nanowires.

    Cung, Kellye; Han, Booyeon J; Nguyen, Thanh D; Mao, Sheng; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Xu, Shiyou; Naik, Rajesh R; Poirier, Gerald; Yao, Nan; Purohit, Prashant K; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric nanowires are an important class of smart materials for next-generation applications including energy harvesting, robotic actuation, and bioMEMS. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT), in particular, has attracted significant attention, owing to its superior electromechanical conversion performance. Yet, the ability to synthesize crystalline PZT nanowires with well-controlled properties remains a challenge. Applications of common nanosynthesis methods to PZT are hampered by issues such as slow kinetics, lack of suitable catalysts, and harsh reaction conditions. Here we report a versatile biomimetic method, in which biotemplates are used to define PZT nanostructures, allowing for rational control over composition and crystallinity. Specifically, stoichiometric PZT nanowires were synthesized using both polysaccharide (alginate) and bacteriophage templates. The wires possessed measured piezoelectric constants of up to 132 pm/V after poling, among the highest reported for PZT nanomaterials. Further, integrated devices can generate up to 0.820 μW/cm(2) of power. These results suggest that biotemplated piezoelectric nanowires are attractive candidates for stimuli-responsive nanosensors, adaptive nanoactuators, and nanoscale energy harvesters.

  11. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8-133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared.

  12. Manganese oxide nanowires, films, and membranes and methods of making

    Suib, Steven Lawrence [Storrs, CT; Yuan, Jikang [Storrs, CT

    2008-10-21

    Nanowires, films, and membranes comprising ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves, and methods of making, are disclosed. A single crystal ultra-long nanowire includes an ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieve, and has an average length greater than about 10 micrometers and an average diameter of about 5 nanometers to about 100 nanometers. A film comprises a microporous network comprising a plurality of single crystal nanowires in the form of a layer, wherein a plurality of layers is stacked on a surface of a substrate, wherein the nanowires of each layer are substantially axially aligned. A free standing membrane comprises a microporous network comprising a plurality of single crystal nanowires in the form of a layer, wherein a plurality of layers is aggregately stacked, and wherein the nanowires of each layer are substantially axially aligned.

  13. Mounting Systems for Structural Members, Fastening Assemblies Thereof, and Vibration Isolation Systems Including the Same

    Young, Ken (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Mounting systems for structural members, fastening assemblies thereof, and vibration isolation systems including the same are provided. Mounting systems comprise a pair of mounting brackets, each clamped against a fastening assembly forming a mounting assembly. Fastening assemblies comprise a spherical rod end comprising a spherical member having a through opening and an integrally threaded shaft, first and second seating members on opposite sides of the spherical member and each having a through opening that is substantially coaxial with the spherical member through opening, and a partially threaded fastener that threadably engages each mounting bracket forming the mounting assembly. Structural members have axial end portions, each releasably coupled to a mounting bracket by the integrally threaded shaft. Axial end portions are threaded in opposite directions for permitting structural member rotation to adjust a length thereof to a substantially zero strain position. Structural members may be vibration isolator struts in vibration isolation systems.

  14. Radial Growth of Self-Catalyzed GaAs Nanowires and the Evolution of the Liquid Ga-Droplet Studied by Time-Resolved in Situ X-ray Diffraction.

    Schroth, Philipp; Jakob, Julian; Feigl, Ludwig; Mostafavi Kashani, Seyed Mohammad; Vogel, Jonas; Strempfer, Jörg; Keller, Thomas F; Pietsch, Ullrich; Baumbach, Tilo

    2018-01-10

    We report on a growth study of self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires based on time-resolved in situ X-ray structure characterization during molecular-beam-epitaxy in combination with ex situ scanning-electron-microscopy. We reveal the evolution of nanowire radius and polytypism and distinguish radial growth processes responsible for tapering and side-wall growth. We interpret our results using a model for diameter self-stabilization processes during growth of self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires including the shape of the liquid Ga-droplet and its evolution during growth.

  15. Extending the Intermediate Data Structure (IDS for longitudinal historical databases to include geographic data

    Finn Hedefalk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Intermediate Data Structure (IDS is a standardised database structure for longitudinal historical databases. Such a common structure facilitates data sharing and comparative research. In this study, we propose an extended version of IDS, named IDS-Geo, that also includes geographic data. The geographic data that will be stored in IDS-Geo are primarily buildings and/or property units, and the purpose of these geographic data is mainly to link individuals to places in space. When we want to assign such detailed spatial locations to individuals (in times before there were any detailed house addresses available, we often have to create tailored geographic datasets. In those cases, there are benefits of storing geographic data in the same structure as the demographic data. Moreover, we propose the export of data from IDS-Geo using an eXtensible Markup Language (XML Schema. IDS-Geo is implemented in a case study using historical property units, for the period 1804 to 1913, stored in a geographically extended version of the Scanian Economic Demographic Database (SEDD. To fit into the IDS-Geo data structure, we included an object lifeline representation of all of the property units (based on the snapshot time representation of single historical maps and poll-tax registers. The case study verifies that the IDS-Geo model is capable of handling geographic data that can be linked to demographic data.

  16. Tuning wettability of hydrogen titanate nanowire mesh by Na+ irradiation

    Das, Pritam; Chatterjee, Shyamal

    2018-04-01

    Hydrogen titanate (HT) nanowires have been widely studied for remarkable properties and various potential applications. However, a handful studies are available related to ion beam induced structural changes and influence on wetting behavior of the HT nanowire surface. In this work, we exposed HT nanowires to 5 keV Na+ at an ion fluence of 1×1016 ions.cm-2. Scanning electron microscope shows that at this ion fluence nanowires are bent arbitrarily and they are welded to each other forming an interlinked network structure. Computer simulation shows that ion beam induces defect formation in the nanowires, which plays major role in such structural modifications. An interesting alteration of surface wetting property is observed due to ion irradiation. The hydrophilic pristine surface turns into hydrophobic after ion irradiation.

  17. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    Picht, Oliver

    2010-05-26

    Polycrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}m. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 {mu}m thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  18. Constricted nanowire with stabilized magnetic domain wall

    Sbiaa, R.; Al Bahri, M.

    2016-01-01

    Domain wall (DW)-based magnetic memory offers the possibility for increasing the storage capacity. However, stability of DW remains the major drawback of this scheme. In this letter, we propose a stepped nanowire for pinning DW in a desirable position. From micromagnetic simulation, the proposed design applied to in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows that by adjusting the nanowire step size and its width it is possible to stabilize DW for a desirable current density range. In contrast, only a movement of DW could be seen for conventional nanowire. An extension to a multi-stepped nanowire could be used for multi-bit per cell magnetic memory. - Highlights: • A stepped nanowire is proposed to pin domain wall in desired position. • The new structure can be made by a simple off set of two single nanowires. • The critical current for moving domain wall from one state to the other could be tuned by adjusting the geometry of the device. • The device could be used for multi-bit per cell memory by extending the steps in the device.

  19. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    Picht, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline Bi 2 Te 3 nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 μm. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi 2 Te 3 and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 μm thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  20. Flexible integration of free-standing nanowires into silicon photonics.

    Chen, Bigeng; Wu, Hao; Xin, Chenguang; Dai, Daoxin; Tong, Limin

    2017-06-14

    Silicon photonics has been developed successfully with a top-down fabrication technique to enable large-scale photonic integrated circuits with high reproducibility, but is limited intrinsically by the material capability for active or nonlinear applications. On the other hand, free-standing nanowires synthesized via a bottom-up growth present great material diversity and structural uniformity, but precisely assembling free-standing nanowires for on-demand photonic functionality remains a great challenge. Here we report hybrid integration of free-standing nanowires into silicon photonics with high flexibility by coupling free-standing nanowires onto target silicon waveguides that are simultaneously used for precise positioning. Coupling efficiency between a free-standing nanowire and a silicon waveguide is up to ~97% in the telecommunication band. A hybrid nonlinear-free-standing nanowires-silicon waveguides Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a racetrack resonator for significantly enhanced optical modulation are experimentally demonstrated, as well as hybrid active-free-standing nanowires-silicon waveguides circuits for light generation. These results suggest an alternative approach to flexible multifunctional on-chip nanophotonic devices.Precisely assembling free-standing nanowires for on-demand photonic functionality remains a challenge. Here, Chen et al. integrate free-standing nanowires into silicon waveguides and show all-optical modulation and light generation on silicon photonic chips.

  1. Aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires: Growth methods, properties, and applications

    Hainey, Mel F.; Redwing, Joan M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Metal-mediated vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth is a promising approach for the fabrication of silicon nanowires, although residual metal incorporation into the nanowires during growth can adversely impact electronic properties particularly when metals such as gold and copper are utilized. Aluminum, which acts as a shallow acceptor in silicon, is therefore of significant interest for the growth of p-type silicon nanowires but has presented challenges due to its propensity for oxidation. This paper summarizes the key aspects of aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth along with wire properties and device results. In the first section, aluminum-catalyzed nanowire growth is discussed with a specific emphasis on methods to mitigate aluminum oxide formation. Next, the influence of growth parameters such as growth temperature, precursor partial pressure, and hydrogen partial pressure on nanowire morphology is discussed, followed by a brief review of the growth of templated and patterned arrays of nanowires. Aluminum incorporation into the nanowires is then discussed in detail, including measurements of the aluminum concentration within wires using atom probe tomography and assessment of electrical properties by four point resistance measurements. Finally, the use of aluminum-catalyzed VLS growth for device fabrication is reviewed including results on single-wire radial p-n junction solar cells and planar solar cells fabricated with nanowire/nanopyramid texturing.

  2. Plasmonic engineering of metal-oxide nanowire heterojunctions in integrated nanowire rectification units

    Lin, Luchan; Zhou, Y. Norman, E-mail: liulei@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Zou, Guisheng; Liu, Lei, E-mail: liulei@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Duley, Walt W. [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2016-05-16

    We show that irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses can produce robust nanowire heterojunctions in coupled non-wetting metal-oxide Ag-TiO{sub 2} structures. Simulations indicate that joining arises from the effect of strong plasmonic localization in the region of the junction. Strong electric field effects occur in both Ag and TiO{sub 2} resulting in the modification of both surfaces and an increase in wettability of TiO{sub 2}, facilitating the interconnection of Ag and TiO{sub 2} nanowires. Irradiation leads to the creation of a thin layer of highly defected TiO{sub 2} in the contact region between the Ag and TiO{sub 2} nanowires. The presence of this layer allows the formation of a heterojunction and offers the possibility of engineering the electronic characteristics of interfacial structures. Rectifying junctions with single and bipolar properties have been generated in Ag-TiO{sub 2} nanowire circuits incorporating asymmetrical and symmetrical interfacial structures, respectively. This fabrication technique should be applicable for the interconnection of other heterogeneous metal-oxide nanowire components and demonstrates that femtosecond laser irradiation enables interfacial engineering for electronic applications of integrated nanowire structures.

  3. Plasmonic engineering of metal-oxide nanowire heterojunctions in integrated nanowire rectification units

    Lin, Luchan; Zou, Guisheng; Liu, Lei; Duley, Walt W.; Zhou, Y. Norman

    2016-05-01

    We show that irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses can produce robust nanowire heterojunctions in coupled non-wetting metal-oxide Ag-TiO2 structures. Simulations indicate that joining arises from the effect of strong plasmonic localization in the region of the junction. Strong electric field effects occur in both Ag and TiO2 resulting in the modification of both surfaces and an increase in wettability of TiO2, facilitating the interconnection of Ag and TiO2 nanowires. Irradiation leads to the creation of a thin layer of highly defected TiO2 in the contact region between the Ag and TiO2 nanowires. The presence of this layer allows the formation of a heterojunction and offers the possibility of engineering the electronic characteristics of interfacial structures. Rectifying junctions with single and bipolar properties have been generated in Ag-TiO2 nanowire circuits incorporating asymmetrical and symmetrical interfacial structures, respectively. This fabrication technique should be applicable for the interconnection of other heterogeneous metal-oxide nanowire components and demonstrates that femtosecond laser irradiation enables interfacial engineering for electronic applications of integrated nanowire structures.

  4. Single Nanowire Probe for Single Cell Endoscopy and Sensing

    Yan, Ruoxue

    The ability to manipulate light in subwavelength photonic and plasmonic structures has shown great potentials in revolutionizing how information is generated, transformed and processed. Chemically synthesized nanowires, in particular, offers a unique toolbox not only for highly compact and integrated photonic modules and devices, including coherent and incoherent light sources, waveguides, photodetectors and photovoltaics, but also for new types of nanoscopic bio-probes for spot cargo delivery and in-situ single cell endoscopy and sensing. Such nanowire probes would enable us to carry out intracellular imaging and probing with high spatial resolution, monitor in-vivo biological processes within single living cells and greatly improve our fundamental understanding of cell functions, intracellular physiological processes, and cellular signal pathways. My work is aimed at developing a material and instrumental platform for such single nanowire probe. Successful optical integration of Ag nanowire plasmonic waveguides, which offers deep subwavelength mode confinement, and conventional photonic waveguides was demonstrated on a single nanowire level. The highest plasmonic-photonic coupling efficiency coupling was found at small coupling angles and low input frequencies. The frequency dependent propagation loss was observed in Ag nanowire and was confirmed by quantitative measurement and in agreement with theoretical expectations. Rational integration of dielectric and Ag nanowire waveguide components into hybrid optical-plasmonic routing devices has been demonstrated. This capability is essential for incorporating sub-100nm Ag nanowire waveguides into optical fiber based nanoprobes for single cell endoscopy. The nanoprobe system based on single nanowire waveguides was demonstrated by optically coupling semiconductor or metal nanowire with an optical fiber with tapered tip. This nanoprobe design requires minimal instrumentation which makes it cost efficient and readily

  5. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components.

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A; Golbeck, John H; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2014-09-02

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  6. Facile synthesis of porous Pt botryoidal nanowires and their electrochemical properties

    Huang, Zhongyuan; Zhou, Haihui; Chen, Zhongxue; Zeng, Fanyan; Chen, Liang; Luo, Wucheng; Kuang, Yafei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Porous Pt nanowires were synthesized by combination of soft and hard templets. • Te nanowires were used as the hard templet and reductant. • The Pt nanowires are composed of many small Pt nanoparticles and pores. • The Pt nanowires have very good electrochemical activity and stability. - Abstract: Long and porous Pt botryoidal nanowires (Pt BNWs) were facilely synthesized by combination of soft and hard templates accompanying chemical reduction of ascorbic acid and replacement of Te nanowires. This bis-template and bis-reductant method is proved to be an effective way to prepare nanowires with special structure. The scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images show the as-prepared product is botryoidal nanowires with diameter of 20–30 nm and length of several micrometers. High resolution transmission electron microscopy shows the Pt botryoidal nanowires are composed of many small Pt nanoparticles (about 3 nm in diameter), which is just like that many grapes grow on the branch. These small nanoparticles make Pt nanowires have botryoidal and porous structure. Moreover, the diameter of Pt BNWs can be adjusted by changing the dosage of Pt precursor, polyvinylpyrrolidone and L-ascorbic acid. The electrocatalytic performance of Pt botryoidal nanowires is studied, which shows that the as-prepared Pt botryoidal nanowires have not only high activity but also good stability for oxygen reduction reaction

  7. High-yield growth and characterization of ⟨100⟩ InP p−n diode nanowires

    Cavalli, A.; Wang, J.; Zadeh, I.E.; Reimer, M.E.; Verheijen, M.A.; Soini, M.; Plissard, S.R.; Zwiller, V.; Haverkort, J.E.M.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are nanoscale structures holding promise in many fields such as optoelectronics, quantum computing, and thermoelectrics. Nanowires are usually grown vertically on (111)-oriented substrates, while (100) is the standard in semiconductor technology. The ability to grow and to

  8. TRANSAT-- method for detecting the conserved helices of functional RNA structures, including transient, pseudo-knotted and alternative structures.

    Wiebe, Nicholas J P; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2010-06-24

    The prediction of functional RNA structures has attracted increased interest, as it allows us to study the potential functional roles of many genes. RNA structure prediction methods, however, assume that there is a unique functional RNA structure and also do not predict functional features required for in vivo folding. In order to understand how functional RNA structures form in vivo, we require sophisticated experiments or reliable prediction methods. So far, there exist only a few, experimentally validated transient RNA structures. On the computational side, there exist several computer programs which aim to predict the co-transcriptional folding pathway in vivo, but these make a range of simplifying assumptions and do not capture all features known to influence RNA folding in vivo. We want to investigate if evolutionarily related RNA genes fold in a similar way in vivo. To this end, we have developed a new computational method, Transat, which detects conserved helices of high statistical significance. We introduce the method, present a comprehensive performance evaluation and show that Transat is able to predict the structural features of known reference structures including pseudo-knotted ones as well as those of known alternative structural configurations. Transat can also identify unstructured sub-sequences bound by other molecules and provides evidence for new helices which may define folding pathways, supporting the notion that homologous RNA sequence not only assume a similar reference RNA structure, but also fold similarly. Finally, we show that the structural features predicted by Transat differ from those assuming thermodynamic equilibrium. Unlike the existing methods for predicting folding pathways, our method works in a comparative way. This has the disadvantage of not being able to predict features as function of time, but has the considerable advantage of highlighting conserved features and of not requiring a detailed knowledge of the cellular

  9. Seismic evaluation of a cooling water reservoir facility including fluid-structure and soil-structure interaction effects

    Kabir, A.F.; Maryak, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    Seismic analyses and structural evaluations were performed for a cooling water reservoir of a nuclear reactor facility. The horizontal input seismic motion was the NRC Reg. guide 1.60 spectrum shape anchored at 0.20g zero period acceleration. Vertical input was taken as two-thirds of the horizontal input. Soil structure interaction and hydrodynamic effects were addressed in the seismic analyses. Uncertainties in the soil properties were accounted for by considering three soil profiles. Two 2-dimensional SSI models and a 3-dimensional static model. Representing different areas of the reservoir structures were developed and analyzed to obtain seismic forces and moments, and accelerations at various locations. The results included in this paper indicated that both hydrodynamic and soil-structure interaction effects are significant contributors to the seismic responses of the water-retaining walls of the reservoir

  10. Influence of structural parameter included in nonlocal rock mass model on stress concentration around circular tunnel

    Lavrikov, SV; Mikenina, OA; Revuzhenko, AF

    2018-03-01

    A model of elastic body, including local curvature of elementary volume, is matched with a nonlocal model with a linear structural parameter in the differential approximation. The problem on deformation of rock mass around a circular cross section tunnel is solved numerically. The contours of the calculated stresses are plotted. It is shown that inclusion of local bends in the model results in expansion of influence zone of the tunnel and reduces stress concentration factor at the tunnel boundary.

  11. Growth and Characterisation of GaAs/AlGaAs Core-shell Nanowires for Optoelectronic Device Applications

    Jiang, Nian

    III-V semiconductor nanowires have been investigated as key components for future electronic and optoelectronic devices and systems due to their direct band gap and high electron mobility. Amongst the III-V semiconductors, the planar GaAs material system has been extensively studied and used in industries. Accordingly, GaAs nanowires are the prime candidates for nano-scale devices. However, the electronic performance of GaAs nanowires has yet to match that of state-of-the-art planar GaAs devices. The present deficiency of GaAs nanowires is typically attributed to the large surface-to- volume ratio and the tendency for non-radiative recombination centres to form at the surface. The favoured solution of this problem is by coating GaAs nanowires with AlGaAs shells, which replaces the GaAs surface with GaAs/AlGaAs interface. This thesis presents a systematic study of GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires grown by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), including understanding the growth, and characterisation of their structural and optical properties. The structures of the nanowires were mainly studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmis- sion electron microscopy (TEM). A procedure of microtomy was developed to prepare the cross-sectional samples for the TEM studies. The optical properties were charac- terised by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Carrier lifetimes were measured by time-resolved PL. The growth of AlGaAs shell was optimised to obtain the best optical properties, e.g. the strongest PL emission and the longest minority carrier lifetimes. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  12. Electronic and magnetic properties of ultrathin rhodium nanowires

    Wang Bao Lin; Ren-Yun; Sun Hou Qian; Chen Xiao Shuang; Zhao Ji Jun

    2003-01-01

    The structures of ultrathin rhodium nanowires are studied using empirical molecular dynamics simulations with a genetic algorithm. Helical multishell cylindrical and pentagonal packing structures are found. The electronic and magnetic properties of the rhodium nanowires are calculated using an spd tight-binding Hamiltonian in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The average magnetic moment and electronic density of states are obtained. Our results indicate that the electronic and magnetic properties of the rhodium nanowires depend not only on the size of the wire but also on the atomic structure. In particular, centred pentagonal and hexagonal structures can be unusually ferromagnetic.

  13. Nanowire growth from the viewpoint of the thin film polylayer growth theory

    Kashchiev, Dimo

    2018-03-01

    The theory of polylayer growth of thin solid films is employed for description of the growth kinetics of single-crystal nanowires. Expressions are derived for the dependences of the height h and radius r of a given nanowire on time t, as well as for the h(r) dependence. These dependences are applicable immediately after the nanowire nucleation on the substrate and thus include the period during which the nucleated nanowire changes its shape from that of cap to that of column. The analysis shows that the nanowire cap-to-column shape transition is continuous and makes it possible to kinetically define the nanowire shape-transition radius by means of the nanowire radial and axial growth rates. The obtained h(t), r(t) and h(r) dependences are found to provide a good description of available experimental data for growth of self-nucleated GaN nanowires by the vapor-solid mechanism.

  14. Indium Arsenide Nanowires

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal

    -ray diffraction. InAs NWs can be used in a broad range of applications, including detectors, high speed electronics and low temperature transport measurements, but in this thesis focus will be put on biological experiments on living cells. Good control of Au-assisted InAs NW growth has been achieved......This thesis is about growth of Au-assisted and self-assisted InAs nanowires (NWs). The wires are synthesized using a solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system and characterized with several techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x...... by a systematic study to optimize the growth conditions; first the Au deposition, then the growth temperature and finally the beam fluxes. For further control of the growth, Au droplets have been positioned with electron beam lithography and large scale arrays with a > 99 % yield have been made on 2 inch...

  15. An ArcGIS approach to include tectonic structures in point data regionalization.

    Darsow, Andreas; Schafmeister, Maria-Theresia; Hofmann, Thilo

    2009-01-01

    Point data derived from drilling logs must often be regionalized. However, aquifers may show discontinuous surface structures, such as the offset of an aquitard caused by tectonic faults. One main challenge has been to incorporate these structures into the regionalization process of point data. We combined ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation to account for neotectonic structures in the regionalization process. The study area chosen to test this approach is the largest porous aquifer in Austria. It consists of three basins formed by neotectonic events and delimited by steep faults with a vertical offset of the aquitard up to 70 m within very short distances. First, ordinary kriging was used to incorporate the characteristic spatial variability of the aquitard location by means of a variogram. The tectonic faults could be included into the regionalization process by using breaklines with buffer zones. All data points inside the buffer were deleted. Last, IDW was performed, resulting in an aquitard map representing the discontinuous surface structures. This approach enables one to account for such surfaces using the standard software package ArcGIS; therefore, it could be adopted in many practical applications.

  16. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  17. Stability of Organic Nanowires

    Balzer, F.; Schiek, M.; Wallmann, I.

    2011-01-01

    The morphological stability of organic nanowires over time and under thermal load is of major importance for their use in any device. In this study the growth and stability of organic nanowires from a naphthyl end-capped thiophene grown by organic molecular beam deposition is investigated via ato...

  18. Effect of growth temperature on photoluminescence and piezoelectric characteristics of ZnO nanowires

    Water, Walter [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Fang, T.-H. [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Institute of Mechanical and Electromechanical Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: fang.tehua@msa.hinet.net; Ji, L.-W.; Lee, C.-C. [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)

    2009-02-25

    ZnO nanowire arrays were synthesized on Au-coated silicon (1 0 0) substrates by using vapour-liquid-solid process in this work. The effect of growth temperatures on the crystal structure and the surface morphology of ZnO nanowires were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The absorption and optical characteristics of the nanowires were examined by Ultraviolet/Visible spectroscopy, and photoluminescence, respectively. The photoluminescence results exhibited ZnO nanowires had an ultraviolet and blue emission at 383 and 492 nm. Then a nanogenerator with ZnO nanowire arrays was fabricated and demonstrated Schottky-like current-voltage characteristics.

  19. Characterization and Optical Properties of the Single Crystalline SnS Nanowire Arrays

    Yue GH

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The SnS nanowire arrays have been successfully synthesized by the template-assisted pulsed electrochemical deposition in the porous anodized aluminum oxide template. The investigation results showed that the as-synthesized nanowires are single crystalline structures and they have a highly preferential orientation. The ordered SnS nanowire arrays are uniform with a diameter of 50 nm and a length up to several tens of micrometers. The synthesized SnS nanowires exhibit strong absorption in visible and near-infrared spectral region and the direct energy gapE gof SnS nanowires is 1.59 eV.

  20. Tunable, flexible antireflection layer of ZnO nanowires embedded in PDMS.

    Kim, Min Kyu; Yi, Dong Kee; Paik, Ungyu

    2010-05-18

    In this article, we report the fabrication of ordered hybrid structures composed of ZnO nanowires and a polymeric matrix with a polymer precursor infiltrating the nanowire arrays. The antireflective properties of the resulting ZnO nanowire-embedded polydimethylsiloxane composite (ZPC) were investigated at various ZnO nanowire lengths and ZPC bending angles. Interestingly, we found that whereas the antireflective properties showed a strong dependence on the length of the embedded ZnO nanowires in PDMS, the bending of ZPC has little effect on the antireflective properties.

