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Sample records for nanotube-based fluidic devices

  1. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention is a...

  2. APR1400 Fluidic Device Sensitivity Test

    Choi, Nam Hyun; Chu, In Cheol; Min, Kyong Ho; Song, Chul Hwa

    2005-12-01

    In the safety injection tank at the emergency core cooling system of APR1400, a new safety design feature, passive fluidic device is equipped which includes no active driving system. It is essential to evaluate the new design feature with various experiments. For this reason, three categories of sensitivity tests have been performed in the present study. As the first sensitivity experiment, the effect of the height of the stand pipe was investigated. The second sensitivity test was conducted with removing the insert plate gasket to examine its effect. The effect of the expansion of the control nozzle width was ascertained from the third sensitivity test. The results of each test showed that the passive fluidic device which will be equipped in the SIT tank of APR1400 has great integrity and repeatability

  3. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    Blackburn, Jeffrey L. [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401-3305 USA; Ferguson, Andrew J. [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401-3305 USA; Cho, Chungyeon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3003 USA; Grunlan, Jaime C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station TX 77843-3003 USA

    2018-01-22

    Conversion of waste heat to voltage has the potential to significantly reduce the carbon footprint of a number of critical energy sectors, such as the transportation and electricity-generation sectors, and manufacturing processes. Thermal energy is also an abundant low-flux source that can be harnessed to power portable/wearable electronic devices and critical components in remote off-grid locations. As such, a number of different inorganic and organic materials are being explored for their potential in thermoelectric-energy-harvesting devices. Carbon-based thermoelectric materials are particularly attractive due to their use of nontoxic, abundant source-materials, their amenability to high-throughput solution-phase fabrication routes, and the high specific energy (i.e., W g-1) enabled by their low mass. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) represent a unique 1D carbon allotrope with structural, electrical, and thermal properties that enable efficient thermoelectric-energy conversion. Here, the progress made toward understanding the fundamental thermoelectric properties of SWCNTs, nanotube-based composites, and thermoelectric devices prepared from these materials is reviewed in detail. This progress illuminates the tremendous potential that carbon-nanotube-based materials and composites have for producing high-performance next-generation devices for thermoelectric-energy harvesting.

  4. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Thermoelectric Materials and Devices.

    Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Ferguson, Andrew J; Cho, Chungyeon; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2018-03-01

    Conversion of waste heat to voltage has the potential to significantly reduce the carbon footprint of a number of critical energy sectors, such as the transportation and electricity-generation sectors, and manufacturing processes. Thermal energy is also an abundant low-flux source that can be harnessed to power portable/wearable electronic devices and critical components in remote off-grid locations. As such, a number of different inorganic and organic materials are being explored for their potential in thermoelectric-energy-harvesting devices. Carbon-based thermoelectric materials are particularly attractive due to their use of nontoxic, abundant source-materials, their amenability to high-throughput solution-phase fabrication routes, and the high specific energy (i.e., W g -1 ) enabled by their low mass. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) represent a unique 1D carbon allotrope with structural, electrical, and thermal properties that enable efficient thermoelectric-energy conversion. Here, the progress made toward understanding the fundamental thermoelectric properties of SWCNTs, nanotube-based composites, and thermoelectric devices prepared from these materials is reviewed in detail. This progress illuminates the tremendous potential that carbon-nanotube-based materials and composites have for producing high-performance next-generation devices for thermoelectric-energy harvesting. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Rapid development of paper-based fluidic diagnostic devices

    Smith, S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a method for rapid and low-cost development of microfluidic diagnostic devices using paper-based techniques. Specifically, the implementation of fluidic flow paths and electronics on paper are demonstrated, with the goal of producing...

  6. CFD Analysis of the Safety Injection Tank and Fluidic Device

    Cho, Jai Oan; Nietiadi, Yohanes Setiawan; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Addad, Yacine [KUSTAR, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-05-15

    One of the most important components in the ECCS is the safety injection tank (SIT). Inside the SIT, a fluidic device is installed, which passively controls the mass flow of the safety injection and eliminates the need for low pressure safety injection pumps. As more passive safety mechanisms are being pursued, it has become more important to understand flow structure and the loss mechanism within the fluidic device. Current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations have had limited success in predicting the fluid flow accurately. This study proposes to find a more exact result using CFD and more realistic modeling to predict the performance during accident scenarios more accurately. The safety injection tank with fluidic device was analyzed thoroughly using CFD. The preliminary calculation used 60,000 meshes for the initial test calculation. The results fit the experimental results surprisingly despite its coarse grid. Nonetheless, the mesh resolution was increased to capture the vortex in the fluidic device precisely. Once a detailed CFD computation is finished, a small-scale experiment will be conducted for the given conditions. Using the experimental results and the CFD model, physical models can be improved to fit the results more accurately.

  7. Transient Characteristics of a Fluidic Device for Circulatory Jet Flow.

    Phan, Hoa Thanh; Dinh, Thien Xuan; Bui, Phong Nhu; Dau, Van Thanh

    2018-03-13

    In this paper, we report on the design, simulation, and experimental analysis of a miniaturized device that can generate multiple circulated jet flows. The device is actuated by a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) diaphragm. The flows in the device were studied using three-dimensional transient numerical simulation with the programmable open source OpenFOAM and was comparable to the experimental result. Each flow is verified by two hotwires mounted at two positions inside each consisting chamber. The experiment confirmed that the flow was successfully created, and it demonstrated good agreement with the simulation. In addition, a prospective application of the device as an angular rate sensor is also demonstrated. The device is robust, is minimal in size, and can contribute to the development of multi-axis fluidic inertial sensors, fluidic amplifiers, gas mixing, coupling, and analysis.

  8. Dynamics of fluidic devices with applications to rotor pitch links

    Scarborough, Lloyd H., III

    Coupling a Fluidic Flexible Matrix Composite (F2MC) to an air-pressurized fluid port produces a fundamentally new class of tunable vibration isolator. This fluidlastic device provides significant vibration reduction at an isolation frequency that can be tuned over a broad frequency range. The material properties and geometry of the F2MC element, as well as the port inertance, determine the isolation frequency. A unique feature of this device is that the port inertance depends on pressure so the isolation frequency can be adjusted by changing the air pressure. For constant port inertance, the isolation frequency is largely independent of the isolated mass so the device is robust to changes in load. A nonlinear model is developed to predict isolator length and port inertance. The model is linearized and the frequency response calculated. Experiments agree with theory, demonstrating a tunable isolation range from 9 Hz to 36 Hz and transmitted force reductions of up to 60 dB at the isolation frequency. Replacing rigid pitch links on rotorcraft with coupled fluidic devices has the potential to reduce the aerodynamic blade loads transmitted through the pitch links to the swashplate. Analytical models of two fluidic devices coupled with three different fluidic circuits are derived. These passive fluidlastic systems are tuned, by varying the fluid inertances and capacitances of each fluidic circuit, to reduce the transmitted pitch-link loads. The different circuit designs result in transmitted pitch link loads reduction at up to three main rotor harmonics. The simulation results show loads reduction at the targeted out-of-phase and in-phase harmonics of up to 88% and 93%, respectively. Experimental validation of two of the fluidic circuits demonstrates loads reduction of up to 89% at the out-of-phase isolation frequencies and up to 81% at the in-phase isolation frequencies. Replacing rigid pitch links on rotorcraft with fluidic pitch links changes the blade torsional

  9. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  10. Carbon nanotube-based sensing devices for human Arginase-1 detection

    S. Baldo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A new carbon nanotube-based device for detection of Arginase 1 (ARG-1 was produced. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were deposited between electrodes by dielectrophoresis (DEP in an accurate and reproducible way. This deposition method has the advantages of low cost and room temperature conditions and therefore, can be used on different kinds of substrates (silicon, glass, plastics allowing for large scale production of chemical or biological sensors. Scanning electrical microscope (SEM and electrical characterization have been performed on the biosensors before and after protein exposure. The devices were tested in the present work for the detection of ARG-1. They show high sensitivity and reproducibility, and can be easily and suitably modified to detect other proteins. Keywords: Carbon nanotube, Biosensor, Arginase, Dielectrophoresis, Biomarker, Protein

  11. Performance Verification for Safety Injection Tank with Fluidic Device

    Yune, Seok Jeong; Kim, Da Yong

    2014-01-01

    In LBLOCA, the SITs of a conventional nuclear power plant deliver excessive cooling water to the reactor vessel causing the water to flow into the containment atmosphere. In an effort to make it more efficient, Fluidic Device (FD) is installed inside a SIT of Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR 1400). FD, a complete passive controller which doesn't require actuating power, controls injection flow rates which are susceptible to a change in the flow resistance inside a vortex chamber of FD. When SIT Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) water level is above the top of the stand pipe, the water enters the vortex chamber through both the top of the stand pipe and the control ports resulting in injection of the water at a large flow rate. When the water level drops below the top of the stand pipe, the water only enters the vortex chamber through the control ports resulting in vortex formation in the vortex chamber and a relatively small flow injection. Performance verification of SIT shall be carried out because SITs play an integral role to mitigate accidents. In this paper, the performance verification method of SIT with FD is presented. In this paper, the equations for calculation of flow resistance coefficient (K) are induced to evaluate on-site performance of APR 1400 SIT with FD. Then, the equations are applied to the performance verification of SIT with FD and good results are obtained

  12. Rapid prototyping of nanotube-based devices using topology-optimized microgrippers

    Sardan, Özlem; Eichhorn, Volkmar; Petersen, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Nanorobotic handling of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using microgrippers is one of the most promising approaches for the rapid characterization of the CNTs and also for the assembly of prototypic nanotube-based devices. In this paper, we present pick-and-place nanomanipulation of multi-walled CNTs...... in a rapid and a reproducible manner. We placed CNTs on copper TEM grids for structural analysis and on AFM probes for the assembly of AFM super-tips. We used electrothermally actuated polysilicon microgrippers designed using topology optimization in the experiments. The microgrippers are able to open...... with an amorphous carbon layer, which is locally removed at the contact points with the microgripper. The assembled AFM super-tips are used for AFM measurements of microstructures with high aspect ratios....

  13. Manufacture of micro fluidic devices by laser welding using thermal transfer printing techniques

    Klein, R.; Klein, K. F.; Tobisch, T.; Thoelken, D.; Belz, M.

    2016-03-01

    Micro-fluidic devices are widely used today in the areas of medical diagnostics and drug research, as well as for applications within the process, electronics and chemical industry. Microliters of fluids or single cell to cell interactions can be conveniently analyzed with such devices using fluorescence imaging, phase contrast microscopy or spectroscopic techniques. Typical micro-fluidic devices consist of a thermoplastic base component with chambers and channels covered by a hermetic fluid and gas tight sealed lid component. Both components are usually from the same or similar thermoplastic material. Different mechanical, adhesive or thermal joining processes can be used to assemble base component and lid. Today, laser beam welding shows the potential to become a novel manufacturing opportunity for midsize and large scale production of micro-fluidic devices resulting in excellent processing quality by localized heat input and low thermal stress to the device during processing. For laser welding, optical absorption of the resin and laser wavelength has to be matched for proper joining. This paper will focus on a new approach to prepare micro-fluidic channels in such devices using a thermal transfer printing process, where an optical absorbing layer absorbs the laser energy. Advantages of this process will be discussed in combination with laser welding of optical transparent micro-fluidic devices.

  14. Development of fluidic device in SIT for Korean Next Generation Reactor I

    Cho, Bong Hyun; Lee, Joon; Bae, Yoon Young; Park, Jong Kyun

    1999-07-01

    The KNGR is to install a Fluidic Device at the bottom of the inner space of the SIT (Safety Injection Tank) to control the flow rate of safety injection coolant from SIT during LBLOCA. During the past two years, a scale model test to obtain the required flow characteristics of the device under the KNGR specific conditions has been performed using the experience and existing facility of AEA Technology (UK) with appropriate modifications. The performance verification test is to be performed this year to obtain optimum characteristics and design data of full size fluidic device. The purpose of the model test was to check the feasibility of developing the device and to produce a generic flow characteristic data. The test was performed in approximately 1/7 scale in terms of flow rate with full height and pressure. This report presents the details of system performance requirements for the device, design procedure for the fluidic device to be used, test facility and test method. The time dependent flow, pressure and Euler number are presented as characteristics curves and the most stable and the most effective flow control characteristic parameters were recommended through the evaluation. A method to predict the size of the fluidic device is presented. And a sizing algorithm, which can be used to conveniently determine the major geometric data of the device for various operating conditions, and a FORTRAN program to produce the prediction of performance curves have been developed. (author). 32 refs., 15 tabs., 47 figs

  15. Fluidic optics

    Whitesides, George M.; Tang, Sindy K. Y.

    2006-09-01

    Fluidic optics is a new class of optical system with real-time tunability and reconfigurability enabled by the introduction of fluidic components into the optical path. We describe the design, fabrication, operation of a number of fluidic optical systems, and focus on three devices, liquid-core/liquid-cladding (L2) waveguides, microfluidic dye lasers, and diffraction gratings based on flowing, crystalline lattices of bubbles, to demonstrate the integration of microfluidics and optics. We fabricate these devices in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with soft-lithographic techniques. They are simple to construct, and readily integrable with microanalytical or lab-on-a-chip systems.

  16. Fabrication of fluidic devices with 30 nm nanochannels by direct imprinting

    Cuesta, Irene Fernandez; Palmarelli, Anna Laura; Liang, Xiaogan

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we propose an innovative approach to the fabrication of a complete micro/nano fluidic system, based on direct nanoimprint lithography. The fabricated device consists of nanochannels connected to U-shaped microchannels by triangular tapered inlets, and has four large reservoirs for l...

  17. Customizable 3D Printed 'Plug and Play' Millifluidic Devices for Programmable Fluidics.

    Tsuda, Soichiro; Jaffery, Hussain; Doran, David; Hezwani, Mohammad; Robbins, Phillip J; Yoshida, Mari; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing is actively sought after in recent years as a promising novel technology to construct complex objects, which scope spans from nano- to over millimeter scale. Previously we utilized Fused deposition modeling (FDM)-based 3D printer to construct complex 3D chemical fluidic systems, and here we demonstrate the construction of 3D milli-fluidic structures for programmable liquid handling and control of biological samples. Basic fluidic operation devices, such as water-in-oil (W/O) droplet generators for producing compartmentalized mono-disperse droplets, sensor-integrated chamber for online monitoring of cellular growth, are presented. In addition, chemical surface treatment techniques are used to construct valve-based flow selector for liquid flow control and inter-connectable modular devices for networking fluidic parts. As such this work paves the way for complex operations, such as mixing, flow control, and monitoring of reaction / cell culture progress can be carried out by constructing both passive and active components in 3D printed structures, which designs can be shared online so that anyone with 3D printers can reproduce them by themselves.

  18. Customizable 3D Printed 'Plug and Play' Millifluidic Devices for Programmable Fluidics.

    Soichiro Tsuda

    Full Text Available Three dimensional (3D printing is actively sought after in recent years as a promising novel technology to construct complex objects, which scope spans from nano- to over millimeter scale. Previously we utilized Fused deposition modeling (FDM-based 3D printer to construct complex 3D chemical fluidic systems, and here we demonstrate the construction of 3D milli-fluidic structures for programmable liquid handling and control of biological samples. Basic fluidic operation devices, such as water-in-oil (W/O droplet generators for producing compartmentalized mono-disperse droplets, sensor-integrated chamber for online monitoring of cellular growth, are presented. In addition, chemical surface treatment techniques are used to construct valve-based flow selector for liquid flow control and inter-connectable modular devices for networking fluidic parts. As such this work paves the way for complex operations, such as mixing, flow control, and monitoring of reaction / cell culture progress can be carried out by constructing both passive and active components in 3D printed structures, which designs can be shared online so that anyone with 3D printers can reproduce them by themselves.

  19. Effects on LOCA mass and energy release of the SIT Fluidic device for SKN 3 and 4

    Song, Jeung Hyo; Kim, Tae Yoon; Choi, Han Rim; Choi, Chul Jin; Seo, Jong Tae

    2003-01-01

    A fluidic device is employed for the control of safety injection tank flow during a large break loss of coolant accident in Shin Kori Nuclear power plant Unit 3 and 4. It is installed in the safety injection tank and provides two stages of safety injection tank flow injection, initially high flow injection and then low flow injection after the reactor vessel downcomer annulus full. This allows a more effective use of safety injection tank water inventory during a loss of coolant accident. However, the fluidic device may have an adverse impact on the mass and energy release during the accident. That is, the steam mass and energy release will be increased by a considerable amount because the safety injection tank low flow injection via fluidic device is not credited to condense the steam flows through intact cold legs. The increased mass and energy releases have an impact on the peak pressure and temperature of the containment. This effect of the fluidic device is analyzed on the mass and energy release and the peak pressure and temperature of the containment. The calculation has been done using the CEFLASH-4A, the FLOOD3 with some modifications for the fluidic device and the CONTEMPT-LT code. The results show that the mass and energy release and the peak pressure and temperature were considerably increased when compared with the case without the fluidic device. However, the results satisfy the required design margin

  20. Effects on LOCA mass and energy release of the SIT Fluidic device for SKN 3 and 4

    Song, Jeung Hyo; Kim, Tae Yoon; Choi, Han Rim; Choi, Chul Jin; Seo, Jong Tae [Korea Power Engineering Company, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    A fluidic device is employed for the control of safety injection tank flow during a large break loss of coolant accident in Shin Kori Nuclear power plant Unit 3 and 4. It is installed in the safety injection tank and provides two stages of safety injection tank flow injection, initially high flow injection and then low flow injection after the reactor vessel downcomer annulus full. This allows a more effective use of safety injection tank water inventory during a loss of coolant accident. However, the fluidic device may have an adverse impact on the mass and energy release during the accident. That is, the steam mass and energy release will be increased by a considerable amount because the safety injection tank low flow injection via fluidic device is not credited to condense the steam flows through intact cold legs. The increased mass and energy releases have an impact on the peak pressure and temperature of the containment. This effect of the fluidic device is analyzed on the mass and energy release and the peak pressure and temperature of the containment. The calculation has been done using the CEFLASH-4A, the FLOOD3 with some modifications for the fluidic device and the CONTEMPT-LT code. The results show that the mass and energy release and the peak pressure and temperature were considerably increased when compared with the case without the fluidic device. However, the results satisfy the required design margin.

  1. Three-dimensional wax patterning of paper fluidic devices.

    Renault, Christophe; Koehne, Jessica; Ricco, Antonio J; Crooks, Richard M

    2014-06-17

    In this paper we describe a method for three-dimensional wax patterning of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs). The method is rooted in the fundamental details of wax transport in paper and provides a simple way to fabricate complex channel architectures such as hemichannels and fully enclosed channels. We show that three-dimensional μPADs can be fabricated with half as much paper by using hemichannels rather than ordinary open channels. We also provide evidence that fully enclosed channels are efficiently isolated from the exterior environment, decreasing contamination risks, simplifying the handling of the device, and slowing evaporation of solvents.

  2. Review on recent and advanced applications of monoliths and related porous polymer gels in micro-fluidic devices

    Vazquez, Mercedes; Paull, Brett

    2010-01-01

    This review critically summarises recent novel and advanced achievements in the application of monolithic materials and related porous polymer gels in micro-fluidic devices appearing within the literature over the period of the last 5 years (2005-2010). The range of monolithic materials has developed rapidly over the past decade, with a diverse and highly versatile class of materials now available, with each exhibiting distinct porosities, pore sizes, and a wide variety of surface functionalities. A major advantage of these materials is their ease of preparation in micro-fluidic channels by in situ polymerisation, leading to monolithic materials being increasingly utilised for a larger variety of purposes in micro-fluidic platforms. Applications of porous polymer monoliths, silica-based monoliths and related homogeneous porous polymer gels in the preparation of separation columns, ion-permeable membranes, preconcentrators, extractors, electrospray emitters, micro-valves, electrokinetic pumps, micro-reactors and micro-mixers in micro-fluidic devices are discussed herein. Procedures used in the preparation of monolithic materials in micro-channels, as well as some practical aspects of the micro-fluidic chip fabrication are addressed. Recent analytical/bioanalytical and catalytic applications of the final micro-fluidic devices incorporating monolithic materials are also reviewed.

  3. Thermo-fluidic devices and materials inspired from mass and energy transport phenomena in biological system

    Jian XIAO; Jing LIU

    2009-01-01

    Mass and energy transport consists of one of the most significant physiological processes in nature, which guarantees many amazing biological phenomena and activ-ities. Borrowing such idea, many state-of-the-art thermo-fluidic devices and materials such as artificial kidneys, carrier erythrocyte, blood substitutes and so on have been successfully invented. Besides, new emerging technologies are still being developed. This paper is dedicated to present-ing a relatively complete review of the typical devices and materials in clinical use inspired by biological mass and energy transport mechanisms. Particularly, these artificial thermo-fluidic devices and materials will be categorized into organ transplantation, drug delivery, nutrient transport, micro operation, and power supply. Potential approaches for innovating conventional technologies were discussed, corresponding biological phenomena and physical mechan-isms were interpreted, future promising mass-and-energy-transport-based bionic devices were suggested, and prospects along this direction were pointed out. It is expected that many artificial devices based on biological mass and energy transport principle will appear to better improve vari-ous fields related to human life in the near future.

  4. An experimental study of the flow characteristics of fluidic device in a passive safety injection tank

    Cho, Seok; Song, Chul Hwa; Won, Suon Yeon; Min, Kyong Ho; Chung, Moon Ki

    1998-01-01

    It is considered to adopt passive safety injection tank (SIT) as a enhanced safety feature in KNGR. Passive SIT employs a vortex chamber as a fluidic device, which control injection flow rate passively by the variation of flow resistance produced by vortex intensity within the vortex chamber. To investigate the flow characteristics of the vortex chamber many tests have been carried out by using small-scale test facility. In this report the effects of geometric parameters of vortex chamber on discharge flow characteristics and the velocity measurement result of flow field, measured by PIV, are presented and discussed. (author). 25 refs., 11 tabs., 31 figs

  5. Nanoparticle/nanotube-based nanoelectronic devices and chemically-directed assembly thereof

    Schmidt, Howard K [Cypress, TX

    2011-02-22

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a nanoelectronic device based on a nanostructure that may include a nanotube with first and second ends, a metallic nanoparticle attached to the first end, and an insulating nanoparticle attached to the second end. The nanoelectronic device may include additional nanostructures so a to form a plurality of nanostructures comprising the first nanostructure and the additional nanostructures. The plurality of nanostructures may arranged in a network comprising a plurality of edges and a plurality of vertices, wherein each edge comprises a nanotube and each vertex comprises at least one insulating nanoparticle and at least one metallic nanoparticle adjacent the insulating nanoparticle. The combination of at least one edge and at least one vertex comprises a diode. The device may be an optical rectenna.

  6. Lightweight carbon nanotube-based structural-energy storage devices for micro unmanned systems

    Rivera, Monica; Cole, Daniel P.; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Reddy, Arava L. M.; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Karna, Shashi P.; Bundy, Mark L.

    2012-06-01

    There is a strong need for small, lightweight energy storage devices that can satisfy the ever increasing power and energy demands of micro unmanned systems. Currently, most commercial and developmental micro unmanned systems utilize commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) lithium polymer batteries for their energy storage needs. While COTS lithium polymer batteries are the industry norm, the weight of these batteries can account for up to 60% of the overall system mass and the capacity of these batteries can limit mission durations to the order of only a few minutes. One method to increase vehicle endurance without adding mass or sacrificing payload capabilities is to incorporate multiple system functions into a single material or structure. For example, the body or chassis of a micro vehicle could be replaced with a multifunctional material that would serve as both the vehicle structure and the on-board energy storage device. In this paper we present recent progress towards the development of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based structural-energy storage devices for micro unmanned systems. Randomly oriented and vertically aligned CNT-polymer composite electrodes with varying degrees of flexibility are used as the primary building blocks for lightweight structural-supercapacitors. For the purpose of this study, the mechanical properties of the CNT-based electrodes and the charge-discharge behavior of the supercapacitor devices are examined. Because incorporating multifunctionality into a single component often degrades the properties or performance of individual structures, the performance and property tradeoffs of the CNT-based structural-energy storage devices will also be discussed.

  7. Development of a millimetrically scaled biodiesel transesterification device that relies on droplet-based co-axial fluidics

    Yeh, S. I.; Huang, Y. C.; Cheng, C. H.; Cheng, C. M.; Yang, J. T.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated a fluidic system that adheres to new concepts of energy production. To improve efficiency, cost, and ease of manufacture, a millimetrically scaled device that employs a droplet-based co-axial fluidic system was devised to complete alkali-catalyzed transesterification for biodiesel production. The large surface-to-volume ratio of the droplet-based system, and the internal circulation induced inside the moving droplets, significantly enhanced the reaction rate of immiscible liquids used here - soybean oil and methanol. This device also decreased the molar ratio between methanol and oil to near the stoichiometric coefficients of a balanced chemical equation, which enhanced the total biodiesel volume produced, and decreased the costs of purification and recovery of excess methanol. In this work, the droplet-based co-axial fluidic system performed better than other methods of continuous-flow production. We achieved an efficiency that is much greater than that of reported systems. This study demonstrated the high potential of droplet-based fluidic chips for energy production. The small energy consumption and low cost of the highly purified biodiesel transesterification system described conforms to the requirements of distributed energy (inexpensive production on a moderate scale) in the world.

  8. The multi-mode modulator: A versatile fluidic device for two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    Seeley, John V; Schimmel, Nicolaas E; Seeley, Stacy K

    2018-02-09

    A fluidic device called the multi-mode modulator (MMM) has been developed for use as a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) modulator. The MMM can be employed in a wide range of capacities including as a traditional heart-cutting device, a low duty cycle GC x GC modulator, and a full transfer GC x GC modulator. The MMM is capable of producing narrow component pulses (widths <50ms) while operating at flows compatible with high resolution chromatography. The sample path of modulated components is confined to the interior of a joining capillary. The joining capillary dimensions and the position of the columns within the joining capillary can be optimized for the selected modulation mode. Furthermore, the joining capillary can be replaced easily and inexpensively if it becomes fouled due to sample matrix components or column bleed. The principles of operation of the MMM are described and its efficacy is demonstrated as a heart-cutting device and as a GC x GC modulator. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A microfluidic device for simultaneous measurement of viscosity and flow rate of blood in a complex fluidic network

    Jun Kang, Yang; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity has been considered as one of important biophysical parameters for effectively monitoring variations in physiological and pathological conditions of circulatory disorders. Standard previous methods make it difficult to evaluate variations of blood viscosity under cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or hemodialysis. In this study, we proposed a unique microfluidic device for simultaneously measuring viscosity and flow rate of whole blood circulating in a complex fluidic network i...

  10. Hydrodynamics of Safety Injection Tank with Fluidic Device in Recent Regulation

    Bang, Young Seok; Yoo, Seung Hun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Safety Injection Tank (SIT) with Fluidic Device (FD) has been used in several APR1400 nuclear power plants. It was designed to provide a longer passive safety injection than the existing accumulator to improve the safety for Large Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LBLOCA) by changing the injected flow through the FD and the standpipe of the SIT. As a result, high flow injection phase and the subsequent low flow one can be achieved as longer than the existing accumulator. The present paper discusses the major concerns related to SIT hydrodynamics and the directions to resolution recently concerned. Modeling of SIT/FD by total hydraulic resistances, potential of nitrogen intrusion, and effect of initial pressure of SIT testing are included. Based on the discussion, a table of the important phenomena of the SIT/FD was proposed with the relevancy of the calculation models applied. The present paper discussed the SIT hydrodynamics including the modeling of SIT/FD by total hydraulic resistances, potential of nitrogen intrusion, and effect of initial pressure of SIT testing. Also a table of the important phenomena of the SIT/FD was proposed with the relevancy of the calculation models applied. The following conclusions are obtained uncertainty due to the assumption of the total Kfactor as constant for high flow, transition phase, and low flow phase should be considered and nitrogen intrusion phenomena during the transition phase should be considered with a conservatism, especially considering the current situation of nonmeasuring the standpipe level.

  11. Hydrodynamics of Safety Injection Tank with Fluidic Device in Recent Regulation

    Bang, Young Seok; Yoo, Seung Hun

    2016-01-01

    Safety Injection Tank (SIT) with Fluidic Device (FD) has been used in several APR1400 nuclear power plants. It was designed to provide a longer passive safety injection than the existing accumulator to improve the safety for Large Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LBLOCA) by changing the injected flow through the FD and the standpipe of the SIT. As a result, high flow injection phase and the subsequent low flow one can be achieved as longer than the existing accumulator. The present paper discusses the major concerns related to SIT hydrodynamics and the directions to resolution recently concerned. Modeling of SIT/FD by total hydraulic resistances, potential of nitrogen intrusion, and effect of initial pressure of SIT testing are included. Based on the discussion, a table of the important phenomena of the SIT/FD was proposed with the relevancy of the calculation models applied. The present paper discussed the SIT hydrodynamics including the modeling of SIT/FD by total hydraulic resistances, potential of nitrogen intrusion, and effect of initial pressure of SIT testing. Also a table of the important phenomena of the SIT/FD was proposed with the relevancy of the calculation models applied. The following conclusions are obtained uncertainty due to the assumption of the total Kfactor as constant for high flow, transition phase, and low flow phase should be considered and nitrogen intrusion phenomena during the transition phase should be considered with a conservatism, especially considering the current situation of nonmeasuring the standpipe level

  12. Engineering fluidic delays in paper-based devices using laser direct-writing.

    He, P J W; Katis, I N; Eason, R W; Sones, C L

    2015-10-21

    We report the use of a new laser-based direct-write technique that allows programmable and timed fluid delivery in channels within a paper substrate which enables implementation of multi-step analytical assays. The technique is based on laser-induced photo-polymerisation, and through adjustment of the laser writing parameters such as the laser power and scan speed we can control the depth and/or the porosity of hydrophobic barriers which, when fabricated in the fluid path, produce controllable fluid delay. We have patterned these flow delaying barriers at pre-defined locations in the fluidic channels using either a continuous wave laser at 405 nm, or a pulsed laser operating at 266 nm. Using this delay patterning protocol we generated flow delays spanning from a few minutes to over half an hour. Since the channels and flow delay barriers can be written via a common laser-writing process, this is a distinct improvement over other methods that require specialist operating environments, or custom-designed equipment. This technique can therefore be used for rapid fabrication of paper-based microfluidic devices that can perform single or multistep analytical assays.

  13. Polymer Coatings in 3D-Printed Fluidic Device Channels for Improved Cellular Adherence Prior to Electrical Lysis.

    Gross, Bethany C; Anderson, Kari B; Meisel, Jayda E; McNitt, Megan I; Spence, Dana M

    2015-06-16

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a polyjet-based three-dimensional (3D)-printed fluidic device where poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) or polystyrene (PS) were used to coat the sides of a fluidic channel within the device to promote adhesion of an immobilized cell layer. The device was designed using computer-aided design software and converted into an .STL file prior to printing. The rigid, transparent material used in the printing process provides an optically transparent path to visualize endothelial cell adherence and supports integration of removable electrodes for electrical cell lysis in a specified portion of the channel (1 mm width × 0.8 mm height × 2 mm length). Through manipulation of channel geometry, a low-voltage power source (500 V max) was used to selectively lyse adhered endothelial cells in a tapered region of the channel. Cell viability was maintained on the device over a 5 day period (98% viable), though cell coverage decreased after day 4 with static media delivery. Optimal lysis potentials were obtained for the two fabricated device geometries, and selective cell clearance was achieved with cell lysis efficiencies of 94 and 96%. The bottleneck of unknown surface properties from proprietary resin use in fabricating 3D-printed materials is overcome through techniques to incorporate PDMS and PS.