  1. Growth of Gold-assisted Gallium Arsenide Nanowires on Silicon Substrates via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Ramon M. delos Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gallium arsenide nanowires were grown on silicon (100 substrates by what is called the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS growth mechanism using a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE system. Good quality nanowires with surface density of approximately 108 nanowires per square centimeter were produced by utilizing gold nanoparticles, with density of 1011 nanoparticles per square centimeter, as catalysts for nanowire growth. X-ray diffraction measurements, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the nanowires are epitaxially grown on the silicon substrates, are oriented along the [111] direction and have cubic zincblende structure.

  2. Nanowires-based light emitters on thermally and electrically conductive substrates and of making same

    Ooi, Boon S.; Zhao, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee

    2017-01-01

    Elemental or compound semiconductors on metal substrates and methods of growing them are provided. The methods can include the steps of: (i) providing a metal substrate; (ii) adding an interlayer on a surface of the metal substrate, and (iii) growing semiconductor nanowires on the interlayer using a semiconductor epitaxy growth system to form the elemental or compound semiconductor. The method can include direct growth of high quality group III-V and group III-N based materials in the form of nanowires and nanowires-based devices on metal substrates. The nanowires on all- metal scheme greatly simplifies the fabrication process of nanowires based high power light emitters.

  3. Nanowires-based light emitters on thermally and electrically conductive substrates and of making same

    Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-04-27

    Elemental or compound semiconductors on metal substrates and methods of growing them are provided. The methods can include the steps of: (i) providing a metal substrate; (ii) adding an interlayer on a surface of the metal substrate, and (iii) growing semiconductor nanowires on the interlayer using a semiconductor epitaxy growth system to form the elemental or compound semiconductor. The method can include direct growth of high quality group III-V and group III-N based materials in the form of nanowires and nanowires-based devices on metal substrates. The nanowires on all- metal scheme greatly simplifies the fabrication process of nanowires based high power light emitters.

  4. Structural and optical properties of ZnMgO nanostructures formed by Mg in-diffused ZnO nanowires

    Pan, C.-J.; Hsu, H.-C.; Cheng, H.-M.; Wu, C.-Y.; Hsieh, W.-F.

    2007-01-01

    ZnMgO nanostructures with wurtzite phase were prepared by thermal diffusion of Mg into the ZnO nanowires. As ZnO light-emitting devices have been operated by using ZnMgO layers as energy barrier layers to confine the carriers, it is essential to realize the characterization of ZnMgO particularly. In this work, the Mg content in Zn 1 -x Mg x O alloy determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) shows a good coincidence. The variation of lattice constant and the blueshift of near-band-edge emission indicate that Zn 2+ ions are successfully substituted by Mg 2+ ions in the ZnO lattice. In Raman-scattering studies, the change of E 2 (high) phonon line shape in ZnO:Mg nanostructures reveals the microscopic substitutional disorder. In addition to the host phonons of ZnO, two additional bands around 383 and 510 cm -1 are presumably attributed to the Mg-related vibrational modes. - Graphical abstract: We reported the synthesis of the ZnMgO nanostructures prepared by a simple vapor transport method. Magnesium-related anomalous modes are observed by Raman spectra for the first time in ZnMgO system

  5. Piezoelectric-Induced Triboelectric Hybrid Nanogenerators Based on the ZnO Nanowire Layer Decorated on the Au/polydimethylsiloxane-Al Structure for Enhanced Triboelectric Performance.

    Jirayupat, Chaiyanut; Wongwiriyapan, Winadda; Kasamechonchung, Panita; Wutikhun, Tuksadon; Tantisantisom, Kittipong; Rayanasukha, Yossawat; Jiemsakul, Thanakorn; Tansarawiput, Chookiat; Liangruksa, Monrudee; Khanchaitit, Paisan; Horprathum, Mati; Porntheeraphat, Supanit; Klamchuen, Annop

    2018-02-21

    Here, we demonstrate a novel device structure design to enhance the electrical conversion output of a triboelectric device through the piezoelectric effect called as the piezo-induced triboelectric (PIT) device. By utilizing the piezopotential of ZnO nanowires embedded into the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer attached on the top electrode of the conventional triboelectric device (Au/PDMS-Al), the PIT device exhibits an output power density of 50 μW/cm 2 , which is larger than that of the conventional triboelectric device by up to 100 folds under the external applied force of 8.5 N. We found that the effect of the external piezopotential on the top Au electrode of the triboelectric device not only enhances the electron transfer from the Al electrode to PDMS but also boosts the internal built-in potential of the triboelectric device through an external electric field of the piezoelectric layer. Furthermore, 100 light-emitting diodes (LEDs) could be lighted up via the PIT device, whereas the conventional device could illuminate less than 20 LED bulbs. Thus, our results highlight that the enhancement of the triboelectric output can be achieved by using a PIT device structure, which enables us to develop hybrid nanogenerators for various self-power electronics such as wearable and mobile devices.

  6. Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion

    Fardy, Melissa Anne

    Se nanowires allowed their thermoelectric properties to be controllably tuned by increasing their carrier concentration or hole mobility. After optimal annealing, single PbSe nanowires exhibited a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 0.12 at 300 K. In addition, using a field-effect gated device, the Seebeck coefficient of single PbSe nanowires could be tuned from 64 to 193 muV˙K-1. This direct electrical field control of the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient suggests a powerful strategy for optimizing ZT in thermoelectric devices and these results represent the first demonstration of field-effect modulation of the thermoelectric figure of merit in a single semiconductor nanowire. This novel strategy for thermoelectric property modulation could prove especially important in optimizing the thermoelectric properties of semiconductors where reproducible doping is difficult to achieve. Recent theoretical work has shown large enhancements in ZT for single-crystal nanowires containing nanoscale interfaces along their lengths. M2O3(ZnO) n ( M = In, Ga, Fe) superlattice nanowires were synthesized via a novel solid-state diffusion approach to investigate this possible enhancement. Using atomic resolution Z-contrast STEM imaging a detailed structural analysis was performed on In2-xGaxO3(ZnO) n nanowires, leading to the discovery that octahedral inclusions within the superlattice structure are likely generated through a defect-assisted process. Single-nanowire thermal and electrical measurements on In2-x GaxO3(ZnO)n reveal a simultaneous improvement in all contributing factors to the thermoelectric figure of merit, giving an order of magnitude enhancement over similar bulk materials at room temperature. This is the first report of enhancement of all three thermoelectric parameters (Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal resistivity) for a nanowire system. Photoelectrochemical water splitting is another exciting renewable energy application that can

  7. Role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of copper nano-wire under tensile load: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsiao, Chun-I.; Hsu, Wen-Dung

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have used atomistic simulations to investigate the role of surface on the size-dependent mechanical properties of nano-wires. In particular, we have performed computational investigation on single crystal face-centered cubic copper nano-wires with diameters ranging from 2 to 20 nm. The wire axis for all the nano-wires are considered along the [0 0 1] direction. Characterization of the initial optimized structures revealed clear differences in interatomic spacing, stress, and potential energy in all the nano-wires. The mechanical properties with respect to wire diameter are evaluated by applying tension along the [0 0 1] direction until yielding. We have discussed the stress-strain relationships, Young's modulus, and the variation in potential energy from surface to the center of the wire for all the cases. Our results indicate that the mechanical response (including yield strain, Young's modulus, and resilience) is directly related to the proportion of surface to bulk type atoms present in each nano-wire. Thus the size-dependent mechanical properties of single crystal copper nano-wire within elastic region are attributed to the surface to volume ratio (surface effect). Using the calculated response, we have formulated a mathematical relationship, which predicts the nonlinear correlation between the mechanical properties and the diameter of the wire.

  8. Core-shell magnetic nanowires fabrication and characterization

    Kalska-Szostko, B., E-mail: kalska@uwb.edu.pl [Institute of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Ciolkowskiego 1K, 15-245 Bialystok (Poland); Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Ciolkowskiego 1L, 15-245 Bialystok, Poland (Poland); Klekotka, U.; Satuła, D. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Bialystok, Ciolkowskiego 1K, 15-245 Bialystok (Poland); Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Ciolkowskiego 1L, 15-245 Bialystok, Poland (Poland)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • New approach for nanowires modification are presented. • Physical and chemical characterization of the nanowires are shown. • Properties modulations as an effect of the surface layer composition are discussed. - Abstract: In this paper, a new way of the preparation of core-shell magnetic nanowires has been proposed. For the modification Fe nanowires were prepared by electrodeposition in anodic aluminium oxide matrixes, in first step. In second, by wetting chemical deposition, shell layers of Ag, Au or Cu were obtained. Resultant core-shell nanowires structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray. Whereas magnetic properties by Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  9. Probe based manipulation and assembly of nanowires into organized mesostructures

    Reynolds, K.; Komulainen, J.; Kivijakola, J.; Lovera, P.; Iacopino, D.; Pudas, M.; Vähäkangas, J.; Röning, J.; Redmond, G.

    2008-12-01

    A convenient approach to patterning inorganic and organic nanowires using a novel probe manipulator is presented. The system utilizes an electrochemically etched tungsten wire probe mounted onto a 3D actuator that is directed by a 3D controller. When it is engaged by the user, the movement of the probe and the forces experienced by the tip are simultaneously reported in real time. Platinum nanowires are manipulated into organized mesostructures on silicon chip substrates. In particular, individual nanowires are systematically removed from aggregates, transferred to a chosen location, and manipulated into complex structures in which selected wires occupy specific positions with defined orientations. Rapid prototyping of complex mesostructures, by pushing, rotating and bending conjugated polymer, i.e., polyfluorene, nanowires into various configurations, is also achieved. By exploiting the strong internal axial alignment of polymer chains within the polyfluorene nanowires, mesostructures tailored to exhibit distinctly anisotropic optical properties, such as birefringence and photoluminescence dichroism, are successfully assembled on fused silica substrates.

  10. Probe based manipulation and assembly of nanowires into organized mesostructures

    Reynolds, K; Lovera, P; Iacopino, D; Redmond, G; Komulainen, J; Pudas, M; Vaehaekangas, J; Kivijakola, J; Roening, J

    2008-01-01

    A convenient approach to patterning inorganic and organic nanowires using a novel probe manipulator is presented. The system utilizes an electrochemically etched tungsten wire probe mounted onto a 3D actuator that is directed by a 3D controller. When it is engaged by the user, the movement of the probe and the forces experienced by the tip are simultaneously reported in real time. Platinum nanowires are manipulated into organized mesostructures on silicon chip substrates. In particular, individual nanowires are systematically removed from aggregates, transferred to a chosen location, and manipulated into complex structures in which selected wires occupy specific positions with defined orientations. Rapid prototyping of complex mesostructures, by pushing, rotating and bending conjugated polymer, i.e., polyfluorene, nanowires into various configurations, is also achieved. By exploiting the strong internal axial alignment of polymer chains within the polyfluorene nanowires, mesostructures tailored to exhibit distinctly anisotropic optical properties, such as birefringence and photoluminescence dichroism, are successfully assembled on fused silica substrates.

  11. Direct electrodeposition of metal nanowires on electrode surface

    Gambirasi, Arianna; Cattarin, Sandro; Musiani, Marco; Vazquez-Gomez, Lourdes; Verlato, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    A method for decorating the surface of disk electrodes with metal nanowires is presented. Cu and Ni nanowires with diameters from 1.0 μm to 0.2 μm are directly deposited on the electrode surface using a polycarbonate membrane filter template maintained in contact with the metal substrate by the soft homogeneous pressure of a sponge soaked with electrolyte. The morphologic and structural properties of the deposit are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The latter shows that the head of nanowires with diameter of 0.4 μm is ordinarily polycrystalline, and that of nanowires with diameter of 0.2 μm is almost always monocrystalline for Cu and frequently also for Ni. Cyclic voltammetries and impedance investigations recorded in alkaline solutions at representative Ni electrodes decorated with nanowires provide consistent values of roughness factor, in the range 20-25.

  12. Electrochemical Deposition of Lanthanum Telluride Thin Films and Nanowires

    Chi, Su (Ike); Farias, Stephen; Cammarata, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Tellurium alloys are characterized by their high performance thermoelectric properties and recent research has shown nanostructured tellurium alloys display even greater performance than bulk equivalents. Increased thermoelectric efficiency of nanostructured materials have led to significant interests in developing thin film and nanowire structures. Here, we report on the first successful electrodeposition of lanthanum telluride thin films and nanowires. The electrodeposition of lanthanum telluride thin films is performed in ionic liquids at room temperature. The synthesis of nanowires involves electrodepositing lanthanum telluride arrays into anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous membranes. These novel procedures can serve as an alternative means of simple, inexpensive and laboratory-environment friendly methods to synthesize nanostructured thermoelectric materials. The thermoelectric properties of thin films and nanowires will be presented to compare to current state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. The morphologies and chemical compositions of the deposited films and nanowires are characterized using SEM and EDAX analysis.

  13. Nanoconstruction by welding individual metallic nanowires together using nanoscale solder

    Peng, Y; Inkson, B J; Cullis, A G

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a new bottom-up nanowelding technique enabling building blocks to be assembled and welded together into complex 3D nanostructures using nanovolumes of metal solder. The building blocks of gold nanowires, (Co 72 Pt 28 /Pt) n multilayer nanowires, and nanosolder Sn 99 Au 1 alloy nanowires were successfully fabricated by a template technique. Individual metallic nanowires were picked up and assembled together. Conductive nanocircuits were then welded together using similar or dissimilar nanosolder material. At the weld sites, nanoscale volumes of a chosen metal are deposited using nanosolder of a sacrificial nanowire, which ensures that the nanoobjects to be bonded retain their structural integrity. The whole nanowelding process is clean, controllable and reliable, and ensures both mechanically strong and electrically conductive contacts.

  14. Rare earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces

    Wanke, Martina

    2008-11-10

    The growth, structure and electronic properties of rare earth silicide nanowires are investigated on planar and vicinal Si(001) und Si(111) surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). On all surfaces investigated within this work hexagonal disilicides are grown epitaxially with a lattice mismatch of -2.55% up to +0.83% along the hexagonal a-axis. Along the hexagonal c-axis the lattice mismatch is essentially larger with 6.5%. On the Si(001)2 x 1 surface two types of nanowires are grown epitaxially. The socalled broad wires show a one-dimensional metallic valence band structure with states crossing the Fermi level. Along the nanowires two strongly dispersing states at the anti J point and a strongly dispersing state at the anti {gamma} point can be observed. Along the thin nanowires dispersing states could not be observed. Merely in the direction perpendicular to the wires an intensity variation could be observed, which corresponds to the observed spacial structure of the thin nanowires. The electronic properties of the broad erbium silicide nanowires are very similar to the broad dysprosium silicide nanowires. The electronic properties of the DySi{sub 2}-monolayer and the Dy{sub 3}Si{sub 5}-multilayer on the Si(111) surface are investigated in comparison to the known ErSi{sub 2}/Si(111) and Er{sub 3}Si{sub 5}/Si(111) system. The positions and the energetic locations of the observed band in the surface Brillouin zone will be confirmed for dysprosium. The shape of the electron pockets in the (vector)k {sub parallel} space is elliptical at the anti M points, while the hole pocket at the anti {gamma} point is showing a hexagonal symmetry. On the Si(557) surface the structural and electronic properties depend strongly on the different preparation conditions likewise, in particular on the rare earth coverage. At submonolayer coverage the thin nanowires grow in wide areas

  15. Methods of fabricating nanostructures and nanowires and devices fabricated therefrom

    Majumdar, Arun; Shakouri, Ali; Sands, Timothy D.; Yang, Peidong; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.; Feick, Henning; Weber, Eicke R.; Kind, Hannes; Huang, Michael; Yan, Haoquan; Wu, Yiying; Fan, Rong

    2018-01-30

    One-dimensional nanostructures having uniform diameters of less than approximately 200 nm. These inventive nanostructures, which we refer to as "nanowires", include single-crystalline homostructures as well as heterostructures of at least two single-crystalline materials having different chemical compositions. Because single-crystalline materials are used to form the heterostructure, the resultant heterostructure will be single-crystalline as well. The nanowire heterostructures are generally based on a semiconducting wire wherein the doping and composition are controlled in either the longitudinal or radial directions, or in both directions, to yield a wire that comprises different materials. Examples of resulting nanowire heterostructures include a longitudinal heterostructure nanowire (LOHN) and a coaxial heterostructure nanowire (COHN).

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of CdS/CdSxSe1-x Nanowires

    Agueda Lopez, Kleyser; Wu, Marvin

    Semiconductor nanowire heterostructures are of interest for potential applications in solar cells and other advanced optoelectronic devices. We report here on synthesis of CdS/CdSxSe1-x nanowires (NWs) using a dual source vapor = liquid - solid technique, and characterization of these NWs with scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. We determine the effect of growth parameters, including source / substrate temperatures and time of exposure, on NW size, shape, and composition. The crystal structure and optical properties individual NWs from selected substrates has been mapped using transmission Kikuchi diffraction and photoluminescence (PL) microscopy. NWs consistently exhibit a hexagonal structure, with growth along the c-axis. Strong PL peaks are observed between the expected bandgap emission from CdS and CdSe, confirming formation of CdSxSe1-x. PL peaks vary significantly with intensity along the long axis of the nanowire, suggesting that the NW surface is not uniformly passivated. These nanowires show promise for future investigation and manipulation of energy band gaps contain in CdS/CdSe. CREST.

  17. Localized synthesis, assembly and integration of silicon nanowires

    Englander, Ongi

    Localized synthesis, assembly and integration of one-dimensional silicon nanowires with MEMS structures is demonstrated and characterized in terms of local synthesis processes, electric-field assisted self-assembly, and a proof-of-concept nanoelectromechanical system (HEMS) demonstration. Emphasis is placed on the ease of integration, process control strategies, characterization techniques and the pursuit of integrated devices. A top-down followed by a bottom-up integration approach is utilized. Simple MEMS heater structures are utilized as the microscale platforms for the localized, bottom-up synthesis of one-dimensional nanostructures. Localized heating confines the high temperature region permitting only localized nanostructure synthesis and allowing the surroundings to remain at room temperature thus enabling CMOS compatible post-processing. The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process in the presence of a catalytic nanoparticle, a vapor phase reactant, and a specific temperature environment is successfully employed locally. Experimentally, a 5nm thick gold-palladium layer is used as the catalyst while silane is the vapor phase reactant. The current-voltage behavior of the MEMS structures can be correlated to the approximate temperature range required for the VLS reaction to take place. Silicon nanowires averaging 45nm in diameter and up to 29mum in length synthesized at growth rates of up to 1.5mum/min result. By placing two MEMS structures in close proximity, 4--10mum apart, localized silicon nanowire growth can be used to link together MEMS structures to yield a two-terminal, self-assembled micro-to-nano system. Here, one MEMS structure is designated as the hot growth structure while a nearby structure is designated as the cold secondary structure, whose role is to provide a natural stopping point for the VLS reaction. The application of a localized electric-field, 5 to 13V/mum in strength, during the synthesis process, has been shown to improve nanowire

  18. Health Promotion Behavior of Chinese International Students in Korea Including Acculturation Factors: A Structural Equation Model.

    Kim, Sun Jung; Yoo, Il Young

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explain the health promotion behavior of Chinese international students in Korea using a structural equation model including acculturation factors. A survey using self-administered questionnaires was employed. Data were collected from 272 Chinese students who have resided in Korea for longer than 6 months. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The p value of final model is .31. The fitness parameters of the final model such as goodness of fit index, adjusted goodness of fit index, normed fit index, non-normed fit index, and comparative fit index were more than .95. Root mean square of residual and root mean square error of approximation also met the criteria. Self-esteem, perceived health status, acculturative stress and acculturation level had direct effects on health promotion behavior of the participants and the model explained 30.0% of variance. The Chinese students in Korea with higher self-esteem, perceived health status, acculturation level, and lower acculturative stress reported higher health promotion behavior. The findings can be applied to develop health promotion strategies for this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Fluid-structure interaction including volumetric coupling with homogenised subdomains for modeling respiratory mechanics.

    Yoshihara, Lena; Roth, Christian J; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2017-04-01

    In this article, a novel approach is presented for combining standard fluid-structure interaction with additional volumetric constraints to model fluid flow into and from homogenised solid domains. The proposed algorithm is particularly interesting for investigations in the field of respiratory mechanics as it enables the mutual coupling of airflow in the conducting part and local tissue deformation in the respiratory part of the lung by means of a volume constraint. In combination with a classical monolithic fluid-structure interaction approach, a comprehensive model of the human lung can be established that will be useful to gain new insights into respiratory mechanics in health and disease. To illustrate the validity and versatility of the novel approach, three numerical examples including a patient-specific lung model are presented. The proposed algorithm proves its capability of computing clinically relevant airflow distribution and tissue strain data at a level of detail that is not yet achievable, neither with current imaging techniques nor with existing computational models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Impact simulation of liquid-filled containers including fluid-structure interaction--Part 1: Theory

    Sauve, R.G.; Morandin, G.D.; Nadeau, E.

    1993-01-01

    In a number of applications, the hydrodynamic effect of a fluid must be included in the structural evaluation of liquid-filled vessels undergoing transient loading. Prime examples are liquid radioactive waste transportation packages. These packages must demonstrate the ability to withstand severe accidental impact scenarios. A hydrodynamic model of the fluid is developed using a finite element discretization of the momentum equations for a three-dimensional continuum. An inviscid fluid model with an isotropic stress state is considered. A barotropic equation of state, relating volumetric strain to pressure, is used to characterize the fluid behavior. The formulation considers the continuum as a compressible medium only, so that no tension fields are permitted. The numerical technique is incorporated into the existing general-purpose three-dimensional structural computer code H3DMAP. Part 1 of the paper describes the theory and implementation along with comparisons with classical theory. Part 2 describes the experimental validations of the theoretical approach. Excellent correlation between predicted and experimental results is obtained

  1. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    Garnett, Erik C.; Peters, Craig; Brongersma, Mark; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  2. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  3. Synthesis, structure, and luminescence properties of In{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 7}/SnO{sub 2} core-shell nanowires

    Park, Sunghoon; An, Soyeon; Jin, Changhyun; Lee, Chongmu [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    In{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 7}/SnO{sub 2} core-shell nanowires were synthesized by using a two-step process: thermal evaporation of a mixture of In and Ge powders and atomic layer deposition of SnO{sub 2}. The core-shell nanowires were characterized using by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The In{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 7} cores in these core-shell nanowires varied from 50 to 100 nanometers in diameter and up to a few hundreds of micrometers in length, and the SnO{sub 2} shell layer thickness ranged from 5 to 15 nm. Photoluminescence measurements showed that the In{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 7} nanowires had a weak broad violet emission band centered at approximately 405 nm. In contrast, the In{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 7}/SnO{sub 2} core-shell nanowires had a taller blue-violet emission peak at approximately 440 nm. The optimum shell layer thickness of the In{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 7}/SnO{sub 2} core-shell nanowires for the highest PL intensity was found to be 15 nm. Our results also showed that the intensity of the blue-violet emission was increased further by thermal annealing in an Ar atmosphere. The origins of the change on and the enhancement of the luminescence of the In{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 7} nanowires by SnO{sub 2} coating and annealing are discussed.

  4. GaN Nanowires Synthesized by Electroless Etching Method

    Najar, Adel; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Ben Slimane, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-long Gallium Nitride Nanowires is synthesized via metal-electroless etching method. The morphologies and optical properties of GaN NWs show a single crystal GaN with hexagonal Wurtzite structure and high luminescence properties.

  5. Silicon nanowires for photovoltaic solar energy conversion.

    Peng, Kui-Qing; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2011-01-11

    Semiconductor nanowires are attracting intense interest as a promising material for solar energy conversion for the new-generation photovoltaic (PV) technology. In particular, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are under active investigation for PV applications because they offer novel approaches for solar-to-electric energy conversion leading to high-efficiency devices via simple manufacturing. This article reviews the recent developments in the utilization of SiNWs for PV applications, the relationship between SiNW-based PV device structure and performance, and the challenges to obtaining high-performance cost-effective solar cells.

  6. Enhanced magnetotransport in nanopatterned manganite nanowires.

    Marín, Lorena; Morellón, Luis; Algarabel, Pedro A; Rodríguez, Luis A; Magén, César; De Teresa, José M; Ibarra, Manuel R

    2014-02-12

    We have combined optical and focused ion beam lithographies to produce large aspect-ratio (length-to-width >300) single-crystal nanowires of La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 that preserve their functional properties. Remarkably, an enhanced magnetoresistance value of 34% in an applied magnetic field of 0.1 T in the narrowest 150 nm nanowire is obtained. The strain release at the edges together with a destabilization of the insulating regions is proposed to account for this behavior. This opens new strategies to implement these structures in functional spintronic devices.

  7. Investigation of CuInSe{sub 2} nanowire arrays with core–shell structure electrodeposited at various duty cycles into anodic alumina templates

    Cheng, Yu-Song [Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Wang, Na-Fu; Tsai, Yu-Zen [Department of Electronic Engineering, Cheng Shiu University, 840 Chengcing Rd., Niaosong District, Kaohsiung City 833, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jia-Jun [Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Houng, Mau-Phon, E-mail: mphoung@eembox.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The present paper reports that CuInSe2 NW arrays were fabricated through pulsed electrode position onto an AAO template with various duty cycles, and a pore-filling ratio of approximately 92% was achieved. • GIXRD patterns showed that all CuInSe2 NW arrays were chalcopyrite and SAED images confirmed that the CuInSe2 NWs were polycrystalline. • PEDOT/CuInSe2 NW core–shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe2 NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. • Current–voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe2 NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core–shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63. - Abstract: Copper indium selenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) nanowire (NW) arrays were prepared at various electrolyte duty cycles by filling anodic alumina templates through the pulsed electrodeposition technique. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the nucleation mechanism of CuInSe{sub 2} NW arrays was affected by the electrodeposition duty cycle. Moreover, SEM images showed that the diameter and length of the NWs were 80 nm and 2 μm, respectively. Furthermore, PEDOT/CuInSe{sub 2} NW core–shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe{sub 2} NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that a core–shell structure was achieved. Current–voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe{sub 2} NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core–shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63.

  8. Investigation of CuInSe2 nanowire arrays with core–shell structure electrodeposited at various duty cycles into anodic alumina templates

    Cheng, Yu-Song; Wang, Na-Fu; Tsai, Yu-Zen; Lin, Jia-Jun; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The present paper reports that CuInSe2 NW arrays were fabricated through pulsed electrode position onto an AAO template with various duty cycles, and a pore-filling ratio of approximately 92% was achieved. • GIXRD patterns showed that all CuInSe2 NW arrays were chalcopyrite and SAED images confirmed that the CuInSe2 NWs were polycrystalline. • PEDOT/CuInSe2 NW core–shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe2 NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. • Current–voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe2 NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core–shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63. - Abstract: Copper indium selenide (CuInSe 2 ) nanowire (NW) arrays were prepared at various electrolyte duty cycles by filling anodic alumina templates through the pulsed electrodeposition technique. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the nucleation mechanism of CuInSe 2 NW arrays was affected by the electrodeposition duty cycle. Moreover, SEM images showed that the diameter and length of the NWs were 80 nm and 2 μm, respectively. Furthermore, PEDOT/CuInSe 2 NW core–shell arrays were fabricated using surfactant-modified CuInSe 2 NW surfaces showing the lotus effect. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that a core–shell structure was achieved. Current–voltage plots revealed that the CuInSe 2 NW arrays were p-type semiconductors; moreover, the core–shell structure improved the diode ideality factor from 3.91 to 2.63.

  9. Quantum transport in nanowire-based hybrid devices

    Guenel, Haci Yusuf

    2013-05-08

    We have studied the low-temperature transport properties of nanowires contacted by a normal metal as well as by superconducting electrodes. As a consequence of quantum coherence, we have demonstrated the electron interference effect in different aspects. The mesoscopic phase coherent transport properties were studied by contacting the semiconductor InAs and InSb nanowires with normal metal electrodes. Moreover, we explored the interaction of the microscopic quantum coherence of the nanowires with the macroscopic quantum coherence of the superconductors. In superconducting Nb contacted InAs nanowire junctions, we have investigated the effect of temperature, magnetic field and electric field on the supercurrent. Owing to relatively high critical temperature of superconducting Nb (T{sub c} ∝ 9 K), we have observed the supercurrent up to 4 K for highly doped nanowire-based junctions, while for low doped nanowire-based junctions a full control of the supercurrent was achieved. Due to low transversal dimension of the nanowires, we have found a monotonous decay of the critical current in magnetic field dependent measurements. The experimental results were analyzed within narrow junction model which has been developed recently. At high bias voltages, we have observed subharmonic energy gap structures as a consequence of multiple Andreev reflection. Some of the nanowires were etched, such that the superconducting Nb electrodes are connected to both ends of the nanowire rather than covering the surface of the nanowire. As a result of well defined nanowire-superconductor interfaces, we have examined quasiparticle interference effect in magnetotransport measurements. Furthermore, we have developed a new junction geometry, such that one of the superconducting Nb electrodes is replaced by a superconducting Al. Owing to the smaller critical magnetic field of superconducting Al (B{sub c} ∝ 15-50,mT), compared to superconducting Nb (B{sub c} ∝ 3 T), we were able to studied

  10. Study of spin dynamics and damping on the magnetic nanowire arrays with various nanowire widths

    Cho, Jaehun [Department of Physics, Inha University, Incheon, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, Yuya; Konioshi, Katsunori [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Yoon, Jungbum [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Kim, Nam-Hui; Jung, Jinyong [Department of Physics, Inha University, Incheon, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Miwa, Shinji [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Jung, Myung-Hwa [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Suzuki, Yoshishige [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); You, Chun-Yeol, E-mail: cyyou@inha.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Inha University, Incheon, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the spin dynamics including Gilbert damping in the ferromagnetic nanowire arrays. We have measured the ferromagnetic resonance of ferromagnetic nanowire arrays using vector-network analyzer ferromagnetic resonance (VNA-FMR) and analyzed the results with the micromagnetic simulations. We find excellent agreement between the experimental VNA-FMR spectra and micromagnetic simulations result for various applied magnetic fields. We find that the same tendency of the demagnetization factor for longitudinal and transverse conditions, N{sub z} (N{sub y}) increases (decreases) as increasing the nanowire width in the micromagnetic simulations while N{sub x} is almost zero value in transverse case. We also find that the Gilbert damping constant increases from 0.018 to 0.051 as the increasing nanowire width for the transverse case, while it is almost constant as 0.021 for the longitudinal case. - Highlights: • We investigate the spin dynamic properties in the ferromagnetic nanowire arrays. • The demagnetization factors have similar tendency with the prism geometry results. • The Gilbert damping constant is increased from 0.018 to 0.051 as the increasing nanowire width for the transverse. • The Gilbert damping constant is almost constant as 0.021 for the longitudinal case.

  11. UV irradiation assisted growth of ZnO nanowires on optical fiber surface

    Gong, Bo; Shi, Tielin; Liao, Guanglan; Li, Xiaoping; Huang, Jie; Zhou, Temgyuan; Tang, Zirong, E-mail: zirong@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • A new fabrication process combined a hydrothermal process with UV irradiation from optical fiber is developed. • The growth of ZnO nanowires is efficient in the utilization of UV light. • A novel hybrid structure which integrates ZnO nanowires on optical fiber surface is synthesized. • The UV assisted growth of ZnO nanowires shows preferred orientation and better quality. • A mechanism of growing ZnO nanowires under UV irradiation is proposed. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel approach was developed for the enhanced growth of ZnO nanowires on optical fiber surface. The method combined a hydrothermal process with the efficient UV irradiation from the fiber core, and the effects of UV irradiation on the growth behavior of ZnO nanowires were investigated. The results show that UV irradiation had great effects on the preferred growth orientation and the quality of the ZnO nanowires. The crystallization velocity along the c-axis would increase rapidly with the increase of the irradiation power, while the growth process in the lateral direction was marginally affected by the irradiation. The structure of ZnO nanowires also shows less oxygen vacancy with UV irradiation of higher power. The developed approach is applicable for the efficient growth of nanowires on the fiber surface, and the ZnO nanowires/optical fiber hybrid structures have great potentials for a wide variety of applications such as optical fiber sensors and probes.

  12. Magnetic Behavior of Ni-Fe Core-Shell and Alloy Nanowires

    Tripathy, Jagnyaseni; Vargas, Jose; Spinu, Leonard; Wiley, John

    2013-03-01

    Template assisted synthesis was used to fabricate a series of Ni-Fe core-shell and alloy nanowires. By controlling reaction conditions as well as pore structure, both systems could be targeted and magnetic properties followed as a function of architectures. In the core-shell structure coercivity increases with decrease in shell thickness while for the alloys, coercivity squareness improve with increase pore diameter. Details on the systematic studies of these materials will be presented in terms of hysteretic measurements, including first order reversal curves (FORC), and FMR data. Magnetic variation as a function of structure and nanowire aspect ratios will be presented and the origins of these behaviors discussed. Advanced Material Research Institute

  13. Growth Mechanism of Nanowires: Ternary Chalcogenides

    Singh, N. B.; Coriell, S. R.; Hopkins, R. H.; Su, Ching Hua; Arnold, B.; Choa, Fow-Sen; Cullum, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the past two decades there has been a large rise in the investment and expectations for nanotechnology use. Almost every area of research has projected improvements in sensors, or even a promise for the emergence of some novel device technologies. For these applications major focuses of research are in the areas of nanoparticles and graphene. Although there are some near term applications with nanowires in photodetectors and other low light detectors, there are few papers on the growth mechanism and fabrication of nanowire-based devices. Semiconductor nanowires exhibit very favorable and promising optical properties, including high transparency and a several order of magnitude better photocurrent than thin film and bulk materials. We present here an overview of the mechanism of nanowire growth from the melt, and some preliminary results for the thallium arsenic selenide material system. Thallium arsenic selenide (TAS) is a multifunctional material combining excellent acousto-optical, nonlinear and radiation detection properties. We observed that small units of (TAS) nanocubes arrange and rearrange at moderate melt undercooling to form the building block of a nanowire. In some cases very long wires (less than mm) are formed. Since we avoided the catalyst, we observed self-nucleation and uncontrolled growth of wires from different places.

  14. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Unknown

    junction nanotubes by the pyrolysis of appropriate organic precursors. ... By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal ..... The use of activated carbon in place of ..... required for the complete removal of the carbon template.

  15. A structural design and analysis of a piping system including seismic load

    Hsieh, B.J.; Kot, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    The structural design/analysis of a piping system at a nuclear fuel facility is used to investigate some aspects of current design procedures. Specifically the effect of using various stress measures including ASME Boiler ampersand Pressure Vessel (B ampersand PV) Code formulas is evaluated. It is found that large differences in local maximum stress values may be calculated depending on the stress criterion used. However, when the global stress maximum for the entire system are compared the differences are much smaller, being nevertheless, for some load combinations, of the order of 50 percent. The effect of using an Equivalent Static Method (ESM) analysis is also evaluated by comparing its results with those obtained from a Response Spectrum Method (RSM) analysis with the modal responses combined by using the absolute summation (ABS), by using the square root of the squares (SRSS), and by using the 10 percent method (10PC). It is shown that for a spectrum amplification factor (equivalent static coefficient greater than unity) of at least 1.32 must be used in the current application of the ESM analysis in order to obtain results which are conservative in all aspects relative to an RSM analysis based on ABS. However, it appears that an adequate design would be obtained from the ESM approach even without the use of a spectrum amplification factor. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Large-scale fabrication of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays

    Wang, Zhong L; Das, Suman; Xu, Sheng; Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui; Wei, Yaguang; Wu, Wenzhuo

    2013-02-05

    In a method for growing a nanowire array, a photoresist layer is placed onto a nanowire growth layer configured for growing nanowires therefrom. The photoresist layer is exposed to a coherent light interference pattern that includes periodically alternately spaced dark bands and light bands along a first orientation. The photoresist layer exposed to the coherent light interference pattern along a second orientation, transverse to the first orientation. The photoresist layer developed so as to remove photoresist from areas corresponding to areas of intersection of the dark bands of the interference pattern along the first orientation and the dark bands of the interference pattern along the second orientation, thereby leaving an ordered array of holes passing through the photoresist layer. The photoresist layer and the nanowire growth layer are placed into a nanowire growth environment, thereby growing nanowires from the nanowire growth layer through the array of holes.

  17. Simple vibration modeling of structural fuzzy with continuous boundary by including two-dimensional spatial memory

    Friis, Lars; Ohlrich, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    Many complicated systems of practical interest consist basically of a well-defined outer shell-like master structure and a complicated internal structure with uncertain dynamic properties. Using the "fuzzy structure theory" for predicting audible frequency vibration, the internal structure......-dimensional continuous boundary. Additionally, a simple method for determining the so-called equivalent coupling factor is presented. The validity of this method is demonstrated by numerical simulations of the vibration response of a master plate structure with fuzzy attachments. It is revealed that the method performs...

  18. Synthesis and properties of silicon nanowire devices

    Byon, Kumhyo

    Silicon nanowire (SiNW) is a very attractive one-dimensional material for future nanoelectronic applications. Reliable control of key field effect transistor (FET) parameters such as conductance, mobility, threshold voltage and on/off ratio is crucial to the applications of SiNW to working logic devices and integrated circuits. In this thesis, we fabricated silicon nanowire field effect transistors (SiNW FETs) and studied the dependence of their electrical transport properties upon various parameters including SiNW growth conditions, post-growth doping, and contact annealing. From these studies, we found how different processes control important FET characteristics. Key accomplishments of this thesis include p-channel enhancement mode FETs, n-channel FETs by post-growth vapor doping and high performance ambipolar devices. In the first part of this work, single crystalline SiNWs were synthesized by thermal evaporation without gold catalysts. FETs were fabricated using both as-grown SiNWs and post-growth n-doped SiNWs. FET from p-type source materials behaves as a p-channel enhancement mode FET which is predominant in logic devices due to its fast operation and low power consumption. Using bismuth vapor, the as-grown SiNWs were doped into n-type materials. The majority carriers in SiNWs can therefore be controlled by proper choice of the vapor phase dopant species. Post-growth doping using vapor phase is applicable to other nanowire systems. In the second part, high performance ambipolar FETs were fabricated. A two step annealing process was used to control the Schottky barrier between SiNW and metal contacts in order to enhance device performance. Initial p-channel SiNW FETs were converted into ambipolar SiNW FETs after contact annealing. Furthermore, significant increases in both on/off ratio and channel mobilities were achieved after contact annealing. Promising device structures to implement ambipolar devices into large scale integrated circuits were proposed

  19. Variation in electrical properties of gamma irradiated cadmium selenate nanowires

    Chauhan, R. P.; Rana, Pallavi; Narula, Chetna; Panchal, Suresh; Choudhary, Ritika

    2016-07-01

    Preparation of low-dimensional materials attracts more and more interest in the last few years, mainly due to the wide field of potential commercial applications ranging from life sciences, medicine and biotechnology to communication and electronics. One-dimensional systems are the smallest dimension structures that can be used for efficient transport of electrons and thus expected to be critical to the function and integration of nanoscale devices. Nanowires with well controlled morphology and extremely high aspect ratio can be obtained by replicating a nanoporous polymer ion-track membrane with cylindrical pores of controlled dimensions. With this technique, materials can be deposited within the pores of the membrane by electrochemical reduction of the desired ion. In the present study, cadmium selenate nanowires were synthesized potentiostatically via template method. These synthesized nanowires were then exposed to gamma rays by using a 60Co source at the Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. Structural, morphological, electrical and elemental characterizations were made in order to analyze the effect of gamma irradiation on the synthesized nanowires. I-V measurements of cadmium selenate nanowires, before and after irradiation were made with the help of Keithley 2400 source meter and Ecopia probe station. A significant change in the electrical conductivity of cadmium selenate nanowires was found after gamma irradiation. The crystallography of the synthesized nanowires was also studied using a Rigaku X-ray diffractrometer equipped with Cu-Kα radiation. XRD patterns of irradiated samples showed no variation in the peak positions or phase change.

  20. Variation in electrical properties of gamma irradiated cadmium selenate nanowires

    Chauhan, R.P., E-mail: chauhanrpc@gmail.com; Rana, Pallavi, E-mail: prana.phy@gmail.com; Narula, Chetna; Panchal, Suresh; Choudhary, Ritika

    2016-07-15

    Preparation of low-dimensional materials attracts more and more interest in the last few years, mainly due to the wide field of potential commercial applications ranging from life sciences, medicine and biotechnology to communication and electronics. One-dimensional systems are the smallest dimension structures that can be used for efficient transport of electrons and thus expected to be critical to the function and integration of nanoscale devices. Nanowires with well controlled morphology and extremely high aspect ratio can be obtained by replicating a nanoporous polymer ion-track membrane with cylindrical pores of controlled dimensions. With this technique, materials can be deposited within the pores of the membrane by electrochemical reduction of the desired ion. In the present study, cadmium selenate nanowires were synthesized potentiostatically via template method. These synthesized nanowires were then exposed to gamma rays by using a {sup 60}Co source at the Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. Structural, morphological, electrical and elemental characterizations were made in order to analyze the effect of gamma irradiation on the synthesized nanowires. I–V measurements of cadmium selenate nanowires, before and after irradiation were made with the help of Keithley 2400 source meter and Ecopia probe station. A significant change in the electrical conductivity of cadmium selenate nanowires was found after gamma irradiation. The crystallography of the synthesized nanowires was also studied using a Rigaku X-ray diffractrometer equipped with Cu-Kα radiation. XRD patterns of irradiated samples showed no variation in the peak positions or phase change.

  1. Biofunctionalized Magnetic Nanowires

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-12-19

    Magnetic nanowires can be used as an alternative method overcoming the limitations of current cancer treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Nanowires are developed so that they selectively attach to cancer cells via antibodies, potentially destroying them when a magnetic field induces their vibration. This will transmit a mechanical force to the targeted cells, which is expected to induce apoptosis on the cancer cells.

  2. Biofunctionalized Magnetic Nanowires

    Kosel, Jü rgen; Ravasi, Timothy; Contreras Gerenas, Maria Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanowires can be used as an alternative method overcoming the limitations of current cancer treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Nanowires are developed so that they selectively attach to cancer cells via antibodies, potentially destroying them when a magnetic field induces their vibration. This will transmit a mechanical force to the targeted cells, which is expected to induce apoptosis on the cancer cells.

  3. Selective etching of n-type silicon in pn junction structure in hydrofluoric acid and its application in silicon nanowire fabrication

    Wang Huiquan; Jin Zhonghe; Zheng Yangming; Ma Huilian; Wang Yuelin; Li Tie

    2008-01-01

    Boron is selectively implanted on the surface of an n-type silicon wafer to form a p-type area surrounded by an n-type area. The wafer is then put into a buffered oxide etch solution. It is found that the n-type area can be selectively etched without illumination, with an etching rate lower than 1 nm min -1 , while the p-type area can be selectively etched under illumination with a much higher etching rate. The possible mechanism of the etching phenomenon is discussed. A simple fabrication process of silicon nanowires is proposed according to the above phenomenon. In this process only traditional micro-electromechanical system technology is used. Dimensions of the fabricated nanowire can be controlled well. A 50 nm wide and 50 nm thick silicon nanowire has been formed using this method

  4. Including RNA secondary structures improves accuracy and robustness in reconstruction of phylogenetic trees.

    Keller, Alexander; Förster, Frank; Müller, Tobias; Dandekar, Thomas; Schultz, Jörg; Wolf, Matthias

    2010-01-15

    In several studies, secondary structures of ribosomal genes have been used to improve the quality of phylogenetic reconstructions. An extensive evaluation of the benefits of secondary structure, however, is lacking. This is the first study to counter this deficiency. We inspected the accuracy and robustness of phylogenetics with individual secondary structures by simulation experiments for artificial tree topologies with up to 18 taxa and for divergency levels in the range of typical phylogenetic studies. We chose the internal transcribed spacer 2 of the ribosomal cistron as an exemplary marker region. Simulation integrated the coevolution process of sequences with secondary structures. Additionally, the phylogenetic power of marker size duplication was investigated and compared with sequence and sequence-structure reconstruction methods. The results clearly show that accuracy and robustness of Neighbor Joining trees are largely improved by structural information in contrast to sequence only data, whereas a doubled marker size only accounts for robustness. Individual secondary structures of ribosomal RNA sequences provide a valuable gain of information content that is useful for phylogenetics. Thus, the usage of ITS2 sequence together with secondary structure for taxonomic inferences is recommended. Other reconstruction methods as maximum likelihood, bayesian inference or maximum parsimony may equally profit from secondary structure inclusion. This article was reviewed by Shamil Sunyaev, Andrea Tanzer (nominated by Frank Eisenhaber) and Eugene V. Koonin. Reviewed by Shamil Sunyaev, Andrea Tanzer (nominated by Frank Eisenhaber) and Eugene V. Koonin. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  5. Thermoelectric material including a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure

    Yang, Jihui [Lakeshore, CA; Shi, Xun [Troy, MI; Bai, Shengqiang [Shanghai, CN; Zhang, Wenqing [Shanghai, CN; Chen, Lidong [Shanghai, CN; Yang, Jiong [Shanghai, CN

    2012-01-17

    A thermoelectric material includes a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure having the formula A.sub.8TM.sub.y.sub.1.sup.1TM.sub.y.sub.2.sup.2 . . . TM.sub.y.sub.n.sup.nM.sub.zX.sub.46-y.sub.1.sub.-y.sub.2.sub.- . . . -y.sub.n.sub.-z. In the formula, A is selected from the group consisting of barium, strontium, and europium; X is selected from the group consisting of silicon, germanium, and tin; M is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, and indium; TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, and TM.sup.n are independently selected from the group consisting of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals; and y.sub.1, y.sub.2, y.sub.n and Z are actual compositions of TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, TM.sup.n, and M, respectively. The actual compositions are based upon nominal compositions derived from the following equation: z=8q.sub.A-|.DELTA.q.sub.1|y.sub.1-|.DELTA.q.sub.2|y.sub.2- . . . -|.DELTA.q.sub.n|y.sub.n, wherein q.sub.A is a charge state of A, and wherein .DELTA.q.sub.1, .DELTA.q.sub.2, .DELTA.q.sub.n are, respectively, the nominal charge state of the first, second, and n-th TM.

  6. Broadband absorption of semiconductor nanowire arrays for photovoltaic applications

    Huang, Ningfeng; Lin, Chenxi; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2012-01-01

    We use electromagnetic simulations to carry out a systematic study of broadband absorption in vertically-aligned semiconductor nanowire arrays for photovoltaic applications. We study six semiconductor materials that are commonly used for solar cells. We optimize the structural parameters of each nanowire array to maximize the ultimate efficiency. We plot the maximal ultimate efficiency as a function of height to determine how it approaches the perfect-absorption limit. We further show that the ultimate efficiencies of optimized nanowire arrays exceed those of equal-height thin films for all six materials and over a wide range of heights from 100 nm to 100 µm

  7. Plasmon-polariton modes of dense Au nanowire arrays

    Yan, Hongdan; Lemmens, Peter; Wulferding, Dirk; Cetin, Mehmet Fatih [IPKM, TU-BS, Braunschweig (Germany); Tornow, Sabine; Zwicknagl, Gertrud [IMP, TU-BS, Braunschweig (Germany); Krieg, Ulrich; Pfnuer, Herbert [IFP, LU Hannover (Germany); Daum, Winfried; Lilienkamp, Gerhard [IEPT, TU Clausthal (Germany); Schilling, Meinhard [EMG, TU-BS, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Using optical absorption and other techniques we study plasmon-polariton modes of dense Au nanowire arrays as function of geometrical parameters and coupling to molecular degrees of freedom. For this instance we electrochemically deposit Au nanowires in porous alumina with well controlled morphology and defect concentration. Transverse and longitudinal modes are observed in the absorption spectra resulting from the anisotropic plasmonic structure. The longitudinal mode shows a blue shift of energy with increasing length of the wires due to the more collective nature of this response. We compare our observations with model calculations and corresponding results on 2D Ag nanowire lattices.

  8. Looking into meta-atoms of plasmonic nanowire metamaterial

    Tsai, Kuntong

    2014-09-10

    Nanowire-based plasmonic metamaterials exhibit many intriguing properties related to the hyperbolic dispersion, negative refraction, epsilon-near-zero behavior, strong Purcell effect, and nonlinearities. We have experimentally and numerically studied the electromagnetic modes of individual nanowires (meta-atoms) forming the metamaterial. High-resolution, scattering-type near-field optical microscopy has been used to visualize the intensity and phase of the modes. Numerical and analytical modeling of the mode structure is in agreement with the experimental observations and indicates the presence of the nonlocal response associated with cylindrical surface plasmons of nanowires.

  9. Poly(1-(2-carboxyethyl)pyrrole)/polypyrrole composite nanowires for glucose biosensor

    Jiang Hairong; Zhang Aifeng; Sun Yanan; Ru Xiaoning; Ge Dongtao; Shi Wei

    2012-01-01

    A novel glucose biosensor based on poly(1-(2-carboxyethyl)pyrrole) (PPyCOOH)/polypyrrole (PPy) composite nanowires was developed by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD) on the nanowires via covalent linkages. The PPyCOOH/PPy composite nanowires were fabricated by a facile two-step electrochemical synthesis route. First, PPy nanowires were synthesized in phosphate buffer solution using organic sulfonic acid, p-toluenesulfonate acid, as soft-template. Then, PPyCOOH/PPy composite nanowires were obtained by polymerizing 1-(2-carboxyethyl)pyrrole onto PPy nanowires via electrochemical method. Scanning electron microscopic, FT-IR spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and cyclic voltammograms were used to characterize the structural and electrical behaviors of the composite nanowires. The PPyCOOH/PPy composite nanowires exhibited uniform diameter, high reactive site (-COOH), large specific surface, excellent electroactivity and good adhesion to electrode. The glucose biosensor was constructed by covalently coupling GOD to the composite nanowires. The biosensor response was rapid (5 s), highly sensitive (33.6 μA mM −1 cm −2 ) with a wide linear range (up to 10.0 mM) and low detection limit (0.63 μM); it also exhibited high stability and specificity to glucose. The attractive electrochemical and structural properties of PPyCOOH/PPy composite nanowires suggested potential application for electrocatalysis and biosensor.