  14. Fluidic sampling

    Houck, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper covers the development of the fluidic sampler and its testing in a fluidic transfer system. The major findings of this paper are as follows. Fluidic jet samples can dependably produce unbiased samples of acceptable volume. The fluidic transfer system with a fluidic sampler in-line will transfer water to a net lift of 37.2--39.9 feet at an average ratio of 0.02--0.05 gpm (77--192 cc/min). The fluidic sample system circulation rate compares very favorably with the normal 0.016--0.026 gpm (60--100 cc/min) circulation rate that is commonly produced for this lift and solution with the jet-assisted airlift sample system that is normally used at ICPP. The volume of the sample taken with a fluidic sampler is dependant on the motive pressure to the fluidic sampler, the sample bottle size and on the fluidic sampler jet characteristics. The fluidic sampler should be supplied with fluid having the motive pressure of the 140--150 percent of the peak vacuum producing motive pressure for the jet in the sampler. Fluidic transfer systems should be operated by emptying a full pumping chamber to nearly empty or empty during the pumping cycle, this maximizes the solution transfer rate

  15. Detached-Eddy Simulation of a Fluidic Device for a Prediction of Pressure Loss Characteristics in a Low Flow Mode

    Lim, Sang Gyu; Lee, Suk Ho; Kim, Han Gon

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Power Reactor 1400(APR1400) adopts a passive flow controller in Safety Injection Tanks (SITs) as one of Advanced Design Features (ADFs). This device, called a 'Fluidic Device (FD)', controls the flow rate of safety injection water in a passive manner. A flow control mechanism varies the flow resistance in the vortex chamber corresponding to the SIT water level hence the flow rate can be adjusted by the specific flow resistance in a specific flow regime. A full-scale test was performed and the test results met the design requirement of APR1400. To enhance the performance of the FD more effectively, a series of CFD analysis were implemented and remedy of design modification was proposed on the basis of a series of CFD analysis. The results of CFD analysis showed that total discharge time of the fluidic device is to be increased by enhancing the K-factor in consequence of changing the control nozzle angle. However, a tendency of a pressure loss was under-estimated as a limitation of turbulence models such as Reynolds Averaged Navier- Stokes (RANS) models compared to the experimental data. This paper shows that pressure loss characteristics of the FD can be predicted using a Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) turbulence model, which can provide valuable flow characteristics far exceeding RANS simulations

  16. A microfluidic device for simultaneous measurement of viscosity and flow rate of blood in a complex fluidic network.

    Jun Kang, Yang; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Blood viscosity has been considered as one of important biophysical parameters for effectively monitoring variations in physiological and pathological conditions of circulatory disorders. Standard previous methods make it difficult to evaluate variations of blood viscosity under cardiopulmonary bypass procedures or hemodialysis. In this study, we proposed a unique microfluidic device for simultaneously measuring viscosity and flow rate of whole blood circulating in a complex fluidic network including a rat, a reservoir, a pinch valve, and a peristaltic pump. To demonstrate the proposed method, a twin-shaped microfluidic device, which is composed of two half-circular chambers, two side channels with multiple indicating channels, and one bridge channel, was carefully designed. Based on the microfluidic device, three sequential flow controls were applied to identify viscosity and flow rate of blood, with label-free and sensorless detection. The half-circular chamber was employed to achieve mechanical membrane compliance for flow stabilization in the microfluidic device. To quantify the effect of flow stabilization on flow fluctuations, a formula of pulsation index (PI) was analytically derived using a discrete fluidic circuit model. Using the PI formula, the time constant contributed by the half-circular chamber is estimated to be 8 s. Furthermore, flow fluctuations resulting from the peristaltic pumps are completely removed, especially under periodic flow conditions within short periods (T viscosity with respect to varying flow rate conditions [(a) known blood flow rate via a syringe pump, (b) unknown blood flow rate via a peristaltic pump]. As a result, the flow rate and viscosity of blood can be simultaneously measured with satisfactory accuracy. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to identify the viscosity of rat blood, which circulates in a complex fluidic network. These observations confirm that the proposed method can be used for

  17. Carbon nanotube based photocathodes

    Hudanski, Ludovic; Minoux, Eric; Schnell, Jean-Philippe; Xavier, Stephane; Pribat, Didier; Legagneux, Pierre; Gangloff, Laurent; Teo, Kenneth B K; Robertson, John; Milne, William I

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a novel photocathode which is an array of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), each MWCNT being associated with one p-i-n photodiode. Unlike conventional photocathodes, the functions of photon-electron conversion and subsequent electron emission are physically separated. Photon-electron conversion is achieved with p-i-n photodiodes and the electron emission occurs from the MWCNTs. The current modulation is highly efficient as it uses an optically controlled reconfiguration of the electric field at the MWCNT locations. Such devices are compatible with high frequency and very large bandwidth operation and could lead to their application in compact, light and efficient microwave amplifiers for satellite telecommunication. To demonstrate this new photocathode concept, we have fabricated the first carbon nanotube based photocathode using silicon p-i-n photodiodes and MWCNT bunches. Using a green laser, this photocathode delivers 0.5 mA with an internal quantum efficiency of 10% and an I ON /I OFF ratio of 30

  18. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei, E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, 38 ZheDa Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li, Jun [Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  19. Physical removal of metallic carbon nanotubes from nanotube network devices using a thermal and fluidic process

    Ford, Alexandra C; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M; Kane, Alexander A; Krafcik, Karen L; Léonard, François; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V; Billups, W Edward; Hauge, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is versatile and is applied to devices post-fabrication. (paper)

  20. The Development of Computer Code for Safety Injection Tank (SIT) with Fluidic Device(FD) Blowdown Test

    Lee, Joo Hee; Kim, Tae Han; Choi, Hae Yun; Lee, Kwang Won; Chung, Chang Kyu

    2007-01-01

    Safety Injection Tanks (SITs) with the Fluidic Device (FD) of APR1400 provides a means of rapid reflooding of the core following a large break Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), and keeping it covered until flow from the Safety Injection Pump (SIP) becomes available. A passive FD can provide two operation stages of a safety water injection into the RCS and allow more effective use of borated water in case of LOCA. Once a large break LOCA occurs, the system will deliver a high flow rate of cooling water for a certain period of time, and thereafter, the flow rate is reduced to a lower flow rate. The conventional computer code 'TURTLE' used to simulate the blowdown of OPR1000 SIT can not be directly applied to simulate a blowdown process of the SIT with FD. A new computer code is needed to be developed for the blowdown test evaluation of the APR1400 SIT with FD. Korea Power Engineering Company (KOPEC) has developed a new computer code to analyze the characteristics of the SIT with FD and validated the code through the comparison of the calculation results with the test results obtained by Ulchin 5 and 6 units pre-operational test and VAlve Performance Evaluation Rig (VAPER) tests performed by The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI)

  1. ZnO nanotube-based dye-sensitized solar cell and its application in self-powered devices

    Han Jingbin; Fan Fengru; Xu Chen; Lin Shisheng; Wang Zhonglin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Wei Min; Duan Xue, E-mail: zhong.wang@mse.gatech.edu, E-mail: weimin@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2010-10-08

    High-density vertically aligned ZnO nanotube arrays were fabricated on FTO substrates by a simple and facile chemical etching process from electrodeposited ZnO nanorods. The nanotube formation was rationalized in terms of selective dissolution of the (001) polar face. The morphology of the nanotubes can be readily controlled by electrodeposition parameters for the nanorod precursor. By employing the 5.1 {mu}m-length nanotubes as the photoanode for a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), a full-sun conversion efficiency of 1.18% was achieved. Furthermore, we show that the DSSC unit can serve as a robust power source to drive a humidity sensor, with a potential for self-powered devices.

  2. Facile Preparation of Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Transparent Conducting Networks for Flexible Noncontact Sensing Device

    Tai, Yanlong

    2016-04-12

    Here, we report the controllable fabrication of transparent conductive films (TCFs) for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS). How baking conditions influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (> 69 %, PET = 90 %), and good stability when subjected to cyclic loading (> 1000 cycles, better than indium tin oxide film) during processing. Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of TCFs were verified through a fully transparent, highly sensitive, rapid response, noncontact moisture-sensing device (5×5 sensing pixels).

  3. ZnO nanotube-based dye-sensitized solar cell and its application in self-powered devices

    Han, Jingbin

    2010-09-10

    Abstract High-density vertically aligned ZnO nanotube arrays were fabricated on FTO substrates by a simple and facile chemical etching process from electrodeposited ZnO nanorods. The nanotube formation was rationalized in terms of selective dissolution of the (001) polar face. The morphology of the nanotubes can be readily controlled by electrodeposition parameters for the nanorod precursor. By employing the 5.1 μm-length nanotubes as the photoanode for a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), a full-sun conversion efficiency of 1.18% was achieved. Furthermore, we show that the DSSC unit can serve as a robust power source to drive a humidity sensor, with a potential for self-powered devices. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Heating-Rate-Triggered Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Conducting Networks for a Highly Sensitive Noncontact Sensing Device

    Tai, Yanlong

    2016-01-28

    Recently, flexible and transparent conductive films (TCFs) are drawing more attention for their central role in future applications of flexible electronics. Here, we report the controllable fabrication of TCFs for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks through drop casting lithography of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) ink. How ink formula and baking conditions influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (>69%, PET = 90%), and good stability when subjected to cyclic loading (>1000 cycles, better than indium tin oxide film) during processing, when formulation parameters are well optimized (weight ratio of SWCNT to PEDOT:PSS: 1:0.5, SWCNT concentration: 0.3 mg/ml, and heating rate: 36 °C/minute). Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of TCFs were verified through a fully transparent, highly sensitive, rapid response, noncontact moisture-sensing device (5 × 5 sensing pixels).

  5. System-on-fluidics immunoassay device integrating wireless radio-frequency-identification sensor chips.

    Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Oonishi, Tadashi; Watanabe, Kazuki; Shiratori, Akiko; Funaoka, Sohei; Fukushima, Masao

    2014-09-01

    A simple and sensitive point-of-care-test (POCT) device for chemiluminescence (CL) immunoassay was devised and tested. The device consists of a plastic flow-channel reactor and two wireless-communication sensor chips, namely, a photo-sensor chip and a temperature-sensor chip. In the flow-channel reactor, a target antigen is captured by an antibody immobilized on the inner wall of the flow-channel and detected with enzyme labeled antibody by using CL substrate. The CL signal corresponding to the amount of antigen is measured by a newly developed radio-frequency-identification (RFID) sensor, which enables batteryless operation and wireless data communication with an external reader. As for the POCT device, its usage environment, especially temperature, varies for each measurement. Hence, temperature compensation is a key issue in regard to eliminating dark-signal fluctuation, which is a major factor in deterioration of the precision of the POCT device. A two-stage temperature-compensation scheme was adopted. As for the first stage, the signals of two photodiodes, one with an open window and one with a sealed window, integrated on the photo-sensor chip are differentiated to delete the dark signal. As for the second stage, the differentiated signal fluctuation caused by a temperature variation is compensated by using the other sensor chip (equipped with a temperature sensor). The dark-level fluctuation caused by temperature was reduced from 0.24 to 0.02 pA/°C. The POCT device was evaluated as a CL immunoassay of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). The flow rate of the CL reagent in the flow channel was optimized. As a result, the detection limit of the POCT device was 0.08 ng/ml (i.e., 0.4 μIU/ml). Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Flash μ-fluidics: a rapid prototyping method for fabricating microfluidic devices

    Buttner, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidics has advanced in terms of design and structures; however, fabrication methods are time-consuming or expensive relative to facility costs and equipment needed. This work demonstrates a fast and economically viable 2D/3D maskless digital light-projection method based on a stereolithography process. Unlike other fabrication methods, one exposure step is used to form the whole device. Flash microfluidics is achieved by incorporating bonding and channel fabrication of complex structures in just 2.5 s to 4 s and by fabricating channel heights between 25 μm and 150 μm with photopolymer resin. The features of this fabrication technique, such as time and cost saving and easy fabrication, are used to build devices that are mostly needed in microfluidic/lab-on-chip systems. Due to the fast production method and low initial setup costs, the process could be used for point of care applications. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Flash μ-fluidics: a rapid prototyping method for fabricating microfluidic devices

    Buttner, Ulrich; Sivashankar, Shilpa; Agambayev, Sumeyra; Mashraei, Yousof; Salama, Khaled N.

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics has advanced in terms of design and structures; however, fabrication methods are time-consuming or expensive relative to facility costs and equipment needed. This work demonstrates a fast and economically viable 2D/3D maskless digital light-projection method based on a stereolithography process. Unlike other fabrication methods, one exposure step is used to form the whole device. Flash microfluidics is achieved by incorporating bonding and channel fabrication of complex structures in just 2.5 s to 4 s and by fabricating channel heights between 25 μm and 150 μm with photopolymer resin. The features of this fabrication technique, such as time and cost saving and easy fabrication, are used to build devices that are mostly needed in microfluidic/lab-on-chip systems. Due to the fast production method and low initial setup costs, the process could be used for point of care applications. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. Fluidic pumps

    Priestman, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    A fluidic pump has primary and secondary vessels connected by a pipe, a displacement vessel having liquid to be delivered through a pipe via a rectifier provided with a feed tank. A drive unit delivers pressure fluid to a line to raise liquid and compress trapped gas or liquid in the space, including the pipe between the liquids in the two vessels and thus drive liquid out of the displacement vessel. The driving gas is therefore separated by the barrier liquid and the trapped gas or liquid from the liquid to be pumped which liquid could be e.g. radioactive. (author)

  9. Encapsulation of Fluidic Tubing and Microelectrodes in Microfluidic Devices: Integrating Off-Chip Process and Coupling Conventional Capillary Electrophoresis with Electrochemical Detection.

    Becirovic, Vedada; Doonan, Steven R; Martin, R Scott

    2013-08-21

    In this paper, an approach to fabricate epoxy or polystyrene microdevices with encapsulated tubing and electrodes is described. Key features of this approach include a fixed alignment between the fluidic tubing and electrodes, the ability to polish the device when desired, and the low dead volume nature of the fluidic interconnects. It is shown that a variety of tubing can be encapsulated with this approach, including fused silica capillary, polyetheretherketone (PEEK), and perfluoroalkoxy (PFA), with the resulting tubing/microchip interface not leading to significant band broadening or plug dilution. The applicability of the devices with embedded tubing is demonstrated by integrating several off-chip analytical methods to the microchip. This includes droplet transfer, droplet desegmentation, and microchip-based flow injection analysis. Off-chip generated droplets can be transferred to the microchip with minimal coalescence, while flow injection studies showed improved peak shape and sensitivity when compared to the use of fluidic interconnects with an appreciable dead volume. Importantly, it is shown that this low dead volume approach can be extended to also enable the integration of conventional capillary electrophoresis (CE) with electrochemical detection. This is accomplished by embedding fused silica capillary along with palladium (for grounding the electrophoresis voltage) and platinum (for detection) electrodes. With this approach, up to 128,000 theoretical plates for dopamine was possible. In all cases, the tubing and electrodes are housed in a rigid base; this results in extremely robust devices that will be of interest to researchers wanting to develop microchips for use by non-experts.

  10. Diffusion dynamics in micro-fluidic dye lasers

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the bleaching dynamics that occur in opto-fluidic dye lasers, where the liquid laser dye in a channel is locally bleached due to optical pumping. Our studies suggest that for micro-fluidic devices, the dye bleaching may be compensated through diffusion of dye molecules alone....... By relying on diffusion rather than convection to generate the necessary dye replenishment, our observation potentially allows for a significant simplification of opto-fluidic dye laser device layouts, omitting the need for cumbersome and costly external fluidic handling or on-chip micro-fluidic pumping...

  11. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  12. A study on the effect of fluidic device installed in a safety injection tank on thermal-hydraulic phenomena of large break loss of coolant accident

    Chung, Young Jong; Bae, Kyoo Hwan; Song, Jin Ho; Sim, Suk Ku; Park, Jong Kyun

    1999-03-01

    The performance of the Safety Injection Tank (SIT) with fluidic device (advanced SIT) is analyzed for the large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) using RELAP5/MOD3.1-KREM. First the case is analyzed using the conventional SIT. Among various cases the case with 4-split downcomer, discharge coefficient Cd=0.6, MCP trip with reactor trip and break location of cold leg discharge side with the pressurizer is found to be the most limiting case. For the same condition, the advanced SIT results the similar PCT, however it can maintain adequately the liquid level in the downcomer. By changing the ECCS location from the current injection to the cold leg elevations, PCT is improved by 75 K. (Author). 6 refs., 4 tabs., 54 figs

  13. A fluidic device for the controlled formation and real-time monitoring of soft membranes self-assembled at liquid interfaces.

    Mendoza-Meinhardt, Arturo; Botto, Lorenzo; Mata, Alvaro

    2018-02-13

    Membrane materials formed at the interface between two liquids have found applications in a large variety of technologies, from sensors to drug-delivery and catalysis. However, studying the formation of these membranes in real-time presents considerable challenges, owing to the difficulty of prescribing the location and instant of formation of the membrane, the difficulty of observing time-dependent membrane shape and thickness, and the poor reproducibility of results obtained using conventional mixing procedures. Here we report a fluidic device that facilitates characterisation of the time-dependent thickness, morphology and mass transport properties of materials self-assembled at fluid-fluid interfaces. In the proposed device the membrane forms from the controlled coalescence of two liquid menisci in a linear open channel. The linear geometry and controlled mixing of the solutions facilitate real-time visualisation, manipulation and improve reproducibility. Because of its small dimensions, the device can be used in conjunction with standard microscopy methods and reduces the required volumes of potentially expensive reagents. As an example application to tissue engineering, we use the device to characterise interfacial membranes formed by supra-molecular self-assembly of peptide-amphiphiles with either an elastin-like-protein or hyaluronic acid. The device can be adapted to study self-assembling membranes for applications that extend beyond bioengineering.

  14. MEMS fluidic actuator

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K [Albuquerque, NM; Johnston, Gabriel A [Trophy Club, TX; Rohrer, Brandon R [Albuquerque, NM; Galambos, Paul C [Albuquerque, NM; Okandan, Murat [Albuquerque, NM

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  15. Point of care with micro fluidic paper based device integrated with nano zeolite-graphene oxide nanoflakes for electrochemical sensing of ketamine.

    Narang, Jagriti; Malhotra, Nitesh; Singhal, Chaitali; Mathur, Ashish; Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Anil, Anusree; Ingle, Aviraj; Pundir, Chandra S

    2017-02-15

    The present study was aimed to develop an ultrasensitive technique for electroanalysis of ketamine; a date rape drug. It involved the fabrication of nano-hybrid based electrochemical micro fluidic paper-based analytical device (EμPADs) for electrochemical sensing of ketamine. A paper chip was developed using zeolites nanoflakes and graphene-oxide nanocrystals (Zeo-GO). EμPAD offers many advantages such as facile approach, economical and potential for commercialization. Nanocrystal modified EμPAD showed wide linear range 0.001-5nM/mL and a very low detection limit of 0.001nM/mL. The developed sensor was tested in real time samples like alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks and found good correlation (99%). The hyphenation of EμPAD integrated with nanocrystalline Zeo-GO for detection of ketamine has immense prospective for field-testing platforms. An extensive development could be made for industrial translation of this fabricated device. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Carbon Nanotube based Nanotechnolgy

    Meyyappan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT) was discovered in the early 1990s and is an off-spring of C60(the fullerene or buckyball). CNT, depending on chirality and diameter, can be metallic or semiconductor and thus allows formation of metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. CNT exhibits extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties and offers remarkable potential for revolutionary applications in electronics devices, computing and data storage technology, sensors, composites, storage of hydrogen or lithium for battery development, nanoelectromechanical systems(NEMS), and as tip in scanning probe microscopy(SPM) for imaging and nanolithography. Thus the CNT synthesis, characterization and applications touch upon all disciplines of science and engineering. A common growth method now is based on CVD though surface catalysis is key to synthesis, in contrast to many CVD applications common in microelectronics. A plasma based variation is gaining some attention. This talk will provide an overview of CNT properties, growth methods, applications, and research challenges and opportunities ahead.

  17. Benchmark and parametric study of a passive flow controller (fluidic device) for the development of optimal designs using a CFD code

    Lim, Sang-Gyu; Lee, Seok-Ho; Kim, Han-Gon

    2010-01-01

    A passive flow controller or a fluidic device (FD) is used for a safety injection system (SIS) for efficient use of nuclear reactor emergency cooling water since it can control the injection flow rate in a passive and optimal way. The performance of the FD is represented by pressure loss coefficient (K-factor) which is further affected by the configuration of the components such as a control port direction and a nozzle angle. The flow control mechanism that is varied according to the water level inside a vortex chamber determines the duration of the safety injection. This paper deals with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis for simulating the flow characteristics of the FD using the ANSYS CFX 11.0. The CFD analysis is benchmarked against existing experimental data to obtain applicability to the prediction of the FD performance in terms of K-factor. The CFD calculation is implemented with Shear Stress Transport (SST) model for a swirling flow and a strong streamline curvature in the vortex chamber of the FD, considering a numerical efficiency. Based on the benchmark results, parametric analyses are performed for an optimal design of the FD by varying the control port direction and the nozzle angle. Consequently, the FD performance is enhanced according to the angle of the control port nozzle.

  18. Fluidic interconnections for microfluidic systems: A new integrated fluidic interconnection allowing plug 'n' play functionality

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Bundgaard, Frederik; Geschke, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A crucial challenge in packaging of microsystems is microfluidic interconnections. These have to seal the ports of the system, and have to provide the appropriate interface to other devices or the external environment. Integrated fluidic interconnections appear to be a good solution for interconn...... external metal ferrules and the system. Theoretical calculations are made to dimension and model the integrated fluidic interconnection. Leakage tests are performed on the interconnections, in order to experimentally confirm the model, and detect its limits....

  19. Effects of Interfaces on Dynamics in Micro-Fluidic Devices: Slip-Boundaries’ Impact on Rotation Characteristics of Polar Liquid Film Motors

    Jiang, Su-Rong; Liu, Zhong-Qiang; Amos Yinnon, Tamar; Kong, Xiang-Mu

    2017-05-01

    A new approach for exploring effects of interfaces on polar liquids is presented. Their impact on the polar liquid film motor (PLFM) - a novel micro-fluidic device - is studied. We account for the interface’s impact by modeling slip boundary effects on the PLFM’s electro-hydro-dynamical rotations. Our analytical results show as k={l}s/R increases (with {l}s denoting the slip length resulting from the interface’s impact on the film’s properties, k > -1 and R denoting the film’s radius): (a) PLFMs subsequently exhibit rotation characteristics under “negative-”, “no-”, “partial-” and “perfect-” slip boundary conditions; (b) The maximum value of the linear velocity of the steady rotating film increases linearly and its location approaches the film’s border; (c) The decay of the angular velocities’ dependency on the distance from the center of the film slows down, resulting in a macroscopic flow near the boundary. With our calculated rotation speed distributions consistent with the existing experimental ones, research aiming at fitting computed to measured distributions promises identifying the factors affecting {l}s, e.g., solid-fluid potential interactions and surface roughness. The consistency also is advantageous for optimizing PLFM’s applications as micro-washers, centrifuges, mixers in the lab-on-a-chip. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11302118, 11275112, and Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province under Grant No. ZR2013AQ015

  20. FLUIDIC AC AMPLIFIERS.

    Several fluidic tuned AC Amplifiers were designed and tested. Interstage tuning and feedback designs are considered. Good results were obtained...corresponding Q’s as high as 12. Element designs and test results of one, two, and three stage amplifiers are presented. AC Modulated Carrier Systems

  1. Measurement of microchannel fluidic resistance with a standard voltage meter

    Godwin, Leah A.; Deal, Kennon S.; Hoepfner, Lauren D.; Jackson, Louis A.; Easley, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Standard voltage meter used to measure fluidic resistance. ► Manual measurement takes a few seconds, akin to electrical resistance measurements. ► Measurement error is reduced compared to other approaches. ► Amenable to dynamic measurement of fluidic resistance. - Abstract: A simplified method for measuring the fluidic resistance (R fluidic ) of microfluidic channels is presented, in which the electrical resistance (R elec ) of a channel filled with a conductivity standard solution can be measured and directly correlated to R fluidic using a simple equation. Although a slight correction factor could be applied in this system to improve accuracy, results showed that a standard voltage meter could be used without calibration to determine R fluidic to within 12% error. Results accurate to within 2% were obtained when a geometric correction factor was applied using these particular channels. When compared to standard flow rate measurements, such as meniscus tracking in outlet tubing, this approach provided a more straightforward alternative and resulted in lower measurement error. The method was validated using 9 different fluidic resistance values (from ∼40 to 600 kPa s mm −3 ) and over 30 separately fabricated microfluidic devices. Furthermore, since the method is analogous to resistance measurements with a voltage meter in electrical circuits, dynamic R fluidic measurements were possible in more complex microfluidic designs. Microchannel R elec was shown to dynamically mimic pressure waveforms applied to a membrane in a variable microfluidic resistor. The variable resistor was then used to dynamically control aqueous-in-oil droplet sizes and spacing, providing a unique and convenient control system for droplet-generating devices. This conductivity-based method for fluidic resistance measurement is thus a useful tool for static or real-time characterization of microfluidic systems.

  2. Fluidic control of reactor flow—Pressure drop matching

    Tesař, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 6A (2009), s. 817-832 ISSN 0263-8762 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760705; GA ČR GA101/07/1499 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : fluidics * matching of fluidic devices * dissipance Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.223, year: 2009 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science

  3. Neuromorphic function learning with carbon nanotube based synapses

    Gacem, Karim; Filoramo, Arianna; Derycke, Vincent; Retrouvey, Jean-Marie; Chabi, Djaafar; Zhao, Weisheng; Klein, Jacques-Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The principle of using nanoscale memory devices as artificial synapses in neuromorphic circuits is recognized as a promising way to build ground-breaking circuit architectures tolerant to defects and variability. Yet, actual experimental demonstrations of the neural network type of circuits based on non-conventional/non-CMOS memory devices and displaying function learning capabilities remain very scarce. We show here that carbon-nanotube-based memory elements can be used as artificial synapses, combined with conventional neurons and trained to perform functions through the application of a supervised learning algorithm. The same ensemble of eight devices can notably be trained multiple times to code successively any three-input linearly separable Boolean logic function despite device-to-device variability. This work thus represents one of the very few demonstrations of actual function learning with synapses based on nanoscale building blocks. The potential of such an approach for the parallel learning of multiple and more complex functions is also evaluated. (paper)

  4. Water based fluidic radio frequency metamaterials

    Cai, Xiaobing; Zhao, Shaolin; Hu, Mingjun; Xiao, Junfeng; Zhang, Naibo; Yang, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Electromagnetic metamaterials offer great flexibility for wave manipulation and enable exceptional functionality design, ranging from negative refraction, anomalous reflection, super-resolution imaging, transformation optics to cloaking, etc. However, demonstration of metamaterials with unprecedented functionalities is still challenging and costly due to the structural complexity or special material properties. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the versatile fluidic radio frequency metamaterials with negative refraction using a water-embedded and metal-coated 3D architecture. Effective medium analysis confirms that metallic frames create an evanescent environment while simultaneously water cylinders produce negative permeability under Mie resonance. The water-metal coupled 3D architectures and the accessory devices for measurement are fabricated by 3D printing with post electroless deposition. Our study also reveals the great potential of fluidic metamaterials and versatility of the 3D printing process in rapid prototyping of customized metamaterials.

  5. Fluidic electrodynamics: Approach to electromagnetic propulsion

    Martins, Alexandre A.; Pinheiro, Mario J.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a new methodological approach to electrodynamics based on a fluidic viewpoint. We develop a systematic approach establishing analogies between physical magnitudes and isomorphism (structure-preserving mappings) between systems of equations. This methodological approach allows us to give a general expression for the hydromotive force, thus re-obtaining the Navier-Stokes equation departing from the appropriate electromotive force. From this ground we offer a fluidic approach to different kinds of issues with interest in propulsion, e.g., the force exerted by a charged particle on a body carrying current; the magnetic force between two parallel currents; the Magnus's force. It is shown how the intermingle between the fluid vector fields and electromagnetic fields leads to new insights on their dynamics. The new concepts introduced in this work suggest possible applications to electromagnetic (EM) propulsion devices and the mastery of the principles of producing electric fields of required configuration in plasma medium.

  6. Integration of fluidic jet actuators in composite structures

    Schueller, Martin; Lipowski, Mathias; Schirmer, Eckart; Walther, Marco; Otto, Thomas; Geßner, Thomas; Kroll, Lothar

    2015-04-01

    Fluidic Actuated Flow Control (FAFC) has been introduced as a technology that influences the boundary layer by actively blowing air through slots or holes in the aircraft skin or wind turbine rotor blade. Modern wing structures are or will be manufactured using composite materials. In these state of the art systems, AFC actuators are integrated in a hybrid approach. The new idea is to directly integrate the active fluidic elements (such as SJAs and PJAs) and their components in the structure of the airfoil. Consequently, the integration of such fluidic devices must fit the manufacturing process and the material properties of the composite structure. The challenge is to integrate temperature-sensitive active elements and to realize fluidic cavities at the same time. The transducer elements will be provided for the manufacturing steps using roll-to-roll processes. The fluidic parts of the actuators will be manufactured using the MuCell® process that provides on the one hand the defined reproduction of the fluidic structures and, on the other hand, a high light weight index. Based on the first design concept, a demonstrator was developed in order to proof the design approach. The output velocity on the exit was measured using a hot-wire anemometer.

  7. Fluidic pumping system

    Wilson, P.D.

    1995-01-01

    A fluidic pumping system comprises two charge vessels which communicate with a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet through a fluidic bridge rectifier. A pressurising and depressurising arrangement for alternately pressurising and depressurising the charge vessels comprises a chamber containing a piston and being in communication with the charge vessels. Drive means not mechanically connected to the piston are provided for causing reciprocatory movement of the piston. Movement of the piston in one direction causes pressurisation of one charge vessel to discharge a liquid therefrom through the liquid outlet. Simultaneously, the other charge vessel is depressurised to draw liquid from the liquid inlet into the depressurised charge vessel. Preferably, the drive means for the piston comprises an external solenoid winding at each end of a horizontally arranged chamber. Alternatively, the chamber may be vertically disposed with an external solenoid winding at the upper end of the chamber to effect upward movement of the piston, the piston then falling under gravity upon de-energisation of the winding. (UK)

  8. Carbon-nanotube-based liquids: a new class of nanomaterials and their applications

    Phan, Ngoc Minh; Nguyen, Manh Hong; Phan, Hong Khoi; Bui, Hung Thang

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-nanotube-based liquids—a new class of nanomaterials—have shown many interesting properties and distinctive features offering unprecedented potential for many applications. This paper summarizes the recent progress on the study of the preparation, characterization and properties of carbon-nanotube-based liquids including so-called nanofluids, nanolubricants and different kinds of nanosolutions containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes/single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene. A broad range of current and future applications of these nanomaterials in the fields of energy saving, power electronic and optoelectronic devices, biotechnology and agriculture are presented. The paper also identifies challenges and opportunities for future research. (paper)

  9. Dampers, fluidics and the failsafe fallacy [fire protection

    Dann, M.; Hodgson, T.

    1989-01-01

    The fire protection practices adopted at nuclear power stations generally follow the well established principles used throughout industry. Unfortunately, there is one particular area - the interaction with heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) services - where nuclear power stations pose a seemingly insoluble conflict: that between the need to contain and the need to ventilate. Now, however, solid state fire dampers using power fluidics may promise a solution. One of the key characteristics of a fluidic device is that it is 'solid state', i.e. it has no moving parts. Because of this, its inherent reliability is orders of magnitude greater than a mechanical device. (U.K.)

  10. Measurement of microchannel fluidic resistance with a standard voltage meter.

    Godwin, Leah A; Deal, Kennon S; Hoepfner, Lauren D; Jackson, Louis A; Easley, Christopher J

    2013-01-03

    A simplified method for measuring the fluidic resistance (R(fluidic)) of microfluidic channels is presented, in which the electrical resistance (R(elec)) of a channel filled with a conductivity standard solution can be measured and directly correlated to R(fluidic) using a simple equation. Although a slight correction factor could be applied in this system to improve accuracy, results showed that a standard voltage meter could be used without calibration to determine R(fluidic) to within 12% error. Results accurate to within 2% were obtained when a geometric correction factor was applied using these particular channels. When compared to standard flow rate measurements, such as meniscus tracking in outlet tubing, this approach provided a more straightforward alternative and resulted in lower measurement error. The method was validated using 9 different fluidic resistance values (from ∼40 to 600kPa smm(-3)) and over 30 separately fabricated microfluidic devices. Furthermore, since the method is analogous to resistance measurements with a voltage meter in electrical circuits, dynamic R(fluidic) measurements were possible in more complex microfluidic designs. Microchannel R(elec) was shown to dynamically mimic pressure waveforms applied to a membrane in a variable microfluidic resistor. The variable resistor was then used to dynamically control aqueous-in-oil droplet sizes and spacing, providing a unique and convenient control system for droplet-generating devices. This conductivity-based method for fluidic resistance measurement is thus a useful tool for static or real-time characterization of microfluidic systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Recent advances in carbon nanotube-based electronics

    Sharma, Prithu; Ahuja, Prerit

    2008-01-01

    CNT-electronics is a field involving synthesis of carbon nanotubes-based novel electronic circuits, comparable to the size of molecules, the practically fundamental size possible. It has brought a new paradigm in science as it has enabled scientists to increase the device integration density tremendously, hence achieving better efficiency and speed. Here we review the state-of-art current research on the applications of CNTs in electronics and present recent results outlining their potential along with illustrating some current concerns in the research field. Unconventional projects such as CNT-based biological sensors, transistors, field emitters, integrated circuits, etc. are taking CNT-based electronics to its extremes. The field holds a promise for mass production of high speed and efficient electronic devices. However, the chemical complexity, reproducibility and other factors make the field a challenging one, which need to be addressed before the field realizes its true potential

  12. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics.

    William G Patrick

    Full Text Available The process of connecting genetic parts-DNA assembly-is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology.

  13. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  14. Micro-Cavity Fluidic Dye Laser

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kristensen, Anders; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully designed, fabricated and characterized a micro-cavity fluidic dye laser with metallic mirrors, which can be integrated with polymer based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the average pumping power...... threshold for lasing as function of cavity-mirror reflectance, laser dye concentration and cavity length. The laser device is characterized using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol. Lasing is observed, and the influence of dye concentration is investigated....

  15. Continuous fabrication of polymeric vesicles and nanotubes with fluidic channe

    Peng, F.; Deng, N.-N.; Tu, Y.; van Hest, J.C.M.; Wilson, D.A.