  10. Voice, Post-Structural Representation and the Subjectivity of "Included" Students

    Whitburn, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Aligned with the broader movement from structuralism to the post-structuralisms [Lather, P. 2013. "Methodology-21: What Do We Do in the Afterward?" "International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education" 26 (6): 634-645; St. Pierre, E. A. 2009. "Afterword: Decentering Voice in Qualitative Inquiry." In "Voice…

  11. Including RNA secondary structures improves accuracy and robustness in reconstruction of phylogenetic trees

    Dandekar Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In several studies, secondary structures of ribosomal genes have been used to improve the quality of phylogenetic reconstructions. An extensive evaluation of the benefits of secondary structure, however, is lacking. Results This is the first study to counter this deficiency. We inspected the accuracy and robustness of phylogenetics with individual secondary structures by simulation experiments for artificial tree topologies with up to 18 taxa and for divergency levels in the range of typical phylogenetic studies. We chose the internal transcribed spacer 2 of the ribosomal cistron as an exemplary marker region. Simulation integrated the coevolution process of sequences with secondary structures. Additionally, the phylogenetic power of marker size duplication was investigated and compared with sequence and sequence-structure reconstruction methods. The results clearly show that accuracy and robustness of Neighbor Joining trees are largely improved by structural information in contrast to sequence only data, whereas a doubled marker size only accounts for robustness. Conclusions Individual secondary structures of ribosomal RNA sequences provide a valuable gain of information content that is useful for phylogenetics. Thus, the usage of ITS2 sequence together with secondary structure for taxonomic inferences is recommended. Other reconstruction methods as maximum likelihood, bayesian inference or maximum parsimony may equally profit from secondary structure inclusion. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Shamil Sunyaev, Andrea Tanzer (nominated by Frank Eisenhaber and Eugene V. Koonin. Open peer review Reviewed by Shamil Sunyaev, Andrea Tanzer (nominated by Frank Eisenhaber and Eugene V. Koonin. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  12. Discrete Material and Thickness Optimization of laminated composite structures including failure criteria

    Lund, Erik

    2017-01-01

    This work extends the Discrete Material and Thickness Optimization approach to structural optimization problems where strength considerations in the form of failure criteria are taken into account for laminated composite structures. It takes offset in the density approaches applied for stress...... constrained topology optimization of single-material problems and develops formulations for multi-material topology optimization problems applied for laminated composite structures. The method can be applied for both stress- and strain-based failure criteria. The large number of local constraints is reduced...

  13. Elastic properties and electron transport in InAs nanowires

    Migunov, Vadim

    2013-02-22

    The electron transport and elastic properties of InAs nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition on InAs (001) substrate were studied experimentally, in-situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A TEM holder allowing the measurement of a nanoforce while simultaneous imaging nanowire bending was used. Diffraction images from local areas of the wire were recorded to correlate elastic properties with the atomic structure of the nanowires. Another TEM holder allowing the application of electrical bias between the nanowire and an apex of a metallic needle while simultaneous imaging the nanowire in TEM or performing electron holography was used to detect mechanical vibrations in mechanical study or holographical observation of the nanowire inner potential in the electron transport studies. The combination of the scanning probe methods with TEM allows to correlate the measured electric and elastic properties of the nanowires with direct identification of their atomic structure. It was found that the nanowires have different atomic structures and different stacking fault defect densities that impacts critically on the elastic properties and electric transport. The unique methods, that were applied in this work, allowed to obtain dependencies of resistivity and Young's modulus of left angle 111 right angle -oriented InAs nanowires on defect density and diameter. It was found that the higher is the defect density the higher are the resistivity and the Young's modulus. Regarding the resistivity, it was deduced that the stacking faults increase the scattering of the electrons in the nanowire. These findings are consistent with the literature, however, the effect described by the other groups is not so pronounced. This difference can be attributed to the significant incompleteness of the physical models used for the data analysis. Regarding the elastic modulus, there are several mechanisms affecting the elasticity of the nanowires discussed in the thesis. It

  14. A Study on Conjugate Heat Transfer Analysis of Reactor Vessel including Irradiated Structural Heat Source

    Yi, Kunwoo; Cho, Hyuksu; Im, Inyoung; Kim, Eunkee [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Though Material reliability programs (MRPs) have a purpose to provide the evaluation or management methodologies for the operating RVI, the similar evaluation methodologies can be applied to the APR1400 fleet in the design stage for the evaluation of neutron irradiation effects. The purposes of this study are: to predict the thermal behavior whether or not irradiated structure heat source; to evaluate effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in relation to isotropic and anisotropic conductivity of porous media for APR1400 Reactor Vessel. The CFD simulations are performed so as to evaluate thermal behavior whether or not irradiated structure heat source and effective thermal conductivity for APR1400 Reactor Vessel. In respective of using irradiated structure heat source, the maximum temperature of fluid and core shroud for isotropic ETC are 325.8 .deg. C, 341.5 .deg. C. The total amount of irradiated structure heat source is about 5.41 MWth and not effect to fluid temperature.

  15. A heuristic approach to optimization of structural topology including self-weight

    Tajs-Zielińska, Katarzyna; Bochenek, Bogdan

    2018-01-01

    Topology optimization of structures under a design-dependent self-weight load is investigated in this paper. The problem deserves attention because of its significant importance in the engineering practice, especially nowadays as topology optimization is more often applied when designing large engineering structures, for example, bridges or carrying systems of tall buildings. It is worth noting that well-known approaches of topology optimization which have been successfully applied to structures under fixed loads cannot be directly adapted to the case of design-dependent loads, so that topology generation can be a challenge also for numerical algorithms. The paper presents the application of a simple but efficient non-gradient method to topology optimization of elastic structures under self-weight loading. The algorithm is based on the Cellular Automata concept, the application of which can produce effective solutions with low computational cost.

  16. Seismic response of nuclear reactors in layered liquefiable soil deposits including nonlinear soil-structure interaction

    Zaman, M.; Mamoon, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of seismic response of structures located at a site with potential for soil liquefaction has drawn attention of many researchers. The topic is particularly important in the design of critical facilities like nuclear reactors and defense installations. This paper presents the results of a study involving evaluation of coupled seismic response of structures (model nuclear reactors) and characteristics of soil liquefaction at a site. The analysis procedure employed is based on the nonlinear finite element (FE) technique and accounts for the interaction effects due to a neighboring structure. Emphasis is given to the following features: prediction of spatial and temporal variation of pore water pressure; identification of the on-set of liquefaction based on the effective stress approach, and tracing the propagation of the liquefied zones with time and resulting response of the structures

  17. Solar cells, structures including organometallic halide perovskite monocrystalline films, and methods of preparation thereof

    Bakr, Osman; Peng, Wei; Wang, Lingfei

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for solar cells including an organometallic halide perovskite monocrystalline film (see fig. 1.1B), other devices including the organometallic halide perovskite monocrystalline film, methods of making

  18. Molecular statics simulations of buckling and yielding of gold nanowires deformed in axial compression

    Jiang, W.; Batra, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    We use molecular statics simulations with the embedded atom method potential to delineate yielding (material instability) and buckling (structural instability) in gold nanowires deformed axially in compression. It is found that both local (stacking faults) and global instabilities occur when the gold nanowire yields but only global instabilities occur when the nanowire buckles. Furthermore strong surface effects reorient the lattice structure which significantly increases Young's modulus in the axial direction and cause a nanowire of relatively small slenderness ratio (e.g., 14) to buckle. Upon complete unloading of the nanowires, the average axial stress and the total potential energy revert to their values in the reference configuration for the nanowires that buckled but not for the one that yielded.

  19. Diameter Tuning of β-Ga2O3 Nanowires Using Chemical Vapor Deposition Technique.

    Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar, Vikram; Singh, R

    2017-12-01

    Diameter tuning of [Formula: see text]-Ga 2 O 3 nanowires using chemical vapor deposition technique have been investigated under various experimental conditions. Diameter of root grown [Formula: see text]-Ga 2 O 3 nanowires having monoclinic crystal structure is tuned by varying separation distance between metal source and substrate. Effect of gas flow rate and mixer ratio on the morphology and diameter of nanowires has been studied. Nanowire diameter depends on growth temperature, and it is independent of catalyst nanoparticle size at higher growth temperature (850-900 °C) as compared to lower growth temperature (800 °C). These nanowires show changes in structural strain value with change in diameter. Band-gap of nanowires increases with decrease in the diameter.

  20. Domain wall propagation tuning in magnetic nanowires through geometric modulation

    Arzuza, L.C.C., E-mail: luisarzuza179@gmail.com [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Universidad de la Costa, Departamento de Ciencias Naturales y Exactas, Calle 58 No. 55-66, Barranquilla (Colombia); López-Ruiz, R. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Salazar-Aravena, D. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapacá, 1000007 Arica (Chile); Knobel, M. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory, Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (CNPEM), 13083-970 Campinas (SP) (Brazil); Béron, F.; Pirota, K.R. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas (SP) (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The modulated nanowires dynamics occurs through two reversal modes. • Modulated nanowires show a change in the χ in contrast to homogeneous ones. • The FORC method reveals a non-uniform stray field due to shape modulation. - Abstract: The magnetic behavior of nickel modulated nanowires embedded in porous alumina membranes is investigated. Their diameters exhibit a sharp transition between below (35 nm) and above (52 nm) the theoretical limit for transverse and vortex domain walls. Magnetic hysteresis loops and first-order reversal curves (FORCs) were measured on several ordered nanowire arrays with different wide-narrow segment lengths ratio and compared with those from homogenous nanowires. The experimental magnetic response evidences a rather complex susceptibility behavior for nanowires with modulated diameter. Micromagnetic simulations on isolated and first-neighbors arrays of nanowires show that the domain wall structure, which depends on the segment diameter, suffers a transformation while crossing the diameter modulation, but without any pinning. The experimental array magnetic behavior can be ascribed to a heterogeneous stray field induced by the diameter modulation, yielding a stronger interaction field at the wide extremity than at the narrow one. The results evidence the possibility to control the domain wall propagation and morphology by modulating the lateral aspect of the magnetic entity.

  1. Single cell detection using a magnetic zigzag nanowire biosensor.

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Ger, Tzong-Rong; Lin, Ya-Hui; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2013-08-07

    A magnetic zigzag nanowire device was designed for single cell biosensing. Nanowires with widths of 150, 300, 500, and 800 nm were fabricated on silicon trenches by electron beam lithography, electron beam evaporation, and lift-off processes. Magnetoresistance measurements were performed before and after the attachment of a single magnetic cell to the nanowires to characterize the magnetic signal change due to the influence of the magnetic cell. Magnetoresistance responses were measured in different magnetic field directions, and the results showed that this nanowire device can be used for multi-directional detection. It was observed that the highest switching field variation occurred in a 150 nm wide nanowire when the field was perpendicular to the substrate plane. On the other hand, the highest magnetoresistance ratio variation occurred in a 800 nm wide nanowire also when the field was perpendicular to the substrate plane. Besides, the trench-structured substrate proposed in this study can fix the magnetic cell to the sensor in a fluid environment, and the stray field generated by the corners of the magnetic zigzag nanowires has the function of actively attracting the magnetic cells for detection.

  2. Ultrahigh Density Array of Vertically Aligned Small-molecular Organic Nanowires on Arbitrary Substrates

    Starko-Bowes, Ryan; Pramanik, Sandipan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years π-conjugated organic semiconductors have emerged as the active material in a number of diverse applications including large-area, low-cost displays, photovoltaics, printable and flexible electronics and organic spin valves. Organics allow (a) low-cost, low-temperature processing and (b) molecular-level design of electronic, optical and spin transport characteristics. Such features are not readily available for mainstream inorganic semiconductors, which have enabled organics to carve a niche in the silicon-dominated electronics market. The first generation of organic-based devices has focused on thin film geometries, grown by physical vapor deposition or solution processing. However, it has been realized that organic nanostructures can be used to enhance performance of above-mentioned applications and significant effort has been invested in exploring methods for organic nanostructure fabrication. A particularly interesting class of organic nanostructures is the one in which vertically oriented organic nanowires, nanorods or nanotubes are organized in a well-regimented, high-density array. Such structures are highly versatile and are ideal morphological architectures for various applications such as chemical sensors, split-dipole nanoantennas, photovoltaic devices with radially heterostructured "core-shell" nanowires, and memory devices with a cross-point geometry. Such architecture is generally realized by a template-directed approach. In the past this method has been used to grow metal and inorganic semiconductor nanowire arrays. More recently π-conjugated polymer nanowires have been grown within nanoporous templates. However, these approaches have had limited success in growing nanowires of technologically important π-conjugated small molecular weight organics, such as tris-8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq3), rubrene and methanofullerenes, which are commonly used in diverse areas including organic displays, photovoltaics, thin film transistors

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivities of superlattice nanowires

    YANG; Juekuan(杨决宽); CHEN; Yunfei(陈云飞); YAN; Jingping(颜景平)

    2003-01-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate heat transfer in superlattice nanowires. Results show that for fixed period length superlattice nanowires, the ratio of the total interfacial thermal resistance to the total thermal resistance and the effective thermal conductivities are invariant with the changes in interface numbers. Increasing the period length leads to an increase in the average interfacial thermal resistance, which indicates that the interfacial thermal resistance depends not only on the materials that constitute the alternating segments of superlattice nanowires, but also on the lattice strain throughout the segments. The modification of the lattice structure due to the lattice mismatch should be taken into account in the acoustic mismatch model. Simulation results also demonstrated the size confinement effect on the thermal conductivities for low dimensional structures, i.e. the thermal conductivities and the interfacial thermal resistance increase as the nanowire cross-sectional area increases.

  4. Tree decomposition based fast search of RNA structures including pseudoknots in genomes.

    Song, Yinglei; Liu, Chunmei; Malmberg, Russell; Pan, Fangfang; Cai, Liming

    2005-01-01

    Searching genomes for RNA secondary structure with computational methods has become an important approach to the annotation of non-coding RNAs. However, due to the lack of efficient algorithms for accurate RNA structure-sequence alignment, computer programs capable of fast and effectively searching genomes for RNA secondary structures have not been available. In this paper, a novel RNA structure profiling model is introduced based on the notion of a conformational graph to specify the consensus structure of an RNA family. Tree decomposition yields a small tree width t for such conformation graphs (e.g., t = 2 for stem loops and only a slight increase for pseudo-knots). Within this modelling framework, the optimal alignment of a sequence to the structure model corresponds to finding a maximum valued isomorphic subgraph and consequently can be accomplished through dynamic programming on the tree decomposition of the conformational graph in time O(k(t)N(2)), where k is a small parameter; and N is the size of the projiled RNA structure. Experiments show that the application of the alignment algorithm to search in genomes yields the same search accuracy as methods based on a Covariance model with a significant reduction in computation time. In particular; very accurate searches of tmRNAs in bacteria genomes and of telomerase RNAs in yeast genomes can be accomplished in days, as opposed to months required by other methods. The tree decomposition based searching tool is free upon request and can be downloaded at our site h t t p ://w.uga.edu/RNA-informatics/software/index.php.

  5. Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Chemical Sensor

    Chen, S.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the work that has been done on the project “Design and optimization of silicon nanowire for chemical sensing‿, including Si-NW fabrication, electrical/electrochemical modeling, the application as ISFET, and the build-up of Si- NW/LOC system for automatic sample delivery. A

  6. Specialists meeting on properties of primary circuit structural materials including environmental effects

    NONE

    1977-07-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Properties of Primary Circuit Structural Materials of LMFBRs covered the following topics: overview of materials program in different countries; mechanical properties of materials in air; fracture mechanics studies - component related activities; impact of environmental influences on mechanical properties; relationship of material properties and design methods. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on structural materials behaviour in primary circuit of fast breeder reactors. Special emphasis was placed on environmental effects such as influence of sodium and irradiation on mechanical properties of reactor materials.

  7. Specialists meeting on properties of primary circuit structural materials including environmental effects

    1977-01-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Properties of Primary Circuit Structural Materials of LMFBRs covered the following topics: overview of materials program in different countries; mechanical properties of materials in air; fracture mechanics studies - component related activities; impact of environmental influences on mechanical properties; relationship of material properties and design methods. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on structural materials behaviour in primary circuit of fast breeder reactors. Special emphasis was placed on environmental effects such as influence of sodium and irradiation on mechanical properties of reactor materials

  8. Structural and optical properties of self-catalytic GaAs:Mn nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on silicon substrates

    Gas, Katarzyna; Sadowski, Janusz; Kasama, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    .e., it is much lower than the Mn/Ga flux ratio (about 3%) used during the MBE growth. The resistivity measurements of individual nanowires confirmed that they are conductive, in accordance with the photoluminescence measurements which showed the presence of Mn2+ acceptors located at Ga sites of the GaAs host...

  9. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Low Pressure Casting

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Kennett, Andrew (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Systems and methods to fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using low-pressure casting techniques are described. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: introducing molten alloy into a mold cavity defined by a mold using a low enough pressure such that the molten alloy does not conform to features of the mold cavity that are smaller than 100 microns; and cooling the molten alloy such that it solidifies, the solid including a metallic glass-based material.

  10. Quantum dot-based local field imaging reveals plasmon-based interferometric logic in silver nanowire networks.

    Wei, Hong; Li, Zhipeng; Tian, Xiaorui; Wang, Zhuoxian; Cong, Fengzi; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Shunping; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Xu, Hongxing

    2011-02-09

    We show that the local electric field distribution of propagating plasmons along silver nanowires can be imaged by coating the nanowires with a layer of quantum dots, held off the surface of the nanowire by a nanoscale dielectric spacer layer. In simple networks of silver nanowires with two optical inputs, control of the optical polarization and phase of the input fields directs the guided waves to a specific nanowire output. The QD-luminescent images of these structures reveal that a complete family of phase-dependent, interferometric logic functions can be performed on these simple networks. These results show the potential for plasmonic waveguides to support compact interferometric logic operations.

  11. Controlled Synthesis of Nanowire Assemblies by Ion-Track Template Electrodeposition

    Rauber, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The development of methods that allow the organization of nanostructures into integrated arrangements is crucial to realizing applications based on nanowires. Although various such methods exist, the direct synthesis of complex nanowire structures is one of the most suitable approaches for translating a large quantity of nanostructures into micro-/macroscale dimensions. In particular, three-dimensional (3-D) nanowire assemblies with a high integration level and adjustable connecti...

  12. Customization of Protein Single Nanowires for Optical Biosensing.

    Sun, Yun-Lu; Sun, Si-Ming; Wang, Pan; Dong, Wen-Fei; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Bin-Bin; Chen, Qi-Dai; Tong, Li-Min; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-06-24

    An all-protein single-nanowire optical biosensor is constructed by a facile and general femtosecond laser direct writing approach with nanoscale structural customization. As-formed protein single nanowires show excellent optical properties (fine waveguiding performance and bio-applicable transmission windows), and are utilized as evanescent optical nanobiosensors for label-free biotin detection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Substrate and Mg doping effects in GaAs nanowires

    Perumal Kannappan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mg doping of GaAs nanowires has been established as a viable alternative to Be doping in order to achieve p-type electrical conductivity. Although reports on the optical properties are available, few reports exist about the physical properties of intermediate-to-high Mg doping in GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE on GaAs(111B and Si(111 substrates. In this work, we address this topic and present further understanding on the fundamental aspects. As the Mg doping was increased, structural and optical investigations revealed: i a lower influence of the polytypic nature of the GaAs nanowires on their electronic structure; ii a considerable reduction of the density of vertical nanowires, which is almost null for growth on Si(111; iii the occurrence of a higher WZ phase fraction, in particular for growth on Si(111; iv an increase of the activation energy to release the less bound carrier in the radiative state from nanowires grown on GaAs(111B; and v a higher influence of defects on the activation of nonradiative de-excitation channels in the case of nanowires only grown on Si(111. Back-gate field effect transistors were fabricated with individual nanowires and the p-type electrical conductivity was measured with free hole concentration ranging from 2.7 × 1016 cm−3 to 1.4 × 1017 cm−3. The estimated electrical mobility was in the range ≈0.3–39 cm2/Vs and the dominant scattering mechanism is ascribed to the WZ/ZB interfaces. Electrical and optical measurements showed a lower influence of the polytypic structure of the nanowires on their electronic structure. The involvement of Mg in one of the radiative transitions observed for growth on the Si(111 substrate is suggested.

  14. As-Grown Gallium Nitride Nanowire Electromechanical Resonators

    Montague, Joshua R.

    Technological development in recent years has led to a ubiquity of micro- and nano-scale electromechanical devices. Sensors for monitoring temperature, pressure, mass, etc., are now found in nearly all electronic devices at both the industrial and consumer levels. As has been true for integrated circuit electronics, these electromechanical devices have continued to be scaled down in size. For many nanometer-scale structures with large surface-to-volume ratio, dissipation (energy loss) becomes prohibitively large causing a decreasing sensitivity with decreasing sensor size. In this work, gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires are investigated as singly-clamped (cantilever) mechanical resonators with typical mechanical quality factors, Q (equal to the ratio of resonance frequency to peak full-width-at-half-maximum-power) and resonance frequencies, respectively, at or above 30,000, and near 1 MHz. These Q values---in vacuum at room temperature---indicate very low levels of dissipation; they are essentially the same as those for bulk quartz crystal resonators that form the basis of simple clocks and mass sensors. The GaN nanowires have lengths and diameters, respectively, of approximately 15 micrometers and hundreds of nanometers. As-grown GaN nanowire Q values are larger than other similarly-sized, bottom-up, cantilever resonators and this property makes them very attractive for use as resonant sensors. We demonstrate the capability of detecting sub-monolayer levels of atomic layer deposited (ALD) films, and the robust nature of the GaN nanowires structure that allows for their 'reuse' after removal of such layers. In addition to electron microscope-based measurement techniques, we demonstrate the successful capacitive detection of a single nanowire using microwave homodyne reflectometry. This technique is then extended to allow for simultaneous measurements of large ensembles of GaN nanowires on a single sample, providing statistical information about the distribution of

  15. Seismic reliability assessment of RC structures including soil–structure interaction using wavelet weighted least squares support vector machine

    Khatibinia, Mohsen; Javad Fadaee, Mohammad; Salajegheh, Javad; Salajegheh, Eysa

    2013-01-01

    An efficient metamodeling framework in conjunction with the Monte-Carlo Simulation (MCS) is introduced to reduce the computational cost in seismic reliability assessment of existing RC structures. In order to achieve this purpose, the metamodel is designed by combining weighted least squares support vector machine (WLS-SVM) and a wavelet kernel function, called wavelet weighted least squares support vector machine (WWLS-SVM). In this study, the seismic reliability assessment of existing RC structures with consideration of soil–structure interaction (SSI) effects is investigated in accordance with Performance-Based Design (PBD). This study aims to incorporate the acceptable performance levels of PBD into reliability theory for comparing the obtained annual probability of non-performance with the target values for each performance level. The MCS method as the most reliable method is utilized to estimate the annual probability of failure associated with a given performance level in this study. In WWLS-SVM-based MCS, the structural seismic responses are accurately predicted by WWLS-SVM for reducing the computational cost. To show the efficiency and robustness of the proposed metamodel, two RC structures are studied. Numerical results demonstrate the efficiency and computational advantages of the proposed metamodel for the seismic reliability assessment of structures. Furthermore, the consideration of the SSI effects in the seismic reliability assessment of existing RC structures is compared to the fixed base model. It shows which SSI has the significant influence on the seismic reliability assessment of structures.

  16. Parallel processing for nonlinear dynamics simulations of structures including rotating bladed-disk assemblies

    Hsieh, Shang-Hsien

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of this research is to develop, test, and implement coarse-grained, parallel-processing strategies for nonlinear dynamic simulations of practical structural problems. There are contributions to four main areas: finite element modeling and analysis of rotational dynamics, numerical algorithms for parallel nonlinear solutions, automatic partitioning techniques to effect load-balancing among processors, and an integrated parallel analysis system.

  17. Global optimization of silicon nanowires for efficient parametric processes

    Vukovic, Dragana; Xu, Jing; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    We present a global optimization of silicon nanowires for parametric single-pump mixing. For the first time, the effect of surface roughness-induced loss is included in the analysis, significantly influencing the optimum waveguide dimensions.......We present a global optimization of silicon nanowires for parametric single-pump mixing. For the first time, the effect of surface roughness-induced loss is included in the analysis, significantly influencing the optimum waveguide dimensions....

  18. Probabilistic and deterministic soil structure interaction analysis including ground motion incoherency effects

    Elkhoraibi, T.; Hashemi, A.; Ostadan, F.

    2014-01-01

    Soil-structure interaction (SSI) is a major step for seismic design of massive and stiff structures typical of the nuclear facilities and civil infrastructures such as tunnels, underground stations, dams and lock head structures. Currently most SSI analyses are performed deterministically, incorporating limited range of variation in soil and structural properties and without consideration of the ground motion incoherency effects. This often leads to overestimation of the seismic response particularly the In-Structure-Response Spectra (ISRS) with significant impositions of design and equipment qualification costs, especially in the case of high-frequency sensitive equipment at stiff soil or rock sites. The reluctance to incorporate a more comprehensive probabilistic approach is mainly due to the fact that the computational cost of performing probabilistic SSI analysis even without incoherency function considerations has been prohibitive. As such, bounding deterministic approaches have been preferred by the industry and accepted by the regulatory agencies. However, given the recently available and growing computing capabilities, the need for a probabilistic-based approach to the SSI analysis is becoming clear with the advances in performance-based engineering and the utilization of fragility analysis in the decision making process whether by the owners or the regulatory agencies. This paper demonstrates the use of both probabilistic and deterministic SSI analysis techniques to identify important engineering demand parameters in the structure. A typical nuclear industry structure is used as an example for this study. The system is analyzed for two different site conditions: rock and deep soil. Both deterministic and probabilistic SSI analysis approaches are performed, using the program SASSI, with and without ground motion incoherency considerations. In both approaches, the analysis begins at the hard rock level using the low frequency and high frequency hard rock

  19. Probabilistic and deterministic soil structure interaction analysis including ground motion incoherency effects

    Elkhoraibi, T., E-mail: telkhora@bechtel.com; Hashemi, A.; Ostadan, F.