    2017-01-01

    Fluidic channels were employed to induce the self-assembly of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polystyrene into polymeric vesicles and nanotubes. The laminar flow in the device enables controlled diffusion of two miscible liquids at the phase boundary, leading to the formation of homogeneous polymeric

  16. A characteristic analysis of the fluidic muscle cylinder

    Kim, Dong-Soo; Bae, Sang-Kyu; Hong, Sung-In

    2005-12-01

    The fluidic muscle cylinder consists of an air bellows tube, flanges and lock nuts. It's features are softness of material and motion, simplicity of structure, low production cost and high power efficiency. Recently, unlikely the pneumatic cylinder, the fluidic muscle cylinder without air leakage, stick slip, friction, and seal was developed as a new concept actuator. It has the characteristics such as light weight, low price, high response, durable design, long life, high power, high contraction, which is innovative product fulfilling RT(Robot Technology) which is one of the nation-leading next generation strategy technologies 6T as well as cleanness technology. The application fields of the fluidic muscle cylinder are so various like fatigue tester, brake, accelerator, high technology testing device such as driving simulator, precise position, velocity, intelligent servo actuator under special environment such as load controlling system, and intelligent robot. In this study, we carried out the finite element modeling and analysis about the main design variables such as contraction ration and force, diameter increment of fluidic muscle cylinder. On the basis of finite element analysis, the prototype of fluidic muscle cylinder was manufactured and tested. Finally, we compared the results between the test and the finite element analysis.

  17. Numerical Studies of a Fluidic Diverter for Flow Control

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Culley, Dennis E.; Raghu, Surya

    2009-01-01

    The internal flow structure in a specific fluidic diverter is studied over a range from low subsonic to sonic inlet conditions by a time-dependent numerical analysis. The understanding will aid in the development of fluidic diverters with minimum pressure losses and advanced designs of flow control actuators. The velocity, temperature and pressure fields are calculated for subsonic conditions and the self-induced oscillatory behavior of the flow is successfully predicted. The results of our numerical studies have excellent agreement with our experimental measurements of oscillation frequencies. The acoustic speed in the gaseous medium is determined to be a key factor for up to sonic conditions in governing the mechanism of initiating the oscillations as well as determining its frequency. The feasibility of employing plasma actuation with a minimal perturbation level is demonstrated in steady-state calculations to also produce oscillation frequencies of our own choosing instead of being dependent on the fixed-geometry fluidic device.

  18. 3D printed fluidics with embedded analytic functionality for automated reaction optimisation

    Andrew J. Capel; Andrew Wright; Matthew J. Harding; George W. Weaver; Yuqi Li; Russell A. Harris; Steve Edmondson; Ruth D. Goodridge; Steven D. R. Christie

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing or ‘3D printing’ is being developed as a novel manufacturing process for the production of bespoke micro and milli-scale fluidic devices. When coupled with online monitoring and optimisation software, this offers an advanced, customised method for performing automated chemical synthesis. This paper reports the use of two additive manufacturing processes, stereolithography and selective laser melting, to create multi-functional fluidic devices with embedded reaction moni...

  19. Carbon nanotube based stationary phases for microchip chromatography

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2012-01-01

    already been demonstrated in more classical formats, for improved separation performance in gas and liquid chromatography, and for unique applications in solid phase extraction. Carbon nanotubes are now also entering the field of microfluidics, where there is a large potential to be able to provide......The objective of this article is to provide an overview and critical evaluation of the use of carbon nanotubes and related carbon-based nanomaterials for microchip chromatography. The unique properties of carbon nanotubes, such as a very high surface area and intriguing adsorptive behaviour, have...... integrated, tailor-made nanotube columns by means of catalytic growth of the nanotubes inside the fluidic channels. An evaluation of the different implementations of carbon nanotubes and related carbon-based nanomaterials for microfluidic chromatography devices is given in terms of separation performance...

  20. Compressible flow in fluidic oscillators

    Graff, Emilio; Hirsch, Damian; Gharib, Mory

    2013-11-01

    We present qualitative observations on the internal flow characteristics of fluidic oscillator geometries commonly referred to as sweeping jets in active flow control applications. We also discuss the effect of the geometry on the output jet in conditions from startup to supersonic exit velocity. Supported by the Boeing Company.

  1. Fusion-bonded fluidic interconnects

    Fazal, I.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to realize fluidic interconnects based on the fusion bonding of glass tubes with silicon is presented. Fusion bond strength analyses have been carried out. Experiments with plain silicon wafers and coated with silicon oxide and silicon nitride are performed. The obtained results are

  2. Dielectric Elastomers for Fluidic and Biomedical Applications

    McCoul, David James

    Dielectric elastomers have demonstrated tremendous potential as high-strain electromechanical transducers for a myriad of novel applications across all engineering disciplines. Because their soft, viscoelastic mechanical properties are similar to those of living tissues, dielectric elastomers have garnered a strong foothold in a plethora of biomedical and biomimetic applications. Dielectric elastomers consist of a sheet of stretched rubber, or elastomer, coated on both sides with compliant electrode materials; application of a voltage generates an electrostatic pressure that deforms the elastomer. They can function as soft generators, sensors, or actuators, and this last function is the focus of this dissertation. Many design configurations are possible, such as stacks, minimum energy structures, interpenetrating polymer networks, shape memory dielectric elastomers, and others; dielectric elastomers are already being applied to many fields of biomedicine. The first part of the original research presented in this dissertation details a PDMS microfluidic system paired with a dielectric elastomer stack actuator of anisotropically prestrained VHB(TM) 4910 (3M(TM)) and single-walled carbon nanotubes. These electroactive microfluidic devices demonstrated active increases in microchannel width when 3 and 4 kV were applied. Fluorescence microscopy also indicated an accompanying increase in channel depth with actuation. The cross-sectional area strains at 3 and 4 kV were approximately 2.9% and 7.4%, respectively. The device was then interfaced with a syringe pump, and the pressure was measured upstream. Linear pressure-flow plots were developed, which showed decreasing fluidic resistance with actuation, from 0.192 psi/(microL/min) at 0 kV, to 0.160 and 0.157 psi/(microL/min) at 3 and 4 kV, respectively. This corresponds to an ~18% drop in fluidic resistance at 4 kV. Active de-clogging was tested in situ with the device by introducing ~50 microm diameter PDMS microbeads and

  3. Micro fluidic System for Culturing and Monitoring of Neuronal Cells and Tissue

    Bakmand, Tanya; Waagepetersen, Helle S.

    The aim of this Ph.D. project was to combine experience within cell and tissue culturing, electrochemistry and microfabrication in order to develop an in vivo-like fluidic culturing platform, challenging the traditional culturing methods. The first goal was to develope a fluidic system for cultur...... with mass production. The last part of this thesis also includes perspectives on how to expand the latest designed device to facilitate culturing of tissue and co-culturing of cells....

  4. Application of fluidic lens technology to an adaptive holographic optical element see-through autophoropter

    Chancy, Carl H.

    A device for performing an objective eye exam has been developed to automatically determine ophthalmic prescriptions. The closed loop fluidic auto-phoropter has been designed, modeled, fabricated and tested for the automatic measurement and correction of a patient's prescriptions. The adaptive phoropter is designed through the combination of a spherical-powered fluidic lens and two cylindrical fluidic lenses that are orientated 45o relative to each other. In addition, the system incorporates Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing technology to identify the eye's wavefront error and corresponding prescription. Using the wavefront error information, the fluidic auto-phoropter nulls the eye's lower order wavefront error by applying the appropriate volumes to the fluidic lenses. The combination of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor the fluidic auto-phoropter allows for the identification and control of spherical refractive error, as well as cylinder error and axis; thus, creating a truly automated refractometer and corrective system. The fluidic auto-phoropter is capable of correcting defocus error ranging from -20D to 20D and astigmatism from -10D to 10D. The transmissive see-through design allows for the observation of natural scenes through the system at varying object planes with no additional imaging optics in the patient's line of sight. In this research, two generations of the fluidic auto-phoropter are designed and tested; the first generation uses traditional glass optics for the measurement channel. The second generation of the fluidic auto-phoropter takes advantage of the progress in the development of holographic optical elements (HOEs) to replace all the traditional glass optics. The addition of the HOEs has enabled the development of a more compact, inexpensive and easily reproducible system without compromising its performance. Additionally, the fluidic lenses were tested during a National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) parabolic flight campaign, to

  5. Fusion-bonded fluidic interconnects

    Fazal, I; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to realize fluidic interconnects based on the fusion bonding of glass tubes with silicon is presented. Fusion bond strength analyses have been carried out. Experiments with plain silicon wafers and coated with silicon oxide and silicon nitride are performed. The obtained results are discussed in terms of the homogeneity and strength of fusion bond. High pressure testing shows that the bond strength is large enough for most applications of fluidic interconnects. The bond strength for 525 µm thick silicon, with glass tubes having an outer diameter of 6 mm and with a wall thickness of 2 mm, is more than 60 bars after annealing at a temperature of 800 °C

  6. Applications of carbon nanotubes-based biomaterials in biomedical nanotechnology.

    Polizu, Stefania; Savadogo, Oumarou; Poulin, Philippe; Yahia, L'Hocine

    2006-07-01

    One of the facets of nanotechnology applications is the immense opportunities they offer for new developments in medicine and health sciences. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have particularly attracted attention for designing new monitoring systems for environment and living cells as well as nanosensors. Carbon nanotubes-based biomaterials are also employed as support for active prosthesis or functional matrices in reparation of parts of the human body. These nanostructures are studied as molecular-level building blocks for the complex and miniaturized medical device, and substrate for stimulation of cellular growth. The CNTs are cylindrical shaped with caged molecules which can act as nanoscale containers for molecular species, well required for biomolecular recognition and drug delivery systems. Endowed with very large aspect ratios, an excellent electrical conductivity and inertness along with mechanical robustness, nanotubes found enormous applications in molecular electronics and bioelectronics. The ballistic electrical behaviour of SWNTs conjugated with functionalization promotes a large variety of biosensors for individual molecules. Actuative response of CNTs is considered very promising feature for nanodevices, micro-robots and artificial muscles. An description of CNTs based biomaterials is attempted in this review, in order to point out their enormous potential for biomedical nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology.

  7. A Fluidic Hourglass

    Marin, Alvaro; Lhuissier, Henri; Rossi, Massimiliano; Volk, Andreas; Kähler, Christian J.

    2016-11-01

    A group of objects passing through a constriction might get eventually stuck. It occurs no matter what type of object is considered: sand in an hourglass, particles in a fluid through a porous medium or people leaving a room in panic. The case of particles in a fluid affects porous mediums, filters and membranes, which become unusable when clogged. Certainly the adherence of the particles to the walls and to each other is an important parameter in such systems, but even without adherence the clogging probability is far from negligible. Focusing in these low-adherence regimes, we use microfluidic devices with a bottleneck of squared cross-section through which we force dilute polystyrene particle solutions with diameters comparable to the bottleneck size and down to one tenth its size. In such low friction conditions we show experimental evidence of a strong transition at a critical particle-to-neck ratio, just as it occurs in dry granular systems. We describe analytically such a transition by modeling the arch formation as a purely stochastic process, which yields a good agreement with the experimental data. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft KA1808/22-1.

  8. Micro-Fluidic Dye Ring Laser - Experimental Tuning of the Wavelength and Numerical Simulation of the Cavity Modes

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate wavelength tuning of a micro-fluidic dye ring laser. Wavelength tunability is obtained by controlling the liquid dye concentration. The device performance is modelled by FEM simulations supporting a ray-tracing view.......We demonstrate wavelength tuning of a micro-fluidic dye ring laser. Wavelength tunability is obtained by controlling the liquid dye concentration. The device performance is modelled by FEM simulations supporting a ray-tracing view....

  9. High-frequency fluidic oscillator

    Tesař, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 234, October (2015), s. 158-167 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : pulsating flow * jet * fluidics Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.201, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924424715301114/pdfft?md5=42ec4f6f3180151913ceade1e4625d74&pid=1-s2.0-S0924424715301114-main.pdf

  10. Separation control with fluidic oscillators in water

    Schmidt, H.-J.; Woszidlo, R.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2017-08-01

    The present study assesses the applicability of fluidic oscillators for separation control in water. The first part of this work evaluates the properties of the fluidic oscillators including frequency, cavitation effects, and exerted thrust. Derived from the governing internal dynamics, the oscillation frequency is found to scale directly with the jet's exit velocity and the size of the fluidic oscillator independent of the working fluid. Frequency data from various experiments collapse onto a single curve. The occurrence of cavitation is examined by visual inspection and hydrophone measurements. The oscillation frequency is not affected by cavitation because it does not occur inside the oscillators. The spectral information obtained with the hydrophone provide a reliable indicator for the onset of cavitation at the exit. The performance of the fluidic oscillators for separation control on a bluff body does not seem to be affected by the presence of cavitation. The thrust exerted by an array of fluidic oscillators with water as the working fluid is measured to be even larger than theoretically estimated values. The second part of the presented work compares the performance of fluidic oscillators for separation control in water with previous results in air. The array of fluidic oscillators is installed into the rear end of a bluff body model. The drag improvements based on force balance measurements agree well with previous wind tunnel experiments on the same model. The flow field is examined by pressure measurements and with particle image velocimetry. Similar performance and flow field characteristics are observed in both water and air.

  11. Automated micro fluidic system for PCR applications in the monitoring of drinking water quality

    Soria Soria, E.; Yanez Amoros, A.; Murtula Corbi, R.; Catalan Cuenca, V.; Martin-Cisneros, C. S.; Ymbern, O.; Alonso-Chamorro, J.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiological laboratories present a growing interest in automated, simple and user-friendly methodologies able to perform simultaneous analysis of a high amount of samples. Analytical tools based on micro-fluidic could play an important role in this field. In this work, the development of an automated micro fluidic system for PCR applications and aimed to monitoring of drinking water quality is presented. The device will be able to determine, simultaneously, fecal pollution indicators and water-transmitted pathogens. Further-more, complemented with DNA pre-concentration and extraction modules, the device would present a highly integrated solution for microbiological diagnostic laboratories. (Author) 13 refs.

  12. Optimum design of A fluidic micro-oscillator

    Noh, Yoojeong; Youn, Sungkie; Kim, Moonuhn

    2002-01-01

    A fluidic micro-oscillator is used to control a linear tool as generating an oscillating fluid jet at its two output ports. The linear tool is a linear actuator that transforms the fluidic energy into mechanical energy via a double acting piston placed in linear actuator housing. Together the two devices form a dynamic microsystem that can be used in medical application. In this paper, we intend to optimize the geometry of the fluidic micro-oscillator. A basic oscillator design is varied in terms of supply nozzle geometry, length of the feedback channels, wall angle, control port width and etc. It was found that characteristics parameters such as frequency, volume flow and output pressure depends strongly on above mentioned design parameters. According to above the observations, we can determine an object function and design variables. Since we eventually have to maximize force to drive and steer a cutting tool, the output pressure difference is chosen as an object function and nozzle width, feedback channel, control port width, distance between splitter and nozzle can be chosen as the design variables. As a result of such design optimization, we can obtain the maximum force. At this time we maximize the output pressure difference using shape optimization

  13. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation

    Benner, Henry W.; Dzenitis, John M.

    2016-06-21

    Provided herein are fluidics platforms and related methods for performing integrated sample collection and solid-phase extraction of a target component of the sample all in one tube. The fluidics platform comprises a pump, particles for solid-phase extraction and a particle-holding means. The method comprises contacting the sample with one or more reagents in a pump, coupling a particle-holding means to the pump and expelling the waste out of the pump while the particle-holding means retains the particles inside the pump. The fluidics platform and methods herein described allow solid-phase extraction without pipetting and centrifugation.

  14. Fluidic-Based Virtual Aerosurface Shaping

    Glezer, Ari

    2004-01-01

    Recent work on a novel approach to the control of the aerodynamic performance of lifting surfaces by fluidic modification of their apparent aerodynamic shape, or virtual aerosurface shaping is reviewed...

  15. Phononic fluidics: acoustically activated droplet manipulations

    Reboud, Julien; Wilson, Rab; Bourquin, Yannyk; Zhang, Yi; Neale, Steven L.; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2011-02-01

    Microfluidic systems have faced challenges in handling real samples and the chip interconnection to other instruments. Here we present a simple interface, where surface acoustic waves (SAWs) from a piezoelectric device are coupled into a disposable acoustically responsive microfluidic chip. By manipulating droplets, SAW technologies have already shown their potential in microfluidics, but it has been limited by the need to rely upon mixed signal generation at multiple interdigitated electrode transducers (IDTs) and the problematic resulting reflections, to allow complex fluid operations. Here, a silicon chip was patterned with phononic structures, engineering the acoustic field by using a full band-gap. It was simply coupled to a piezoelectric LiNbO3 wafer, propagating the SAW, via a thin film of water. Contrary to the use of unstructured superstrates, phononic metamaterials allowed precise spatial control of the acoustic energy and hence its interaction with the liquids placed on the surface of the chip, as demonstrated by simulations. We further show that the acoustic frequency influences the interaction between the SAW and the phononic lattice, providing a route to programme complex fluidic manipulation onto the disposable chip. The centrifugation of cells from a blood sample is presented as a more practical demonstration of the potential of phononic crystals to realize diagnostic systems.

  16. Room temperature vortex fluidic synthesis of monodispersed amorphous proto-vaterite.

    Peng, Wenhong; Chen, Xianjue; Zhu, Shenmin; Guo, Cuiping; Raston, Colin L

    2014-10-11

    Monodispersed particles of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) 90 to 200 nm in diameter are accessible at room temperature in ethylene glycol and water using a vortex fluidic device (VFD). The ACC material is stable for at least two weeks under ambient conditions.

  17. Packaged integrated opto-fluidic solution for harmful fluid analysis

    Allenet, T.; Bucci, D.; Geoffray, F.; Canto, F.; Couston, L.; Jardinier, E.; Broquin, J.-E.

    2016-02-01

    Advances in nuclear fuel reprocessing have led to a surging need for novel chemical analysis tools. In this paper, we present a packaged lab-on-chip approach with co-integration of optical and micro-fluidic functions on a glass substrate as a solution. A chip was built and packaged to obtain light/fluid interaction in order for the entire device to make spectral measurements using the photo spectroscopy absorption principle. The interaction between the analyte solution and light takes place at the boundary between a waveguide and a fluid micro-channel thanks to the evanescent part of the waveguide's guided mode that propagates into the fluid. The waveguide was obtained via ion exchange on a glass wafer. The input and the output of the waveguides were pigtailed with standard single mode optical fibers. The micro-scale fluid channel was elaborated with a lithography procedure and hydrofluoric acid wet etching resulting in a 150+/-8 μm deep channel. The channel was designed with fluidic accesses, in order for the chip to be compatible with commercial fluidic interfaces/chip mounts. This allows for analyte fluid in external capillaries to be pumped into the device through micro-pipes, hence resulting in a fully packaged chip. In order to produce this co-integrated structure, two substrates were bonded. A study of direct glass wafer-to-wafer molecular bonding was carried-out to improve detector sturdiness and durability and put forward a bonding protocol with a bonding surface energy of γ>2.0 J.m-2. Detector viability was shown by obtaining optical mode measurements and detecting traces of 1.2 M neodymium (Nd) solute in 12+/-1 μL of 0.01 M and pH 2 nitric acid (HNO3) solvent by obtaining an absorption peak specific to neodymium at 795 nm.

  18. Solenoid Driven Pressure Valve System: Toward Versatile Fluidic Control in Paper Microfluidics.

    Kim, Taehoon H; Hahn, Young Ki; Lee, Jungmin; van Noort, Danny; Kim, Minseok S

    2018-02-20

    As paper-based diagnostics has become predominantly driven by more advanced microfluidic technology, many of the research efforts are still focused on developing reliable and versatile fluidic control devices, apart from improving sensitivity and reproducibility. In this work, we introduce a novel and robust paper fluidic control system enabling versatile fluidic control. The system comprises a linear push-pull solenoid and an Arduino Uno microcontroller. The precisely controlled pressure exerted on the paper stops the flow. We first determined the stroke distance of the solenoid to obtain a constant pressure while examining the fluidic time delay as a function of the pressure. Results showed that strips of grade 1 chromatography paper had superior reproducibility in fluid transport. Next, we characterized the reproducibility of the fluidic velocity which depends on the type and grade of paper used. As such, we were able to control the flow velocity on the paper and also achieve a complete stop of flow with a pressure over 2.0 MPa. Notably, after the actuation of the pressure driven valve (PDV), the previously pressed area regained its original flow properties. This means that, even on a previously pressed area, multiple valve operations can be successfully conducted. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of an active and repetitive valve operation in paper microfluidics. As a proof of concept, we have chosen to perform a multistep detection system in the form of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with mouse IgG as the target analyte.

  19. Integrated electronics and fluidic MEMS for bioengineering

    Fok, Ho Him Raymond

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and microelectronics have become enabling technologies for many research areas. This dissertation presents the use of fluidic MEMS and microelectronics for bioengineering applications. In particular, the versatility of MEMS and microelectronics is highlighted by the presentation of two different applications, one for in-vitro study of nano-scale dynamics during cell division and one for in-vivo monitoring of biological activities at the cellular level. The first application of an integrated system discussed in this dissertation is to utilize fluidic MEMS for studying dynamics in the mitotic spindle, which could lead to better chemotherapeutic treatments for cancer patients. Previous work has developed the use of electrokinetic phenomena on the surface of a glass-based platform to assemble microtubules, the building blocks of mitotic spindles. Nevertheless, there are two important limitations of this type of platform. First, an unconventional microfabrication process is necessary for the glass-based platform, which limits the utility of this platform. In order to overcome this limitation, in this dissertation a convenient microfluidic system is fabricated using a negative photoresist called SU-8. The fabrication process for the SU-8-based system is compatible with other fabrication techniques used in developing microelectronics, and this compatibility is essential for integrating electronics for studying dynamics in the mitotic spindle. The second limitation of the previously-developed glass-based platform is its lack of bio-compatibility. For example, microtubules strongly interact with the surface of the glass-based platform, thereby hindering the study of dynamics in the mitotic spindle. This dissertation presents a novel approach for assembling microtubules away from the surface of the platform, and a fabrication process is developed to assemble microtubules between two self-aligned thin film electrodes on thick SU-8

  20. Formation of a vertical MOSFET for charge sensing in a Si micro-fluidic channel

    Lyu, Hong-Kun; Kim, Dong-Sun; Shin, Jang-Kyoo; Choi, Pyung; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Park, Hey-Jung; Park, Chin-Sung; Lim, Geun-Bae

    2004-01-01

    We have formed a fluidic channel that can be used in micro-fluidic systems and fabricated a 3-dimensional vertical metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (vertical MOSFET) in the convex corner of a Si micro-fluidic channel by using an anisotropic tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) etching solution. A Au/Cr layer was used for the gate metal and might be useful for detecting charged biomolecules. The electrical characteristics of the vertical MOSFET and its operation as a chemical sensor were investigated. At V DS = -5 V and V GS = -5 V the drain current of the device was -22.5 μA and the threshold voltage was about -1.4 V. A non-planar, non-rectangular vertical MOSFET with a trapezoidal gate was transformed into an equivalent rectangularly based one by using a Schwartz-Christoffel transformation. The LEVEL1 device parameters of the vertical MOSFET were extracted from the measured electrical device characteristics and were used in the SPICE simulation for the vertical MOSFET. The measured and the simulated results for the vertical PMOSFET showed relatively good agreement. When the vertical MOSFET was dipped into a thiol DNA solution, the drain current decreased due to charged biomolecules probably being adsorbed on the gate, which indicates that a vertical MOSFET in a Si micro-fluidic channel might be useful for sensing charged biomolecules.

  1. Carbon nanotube based functional superhydrophobic coatings

    Sethi, Sunny

    The main objective of this dissertation is synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT) based superhydrophobic materials. The materials were designed such that electrical and mechanical properties of CNTs could be combined with superhydrophobicity to create materials with unique properties, such as self-cleaning adhesives, miniature flotation devices, ice-repellant coatings, and coatings for heat transfer furnaces. The coatings were divided into two broad categories based on CNT structure: Vertically aligned CNT arrays (VA coatings) and mesh-like (non-aligned) carbon nanotube arrays (NA coatings). VA coatings were used to create self-cleaning adhesives and flexible field emission devices. Coatings with self cleaning property along with high adhesiveness were inspired from structure found on gecko foot. Gecko foot is covered with thousands of microscopic hairs called setae; these setae are further divided into hundreds of nanometer sized hairs called spatulas. When gecko presses its foot against any surface, these hairs bend and conform to the topology of the surface resulting into very large area of contact. Such large area of intimate contact allows geckos to adhere to surfaces using van der Waals (vdW) interactions alone. VA-CNTs adhere to a variety of surfaces using a similar mechanism. CNTs of suitable diameter could withstand four times higher adhesion force than gecko foot. We found that upon soiling these CNT based adhesives (gecko tape) could be cleaned using a water droplet (lotus effect) or by applying vibrations. These materials could be used for applications requiring reversible adhesion. VA coatings were also used for developing field emission devices. A single CNT can emit electrons at very low threshold voltages. Achieving efficient electron emission on large scale has a lot of challenges such as screening effect, pull-off and lower current efficiency. We have explored the use of polymer-CNT composite structures to overcome these challenges in this work. NA

  2. Fluidic Elements based on Coanda Effect

    Constantin OLIVOTTO

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains first some definitions and classifications regarding the fluidic elements. Thegeneral current status is presented, nominating the main specific elements based on the Coanda effect developedspecially in Romania. In particularly the development of an original bistable element using industrial compressedair at industrial pressure supply is presented. The function of this element is based on the controlled attachmentof the main jet at a curved wall through the Coanda effect. The methods used for particular calculation andexperiments are nominated. The main application of these elements was to develop a specific execution element:a fluidic step–by-step motor based on the Coanda effect.

  3. 3D printed fluidics with embedded analytic functionality for automated reaction optimisation

    Andrew J. Capel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing or ‘3D printing’ is being developed as a novel manufacturing process for the production of bespoke micro- and milliscale fluidic devices. When coupled with online monitoring and optimisation software, this offers an advanced, customised method for performing automated chemical synthesis. This paper reports the use of two additive manufacturing processes, stereolithography and selective laser melting, to create multifunctional fluidic devices with embedded reaction monitoring capability. The selectively laser melted parts are the first published examples of multifunctional 3D printed metal fluidic devices. These devices allow high temperature and pressure chemistry to be performed in solvent systems destructive to the majority of devices manufactured via stereolithography, polymer jetting and fused deposition modelling processes previously utilised for this application. These devices were integrated with commercially available flow chemistry, chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis equipment, allowing automated online and inline optimisation of the reaction medium. This set-up allowed the optimisation of two reactions, a ketone functional group interconversion and a fused polycyclic heterocycle formation, via spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis.

  4. 3D printed fluidics with embedded analytic functionality for automated reaction optimisation

    Capel, Andrew J; Wright, Andrew; Harding, Matthew J; Weaver, George W; Li, Yuqi; Harris, Russell A; Edmondson, Steve; Goodridge, Ruth D

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing or ‘3D printing’ is being developed as a novel manufacturing process for the production of bespoke micro- and milliscale fluidic devices. When coupled with online monitoring and optimisation software, this offers an advanced, customised method for performing automated chemical synthesis. This paper reports the use of two additive manufacturing processes, stereolithography and selective laser melting, to create multifunctional fluidic devices with embedded reaction monitoring capability. The selectively laser melted parts are the first published examples of multifunctional 3D printed metal fluidic devices. These devices allow high temperature and pressure chemistry to be performed in solvent systems destructive to the majority of devices manufactured via stereolithography, polymer jetting and fused deposition modelling processes previously utilised for this application. These devices were integrated with commercially available flow chemistry, chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis equipment, allowing automated online and inline optimisation of the reaction medium. This set-up allowed the optimisation of two reactions, a ketone functional group interconversion and a fused polycyclic heterocycle formation, via spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis. PMID:28228852

  5. 3D printed fluidics with embedded analytic functionality for automated reaction optimisation.

    Capel, Andrew J; Wright, Andrew; Harding, Matthew J; Weaver, George W; Li, Yuqi; Harris, Russell A; Edmondson, Steve; Goodridge, Ruth D; Christie, Steven D R

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing or '3D printing' is being developed as a novel manufacturing process for the production of bespoke micro- and milliscale fluidic devices. When coupled with online monitoring and optimisation software, this offers an advanced, customised method for performing automated chemical synthesis. This paper reports the use of two additive manufacturing processes, stereolithography and selective laser melting, to create multifunctional fluidic devices with embedded reaction monitoring capability. The selectively laser melted parts are the first published examples of multifunctional 3D printed metal fluidic devices. These devices allow high temperature and pressure chemistry to be performed in solvent systems destructive to the majority of devices manufactured via stereolithography, polymer jetting and fused deposition modelling processes previously utilised for this application. These devices were integrated with commercially available flow chemistry, chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis equipment, allowing automated online and inline optimisation of the reaction medium. This set-up allowed the optimisation of two reactions, a ketone functional group interconversion and a fused polycyclic heterocycle formation, via spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis.

  6. Fluidic load control for wind turbines blades

    Boeije, C.S.; Vries, de H.; Cleine, I.; Emden, van E.; Zwart, G.G.M.; Stobbe, H.; Hirschberg, A.; Hoeijmakers, H.W.M.; Maureen Hand, xx

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the initial steps into the investigation of the possibility of reducing fatigue loads on wind turbine blades by the application of fluidic jets. This investigation involves static pressure measurements as well as numerical simulations for a non-rotating NACA-0018 airfoil. The

  7. Variable recruitment fluidic artificial muscles: modeling and experiments

    Bryant, Matthew; Meller, Michael A; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2014-01-01

    We investigate taking advantage of the lightweight, compliant nature of fluidic artificial muscles to create variable recruitment actuators in the form of artificial muscle bundles. Several actuator elements at different diameter scales are packaged to act as a single actuator device. The actuator elements of the bundle can be connected to the fluidic control circuit so that different groups of actuator elements, much like individual muscle fibers, can be activated independently depending on the required force output and motion. This novel actuation concept allows us to save energy by effectively impedance matching the active size of the actuators on the fly based on the instantaneous required load. This design also allows a single bundled actuator to operate in substantially different force regimes, which could be valuable for robots that need to perform a wide variety of tasks and interact safely with humans. This paper proposes, models and analyzes the actuation efficiency of this actuator concept. The analysis shows that variable recruitment operation can create an actuator that reduces throttling valve losses to operate more efficiently over a broader range of its force–strain operating space. We also present preliminary results of the design, fabrication and experimental characterization of three such bioinspired variable recruitment actuator prototypes. (paper)

  8. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers.

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-18

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  9. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  10. Electrochemical device

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Bellows, Richard J.

    1988-01-12

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  11. Fluidic system for long-term in vitro culturing and monitoring of organotypic brain slices

    Bakmand, Tanya; Troels-Smith, Ane R.; Dimaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Brain slice preparations cultured in vitro have long been used as a simplified model for studying brain development, electrophysiology, neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. In this paper an open fluidic system developed for improved long term culturing of organotypic brain slices is presented....... The positive effect of continuous flow of growth medium, and thus stability of the glucose concentration and waste removal, is simulated and compared to the effect of stagnant medium that is most often used in tissue culturing. Furthermore, placement of the tissue slices in the developed device was studied...... by numerical simulations in order to optimize the nutrient distribution. The device was tested by culturing transverse hippocampal slices from 7 days old NMRI mice for a duration of 14 days. The slices were inspected visually and the slices cultured in the fluidic system appeared to have preserved...

  12. Impinging jets controlled by fluidic input signal

    Tesař, Václav; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Peszyński, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 249, October (2016), s. 85-92 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S; GA ČR GA14-08888S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : fluidics * jets * impinging jets * coanda effect Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.499, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0924424716303880

  13. Heat dissipation for the Intel Core i5 processor using multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based ethylene glycol

    Thang, Bui Hung; Trinh, Pham Van; Quang, Le Dinh; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc; Huong, Nguyen Thi

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are some of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown by using chemical vapor deposition is 600 ± 100 Wm -1 K -1 compared with the thermal conductivity 419 Wm -1 K -1 of Ag. Carbon-nanotube-based liquids - a new class of nanomaterials, have shown many interesting properties and distinctive features offering potential in heat dissipation applications for electronic devices, such as computer microprocessor, high power LED, etc. In this work, a multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based liquid was made of well-dispersed hydroxyl-functional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-OH) in ethylene glycol (EG)/distilled water (DW) solutions by using Tween-80 surfactant and an ultrasonication method. The concentration of MWCNT-OH in EG/DW solutions ranged from 0.1 to 1.2 gram/liter. The dispersion of the MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions was evaluated by using a Zeta-Sizer analyzer. The MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions were used as coolants in the liquid cooling system for the Intel Core i5 processor. The thermal dissipation efficiency and the thermal response of the system were evaluated by directly measuring the temperature of the micro-processor using the Core Temp software and the temperature sensors built inside the micro-processor. The results confirmed the advantages of CNTs in thermal dissipation systems for computer processors and other high-power electronic devices.