    2014-04-01

    Soil-structure interaction (SSI) is a major step for seismic design of massive and stiff structures typical of the nuclear facilities and civil infrastructures such as tunnels, underground stations, dams and lock head structures. Currently most SSI analyses are performed deterministically, incorporating limited range of variation in soil and structural properties and without consideration of the ground motion incoherency effects. This often leads to overestimation of the seismic response particularly the In-Structure-Response Spectra (ISRS) with significant impositions of design and equipment qualification costs, especially in the case of high-frequency sensitive equipment at stiff soil or rock sites. The reluctance to incorporate a more comprehensive probabilistic approach is mainly due to the fact that the computational cost of performing probabilistic SSI analysis even without incoherency function considerations has been prohibitive. As such, bounding deterministic approaches have been preferred by the industry and accepted by the regulatory agencies. However, given the recently available and growing computing capabilities, the need for a probabilistic-based approach to the SSI analysis is becoming clear with the advances in performance-based engineering and the utilization of fragility analysis in the decision making process whether by the owners or the regulatory agencies. This paper demonstrates the use of both probabilistic and deterministic SSI analysis techniques to identify important engineering demand parameters in the structure. A typical nuclear industry structure is used as an example for this study. The system is analyzed for two different site conditions: rock and deep soil. Both deterministic and probabilistic SSI analysis approaches are performed, using the program SASSI, with and without ground motion incoherency considerations. In both approaches, the analysis begins at the hard rock level using the low frequency and high frequency hard rock

  20. Solar cells, structures including organometallic halide perovskite monocrystalline films, and methods of preparation thereof

    Bakr, Osman M.

    2017-03-02

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for solar cells including an organometallic halide perovskite monocrystalline film (see fig. 1.1B), other devices including the organometallic halide perovskite monocrystalline film, methods of making organometallic halide perovskite monocrystalline film, and the like.

  1. Seismic response and fragility evaluation for an Eastern US NPP including soil-structure interaction effects

    Ghiocel, Dan M.; Wilson, Paul R.; Thomas, Gary G.; Stevenson, John D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper discusses methodological aspects involved in a probabilistic seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis for a Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA) review. An example of an Eastern US nuclear power plant (NPP) is presented. The approach presented herein follows the current practice of the Individual Plant Examination for External Events (IPEEE) program in the US. The NPP is founded on a relatively soft soil deposit, and thus the SSI effects on seismic responses are significant. Probabilistic models used for the idealization of the seismic excitation and the surrounding soil deposit are described. Using a lognormal format, computed random variability effects were combined with those proposed in the SPRA methodology guidelines. Probabilistic floor response spectra and structural fragilities for different NPP buildings were computed. Structural capacities were determined following the current practice which assumes independent median safety factors for strength and inelastic absorption. Limitations of the IPEEE practice for performing SPRA are discussed and alternate procedures, more rigorous and simple to implement, are suggested

  2. The importance of including dynamic soil-structure interaction into wind turbine simulation codes

    Damgaard, Mads; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    A rigorous numerical model, describing a wind turbine structure and subsoil, may contain thousands of degrees of freedom, making the approach computationally inefficient for fast time domain analysis. In order to meet the requirements of real-time calculations, the dynamic impedance of the founda......A rigorous numerical model, describing a wind turbine structure and subsoil, may contain thousands of degrees of freedom, making the approach computationally inefficient for fast time domain analysis. In order to meet the requirements of real-time calculations, the dynamic impedance...... of the foundation from a rigorous analysis can be formulated into a so-called lumped-parameter model consisting of a few springs, dashpots and point masses which are easily implemented into aeroelastic codes. In this paper, the quality of consistent lumped-parameter models of rigid surface footings and mono piles...... is examined. The optimal order of the models is determined and implemented into the aeroelastic code HAWC2, where the dynamic response of a 5.0 MW wind turbine is evaluated. In contrast to the fore-aft vibrations, the inclusion of soil-structure interaction is shown to be critical for the side-side vibrations...

  3. Regulation of Gene Expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 during Electron Acceptor Limitation and Bacterial Nanowire Formation

    Barchinger, Sarah E.; Pirbadian, Sahand; Baker, Carol S.; Leung, Kar Man; Burroughs, Nigel J.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In limiting oxygen as an electron acceptor, the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 rapidly forms nanowires, extensions of its outer membrane containing the cytochromes MtrC and OmcA needed for extracellular electron transfer. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis was employed to determine differential gene expression over time from triplicate chemostat cultures that were limited for oxygen. We identified 465 genes with decreased expression and 677 genes with increased expression. The coordinated increased expression of heme biosynthesis, cytochrome maturation, and transport pathways indicates that S. oneidensis MR-1 increases cytochrome production, including the transcription of genes encoding MtrA, MtrC, and OmcA, and transports these decaheme cytochromes across the cytoplasmic membrane during electron acceptor limitation and nanowire formation. In contrast, the expression of the mtrA and mtrC homologs mtrF and mtrD either remains unaffected or decreases under these conditions. The ompW gene, encoding a small outer membrane porin, has 40-fold higher expression during oxygen limitation, and it is proposed that OmpW plays a role in cation transport to maintain electrical neutrality during electron transfer. The genes encoding the anaerobic respiration regulator cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and the extracytoplasmic function sigma factor RpoE are among the transcription factor genes with increased expression. RpoE might function by signaling the initial response to oxygen limitation. Our results show that RpoE activates transcription from promoters upstream of mtrC and omcA. The transcriptome and mutant analyses of S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowire production are consistent with independent regulatory mechanisms for extending the outer membrane into tubular structures and for ensuring the electron transfer function of the nanowires. IMPORTANCE Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to transfer electrons to its external surface

  4. Fold classification based on secondary structure – how much is gained by including loop topology?

    Przytycka Teresa

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that secondary structure information can be used to classify (to some extend protein folds. Since this method utilizes very limited information about the protein structure, it is not surprising that it has a higher error rate than the approaches that use full 3D fold description. On the other hand, the comparing of 3D protein structures is computing intensive. This raises the question to what extend the error rate can be decreased with each new source of information, especially if the new information can still be used with simple alignment algorithms. We consider the question whether the information about closed loops can improve the accuracy of this approach. While the answer appears to be obvious, we had to overcome two challenges. First, how to code and to compare topological information in such a way that local alignment of strings will properly identify similar structures. Second, how to properly measure the effect of new information in a large data sample. We investigate alternative ways of computing and presenting this information. Results We used the set of beta proteins with at most 30% pairwise identity to test the approach; local alignment scores were used to build a tree of clusters which was evaluated using a new log-odd cluster scoring function. In particular, we derive a closed formula for the probability of obtaining a given score by chance.Parameters of local alignment function were optimized using a genetic algorithm. Of 81 folds that had more than one representative in our data set, log-odds scores registered significantly better clustering in 27 cases and significantly worse in 6 cases, and small differences in the remaining cases. Various notions of the significant change or average change were considered and tried, and the results were all pointing in the same direction. Conclusion We found that, on average, properly presented information about the loop topology improves noticeably

  5. Predicting transmission of structure-borne sound power from machines by including terminal cross-coupling

    Ohlrich, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    of translational terminals in a global plane. This paired or bi-coupled power transmission represents the simplest case of cross-coupling. The procedure and quality of the predicted transmission using this improved technique is demonstrated experimentally for an electrical motor unit with an integrated radial fan......Structure-borne sound generated by audible vibration of machines in vehicles, equipment and house-hold appliances is often a major cause of noise. Such vibration of complex machines is mostly determined and quantified by measurements. It has been found that characterization of the vibratory source...

  6. Model - including thermal creep effects - for the analysis of three-dimensional concrete structures

    Rodriguez, C.; Rebora, B.; Favrod, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    This article presents the most recent developments and results of research carried out by IPEN to establish a mathematical model for the non-linear rheological three-dimensional analysis of massive prestressed concrete structures. The main point of these latest developments is the simulation of the creep of concrete submitted to high temperatures over a long period of time. This research, financed by the Swiss National Science Foundation, has taken an increased importance with the advent of nuclear reactor vessels of the HHT type and new conceptions concerning the cooling of their concrete (replacement of the thermal insulation by a zone of hot concrete). (orig.)

  7. Microwave effective surface impedance of structures including a high-Tc superconducting film

    Hartemann, P.

    1992-01-01

    The microwave effective surface impedances of different stacks made of high-temperature superconducting films, dielectric materials and bulk normal metals were computed. The calculations were based on the two-fluid model of superconductors and the conventional transmission line theory. These effective impedances are compared to the calculated intrinsic surface impedances of the stacked superconducting films. The considered superconducting material has been the oxide YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 epitaxially grown on crystalline substrates (MgO, LaAlO 3 , SrTiO 3 ), the film thickness ranging from a few nm to 1μm. Discrepancies between the effective surface resistances or reactances and the corresponding intrinsic values were determined at 10 GHz for non resonant or resonant structures. At resonance the surface resistance discrepancy exhibits a sharp peak which reaches 10 4 or more in relative value according to the geometry and the used materials. Obviously the effective surface reactance shows also huge variations about the resonance and may be negative. Moreover geometries allowing to obtain an effective resistance smaller than the film intrinsic value have been found. The effects of the resonance phenomenon on the electromagnetic wave reflectivity and reflection phase shift are investigated. Therefore the reported theoretical results demonstrate that the effective surface impedance of YBCO films with a thickness smaller than 500 nm can be very different from the intrinsic film impedance according to the structures. (Author). 3 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Including fluid shear viscosity in a structural acoustic finite element model using a scalar fluid representation.

    Cheng, Lei; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl

    2013-08-15

    An approximate boundary condition is developed in this paper to model fluid shear viscosity at boundaries of coupled fluid-structure system. The effect of shear viscosity is approximated by a correction term to the inviscid boundary condition, written in terms of second order in-plane derivatives of pressure. Both thin and thick viscous boundary layer approximations are formulated; the latter subsumes the former. These approximations are used to develop a variational formation, upon which a viscous finite element method (FEM) model is based, requiring only minor modifications to the boundary integral contributions of an existing inviscid FEM model. Since this FEM formulation has only one degree of freedom for pressure, it holds a great computational advantage over the conventional viscous FEM formulation which requires discretization of the full set of linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The results from thick viscous boundary layer approximation are found to be in good agreement with the prediction from a Navier-Stokes model. When applicable, thin viscous boundary layer approximation also gives accurate results with computational simplicity compared to the thick boundary layer formulation. Direct comparison of simulation results using the boundary layer approximations and a full, linearized Navier-Stokes model are made and used to evaluate the accuracy of the approximate technique. Guidelines are given for the parameter ranges over which the accurate application of the thick and thin boundary approximations can be used for a fluid-structure interaction problem.

  9. Study of residual gas adsorption on GaN nanowire arrays photocathode

    Xia, Sihao; Liu, Lei, E-mail: liu1133_cn@sina.com.cn; Diao, Yu; Kong, Yike

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • H{sub 2}O is more easily to absorb on the nanowire surface. • The work function increase after residual gas adsorption. • Bandgaps of the nanowire increase slightly. • Absorption coefficient is reduced and moves to higher energy side. - Abstract: In order to find out the influences of residual gas on GaN nanowire arrays photocathode, the optoelectronic properties of adsorption system are calculated on the basis of first principles. Results suggest that the residual gas adsorption will increase the work function and introduce a dipole moment with a direction from the nanowire to the adsorbates. The surface structures are changed and electrons transfer from nanowire to gas molecule. The bandgaps are enhanced after adsorption. Besides, the peak of absorption coefficients is reduced and moves to higher energy side. It is discovered that residual gas will drastically degrade the characteristics and lifetime of GaN nanowire arrays photocathode.

  10. Photovoltaic Performance of a Nanowire/Quantum Dot Hybrid Nanostructure Array Solar Cell.

    Wu, Yao; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2018-02-23

    An innovative solar cell based on a nanowire/quantum dot hybrid nanostructure array is designed and analyzed. By growing multilayer InAs quantum dots on the sidewalls of GaAs nanowires, not only the absorption spectrum of GaAs nanowires is extended by quantum dots but also the light absorption of quantum dots is dramatically enhanced due to the light-trapping effect of the nanowire array. By incorporating five layers of InAs quantum dots into a 500-nm high-GaAs nanowire array, the power conversion efficiency enhancement induced by the quantum dots is six times higher than the power conversion efficiency enhancement in thin-film solar cells which contain the same amount of quantum dots, indicating that the nanowire array structure can benefit the photovoltaic performance of quantum dot solar cells.

  11. Visual Understanding of Light Absorption and Waveguiding in Standing Nanowires with 3D Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy.

    Frederiksen, Rune; Tutuncuoglu, Gozde; Matteini, Federico; Martinez, Karen L; Fontcuberta I Morral, Anna; Alarcon-Llado, Esther

    2017-09-20

    Semiconductor nanowires are promising building blocks for next-generation photonics. Indirect proofs of large absorption cross sections have been reported in nanostructures with subwavelength diameters, an effect that is even more prominent in vertically standing nanowires. In this work we provide a three-dimensional map of the light around vertical GaAs nanowires standing on a substrate by using fluorescence confocal microscopy, where the strong long-range disruption of the light path along the nanowire is illustrated. We find that the actual long-distance perturbation is much larger in size than calculated extinction cross sections. While the size of the perturbation remains similar, the intensity of the interaction changes dramatically over the visible spectrum. Numerical simulations allow us to distinguish the effects of scattering and absorption in the nanowire leading to these phenomena. This work provides a visual understanding of light absorption in semiconductor nanowire structures, which is of high interest for solar energy conversion applications.

  12. Highly ordered uniform single-crystal Bi nanowires: fabrication and characterization

    Bisrat, Y; Luo, Z P; Davis, D; Lagoudas, D

    2007-01-01

    A mechanical pressure injection technique has been used to fabricate uniform bismuth (Bi) nanowires in the pores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. The AAO template was prepared from general purity aluminum by a two-step anodization followed by heat treatment to achieve highly ordered nanochannels. The nanowires were then fabricated by an injection technique whereby the molten Bi was injected into the AAO template using a hydraulic pressure method. The Bi nanowires prepared by this method were found to be dense and continuous with uniform diameter throughout the length. Electron diffraction experiments using the transmission electron microscope on cross-sectional and free-standing longitudinal Bi nanowires showed that the majority of the individual nanowires were single crystalline, with preferred orientation of growth along the [011] zone axis of the pseudo-cubic structure. The work presented here provides an inexpensive and effective way of fabricating highly ordered single-crystalline Bi nanowires, with uniform size distributions

  13. Printing nanotube/nanowire for flexible microsystems

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2014-04-01

    Printing has become an emerging manufacturing technology for mechanics, electronics, and consumer products. Additionally, both nanotubes and nanowires have recently been used as materials for sensors and electrodes due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties. Printed electrodes and conductive traces particularly offer versatility of fabricating low-cost, disposable, and flexible electrical devices and microsystems. While various printing methods such as screen printing have been conventional methods for printing conductive traces and electrodes, inkjet printing has recently attracted great attention due to its unique advantages including no template requirement, rapid printing at low cost, on-demand printing capability, and precise control of the printed material. Computer generated conductive traces or electrode patterns can simply be printed on a thin film substrate with proper conductive ink consisting of nanotubes or nanowires. However, in order to develop nanotube or nanowire ink, there are a few challenges that need to be addressed. The most difficult obstacle to overcome is that of nanotube/nanowire dispersion within a solution. Other challenges include adjusting surface tension and controlling viscosity of the ink as well as treating the surface of the printing substrate. In an attempt to pave the way for nanomaterial inkjet printing, we present a method for preparing carbon nanotube ink as well as its printing technique. A fully printed electrochemical sensor using inkjet-printed carbon nanotube electrodes is also demonstrated as an example of the possibilities for this technology.

  14. Field Emission of ITO-Coated Vertically Aligned Nanowire Array.

    Lee, Changhwa

    2010-04-29

    An indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated vertically aligned nanowire array is fabricated, and the field emission characteristics of the nanowire array are investigated. An array of vertically aligned nanowires is considered an ideal structure for a field emitter because of its parallel orientation to the applied electric field. In this letter, a vertically aligned nanowire array is fabricated by modified conventional UV lithography and coated with 0.1-μm-thick ITO. The turn-on electric field intensity is about 2.0 V/μm, and the field enhancement factor, β, is approximately 3,078 when the gap for field emission is 0.6 μm, as measured with a nanomanipulator in a scanning electron microscope.

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Magnetic Nanowires in Anodic Alumina

    Xiao, Z. L.; Han, Y. R.; Wang, H. H.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2002-03-01

    Magnetic nanowires (cobalt, iron and nickel) with diameters down to 20 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition. Both commercial and home-made anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with nanochannel arrays were used as templates. The structure and magnetization hysteresis of the specimens with nanowires were investigated with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), respectively. Growth of nanowires with both aqueous and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solutions was conducted and better quality nanowires were obtained with the organic DMSO solution. The influence of the diameter, the length and the separation of the nanochannels on the magnetization orientation was investigated in detail. Work supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), BES-Materials Science, Contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38.

  16. Field Emission of ITO-Coated Vertically Aligned Nanowire Array.

    Lee, Changhwa; Lee, Seokwoo; Lee, Seung S

    2010-01-01

    An indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated vertically aligned nanowire array is fabricated, and the field emission characteristics of the nanowire array are investigated. An array of vertically aligned nanowires is considered an ideal structure for a field emitter because of its parallel orientation to the applied electric field. In this letter, a vertically aligned nanowire array is fabricated by modified conventional UV lithography and coated with 0.1-μm-thick ITO. The turn-on electric field intensity is about 2.0 V/μm, and the field enhancement factor, β, is approximately 3,078 when the gap for field emission is 0.6 μm, as measured with a nanomanipulator in a scanning electron microscope.

  17. Piezoelectric properties of zinc oxide nanowires: an ab initio study.

    Korir, K K; Cicero, G; Catellani, A

    2013-11-29

    Nanowires made of materials with non-centrosymmetric crystal structures are expected to be ideal building blocks for self-powered nanodevices due to their piezoelectric properties, yet a controversial explanation of the effective operational mechanisms and size effects still delays their real exploitation. To solve this controversy, we propose a methodology based on DFT calculations of the response of nanostructures to external deformations that allows us to distinguish between the different (bulk and surface) contributions: we apply this scheme to evaluate the piezoelectric properties of ZnO [0001] nanowires, with a diameter up to 2.3 nm. Our results reveal that, while surface and confinement effects are negligible, effective strain energies, and thus the nanowire mechanical response, are dependent on size. Our unified approach allows for a proper definition of piezoelectric coefficients for nanostructures, and explains in a rigorous way the reason why nanowires are found to be more sensitive to mechanical deformation than the corresponding bulk material.

  18. Insights into pulsed electrodeposition of GMR multilayered nanowires

    Pullini, D.; Busquets, D.; Ruotolo, A.; Innocenti, G.; Amigo, V.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, Co/Cu nanowires are fabricated by pulsed electrodeposition from a single bath solution containing both Co and Cu ions. Alternate Co and Cu layers are deposited into the nanopores of track etched polycarbonate templates. Although the feasibility of this process is generally recognized, some important issues such as process reproducibility and how structural defects affect the nanowires arrays' sensing performances are still open; conditions necessary to turn a this made system into a magnetic field sensor. The present work aims at pushing forward knowledge concerning the nanowires fabrication and defining the best growth parameters; in particular, a tight control of the growth process parameters such as single metal deposition potentials and single cycle deposition durations have been carried out for nanowires of 80 nm diameter and correlated to the system magneto-electric response

  19. Functionalization of lanthanum hydroxide nanowires by atom transfer radical polymerization

    Zhou Mi; Yuan Jinying; Yuan Weizhong; Yin Yingwu; Hong Xiaoyin

    2007-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) has been used to prepare a core-shell hybrid nanostructure successfully: a hard core of single-crystalline lanthanum hydroxide nanowires and a soft shell of polystyrene (PS) brushes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicated that the resulting products presented special structures and different thicknesses of polymer layers. The chemical components and grafted PS quantities of the samples were measured by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The polymers showed narrow polydispersity, which proved that the lanthanum hydroxide nanowires initiated the 'living'/controlled polymerization of styrene. With the modifiability of lanthanum hydroxide nanowires, the solubility increased, which affords a new way to functionalize nanowires

  20. Shear-driven phase transformation in silicon nanowires.

    Vincent, L; Djomani, D; Fakfakh, M; Renard, C; Belier, B; Bouchier, D; Patriarche, G

    2018-03-23

    We report on an unprecedented formation of allotrope heterostructured Si nanowires by plastic deformation based on applied radial compressive stresses inside a surrounding matrix. Si nanowires with a standard diamond structure (3C) undergo a phase transformation toward the hexagonal 2H-allotrope. The transformation is thermally activated above 500 °C and is clearly driven by a shear-stress relief occurring in parallel shear bands lying on {115} planes. We have studied the influence of temperature and axial orientation of nanowires. The observations are consistent with a martensitic phase transformation, but the finding leads to clear evidence of a different mechanism of deformation-induced phase transformation in Si nanowires with respect to their bulk counterpart. Our process provides a route to study shear-driven phase transformation at the nanoscale in Si.

  1. Optical Control of Internal Electric Fields in Band Gap-Graded InGaN Nanowires

    Erhard, N.; Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; Yang, F.; McComb, D. W.; Myers, R. C.; Holleitner, A. W.

    2015-01-01

    InGaN nanowires are suitable building blocks for many future optoelectronic devices. We show that a linear grading of the indium content along the nanowire axis from GaN to InN introduces an internal electric field evoking a photocurrent. Consistent with quantitative band structure simulations we observe a sign change in the measured photocurrent as a function of photon flux. This negative differential photocurrent opens the path to a new type of nanowire-based photodetector. We demonstrate that the photocurrent response of the nanowires is as fast as 1.5 ps.

  2. Optical properties of Mg doped p-type GaN nanowires

    Patsha, Avinash; Pandian, Ramanathaswamy; Dhara, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    Mg doped p-type GaN nanowires are grown using chemical vapor deposition technique in vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process. Morphological and structural studies confirm the VLS growth process of nanowires and wurtzite phase of GaN. We report the optical properties of Mg doped p-type GaN nanowires. Low temperature photoluminescence studies on as-grown and post-growth annealed samples reveal the successful incorporation of Mg dopants. The as-grwon and annealed samples show passivation and activation of Mg dopants, respectively, in GaN nanowires.

  3. Effect of field deposition and pore size on Co/Cu barcode nanowires by electrodeposition

    Cho, Ji Ung; Wu, J.-H.; Min, Ji Hyun; Lee, Ju Hun; Liu, H.-L.; Kim, Young Keun

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the effect of an external magnetic field applied during electrodeposition of Co/Cu barcode nanowires in anodic aluminum oxide nanotemplates. The magnetic properties of the barcode nanowires were greatly enhanced for 50 nm pore diameter regardless of segment aspect ratio, but field deposition has little effect on the 200 nm nanowires. The magnetic improvement is correlated with a structural change, attributed to field modification of the growth habit of the barcode nanowires. A mechanism of growth subject to geometric confinement is proposed

  4. Effect of field deposition and pore size on Co/Cu barcode nanowires by electrodeposition

    Cho, Ji Ung; Wu, Jun-Hua; Min, Ji Hyun; Lee, Ju Hun; Liu, Hong-Ling; Kim, Young Keun

    2007-03-01

    We have studied the effect of an external magnetic field applied during electrodeposition of Co/Cu barcode nanowires in anodic aluminum oxide nanotemplates. The magnetic properties of the barcode nanowires were greatly enhanced for 50 nm pore diameter regardless of segment aspect ratio, but field deposition has little effect on the 200 nm nanowires. The magnetic improvement is correlated with a structural change, attributed to field modification of the growth habit of the barcode nanowires. A mechanism of growth subject to geometric confinement is proposed.

  5. Direct observation of short-circuit diffusion during the formation of a single cupric oxide nanowire

    Cheng, C-L; Ma, Y-R; Chou, M H; Huang, C Y; Yeh, V; Wu, S Y

    2007-01-01

    Short-circuit diffusion was observed in a single CuO nanowire synthesized using a thermal oxidation method. The confocal Raman spectra of a single CuO nanowire permit direct observation of the nature of an individual CuO nanowire. The parameter order obtained from the inverse Raman B g 2 peak linewidth results in the length dependence of the linewidth and a short-circuit diffusion length of 3.3 μm. The observed structural information is also consistent with the energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic mapping. The results confirm that the growth of CuO nanowires occurs through the short-circuit diffusion mechanism

  6. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B.

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si 3 N 4 . Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation

  7. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation.

  8. Atomic-Resolution Spectrum Imaging of Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Zamani, Reza R; Hage, Fredrik S; Lehmann, Sebastian; Ramasse, Quentin M; Dick, Kimberly A

    2018-03-14

    Over the past decade, III-V heterostructure nanowires have attracted a surge of attention for their application in novel semiconductor devices such as tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs). The functionality of such devices critically depends on the specific atomic arrangement at the semiconductor heterointerfaces. However, most of the currently available characterization techniques lack sufficient spatial resolution to provide local information on the atomic structure and composition of these interfaces. Atomic-resolution spectrum imaging by means of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is a powerful technique with the potential to resolve structure and chemical composition with sub-angstrom spatial resolution and to provide localized information about the physical properties of the material at the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of atomic-resolution EELS to understand the interface atomic arrangement in three-dimensional heterostructures in semiconductor nanowires. We observed that the radial interfaces of GaSb-InAs heterostructure nanowires are atomically abrupt, while the axial interface in contrast consists of an interfacial region where intermixing of the two compounds occurs over an extended spatial region. The local atomic configuration affects the band alignment at the interface and, hence, the charge transport properties of devices such as GaSb-InAs nanowire TFETs. STEM-EELS thus represents a very promising technique for understanding nanowire physical properties, such as differing electrical behavior across the radial and axial heterointerfaces of GaSb-InAs nanowires for TFET applications.

  9. Silicon nanowire hot carrier electroluminescence

    Plessis, M. du, E-mail: monuko@up.ac.za; Joubert, T.-H.