  14. A Recipe for Soft Fluidic Elastomer Robots.

    Marchese, Andrew D; Katzschmann, Robert K; Rus, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    This work provides approaches to designing and fabricating soft fluidic elastomer robots. That is, three viable actuator morphologies composed entirely from soft silicone rubber are explored, and these morphologies are differentiated by their internal channel structure, namely, ribbed, cylindrical, and pleated. Additionally, three distinct casting-based fabrication processes are explored: lamination-based casting, retractable-pin-based casting, and lost-wax-based casting. Furthermore, two ways of fabricating a multiple DOF robot are explored: casting the complete robot as a whole and casting single degree of freedom (DOF) segments with subsequent concatenation. We experimentally validate each soft actuator morphology and fabrication process by creating multiple physical soft robot prototypes.

  15. Fluidic Vectoring of a Planar Incompressible Jet Flow

    Mendez, Miguel Alfonso; Scelzo, Maria Teresa; Enache, Adriana; Buchlin, Jean-Marie

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental, a numerical and a theoretical analysis of the performances of a fluidic vectoring device for controlling the direction of a turbulent, bi-dimensional and low Mach number (incompressible) jet flow. The investigated design is the co-flow secondary injection with Coanda surface, which allows for vectoring angles up to 25° with no need of moving mechanical parts. A simple empirical model of the vectoring process is presented and validated via experimental and numerical data. The experiments consist of flow visualization and image processing for the automatic detection of the jet centerline; the numerical simulations are carried out solving the Unsteady Reynolds Average Navier- Stokes (URANS) closed with the k - ω SST turbulence model, using the PisoFoam solver from OpenFOAM. The experimental validation on three different geometrical configurations has shown that the model is capable of providing a fast and reliable evaluation of the device performance as a function of the operating conditions.

  16. Gecko-Inspired Carbon Nanotube-Based Adhesives

    Ge, Liehui; Sethi, Sunny; Goyal, Anubha; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, Pulickel; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2009-03-01

    Nature has developed hierarchical hairy structure on the wall-climbing gecko's foot, consisting of microscopic hairs called setae, which further split into hundreds of smaller structures called spatulas. In the last five years, numerous attempts to mimic gecko foot-hair using polymer soft molding and photolithography methods have been reported. However, most of these polymer-based synthetic gecko hairs fall short of the clinging ability of geckos. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) have shown strong adhesion at nanometer scale. Here, we present our work on developing CNT-based macroscopic flexible tape mimicking the hierarchical structure found on gecko's foot. The synthetic gecko tape is made by transferring aligned CNT array onto flexible polymer tape. The unpatterned CNT-gecko tape can support a shear force stress similar to gecko foot (10 N/cm^2). The supported shear stress increase by a factor of four, when we use micro-patterned CNT patches (50 to 500 μm). We find that both setae (replicated by CNT bundles) and spatulas (individual CNT) are necessary to achieve large macroscopic shear adhesion. The carbon nanotube-based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics, and space applications.

  17. Dissolvable fluidic time delays for programming multi-step assays in instrument-free paper diagnostics.

    Lutz, Barry; Liang, Tinny; Fu, Elain; Ramachandran, Sujatha; Kauffman, Peter; Yager, Paul

    2013-07-21

    Lateral flow tests (LFTs) are an ingenious format for rapid and easy-to-use diagnostics, but they are fundamentally limited to assay chemistries that can be reduced to a single chemical step. In contrast, most laboratory diagnostic assays rely on multiple timed steps carried out by a human or a machine. Here, we use dissolvable sugar applied to paper to create programmable flow delays and present a paper network topology that uses these time delays to program automated multi-step fluidic protocols. Solutions of sucrose at different concentrations (10-70% of saturation) were added to paper strips and dried to create fluidic time delays spanning minutes to nearly an hour. A simple folding card format employing sugar delays was shown to automate a four-step fluidic process initiated by a single user activation step (folding the card); this device was used to perform a signal-amplified sandwich immunoassay for a diagnostic biomarker for malaria. The cards are capable of automating multi-step assay protocols normally used in laboratories, but in a rapid, low-cost, and easy-to-use format.

  18. Fabrication of resonant micro cantilevers with integrated transparent fluidic channel

    Khan, Faheem; Schmid, Silvan; Davis, Zachary James

    2011-01-01

    Microfabricated cantilevers are proving their potential as excellent tools for analysis applications. In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication and testing of resonant micro cantilevers with integrated transparent fluidic channels. The cantilevers have been devised to measure the density...

  19. Pulsatile fluidic pump demonstration and predictive model application

    Morgan, J.G.; Holland, W.D.

    1986-04-01

    Pulsatile fluidic pumps were developed as a remotely controlled method of transferring or mixing feed solutions. A test in the Integrated Equipment Test facility demonstrated the performance of a critically safe geometry pump suitable for use in a 0.1-ton/d heavy metal (HM) fuel reprocessing plant. A predictive model was developed to calculate output flows under a wide range of external system conditions. Predictive and experimental flow rates are compared for both submerged and unsubmerged fluidic pump cases

  20. Microbubble generator excited by fluidic oscillator's third harmonic frequency

    Tesař, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 9 (2014), s. 1603-1615 ISSN 0263-8762 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : fluidic oscillator * microbubble generation * fluidic feedback loop Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.348, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cherd.2013.12.004

  1. Heat dissipation for the Intel Core i5 processor using multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based ethylene glycol

    Thang, Bui Hung; Trinh, Pham Van; Quang, Le Dinh; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Ho Chi Minh CIty (Viet Nam); Huong, Nguyen Thi [Hanoi University of Science, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Vietnam National University, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-08-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are some of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown by using chemical vapor deposition is 600 ± 100 Wm{sup -1}K{sup -1} compared with the thermal conductivity 419 Wm{sup -1}K{sup -1} of Ag. Carbon-nanotube-based liquids - a new class of nanomaterials, have shown many interesting properties and distinctive features offering potential in heat dissipation applications for electronic devices, such as computer microprocessor, high power LED, etc. In this work, a multiwalled carbon-nanotube-based liquid was made of well-dispersed hydroxyl-functional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-OH) in ethylene glycol (EG)/distilled water (DW) solutions by using Tween-80 surfactant and an ultrasonication method. The concentration of MWCNT-OH in EG/DW solutions ranged from 0.1 to 1.2 gram/liter. The dispersion of the MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions was evaluated by using a Zeta-Sizer analyzer. The MWCNT-OH-based EG/DW solutions were used as coolants in the liquid cooling system for the Intel Core i5 processor. The thermal dissipation efficiency and the thermal response of the system were evaluated by directly measuring the temperature of the micro-processor using the Core Temp software and the temperature sensors built inside the micro-processor. The results confirmed the advantages of CNTs in thermal dissipation systems for computer processors and other high-power electronic devices.

  2. Topology optimization of flexible micro-fluidic devices

    Kreissl, Sebastian; Pingen, Georg; Evgrafov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    is predicted by a non-linear finite element model and a hydrodynamic lattice Boltzmann method. Focusing on applications with low flow velocities and pressures, structural deformations due to fluid-forces are neglected. A mapping scheme is presented that couples the material distributions in the structural...

  3. Resealable, optically accessible, PDMS-free fluidic platform for ex vivo interrogation of pancreatic islets.

    Lenguito, Giovanni; Chaimov, Deborah; Weitz, Jonathan R; Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Rawal, Siddarth A K; Tamayo-Garcia, Alejandro; Caicedo, Alejandro; Stabler, Cherie L; Buchwald, Peter; Agarwal, Ashutosh

    2017-02-28

    We report the design and fabrication of a robust fluidic platform built out of inert plastic materials and micromachined features that promote optimized convective fluid transport. The platform is tested for perfusion interrogation of rodent and human pancreatic islets, dynamic secretion of hormones, concomitant live-cell imaging, and optogenetic stimulation of genetically engineered islets. A coupled quantitative fluid dynamics computational model of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and fluid dynamics was first utilized to design device geometries that are optimal for complete perfusion of three-dimensional islets, effective collection of secreted insulin, and minimization of system volumes and associated delays. Fluidic devices were then fabricated through rapid prototyping techniques, such as micromilling and laser engraving, as two interlocking parts from materials that are non-absorbent and inert. Finally, the assembly was tested for performance using both rodent and human islets with multiple assays conducted in parallel, such as dynamic perfusion, staining and optogenetics on standard microscopes, as well as for integration with commercial perfusion machines. The optimized design of convective fluid flows, use of bio-inert and non-absorbent materials, reversible assembly, manual access for loading and unloading of islets, and straightforward integration with commercial imaging and fluid handling systems proved to be critical for perfusion assay, and particularly suited for time-resolved optogenetics studies.

  4. Quasi-static analysis and control of planer and spatial bending fluidic actuator

    Chang, Benjamin Che-Ming

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a novel silicone-based millimetre scale bending fluidic actuator. Two designs of the bending fluidic actuator are studied: a planer actuator that bends about one axis; and a spatial actuator able to bend about two orthogonal axes. The unique parallel micro-channel design of the fluidic actuators enables operation at low working pressures, while at the same time having a very limited thickness expansion during pressurization. The fluidic actuators can be easily scaled to des...

  5. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis

    Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

    2014-08-19

    Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

  6. Research of Dielectric Breakdown Micro fluidic Sampling Chip

    Jiang, F.; Lei, Y.; Yu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Micro fluidic chip is mainly driven electrically by external electrode and array electrode, but there are certain disadvantages in both of ways, which affect the promotion and application of micro fluidic technology. This paper discusses a scheme that uses the conductive solution in a microchannel made by PDMS, replacing electrodes and the way of dielectric breakdown to achieve microfluidic chip driver. It could reduce the driving voltage and simplify the chip production process. To prove the feasibility of this method, we produced a micro fluidic chip used in PDMS material with the lithography technology and experimented it. The results showed that using the dielectric breakdown to achieve microfluidic chip driver is feasible, and it has certain application prospect.

  7. New Fluidic-Oscillator Concept for Flow-Separation Control

    Tesař, Václav; Zhong, S.; Rasheed, F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2013), s. 397-405 ISSN 0001-1452 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GCP101/11/J019; GA TA ČR TA02020795; GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : fluidics * fluidic oscillator * resonator Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.165, year: 2013 http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/1.J051791?journalCode=aiaaj

  8. Comparison of cumulative dissipated energy delivered by active-fluidic pressure control phacoemulsification system versus gravity-fluidics.

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Garza-Leon, Manuel; Saenz-de-Viteri, Manuel; Solis-S, Juan C; Gulias-Cañizo, Rosario; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo

    2017-08-22

    To compare the cumulative dissipated energy (CDE), aspiration time and estimated aspiration fluid utilized during phacoemulsification cataract surgery using two phacoemulsification systems . A total of 164 consecutive eyes of 164 patients undergoing cataract surgery, 82 in the active-fluidics group and 82 in the gravity-fluidics group were enrolled in this study. Cataracts graded NII to NIII using LOCS II were included. Each subject was randomly assigned to one of the two platforms with a specific configuration: the active-fluidics Centurion ® phacoemulsification system or the gravity-fluidics Infiniti ® Vision System. CDE, aspiration time (AT) and the mean estimated aspiration fluid (EAF) were registered and compared. A mean age of 68.3 ± 9.8 years was found (range 57-92 years), and no significant difference was evident between both groups. A positive correlation between the CDE values obtained by both platforms was verified (r = 0.271, R 2  = 0.073, P = 0.013). Similarly, a significant correlation was evidenced for the EAF (r = 0.334, R 2  = 0.112, P = 0.046) and AT values (r = 0.156, R 2  = 0.024, P = 0.161). A statistically significantly lower CDE count, aspiration time and estimated fluid were obtained using the active-fluidics configuration when compared to the gravity-fluidics configuration by 19.29, 12.10 and 9.29%, respectively (P = 0.001, P Infiniti ® IP system for NII and NIII cataracts.

  9. Integrated optics nano-opto-fluidic sensor based on whispering gallery modes for picoliter volume refractometry

    Gilardi, Giovanni; Beccherelli, Romeo

    2013-01-01

    We propose and numerically investigate an integrated optics refractometric nano-opto-fluidic sensor based on whispering gallery modes in sapphire microspheres. A measurand fluid is injected in a micromachined reservoir defined in between the microsphere and an optical waveguide. The wavelength shift due to changes in the refractive index of the measurand fluid are studied for a set of different configurations by the finite element method and a high sensitivity versus fluid volume is found. The proposed device can be tailored to work with a minimum fluid volume of 1 pl and a sensitivity up of 2000 nm/(RIU·nl). We introduce a figure of merit which quantifies the amplifying effect on the sensitivity of high quality factor resonators and allows us to compare different devices. (paper)

  10. Silicon micro-fluidic cooling for NA62 GTK pixel detectors

    Romagnoli, G; Brunel, B; Catinaccio, A; Degrange, J; Mapelli, A; Morel, M; Noel, J; Petagna, P

    2015-01-01

    Silicon micro-channel cooling is being studied for efficient thermal management in application fields such as high power computing and 3D electronic integration. This concept has been introduced in 2010 for the thermal management of silicon pixel detectors in high energy physics experiments. Combining the versatility of standard micro-fabrication processes with the high thermal efficiency typical of micro-fluidics, it is possible to produce effective thermal management devices that are well adapted to different detector configurations. The production of very thin cooling devices in silicon enables a minimization of material of the tracking sensors and eliminates mechanical stresses due to the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between detectors and cooling systems. The NA62 experiment at CERN will be the first high particle physics experiment that will install a micro-cooling system to perform the thermal management of the three detection planes of its Gigatracker pixel detector.

  11. Methodology for designing and manufacturing complex biologically inspired soft robotic fluidic actuators: prosthetic hand case study.

    Thompson-Bean, E; Das, R; McDaid, A

    2016-10-31

    We present a novel methodology for the design and manufacture of complex biologically inspired soft robotic fluidic actuators. The methodology is applied to the design and manufacture of a prosthetic for the hand. Real human hands are scanned to produce a 3D model of a finger, and pneumatic networks are implemented within it to produce a biomimetic bending motion. The finger is then partitioned into material sections, and a genetic algorithm based optimization, using finite element analysis, is employed to discover the optimal material for each section. This is based on two biomimetic performance criteria. Two sets of optimizations using two material sets are performed. Promising optimized material arrangements are fabricated using two techniques to validate the optimization routine, and the fabricated and simulated results are compared. We find that the optimization is successful in producing biomimetic soft robotic fingers and that fabrication of the fingers is possible. Limitations and paths for development are discussed. This methodology can be applied for other fluidic soft robotic devices.

  12. Proton beam writing of long, arbitrary structures for micro/nano photonics and fluidics applications

    Udalagama, Chammika; Teo, E.J.; Chan, S.F.; Kumar, V.S.; Bettiol, A.A.; Watt, F.

    2011-01-01

    The last decade has seen proton beam writing maturing into a versatile lithographic technique able to produce sub-100 nm, high aspect ratio structures with smooth side walls. However, many applications in the fields of photonics and fluidics require the fabrication of structures with high spatial resolution that extends over several centimetres. This cannot be achieved by purely magnetic or electrostatic beam scanning due to the large off-axis beam aberrations in high demagnification systems. As a result, this has limited us to producing long straight structures using a combination of beam and stage scanning. In this work we have: (1) developed an algorithm to include any arbitrary pattern into the writing process by using a more versatile combination of beam and stage scanning while (2) incorporating the use of the ubiquitous AutoCAD DXF (drawing exchange format) into the design process. We demonstrate the capability of this approach in fabricating structures such as Y-splitters, Mach-Zehnder modulators and microfluidic channels that are over several centimetres in length, in polymer. We also present optimisation of such parameters as scanning speed and scanning loops to improve on the surface roughness of the structures. This work opens up new possibilities of using CAD software in PBW for microphotonics and fluidics device fabrication.

  13. Proton beam writing of long, arbitrary structures for micro/nano photonics and fluidics applications

    Udalagama, Chammika; Teo, E. J.; Chan, S. F.; Kumar, V. S.; Bettiol, A. A.; Watt, F.

    2011-10-01

    The last decade has seen proton beam writing maturing into a versatile lithographic technique able to produce sub-100 nm, high aspect ratio structures with smooth side walls. However, many applications in the fields of photonics and fluidics require the fabrication of structures with high spatial resolution that extends over several centimetres. This cannot be achieved by purely magnetic or electrostatic beam scanning due to the large off-axis beam aberrations in high demagnification systems. As a result, this has limited us to producing long straight structures using a combination of beam and stage scanning. In this work we have: (1) developed an algorithm to include any arbitrary pattern into the writing process by using a more versatile combination of beam and stage scanning while (2) incorporating the use of the ubiquitous AutoCAD DXF (drawing exchange format) into the design process. We demonstrate the capability of this approach in fabricating structures such as Y-splitters, Mach-Zehnder modulators and microfluidic channels that are over several centimetres in length, in polymer. We also present optimisation of such parameters as scanning speed and scanning loops to improve on the surface roughness of the structures. This work opens up new possibilities of using CAD software in PBW for microphotonics and fluidics device fabrication.

  14. Proton beam writing of long, arbitrary structures for micro/nano photonics and fluidics applications

    Udalagama, Chammika, E-mail: chammika@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Teo, E.J. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Chan, S.F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); NUS Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, NUS, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 (Singapore); Kumar, V.S.; Bettiol, A.A.; Watt, F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2011-10-15

    The last decade has seen proton beam writing maturing into a versatile lithographic technique able to produce sub-100 nm, high aspect ratio structures with smooth side walls. However, many applications in the fields of photonics and fluidics require the fabrication of structures with high spatial resolution that extends over several centimetres. This cannot be achieved by purely magnetic or electrostatic beam scanning due to the large off-axis beam aberrations in high demagnification systems. As a result, this has limited us to producing long straight structures using a combination of beam and stage scanning. In this work we have: (1) developed an algorithm to include any arbitrary pattern into the writing process by using a more versatile combination of beam and stage scanning while (2) incorporating the use of the ubiquitous AutoCAD DXF (drawing exchange format) into the design process. We demonstrate the capability of this approach in fabricating structures such as Y-splitters, Mach-Zehnder modulators and microfluidic channels that are over several centimetres in length, in polymer. We also present optimisation of such parameters as scanning speed and scanning loops to improve on the surface roughness of the structures. This work opens up new possibilities of using CAD software in PBW for microphotonics and fluidics device fabrication.

  15. Heat Dissipation for Microprocessor Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Based Liquid

    Hung Thang, Bui; Trinh, Pham Van; Chuc, Nguyen Van; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity (2000 W/m · K compared with thermal conductivity of Ag 419 W/m · K). This suggested an approach in applying the CNTs in thermal dissipation system for high power electronic devices, such as computer processor and high brightness light emitting diode (HB-LED). In this work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based liquid was made by COOH functionalized MWCNTs dispersed in distilled water with conce...

  16. Heat Dissipation for Microprocessor Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Based Liquid

    Trinh, Pham Van; Chuc, Nguyen Van; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity (2000 W/m · K compared with thermal conductivity of Ag 419 W/m · K). This suggested an approach in applying the CNTs in thermal dissipation system for high power electronic devices, such as computer processor and high brightness light emitting diode (HB-LED). In this work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based liquid was made by COOH functionalized MWCNTs dispersed in distilled water with concentration in the range between 0.2 and 1.2 gram/liter. MWCNT based liquid was used in liquid cooling system to enhance thermal dissipation for computer processor. By using distilled water in liquid cooling system, CPU's temperature decreases by about 10°C compared with using fan cooling system. By using MWCNT liquid with concentration of 1 gram/liter MWCNTs, the CPU's temperature decreases by 7°C compared with using distilled water in cooling system. Theoretically, we also showed that the presence of MWCNTs reduced thermal resistance and increased the thermal conductivity of liquid cooling system. The results have confirmed the advantages of the MWCNTs for thermal dissipation systems for the μ-processor and other high power electronic devices. PMID:24453829

  17. On the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-based composites: modelling and characterization

    Thostenson, E T

    2003-01-01

    The exceptional mechanical and physical properties observed for carbon nanotubes has stimulated the development of nanotube-based composite materials, but critical challenges exist before we can exploit these extraordinary nanoscale properties in a macroscopic composite. At the nanoscale, the structure of the carbon nanotube strongly influences the overall properties of the composite. The focus of this research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the structure/size influence of carbon nanotubes on the elastic properties of nanotube-based composites. Towards this end, the nanoscale structure and elastic properties of a model composite system of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polystyrene matrix were characterized, and a micromechanical approach for modelling of short fibre composites was modified to account for the structure of the nanotube reinforcement to predict the elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of the constituent properties, reinforcement geometry and nanot...

  18. High-performance field emission device utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes-based pillar architectures

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Kedawat, Garima; Gangwar, Amit Kumar; Nagpal, Kanika; Kashyap, Pradeep Kumar; Srivastava, Shubhda; Singh, Satbir; Kumar, Pawan; Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; Seo, Deok Min; Tripathi, Prashant; More, Mahendra A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Late, Dattatray J.

    2018-01-01

    The vertical aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based pillar architectures were created on laminated silicon oxide/silicon (SiO2/Si) wafer substrate at 775 °C by using water-assisted chemical vapor deposition under low pressure process condition. The lamination was carried out by aluminum (Al, 10.0 nm thickness) as a barrier layer and iron (Fe, 1.5 nm thickness) as a catalyst precursor layer sequentially on a silicon wafer substrate. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that synthesized CNTs are vertically aligned and uniformly distributed with a high density. The CNTs have approximately 2-30 walls with an inner diameter of 3-8 nm. Raman spectrum analysis shows G-band at 1580 cm-1 and D-band at 1340 cm-1. The G-band is higher than D-band, which indicates that CNTs are highly graphitized. The field emission analysis of the CNTs revealed high field emission current density (4mA/cm2 at 1.2V/μm), low turn-on field (0.6 V/μm) and field enhancement factor (6917) with better stability and longer lifetime. Emitter morphology resulting in improved promising field emission performances, which is a crucial factor for the fabrication of pillared shaped vertical aligned CNTs bundles as practical electron sources.

  19. High-performance field emission device utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes-based pillar architectures

    Bipin Kumar Gupta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The vertical aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs-based pillar architectures were created on laminated silicon oxide/silicon (SiO2/Si wafer substrate at 775 °C by using water-assisted chemical vapor deposition under low pressure process condition. The lamination was carried out by aluminum (Al, 10.0 nm thickness as a barrier layer and iron (Fe, 1.5 nm thickness as a catalyst precursor layer sequentially on a silicon wafer substrate. Scanning electron microscope (SEM images show that synthesized CNTs are vertically aligned and uniformly distributed with a high density. The CNTs have approximately 2–30 walls with an inner diameter of 3–8 nm. Raman spectrum analysis shows G-band at 1580 cm−1 and D-band at 1340 cm−1. The G-band is higher than D-band, which indicates that CNTs are highly graphitized. The field emission analysis of the CNTs revealed high field emission current density (4mA/cm2 at 1.2V/μm, low turn-on field (0.6 V/μm and field enhancement factor (6917 with better stability and longer lifetime. Emitter morphology resulting in improved promising field emission performances, which is a crucial factor for the fabrication of pillared shaped vertical aligned CNTs bundles as practical electron sources.

  20. Investigations of niobium carbide contact for carbon-nanotube-based devices

    Huang, L; Chor, E F; Wu, Y; Guo, Z

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field effect transistors (FETs) with Nb contacts have been fabricated and upon annealing in vacuum at 700 deg. C for 1 h, niobium carbide (Nb 2 C) is formed at the Nb/SWCNT interface. The Nb 2 C/SWCNT contacts demonstrate a very small Schottky barrier height of ∼ 18 meV (decreased by > 80% relative to that of pristine Nb/SWCNT contact of ∼ 98 meV) to p-type transport. This is attributed to the higher work function of Nb 2 C (∼5.2 eV) than Nb (∼4.3 eV) and better bonding between Nb 2 C and SWCNTs. The performance of Nb 2 C-contacted SWCNT FETs is as follows: the p-channel ON current is as high as 0.5 μA at V DS = 0.1 V, the I ON /I OFF ratio is up to ∼ 10 5 and the subthreshold slope is ∼ 550 mV/dec, which is as good as that of titanium carbide (TiC-) and Pd-contacted SWCNT FETs. Compared with TiC, Nb 2 C contacts yield more unipolar p-type SWCNT FETs, as a result of the Nb 2 Cs higher work function. More importantly, Nb 2 C contacts can form near-ohmic contacts to both large-(≥1.6 nm) and small-diameter (∼1 nm) SWCNTs, while Pd can only form near-ohmic contacts for large-diameter SWCNTs. Moreover, the Nb 2 C contacts demonstrate good stability in air.

  1. Fast cholesterol detection using flow injection microfluidic device with functionalized carbon nanotubes based electrochemical sensor.

    Wisitsoraat, A; Sritongkham, P; Karuwan, C; Phokharatkul, D; Maturos, T; Tuantranont, A

    2010-12-15

    This work reports a new cholesterol detection scheme using functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode in a polydimethylsiloxane/glass based flow injection microfluidic chip. CNTs working, silver reference and platinum counter electrode layers were fabricated on the chip by sputtering and low temperature chemical vapor deposition methods. Cholesterol oxidase prepared in polyvinyl alcohol solution was immobilized on CNTs by in-channel flow technique. Cholesterol analysis based on flow injection chronoamperometric measurement was performed in 150-μm-wide and 150-μm-deep microchannels. Fast and sensitive real-time detection was achieved with high throughput of more than 60 samples per hour and small sample volume of 15 μl. The cholesterol sensor had a linear detection range between 50 and 400 mg/dl. In addition, low cross-sensitivities toward glucose, ascorbic acid, acetaminophen and uric acid were confirmed. The proposed system is promising for clinical diagnostics of cholesterol with high speed real-time detection capability, very low sample consumption, high sensitivity, low interference and good stability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Roll-to-Roll production of carbon nanotubes based supercapacitors

    Zhu, Jingyi; Childress, Anthony; Karakaya, Mehmet; Roberts, Mark; Arcilla-Velez, Margarita; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials provide an excellent platform for electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs). However, current industrial methods for producing carbon nanotubes are expensive and thereby increase the costs of energy storage to more than 10 Wh/kg. In this regard, we developed a facile roll-to-roll production technology for scalable manufacturing of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with variable density on run-of-the-mill kitchen Al foils. Our method produces MWNTs with diameter (heights) between 50-100 nm (10-100 μm), and a specific capacitance as high as ~ 100 F/g in non-aqueous electrolytes. In this talk, the fundamental challenges involved in EDLC-suitable MWNT growth, roll-to-roll production, and device manufacturing will be discussed along with electrochemical characteristics of roll-to-roll MWNTs. Research supported by NSF CMMI Grant1246800.

  3. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    So, Hye-Mi; Sim, Jin Woo; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun; Chang, Won Seok

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate

  4. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    So, Hye-Mi [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Jin Woo [Advanced Nano Technology Ltd., Seoul 132-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jinhyeong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Department of Energy Science and School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won Seok, E-mail: paul@kimm.re.kr [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate.

  5. Carbon Nanotube-Based Ion Selective Sensors for Wearable Applications.

    Roy, Soumyendu; David-Pur, Moshe; Hanein, Yael

    2017-10-11

    Wearable electronics offer new opportunities in a wide range of applications, especially sweat analysis using skin sensors. A fundamental challenge in these applications is the formation of sensitive and stable electrodes. In this article we report the development of a wearable sensor based on carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode arrays for sweat sensing. Solid-state ion selective electrodes (ISEs), sensitive to Na + ions, were prepared by drop coating plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) doped with ionophore and ion exchanger on CNT electrodes. The ion selective membrane (ISM) filled the intertubular spaces of the highly porous CNT film and formed an attachment that was stronger than that achieved with flat Au, Pt, or carbon electrodes. Concentration of the ISM solution used influenced the attachment to the CNT film, the ISM surface morphology, and the overall performance of the sensor. Sensitivity of 56 ± 3 mV/decade to Na + ions was achieved. Optimized solid-state reference electrodes (REs), suitable for wearable applications, were prepared by coating CNT electrodes with colloidal dispersion of Ag/AgCl, agarose hydrogel with 0.5 M NaCl, and a passivation layer of PVC doped with NaCl. The CNT-based REs had low sensitivity (-1.7 ± 1.2 mV/decade) toward the NaCl solution and high repeatability and were superior to bare Ag/AgCl, metals, carbon, and CNT films, reported previously as REs. CNT-based ISEs were calibrated against CNT-based REs, and the short-term stability of the system was tested. We demonstrate that CNT-based devices implemented on a flexible support are a very attractive platform for future wearable technology devices.

  6. Impact of carbon nanotubes based nanofluid on oil recovery efficiency using core flooding

    Soleimani, Hassan; Baig, Mirza Khurram; Yahya, Noorhana; Khodapanah, Leila; Sabet, Maziyar; Demiral, Birol M. R.; Burda, Marek

    2018-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the influence of carbon nanotubes based nanofluid on interfacial tension and oil recovery efficiency. Practically multi-walled carbon nanotubes were successfully synthesized using chemical vapour deposition technique and characterized using X-ray diffraction and Field Emission Scanning Electron microscope in order to understand its structure, shape, and morphology. Nanofluids are one of the interesting new agents for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) that can change the reservoir rock-fluid properties in terms of interfacial tension and wettability. In this work, different concentration of carbon nanotubes based fluids were prepared and the effect of each concentration on surface tension was determined using pendant drop method. After specifying the optimum concentration of carbon nanotubes based nanofluid, core flooding experiment was conducted by two pore volume of brine and two pore volume of nanofluid and then oil recovery factor was calculated. The results show that carbon nanotubes can bring in additional recovery factor of 18.57% in the glass bead sample. It has been observed that nanofluid with high surface tension value gives higher recovery. It was found that the optimum value of concentration is 0.3 wt% at which maximum surface tension of 33.46 mN/m and oil recovery factor of 18.57% was observed. This improvement in recovery factor can be recognized due to interfacial tension reduction and wettability alteration.

  7. A vertically aligned carbon nanotube-based impedance sensing biosensor for rapid and high sensitive detection of cancer cells.

    Abdolahad, Mohammad; Taghinejad, Mohammad; Taghinejad, Hossein; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Mohajerzadeh, Shams

    2012-03-21

    A novel vertically aligned carbon nanotube based electrical cell impedance sensing biosensor (CNT-ECIS) was demonstrated for the first time as a more rapid, sensitive and specific device for the detection of cancer cells. This biosensor is based on the fast entrapment of cancer cells on vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays and leads to mechanical and electrical interactions between CNT tips and entrapped cell membranes, changing the impedance of the biosensor. CNT-ECIS was fabricated through a photolithography process on Ni/SiO(2)/Si layers. Carbon nanotube arrays have been grown on 9 nm thick patterned Ni microelectrodes by DC-PECVD. SW48 colon cancer cells were passed over the surface of CNT covered electrodes to be specifically entrapped on elastic nanotube beams. CNT arrays act as both adhesive and conductive agents and impedance changes occurred as fast as 30 s (for whole entrapment and signaling processes). CNT-ECIS detected the cancer cells with the concentration as low as 4000 cells cm(-2) on its surface and a sensitivity of 1.7 × 10(-3)Ω cm(2). Time and cell efficiency factor (TEF and CEF) parameters were defined which describe the sensor's rapidness and resolution, respectively. TEF and CEF of CNT-ECIS were much higher than other cell based electrical biosensors which are compared in this paper.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Based Chemical Sensors for Space and Terrestrial Applications

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2009-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using photolithography and thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to nitrogen dioxide, acetone, benzene, nitrotoluene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing of carbon nanotubes in our sensor platform can be understood by intra- and inter-tube electron modulation in terms of charge transfer mechanisms. As a result of the charge transfer, the conductance of p-type or hole-richer SWNTs in air will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost. Additionally, a wireless capability of such a sensor chip can be used for networked mobile and fixed-site detection and warning systems for military bases, facilities and battlefield areas.

  9. Carbon Nanotubes-Based Digitally Programmable Current Follower

    S. K. Tripathi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The physical constraints of ever-shrinking CMOS transistors are rapidly approaching atomistic and quantum mechanical limits. Therefore, research is now directed towards the development of nanoscale devices that could work efficiently in the sub-10 nm regime. This coupled with the fact that recent design trend for analog signal processing applications is moving towards current-mode circuits which offer lower voltage swings, higher bandwidth, and better signal linearity is the motivation for this work. A digitally controlled DVCC has been realized using CNFETs. This work exploited the CNFET’s parameters like chirality, pitch, and numbers of CNTs to perform the digital control operation. The circuit has minimum number of transistors and can control the output current digitally. A similar CMOS circuit with 32 nm CMOS parameters was also simulated and compared. The result shows that CMOS-based circuit requires 418.6 μW while CNFET-based circuit consumes 352.1 μW only. Further, the proposed circuit is used to realize a CNFET-based instrumentation amplifier with digitally programmable gain. The amplifier has a CMRR of 100 dB and ICMR equal to 0.806 V. The 3 dB bandwidth of the amplifier is 11.78 GHz which is suitable for the applications like navigation, radar instrumentation, and high-frequency signal amplification and conditioning.

  10. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures

    Sundes Fakher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS and thin film transistor (TFT structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance–voltage (C–V for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors. Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses, the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of a carbon nanotube-based nanoknife

    Singh, G; Rice, P; Mahajan, R L; McIntosh, J R

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication and testing of a prototype microtome knife based on a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) for cutting ∼100 nm thick slices of frozen-hydrated biological samples. A piezoelectric-based 3D manipulator was used inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to select and position individual MWCNTs, which were subsequently welded in place using electron beam-induced deposition. The knife is built on a pair of tungsten needles with provision to adjust the distance between the needle tips, accommodating various lengths of MWCNTs. We performed experiments to test the mechanical strength of a MWCNT in the completed device using an atomic force microscope tip. An increasing force was applied at the mid-point of the nanotube until failure occurred, which was observed in situ in the SEM. The maximum breaking force was approximately (8 x 10 -7 ) N which corresponds well with the typical microtome cutting forces reported in the literature. In situ cutting experiments were performed on a cell biological embedding plastic (epoxy) by pushing it against the nanotube. Initial experiments show indentation marks on the epoxy surface. Quantitative analysis is currently limited by the surface asperities, which have the same dimensions as the nanotube.

  12. The precise self-assembly of individual carbon nanotubes using magnetic capturing and fluidic alignment

    Shim, Joon S; Rust, Michael J; Do, Jaephil; Ahn, Chong H [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microsystems and BioMEMS Laboratory, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Yun, Yeo-Heung; Schulz, Mark J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 45221 (United States); Shanov, Vesselin, E-mail: chong.ahn@uc.ed [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 45221 (United States)

    2009-08-12

    A new method for the self-assembly of a carbon nanotube (CNT) using magnetic capturing and fluidic alignment has been developed and characterized in this work. In this new method, the residual iron (Fe) catalyst positioned at one end of the CNT was utilized as a self-assembly driver to attract and position the CNT, while the assembled CNT was aligned by the shear force induced from the fluid flow through the assembly channel. The self-assembly procedures were successfully developed and the electrical properties of the assembled multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) were fully characterized. The new assembly method developed in this work shows its feasibility for the precise self-assembly of parallel CNTs for electronic devices and nanobiosensors.

  13. Lab on a Biomembrane: Rapid prototyping and manipulation of 2D fluidic lipid bilayers circuits

    Ainla, Alar; Gözen, Irep; Hakonen, Bodil; Jesorka, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Lipid bilayer membranes are among the most ubiquitous structures in the living world, with intricate structural features and a multitude of biological functions. It is attractive to recreate these structures in the laboratory, as this allows mimicking and studying the properties of biomembranes and their constituents, and to specifically exploit the intrinsic two-dimensional fluidity. Even though diverse strategies for membrane fabrication have been reported, the development of related applications and technologies has been hindered by the unavailability of both versatile and simple methods. Here we report a rapid prototyping technology for two-dimensional fluidic devices, based on in-situ generated circuits of phospholipid films. In this “lab on a molecularly thin membrane”, various chemical and physical operations, such as writing, erasing, functionalization, and molecular transport, can be applied to user-defined regions of a membrane circuit. This concept is an enabling technology for research on molecular membranes and their technological use. PMID:24067786

  14. pH-Sensitive Hydrogel for Micro-Fluidic Valve

    Zhengzhi Yang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The deformation behavior of a pH-sensitive hydrogel micro-fluidic valve system is investigated using inhomogeneous gel deformation theory, in which the fluid-structure interaction (FSI of the gel solid and fluid flow in the pipe is considered. We use a finite element method with a well adopted hydrogel constitutive equation, which is coded in commercial software, ABAQUS, to simulate the hydrogel valve swelling deformation, while FLUENT is adopted to model the fluid flow in the pipe of the hydrogel valve system. The study demonstrates that FSI significantly affects the gel swelling deformed shapes, fluid flow pressure and velocity patterns. FSI has to be considered in the study on fluid flow regulated by hydrogel microfluidic valve. The study provides a more accurate and adoptable model for future design of new pH-sensitive hydrogel valves, and also gives a useful guideline for further studies on hydrogel fluidic applications.

  15. Microfluidic hubs, systems, and methods for interface fluidic modules

    Bartsch, Michael S; Claudnic, Mark R; Kim, Hanyoup; Patel, Kamlesh D; Renzi, Ronald F; Van De Vreugde, James L

    2015-01-27

    Embodiments of microfluidic hubs and systems are described that may be used to connect fluidic modules. A space between surfaces may be set by fixtures described herein. In some examples a fixture may set substrate-to-substrate spacing based on a distance between registration surfaces on which the respective substrates rest. Fluidic interfaces are described, including examples where fluid conduits (e.g. capillaries) extend into the fixture to the space between surfaces. Droplets of fluid may be introduced to and/or removed from microfluidic hubs described herein, and fluid actuators may be used to move droplets within the space between surfaces. Continuous flow modules may be integrated with the hubs in some examples.

  16. Development of a continuous-flow fluidic pump

    Robinson, S.M.

    1985-08-01

    A study was made of a fluidic pump which utilizes gas pistons, a venturi-like reverse-flow-diverter, and a planar Y-type flow junction to produce a continuous flow of liquid from a system containing no moving parts. The study included an evaluation of the system performance and of methods for controlling the stability of the fluidic system. A mathematical model of the system was developed for steady-state operation using accepted theories of fluid mechanics. Although more elaborate models are needed for detailed design and optimization of specific systems, the model determined some of the main factors controlling the system performance and will be used in the development of more accurate models. 49 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs

  17. Investigation of the dye concentration influence on the lasing wavelength and threshold for a micro-fluidic dye laser

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kragh, Søren; Kjeldsen, B.G.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a micro-fluidic dye laser, which can be integrated with polymer-based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the lasing threshold. The laser device is characterised using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved...... in ethanol, and the influence of dye concentration on the lasing wavelength and threshold is investigated. The experiments confirm the predictions of the rate-equation model, that lasing can be achieved in the 10 mum long laser cavity with moderate concentrations of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol, starting from 5 x...

  18. FLUIDICS: THE ANSWER TO PROBLEMS OF HANDLING HAZARDOUS FLUIDS – A SURVEY

    Tesař, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2012), s. 167-183 ISSN 2041-9031 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GCP101/11/J019; GA TA ČR TA02020795 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : fluidic pumps * fluidics * fluidic valves Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://journals.witpress.com/journals.asp?iID=78#papers

  19. Porous Microfluidic Devices - Fabrication adn Applications

    de Jong, J.; Geerken, M.J.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The major part of microfluidic devices nowadays consists of a dense material that defines the fluidic structure. A generic fabrication method enabling the production of completely porous micro devices with user-defined channel networks is developed. The channel walls can be used as a (selective)

  20. Nanoscale memory devices

    Chung, Andy; Deen, Jamal; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Meyyappan, M

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the current status and future prospects for the use of nanomaterials and devices in memory technology. First, the status and continuing scaling trends of the flash memory are discussed. Then, a detailed discussion on technologies trying to replace flash in the near-term is provided. This includes phase change random access memory, Fe random access memory and magnetic random access memory. The long-term nanotechnology prospects for memory devices include carbon-nanotube-based memory, molecular electronics and memristors based on resistive materials such as TiO 2 . (topical review)

  1. Rectifying Properties of a Nitrogen/Boron-Doped Capped-Carbon-Nanotube-Based Molecular Junction

    Zhao Peng; Zhang Ying; Wang Pei-Ji; Zhang Zhong; Liu De-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Based on the non-equilibrium Green's function method and first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the electronic transport properties of a nitrogen/boron-doped capped-single-walled carbon-nanotube-based molecular junction. Obvious rectifying behavior is observed and it is strongly dependent on the doping site. The best rectifying performance can be carried out when the nitrogen/boron atom dopes at a carbon site in the second layer. Moreover, the rectifying performance can be further improved by adjusting the distance between the C 60 nanotube caps. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of single-wall carbon nanotube-based material

    Danilov, Pavel A; Ionin, Andrey A; Kudryashov, Sergey I; Makarov, Sergey V; Mel’nik, Nikolay N; Rudenko, Andrey A; Yurovskikh, Vladislav I; Zayarny, Dmitry V; Lednev, Vasily N; Obraztsova, Elena D; Pershin, Sergey M; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    Single- and multi-shot femtosecond laser surface ablation of a single-wall carbon nanotube-based substrate at 515- and 1030 nm wavelengths was studied by scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The laser ablation proceeds in two ways: as the low-fluence mesoscopic shallow disintegration of the surface nanotube packing, preserving the individual integrity and the semiconducting character of the nanotubes or as the high-fluence deep material removal apparently triggered by the strong intrinsic or impurity-mediated ablation of the individual carbon nanotubes on the substrate surface. (letter)

  3. Dielectric elastomer strain and pressure sensing enable reactive soft fluidic muscles

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Sheng Q.

    2016-04-01

    Wearable assistive devices are the future of rehabilitation therapy and bionic limb technologies. Traditional electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators can provide the precise and powerful around-the-clock assistance that therapists cannot deliver. However, they do so in the confines of highly controlled factory environments, resulting in actuators too rigid, heavy, and immobile for wearable applications. In contrast, biological skeletal muscles have been designed and proven in the uncertainty of the real world. Bioinspired artificial muscle actuators aim to mimic the soft, slim, and self-sensing abilities of natural muscle that make them tough and intelligent. Fluidic artificial muscles are a promising wearable assistive actuation candidate, sharing the high-force, inherent compliance of their natural counterparts. Until now, they have not been able to self-sense their length, pressure, and force in an entirely soft and flexible system. Their use of rigid components has previously been a requirement for the generation of large forces, but reduces their reliability and compromises their ability to be comfortably worn. We present the unobtrusive integration of dielectric elastomer (DE) strain and pressure sensors into a soft Peano fluidic muscle, a planar alternative to the relatively bulky McKibben muscle. Characterization of these DE sensors shows they can measure the full operating range of the Peano muscle: strains of around 18% and pressures up to 400 kPa with changes in capacitance of 2.4 and 10.5 pF respectively. This is a step towards proprioceptive artificial muscles, paving the way for wearable actuation that can truly feel its environment.

  4. Configurations of Fluidic Actuators for Generation of Hybrid-Synthetic Jets

    Tesař, Václav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 138, - (2007), s. 213-220 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/1499 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : synthetic jets * fluidics * fluidic alternators Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.348, year: 2007

  5. Sample handling in surface sensitive chemical and biological sensing: a practical review of basic fluidics and analyte transport.

    Orgovan, Norbert; Patko, Daniel; Hos, Csaba; Kurunczi, Sándor; Szabó, Bálint; Ramsden, Jeremy J; Horvath, Robert

    2014-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of the advantages and associated caveats of the most common sample handling methods in surface-sensitive chemical and biological sensing. We summarize the basic theoretical and practical considerations one faces when designing and assembling the fluidic part of the sensor devices. The influence of analyte size, the use of closed and flow-through cuvettes, the importance of flow rate, tubing length and diameter, bubble traps, pressure-driven pumping, cuvette dead volumes, and sample injection systems are all discussed. Typical application areas of particular arrangements are also highlighted, such as the monitoring of cellular adhesion, biomolecule adsorption-desorption and ligand-receptor affinity binding. Our work is a practical review in the sense that for every sample handling arrangement considered we present our own experimental data and critically review our experience with the given arrangement. In the experimental part we focus on sample handling in optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) measurements, but the present study is equally applicable for other biosensing technologies in which an analyte in solution is captured at a surface and its presence is monitored. Explicit attention is given to features that are expected to play an increasingly decisive role in determining the reliability of (bio)chemical sensing measurements, such as analyte transport to the sensor surface; the distorting influence of dead volumes in the fluidic system; and the appropriate sample handling of cell suspensions (e.g. their quasi-simultaneous deposition). At the appropriate places, biological aspects closely related to fluidics (e.g. cellular mechanotransduction, competitive adsorption, blood flow in veins) are also discussed, particularly with regard to their models used in biosensing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rheostatic control of tryptic digestion in a microscale fluidic system

    Percy, Andrew J.; Schriemer, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated fluidic systems that unite bottom-up and top-down proteomic approaches have the potential to deliver complete protein characterization. To circumvent fraction collection, as is conducted in current blended approaches, a technique to regulate digestion efficiency in a flow-through system is required. The present study examined the concept of regulating tryptic digestion in an immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER), incorporating mixed solvent systems for digestion acceleration. Using ovalbumin, cytochrome c, and myoglobin as protein standards, we demonstrate that tryptic digestion can be efficiently regulated between complete digestion and no digestion extremes by oscillating between 45 and 0% acetonitrile in the fluid stream. Solvent composition was tuned using programmable solvent waveforms in a closed system consisting of the IMER, a sample delivery stream, a dual gradient pumping system and a mass spectrometer. Operation in this rheostatic digestion mode provides access to novel peptide mass maps (due to substrate unfolding hysteresis) as well as the intact protein, in a reproducible and stable fashion. Although cycle times were on the order of 90 s for testing purposes, we show that regulated digestion is sufficiently rapid to be limited by solvent switching efficiency and kinetics of substrate unfolding/folding. Thus, regulated digestion should be useful in blending bottom-up and top-down proteomics in a single closed fluidic system.

  7. Fluidic Sampler. Tanks Focus Area. OST Reference No. 2007

    1999-01-01

    Problem Definition; Millions of gallons of radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored in underground tanks across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. To manage this waste, tank operators need safe, cost-effective methods for mixing tank material, transferring tank waste between tanks, and collecting samples. Samples must be collected at different depths within storage tanks containing various kinds of waste including salt, sludge, and supernatant. With current or baseline methods, a grab sampler or a core sampler is inserted into the tank, waste is maneuvered into the sample chamber, and the sample is withdrawn from the tank. The mixing pumps in the tank, which are required to keep the contents homogeneous, must be shut down before and during sampling to prevent airborne releases. These methods are expensive, require substantial hands-on labor, increase the risk of worker exposure to radiation, and often produce nonrepresentative and unreproducible samples. How It Works: The Fluidic Sampler manufactured by AEA Technology Engineering Services, Inc., enables tank sampling to be done remotely with the mixing pumps in operation. Remote operation minimizes the risk of exposure to personnel and the possibility of spills, reducing associated costs. Sampling while the tank contents are being agitated yields consistently homogeneous, representative samples and facilitates more efficient feed preparation and evaluation of the tank contents. The above-tank portion of the Fluidic Sampler and the replacement plug and pipework that insert through the tank top are shown.

  8. A Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-based Biosensor for Monitoring Microcystin-LR in Sources of Drinking Water Supplies

    A multi-walled carbon nanotube-based electrochemical biosensor is developed for monitoring microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a toxic cyanobacterial toxin, in sources of drinking water supplies. The biosensor electrodes are fabricated using dense, mm-long multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) arrays gro...

  9. Halloysite nanotube-based electrospun ceramic nanofibre mat: a novel support for zeolite membranes

    Chen, Zhuwen; Zeng, Jiaying; Lv, Dong; Gao, Jinqiang; Zhang, Jian; Bai, Shan; Li, Ruili; Hong, Mei; Wu, Jingshen

    2016-12-01

    Some key parameters of supports such as porosity, pore shape and size are of great importance for fabrication and performance of zeolite membranes. In this study, we fabricated millimetre-thick, self-standing electrospun ceramic nanofibre mats and employed them as a novel support for zeolite membranes. The nanofibre mats were prepared by electrospinning a halloysite nanotubes/polyvinyl pyrrolidone composite followed by a programmed sintering process. The interwoven nanofibre mats possess up to 80% porosity, narrow pore size distribution, low pore tortuosity and highly interconnected pore structure. Compared with the commercial α-Al2O3 supports prepared by powder compaction and sintering, the halloysite nanotube-based mats (HNMs) show higher flux, better adsorption of zeolite seeds, adhesion of zeolite membranes and lower Al leaching. Four types of zeolite membranes supported on HNMs have been successfully synthesized with either in situ crystallization or a secondary growth method, demonstrating good universality of HNMs for supporting zeolite membranes.

  10. Properties of single-walled carbon nanotube-based aerogels as a function of nanotube loading

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Hamza, Alex V.; Satcher, Joe H.; Baumann, Theodore F.

    2009-01-01

    Here, we present the synthesis and characterization of low-density single-walled carbon nanotube-based aerogels (SWNT-CA). Aerogels with varying nanotube loading (0-55 wt.%) and density (20-350 mg cm -3 ) were fabricated and characterized by four-probe method, electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and nitrogen porosimetry. Several properties of the SWNT-CAs were highly dependent upon nanotube loading. At nanotube loadings of 55 wt.%, shrinkage of the aerogel monoliths during carbonization and drying was almost completely eliminated. Electrical conductivities are improved by an order of magnitude for the SWNT-CA (55 wt.% nanotubes) compared to those of foams without nanotubes. Surface areas as high as 184 m 2 g -1 were achieved for SWNT-CAs with greater than 20 wt.% nanotube loading.

  11. An Overview of Pesticide Monitoring at Environmental Samples Using Carbon Nanotubes-Based Electrochemical Sensors

    Ademar Wong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have received enormous attention in the development of electrochemical sensors by promoting electron transfer reactions, decreasing the work overpotential within great surface areas. The growing concerns about environmental health emphasized the necessity of continuous monitoring of pollutants. Pesticides have been successfully used to control agricultural and public health pests; however, intense use can cause a number of damages for biodiversity and human health. In this sense, carbon nanotubes-based electrochemical sensors have been proposed for pesticide monitoring combining different electrode modification strategies and electroanalytical techniques. In this paper, we provide a review of the recent advances in the use of carbon nanotubes for the construction of electrochemical sensors dedicated to the environmental monitoring of pesticides. Future directions, perspectives, and challenges are also commented.

  12. Sub-micrometer fluidic channel for measuring photon emitting entities

    Stavis, Samuel M; Edel, Joshua B; Samiee, Kevan T; Craighead, Harold G

    2014-11-18

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  13. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    Stavis, Samuel M.; Edel, Joshua B.; Samiee, Kevan T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2010-04-13

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  14. Performance characteristics of a continuous-flow fluidic pump

    Robinson, S.M.; Counce, R.M.; Smith, G.V.

    1987-01-01

    The fluidic pump is a type of positive-displacement pump in which basic fluid mechanics phenomena are utilized to eliminate valves and other moving parts that are exposed to the fluid being transferred. The version described in this article is powered by gas pressure serving as gas pistons and is virtually maintenance-free. It utilizes two displacement vessels and is designed to produce a steady and continuous liquid flow. This type of pump may be very useful for the transfer of radioactive or hazardous liquids where mechanical maintenance may be difficult or exposure of personnel to the fluid is undesirable. This paper presents experimental and model-predicted characteristics of such systems. The effects of several geometric parameters and operating conditions on the performance of the pump are briefly discussed

  15. Fractal modeling of fluidic leakage through metal sealing surfaces

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Xiaoqian; Huang, Yiyong; Chen, Yong

    2018-04-01

    This paper investigates the fluidic leak rate through metal sealing surfaces by developing fractal models for the contact process and leakage process. An improved model is established to describe the seal-contact interface of two metal rough surface. The contact model divides the deformed regions by classifying the asperities of different characteristic lengths into the elastic, elastic-plastic and plastic regimes. Using the improved contact model, the leakage channel under the contact surface is mathematically modeled based on the fractal theory. The leakage model obtains the leak rate using the fluid transport theory in porous media, considering that the pores-forming percolation channels can be treated as a combination of filled tortuous capillaries. The effects of fractal structure, surface material and gasket size on the contact process and leakage process are analyzed through numerical simulations for sealed ring gaskets.

  16. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    Stavis, Samuel M [Ithaca, NY; Edel, Joshua B [Brookline, MA; Samiee, Kevan T [Ithaca, NY; Craighead, Harold G [Ithaca, NY

    2008-07-29

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  17. Fluidic Manufacture of Star-Shaped Gold Nanoparticles.

    Silvestri, Alessandro; Lay, Luigi; Psaro, Rinaldo; Polito, Laura; Evangelisti, Claudio

    2017-07-21

    Star-shaped gold nanoparticles (StarAuNPs) are extremely attractive nanomaterials, characterized by localized surface plasmon resonance which could be potentially employed in a large number of applications. However, the lack of a reliable and reproducible synthetic protocols for the production of StarAuNPs is the major limitation to their spreading. For the first time, here we present a robust protocol to manufacture reproducible StarAuNPs by exploiting a fluidic approach. Star-shaped AuNPs have been synthesized by means of a seed-less protocol, employing ascorbic acid as reducing agent at room temperature. Moreover, the versatility of the bench-top microfluidic protocol has been exploited to afford hydrophilic, hydrophobic and solid-supported engineered StarAuNPs, by avoiding intermediate NP purifications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Topology optimisation of micro fluidic mixers considering fluid-structure interactions with a coupled Lattice Boltzmann algorithm

    Munk, David J.; Kipouros, Timoleon; Vio, Gareth A.; Steven, Grant P.; Parks, Geoffrey T.

    2017-11-01

    Recently, the study of micro fluidic devices has gained much interest in various fields from biology to engineering. In the constant development cycle, the need to optimise the topology of the interior of these devices, where there are two or more optimality criteria, is always present. In this work, twin physical situations, whereby optimal fluid mixing in the form of vorticity maximisation is accompanied by the requirement that the casing in which the mixing takes place has the best structural performance in terms of the greatest specific stiffness, are considered. In the steady state of mixing this also means that the stresses in the casing are as uniform as possible, thus giving a desired operating life with minimum weight. The ultimate aim of this research is to couple two key disciplines, fluids and structures, into a topology optimisation framework, which shows fast convergence for multidisciplinary optimisation problems. This is achieved by developing a bi-directional evolutionary structural optimisation algorithm that is directly coupled to the Lattice Boltzmann method, used for simulating the flow in the micro fluidic device, for the objectives of minimum compliance and maximum vorticity. The needs for the exploration of larger design spaces and to produce innovative designs make meta-heuristic algorithms, such as genetic algorithms, particle swarms and Tabu Searches, less efficient for this task. The multidisciplinary topology optimisation framework presented in this article is shown to increase the stiffness of the structure from the datum case and produce physically acceptable designs. Furthermore, the topology optimisation method outperforms a Tabu Search algorithm in designing the baffle to maximise the mixing of the two fluids.

  19. Hybrid Macro-Micro Fluidics System for a Chip-Based Biosensor

    Tamanaha, C. R; Whitman, L. J; Colton, R.J

    2002-01-01

    We describe the engineering of a hybrid fluidics platform for a chip-based biosensor system that combines high-performance microfluidics components with powerful, yet compact, millimeter-scale pump and valve actuators...

  20. Design and fabrication of a micro fluidic circuit for the separation of micron sized particles

    Khumalo, F

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of a micro fluidic circuit for the separation of micro particles is being investigated. There are a wide range of available separation techniques such as acoustic, laminar flow, split flow, optical trapping and centrifugal forces...

  1. Precision Controlled Carbon Materials for Next-Generation Optoelectronic and Photonic Devices

    2018-01-08

    engineer next-generation carbon-based optoelectronic and photonic devices with superior performance and capabilities. These devices include carbon...electronics; (4) nanostructured graphene plasmonics; and (5) polymer-nanotube conjugate chemistry . (1) Semiconducting carbon nanotube-based...applications (In Preparation, 2018). (5) Polymer-nanotube conjugate chemistry Conjugated polymers can be exploited as agents for selectively wrapping and

  2. Rapid Vortex Fluidics: Continuous Flow Synthesis of Amides and Local Anesthetic Lidocaine.

    Britton, Joshua; Chalker, Justin M; Raston, Colin L

    2015-07-20

    Thin film flow chemistry using a vortex fluidic device (VFD) is effective in the scalable acylation of amines under shear, with the yields of the amides dramatically enhanced relative to traditional batch techniques. The optimized monophasic flow conditions are effective in ≤80 seconds at room temperature, enabling access to structurally diverse amides, functionalized amino acids and substituted ureas on multigram scales. Amide synthesis under flow was also extended to a total synthesis of local anesthetic lidocaine, with sequential reactions carried out in two serially linked VFD units. The synthesis could also be executed in a single VFD, in which the tandem reactions involve reagent delivery at different positions along the rapidly rotating tube with in situ solvent replacement, as a molecular assembly line process. This further highlights the versatility of the VFD in organic synthesis, as does the finding of a remarkably efficient debenzylation of p-methoxybenzyl amines. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. LES-based characterization of a suction and oscillatory blowing fluidic actuator

    Kim, Jeonglae; Moin, Parviz

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a novel fluidic actuator using steady suction and oscillatory blowing was developed for control of turbulent flows. The suction and oscillatory blowing (SaOB) actuator combines steady suction and pulsed oscillatory blowing into a single device. The actuation is based upon a self-sustained mechanism of confined jets and does not require any moving parts. The control output is determined by a pressure source and the geometric details, and no additional input is needed. While its basic mechanisms have been investigated to some extent, detailed characteristics of internal turbulent flows are not well understood. In this study, internal flows of the SaOB actuator are simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES). Flow characteristics within the actuator are described in detail for a better understanding of the physical mechanisms and improving the actuator design. LES predicts the self-sustained oscillations of the turbulent jet. Switching frequency, maximum velocity at the actuator outlets, and wall pressure distribution are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The computational results are used to develop simplified boundary conditions for numerical experiments of active flow control. Supported by the Boeing company.

  4. On Emulation of Flueric Devices in Excitable Chemical Medium.

    Andrew Adamatzky

    Full Text Available Flueric devices are fluidic devices without moving parts. Fluidic devices use fluid as a medium for information transfer and computation. A Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ medium is a thin-layer spatially extended excitable chemical medium which exhibits travelling excitation wave-fronts. The excitation wave-fronts transfer information. Flueric devices compute via jets interaction. BZ devices compute via excitation wave-fronts interaction. In numerical model of BZ medium we show that functions of key flueric devices are implemented in the excitable chemical system: signal generator, and, xor, not and nor Boolean gates, delay elements, diodes and sensors. Flueric devices have been widely used in industry since late 1960s and are still employed in automotive and aircraft technologies. Implementation of analog of the flueric devices in the excitable chemical systems opens doors to further applications of excitation wave-based unconventional computing in soft robotics, embedded organic electronics and living technologies.

  5. On Emulation of Flueric Devices in Excitable Chemical Medium.

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Flueric devices are fluidic devices without moving parts. Fluidic devices use fluid as a medium for information transfer and computation. A Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) medium is a thin-layer spatially extended excitable chemical medium which exhibits travelling excitation wave-fronts. The excitation wave-fronts transfer information. Flueric devices compute via jets interaction. BZ devices compute via excitation wave-fronts interaction. In numerical model of BZ medium we show that functions of key flueric devices are implemented in the excitable chemical system: signal generator, and, xor, not and nor Boolean gates, delay elements, diodes and sensors. Flueric devices have been widely used in industry since late 1960s and are still employed in automotive and aircraft technologies. Implementation of analog of the flueric devices in the excitable chemical systems opens doors to further applications of excitation wave-based unconventional computing in soft robotics, embedded organic electronics and living technologies.

  6. An Evaluation of Power Fluidics Mixing and Pumping for Application in the Single Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Program

    CRASS, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    This document is being released for information only. It provides an explanation of fluidics pumping and mixing technology and explores the feasibility of using fluidics technology for the retrieval of S102. It concludes that there are no obvious flaws that would prevent deploying the technology and recommends further development of fluidics technology as a retrieval option. The configuration described herein does not represent the basis for project definition

  7. Surface Tension Directed Fluidic Self-Assembly of Semiconductor Chips across Length Scales and Material Boundaries

    Shantonu Biswas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This publication provides an overview and discusses some challenges of surface tension directed fluidic self-assembly of semiconductor chips which are transported in a liquid medium. The discussion is limited to surface tension directed self-assembly where the capture, alignment, and electrical connection process is driven by the surface free energy of molten solder bumps where the authors have made a contribution. The general context is to develop a massively parallel and scalable assembly process to overcome some of the limitations of current robotic pick and place and serial wire bonding concepts. The following parts will be discussed: (2 Single-step assembly of LED arrays containing a repetition of a single component type; (3 Multi-step assembly of more than one component type adding a sequence and geometrical shape confinement to the basic concept to build more complex structures; demonstrators contain (3.1 self-packaging surface mount devices, and (3.2 multi-chip assemblies with unique angular orientation. Subsequently, measures are discussed (4 to enable the assembly of microscopic chips (10 μm–1 mm; a different transport method is introduced; demonstrators include the assembly of photovoltaic modules containing microscopic silicon tiles. Finally, (5 the extension to enable large area assembly is presented; a first reel-to-reel assembly machine is realized; the machine is applied to the field of solid state lighting and the emerging field of stretchable electronics which requires the assembly and electrical connection of semiconductor devices over exceedingly large area substrates.

  8. Energy-density enhancement of carbon-nanotube-based supercapacitors with redox couple in organic electrolyte.

    Park, Jinwoo; Kim, Byungwoo; Yoo, Young-Eun; Chung, Haegeun; Kim, Woong

    2014-11-26

    We demonstrate for the first time that the incorporation of a redox-active molecule in an organic electrolyte can increase the cell voltage of a supercapacitor. The redox molecule also contributes to increasing the cell capacitance by a faradaic redox reaction, and therefore the energy density of the supercapacitor can be significantly increased. More specifically, the addition of redox-active decamethylferrocene in an organic electrolyte results in an approximately 27-fold increase in the energy density of carbon-nanotube-based supercapacitors. The resulting high energy density (36.8 Wh/kg) stems from the increased cell voltage (1.1 V→2.1 V) and cell capacitance (8.3 F/g→61.3 F/g) resulting from decamethylferrocene addition. We found that the voltage increase is associated with the potential of the redox species relative to the electrochemical stability window of the supporting electrolyte. These results will be useful in identifying new electrolytes for high-energy-density supercapacitors.

  9. Modelling the nonlinear behaviour of double walled carbon nanotube based resonator with curvature factors

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear vibration analysis of a double walled carbon nanotube based mass sensor with curvature factor or waviness, which is doubly clamped at a source and a drain. Nonlinear vibrational behaviour of a double-walled carbon nanotube excited harmonically near its primary resonance is considered. The double walled carbon nanotube is harmonically excited by the addition of an excitation force. The modelling involves stretching of the mid plane and damping as per phenomenon. The equation of motion involves four nonlinear terms for inner and outer tubes of DWCNT due to the curved geometry and the stretching of the central plane due to the boundary conditions. The vibrational behaviour of the double walled carbon nanotube with different surface deviations along its axis is analyzed in the context of the time response, Poincaré maps and Fast Fourier Transformation diagrams. The appearance of instability and chaos in the dynamic response is observed as the curvature factor on double walled carbon nanotube is changed. The phenomenon of Periodic doubling and intermittency are observed as the pathway to chaos. The regions of periodic, sub-harmonic and chaotic behaviour are clearly seen to be dependent on added mass and the curvature factors in the double walled carbon nanotube. Poincaré maps and frequency spectra are used to explicate and to demonstrate the miscellany of the system behaviour. With the increase in the curvature factor system excitations increases and results in an increase of the vibration amplitude with reduction in excitation frequency.

  10. Processing and Characterization of a Novel Distributed Strain Sensor Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Nonwoven Composites

    Hongbo Dai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of an innovative carbon nanotube-based non-woven composite sensor that can be tailored for strain sensing properties and potentially offers a reliable and cost-effective sensing option for structural health monitoring (SHM. This novel strain sensor is fabricated using a readily scalable process of coating Carbon nanotubes (CNT onto a nonwoven carrier fabric to form an electrically-isotropic conductive network. Epoxy is then infused into the CNT-modified fabric to form a free-standing nanocomposite strain sensor. By measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the sensing composite the deformation can be measured in real-time. The sensors are repeatable and linear up to 0.4% strain. Highest elastic strain gage factors of 1.9 and 4.0 have been achieved in the longitudinal and transverse direction, respectively. Although the longitudinal gage factor of the newly formed nanocomposite sensor is close to some metallic foil strain gages, the proposed sensing methodology offers spatial coverage, manufacturing customizability, distributed sensing capability as well as transverse sensitivity.

  11. Multiscale modeling of graphene- and nanotube-based reinforced polymer nanocomposites

    Montazeri, A. [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafii-Tabar, H., E-mail: rafii-tabar@nano.ipm.ac.ir [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, and Research Centre for Medical Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-31

    A combination of molecular dynamics, molecular structural mechanics, and finite element method is employed to compute the elastic constants of a polymeric nanocomposite embedded with graphene sheets, and carbon nanotubes. The model is first applied to study the effect of inclusion of graphene sheets on the Young modulus of the composite. To explore the significance of the nanofiller geometry, the elastic constants of nanotube-based and graphene-based polymer composites are computed under identical conditions. The reinforcement role of these nanofillers is also investigated in transverse directions. Moreover, the dependence of the nanocomposite's axial Young modulus on the presence of ripples on the surface of the embedded graphene sheets, due to thermal fluctuations, is examined via MD simulations. Finally, we have also studied the effect of sliding motion of graphene layers on the elastic constants of the nanocomposite. -- Highlights: → A hierarchical MD/FEM multiscale model of nanocomposites is developed. → At low nanofiller content, graphene layers perform significantly better than CNTs. → Ripples in the graphene layers reduce the Young modulus of nanocomposites. → The elastic moduli is considerably affected by the shear of graphene layers.