    2016-08-31

    Avalanche electroluminescence from silicon pn junctions has been known for many years. However, the internal quantum efficiencies of these devices are quite low due to the indirect band gap nature of the semiconductor material. In this study we have used reach-through biasing and SOI (silicon-on-insulator) thin film structures to improve the internal power efficiency and the external light extraction efficiency. Both continuous silicon thin film pn junctions and parallel nanowire pn junctions were manufactured using a custom SOI technology. The pn junctions are operated in the reach-through mode of operation, thus increasing the average electric field within the fully depleted region. Experimental results of the emission spectrum indicate that the most dominant photon generating mechanism is due to intraband hot carrier relaxation processes. It was found that the SOI nanowire light source external power efficiency is at least an order of magnitude better than the comparable bulk CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) light source. - Highlights: • We investigate effect of electric field on silicon avalanche electroluminescence. • With reach-through pn junctions the current and carrier densities are kept constant. • Higher electric fields increase short wavelength radiation. • Higher electric fields decrease long wavelength radiation. • The effect of the electric field indicates intraband transitions as main mechanism.

  10. Ganymede's internal structure including thermodynamics of magnesium sulfate oceans in contact with ice

    Vance, Steve; Bouffard, Mathieu; Choukroun, Mathieu; Sotin, Christophe

    2014-06-01

    The large icy moons of Jupiter contain vast quantities of liquid water, a key ingredient for life. Ganymede and Callisto are weaker candidates for habitability than Europa, in part because of the model-based assumption that high-pressure ice layers cover their seafloors and prevent significant water-rock interaction. Water-rock interactions may occur, however, if heating at the rock-ice interface melts the high pressure ice. Highly saline fluids would be gravitationally stable, and might accumulate under the ice due to upward migration, refreezing, and fractionation of salt from less concentrated liquids. To assess the influence of salinity on Ganymede's internal structure, we use available phase-equilibrium data to calculate activity coefficients and predict the freezing of water ice in the presence of aqueous magnesium sulfate. We couple this new equation of state with thermal profiles in Ganymede's interior-employing recently published thermodynamic data for the aqueous phase-to estimate the thicknesses of layers of ice I, III, V, and VI. We compute core and silicate mantle radii consistent with available constraints on Ganymede's mass and gravitational moment of inertia. Mantle radii range from 800 to 900 km for the values of salt and heat flux considered here (4-44 mW m-2 and 0 to 10 wt% MgSO4). Ocean concentrations with salinity higher than 10 wt% have little high pressure ice. Even in a Ganymede ocean that is mostly liquid, achieving such high ocean salinity is permissible for the range of likely S/Si ratios. However, elevated salinity requires a smaller silicate mantle radius to satisfy mass and moment-of-inertia constraints, so ice VI is always present in Ganymede's ocean. For lower values of heat flux, oceans with salinity as low as 3 wt% can co-exist with ice III. Available experimental data indicate that ice phases III and VI become buoyant for salinity higher than 5 wt% and 10 wt%, respectively. Similar behavior probably occurs for ice V at salinities

  11. Investigation of the influence of growth parameters on self-catalyzed ITO nanowires by high RF-power sputtering

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Yuantao; Feng, Lungang; Wang, Zuming; Wang, Tao; Yun, Feng

    2018-04-01

    Tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowires are successfully fabricated using a radio frequency (RF) sputtering technique with a high RF power of 250 W. The fabrication of the ITO nanowires is optimized through the study of oxygen flow rates, temperatures and RF power. The difference in the morphology of the ITO nanowires prepared by using a new target and a used target is observed and the mechanism for the difference is discussed in detail. A hollow structure and air voids within the nanowires are formed during the process of the nanowire growth. The ITO nanowires fabricated by this method demonstrated good conductivity (15 Ω sq-1) and a transmittance of more than 64% at a wavelength longer than 550 nm after annealing. Furthermore, detailed microstructure studies show that the ITO nanowires exhibit a large number of oxygen vacancies. As a result, it is expected that they can be useful for the fabrication of gas sensor devices.

  12. Electrical properties of fluorine-doped ZnO nanowires formed by biased plasma treatment

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Yicong; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Doping is an effective method for tuning electrical properties of zinc oxide nanowires, which are used in nanoelectronic devices. Here, ZnO nanowires were prepared by a thermal oxidation method. Fluorine doping was achieved by a biased plasma treatment, with bias voltages of 100, 200, and 300 V. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the nanowires treated at bias voltages of 100 and 200 V featured low crystallinity. When the bias voltage was 300 V, the nanowires showed single crystalline structures. Photoluminescence measurements revealed that concentrations of oxygen and surface defects decreased at high bias voltage. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggested that the F content increased as the bias voltage was increased. The conductivity of the as-grown nanowires was less than 103 S/m; the conductivity of the treated nanowires ranged from 1 × 104-5 × 104, 1 × 104-1 × 105, and 1 × 103-2 × 104 S/m for bias voltage treatments at 100, 200, and 300 V, respectively. The conductivity improvements of nanowires formed at bias voltages of 100 and 200 V, were attributed to F-doping, defects and surface states. The conductivity of nanowires treated at 300 V was attributed to the presence of F ions. Thus, we provide a method of improving electrical properties of ZnO nanowires without altering their crystal structure.

  13. Including crystal structure attributes in machine learning models of formation energies via Voronoi tessellations

    Ward, Logan; Liu, Ruoqian; Krishna, Amar; Hegde, Vinay I.; Agrawal, Ankit; Choudhary, Alok; Wolverton, Chris

    2017-07-01

    While high-throughput density functional theory (DFT) has become a prevalent tool for materials discovery, it is limited by the relatively large computational cost. In this paper, we explore using DFT data from high-throughput calculations to create faster, surrogate models with machine learning (ML) that can be used to guide new searches. Our method works by using decision tree models to map DFT-calculated formation enthalpies to a set of attributes consisting of two distinct types: (i) composition-dependent attributes of elemental properties (as have been used in previous ML models of DFT formation energies), combined with (ii) attributes derived from the Voronoi tessellation of the compound's crystal structure. The ML models created using this method have half the cross-validation error and similar training and evaluation speeds to models created with the Coulomb matrix and partial radial distribution function methods. For a dataset of 435 000 formation energies taken from the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD), our model achieves a mean absolute error of 80 meV/atom in cross validation, which is lower than the approximate error between DFT-computed and experimentally measured formation enthalpies and below 15% of the mean absolute deviation of the training set. We also demonstrate that our method can accurately estimate the formation energy of materials outside of the training set and be used to identify materials with especially large formation enthalpies. We propose that our models can be used to accelerate the discovery of new materials by identifying the most promising materials to study with DFT at little additional computational cost.

  14. MR features of the developing perianterior horn structure including subcallosal fasciculus in infants and children

    Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    To describe the changes in the magnetic resonance (MR) signal of the perianterior horn structure (PAS) with increasing age, we studied 69 infants and children aged between 3 days and 9.4 years (average: 2.8 years) without any neurological deficits. T1- and T2-weighted images and FLAIR (fluid attenuation inversion recovery) images were obtained in the axial plane. Based on a comparison of the intensity of the PAS with that of the cortex in each sequence (T1-WI/FLAIR/T2-WI), we classified the signal-intensity patterns into four types: I, low/low/high; II, low/high/high; III, iso/high/high; IV, high/low/low. Signal-intensity types I, II, III and IV were seen in 22, 8, 17, and 22 subjects, respectively, with younger subjects showing type I or II intensity patterns and older subjects showing type III or IV. In addition, T1-weighted and FLAIR images of subjects with a type I intensity pattern showed a rim of an isointensity component around the PAS that histologically coincided with migrating glial cells. The low-intensity area on FLAIR and T2-WI images of subjects with a type IV intensity pattern may represent myelinated fibers of the subcallosal fasciculus (ScF). The intensity of the MR signals of the PAS changes with increasing age, and this change may reflect histological features. A better understanding of these characteristics may help us to clarify myelination abnormalities, particularly those related to the ScF in the frontal lobe in infants and children. (orig.)

  15. Structural and functional effects of heavy metals on the nervous system, including sense organs, of fish

    Baatrup, E

    1991-01-01

    metals are well known pollutants in the aquatic environment. Their interaction with relevant chemical stimuli may interfere with the communication between fish and environment. 5. The affinity for a number of ligands and macromolecules makes heavy metals most potent neurotoxins. 6. The present Mini......1. Today, fish in the environment are inevitably exposed to chemical pollution. Although most hazardous substances are present at concentrations far below the lethal level, they may still cause serious damage to the life processes of these animals. 2. Fish depend on an intact nervous system......, including their sense organs, for mediating relevant behaviour such as food search, predator recognition, communication and orientation. 3. Unfortunately, the nervous system is most vulnerable and injuries to its elements may dramatically change the behaviour and consequently the survival of fish. 4. Heavy...

  16. Visualizing One-Dimensional Electronic States and their Scattering in Semi-conducting Nanowires

    Beidenkopf, Haim; Reiner, Jonathan; Norris, Andrew; Nayak, Abhay Kumar; Avraham, Nurit; Shtrikman, Hadas

    One-dimensional electronic systems constitute a fascinating playground for the emergence of exotic electronic effects and phases, within and beyond the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid paradigm. More recently topological superconductivity and Majorana modes were added to that long list of phenomena. We report scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements conducted on pristine, epitaxialy grown InAs nanowires. We resolve the 1D electronic band structure manifested both via Van-Hove singularities in the local density-of-states, as well as by the quasi-particle interference patterns, induced by scattering from surface impurities. By studying the scattering of the one-dimensional electronic states off various scatterers, including crystallographic defects and the nanowire end, we identify new one-dimensional relaxation regimes and yet unexplored effects of interactions. Some of these may bear implications on the topological superconducting state and Majorana modes therein. The authors acknowledge support from the Israeli Science Foundation (ISF).

  17. Resolution of fine biological structure including small narcomedusae across a front in the Southern California Bight

    McClatchie, Sam; Cowen, Robert; Nieto, Karen; Greer, Adam; Luo, Jessica Y.; Guigand, Cedric; Demer, David; Griffith, David; Rudnick, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    We sampled a front detected by SST gradient, ocean color imagery, and a Spray glider south of San Nicolas Island in the Southern California Bight between 14 and 18 October 2010. We sampled the front with an unusually extensive array of instrumentation, including the Continuous Underway Fish Egg Sampler (CUFES), the undulating In Situ Ichthyoplankton Imaging System (ISIIS) (fitted with temperature, salinity, oxygen, and fluorescence sensors), multifrequency acoustics, a surface pelagic trawl, a bongo net, and a neuston net. We found higher fluorescence and greater cladoceran, decapod, and euphausiid densities in the front, indicating increased primary and secondary production. Mesopelagic fish were most abundant in oceanic waters to the west of the front, market squid were abundant in the front associated with higher krill and decapod densities, and jack mackerel were most common in the front and on the shoreward side of the front. Egg densities peaked to either side of the front, consistent with both offshore (for oceanic squid and mesopelagic fish) and shelf origins (for white croaker and California halibut). We discovered unusually high concentrations of predatory narcomedusae in the surface layer of the frontal zone. Potential ichthyoplankton predators were more abundant either in the front (decapods, euphausiids, and squid) or shoreward of the front (medusae, chaetognaths, and jack mackerel). For pelagic fish like sardine, which can thrive in less productive waters, the safest place to spawn would be offshore because there are fewer potential predators.

  18. Some Mathematical Structures Including Simplified Non-Relativistic Quantum Teleportation Equations and Special Relativity

    Woesler, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The computations of the present text with non-relativistic quantum teleportation equations and special relativity are totally speculative, physically correct computations can be done using quantum field theory, which remain to be done in future. Proposals for what might be called statistical time loop experiments with, e.g., photon polarization states are described when assuming the simplified non-relativistic quantum teleportation equations and special relativity. However, a closed time loop would usually not occur due to phase incompatibilities of the quantum states. Histories with such phase incompatibilities are called inconsistent ones in the present text, and it is assumed that only consistent histories would occur. This is called an exclusion principle for inconsistent histories, and it would yield that probabilities for certain measurement results change. Extended multiple parallel experiments are proposed to use this statistically for transmission of classical information over distances, and regarding time. Experiments might be testable in near future. However, first a deeper analysis, including quantum field theory, remains to be done in future

  19. Nondestructive mapping of chemical composition and structural qualities of group III-nitride nanowires using submicron beam synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction

    Bonanno, P.L., E-mail: plb2@njit.edu [Georgia Institute of Technology/GTL, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Gautier, S. [LMOPS + UMI: Laboratoire Matériaux Optiques, Photonique et micro-nano Systèmes, UMR CNRS 7132, Université de Metz et SUPELEC, 2 rue E. Belin, 57070 Metz, France, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Gmili, Y.El.; Moudakir, T. [UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Sirenko, A.A. [Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Kazimirov, A. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cai, Z.-H. [Advanced Photon Source, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Martin, J. [LMOPS + UMI: Laboratoire Matériaux Optiques, Photonique et micro-nano Systèmes, UMR CNRS 7132, Université de Metz et SUPELEC, 2 rue E. Belin, 57070 Metz, France, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Goh, W.H. [Georgia Institute of Technology/GTL, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Martinez, A.; Ramdane, A.; Le Gratiet, L. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, UPR CNRS 20, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Maloufi, N. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Textures et Application aux Matériaux UMR CNRS 7078 Ile du Saulcy 57045 METZ cedex 1 (France); Assouar, M.B. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Ionisés et Applications, Nancy University, CNRS, BP 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cédex (France); Ougazzaden, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology/GTL, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France)

    2013-08-31

    Submicron beam synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques have been developed and used to accurately and nondestructively map chemical composition and material quality of selectively grown group III-nitride nanowires. GaN, AlGaN, and InGaN multi-quantum-well nanowires have been selectively grown on lattice matched and mismatched substrates, and the challenges associated with obtaining and interpreting submicron beam XRD results are addressed and solved. Nanoscale cathodoluminescence is used to examine exciton behavior, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy is used to verify chemical composition. Scanning transmission electron microscopy is later used to paint a more complete picture. The advantages of submicron beam XRD over other techniques are discussed in the context of this challenging material system. - Highlights: ► We used nano selective area growth to create nanowires of GaN, AlGaN and InGaN/GaN. ► We characterized them by synchrotron-based submicron beam X-ray diffraction (XRD). ► This technique accurately determined chemical and crystallographic properties. ► Challenges of XRD are addressed in the context of this challenging material system. ► Advantages of XRD over other characterization methods are discussed.

  20. Production of zinc oxide nanowires power with precisely defined morphology

    Mičová, Júlia; Remeš, Zdeněk; Chan, Yu-Ying

    2017-12-01

    The interest about zinc oxide is increasing thanks to its unique chemical and physical properties. Our attention has focused on preparation powder of 1D nanostructures of ZnO nanowires with precisely defined morphology include characterization size (length and diameter) and shape controlled in the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We have compared results of SEM with dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique. We have found out that SEM method gives more accurate results. We have proposed transformation process from ZnO nanowires on substrates to ZnO nanowires powder by ultrasound peeling to colloid followed by lyophilization. This method of the mass production of the ZnO nanowires powder has some advantages: simplicity, cost effective, large-scale and environment friendly.

  1. Metal nanogrids, nanowires, and nanofibers for transparent electrodes

    Hu, Liangbing; Wu, Hui; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Metals possess the highest conductivity among all room-temperature materials; however, ultrathin metal films demonstrate decent optical transparency but poor sheet conductance due to electron scattering from the surface and grain boundaries. This article discusses engineered metal nanostructures in the form of nanogrids, nanowires, or continuous nanofibers as efficient transparent and conductive electrodes. Metal nanogrids are discussed, as they represent an excellent platform for understanding the fundamental science. Progress toward low-cost, nano-ink-based printed silver nanowire electrodes, including silver nanowire synthesis, film fabrication, wire-wire junction resistance, optoelectronic properties, and stability, are also discussed. Another important factor for low-cost application is to use earth-abundant materials. Copper-based nanowires and nanofibers are discussed in this context. Examples of device integrations of these materials are also given. Such metal nanostructure-based transparent electrodes are particularly attractive for solar cell applications. © 2011 Materials Research Society.

  2. Metal nanogrids, nanowires, and nanofibers for transparent electrodes

    Hu, Liangbing

    2011-10-01

    Metals possess the highest conductivity among all room-temperature materials; however, ultrathin metal films demonstrate decent optical transparency but poor sheet conductance due to electron scattering from the surface and grain boundaries. This article discusses engineered metal nanostructures in the form of nanogrids, nanowires, or continuous nanofibers as efficient transparent and conductive electrodes. Metal nanogrids are discussed, as they represent an excellent platform for understanding the fundamental science. Progress toward low-cost, nano-ink-based printed silver nanowire electrodes, including silver nanowire synthesis, film fabrication, wire-wire junction resistance, optoelectronic properties, and stability, are also discussed. Another important factor for low-cost application is to use earth-abundant materials. Copper-based nanowires and nanofibers are discussed in this context. Examples of device integrations of these materials are also given. Such metal nanostructure-based transparent electrodes are particularly attractive for solar cell applications. © 2011 Materials Research Society.

  3. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    Kong, Desheng

    2010-01-13

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi2Se3 material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi2Se5 nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi 2Se5 nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [1120] direction with a rectangular cross-section and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with ∼ 1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitais to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  4. Computational and experimental analyses of the wave propagation through a bar structure including liquid-solid interface

    Park, Sang Jin [UST Graduate School, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Hui Nam [Division of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Doo Byung; Park, Jin Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    In this research, we study the propagation of longitudinal and transverse waves through a metal rod including a liquid layer using computational and experimental analyses. The propagation characteristics of longitudinal and transverse waves obtained by the computational and experimental analyses were consistent with the wave propagation theory for both cases, that is, the homogeneous metal rod and the metal rod including a liquid layer. The fluid-structure interaction modeling technique developed for the computational wave propagation analysis in this research can be applied to the more complex structures including solid-liquid interfaces.

  5. Copper Nanowire Production for Interconnect Applications

    Han, Jin-Woo (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of fabricating metallic Cu nanowires with lengths up to about 25 micrometers and diameters in a range 20-100 nanometers, or greater if desired. Vertically oriented or laterally oriented copper oxide structures (CuO and/or Cu2O) are grown on a Cu substrate. The copper oxide structures are reduced with 99+ percent H or H2, and in this reduction process the lengths decrease (to no more than about 25 micrometers), the density of surviving nanostructures on a substrate decreases, and the diameters of the surviving nanostructures have a range, of about 20-100 nanometers. The resulting nanowires are substantially pure Cu and can be oriented laterally (for local or global interconnects) or can be oriented vertically (for standard vertical interconnects).

  6. Multisensor system based on bisphthalocyanine nanowires for the detection of antioxidants

    Gay Martín, Mónica; Saja, José Antonio de; Muñoz, Raquel; Rodríguez-Méndez, María Luz

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sensors based on LnPc 2 nanowires can be prepared by electrodeposition (EDP). ► An electronic tongue can be constructed by combining EDP sensors with a data treatment system. ► The e-tongue is able to discriminate antioxidants of interest in the food industry. ► The fast preparation and excellent performance of these nanostructured sensors is an advantage. - Abstract: Electrophoretic deposition has been used to prepare thin films based on nanowires of three lanthanoid bisphthalocyaninates (including dysprosium, gadolinium and lutetium). Nanowires of similar structural characteristics have been obtained for the three compounds by tuning the electrophoretic conditions according to the redox properties of each phthalocyanine. The three electrodes have been used to form an array of sensors that has been employed to discriminate phenolic antioxidants of interest in the food industry including caffeic, gallic, vanillic and ferulic acids. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and the Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) of the electrochemical signals has allowed a clear discrimination of the four phenols analyzed according to the number of phenolic groups attached to the structure (monophenol, diphenol or triphenol). The PCA loading plots indicate that the three electrodes bring complementary information facilitating the discrimination of the studied solutions. In addition, good correlations between the intensity of the redox processes observed in the electrodes and the concentration of phenolic compounds have been found with detection limits in the range of 10 −5 –10 −6 mol L −1 and good reproducibility. The fast preparation of these nanowires based films and their excellent performance offer a new sensing platform for the detection of antioxidants in a fast, reliable way.

  7. Surface-Passivated AlGaN Nanowires for Enhanced Luminescence of Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes

    Sun, Haiding; Shakfa, Mohammad Khaled; Muhammed, Mufasila; Janjua, Bilal; Li, Kuang-Hui; Lin, Ronghui; Ng, Tien Khee; Roqan, Iman S.; Ooi, Boon S.; Li, Xiaohang

    2017-01-01

    investigation on the samples reveals almost intact nanowire structures after the passivation process. We demonstrated an approximately 49.7% enhancement in the ultraviolet light output power after 30-s KOH treatment on AlGaN nanowires grown on titanium

  8. Carbon−Silicon Core−Shell Nanowires as High Capacity Electrode for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Cui, Li-Feng; Yang, Yuan; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Cui, Yi

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel design of carbon-silicon core-shell nanowires for high power and long life lithium battery electrodes. Amorphous silicon was coated onto carbon nanofibers to form a core-shell structure and the resulted core-shell nanowires

  9. A versatile method to grow localized arrays of nanowires for highly sensitive capacitive devices

    Antohe, V.A.; Radu, A.; Yunus, S.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new approach to increase the detection efficiency of the capacitive sensing devices, by growing vertically aligned nanowires arrays, localized and confined on small interdigited electrodes structures. The metallic tracks are made using optical lithography, and the nanowires are reali...

  10. Synthesis and high catalytic properties of mesoporous Pt nanowire array by novel conjunct template method

    Zhong, Yi; Xu, Cai-Ling; Kong, Ling-Bin; Li, Hu-Lin

    2008-12-01

    A novel conjunct template method for fabricating mesoporous Pt nanowire array through direct current (DC) electrodeposition of Pt into the pores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template on Ti/Si substrate from hexagonal structured lyotropic liquid crystalline phase is demonstrated in this paper. The morphology and structure of as-prepared Pt nanowire array are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrocatalytic properties of Pt nanowire array for methanol are also investigated in detail. The results indicate that Pt nanowire array has the unique mesoporous structure of approximate 40-50 nm in diameter, which resulted in the high surface area and greatly improved electrocatalytic activity for methanol. The mesoporous Pt nanowire array synthesized by the new conjunct template method has a very promising application in portable fuel cell power sources.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and photoluminescence of tin oxide nanoribbons and nanowires

    Duraia, El-Shazly M.A., E-mail: duraia_physics@yahoo.co [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physics and Technology, 11 Ibragimov Street, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Mansorov, Z.A. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Tokmolden, S. [Institute of Physics and Technology, 11 Ibragimov Street, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2009-11-15

    In this work we report the successful formation of tin oxide nanowires and tin oxide nanoribbons with high yield and by using simple cheap method. We also report the formation of curved nanoribbon, wedge-like tin oxide nanowires and star-like nanowires. The growth mechanism of these structures has been studied. Scanning electron microscope was used in the analysis and the EDX analysis showed that our samples is purely Sn and O with ratio 1:2. X-ray analysis was also used in the characterization of the tin oxide nanowire and showed the high crystallinity of our nanowires. The mechanism of the growth of our1D nanostructures is closely related to the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process. The photoluminescence PL measurements for the tin oxide nanowires indicated that there are three stable emission peaks centered at wavelengths 630, 565 and 395 nm. The nature of the transition may be attributed to nanocrystals inside the nanobelts or to Sn or O vacancies occurring during the growth which can induce trapped states in the band gap.

  12. Magnetic properties of nickel nanowires decorated with cobalt nanoparticles fabricated by two step electrochemical deposition technique

    Maaz, K., E-mail: maaz@impcas.ac.cn [Materials Research Center, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Nanomaterials Research Group, Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 45650, Islamabad (Pakistan); Duan, J.L. [Materials Research Center, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Karim, S. [Nanomaterials Research Group, Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 45650, Islamabad (Pakistan); Chen, Y.H.; Yao, H.J.; Mo, D.; Sun, Y.M. [Materials Research Center, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Liu, J., E-mail: j.liu@impcas.ac.cn [Materials Research Center, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000 (China)

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate fabrication and magnetic characterization of novel nanostructures composed of Ni nanowires decorated with Co nanoparticles by two step etching and electrochemical deposition in polycarbonate template. Structural analysis confirmed the formation of nickel nanowires with diameter of 62 nm which are surrounded by cobalt nanoparticles of about 15 nm in diameter. By electron microscopy analyses it is evident that the nanoparticles are distributed on the surface of the nanowires. Analysis of magnetization data indicates that ferromagnetic Ni nanowires exhibit an easy axis of magnetization parallel to the wire long-axis while the angular dependence of coercivity indicates that magnetization reversal occurs through the curling process in these nanowires. An exchange bias accompanied by vertical shift in magnetization was observed below ∼20 K, measured under a cooling field of 1 kOe, which is attributed to the spin interactions between the spin-glass like surface layer and ferromagnetic core of the nanowires and nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Co-decorated Ni nanowires were fabricated by two-step electrodeposition technique. • The nanoparticles are distributed on the surface of nanowires. • Magnetization reversal occurs through the curling process in the nanowires. • Temperature dependent coercivity follows thermal activation model.

  13. Template-assisted fabrication of tin and antimony based nanowire arrays

    Zaraska, Leszek; Kurowska, Elżbieta; Sulka, Grzegorz D.; Jaskuła, Marian

    2012-10-01

    Antimony nanowires with diameters ranging from 35 nm to 320 nm were successfully prepared by simple, galvanostatic electrodeposition inside the pores of anodic alumina membranes from a citrate based electrolyte. The use of the potassium antimonyl tartrate electrolyte for electrodeposition results in the formation of Sb/Sb2O3 nanowires. The structural features of the nanowire arrays were investigated by FE-SEM, and the nanowire composition was confirmed by EDS and XRD measurements. A distinct peak at about 27.5° in the XRD pattern recorded for nanowires formed in the tartrate electrolyte was attributed to the presence of co-deposited Sb2O3. Three types of dense arrays of Sn-SnSb nanowires with diameters ranging from 82 nm to 325 nm were also synthesized by DC galvanostatic electrodeposition into the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes for the first time. Only Sn and SnSb peaks appeared in the XRD pattern and both phases seem to have a relatively high degree of crystallinity. The influence of current density applied during electrodeposition on the composition of nanowires was investigated. It was found that the Sb content in fabricated nanowires decreases with increasing current density. The diameters of all synthesized nanowires roughly correspond to the dimensions of the nanochannels of AAO templates used for electrodeposition.