  12. Multiscale modeling of graphene- and nanotube-based reinforced polymer nanocomposites

    Montazeri, A.; Rafii-Tabar, H.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of molecular dynamics, molecular structural mechanics, and finite element method is employed to compute the elastic constants of a polymeric nanocomposite embedded with graphene sheets, and carbon nanotubes. The model is first applied to study the effect of inclusion of graphene sheets on the Young modulus of the composite. To explore the significance of the nanofiller geometry, the elastic constants of nanotube-based and graphene-based polymer composites are computed under identical conditions. The reinforcement role of these nanofillers is also investigated in transverse directions. Moreover, the dependence of the nanocomposite's axial Young modulus on the presence of ripples on the surface of the embedded graphene sheets, due to thermal fluctuations, is examined via MD simulations. Finally, we have also studied the effect of sliding motion of graphene layers on the elastic constants of the nanocomposite. -- Highlights: → A hierarchical MD/FEM multiscale model of nanocomposites is developed. → At low nanofiller content, graphene layers perform significantly better than CNTs. → Ripples in the graphene layers reduce the Young modulus of nanocomposites. → The elastic moduli is considerably affected by the shear of graphene layers.

  13. Fluidic actuators for active flow control on airframe

    Schueller, M.; Weigel, P.; Lipowski, M.; Meyer, M.; Schlösser, P.; Bauer, M.

    2016-04-01

    One objective of the European Projects AFLoNext and Clean Sky 2 is to apply Active Flow Control (AFC) on the airframe in critical aerodynamic areas such as the engine/wing junction or the outer wing region for being able to locally improve the aerodynamics in certain flight conditions. At the engine/wing junction, AFC is applied to alleviate or even eliminate flow separation at low speeds and high angle of attacks likely to be associated with the integration of underwing- mounted Ultra High Bypass Ratio (UHBR) engines and the necessary slat-cut-outs. At the outer wing region, AFC can be used to allow more aggressive future wing designs with improved performance. A relevant part of the work on AFC concepts for airframe application is the development of suitable actuators. Fluidic Actuated Flow Control (FAFC) has been introduced as a Flow Control Technology that influences the boundary layer by actively blowing air through slots or holes out of the aircraft skin. FAFC actuators can be classified by their Net Mass Flux and accordingly divided into ZNMF (Zero Net Mass Flux) and NZNMF (Non Zero Net-Mass-Flux) actuators. In the frame of both projects, both types of the FAFC actuator concepts are addressed. In this paper, the objectives of AFC on the airframe is presented and the actuators that are used within the project are discussed.

  14. Fluidic delivery of homogeneous solutions through carbon tube bundles

    Srikar, R; Yarin, A L; Megaridis, C M

    2009-01-01

    A wide array of technological applications requires localized high-rate delivery of dissolved compounds (in particular, biological ones), which can be achieved by forcing the solutions or suspensions of such compounds through nano or microtubes and their bundled assemblies. Using a water-soluble compound, the fluorescent dye Rhodamine 610 chloride, frequently used as a model drug release compound, it is shown that deposit buildup on the inner walls of the delivery channels and its adverse consequences pose a severe challenge to implementing pressure-driven long-term fluidic delivery through nano and microcapillaries, even in the case of such homogeneous solutions. Pressure-driven delivery (3-6 bar) of homogeneous dye solutions through macroscopically-long (∼1 cm) carbon nano and microtubes with inner diameters in the range 100 nm-1 μm and their bundled parallel assemblies is studied experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that the flow delivery gradually shifts from fast convection-dominated (unobstructed) to slow jammed convection, and ultimately to diffusion-limited transport through a porous deposit. The jamming/clogging phenomena appear to be rather generic: they were observed in a wide concentration range for two fluorescent dyes in carbon nano and microtubes, as well as in comparable transparent glass microcapillaries. The aim of the present work is to study the physics of jamming, rather than the chemical reasons for the affinity of dye molecules to the tube walls.

  15. Fluidic origami cellular structure -- combining the plant nastic movements with paper folding art

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K. W.

    2015-04-01

    By combining the physical principles behind the nastic plant movements and the rich designs of paper folding art, we propose a new class of multi-functional adaptive structure called fluidic origami cellular structure. The basic elements of this structure are fluid filled origami "cells", made by connecting two compatible Miura-Ori stripes along their crease lines. These cells are assembled seamlessly into a three dimensional topology, and their internal fluid pressure or volume are strategically controlled just like in plants for nastic movements. Because of the unique geometry of the Miura-Ori, the relationships among origami folding, internal fluid properties, and the crease bending are intricate and highly nonlinear. Fluidic origami can exploit such relationships to provide multiple adaptive functions concurrently and effectively. For example, it can achieve actuation or morphing by actively changing the internal fluid volume, and stillness tuning by constraining the fluid volume. Fluidic origami can also be bistable because of the nonlinear correlation between folding and crease material bending, and such bistable character can be altered significantly by fluid pressurization. These functions are natural and essential companions with respect to each other, so that fluidic origami can holistically exhibit many attractive characteristics of plants and deliver rapid and efficient actuation/morphing while maintaining a high structural stillness. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the design and working principles of the fluidic origami, as well as to explore and demonstrate its performance potential.

  16. A micro-fluidic study of whole blood behaviour on PMMA topographical nanostructures

    Tsud Nataliya

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymers are attractive materials for both biomedical engineering and cardiovascular applications. Although nano-topography has been found to influence cell behaviour, no established method exists to understand and evaluate the effects of nano-topography on polymer-blood interaction. Results We optimized a micro-fluidic set-up to study the interaction of whole blood with nano-structured polymer surfaces under flow conditions. Micro-fluidic chips were coated with polymethylmethacrylate films and structured by polymer demixing. Surface feature size varied from 40 nm to 400 nm and feature height from 5 nm to 50 nm. Whole blood flow rate through the micro-fluidic channels, platelet adhesion and von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen adsorption onto the structured polymer films were investigated. Whole blood flow rate through the micro-fluidic channels was found to decrease with increasing average surface feature size. Adhesion and spreading of platelets from whole blood and von Willebrand factor adsorption from platelet poor plasma were enhanced on the structured surfaces with larger feature, while fibrinogen adsorption followed the opposite trend. Conclusion We investigated whole blood behaviour and plasma protein adsorption on nano-structured polymer materials under flow conditions using a micro-fluidic set-up. We speculate that surface nano-topography of polymer films influences primarily plasma protein adsorption, which results in the control of platelet adhesion and thrombus formation.

  17. Piezoresistive strain sensing of carbon nanotubes-based composite skin for aeronautical morphing structures

    Viscardi, Massimo; Arena, Maurizio; Barra, Giuseppina; Vertuccio, Luigi; Ciminello, Monica; Guadagno, Liberata

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, smart composites based on different nano-scale carbon fillers, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are increasingly being thought of as a more possible alternative solution to conventional smart materials, mainly for their improved electrical properties. Great attention is being given by the research community in designing highly sensitive strain sensors for more and more ambitious challenges: in such context, interest fields related to carbon nanotubes have seen extraordinary development in recent years. The authors aim to provide the most contemporary overview possible of carbon nanotube-based strain sensors for aeronautical application. A smart structure as a morphing wing needs an embedded sensing system in order to measure the actual deformation state as well as to "monitor" the structural conditions. Looking at more innovative health monitoring tools for the next generation of composite structures, a resin strain sensor has been realized. The epoxy resin was first analysed by means of a micro-tension test, estimating the electrical resistance variations as function of the load, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the sensor. The epoxy dogbone specimen has been equipped with a standard strain gauge to quantify its strain sensitivity. The voltamperometric tests highlight a good linearity of the electrical resistance value as the load increases at least in the region of elastic deformation of the material. Such intrinsic piezoresistive performance is essentially attributable to the re-arrangement of conductive percolating network formed by MWCNT, induced by the deformation of the material due to the applied loads. The specimen has been prepared within this investigation, to demonstrate its performance for a future composite laminate typical of aerospace structures. The future carbon-fiber sensor can replace conventional metal foil strain gauges in aerospace applications. Furthermore, dynamic tests will be carried out to detect any non

  18. Molecular Weiss domain polarization in piezoceramics to diaphragm, cantilever and channel construction in low-temperature-cofired ceramics for micro-fluidic applications

    Khanna, P.K.; Ahmad, S.; Grimme, R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the efforts made to study the process of comminution to Weiss domain polarization and phase transition in piezoceramics together with the versatility of low-temperature-cofired ceramics-based devices and components for their ready adoption for typical applications in the area of micro-fluidics. A conceptual micro-fluidic module has been presented and few unit entities necessary for its realization have been described. The purpose of these entities is to position the sensors and actuators by using piezoelectric materials. Investigations are performed to make useful constructions like diaphragms and cantilevers for laying the sensing elements, cavities for burying the electronic chip devices, and channels for fluid transportation. In order to realize these constructions, the basic step involves machining of circular, straight line, rectangular and square-shaped structure in the green ceramic tapes followed by lamination and firing with post-machining in some cases. The diaphragm and cavity includes one or more un-machined layer stacked together with several machined layers with rectangular or square slits. The cantilever is an extension of the diaphragm creation process with inclusion of a post-machining step. The channel essentially consists of a machined green ceramic layer sandwiched between an un-machined and a partially machined layer. The fabrication for all the above constructions has been exemplified and the details have been discussed

  19. Determining DfT Hardware by VHDL-AMS Fault Simulation for Biological Micro-Electronic Fluidic Arrays

    Kerkhoff, Hans G.; Zhang, X.; Liu, H.; Richardson, A.; Nouet, P.; Azais, F.

    2005-01-01

    The interest of microelectronic fluidic arrays for biomedical applications, like DNA determination, is rapidly increasing. In order to evaluate these systems in terms of required Design-for-Test structures, fault simulations in both fluidic and electronic domains are necessary. VHDL-AMS can be used

  20. Dynamic response of a carbon nanotube-based rotary nano device with different carbon-hydrogen bonding layout

    Yin, Hang [College of Water Resources and Architectural Engineering, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Cai, Kun, E-mail: caikun1978@163.com [College of Water Resources and Architectural Engineering, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Wan, Jing [College of Water Resources and Architectural Engineering, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Gao, Zhaoliang, E-mail: coopcg@163.com [Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, 712100 (China); Chen, Zhen [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Faculty of Vehicle Engineering and Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The rotational transmission performance of a rotational transmission system (RTS) with different types of C−H bonding layouts on the edge of motor and rotor is investigated using MD simulation method. • The L–J interaction between covalently bonded hydrogen atoms and sp1 carbon atoms is too weak to support a stable rotational transmission when only the motor or rotor has bonded hydrogen atoms. • When both the motor and rotor have the same C−H bonding layout on their adjacent ends, a stable output rotational speed of rotor can be obtained. • A low input rotational speed (e.g., 100 GHz) would lead to a synchronous rotational transmission if the system has (+0.5H) C−H bonding layout. - Abstract: In a nano rotational transmission system (RTS) which consists of a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as the motor and a coaxially arranged double walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) as a bearing, the interaction between the motor and the rotor in bearing, which has great effects on the response of the RTS, is determined by their adjacent edges. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the interaction is analyzed when the adjacent edges have different carbon-hydrogen (C−H) bonding layouts. In the computational models, the rotor in bearing and the motor with a specific input rotational speed are made from the same armchair SWCNT. Simulation results demonstrate that a perfect rotational transmission could happen when the motor and rotor have the same C−H bonding layout on their adjacent ends. If only half or less of the carbon atoms on the adjacent ends are bonded with hydrogen atoms, the strong attraction between the lower speed (100 GHz) motor and rotor leads to a synchronous rotational transmission. If only the motor or the rotor has C−H bonds on their adjacent ends, no rotational transmission happens due to weak interaction between the bonded hydrogen atoms on one end with the sp{sup 1} bonded carbon atoms on the other end.

  1. Heating-Rate-Triggered Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Conducting Networks for a Highly Sensitive Noncontact Sensing Device

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (>69%, PET = 90%), and good stability when

  2. Facile Preparation of Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Transparent Conducting Networks for Flexible Noncontact Sensing Device

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the controllable fabrication of transparent conductive films (TCFs) for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Gear

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties of a multi-walled carbon nanotube based gear. Previous work computationally suggested that molecular gears fashioned from (14,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes operate well at 50-100 gigahertz. The gears were formed from nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. The gear in this study was based on the smallest multi-walled nanotube supported by some experimental evidence. Each gear was a (52,0) nanotube surrounding a (37,10) nanotube with approximate 20.4 and 16,8 A radii respectively. These sizes were chosen to be consistent with inter-tube spacing observed by and were slightly larger than graphite inter-layer spacings. The benzyne teeth were attached via 2+4 cycloaddition to exterior of the (52,0) tube. 2+4 bonds were used rather than the 2+2 bonds observed by Hoke since 2+4 bonds are preferred by naphthalene and quantum calculations by Jaffe suggest that 2+4 bonds are preferred on carbon nanotubes of sufficient diameter. One gear was 'powered' by forcing the atoms near the end of the outside buckytube to rotate to simulate a motor. A second gear was allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its outside buckytube on a cylinder. The ends of both gears were constrained to stay in an approximately constant position relative to each other, simulating a casing, to insure that the gear teeth meshed. The stiff meshing aromatic gear teeth transferred angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. The simulation was performed in a vacuum and with a software thermostat. Preliminary results suggest that the powered gear had trouble turning the driven gear without slip. The larger radius and greater mass of these gears relative to the (14,0) gears previously studied requires a

  4. Geometrical and fluidic tuning of periodically modulated thin metal films

    Gilardi, Giovanni; Xiao, Sanshui; Beccherelli, Romeo

    2012-01-01

    We numerically demonstrate near-zero transmission of light through two-dimensional arrays of isolated gold rings. The analysis of the device as an optofluidic sensor is presented to demonstrate the tuning of the device in relation to variations of volume and refractive index of an isotropic fluid...... positioned over the structure. We also evaluate the performance of the device with respect to geometrical parameters of the rings....

  5. Multi Objective Optimization of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotube Based Nanogrinding Wheel Using Grey Relational and Regression Analysis

    Sethuramalingam, Prabhu; Vinayagam, Babu Kupusamy

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotube mixed grinding wheel is used in the grinding process to analyze the surface characteristics of AISI D2 tool steel material. Till now no work has been carried out using carbon nanotube based grinding wheel. Carbon nanotube based grinding wheel has excellent thermal conductivity and good mechanical properties which are used to improve the surface finish of the workpiece. In the present study, the multi response optimization of process parameters like surface roughness and metal removal rate of grinding process of single wall carbon nanotube (CNT) in mixed cutting fluids is undertaken using orthogonal array with grey relational analysis. Experiments are performed with designated grinding conditions obtained using the L9 orthogonal array. Based on the results of the grey relational analysis, a set of optimum grinding parameters is obtained. Using the analysis of variance approach the significant machining parameters are found. Empirical model for the prediction of output parameters has been developed using regression analysis and the results are compared empirically, for conditions of with and without CNT grinding wheel in grinding process.

  6. Centrifugal micro-fluidic platform for radiochemistry: Potentialities for the chemical analysis of nuclear spent fuels

    Bruchet, Anthony; Mariet, Clarisse; Taniga, Velan; Descroix, Stephanie; Malaquin, Laurent; Goutelard, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The use of a centrifugal micro-fluidic platform is for the first time reported as an alternative to classical chromatographic procedures for radiochemistry. The original design of the micro-fluidic platform has been thought to fasten and simplify the prototyping process with the use of a circular platform integrating four rectangular microchips made of thermoplastic. The microchips, dedicated to anion-exchange chromatographic separations, integrate a localized monolithic stationary phase as well as injection and collection reservoirs. The results presented here were obtained with a simplified simulated nuclear spent fuel sample composed of non-radioactive isotopes of Europium and Uranium, in proportion usually found for uranium oxide nuclear spent fuel. While keeping the analytical results consistent with the conventional procedure (extraction yield for Europium of ∼97%), the use of the centrifugal micro-fluidic platform allowed to reduce the volume of liquid needed by a factor of ∼250. Thanks to their unique 'easy-to-use' features, centrifugal micro-fluidic platforms are potential successful candidates for the down-scaling of chromatographic separation of radioactive samples (automation, multiplexing, easy integration in glove-boxes environment and low cost of maintenance). (authors)

  7. Accurate and versatile multivariable arbitrary piecewise model regression of nonlinear fluidic muscle behavior

    Veale, A.J.; Xie, Sheng Quan; Anderson, Iain Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Wearable exoskeletons and soft robots require actuators with muscle-like compliance. These actuators can benefit from the robust and effective interaction that biological muscles' compliance enables them to have in the uncertainty of the real world. Fluidic muscles are compliant but difficult to

  8. Integrated optics nano-opto-fluidic sensor based on whispering gallery modes for picoliter volume refractometry

    Gilardi, G.; Beccherelli, R.

    2013-01-01

    We propose and numerically investigate an integrated optics refractometric nano-opto-fluidic sensor based on whispering gallery modes in sapphire microspheres. A measurand fluid is injected in a micromachined reservoir defined in between the microsphere and an optical waveguide. The wavelength shift

  9. No-moving-part electro/fluidic transducer based on plasma discharge effect

    Tesař, Václav; Šonský, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 232, August (2015), s. 20-29 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : transducer * fluidic * plasma discharge Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.201, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092442471500206X

  10. Fluidic origami with embedded pressure dependent multi-stability: a plant inspired innovation.

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K W

    2015-10-06

    Inspired by the impulsive movements in plants, this research investigates the physics of a novel fluidic origami concept for its pressure-dependent multi-stability. In this innovation, fluid-filled tubular cells are synthesized by integrating different Miura-Ori sheets into a three-dimensional topological system, where the internal pressures are strategically controlled similar to the motor cells in plants. Fluidic origami incorporates two crucial physiological features observed in nature: one is distributed, pressurized cellular organization, and the other is embedded multi-stability. For a single fluidic origami cell, two stable folding configurations can coexist due to the nonlinear relationships among folding, crease material deformation and internal volume change. When multiple origami cells are integrated, additional multi-stability characteristics could occur via the interactions between pressurized cells. Changes in the fluid pressure can tailor the existence and shapes of these stable folding configurations. As a result, fluidic origami can switch between being mono-stable, bistable and multi-stable with pressure control, and provide a rapid 'snap-through' type of shape change based on the similar principles as in plants. The outcomes of this research could lead to the development of new adaptive materials or structures, and provide insights for future plant physiology studies at the cellular level. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Rapid prototyping tools and methods for all-Topas (R) cyclic olefin copolymer fluidic microsystems

    Bundgaard, Frederik; Perozziello, Gerardo; Geschke, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    , good machinability, and good optical properties. A number of different processes for rapid and low-cost prototyping of all-Topas microfluidic systems, made with desktop machinery, are presented. Among the processes are micromilling of fluidic structures with a width down to 25 p,m and sealing...

  12. Micro Machining of Injection Mold Inserts for Fluidic Channel of Polymeric Biochips

    Myeong-Woo Cho

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the polymeric micro-fluidic biochip, often called LOC (lab-on-a-chip, has been focused as a cheap, rapid and simplified method to replace the existing biochemical laboratory works. It becomes possible to form miniaturized lab functionalities on a chip with the development of MEMS technologies. The micro-fluidic chips contain many micro-channels for the flow of sample and reagents, mixing, and detection tasks. Typical substrate materials for the chip are glass and polymers. Typical techniques for micro-fluidic chip fabrication are utilizing various micro pattern forming methods, such as wet-etching, micro-contact printing, and hot-embossing, micro injection molding, LIGA, and micro powder blasting processes, etc. In this study, to establish the basis of the micro pattern fabrication and mass production of polymeric micro-fluidic chips using injection molding process, micro machining method was applied to form micro-channels on the LOC molds. In the research, a series of machining experiments using micro end-mills were performed to determine optimum machining conditions to improve surface roughness and shape accuracy of designed simplified micro-channels. Obtained conditions were used to machine required mold inserts for micro-channels using micro end-mills. Test injection processes using machined molds and COC polymer were performed, and then the results were investigated.

  13. Highly sensitive miniature fluidic flowmeter based on an FBG heated by Co2+-doped fiber

    Liu, Z.; Htein, L.; Cheng, L.K.; Martina, Q.; Jansen, R.; Tam, H.Y.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a miniature fluidic flow sensor based on a short fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a single mode fiber and heated by Co2+-doped multimode fibers. The proposed flow sensor was employed to measure the flow rates of oil and water, showing good sensitivity of 0.339 nm/(m/s) and

  14. Low voltage electroosmotic pump for high density integration into microfabricated fluidic systems

    Heuck, F.C.A.; Staufer, U.

    2011-01-01

    A low voltage electroosmotic (eo) pump suitable for high density integration into microfabricated fluidic systems has been developed. The high density integration of the eo pump required a small footprint as well as a specific on-chip design to ventilate the electrolyzed gases emerging at the

  15. Opto-fluidics based microscopy and flow cytometry on a cell phone for blood analysis.

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-01-01

    Blood analysis is one of the most important clinical tests for medical diagnosis. Flow cytometry and optical microscopy are widely used techniques to perform blood analysis and therefore cost-effective translation of these technologies to resource limited settings is critical for various global health as well as telemedicine applications. In this chapter, we review our recent progress on the integration of imaging flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using compact, light-weight and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments integrated onto the camera module of a smartphone. In our cell-phone based opto-fluidic imaging cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are delivered into the imaging area using a disposable micro-fluidic chip that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the sides of this micro-fluidic chip without any lenses, which effectively acts as a multimode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to excite the fluorescent targets within the micro-fluidic chip. Since the excitation light propagates perpendicular to the detection path, an inexpensive plastic absorption filter is able to reject most of the scattered light and create a decent dark-field background for fluorescent imaging. With this excitation geometry, the cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the particles/cells as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the solution under test. With a similar opto-fluidic design, we have recently demonstrated imaging and automated counting of stationary blood cells (e.g., labeled white blood cells or unlabeled red blood cells) loaded within a disposable cell counting chamber. We tested the performance of this cell-phone based imaging cytometry and blood analysis platform

  16. Monitoring Apnea in the Elderly by an Electromechanical System with a Carbon Nanotube-based Sensor

    Hung-Chang Liu

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Our results showed that a new device composed of an NEMS by combining an MWCNT sensor and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS circuits could be integrated to effectively detect apnea in the elderly. This novel device may improve the pattern of safe respiratory care for the elderly in the future.

  17. Improvement of Modeling Scheme of the Safety Injection Tank with Fluidic Device for Realistic LBLOCA Calculation

    Bang, Young Seok; Cheong, Aeju; Woo, Sweng Woong

    2014-01-01

    Confirmation of the performance of the SIT with FD should be based on thermal-hydraulic analysis of LBLOCA and an adequate and physical model simulating the SIT/FD should be used in the LBLOCA calculation. To develop such a physical model on SIT/FD, simulation of the major phenomena including flow distribution of by standpipe and FD should be justified by full scale experiment and/or plant preoperational testing. Author's previous study indicated that an approximation of SIT/FD phenomena could be obtained by a typical system transient code, MARS-KS, and using 'accumulator' component model, however, that additional improvement on modeling scheme of the FD and standpipe flow paths was needed for a reasonable prediction. One problem was a depressurizing behavior after switchover to low flow injection phase. Also a potential to release of nitrogen gas from the SIT to the downstream pipe and then reactor core through flow paths of FD and standpipe has been concerned. The intrusion of noncondensible gas may have an effect on LBLOCA thermal response. Therefore, a more reliable model on SIT/FD has been requested to get a more accurate prediction and a confidence of the evaluation of LBLOCA. The present paper is to discuss an improvement of modeling scheme from the previous study. Compared to the existing modeling, effect of the present modeling scheme on LBLOCA cladding thermal response is discussed. The present study discussed the modeling scheme of SIT with FD for a realistic simulation of LBLOCA of APR1400. Currently, the SIT blowdown test can be best simulated by the modeling scheme using 'pipe' component with dynamic area reduction. The LBLOCA analysis adopting the modeling scheme showed the PCT increase of 23K when compared to the case of 'accumulator' component model, which was due to the flow rate decrease at transition phase low flow injection and intrusion of nitrogen gas to the core. Accordingly, the effect of SIT/FD modeling scheme should be considered for realistic LBLOCA analysis

  18. Development of a novel concept for performing multiple assays on clinical samples using fluidic device

    Søe, Martin Jensen

    RNA-130a sammenlignet med konventionelle teknikker, hvor der benyttes prober af DNA og LNA. Desuden kunne multiple miRNAer detekteres ved brug af sekventielle inkuberinger af TSA reagens. Dette tillod detektion af to miRNA og et protein på samme vævssnit. Den anden model involverede design og konstruktion...

  19. Fluidic separation in microstructured devices – concepts and their Integration into process flow networks

    Vural - Gürsel, I.; Kockmann, N.; Hessel, V.

    2017-01-01

    FDA and pharmaceutical industry turn the vision of integrated end-to-end manufacturing currently into reality. Accordingly, besides the efforts to develop reactions in continuous flow, it is also essential to consider separation of reaction mixtures and purification of the desired product - and how

  20. Precision manufacturing of polymer micro-nano fluidic systems

    Garnæs, Jørgen; Calaon, Matteo; Tosello, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) technologies require the possibility of fabricating devices which include micro down to sub-micrometre features with high production rate and low cost. In the present study precision injection moulding is performed using a COC Topas 5013 L10 polymer to produce LoC devices...... in the sample. Design of experiment (DOE) was adopted to characterize the replication fidelity of produced polymer features. Results have shown the possibility of performing quality control of micro- and sub-μm features, taking into account the polymer shrinkage, depending on process conditions at both micro...

  1. Development of an opto-fluidic micro-system dedicated to chemical analysis in a nuclear environment

    Geoffray, F.; Canto, F.; Couston, L. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry and Processes Department, SERA/LAMM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Allenet, T.; Bucci, D.; Broquin, J.E. [IMEP-LaHC, Universite de Grenoble Alpes, UMR 5130 CNRS, Minatec-Grenoble-INP, CS 50257, 38016 Grenoble (France); Jardinier, E. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry and Processes Department, SERA/LAMM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); IMEP-LaHC, Universite de Grenoble Alpes, UMR 5130 CNRS, Minatec-Grenoble-INP, CS 50257, 38016 Grenoble (France)

    2016-07-01

    Micromachining techniques enable the fabrication of innovative lab-on-a-chip. Following the trend in chemical and biological analysis, the use of microsystems also appears compelling in the nuclear industry. The volume reduction of radioactive solutions is especially attractive in order to reduce the workers radiation exposition in the context of off-line analysis in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. We hence present the development of an opto-fluidic sensor combining micro-fluidic channels for fluid transportation and integrated optics for detection. With the aim of achieving automated microanalysis with reduced response time the sensor is made compatible with a commercial micro-fluidic holder. Therefore the chip is connected to computer controlled pumps and electro-valves thanks to capillary tubing. In this paper we emphasis on the fluid handling capacities of the opto-fluidic sensor. (authors)

  2. Study of thermo-fluidic behavior of micro-droplet in inkjet-based micro manufacturing processes

    Das, Raju; Mahapatra, Abhijit; Ball, Amit Kumar; Roy, Shibendu Shekhar; Murmu, Naresh Chandra

    2017-06-01

    Inkjet printing technology, a maskless, non-contact patterning operation, which has been a revelation in the field of micro and nano manufacturing for its use in the selective deposition of desired materials. It is becoming an exciting alternative technology such as lithography to print functional material on to a substrate. Selective deposition of functional materials on desired substrates is a basic requirement in many of the printing based micro and nano manufacturing operations like the fabrication of microelectronic devices, solar cell, Light-emitting Diode (LED) research fields like pharmaceutical industries for drug discovery purposes and in biotechnology to make DNA microarrays. In this paper, an attempt has been made to design and develop an indigenous Electrohydrodynamic Inkjet printing system for micro fabrication and to study the interrelationships between various thermos-fluidic parameters of the ink material in the printing process. The effect of printing process parameters on printing performance characteristics has also been studied. And the applicability of the process has also been experimentally demonstrated. The experimentally found results were quite satisfactory and accordance to its applicability.

  3. Steady cone-jet mode in compound-fluidic electro-flow focusing for fabricating multicompartment microcapsules

    Si, Ting; Yin, Chuansheng; Gao, Peng; Li, Guangbin; Ding, Hang; He, Xiaoming; Xie, Bin; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-01-01

    A compound-fluidic electro-flow focusing (CEFF) process is proposed to produce multicompartment microcapsules. The central device mainly consists of a needle assembly of two parallel inner needles and one outer needle mounted in a gas chamber with their tips facing a small orifice at the bottom of the chamber. As the outer and the inner fluids flow through the needle assembly, a high-speed gas stream elongates the liquid menisci in the vicinity of the orifice entrance. An electric field is further integrated into capillary flow focusing to promote the formation of steady cone-jet mode in a wide range of operation parameters. The multiphase liquid jet is broken up into droplets due to perturbation propagation along the jet surface. To estimate the diameter of the multiphase liquid jet as a function of process parameters, a modified scaling law is derived and experimentally validated. Microcapsules of around 100 μm with an alginate shell and multiple cores at a production rate of 103-105 per second are produced. Technical feasibility of stimulation triggered coalescence and drug release is demonstrated by benchtop experiments. The proposed CEFF process can be potentially used to encapsulate therapeutic agents and biological cargos for controlled micro-reaction and drug delivery.

  4. Electromechanical interactions in a carbon nanotube based thin film field emitting diode

    Sinha, N; Mahapatra, D Roy; Sun, Y; Yeow, J T W; Melnik, R V N; Jaffray, D A

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as promising candidates for biomedical x-ray devices and other applications of field emission. CNTs grown/deposited in a thin film are used as cathodes for field emission. In spite of the good performance of such cathodes, the procedure to estimate the device current is not straightforward and the required insight towards design optimization is not well developed. In this paper, we report an analysis aided by a computational model and experiments by which the process of evolution and self-assembly (reorientation) of CNTs is characterized and the device current is estimated. The modeling approach involves two steps: (i) a phenomenological description of the degradation and fragmentation of CNTs and (ii) a mechanics based modeling of electromechanical interaction among CNTs during field emission. A computational scheme is developed by which the states of CNTs are updated in a time incremental manner. Finally, the device current is obtained by using the Fowler-Nordheim equation for field emission and by integrating the current density over computational cells. A detailed analysis of the results reveals the deflected shapes of the CNTs in an ensemble and the extent to which the initial state of geometry and orientation angles affect the device current. Experimental results confirm these effects

  5. Sample preparation and detection device for infectious agents

    Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Amy W.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Bettencourt, Kerry A.; Yu, June

    2003-06-10

    A sample preparation and analysis device which incorporates both immunoassays and PCR assays in one compact, field-portable microchip. The device provides new capabilities in fluid and particle control which allows the building of a fluidic chip with no moving parts, thus decreasing fabrication cost and increasing the robustness of the device. The device can operate in a true continuous (not batch) mode. The device incorporates magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumps to move the fluid through the system, acoustic mixing and fractionation, dielectropheretic (DEP) sample concentration and purification, and on-chip optical detection capabilities.

  6. A GENERIC PACKAGING TECHNIQUE USING FLUIDIC ISOLATION FOR LOW-DRIFT IMPLANTABLE PRESSURE SENSORS.

    Kim, A; Powell, C R; Ziaie, B

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on a generic packaging method for reducing drift in implantable pressure sensors. The described technique uses fluidic isolation by encasing the pressure sensor in a liquid-filled medical-grade polyurethane balloon; thus, isolating it from surrounding aqueous environment that is the major source of baseline drift. In-vitro tests using commercial micromachined piezoresistive pressure sensors show an average baseline drift of 0.006 cmH 2 O/day (0.13 mmHg/month) for over 100 days of saline soak test, as compared to 0.101 cmH 2 O/day (2.23 mmHg/month) for a non-fluidic-isolated one soaked for 18 days. To our knowledge, this is the lowest reported drift for an implantable pressure sensor.

  7. Evaluation of the threshold trimming method for micro inertial fluidic switch based on electrowetting technology

    Tingting Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The switch based on electrowetting technology has the advantages of no moving part, low contact resistance, long life and adjustable acceleration threshold. The acceleration threshold of switch can be fine-tuned by adjusting the applied voltage. This paper is focused on the electrowetting properties of switch and the influence of microchannel structural parameters, applied voltage and droplet volume on acceleration threshold. In the presence of process errors of micro inertial fluidic switch and measuring errors of droplet volume, there is a deviation between test acceleration threshold and target acceleration threshold. Considering the process errors and measuring errors, worst-case analysis is used to analyze the influence of parameter tolerance on the acceleration threshold. Under worst-case condition the total acceleration threshold tolerance caused by various errors is 9.95%. The target acceleration threshold can be achieved by fine-tuning the applied voltage. The acceleration threshold trimming method of micro inertial fluidic switch is verified.

  8. Induced fluid rotation and bistable fluidic turn-down valves (a survey

    Tesař Václav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper surveys engineering applications of an unusual fluidic principle — momentum transfer through a relatively small communicating window into a vortex chamber, where the initially stationary fluid is put into rotation. The transfer is often by shear stress acting in the window plane, but may be enhanced and perhaps even dominated by fluid flow crossing the boundary. The case of zero-time-mean fluid transport through the window has found use in experimental fluid mechanics: non-invasive measurement of wall shear stress on objects by evaluating the induced rotation in the vortex chamber. The case with the non-zero flow through the interface became the starting point in development of fluidic valves combining two otherwise mutually incompatible properties: bistability and flow turning down.