  14. Effect of size on fracture and tensile manipulation of gold nanowires

    Wang, Fenying; Dai, Yanfeng; Zhao, Jianwei; Li, Qianjin; Zhang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The fracture of metallic nanowires has attracted much attention owing to its reliability of application in nanoelectromechanical system. In this paper, we studied the fracture of [100] single-crystal gold nanowire subjected to uniaxial tension. The statistical breaking position distributions showed that the size effects had dominated the deformation and fracture of nanowires, and the quasi-static tensile deformations are insensitive to the styles of tensile rates. Furthermore, it was observed that the small-sized nanowire broke in the middle with disordered crystalline structure; for the middle-sized nanowire, although slippage plane had maintained the lattice degree, the fracture also happened in the middle due to symmetric tension; for the large-sized nanowire, the slippage was destroyed by symmetric tension, which induced the broken neck at one end of the nanowire. When the nanowire width is less than 5a (“a” means lattice constant, 0.408 nm for gold), the mechanical strength is relatively strong with obvious uncertainty, which can be attributed to the surface atom effect; when the width is larger than 5a, the influence of size on the mechanical property is more obvious at the constant strain rate than that at the absolute rate. Finally, the mechanical strength of the nanowire decreases with the size increasing

  15. Effect of the nanowire diameter on the linearity of the response of GaN-based heterostructured nanowire photodetectors

    Spies, Maria; Polaczyński, Jakub; Ajay, Akhil; Kalita, Dipankar; Luong, Minh Anh; Lähnemann, Jonas; Gayral, Bruno; den Hertog, Martien I.; Monroy, Eva

    2018-06-01

    Nanowire photodetectors are investigated because of their compatibility with flexible electronics, or for the implementation of on-chip optical interconnects. Such devices are characterized by ultrahigh photocurrent gain, but their photoresponse scales sublinearly with the optical power. Here, we present a study of single-nanowire photodetectors displaying a linear response to ultraviolet illumination. Their structure consists of a GaN nanowire incorporating an AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructure, which generates an internal electric field. The activity of the heterostructure is confirmed by the rectifying behavior of the current–voltage characteristics in the dark, as well as by the asymmetry of the photoresponse in magnitude and linearity. Under reverse bias (negative bias on the GaN cap segment), the detectors behave linearly with the impinging optical power when the nanowire diameter is below a certain threshold (≈80 nm), which corresponds to the total depletion of the nanowire stem due to the Fermi level pinning at the sidewalls. In the case of nanowires that are only partially depleted, their nonlinearity is explained by a nonlinear variation of the diameter of their central conducting channel under illumination.

  16. Novel mechanical behaviors of wurtzite CdSe nanowires

    Fu, Bing [Shanghai Normal University, Department of Physics (China); Chen, Li [MCPHS University, School of Arts and Sciences (United States); Xie, Yiqun; Feng, Jie; Ye, Xiang, E-mail: yexiang@shnu.edu.cn [Shanghai Normal University, Department of Physics (China)

    2015-09-15

    As an important semiconducting nanomaterial, CdSe nanowires have attracted much attention. Although many studies have been conducted in the electronic and optical properties of CdSe NWs, the mechanical properties of Wurtzite (WZ) CdSe nanowires remain unclear. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the tensile mechanical properties and behaviors of [0001]-oriented Wurtzite CdSe nanowires. By monitoring the stretching processes of CdSe nanowires, three distinct structures are found: the WZ wire, a body-centered tetragonal structure with four-atom rings (denoted as BCT-4), and a structure that consists of ten-atom rings with two four-atom rings (denoted as TAR-4) which is observed for the first time. Not only the elastic tensile characteristics are highly reversible under unloading, but a reverse transition between TAR-4 and BCT-4 is also observed. The stretching processes also have a strong dependence on temperature. A tubular structure similar to carbon nanotubes is observed at 150 K, a single-atom chain is formed at 300, 350 and 450 K, and a double-atom chain is found at 600 K. Our findings on tensile mechanical properties of WZ CdSe nanowires does not only provide inspiration to future study on other properties of CdSe nanomaterials but also help design and build efficient nanoscale devices.

  17. Growth Mechanism of Nanowires: Binary and Ternary Chalcogenides

    Singh, N. B.; Coriell, S. R.; Su, Ching-Hua; Hopkins, R. H.; Arnold, B.; Choa, Fow-Sen; Cullum, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires exhibit very exciting optical and electrical properties including high transparency and a several order of magnitude better photocurrent than thin film and bulk materials. We present here the mechanism of nanowire growth from the melt-liquid-vapor medium. We describe preliminary results of binary and ternary selenide materials in light of recent theories. Experiments were performed with lead selenide and thallium arsenic selenide systems which are multifunctional material and have been used for detectors, acousto-optical, nonlinear and radiation detection applications. We observed that small units of nanocubes and elongated nanoparticles arrange and rearrange at moderate melt undercooling to form the building block of a nanowire. Since we avoided the catalyst, we observed self-nucleation and uncontrolled growth of wires from different places. Growth of lead selenide nanowires was performed by physical vapor transport method and thallium arsenic selenide nanowire by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method. In some cases very long wires (>mm) are formed. To achieve this goal experiments were performed to create situation where nanowires grew on the surface of solid thallium arsenic selenide itself.

  18. Gas Sensors Based on Semiconducting Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors

    Ping Feng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are unique sensing materials for the fabrication of gas sensors. In this article, gas sensors based on semiconducting nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs are comprehensively reviewed. Individual nanowires or nanowire network films are usually used as the active detecting channels. In these sensors, a third electrode, which serves as the gate, is used to tune the carrier concentration of the nanowires to realize better sensing performance, including sensitivity, selectivity and response time, etc. The FET parameters can be modulated by the presence of the target gases and their change relate closely to the type and concentration of the gas molecules. In addition, extra controls such as metal decoration, local heating and light irradiation can be combined with the gate electrode to tune the nanowire channel and realize more effective gas sensing. With the help of micro-fabrication techniques, these sensors can be integrated into smart systems. Finally, some challenges for the future investigation and application of nanowire field-effect gas sensors are discussed.

  19. Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of hierarchically branched ZnO nanostructures on ensembles of gold nanowires

    Ongaro, Michael; Gambirasi, Arianna; Favaro, Monica; Ugo, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ZnO branched nanofibres for photoelectrochemical applications. ► Branched nanostructures are obtained by electrochemical deposition of ZnO on gold template nanowires. ► Branched nanowires crystallographic phase determined by electron back scatter diffraction. ► Branched structures display improved performances for the photoelectrochemical oxidation of water. - Abstract: This study presents an electrosynthetic methodology to obtain hierarchically structured ZnO electrodes with improved surface area, by exploiting gold nanowires ensembles (3D-NEEs) as the growing substrate. By this way, semiconductor electrodes organized in the shape of fir-like branches are obtained. Branched nanofibres are characterized by electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), the latter technique allowing the determination of the crystalline habit of individual nanostructures. The hierarchical branched nanowires show enhanced performances with respect to water photooxidation in comparison with already known nanostructured materials such as 1D-ZnO nanowires.

  20. Chirality-Discriminated Conductivity of Metal-Amino Acid Biocoordination Polymer Nanowires.

    Zheng, Jianzhong; Wu, Yijin; Deng, Ke; He, Meng; He, Liangcan; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Xugang; Liu, Yaling; Li, Shunxing; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-27

    Biocoordination polymer (BCP) nanowires are successfully constructed through self-assembly of chiral cysteine amino acids and Cd cations in solution. The varied chirality of cysteine is explored to demonstrate the difference of BCP nanowires in both morphology and structure. More interestingly and surprisingly, the electrical property measurement reveals that, although all Cd(II)/cysteine BCP nanowires behave as semiconductors, the conductivity of the Cd(II)/dl-cysteine nanowires is 4 times higher than that of the Cd(II)/l-cysteine or Cd(II)/d-cysteine ones. The origin of such chirality-discriminated characteristics registered in BCP nanowires is further elucidated by theoretical calculation. These findings demonstrate that the morphology, structure, and property of BCP nanostructures could be tuned by the chirality of the bridging ligands, which will shed light on the comprehension of chirality transcription as well as construction of chirality-regulated functional materials.

  1. In situ x-ray diffraction study on AgI nanowire arrays

    Wang Yinhai; Ye Changhui; Wang Guozhong; Zhang Lide; Liu Yanmei; Zhao Zhongyan

    2003-01-01

    The AgI nanowire arrays were prepared in the ordered porous alumina membrane by an electrochemical method. Transmission electron microscopy observation shows that the AgI nanowires are located in the channels of the alumina membrane. In situ x-ray diffractions show that the nanowire arrays possess hexagonal close-packed structure (β-AgI) at 293 K, orienting along the (002) plane, whereas at 473 K, the nanowire arrays possess a body-centered cubic structure (α-AgI), orienting along the (110) plane. The AgI nanowire arrays exhibit a negative thermal expansion property from 293 to 433 K, and a higher transition temperature from the β to α phase. We ascribe the negative thermal expansion behavior to the phase transition from the β to α phase, and the elevated transition temperature to the radial restriction by the channels of alumina membrane

  2. Self-organized patterns along sidewalls of iron silicide nanowires on Si(110) and their origin

    Das, Debolina; Mahato, J. C.; Bisi, Bhaskar; Dev, B. N., E-mail: msbnd@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata 700032 (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Material Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-11-10

    Iron silicide (cubic FeSi{sub 2}) nanowires have been grown on Si(110) by reactive deposition epitaxy and investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning/transmission electron microscopy. On an otherwise uniform nanowire, a semi-periodic pattern along the edges of FeSi{sub 2} nanowires has been discovered. The origin of such growth patterns has been traced to initial growth of silicide nanodots with a pyramidal Si base at the chevron-like atomic arrangement of a clean reconstructed Si(110) surface. The pyramidal base evolves into a comb-like structure along the edges of the nanowires. This causes the semi-periodic structure of the iron silicide nanowires along their edges.

  3. Angular dependence of coercivity with temperature in Co-based nanowires

    Bran, C., E-mail: cristina.bran@icmm.csic.es [Institute of Materials Science of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Espejo, A.P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH) and Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Avenida Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Palmero, E.M. [Institute of Materials Science of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Escrig, J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH) and Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Avenida Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Vázquez, M. [Institute of Materials Science of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    The magnetic behavior of arrays of Co and CoFe nanowire arrays has been measured in the temperature range between 100 and 300 K. We have paid particular attention to the angular dependence of magnetic properties on the applied magnetic field orientation. The experimental angular dependence of coercivity has been modeled according to micromagnetic analytical calculations, and we found that the propagation of a transversal domain wall mode gives the best fitting with experimental observations. That reversal mode holds in the whole measuring temperature range, for nanowires with different diameters and crystalline structure. Moreover, the quantitative strength of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetization easy axis are determined to depend on the crystalline structure and nanowires diameter. The evolution of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy with temperature for nanowires with different composition gives rise to an opposite evolution of coercivity with increasing temperature: it decreases for CoFe while it increases for Co nanowire arrays.

  4. Long Silver Nanowires Synthesis by Pulsed Electrodeposition

    M.R. Batevandi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanowires were pulse electrodeposited into nanopore anodic alumina oxide templates. The effects of continuous and pulse electrodeposition waveform on the microstructure properties of the nanowire arrays were studied. It is seen that the microstructure of nanowire is depend to pulse condition. The off time duration of pulse waveform enables to control the growth direction of Ag nanowires.

  5. A range of complex probabilistic models for RNA secondary structure prediction that includes the nearest-neighbor model and more.

    Rivas, Elena; Lang, Raymond; Eddy, Sean R

    2012-02-01

    The standard approach for single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction uses a nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model with several thousand experimentally determined energy parameters. An attractive alternative is to use statistical approaches with parameters estimated from growing databases of structural RNAs. Good results have been reported for discriminative statistical methods using complex nearest-neighbor models, including CONTRAfold, Simfold, and ContextFold. Little work has been reported on generative probabilistic models (stochastic context-free grammars [SCFGs]) of comparable complexity, although probabilistic models are generally easier to train and to use. To explore a range of probabilistic models of increasing complexity, and to directly compare probabilistic, thermodynamic, and discriminative approaches, we created TORNADO, a computational tool that can parse a wide spectrum of RNA grammar architectures (including the standard nearest-neighbor model and more) using a generalized super-grammar that can be parameterized with probabilities, energies, or arbitrary scores. By using TORNADO, we find that probabilistic nearest-neighbor models perform comparably to (but not significantly better than) discriminative methods. We find that complex statistical models are prone to overfitting RNA structure and that evaluations should use structurally nonhomologous training and test data sets. Overfitting has affected at least one published method (ContextFold). The most important barrier to improving statistical approaches for RNA secondary structure prediction is the lack of diversity of well-curated single-sequence RNA secondary structures in current RNA databases.

  6. Direct Photonic-Plasmonic Coupling and Routing in Single Nanowires

    Yan, Rouxue; Pausauskie, Peter; Huang, Jiaxing; Yang, Piedong

    2009-10-20

    Metallic nanoscale structures are capable of supporting surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), propagating collective electron oscillations with tight spatial confinement at the metal surface. SPPs represent one of the most promising structures to beat the diffraction limit imposed by conventional dielectric optics. Ag nano wires have drawn increasing research attention due to 2D sub-100 nm mode confinement and lower losses as compared with fabricated metal structures. However, rational and versatile integration of Ag nanowires with other active and passive optical components, as well as Ag nanowire based optical routing networks, has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate that SPPs can be excited simply by contacting a silver nanowire with a SnO2 nanoribbon that serves both as an unpolarized light source and a dielectric waveguide. The efficient coupling makes it possible to measure the propagation-distance-dependent waveguide spectra and frequency-dependent propagation length on a single Ag nanowire. Furthermore, we have demonstrated prototypical photonic-plasmonic routing devices, which are essential for incorporating low-loss Ag nanowire waveguides as practical components into high-capacity photonic circuits.

  7. Nanowire arrays restore vision in blind mice.

    Tang, Jing; Qin, Nan; Chong, Yan; Diao, Yupu; Yiliguma; Wang, Zhexuan; Xue, Tian; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Jiayi; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2018-03-06

    The restoration of light response with complex spatiotemporal features in retinal degenerative diseases towards retinal prosthesis has proven to be a considerable challenge over the past decades. Herein, inspired by the structure and function of photoreceptors in retinas, we develop artificial photoreceptors based on gold nanoparticle-decorated titania nanowire arrays, for restoration of visual responses in the blind mice with degenerated photoreceptors. Green, blue and near UV light responses in the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are restored with a spatial resolution better than 100 µm. ON responses in RGCs are blocked by glutamatergic antagonists, suggesting functional preservation of the remaining retinal circuits. Moreover, neurons in the primary visual cortex respond to light after subretinal implant of nanowire arrays. Improvement in pupillary light reflex suggests the behavioral recovery of light sensitivity. Our study will shed light on the development of a new generation of optoelectronic toolkits for subretinal prosthetic devices.

  8. Optical emission of InAs nanowires

    Möller, M; De Lima Jr, M M; Cantarero, A; Chiaramonte, T; Cotta, M A; Iikawa, F

    2012-01-01

    Wurtzite InAs nanowire samples grown by chemical beam epitaxy have been analyzed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. The nanowires exhibit two main optical emission bands at low temperatures. They are attributed to the recombination of carriers in quantum well structures, formed by zincblende–wurtzite alternating layers, and to the donor–acceptor pair. The blue-shift observed in the former emission band when the excitation power is increased is in good agreement with the type-II band alignment between the wurtzite and zincblende sections predicted by previous theoretical works. When increasing the temperature and the excitation power successively, an additional band attributed to the band-to-band recombination from wurtzite InAs appears. We estimated a lower bound for the wurtzite band gap energy of approximately 0.46 eV at low temperature. (paper)

  9. Optical emission of InAs nanowires

    Möller, M.; de Lima, M. M., Jr.; Cantarero, A.; Chiaramonte, T.; Cotta, M. A.; Iikawa, F.

    2012-09-01

    Wurtzite InAs nanowire samples grown by chemical beam epitaxy have been analyzed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. The nanowires exhibit two main optical emission bands at low temperatures. They are attributed to the recombination of carriers in quantum well structures, formed by zincblende-wurtzite alternating layers, and to the donor-acceptor pair. The blue-shift observed in the former emission band when the excitation power is increased is in good agreement with the type-II band alignment between the wurtzite and zincblende sections predicted by previous theoretical works. When increasing the temperature and the excitation power successively, an additional band attributed to the band-to-band recombination from wurtzite InAs appears. We estimated a lower bound for the wurtzite band gap energy of approximately 0.46 eV at low temperature.

  10. Aging of Organic Nanowires

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Osadnik, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Organic semiconductors formed by epitaxial growth from small molecules such as the para-phenylenes or squaraines promise a vast application potential as the active ingredient in electric and optoelectronic devices. Their self-organization into organic nanowires or "nanofibers" adds a peculiar...... attribute, making them especially interesting for light generation in OLEDs and for light-harvesting devices such as solar cells. Functionalization of the molecules allows the customization of optical and electrical properties. However, aging of the wires might lead to a considerable decrease in device...... performance over time. In this study the morphological stability of organic nanoclusters and nanowires from the methoxy functionalized quaterphenylene, 4,4'''dimethoxy-1,1':4',1''4'',1'''-quaterphenylene (MOP4), is investigated in detail. Aging experiments conducted by atomic force microscopy under ambient...

  11. Characterization of Nanowire Photodetectors

    2016-11-28

    characterization system and picosecond pulsed laser source will be used to provide deeper insight into the fast charge carrier dynamics in the GaAsSb and...value of the current fluctuations for a particular frequency, f is the effective measurement bandwidth at the discrete frequency point, and IDS is...GaAsSb CS nanowires. The best fit of the spectra with the simulation carried out using Matlab revealed flicker noise at lower frequency having 1/f

  12. VLS-grown diffusion doped ZnO nanowires and their luminescence properties

    Roy, Pushan Guha; Dutta, Amartya; Das, Arpita; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Sen, Sayantani; Pramanik, Pallabi

    2015-01-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanowires were deposited by vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) method on to aluminum doped ZnO (AZO) thin films grown by sol-gel technique. For various device applications, current injection into such nanowires is critical. This is expected to be more efficient for ZnO nanowires deposited on to AZO compared to those deposited on to a foreign substrate such as silicon. In this work we compare the morphological and optical properties of nanowires grown on AZO with those grown under similar conditions on silicon (Si) wafers. For nanowires grown on silicon, diameters around 44 nm with heights around 2.2 μm were obtained. For the growth on to AZO, the diameters were around 90 nm while the heights were around 520 nm. Room temperature photoluminescence (RT-PL) measurements show improved near band-edge emission for nanowires grown on to AZO, indicating higher material quality. This is further established by low temperature photoluminescence (LT-PL) measurements where excitonic transitions with width as small as 14 meV have been obtained at 4 K for such structures. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) studies indicate the presence of Al in the nanowires, indicating a new technique for introduction of dopants into these structures. These results indicate that ZnO nanowires on sol-gel grown AZO thin films show promise in the development of various optoelectronic devices. (paper)

  13. Fabrication of diameter-modulated and ultrathin porous nanowires in anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Sulka, Grzegorz D., E-mail: Sulka@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Department of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30060 Krakow (Poland); Brzozka, Agnieszka [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, Al. Mickiewicza 30, Krakow 30-059 (Poland); Liu, Lifeng [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2011-05-30

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > AAO templates with modulated pore diameter were fabricated by pulse anodization. > HA pulse duration tunes the shape of pores and the structure of AAO channels. > Au, Ag, Ni and Ag-Au diameter-modulated nanowires were synthetized. > Porous ultrathin Au nanowires were obtained by dealloying Ag-Au nanowires. - Abstract: Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with modulated pore diameter were synthesized by pulse anodization in 0.3 M sulfuric acid at 1 deg. C. For AAO growth, a typical combination of alternating mild anodizing (MA) and hard anodizing (HA) pulses with applied potential pulses of 25 V and 35 V was applied. The control of the duration of HA pulses will provide an interesting way to tune the shape of pores and the structure of AAO channels. It was found that a non-uniform length of HA segments in cross section of AAO is usually observed when the HA pulse duration is shorter than 1.2 s. The pulse anodization performed with longer HA pulses leads to the formation of AAO templates with periodically modulated pore diameter and nearly uniform length of segments. Various diameter-modulated metallic nanowires (Au, Ag, Ni and Ag-Au) were fabricated by electrodeposition in the pores of anodic alumina membranes. A typical average nanowire diameter was about 30 nm and 48 nm for MA and HA nanowire segments, respectively. After a successful dealloying silver from Ag-Au nanowires, porous ultrathin Au nanowires were obtained.

  14. Photoluminescence study of as-grown vertically standing wurtzite InP nanowire ensembles.

    Iqbal, Azhar; Beech, Jason P; Anttu, Nicklas; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Samuelson, Lars; Borgström, Magnus T; Yartsev, Arkady

    2013-03-22

    We demonstrate a method that enables the study of photoluminescence of as-grown nanowires on a native substrate by non-destructively suppressing the contribution of substrate photoluminescence. This is achieved by using polarized photo-excitation and photoluminescence and by making an appropriate choice of incident angle of both excitation beam and photoluminescence collection direction. Using TE-polarized excitation at a wavelength of 488 nm at an incident angle of ∼70° we suppress the InP substrate photoluminescence relative to that of the InP nanowires by about 80 times. Consequently, the photoluminescence originating from the nanowires becomes comparable to and easily distinguishable from the substrate photoluminescence. The measured photoluminescence, which peaks at photon energies of ∼1.35 eV and ∼1.49 eV, corresponds to the InP substrate with zinc-blende crystal structure and to the InP nanowires with wurtzite crystal structure, respectively. The photoluminescence quantum yield of the nanowires was found to be ∼20 times lower than that of the InP substrate. The nanowires, grown vertically in a random ensemble, neither exhibit substantial emission polarization selectivity to the axis of the nanowires nor follow excitation polarization preferences observed previously for a single nanowire.

  15. Fabrication of diameter-modulated and ultrathin porous nanowires in anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Sulka, Grzegorz D.; Brzozka, Agnieszka; Liu, Lifeng

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → AAO templates with modulated pore diameter were fabricated by pulse anodization. → HA pulse duration tunes the shape of pores and the structure of AAO channels. → Au, Ag, Ni and Ag-Au diameter-modulated nanowires were synthetized. → Porous ultrathin Au nanowires were obtained by dealloying Ag-Au nanowires. - Abstract: Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes with modulated pore diameter were synthesized by pulse anodization in 0.3 M sulfuric acid at 1 deg. C. For AAO growth, a typical combination of alternating mild anodizing (MA) and hard anodizing (HA) pulses with applied potential pulses of 25 V and 35 V was applied. The control of the duration of HA pulses will provide an interesting way to tune the shape of pores and the structure of AAO channels. It was found that a non-uniform length of HA segments in cross section of AAO is usually observed when the HA pulse duration is shorter than 1.2 s. The pulse anodization performed with longer HA pulses leads to the formation of AAO templates with periodically modulated pore diameter and nearly uniform length of segments. Various diameter-modulated metallic nanowires (Au, Ag, Ni and Ag-Au) were fabricated by electrodeposition in the pores of anodic alumina membranes. A typical average nanowire diameter was about 30 nm and 48 nm for MA and HA nanowire segments, respectively. After a successful dealloying silver from Ag-Au nanowires, porous ultrathin Au nanowires were obtained.

  16. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires

    Van Dam, J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding the low-temperature electrical transport properties of semiconductor nanowires. The semiconductor nanowires (1-100 nm in diameter) are grown from nanoscale gold particles via a chemical process called vapor-liquid-solid (VLS)

  17. Electroluminescence from single nanowires by tunnel injection: an experimental study

    Zimmler, Mariano A; Bao Jiming; Shalish, Ilan; Yi, Wei; Yoon, Joonah; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Capasso, Federico

    2007-01-01

    We present a hybrid light-emitting diode structure composed of an n-type gallium nitride nanowire on a p-type silicon substrate in which current is injected along the length of the nanowire. The device emits ultraviolet light under both bias polarities. Tunnel injection of holes from the p-type substrate (under forward bias) and from the metal (under reverse bias) through thin native oxide barriers consistently explains the observed electroluminescence behaviour. This work shows that the standard p-n junction model is generally not applicable to this kind of device structure

  18. In Situ TEM Creation and Electrical Characterization of Nanowire Devices

    Kallesøe, Christian; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Booth, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    bridge devices in situ and relate these to the structure. We also describe processes to modify the contact and the nanowire surface after device formation. The technique we describe allows the direct analysis of the processes taking place during device formation and use, correlating specific nanoscale......We demonstrate the observation and measurement of simple nanoscale devices over their complete lifecycle from creation to failure within a transmission electron microscope. Devices were formed by growing Si nanowires, using the vapor–liquid–solid method, to form bridges between Si cantilevers. We...... structural and electrical parameters on an individual device basis....

  19. Synthesis of metallic ReO3 nanowires

    Myung, Dongshin; Lee, Yumin; Lee, Jaeyeon; Kim, Myung Hwa; Yu, Hak Ki; Lee, Jong-Lam; Baik, Jeong Min; Kim, Woong

    2010-01-01

    We present the synthesis of highly crystalline metallic rhenium trioxide (ReO 3 ) nanowires via a simple physical vapor transport at 300 C for the first time. Based on HRTEM, the ReO 3 nanowires exhibit a core of perfect cubic perovskite-type single crystal structure with a shell of thin amorphous and disordered structures of less than 2 nm in the near surface layers. Possibly this is due to proton intercalation induced by the surface reaction of single crystal ReO 3 with water. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Fluorinated alkyne-derived monolayers on oxide-free silicon nanowires via one-step hydrosilylation

    Nguyen Minh, Quyen; Pujari, Sidharam P.; Wang, Bin; Wang, Zhanhua; Haick, Hossam; Zuilhof, Han; Rijn, Cees J.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxide-free H-terminated silicon nanowires undergo efficient surface modification by reaction with fluorinated 1-alkynes (HC≡C−(CH 2 ) 6 C 8 H 17−x F x ; x = 0–17). • These surface-modified Si NWs are chemically stable under range of conditions (including acid, base). • The surface coating yields efficient electrical passivation as demonstrated by a near-zero electrochemical activity of the surface. - Abstract: Passivation of oxide-free silicon nanowires (Si NWs) by the formation of high-quality fluorinated 1-hexadecyne-derived monolayers with varying fluorine content has been investigated. Alkyl chain monolayers (C 16 H 30−x F x ) with a varying number of fluorine substituents (x = 0, 1, 3, 9, 17) were attached onto hydrogen-terminated silicon (Si−H) surfaces with an effective one-step hydrosilylation. This surface chemistry gives well-defined monolayers on nanowires that have a cylindrical core–shell structure, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and static contact angle (SCA) analysis. The monolayers were stable under acidic and basic conditions, as well as under extreme conditions (such as UV exposure), and provide excellent surface passivation, which opens up applications in the fields of field effect transistors, optoelectronics and especially for disease diagnosis.

  1. Fluorinated alkyne-derived monolayers on oxide-free silicon nanowires via one-step hydrosilylation

    Nguyen Minh, Quyen [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen (Netherlands); Nanosens, IJsselkade 7, 7201 HB Zutphen (Netherlands); Pujari, Sidharam P. [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen (Netherlands); Wang, Bin [The Department of Chemical Engineering and Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200003 (Israel); Wang, Zhanhua [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen (Netherlands); Haick, Hossam [The Department of Chemical Engineering and Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200003 (Israel); Zuilhof, Han [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen (Netherlands); Rijn, Cees J.M. van, E-mail: cees.vanrijn@wur.nl [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Stippeneng 4, 6708 WE Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Oxide-free H-terminated silicon nanowires undergo efficient surface modification by reaction with fluorinated 1-alkynes (HC≡C−(CH{sub 2}){sub 6}C{sub 8}H{sub 17−x}F{sub x}; x = 0–17). • These surface-modified Si NWs are chemically stable under range of conditions (including acid, base). • The surface coating yields efficient electrical passivation as demonstrated by a near-zero electrochemical activity of the surface. - Abstract: Passivation of oxide-free silicon nanowires (Si NWs) by the formation of high-quality fluorinated 1-hexadecyne-derived monolayers with varying fluorine content has been investigated. Alkyl chain monolayers (C{sub 16}H{sub 30−x}F{sub x}) with a varying number of fluorine substituents (x = 0, 1, 3, 9, 17) were attached onto hydrogen-terminated silicon (Si−H) surfaces with an effective one-step hydrosilylation. This surface chemistry gives well-defined monolayers on nanowires that have a cylindrical core–shell structure, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and static contact angle (SCA) analysis. The monolayers were stable under acidic and basic conditions, as well as under extreme conditions (such as UV exposure), and provide excellent surface passivation, which opens up applications in the fields of field effect transistors, optoelectronics and especially for disease diagnosis.

  2. In situ electron backscattered diffraction of individual GaAs nanowires

    Prikhodko, S.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)], E-mail: sergey@seas.ucla.edu; Sitzman, S. [Oxford Instruments America, Concord, MA 01742 (United States); Gambin, V. [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Kodambaka, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    We suggest and demonstrate that electron backscattered diffraction, a scanning electron microscope-based technique, can be used for non-destructive structural and morphological characterization of statistically significant number of nanowires in situ on their growth substrate. We obtain morphological, crystal phase, and crystal orientation information of individual GaAs nanowires in situ on the growth substrate GaAs(1 1 1) B. Our results, verified using transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction analyses of the same set of wires, indicate that most wires possess a wurtzite structure with a high density of thin structural defects aligned normal to the wire growth axis, while others grow defect-free with a zincblende structure. The demonstrated approach is general, applicable to other material systems, and is expected to provide important insights into the role of substrate structure on nanowire structure on nanowire crystallinity and growth orientation.

  3. Microscopic and magnetic properties of template assisted electrodeposited iron nanowires

    Irshad, M. I., E-mail: imrancssp@gmail.com; Mohamed, N. M., E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my; Yar, A., E-mail: asfandyarhargan@gmail.com [Department of Fundamental & Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia); Ahmad, F., E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Abdullah, M. Z., E-mail: zaki-abdullah@petronas.com.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 PERAK (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Nanowires of magnetic materials such as Iron, nickel, cobalt, and alloys of them are one of the most widely investigated structures because of their possible applications in high density magnetic recording media, sensor elements, and building blocks in biological transport systems. In this work, Iron nanowires have been prepared by electrodeposition technique using Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. The electrolyte used consisted of FeSO{sub 4.}6H{sub 2}O buffered with H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and acidized by dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. FESEM analysis shows that the asdeposited nanowires are parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. To fabricate the working electrode, a thin film of copper (∼ 220 nm thick) was coated on back side of AAO template by e-beam evaporation system to create electrical contact with the external circuit. The TEM results show that electrodeposited nanowires have diameter around 100 nm and are polycrystalline in structure. Magnetic properties show the existence of anisotropy for in and out of plane configuration. These nanowires have potential applications in magnetic data storage, catalysis and magnetic sensor applications.

  4. Review on Raman scattering in semiconductor nanowires: I. theory

    Cantarero, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Raman scattering is a nondestructive technique that is able to supply information on the crystal and electronic structures, strain, temperature, phonon-phonon, and electron-phonon interaction. In the particular case of semiconductor nanowires, Raman scattering provides additional information related to surfaces. Although correct, a theoretical approach to analyze the surface optical modes loses critical information when retardation is neglected. A comparison of the retarded and unretarded approaches clarifies the role of the electric and magnetic polarization in the Raman selection rules. Since most III-V compounds growing in the zincblende phase change their crystal structure to wurtzite when growing as nanowires, the polariton description will be particularized for these two important crystal phases. Confined phonons exist in cylindrical nanowires and couple with longitudinal and transverse modes due to the presence of the nanowire's surface. This coupling vanishes in the case of rotational symmetry. The boundary conditions of the electromagnetic fields on small-size nanowires (antenna effect) have a dramatic effect on the polarization properties of a Raman spectrum.

  5. Unveiling the Formation Pathway of Single Crystalline Porous Silicon Nanowires

    Zhong, Xing; Qu, Yongquan; Lin, Yung-Chen; Liao, Lei; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    Porous silicon nanowire is emerging as an interesting material system due to its unique combination of structural, chemical, electronic, and optical properties. To fully understand their formation mechanism is of great importance for controlling the fundamental physical properties and enabling potential applications. Here we present a systematic study to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the formation of porous silicon nanowires in a two-step silver-assisted electroless chemical etching method. It is shown that silicon nanowire arrays with various porosities can be prepared by varying multiple experimental parameters such as the resistivity of the starting silicon wafer, the concentration of oxidant (H2O2) and the amount of silver catalyst. Our study shows a consistent trend that the porosity increases with the increasing wafer conductivity (dopant concentration) and oxidant (H2O2) concentration. We further demonstrate that silver ions, formed by the oxidation of silver, can diffuse upwards and re-nucleate on the sidewalls of nanowires to initiate new etching pathways to produce porous structure. The elucidation of this fundamental formation mechanism opens a rational pathway to the production of wafer-scale single crystalline porous silicon nanowires with tunable surface areas ranging from 370 m2·g−1 to 30 m2·g−1, and can enable exciting opportunities in catalysis, energy harvesting, conversion, storage, as well as biomedical imaging and therapy. PMID:21244020

  6. Growth and Raman spectroscopy studies of gold-free catalyzed semiconductor nanowires

    Zardo, Ilaria

    2010-12-15

    The present Ph.D. thesis proposes two aims: the search for catalysts alternative to gold for the growth of silicon nanowires and the investigation of the structural properties of the gold-free catalyzed Si, Ge, and GaAs nanowires. The successful growth of gold free catalyzed silicon nanowires was obtained using Ga and In as catalyst. Hydrogen plasma conditions were needed during the growth process. We proposed a growth mechanism where the role of the hydrogen plasma is taken into account. The influence of the growth conditions on nanowire growth morphology and structural properties was investigated in detail. The TEM studies showed the occurrence of different kind of twin defects depending on the nanowire growth direction. The intersection of twins in different spatial directions in <111>-oriented nanowires or the periodicity of highly dense twins in <112>-oriented nanowires leads to the formation of hexagonal domains embedded in the diamond silicon structure. A simple crystallographic model which illustrates the formation of the hexagonal phase was proposed. The presence of the hexagonal domains embedded in the diamond silicon structure was investigated also by means of Raman spectroscopy. The measured frequencies of the E2g and A1g modes were found to be in agreement with frequencies expected from phonon dispersion folding. An estimation of the percentage of hexagonal structure with respect to the cubic structure was given. The relative percentage of the two structures was found to change with growth temperature. Spatially resolved Raman scattering experiments were also realized on single Si nanowires. The lattice dynamics of gold-free catalyzed Ge and GaAs nanowires was studied by means of Raman spectroscopy. We performed spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy experiments on single crystalline- amorphous core-shell Ge nanowires. The correlation with TEM studies on nanowires grown under the same conditions and with AFM measurements realized of the same nanowires

  7. The preparation and cathodoluminescence of ZnS nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Huang, Meng-Wen; Cheng, Yin-Wei; Pan, Ko-Ying; Chang, Chen-Chuan; Shieu, F.S.; Shih, Han C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ZnS nanowires have been achieved by thermal evaporation. ► The nanowires were 20–50 nm in diameter and up to tens of nanometers in length. ► Single-crystalline wurtzite and sphalerite ZnS phase are coexist in the nanowires. ► The ZnS nanowires showed almost identical blue luminescence at room temperature. ► ZnS nanowires may be appropriate for use in UV/blue LED phosphor materials. - Abstract: Single crystal ZnS nanowires were successfully synthesized in large quantities on Si (1 0 0) substrates by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition without using any catalyst. The morphology, composition, and crystal structure were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. SEM observations show that the nanowires have diameters about 20–50 nm and lengths up to several tens of micrometers. XRD and TEM results confirmed that the nanowires exhibited both wurtzite and zinc blende structures with growth directions aligned along [0 0 0 2] and [1 1 1], respectively. The CL spectrum revealed emission bands in the UV and blue regions. The blue emissions at 449 and ∼581 nm were attributed to surface states and impurity-related defects of the nanowires, respectively. The perfect crystal structure of the nanowires indicates their potential applications in nanotechnology and in the fabrication of nanodevices.

  8. X-ray diffraction from single GaAs nanowires

    Biermanns, Andreas

    2012-11-12

    In recent years, developments in X-ray focussing optics have allowed to produce highly intense, coherent X-ray beams with spot sizes in the range of 100 nm and below. Together with the development of new experimental stations, X-ray diffraction techniques can now be applied to study single nanometer-sized objects. In the present work, X-ray diffraction is applied to study different aspects of the epitaxial growth of GaAs nanowires. Besides conventional diffraction methods, which employ X-ray beams with dimensions of several tens of {mu}m, special emphasis lies on the use of nanodiffraction methods which allow to study single nanowires in their as-grown state without further preparation. In particular, coherent X-ray diffraction is applied to measure simultaneously the 3-dimensional shape and lattice parameters of GaAs nanowires grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. It is observed that due to a high density of zinc-blende rotational twins within the nanowires, their lattice parameter deviates systematically from the bulk zinc-blende phase. In a second step, the initial stage in the growth of GaAs nanowires on Si (1 1 1) surfaces is studied. This nanowires, obtained by Ga-assisted growth in molecular beam epitaxy, grow predominantly in the cubic zinc-blende structure, but contain inclusions of the hexagonal wurtzite phase close to their bottom interface. Using nanodiffraction methods, the position of the different structural units along the growth axis is determined. Because the GaAs lattice is 4% larger than silicon, these nanowires release their lattice mismatch by the inclusion of dislocations at the interface. Whereas NWs with diameters below 50 nm are free of strain, a rough interface structure in nanowires with diameters above 100 nm prevents a complete plastic relaxation, leading to a residual strain at the interface that decays elastically along the growth direction. Finally, measurements on GaAs-core/InAs-shell nanowire heterostructures are presented

  9. Investigation of optical properties of Cu/Ni multilayer nanowires embedded in etched ion-track template

    Xie, Lu [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yao, Huijun, E-mail: Yaohuijun@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Duan, Jinglai; Chen, Yonghui [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lyu, Shuangbao [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Maaz, Khan [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Nanomaterials Research Group, Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore 45650, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mo, Dan [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, Jie, E-mail: J.Liu@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sun, Youmei; Hou, Mingdong [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram of measurement of extinction spectra of Cu/Ni multilayer nanowire arrays embedded in the template after removing the gold/copper substrate. - Highlights: • The optical properties of Cu/Ni multilayer nanowire arrays were first investigated by UV/Vis/NIR spectrometer and it was confirmed that the extinction peaks strongly related to the periodicity of the multilayer nanowire. • The Ni segment was thought as a kind of impurity which can change the surface electron distribution and thereby the extinction peaks of nanowire. • Current work supplied the clear layer thickness information of Cu and Ni in Cu/Ni multilayer nanowire with TEM and EDS line-scan profile analysis. - Abstract: For understanding the interaction between light and noble/magnetism multilayer nanowires, Cu/Ni multilayer nanowires are fabricated by a multi-potential step deposition technique in etched ion-track polycarbonate template. The component and the corresponding layer thickness of multilayer nanowire are confirmed by TEM and EDS line-scan analysis. By tailoring the nanowire diameter, the Cu layer thickness and the periodicity of the nanowire, the extinction spectral of nanowire arrays exhibit an extra sensitivity to the change of structural parameters. The resonance wavelength caused by surface plasmon resonance increases obviously with increasing the nanowire diameter, the Cu layer thickness and the periodicity. The observations in our work can be explained by the “impurity effect” and coupled effect and can also be optimized for developing optical devices based on multilayer nanowires.

  10. Nanowire field effect transistors principles and applications

    Jeong, Yoon-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Nanowire Field Effect Transistor: Basic Principles and Applications” places an emphasis on the application aspects of nanowire field effect transistors (NWFET). Device physics and electronics are discussed in a compact manner, together with the p-n junction diode and MOSFET, the former as an essential element in NWFET and the latter as a general background of the FET. During this discussion, the photo-diode, solar cell, LED, LD, DRAM, flash EEPROM and sensors are highlighted to pave the way for similar applications of NWFET. Modeling is discussed in close analogy and comparison with MOSFETs. Contributors focus on processing, electrostatic discharge (ESD) and application of NWFET. This includes coverage of solar and memory cells, biological and chemical sensors, displays and atomic scale light emitting diodes. Appropriate for scientists and engineers interested in acquiring a working knowledge of NWFET as well as graduate students specializing in this subject.

  11. Lasing and ion beam doping of semiconductor nanowires

    Geburt, Sebastian

    2013-01-31

    Semiconductor nanowires exhibit extraordinary optical properties like highly localized light emission, efficient waveguiding and light amplification. Even the stimulation of laser oscillations can be achieved at optical pumping, making nanowires promising for optoelectronic applications. For successful integration into future devices, three major key challenges have to be faced: (1) the understanding of the fundamental properties, (2) the modification of the emission characteristics and (3) the investigation of the efficiency-limiting factors. All key challenges are addressed in this thesis: (1) The fundamental properties of CdS nanowire have been investigated to uncover the size limits for photonic nanowire lasers. Laser oscillations were observed at room temperature and the emission characteristics were correlated to the morphology, which allowed the determination of a minimum diameter and length necessary for lasing. (2) The emission characteristics of ZnO nanowires have been successfully modified by ion beam doping with Co. The structural investigations revealed a good recovery of the ion induced damage in the crystal lattice. Optical activation of the implanted Co ions was achieved and an intense intra-3d-emission confirmed successful modification. (3) The temporal decay of excited luminescence centers strongly depends on the interplay of luminescent ions and defects, thus offering an approach to investigate the efficiency-limiting processes. Mn implanted ZnS nanowires were investigated, as the temporal decay of the incorporated Mn ions can be described by a Foerster energy transfer model modified for nanostructures. The defect concentration was varied systematically by several approaches and the model could successfully fit the transients in all cases. The emission properties of Tb implanted ZnS nanowires were investigated and the temporal decay of the intra-4f-emission could also be fitted by the model, proving its accuracy for an additional element.

  12. Lasing and ion beam doping of semiconductor nanowires

    Geburt, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires exhibit extraordinary optical properties like highly localized light emission, efficient waveguiding and light amplification. Even the stimulation of laser oscillations can be achieved at optical pumping, making nanowires promising for optoelectronic applications. For successful integration into future devices, three major key challenges have to be faced: (1) the understanding of the fundamental properties, (2) the modification of the emission characteristics and (3) the investigation of the efficiency-limiting factors. All key challenges are addressed in this thesis: (1) The fundamental properties of CdS nanowire have been investigated to uncover the size limits for photonic nanowire lasers. Laser oscillations were observed at room temperature and the emission characteristics were correlated to the morphology, which allowed the determination of a minimum diameter and length necessary for lasing. (2) The emission characteristics of ZnO nanowires have been successfully modified by ion beam doping with Co. The structural investigations revealed a good recovery of the ion induced damage in the crystal lattice. Optical activation of the implanted Co ions was achieved and an intense intra-3d-emission confirmed successful modification. (3) The temporal decay of excited luminescence centers strongly depends on the interplay of luminescent ions and defects, thus offering an approach to investigate the efficiency-limiting processes. Mn implanted ZnS nanowires were investigated, as the temporal decay of the incorporated Mn ions can be described by a Foerster energy transfer model modified for nanostructures. The defect concentration was varied systematically by several approaches and the model could successfully fit the transients in all cases. The emission properties of Tb implanted ZnS nanowires were investigated and the temporal decay of the intra-4f-emission could also be fitted by the model, proving its accuracy for an additional element.

  13. Spectral element modelling of wave propagation in isotropic and anisotropic shell-structures including different types of damage

    Schulte, R T; Fritzen, C-P; Moll, J

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades, guided waves have shown great potential for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. These waves can be excited and sensed by piezoelectric elements that can be permanently attached onto a structure offering online monitoring capability. However, the setup of wave based SHM systems for complex structures may be very difficult and time consuming. For that reason there is a growing demand for efficient simulation tools providing the opportunity to design wave based SHM systems in a virtual environment. As usually high frequency waves are used, the associated short wavelength leads to the necessity of a very dense mesh, which makes conventional finite elements not well suited for this purpose. Therefore in this contribution a flat shell spectral element approach is presented. By including electromechanical coupling a SHM system can be simulated entirely from actuator voltage to sensor voltage. Besides a comparison to measured data for anisotropic materials including delamination, a numerical example of a more complex, stiffened shell structure with debonding is presented.

  14. Growth mechanism of silver nanowires synthesized by polyvinylpyrrolidone-assisted polyol reduction

    Gao Yan; Jiang Peng; Song Li; Liu Lifeng; Yan Xiaoqin; Zhou Zhenping; Liu Dongfang; Wang Jianxiong; Yuan Huajun; Zhang Zengxing; Zhao Xiaowei; Dou Xinyuan; Zhou Weiya; Wang Gang; Xie Sishen

    2005-01-01

    Silver (Ag) nanowires with a pentagonal cross section have been synthesized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-assisted polyol reduction in the presence of Pt nanoparticle seeds. The UV-visible absorption spectra and scanning electron microscopy have been used to trace the growth process of the Ag nanowires. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation further shows that the PVP molecules are adsorbed on the surface of the Ag nanowires through Ag : O coordination. Comparing with the growth process of Ag nanoparticles, a possible growth mechanism of the Ag nanowires has been proposed. It is implied that the PVP molecules are used as both a protecting agent and a structure-directing agent for the growth of Ag nanowires. It is concluded that the five-fold twinning Ag nanoparticles are formed through heterogenous nucleation after the introduction of Pt nanoparticle seeds and then grow anisotropically along the (110) direction, while the growth along (100) is relatively depressed

  15. Schottky barrier measurements on individual GaAs nanowires by X-ray photoemission microscopy

    Di Mario, Lorenzo [IMM-CNR, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Turchini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.turchini@cnr.it [ISM-CNR, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Zamborlini, Giovanni; Feyer, Vitaly [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Center Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Tian, Lin [IMM-CNR, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Schneider, Claus M. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Center Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Fakultät für Physik and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Rubini, Silvia [IOM-CNR, TASC Laboratory, Basovizza 34149, Trieste (Italy); Martelli, Faustino, E-mail: faustino.martelli@cnr.it [IMM-CNR, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The Schottky barrier at the interface between Cu and GaAs nanowires was measured. • Individual nanowires were investigated by X-ray Photoemission Microscopy. • The Schottky barrier at different positions along the nanowire was evaluated. - Abstract: We present measurements of the Schottky barrier height on individual GaAs nanowires by means of x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (XPEEM). Values of 0.73 and 0.51 eV, averaged over the entire wires, were measured on Cu-covered n-doped and p-doped GaAs nanowires, respectively, in agreement with results obtained on bulk material. Our measurements show that XPEEM can become a feasible and reliable investigation tool of interface formation at the nanoscale and pave the way towards the study of size-dependent effects on semiconductor-based structures.

  16. CdS nanowires formed by chemical synthesis using conjugated single-stranded DNA molecules

    Sarangi, S. N.; Sahu, S. N.; Nozaki, S.

    2018-03-01

    CdS nanowires were successfully grown by chemical synthesis using two conjugated single-stranded (ss) DNA molecules, poly G (30) and poly C (30), as templates. During the early stage of the synthesis with the DNA molecules, the Cd 2+ interacts with Poly G and Poly C and produces the (Cd 2+)-Poly GC complex. As the growth proceeds, it results in nanowires. The structural analysis by grazing angle x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the zinc-blende CdS nanowires with the growth direction of . Although the nanowires are well surface-passivated with the DNA molecules, the photoluminescence quenching was caused by the electron transfer from the nanowires to the DNA molecules. The quenching can be used to detect and label the DNAs.

  17. Static and dynamic magnetic properties of densely packed magnetic nanowire arrays

    Dmytriiev, O.; Al-Jarah, U.A.S.; Gangmei, P.

    2013-01-01

    and a continuous ferromagnetic thin film. In particular, the competition between anisotropies associated with the shape of the individual nanowires and that of the array as a whole has been studied. Measured and simulated hysteresis loops are largely anhysteretic with zero remanence, and the micromagnetic...... configuration is such that the net magnetization vanishes in directions orthogonal to the applied field. Simulations of the remanent state reveal antiferromagnetic alignment of the magnetization in adjacent nanowires and the formation of vortex flux closure structures at the ends of each nanowire....... The excitation spectra obtained from experiment and micromagnetic simulations are in qualitative agreement for magnetic fields applied both parallel and perpendicular to the axes of the nanowires. For the field parallel to the nanowire axes, there is also good quantitative agreement between experiment...

  18. Modulating the Optoelectronic Properties of Silver Nanowires Films: Effect of Capping Agent and Deposition Technique.

    Lopez-Diaz, D; Merino, C; Velázquez, M M

    2015-11-11

    Silver nanowires 90 nm in diameter and 9 µm in length have been synthesized using different capping agents: polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and alkyl thiol of different chain lengths. The nanowire structure is not influenced by the displacement of PVP by alkyl thiols, although alkyl thiols modify the lateral aggregation of nanowires. We examined the effect of the capping agent and the deposition method on the optical and electrical properties of films prepared by Spray and the Langmuir-Schaefer methodologies. Our results revealed that nanowires capped with PVP and C8-thiol present the best optoelectronic properties. By using different deposition techniques and by modifying the nanowire surface density, we can modulate the optoelectronic properties of films. This strategy allows obtaining films with the optoelectronic properties required to manufacture touch screens and electromagnetic shielding.

  19. Si Incorporation in InP Nanowires Grown by Au-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Lorenzo Rigutti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the growth, structural characterization, and conductivity studies of Si-doped InP nanowires grown by Au-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is shown that Si doping reduces the mean diffusion length of adatoms on the lateral nanowire surface and consequently reduces the nanowire growth rate and promotes lateral growth. A resistivity as low as 5.1±0.3×10−5 Ω⋅cm is measured for highly doped nanowires. Two dopant incorporation mechanisms are discussed: incorporation via catalyst particle and direct incorporation on the nanowire sidewalls. The first mechanism is shown to be less efficient than the second one, resulting in inhomogeneous radial dopant distribution.

  20. Modulating the Optoelectronic Properties of Silver Nanowires Films: Effect of Capping Agent and Deposition Technique

    D. Lopez-Diaz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanowires 90 nm in diameter and 9 µm in length have been synthesized using different capping agents: polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP and alkyl thiol of different chain lengths. The nanowire structure is not influenced by the displacement of PVP by alkyl thiols, although alkyl thiols modify the lateral aggregation of nanowires. We examined the effect of the capping agent and the deposition method on the optical and electrical properties of films prepared by Spray and the Langmuir-Schaefer methodologies. Our results revealed that nanowires capped with PVP and C8-thiol present the best optoelectronic properties. By using different deposition techniques and by modifying the nanowire surface density, we can modulate the optoelectronic properties of films. This strategy allows obtaining films with the optoelectronic properties required to manufacture touch screens and electromagnetic shielding.