  9. Numerical Studies of a Supersonic Fluidic Diverter Actuator for Flow Control

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Culley, Dennis e.; Raghu, Surya

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of the internal flow structure and performance of a specific fluidic diverter actuator, previously studied by time-dependent numerical computations for subsonic flow, is extended to include operation with supersonic actuator exit velocities. The understanding will aid in the development of fluidic diverters with minimum pressure losses and advanced designs of flow control actuators. The self-induced oscillatory behavior of the flow is successfully predicted and the calculated oscillation frequencies with respect to flow rate have excellent agreement with our experimental measurements. The oscillation frequency increases with Mach number, but its dependence on flow rate changes from subsonic to transonic to supersonic regimes. The delay time for the initiation of oscillations depends on the flow rate and the acoustic speed in the gaseous medium for subsonic flow, but is unaffected by the flow rate for supersonic conditions

  10. The thermal-hydraulic for the new technologies: the micro-fluidics

    Crecy, F. de; Gruss, A.; Bricard, A.; Excoffon, J.

    2000-01-01

    The micro-fluidics can be defined as the fluid flow in little canals. This scale offers a great interest for the biotechnology type. In this paper, the authors present this fluids form and detail the researches performed at the Department of Physics and Thermal-hydraulics of the CEA, in the domain of the physical properties characterization and of the numerical two-phase direct simulation. (A.L.B.)

  11. Fluidic low-frequency oscillator with vortex spin-up time delay

    Tesař, Václav; Smyk, E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 90, April (2015), s. 6-15 ISSN 0255-2701 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23046S; GA ČR GA14-08888S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : fluidics * oscillator * vortex chamber Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.154, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0255270115000252

  12. Automation of column-based radiochemical separations. A comparison of fluidic, robotic, and hybrid architectures

    Grate, J.W.; O' Hara, M.J.; Farawila, A.F.; Ozanich, R.M.; Owsley, S.L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Two automated systems have been developed to perform column-based radiochemical separation procedures. These new systems are compared with past fluidic column separation architectures, with emphasis on using disposable components so that no sample contacts any surface that any other sample has contacted, and setting up samples and columns in parallel for subsequent automated processing. In the first new approach, a general purpose liquid handling robot has been modified and programmed to perform anion exchange separations using 2 mL bed columns in 6 mL plastic disposable column bodies. In the second new approach, a fluidic system has been developed to deliver clean reagents through disposable manual valves to six disposable columns, with a mechanized fraction collector that positions one of four rows of six vials below the columns. The samples are delivered to each column via a manual 3-port disposable valve from disposable syringes. This second approach, a hybrid of fluidic and mechanized components, is a simpler more efficient approach for performing anion exchange procedures for the recovery and purification of plutonium from samples. The automation architectures described can also be adapted to column-based extraction chromatography separations. (orig.)

  13. Fast-responsive hydrogel as an injectable pump for rapid on-demand fluidic flow control.

    Luo, Rongcong; Dinh, Ngoc-Duy; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2017-05-01

    Chemically synthesized functional hydrogels have been recognized as optimized soft pumps for on-demand fluidic regulation in micro-systems. However, the challenges regarding the slow responses of hydrogels have very much limited their application in effective fluidic flow control. In this study, a heterobifunctional crosslinker (4-hydroxybutyl acrylate)-enabled two-step hydrothermal phase separation process for preparing a highly porous hydrogel with fast response dynamics was investigated for the fabrication of novel microfluidic functional units, such as injectable valves and pumps. The cylinder-shaped hydrogel, with a diameter of 9 cm and a height of 2.5 cm at 25 °C, achieved a size reduction of approximately 70% in less than 30 s after the hydrogels were heated at 40 °C. By incorporating polypyrrole nanoparticles as photothermal transducers, a photo-responsive composite hydrogel was approached and exhibited a remotely triggerable fluidic regulation and pumping ability to generate significant flows, showing on-demand water-in-oil droplet generation by laser switching, whereby the droplet size could be tuned by adjusting the laser intensity and irradiation period with programmable manipulation.

  14. Characterization of printable cellular micro-fluidic channels for tissue engineering

    Zhang, Yahui; Chen, Howard; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Yu, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering has been a promising field of research, offering hope of bridging the gap between organ shortage and transplantation needs. However, building three-dimensional (3D) vascularized organs remains the main technological barrier to be overcome. One of the major challenges is the inclusion of a vascular network to support cell viability in terms of nutrients and oxygen perfusion. This paper introduces a new approach to the fabrication of vessel-like microfluidic channels that has the potential to be used in thick tissue or organ fabrication in the future. In this research, we investigate the manufacturability of printable micro-fluidic channels, where micro-fluidic channels support mechanical integrity as well as enable fluid transport in 3D. A pressure-assisted solid freeform fabrication platform is developed with a coaxial needle dispenser unit to print hollow hydrogel filaments. The dispensing rheology is studied, and effects of material properties on structural formation of hollow filaments are analyzed. Sample structures are printed through the developed computer-controlled system. In addition, cell viability and gene expression studies are presented in this paper. Cell viability shows that cartilage progenitor cells (CPCs) maintained their viability right after bioprinting and during prolonged in vitro culture. Real-time PCR analysis yielded a relatively higher expression of cartilage-specific genes in alginate hollow filament encapsulating CPCs, compared with monolayer cultured CPCs, which revealed that printable semi-permeable micro-fluidic channels provided an ideal environment for cell growth and function. (paper)

  15. Modeling and Analysis of an Opto-Fluidic Sensor for Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

    Venkatesha Muniswamy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work modeling and analysis of an integrated opto-fluidic sensor, with a focus on achievement of single mode optical confinement and continuous flow of microparticles in the microfluidic channel for lab-on-a-chip (LOC sensing application is presented. This sensor consists of integrated optical waveguides, microfluidic channel among other integrated optical components. A continuous flow of microparticles in a narrow fluidic channel is achieved by maintaining the two sealed chambers at different temperatures and by maintaining a constant pressure of 1 Pa at the centroid of narrow fluidic channel geometry. The analysis of silicon on insulator (SOI integrated optical waveguide at an infrared wavelength of 1550 nm for single mode sensing operation is presented. The optical loss is found to be 5.7 × 10−4 dB/cm with an effective index of 2.3. The model presented in this work can be effectively used to detect the nature of microparticles and continuous monitoring of pathological parameters for sensing applications.

  16. Magnesium oxide grafted carbon nanotubes based impedimetric genosensor for biomedical application.

    Patel, Manoj Kumar; Ali, Md Azahar; Srivastava, Saurabh; Agrawal, Ved Varun; Ansari, S G; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2013-12-15

    Nanostructured magnesium oxide (sizeEIS) reveal sensitivity as 3.87 Ω ng(-1) cm(-2), detection limit of ~21.70 ng µL(-1) in the linear range of 100-500 ng µL(-1) and stability of about 120 days. The proposed DNA functionalized nMgO-cMWCNTs nanomatrix provides a novel impedimetric platform for the fabrication of a compact genosensor device for biomedical application. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Experimental Characterization of Piezoelectric Radial Field Diaphragms for Fluidic Control

    Bryant, R. G.; Kavli, S. E.; Thomas, R. A., Jr.; Darji, K. J.; Mossi, K. M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA has recently developed a new piezoelectric actuator, the Radial Field Diaphragm or RFD. This actuator uses a radially-directed electric field to generate concentric out-of-plane (Z-axis) motion that allows this packaged device to be used as a pump or valve diaphragm. In order to efficiently use this new active device, experimental determination of pressure, flow rate, mechanical work, power consumption and overall efficiency needs to be determined by actually building a pump. However, without an optimized pump design, it is difficult to assess the quality of the data, as these results are inherent to the actual pump. Hence, separate experiments must be conducted in order to generate independent results to help guide the design criteria and pump quality. This paper focuses on the experiments used to generate the RFD's operational parameters and then compares these results to the experimentally determined results of several types of ball pumps. Also discussed are how errors are inherently introduced into the experiments, the pump design, experimental hardware and their effects on the overall system efficiency.

  18. Performance Analysis of a Fluidic Axial Oscillation Tool for Friction Reduction with the Absence of a Throttling Plate

    Xinxin Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An axial oscillation tool is proved to be effective in solving problems associated with high friction and torque in the sliding drilling of a complex well. The fluidic axial oscillation tool, based on an output-fed bistable fluidic oscillator, is a type of axial oscillation tool which has become increasingly popular in recent years. The aim of this paper is to analyze the dynamic flow behavior of a fluidic axial oscillation tool with the absence of a throttling plate in order to evaluate its overall performance. In particular, the differences between the original design with a throttling plate and the current default design are profoundly analyzed, and an improvement is expected to be recorded for the latter. A commercial computational fluid dynamics code, Fluent, was used to predict the pressure drop and oscillation frequency of a fluidic axial oscillation tool. The results of the numerical simulations agree well with corresponding experimental results. A sufficient pressure pulse amplitude with a low pressure drop is desired in this study. Therefore, a relative pulse amplitude of pressure drop and displacement are introduced in our study. A comparison analysis between the two designs with and without a throttling plate indicates that when the supply flow rate is relatively low or higher than a certain value, the fluidic axial oscillation tool with a throttling plate exhibits a better performance; otherwise, the fluidic axial oscillation tool without a throttling plate seems to be a preferred alternative. In most of the operating circumstances in terms of the supply flow rate and pressure drop, the fluidic axial oscillation tool performs better than the original design.

  19. Magneto-controlled illumination with opto-fluidics

    Malynych, Serhiy Z.; Tokarev, Alexander; Hudson, Stephen; Chumanov, George; Ballato, John; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2010-01-01

    Imaging of micro- and nanofluidics is a challenge since the size of the channels is so small that the installment of additional optical and mechanical switches is very difficult. The size of the device and associated increase in viscous dissipation constitute another constraint. In response to these limitations, this work proposes and demonstrates the manipulation of light by adding a functional lens to control the light on demand. In the present work, this lens is realized by filling a hollow fiber with a colloid of superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. When the propagation of light is perpendicular to the magnetic field, this lens stretches the circular beam into a ribbon yielding a larger visible area. Potentially, one can apply a rotating magnetic field thus illuminating a larger spot size or creating other beam geometries. Such composite fibers might also be of value for Faraday isolation and other magneto-optic effects in optical fibers.

  20. Synthesis, Characterization and Utility of Carbon Nanotube Based Hybrid Sensors in Bioanalytical Applications

    Badhulika, Sushmee

    The detection of gaseous analytes and biological molecules is of prime importance in the fields of environmental pollution control, food and water - safety and analysis; and medical diagnostics. This necessitates the development of advanced and improved technology that is reliable, inexpensive and suitable for high volume production. The conventional sensors are often thin film based which lack sensitivity due to the phenomena of current shunting across the charge depleted region when an analyte binds with them. One dimensional (1-D) nanostructures provide a better alternative for sensing applications by eliminating the issue of current shunting due to their 1-D geometries and facilitating device miniaturization and low power operations. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are 1-D nanostructures that possess small size, high mechanical strength, high electrical and thermal conductivity and high specific area that have resulted in their wide spread applications in sensor technology. To overcome the issue of low sensitivity of pristine CNTs and to widen their scope, hybrid devices have been fabricated that combine the synergistic properties of CNTs along with materials like metals and conducting polymers (CPs). CPs exhibit electronic, magnetic and optical properties of metals and semiconductors while retaining the processing advantages of polymers. Their high chemical sensitivity, room temperature operation and tunable charge transport properties has made them ideal for use as transducing elements in chemical sensors. In this dissertation, various CNT based hybrid devices such as CNT-conducting polymer and graphene-CNT-metal nanoparticles based sensors have been developed and demonstrated towards bioanalytical applications such as detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and saccharides. Electrochemical polymerization enabled the synthesis of CPs and metal nanoparticles in a simple, cost effective and controlled way on the surface of CNT based platforms thus resulting in

  1. Carbon nanotube based 3-D matrix for enabling three-dimensional nano-magneto-electronics [corrected].

    Jeongmin Hong

    Full Text Available This letter describes the use of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT-based arrays with estimated 2-nm thick cobalt (Co nanoparticles deposited inside individual tubes to unravel the possibility of using the unique templates for ultra-high-density low-energy 3-D nano-magneto-electronic devices. The presence of oriented 2-nm thick Co layers within individual nanotubes in the CNT-based 3-D matrix is confirmed through VSM measurements as well as an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS.

  2. Sustaining GHz oscillation of carbon nanotube based oscillators via a MHz frequency excitation

    Motevalli, Benyamin; Taherifar, Neda; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-01-01

    There have been intensive studies to investigate the properties of gigahertz nano-oscillators based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Many of these studies, however, revealed that the unique telescopic translational oscillations in such devices would damp quickly due to various energy dissipation mechanisms. This challenge remains the primary obstacle against its practical applications. Herein, we propose a design concept in which a GHz oscillation could be re-excited by a MHz mechanical motion. This design involves a triple-walled CNT, in which sliding of the longer inner tube at a MHz frequency can re-excite and sustain a GHz oscillation of the shorter middle tube. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations prove this design concept at ∼10 nm scale. A mathematical model is developed to explore the feasibility at a larger size scale. As an example, in an oscillatory system with the CNT’s length above 100 nm, the high oscillatory frequency range of 1.8–3.3 GHz could be excited by moving the inner tube at a much lower frequency of 53.4 MHz. This design concept together with the mechanical model could energize the development of GHz nano-oscillators in miniaturized electro-mechanical devices. (paper)

  3. Thermal Dissipation Efficiency in a Micro-Processor Using Carbon Nanotubes Based Composite

    Thang, Bui Hung; Van Quang, Cao; Nghia, Van Trong; Hong, Phan Ngoc; Van Chuc, Nguyen; Tam, Ngo Thi Thanh; Quang, Le Dinh; Khang, Dao Duc; Khoi, Phan Hong; Minh, Phan Ngoc

    2009-09-01

    Modern electronic and optoelectronic devices such as μ-processor, light emitting diode, semiconductor laser issued a challenge in the thermal dissipation problem. Finding an effective way for thermal dissipation therefore becomes a very important issue. It is known that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is one of the most valuable materials with high thermal conductivity (2000 W/m.K compared to thermal conductivity of Ag 419 W/m.K). This suggested an approach in applying the CNTs as an essential component for thermal dissipation media to improve the performance of computer processor and other high power electronic devices. In this work multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based composites were utilized as the thermal dissipation media in a micro processor of a personal computer. The MWCNTs of different concentrations were added into polyaniline, commercial silicon thermal paste and commercial silver thermal paste by mechanical methods. A personal computer with configuration: Intel Pentium IV 3.066 GHz, 512 MB of RAM and Windows XP Service Pack 2 Operating System was employed. The thermal dissipation efficiency of the system was evaluated by directly measure the temperature of the μ-processor during the operation of the computer in different CPU speeds. The measured results showed that the CNTs based composite could reduce the temperature of the u-processor more than 5° C, and the time for increasing the temperature of the μ-processor was three times longer than that when using commercial thermal paste.

  4. Significantly enhanced robustness and electrochemical performance of flexible carbon nanotube-based supercapacitors by electrodepositing polypyrrole

    Chen, Yanli; Du, Lianhuan; Yang, Peihua; Sun, Peng; Yu, Xiang; Mai, Wenjie

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report robust, flexible CNT-based supercapacitor (SC) electrodes fabricated by electrodepositing polypyrrole (PPy) on freestanding vacuum-filtered CNT film. These electrodes demonstrate significantly improved mechanical properties (with the ultimate tensile strength of 16 MPa), and greatly enhanced electrochemical performance (5.6 times larger areal capacitance). The major drawback of conductive polymer electrodes is the fast capacitance decay caused by structural breakdown, which decreases cycling stability but this is not observed in our case. All-solid-state SCs assembled with the robust CNT/PPy electrodes exhibit excellent flexibility, long lifetime (95% capacitance retention after 10,000 cycles) and high electrochemical performance (a total device volumetric capacitance of 4.9 F/cm3). Moreover, a flexible SC pack is demonstrated to light up 53 LEDs or drive a digital watch, indicating the broad potential application of our SCs for portable/wearable electronics.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  6. Detection of Individual Molecules and Ions by Carbon Nanotube-Based Differential Resistive Pulse Sensor.

    Peng, Ran; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Li, Dongqing

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a new method of sensing single molecules and cations by a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based differential resistive pulse sensing (RPS) technique on a nanofluidic chip. A mathematical model for multichannel RPS systems is developed to evaluate the CNT-based RPS signals. Individual cations, rhodamine B dye molecules, and ssDNAs are detected successfully with high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. Differentiating ssDNAs with 15 and 30 nucleotides are achieved. The experimental results also show that translocation of negatively charged ssDNAs through a CNT decreases the electrical resistance of the CNT channel, while translocation of positively charged cations and rhodamine B molecules increases the electrical resistance of the CNT. The CNT-based nanofluidic device developed in this work provides a new avenue for single-molecule/ion detection and offers a potential strategy for DNA sequencing. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Multi-chamber nucleic acid amplification and detection device

    Dugan, Lawrence

    2017-10-25

    A nucleic acid amplification and detection device includes an amplification cartridge with a plurality of reaction chambers for containing an amplification reagent and a visual detection reagent, and a plurality of optically transparent view ports for viewing inside the reaction chambers. The cartridge also includes a sample receiving port which is adapted to receive a fluid sample and fluidically connected to distribute the fluid sample to the reaction chamber, and in one embodiment, a plunger is carried by the cartridge for occluding fluidic communication to the reaction chambers. The device also includes a heating apparatus having a heating element which is activated by controller to generate heat when a trigger event is detected. The heating apparatus includes a cartridge-mounting section which positioned a cartridge in thermal communication with the heating element so that visual changes to the contents of the reaction chambers are viewable through the view ports.

  8. Disposable Fluidic Actuators for Miniature In-Vivo Surgical Robotics.

    Pourghodrat, Abolfazl; Nelson, Carl A

    2017-03-01

    Fusion of robotics and minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has created new opportunities to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Surgical robotics is advancing from externally actuated systems to miniature in-vivo robotics. However, with miniaturization of electric-motor-driven surgical robots, there comes a trade-off between the size of the robot and its capability. Slow actuation, low load capacity, sterilization difficulties, leaking electricity and transferring produced heat to tissues, and high cost are among the key limitations of the use of electric motors in in-vivo applications. Fluid power in the form of hydraulics or pneumatics has a long history in driving many industrial devices and could be exploited to circumvent these limitations. High power density and good compatibility with the in-vivo environment are the key advantages of fluid power over electric motors when it comes to in-vivo applications. However, fabrication of hydraulic/pneumatic actuators within the desired size and pressure range required for in-vivo surgical robotic applications poses new challenges. Sealing these types of miniature actuators at operating pressures requires obtaining very fine surface finishes which is difficult and costly. The research described here presents design, fabrication, and testing of a hydraulic/pneumatic double-acting cylinder, a limited-motion vane motor, and a balloon-actuated laparoscopic grasper. These actuators are small, seal-less, easy to fabricate, disposable, and inexpensive, thus ideal for single-use in-vivo applications. To demonstrate the ability of these actuators to drive robotic joints, they were modified and integrated in a robotic arm. The design and testing of this surgical robotic arm are presented to validate the concept of fluid-power actuators for in-vivo applications.

  9. Impact of fluidic agitation on human pluripotent stem cells in stirred suspension culture.

    Nampe, Daniel; Joshi, Ronak; Keller, Kevin; Zur Nieden, Nicole I; Tsutsui, Hideaki

    2017-09-01

    The success of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) as a source of future cell therapies hinges, in part, on the availability of a robust and scalable culture system that can readily produce a clinically relevant number of cells and their derivatives. Stirred suspension culture has been identified as one such promising platform due to its ease of use, scalability, and widespread use in the pharmaceutical industry (e.g., CHO cell-based production of therapeutic proteins) among others. However, culture of undifferentiated hPSCs in stirred suspension is a relatively new development within the past several years, and little is known beyond empirically optimized culture parameters. In particular, detailed characterizations of different agitation rates and their influence on the propagation of hPSCs are often not reported in the literature. In the current study, we systematically investigated various agitation rates to characterize their impact on cell yield, viability, and the maintenance of pluripotency. Additionally, we closely examined the distribution of cell aggregates and how the observed culture outcomes are attributed to their size distribution. Overall, our results showed that moderate agitation maximized the propagation of hPSCs to approximately 38-fold over 7 days by keeping the cell aggregates below the critical size, beyond which the cells are impacted by the diffusion limit, while limiting cell death caused by excessive fluidic forces. Furthermore, we observed that fluidic agitation could regulate not only cell aggregation, but also expression of some key signaling proteins in hPSCs. This indicates a new possibility to guide stem cell fate determination by fluidic agitation in stirred suspension cultures. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2109-2120. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Induced movement of the magnetic beads and DNA-based dumbbell in a micro fluidic channel

    Babić, B.; Ghai, R.; Dimitrov, K.

    2007-12-01

    We have explored controlled movement of magnetic beads and a dumbbell structure composed of DNA, a magnetic and a non-magnetic bead in a micro fluidic channel. Movement of the beads and dumbbells is simulated assuming that a net force is described as a superposition between the magnetic and hydrodynamic drag forces. Trajectories of beads and dumbbells are observed with optical light microscopy. The experimentally measured data show a good agreement with the simulations. This dynamical approach offers the prospect to stretch the DNA within the dumbbell and investigate its conformational changes. Further on, we demonstrate that short sonication can reduce multiple attachments of DNA to the beads.

  11. A High-Voltage SOI CMOS Exciter Chip for a Programmable Fluidic Processor System.

    Current, K W; Yuk, K; McConaghy, C; Gascoyne, P R C; Schwartz, J A; Vykoukal, J V; Andrews, C

    2007-06-01

    A high-voltage (HV) integrated circuit has been demonstrated to transport fluidic droplet samples on programmable paths across the array of driving electrodes on its hydrophobically coated surface. This exciter chip is the engine for dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based micro-fluidic lab-on-a-chip systems, creating field excitations that inject and move fluidic droplets onto and about the manipulation surface. The architecture of this chip is expandable to arrays of N X N identical HV electrode driver circuits and electrodes. The exciter chip is programmable in several senses. The routes of multiple droplets may be set arbitrarily within the bounds of the electrode array. The electrode excitation waveform voltage amplitude, phase, and frequency may be adjusted based on the system configuration and the signal required to manipulate a particular fluid droplet composition. The voltage amplitude of the electrode excitation waveform can be set from the minimum logic level up to the maximum limit of the breakdown voltage of the fabrication technology. The frequency of the electrode excitation waveform can also be set independently of its voltage, up to a maximum depending upon the type of droplets that must be driven. The exciter chip can be coated and its oxide surface used as the droplet manipulation surface or it can be used with a top-mounted, enclosed fluidic chamber consisting of a variety of materials. The HV capability of the exciter chip allows the generated DEP forces to penetrate into the enclosed chamber region and an adjustable voltage amplitude can accommodate a variety of chamber floor thicknesses. This demonstration exciter chip has a 32 x 32 array of nominally 100 V electrode drivers that are individually programmable at each time point in the procedure to either of two phases: 0deg and 180deg with respect to the reference clock. For this demonstration chip, while operating the electrodes with a 100-V peak-to-peak periodic waveform, the maximum HV electrode

  12. Design and fabrication of a micro PZT cantilever array actuator for applications in fluidic systems

    Kim, H.; In, C.; Yoon, Gil Ho

    2005-01-01

    In this article, a micro cantilever array actuated by PZT films is designed and fabricated for micro fluidic systems. The design features for maximizing tip deflections and minimizing fluid leakage are described. The governing equation of the composite PZT cantilever is derived and the actuating......, dielectric constant, and dielectric loss. Tip deflections of 12 mu m at 5 V are measured, which agreed well with the predicted value. The 18 mu l/s leakage rate of air was observed at a pressure difference of 1000 Pa. Micro cooler is introduced, and its possible application to micro compressor is discussed....

  13. A capability study of micro moulding for nano fluidic system manufacture

    Calaon, Matteo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tosello, Guido

    2013-01-01

    With the present paper the authors analysed process capability of ultra-precision moulding used for producing nano crosses with the same critical channels dimensions of a nano fluidic system for optical mapping of genomic length DNA. The process variation focused on product tolerances is quantified...... through AFM measurements. Uncertainty assessment of measurements on polymer objects is described and quality control results of sub-micro injection moulded crosses are shown in respect of the tolerance range specified by the end user as limit value for functional design....

  14. A carbon nanotube based resettable sensor for measuring free chlorine in drinking water

    Hsu, Leo H. H.; Hoque, Enamul; Kruse, Peter; Ravi Selvaganapathy, P.

    2015-01-01

    Free chlorine from dissolved chlorine gas is widely used as a disinfectant for drinking water. The residual chlorine concentration has to be continuously monitored and accurately controlled in a certain range around 0.5–2 mg/l to ensure drinking water safety and quality. However, simple, reliable, and reagent free monitoring devices are currently not available. Here, we present a free chlorine sensor that uses oxidation of a phenyl-capped aniline tetramer (PCAT) to dope single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and to change their resistance. The oxidation of PCAT by chlorine switches the PCAT-SWCNT system into a low resistance (p-doped) state which can be detected by probing it with a small voltage. The change in resistance is found to be proportional to the log-scale concentration of the free chlorine in the sample. The p-doping of the PCAT-SWCNT film then can be electrochemically reversed by polarizing it cathodically. This sensor not only shows good sensing response in the whole concentration range of free chlorine in drinking water but is also able to be electrochemically reset back many times without the use of any reagents. This simple sensor is ideally suited for measuring free chlorine in drinking water continuously

  15. Materials Integration and Doping of Carbon Nanotube-based Logic Circuits

    Geier, Michael

    Over the last 20 years, extensive research into the structure and properties of single- walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) has elucidated many of the exceptional qualities possessed by SWCNTs, including record-setting tensile strength, excellent chemical stability, distinctive optoelectronic features, and outstanding electronic transport characteristics. In order to exploit these remarkable qualities, many application-specific hurdles must be overcome before the material can be implemented in commercial products. For electronic applications, recent advances in sorting SWCNTs by electronic type have enabled significant progress towards SWCNT-based integrated circuits. Despite these advances, demonstrations of SWCNT-based devices with suitable characteristics for large-scale integrated circuits have been limited. The processing methodologies, materials integration, and mechanistic understanding of electronic properties developed in this dissertation have enabled unprecedented scales of SWCNT-based transistor fabrication and integrated circuit demonstrations. Innovative materials selection and processing methods are at the core of this work and these advances have led to transistors with the necessary transport properties required for modern circuit integration. First, extensive collaborations with other research groups allowed for the exploration of SWCNT thin-film transistors (TFTs) using a wide variety of materials and processing methods such as new dielectric materials, hybrid semiconductor materials systems, and solution-based printing of SWCNT TFTs. These materials were integrated into circuit demonstrations such as NOR and NAND logic gates, voltage-controlled ring oscillators, and D-flip-flops using both rigid and flexible substrates. This dissertation explores strategies for implementing complementary SWCNT-based circuits, which were developed by using local metal gate structures that achieve enhancement-mode p-type and n-type SWCNT TFTs with widely separated and

  16. Single walled carbon nanotube-based junction biosensor for detection of Escherichia coli.

    Kara Yamada

    Full Text Available Foodborne pathogen detection using biomolecules and nanomaterials may lead to platforms for rapid and simple electronic biosensing. Integration of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and immobilized antibodies into a disposable bio-nano combinatorial junction sensor was fabricated for detection of Escherichia coli K-12. Gold tungsten wires (50 µm diameter coated with polyethylenimine (PEI and SWCNTs were aligned to form a crossbar junction, which was functionalized with streptavidin and biotinylated antibodies to allow for enhanced specificity towards targeted microbes. In this study, changes in electrical current (ΔI after bioaffinity reactions between bacterial cells (E. coli K-12 and antibodies on the SWCNT surface were monitored to evaluate the sensor's performance. The averaged ΔI increased from 33.13 nA to 290.9 nA with the presence of SWCNTs in a 10(8 CFU/mL concentration of E. coli, thus showing an improvement in sensing magnitude. Electrical current measurements demonstrated a linear relationship (R2 = 0.973 between the changes in current and concentrations of bacterial suspension in range of 10(2-10(5 CFU/mL. Current decreased as cell concentrations increased, due to increased bacterial resistance on the bio-nano modified surface. The detection limit of the developed sensor was 10(2 CFU/mL with a detection time of less than 5 min with nanotubes. Therefore, the fabricated disposable junction biosensor with a functionalized SWCNT platform shows potential for high-performance biosensing and application as a detection device for foodborne pathogens.

  17. Metal-filled carbon nanotube based optical nanoantennas: bubbling, reshaping, and in situ characterization.

    Fan, Zheng; Tao, Xinyong; Cui, Xudong; Fan, Xudong; Zhang, Xiaobin; Dong, Lixin

    2012-09-21

    Controlled fabrication of metal nanospheres on nanotube tips for optical antennas is investigated experimentally. Resembling soap bubble blowing using a straw, the fabrication process is based on nanofluidic mass delivery at the attogram scale using metal-filled carbon nanotubes (m@CNTs). Two methods have been investigated including electron-beam-induced bubbling (EBIB) and electromigration-based bubbling (EMBB). EBIB involves the bombardment of an m@CNT with a high energy electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM), with which the encapsulated metal is melted and flowed out from the nanotube, generating a metallic particle on a nanotube tip. In the case where the encapsulated materials inside the CNT have a higher melting point than what the beam energy can reach, EMBB is an optional process to apply. Experiments show that, under a low bias (2.0-2.5 V), nanoparticles can be formed on the nanotube tips. The final shape and crystallinity of the nanoparticles are determined by the cooling rate. Instant cooling occurs with a relatively large heat sink and causes the instant shaping of the solid deposit, which is typically similar to the shape of the molten state. With a smaller heat sink as a probe, it is possible to keep the deposit in a molten state. Instant cooling by separating the deposit from the probe can result in a perfect sphere. Surface and volume plasmons characterized with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) prove that resonance occurs between a pair of as-fabricated spheres on the tip structures. Such spheres on pillars can serve as nano-optical antennas and will enable devices such as scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probes, scanning anodes for field emitters, and single molecule detectors, which can find applications in bio-sensing, molecular detection, and high-resolution optical microscopy.

  18. Carbon nanotube-based glucose oxidase nanocomposite anode materials for bio-fuel cells

    Dudzik, Jonathan

    The field of nanotechnology has benefited medicine, science, and engineering. The advent of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and protein-inorganic interfacing have received much attention due to their unique nanostructures which can be modified to act as a scaffold to house proteins or create nanowires. The current trend incorporates the robustness and specificity characteristics of proteins to the mechanical strength, enlarged surface area, and conductive capabilities emblematic of their inorganic counterparts. Bio-Fuel Cells (BFCs) and Biosensors remain at the forefront and devices such as implantable glucose monitors are closer to realization than ever before. This research strives to exploit potential energy from the eukaryotic enzyme Glucose Oxidase (GOx) during oxidation of its substrate, glucose. During this process, a two-electron transfer occurs at its two FAD redox centres which can be harnessed via an electrochemical setup involving a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNTs) modified electrode. The objective is to develop a MWCNT-GOx bionanocomposite capable of producing and sustaining a competitive power output. To help with this aim, investigation into a crosslinked enzyme cluster (CEC) immobilization technique is envisioned to amplify power output due to its highly concentrated, reusable, and thermally stable characteristics. Numerous CEC-GOx-MWCNT composites were fabricated with the highest initial output reaching 170 muW/cm 2. It was hypothesized that the carbohydrate moiety increased tunnelling distance and therefore hindered electron transfer. Efforts to produce a recombinant GOx without the encumbrance were unsuccessful. Two sub-clone constructs were explored and although a recombinant protein was identified, it was not confirmed to be GOx. BFC testing on bionanocomposites integrating non-glycosylated GOx could not be performed although there remains a strong contention that the recombinant would demonstrate superior power densities in comparison to its

  19. Carbon Nanotube Based Nanotechnology for NASA Mission Needs and Societal Applications

    Li, Jing; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    (greater than 100 mA/per square centimeters) field emission capabilities of CNTs can be exploited for construction of electron gun for electron microscopy and X-ray tubes for spectrometers and baggage screening. A CNT pillar array configuration has been demonstrated, not only meeting the high current density needs but more importantly providing long term emitter stability. Finally, supercapacitors hold the promise to combine the high energy density of a battery with the high power density of capacitors. Traditional graphite electrodes have not delivered this promise yet. A novel design and processing approach using MWCNTs has shown a record 550 F/g capacitance along with significant device endurance. This supercapacitor is suitable for railgun launch application for NASA, powering rovers and robots, consumer electronics and future hybrid vehicles.

  20. Modeling and testing of a knitted-sleeve fluidic artificial muscle

    Ball, Erick J.; Meller, Michael A.; Chipka, Jordan B.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2016-11-01

    The knitted-sleeve fluidic muscle is similar in design to a traditional McKibben muscle, with a separate bladder and sleeve. However, in place of a braided sleeve, it uses a tubular-knit sleeve made from a thin strand of flexible but inextensible yarn. When the bladder is pressurized, the sleeve expands by letting the loops of fiber slide past each other, changing the dimensions of the rectangular cells in the stitch pattern. Ideally, the internal volume of the sleeve would reach a maximum when its length has contracted by 2/3 from its maximum length, and although this is not reachable in practice, preliminary tests show that free contraction greater than 50% is achievable. The motion relies on using a fiber with a low coefficient of friction in order to reduce hysteresis to an acceptable level. In addition to increased stroke length, potential advantages of this technique include slower force drop-off during the stroke, more useable energy in certain applications, and greater similarity to the force-length relationship of skeletal muscle. Its main limitation is its potentially greater effect from friction compared to other fluidic muscle designs.

  1. The smart Peano fluidic muscle: a low profile flexible orthosis actuator that feels pain

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Shane Q.

    2015-03-01

    Robotic orthoses have the potential to provide effective rehabilitation while overcoming the availability and cost constraints of therapists. These orthoses must be characterized by the naturally safe, reliable, and controlled motion of a human therapist's muscles. Such characteristics are only possible in the natural kingdom through the pain sensing realized by the interaction of an intelligent nervous system and muscles' embedded sensing organs. McKibben fluidic muscles or pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) are a popular orthosis actuator because of their inherent compliance, high force, and muscle-like load-displacement characteristics. However, the circular cross-section of PMA increases their profile. PMA are also notoriously unreliable and difficult to control, lacking the intelligent pain sensing systems of their biological muscle counterparts. Here the Peano fluidic muscle, a new low profile yet high-force soft actuator is introduced. This muscle is smart, featuring bioinspired embedded pressure and soft capacitive strain sensors. Given this pressure and strain feedback, experimental validation shows that a lumped parameter model based on the muscle geometry and material parameters can be used to predict its force for quasistatic motion with an average error of 10 - 15N. Combining this with a force threshold pain sensing algorithm sets a precedent for flexible orthosis actuation that uses embedded sensors to prevent damage to the actuator and its environment.

  2. Numerical simulations on increasing turbojet engines exhaust mixture ratio using fluidic chevrons

    Adrian GRUZEA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper refers to some aspects regarding the terms “chevron” and “fluidic chevron” and to the process of increasing the jet engines exhaust mixing rate towards achieving noise reduction. One of the noise reduction methods consists in covering the high velocity main flow with a secondary one, having a much lower velocity, similar to the turbofan engines. The fluidic chevrons try to accomplish these requirements, being used just in particular moments of the flight. This study will be based on numerical simulations carried using the commercial software ANSYS. The geometry used will the based on the micro jet engine JetCat P80, equipping the turbines laboratory from the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering. A research based on the measured geometric, gasodynamic and cinematic parameters will be carried varying the mass flow and keeping the immersion angle constant. As a result of these simulations we’ll observe the influence of the mentioned parameters on the jet’s flow field.

  3. Porous PDMS structures for the storage and release of aqueous solutions into fluidic environments.

    Thurgood, Peter; Baratchi, Sara; Szydzik, Crispin; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2017-07-11

    Typical microfluidic systems take advantage of multiple storage reservoirs, pumps and valves for the storage, driving and release of buffers and other reagents. However, the fabrication, integration, and operation of such components can be difficult. In particular, the reliance of such components on external off-chip equipment limits their utility for creating self-sufficient, stand-alone microfluidic systems. Here, we demonstrate a porous sponge made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which is fabricated by templating microscale water droplets using a T-junction microfluidic structure. High-resolution microscopy reveals that this sponge contains a network of pores, interconnected by small holes. This unique structure enables the sponge to passively release stored solutions very slowly. Proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that the sponge can be used for the passive release of stored solutions into narrow channels and circular well plates, with the latter used for inducing intracellular calcium signalling of immobilised endothelial cells. The release rate of stored solutions can be controlled by varying the size of interconnecting holes, which can be easily achieved by changing the flow rate of the water injected into the T-junction. We also demonstrate the active release of stored liquids into a fluidic channel upon the manual compression of the sponge. The developed PDMS sponge can be easily integrated into complex micro/macro fluidic systems and prepared with a wide array of reagents, representing a new building block for self-sufficient microfluidic systems.

  4. Fabrication of Biochips with Micro Fluidic Channels by Micro End-milling and Powder Blasting

    Dong Sam Park

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available For microfabrications of biochips with micro fluidic channels, a large number of microfabrication techniques based on silicon or glass-based Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS technologies were proposed in the last decade. In recent years, for low cost and mass production, polymer-based microfabrication techniques by microinjection molding and micro hot embossing have been proposed. These techniques, which require a proper photoresist, mask, UV light exposure, developing, and electroplating as a preprocess, are considered to have some problems. In this study, we propose a new microfabrication technology which consists of micro end-milling and powder blasting. This technique could be directly applied to fabricate the metal mold without any preprocesses. The metal mold with micro-channels is machined by micro end-milling, and then, burrs generated in the end-milling process are removed by powder blasting. From the experimental results, micro end-milling combined with powder blasting could be applied effectively for fabrication of the injection mold of biochips with micro fluidic channels.

  5. Micro-fluidic module for blood cell separation for gene expression radiobiological assays

    Brengues, Muriel; Gu, Jian; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Advances in molecular techniques have improved discovery of biomarkers associated with radiation exposure. Gene expression techniques have been demonstrated as effective tools for biodosimetry, and different assay platforms with different chemistries are now available. One of the main challenges is to integrate the sample preparation processing of these assays into micro-fluidic platforms to be fully automated for point-of-care medical countermeasures in the case of a radiological event. Most of these assays follow the same workflow processing that comprises first the collection of blood samples followed by cellular and molecular sample preparation. The sample preparation is based on the specific reagents of the assay system and depends also on the different subsets of cells population and the type of biomarkers of interest. In this article, the authors present a module for isolation of white blood cells from peripheral blood as a prerequisite for automation of gene expression assays on a micro-fluidic cartridge. For each sample condition, the gene expression platform can be adapted to suit the requirements of the selected assay chemistry (authors)

  6. Fluidic Logic Used in a Systems Approach to Enable Integrated Single-cell Functional Analysis

    Naveen Ramalingam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of single cells has evolved over the past several years to include expression and genomic analysis of an increasing number of single cells. Several studies have demonstrated wide-spread variation and heterogeneity within cell populations of similar phenotype. While the characterization of these populations will likely set the foundation for our understanding of genomic- and expression-based diversity, it will not be able to link the functional differences of a single cell to its underlying genomic structure and activity. Currently, it is difficult to perturb single cells in a controlled environment, monitor and measure the response due to perturbation, and link these response measurements to downstream genomic and transcriptomic analysis. In order to address this challenge, we developed a platform to integrate and miniaturize many of the experimental steps required to study single-cell function. The heart of this platform is an elastomer-based Integrated Fluidic Circuit (IFC that uses fluidic logic to select and sequester specific single cells based on a phenotypic trait for downstream experimentation. Experiments with sequestered cells that have been performed include on-chip culture, exposure to a variety of stimulants, and post-exposure image-based response analysis, followed by preparation of the mRNA transcriptome for massively parallel sequencing analysis. The flexible system embodies experimental design and execution that enable routine functional studies of single cells.

  7. Hybrid macro-micro fluidics system for a chip-based biosensor

    Tamanaha, C. R.; Whitman, L. J.; Colton, R. J.

    2002-03-01

    We describe the engineering of a hybrid fluidics platform for a chip-based biosensor system that combines high-performance microfluidics components with powerful, yet compact, millimeter-scale pump and valve actuators. The microfluidics system includes channels, valveless diffuser-based pumps, and pinch-valves that are cast into a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane and packaged along with the sensor chip into a palm-sized plastic cartridge. The microfluidics are driven by pump and valve actuators contained in an external unit (with a volume ~30 cm3) that interfaces kinematically with the PDMS microelements on the cartridge. The pump actuator is a simple-lever, flexure-hinge displacement amplifier that increases the motion of a piezoelectric stack. The valve actuators are an array of cantilevers operated by shape memory alloy wires. All components can be fabricated without the need for complex lithography or micromachining, and can be used with fluids containing micron-sized particulates. Prototypes have been modeled and tested to ensure the delivery of microliter volumes of fluid and the even dispersion of reagents over the chip sensing elements. With this hybrid approach to the fluidics system, the biochemical assay benefits from the many advantages of microfluidics yet we avoid the complexity and unknown reliability of immature microactuator technologies.

  8. Mass transport enhancement in redox flow batteries with corrugated fluidic networks

    Lisboa, Kleber Marques; Marschewski, Julian; Ebejer, Neil; Ruch, Patrick; Cotta, Renato Machado; Michel, Bruno; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-08-01

    We propose a facile, novel concept of mass transfer enhancement in flow batteries based on electrolyte guidance in rationally designed corrugated channel systems. The proposed fluidic networks employ periodic throttling of the flow to optimally deflect the electrolytes into the porous electrode, targeting enhancement of the electrolyte-electrode interaction. Theoretical analysis is conducted with channels in the form of trapezoidal waves, confirming and detailing the mass transport enhancement mechanism. In dilute concentration experiments with an alkaline quinone redox chemistry, a scaling of the limiting current with Re0.74 is identified, which compares favourably against the Re0.33 scaling typical of diffusion-limited laminar processes. Experimental IR-corrected polarization curves are presented for high concentration conditions, and a significant performance improvement is observed with the narrowing of the nozzles. The adverse effects of periodic throttling on the pumping power are compared with the benefits in terms of power density, and an improvement of up to 102% in net power density is obtained in comparison with the flow-by case employing straight parallel channels. The proposed novel concept of corrugated fluidic networks comes with facile fabrication and contributes to the improvement of the transport characteristics and overall performance of redox flow battery systems.

  9. Evaluation and refinement of a field-portable drinking water toxicity sensor utilizing electric cell-substrate impedance sensing and a fluidic biochip.

    Widder, Mark W; Brennan, Linda M; Hanft, Elizabeth A; Schrock, Mary E; James, Ryan R; van der Schalie, William H

    2015-07-01

    The US Army's need for a reliable and field-portable drinking water toxicity sensor was the catalyst for the development and evaluation of an electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) device. Water testing technologies currently available to soldiers in the field are analyte-specific and have limited capabilities to detect broad-based water toxicity. The ECIS sensor described here uses rainbow trout gill epithelial cells seeded on fluidic biochips to measure changes in impedance for the detection of possible chemical contamination of drinking water supplies. Chemicals selected for testing were chosen as representatives of a broad spectrum of toxic industrial compounds. Results of a US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-sponsored evaluation of the field portable device were similar to previously published US Army testing results of a laboratory-based version of the same technology. Twelve of the 18 chemicals tested following USEPA Technology Testing and Evaluation Program procedures were detected by the ECIS sensor within 1 h at USEPA-derived human lethal concentrations. To simplify field-testing methods further, elimination of a procedural step that acclimated cells to serum-free media streamlined the test process with only a slight loss of chemical sensitivity. For field use, the ECIS sensor will be used in conjunction with an enzyme-based sensor that is responsive to carbamate and organophosphorus pesticides. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Pressure driven digital logic in PDMS based microfluidic devices fabricated by multilayer soft lithography.

    Devaraju, Naga Sai Gopi K; Unger, Marc A

    2012-11-21

    Advances in microfluidics now allow an unprecedented level of parallelization and integration of biochemical reactions. However, one challenge still faced by the field has been the complexity and cost of the control hardware: one external pressure signal has been required for each independently actuated set of valves on chip. Using a simple post-modification to the multilayer soft lithography fabrication process, we present a new implementation of digital fluidic logic fully analogous to electronic logic with significant performance advances over the previous implementations. We demonstrate a novel normally closed static gain valve capable of modulating pressure signals in a fashion analogous to an electronic transistor. We utilize these valves to build complex fluidic logic circuits capable of arbitrary control of flows by processing binary input signals (pressure (1) and atmosphere (0)). We demonstrate logic gates and devices including NOT, NAND and NOR gates, bi-stable flip-flops, gated flip-flops (latches), oscillators, self-driven peristaltic pumps, delay flip-flops, and a 12-bit shift register built using static gain valves. This fluidic logic shows cascade-ability, feedback, programmability, bi-stability, and autonomous control capability. This implementation of fluidic logic yields significantly smaller devices, higher clock rates, simple designs, easy fabrication, and integration into MSL microfluidics.

  11. Developing and Analysing sub-10 µm Fluidic Systems with Integrated Electrodes for Pumping and Sensing in Nanotechnology Applications

    Heuck, F.C.A.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, sub-10 µm fluidic systems with integrated electrodes for pumping and sensing in nanotechnology applications were developed and analyzed. This work contributes to the development of the scanning ion pipette (SIP), a tool to investigate surface changes on the nanometer scale induced by

  12. Development of Two Color Fluorescent Imager and Integrated Fluidic System for Nanosatellite Biology Applications

    Wu, Diana Terri; Ricco, Antonio Joseph; Lera, Matthew P.; Timucin, Linda R.; Parra, Macarena P.

    2012-01-01

    Nanosatellites offer frequent, low-cost space access as secondary payloads on launches of larger conventional satellites. We summarize the payload science and technology of the Microsatellite in-situ Space Technologies (MisST) nanosatellite for conducting automated biological experiments. The payload (two fused 10-cm cubes) includes 1) an integrated fluidics system that maintains organism viability and supports growth and 2) a fixed-focus imager with fluorescence and scattered-light imaging capabilities. The payload monitors temperature, pressure and relative humidity, and actively controls temperature. C. elegans (nematode, 50 m diameter x 1 mm long) was selected as a model organism due to previous space science experience, its completely sequenced genome, size, hardiness, and the variety of strains available. Three strains were chosen: two green GFP-tagged strains and one red tdTomato-tagged strain that label intestinal, nerve, and pharyngeal cells, respectively. The integrated fluidics system includes bioanalytical and reservoir modules. The former consists of four 150 L culture wells and a 4x5 mm imaging zone the latter includes two 8 mL fluid reservoirs for reagent and waste storage. The fluidic system is fabricated using multilayer polymer rapid prototyping: laser cutting, precision machining, die cutting, and pressure-sensitive adhesives it also includes eight solenoid-operated valves and one mini peristaltic pump. Young larval-state (L2) nematodes are loaded in C. elegans Maintenance Media (CeMM) in the bioanalytical module during pre-launch assembly. By the time orbit is established, the worms have grown to sufficient density to be imaged and are fed fresh CeMM. The strains are pumped sequentially into the imaging area, imaged, then pumped into waste. Reagent storage utilizes polymer bags under slight pressure to prevent bubble formation in wells or channels. The optical system images green and red fluorescence bands by excitation with blue (473 nm peak

  13. Oil Motion Control by an Extra Pinning Structure in Electro-Fluidic Display.

    Dou, Yingying; Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Li, Fahong; Yue, Qiao; Zhou, Rui; Li, Hui; Shui, Lingling; Henzen, Alex; Zhou, Guofu

    2018-04-06

    Oil motion control is the key for the optical performance of electro-fluidic displays (EFD). In this paper, we introduced an extra pinning structure (EPS) into the EFD pixel to control the oil motion inside for the first time. The pinning structure canbe fabricated together with the pixel wall by a one-step lithography process. The effect of the relative location of the EPS in pixels on the oil motion was studied by a series of optoelectronic measurements. EPS showed good control of oil rupture position. The properly located EPS effectively guided the oil contraction direction, significantly accelerated switching on process, and suppressed oil overflow, without declining in aperture ratio. An asymmetrically designed EPS off the diagonal is recommended. This study provides a novel and facile way for oil motion control within an EFD pixel in both direction and timescale.

  14. Maximizing ion current rectification in a bipolar conical nanopore fluidic diode using optimum junction location.

    Singh, Kunwar Pal

    2016-10-12

    The ion current rectification has been obtained as a function of the location of a heterojunction in a bipolar conical nanopore fluidic diode for different parameters to determine the junction location for maximum ion current rectification using numerical simulations. Forward current peaks for a specific location of the junction and reverse current decreases with the junction location due to a change in ion enrichment/depletion in the pore. The optimum location of the heterojunction shifts towards the tip with base/tip diameter and surface charge density, and towards the base with the electrolyte concentration. The optimum location of the heterojunction has been approximated by an equation as a function of pore length, base/tip diameter, surface charge density and electrolyte concentration. The study is useful to design a rectifier with maximum ion current rectification for practical purposes.

  15. Autonomous undulatory serpentine locomotion utilizing body dynamics of a fluidic soft robot

    Onal, Cagdas D; Rus, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Soft robotics offers the unique promise of creating inherently safe and adaptive systems. These systems bring man-made machines closer to the natural capabilities of biological systems. An important requirement to enable self-contained soft mobile robots is an on-board power source. In this paper, we present an approach to create a bio-inspired soft robotic snake that can undulate in a similar way to its biological counterpart using pressure for actuation power, without human intervention. With this approach, we develop an autonomous soft snake robot with on-board actuation, power, computation and control capabilities. The robot consists of four bidirectional fluidic elastomer actuators in series to create a traveling curvature wave from head to tail along its body. Passive wheels between segments generate the necessary frictional anisotropy for forward locomotion. It takes 14 h to build the soft robotic snake, which can attain an average locomotion speed of 19 mm s −1 . (paper)

  16. Experimental Studies of Sealing Mechanism of a Dismountable Microsystem-to-Macropart Fluidic Connector for High Pressure and a Wide Range of Temperature

    Hugo Nguyen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As fluidic microelectromechanical devices are developing and often attached to, or embedded in, large, complex, and expensive systems, the issues of modularity, maintenance, and subsystem replacement arise. In this work, a robust silicon connector suitable for high-pressure applications—likely with harsh fluids—in the temperature range of +100 to −100° C is demonstrated and tested together with a stainless steel nipple representing a simple and typical macropart. With a micromachined circular membrane equipped with a 5 μm high ridge, this connector is able to maintain a leak rate below 2.0×10−8 scc/s of gaseous helium with a pressure of up to 9.7 bar. Degradation of the sealing performance on reassembly is associated with the indentation of the ridge. However, the ridge makes the sealing interface less sensitive to particles in comparison with a flat reference. Most evaluation is made through the so-called heat-until-leak tests conducted to determine the maximum working temperature and the sealing mechanism of the connector. A couple of these are followed by cryogenic testing. The effect of thermal mismatch of the components is discussed and utilized as an early warning mechanism.

  17. Preparation and Testing of Impedance-based Fluidic Biochips with RTgill-W1 Cells for Rapid Evaluation of Drinking Water Samples for Toxicity.

    Brennan, Linda M; Widder, Mark W; McAleer, Michael K; Mayo, Michael W; Greis, Alex P; van der Schalie, William H

    2016-03-07

    This manuscript describes how to prepare fluidic biochips with Rainbow trout gill epithelial (RTgill-W1) cells for use in a field portable water toxicity sensor. A monolayer of RTgill-W1 cells forms on the sensing electrodes enclosed within the biochips. The biochips are then used for testing in a field portable electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) device designed for rapid toxicity testing of drinking water. The manuscript further describes how to run a toxicity test using the prepared biochips. A control water sample and the test water sample are mixed with pre-measured powdered media and injected into separate channels of the biochip. Impedance readings from the sensing electrodes in each of the biochip channels are measured and compared by an automated statistical software program. The screen on the ECIS instrument will indicate either "Contamination Detected" or "No Contamination Detected" within an hour of sample injection. Advantages are ease of use and rapid response to a broad spectrum of inorganic and organic chemicals at concentrations that are relevant to human health concerns, as well as the long-term stability of stored biochips in a ready state for testing. Limitations are the requirement for cold storage of the biochips and limited sensitivity to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides. Applications for this toxicity detector are for rapid field-portable testing of drinking water supplies by Army Preventative Medicine personnel or for use at municipal water treatment facilities.

  18. Hot spot dynamics in carbon nanotube array devices.

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Seo, Jung-Woo T; Hersam, Mark C; Avouris, Phaedon

    2015-03-11

    We report on the dynamics of spatial temperature distributions in aligned semiconducting carbon nanotube array devices with submicrometer channel lengths. By using high-resolution optical microscopy in combination with electrical transport measurements, we observe under steady state bias conditions the emergence of time-variable, local temperature maxima with dimensions below 300 nm, and temperatures above 400 K. On the basis of time domain cross-correlation analysis, we investigate how the intensity fluctuations of the thermal radiation patterns are correlated with the overall device current. The analysis reveals the interdependence of electrical current fluctuations and time-variable hot spot formation that limits the overall device performance and, ultimately, may cause device degradation. The findings have implications for the future development of carbon nanotube-based technologies.

  19. Large-area fluidic assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes through dip-coating and directional evaporation

    Kim, Pilnam; Kang, Tae June

    2017-12-01

    We present a simple and scalable fluidic-assembly approach, in which bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are selectively aligned and deposited by directionally controlled dip-coating and solvent evaporation processes. The patterned surface with alternating regions of hydrophobic polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) (height 100 nm) strips and hydrophilic SiO2 substrate was withdrawn vertically at a constant speed ( 3 mm/min) from a solution bath containing SWCNTs ( 0.1 mg/ml), allowing for directional evaporation and subsequent selective deposition of nanotube bundles along the edges of horizontally aligned PDMS strips. In addition, the fluidic assembly was applied to fabricate a field effect transistor (FET) with highly oriented SWCNTs, which demonstrate significantly higher current density as well as high turn-off ratio (T/O ratio 100) as compared to that with randomly distributed carbon nanotube bundles (T/O ratio <10).

  20. Fluidic oscillator-mediated microbubble generation to provide cost effective mass transfer and mixing efficiency to the wastewater treatment plants.

    Rehman, Fahad; Medley, Gareth J D; Bandulasena, Hemaka; Zimmerman, William B J

    2015-02-01

    Aeration is one of the most energy intensive processes in the waste water treatment plants and any improvement in it is likely to enhance the overall efficiency of the overall process. In the current study, a fluidic oscillator has been used to produce microbubbles in the order of 100 μm in diameter by oscillating the inlet gas stream to a pair of membrane diffusers. Volumetric mass transfer coefficient was measured for steady state flow and oscillatory flow in the range of 40-100l/min. The highest improvement of 55% was observed at the flow rates of 60, 90 and 100l/min respectively. Standard oxygen transfer rate and efficiency were also calculated. Both standard oxygen transfer rate and efficiency were found to be considerably higher under oscillatory air flow conditions compared to steady state airflow. The bubble size distributions and bubble densities were measured using an acoustic bubble spectrometer and confirmed production of monodisperse bubbles with approximately 100 μm diameters with fluidic oscillation. The higher number density of microbubbles under oscillatory flow indicated the effect of the fluidic oscillation in microbubble production. Visual observations and dissolved oxygen measurements suggested that the bubble cloud generated by the fluidic oscillator was sufficient enough to provide good mixing and to maintain uniform aerobic conditions. Overall, improved mass transfer coefficients, mixing efficiency and energy efficiency of the novel microbubble generation method could offer significant savings to the water treatment plants as well as reduction in the carbon footprint. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Phase-locked 3D3C-MRV measurements in a bi-stable fluidic oscillator

    Wassermann, Florian; Hecker, Daniel; Jung, Bernd; Markl, Michael; Seifert, Avi; Grundmann, Sven

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the phase-resolved internal flow of a bi-stable fluidic oscillator was measured using phase-locked three-dimensional three-components magnetic resonance velocimetry (3D3C-MRV), also termed as 4D-MRV. A bi-stable fluidic oscillator converts a continuous inlet-mass flow into a jet alternating between two outlet channels and, as a consequence provides an unsteady, periodic flow. This actuator can therefore be used as flow-control actuator. Since data acquisition in a 3D volume takes up to several minutes, only a small portion of the data is acquired in each flow cycle for every time point of the flow cycle. The acquisition of the entire data set is segmented over many cycles of the periodic flow. This procedure allows to measure phase-averaged 3D3C velocity fields with a certain temporal resolution. However, the procedure requires triggering to the periodic nature of the flow. Triggering the MR scanner precisely on each flow cycle is one of the key issues discussed in this manuscript. The 4D-MRV data are compared to data measured using phase-locked laser Doppler anemometry and good agreement between the results is found. The validated 4D-MRV data is analyzed and the fluid-mechanic features and processes inside the fluidic oscillator are investigated and described, providing a detailed description of the internal jet-switching mechanism.

  2. Robust and Optimal Control of Magnetic Microparticles inside Fluidic Channels with Time-Varying Flow Rates

    Islam S.M. Khalil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy using magnetic microparticles and nanoparticles has the potential to mitigate the negative side-effects associated with conventional medical treatment. Major technological challenges still need to be addressed in order to translate these particles into in vivo applications. For example, magnetic particles need to be navigated controllably in vessels against flowing streams of body fluid. This paper describes the motion control of paramagnetic microparticles in the flowing streams of fluidic channels with time-varying flow rates (maximum flow is 35 ml.hr−1. This control is designed using a magnetic-based proportional-derivative (PD control system to compensate for the time-varying flow inside the channels (with width and depth of 2 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively. First, we achieve point-to-point motion control against and along flow rates of 4 ml.hr−1, 6 ml.hr−1, 17 ml.hr−1, and 35 ml.hr−1. The average speeds of single microparticle (with average diameter of 100 μm against flow rates of 6 ml.hr−1 and 30 ml.hr−1 are calculated to be 45 μm.s−1 and 15 μm.s−1, respectively. Second, we implement PD control with disturbance estimation and compensation. This control decreases the steady-state error by 50%, 70%, 73%, and 78% at flow rates of 4 ml.hr−1, 6 ml.hr−1, 17 ml.hr−1, and 35 ml.hr−1, respectively. Finally, we consider the problem of finding the optimal path (minimal kinetic energy between two points using calculus of variation, against the mentioned flow rates. Not only do we find that an optimal path between two collinear points with the direction of maximum flow (middle of the fluidic channel decreases the rise time of the microparticles, but we also decrease the input current that is supplied to the electromagnetic coils by minimizing the kinetic energy of the microparticles, compared to a PD control with disturbance compensation.

  3. Modification of anisotropic plasma diffusion via auxiliary electrons emitted by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Malferrari, L; Odorici, F; Veronese, G P; Rizzoli, R; Mascali, D; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Castro, G; Miracoli, R; Serafino, T

    2012-02-01

    The diffusion mechanism in magnetized plasmas is a largely debated issue. A short circuit model was proposed by Simon, assuming fluxes of lost particles along the axial (electrons) and radial (ions) directions which can be compensated, to preserve the quasi-neutrality, by currents flowing throughout the conducting plasma chamber walls. We hereby propose a new method to modify Simon's currents via electrons injected by a carbon nanotubes-based electron gun. We found this improves the source performances, increasing the output current for several charge states. The method is especially sensitive to the pumping frequency. Output currents for given charge states, at different auxiliary electron currents, will be reported in the paper and the influence of the frequency tuning on the compensation mechanism will be discussed.

  4. Catalytic wet air oxidation of bisphenol A solution in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over titanate nanotube-based catalysts.

    Kaplan, Renata; Erjavec, Boštjan; Senila, Marin; Pintar, Albin

    2014-10-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is classified as an advanced oxidation process, which proved to be highly efficient for the removal of emerging organic pollutant bisphenol A (BPA) from water. In this study, BPA was successfully removed in a batch-recycle trickle-bed reactor over bare titanate nanotube-based catalysts at very short space time of 0.6 min gCAT g(-1). The as-prepared titanate nanotubes, which underwent heat treatment at 600 °C, showed high activity for the removal of aqueous BPA. Liquid-phase recycling (5- or 10-fold recycle) enabled complete BPA conversion already at 200 °C, together with high conversion of total organic carbon (TOC), i.e., 73 and 98 %, respectively. The catalyst was chemically stable in the given range of operating conditions for 189 h on stream.

  5. Nanobiomimetic Active Shape Control - Fluidic and Swarm-Intelligence Embodiments for Planetary Exploration

    Santoli, S.

    The concepts of Active Shape Control ( ASC ) and of Generalized Quantum Holography ( GQH ), respectively embodying a closer approach to biomimicry than the current macrophysics-based attempts at bioinspired robotic systems, and realizing a non-connectionistic, life-like kind of information processing that allows increasingly depths of mimicking of the biological structure-function solidarity, which have been formulated in physical terms in previous papers, are here further investigated for application to bioinspired flying or swimming robots for planetary exploration. It is shown that nano-to-micro integration would give the deepest level of biomimicry, and that both low and very low Reynolds number ( Re ) fluidics would involve GQH and Fiber Bundle Topology ( FBT ) for processing information at the various levels of ASC bioinspired robotics. While very low Re flows lend themselves to geometrization of microrobot dynamics and to FBT design, the general design problem is geometrized through GQH , i.e. made independent of dynamic considerations, thus allowing possible problems of semantic dyscrasias in highly complex hierarchical dynamical chains of sensing information processing actuating to be overcome. A roadmap to near- and medium-term nanostructured and nano-to-micro integration realizations is suggested.

  6. Bio-inspired online variable recruitment control of fluidic artificial muscles

    Jenkins, Tyler E.; Chapman, Edward M.; Bryant, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    This paper details the creation of a hybrid variable recruitment control scheme for fluidic artificial muscle (FAM) actuators with an emphasis on maximizing system efficiency and switching control performance. Variable recruitment is the process of altering a system’s active number of actuators, allowing operation in distinct force regimes. Previously, FAM variable recruitment was only quantified with offline, manual valve switching; this study addresses the creation and characterization of novel, on-line FAM switching control algorithms. The bio-inspired algorithms are implemented in conjunction with a PID and model-based controller, and applied to a simulated plant model. Variable recruitment transition effects and chatter rejection are explored via a sensitivity analysis, allowing a system designer to weigh tradeoffs in actuator modeling, algorithm choice, and necessary hardware. Variable recruitment is further developed through simulation of a robotic arm tracking a variety of spline position inputs, requiring several levels of actuator recruitment. Switching controller performance is quantified and compared with baseline systems lacking variable recruitment. The work extends current variable recruitment knowledge by creating novel online variable recruitment control schemes, and exploring how online actuator recruitment affects system efficiency and control performance. Key topics associated with implementing a variable recruitment scheme, including the effects of modeling inaccuracies, hardware considerations, and switching transition concerns are also addressed.

  7. The use of micro-/milli-fluidics to better understand the mechanisms behind deep venous thrombosis

    Schofield, Zoe; Alexiadis, Alessio; Brill, Alexander; Nash, Gerard; Vigolo, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a dangerous and painful condition in which blood clots form in deep veins (e.g., femoral vein). If these clots become unstable and detach from the thrombus they can be delivered to the lungs resulting in a life threatening complication called pulmonary embolism (PE). Mechanisms of clot development in veins remain unclear but researchers suspect that the specific flow patterns in veins, especially around the valve flaps, play a fundamental role. Here we show how it is now possible to mimic the current murine model by developing micro-/milli-fluidic experiments. We exploited a novel detection technique, ghost particle velocimetry (GPV), to analyse the velocity profiles for various geometries. These vary from regular microfluidics with a rectangular cross section with a range of geometries (mimicking the presence of side and back branches in veins, closed side branch and flexible valves) to a more accurate venous representation with a 3D cylindrical geometry obtained by 3D printing. In addition to the GPV experiments, we analysed the flow field developing in these geometries by using computational fluid dynamic simulations to develop a better understanding of the mechanisms behind DVT. ZS gratefully acknowledges financial support from the EPSRC through a studentship from the Sci-Phy-4-Health Centre for Doctoral Training (EP/L016346/1).

  8. Zone fluidics for measurement of octanol-water partition coefficient of drugs.

    Wattanasin, Panwadee; Saetear, Phoonthawee; Wilairat, Prapin; Nacapricha, Duangjai; Teerasong, Saowapak

    2015-02-20

    A novel zone fluidics (ZF) system for the determination of the octanol-water partition coefficient (Pow) of drugs was developed. The ZF system consisted of a syringe pump with a selection valve, a holding column, a silica capillary flow-cell and an in-line spectrophotometer. Exact microliter volumes of solvents (octanol and phosphate buffer saline) and a solution of the drug, sandwiched between air segments, were sequentially loaded into the vertically aligned holding column. Distribution of the drug between the aqueous and octanol phases occurred by the oscillation movement of the syringe pump piston. Phase separation occurred due to the difference in densities. The liquid zones were then pushed into the detection flow cell. In this method, absorbance measurements in only one of the phase (octanol or aqueous) were employed, which together with the volumes of the solvents and pure drug sample, allowed the calculation of the Pow. The developed system was applied to the determination of the Pow of some common drugs. The log (Pow) values agreed well with a batch method (R(2)=0.999) and literature (R(2)=0.997). Standard deviations for intra- and inter-day analyses were both less than 0.1log unit. This ZF system provides a robust and automated method for screening of Pow values in the drug discovery process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler supplementary testing - AEAT doc 2926-2-002

    REICH, F.R.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of cold testing, completed by AEAT, as part of the proof-of-principle testing for a proposed nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampling system. This sampling system will provide waste samples from the PHMC feed tank to support the privatization contract with BNFL. Proof-of-principle tests were completed with 2 wt% and 10 wt% sand/water and 25 wt% kaolin clay/water simulants with a test setup that spanned the 24 ft to 57 ft height required in the feed tank. The tests demonstrated that the system could pump and sample waste materials with low and with high solids content. In addition, the tests demonstrated a need for some design upgrades to the sampling system, as there was material loss when the sample bottle was removed from the sampling needle. These were complementary tests, completed as part of an EM-50 Tank Focus Area (TFA) to develop a sampling system for validating LAW and HLW waste batches for the Privatization Contract

  10. Psychicones: Visual Traces of the Soul in Late Nineteenth-Century Fluidic Photography.

    Pethes, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    The article discusses attempts to visualise the soul on photographic plates at the end of the nineteenth century, as conducted by the French physician Hippolyte Baraduc in Paris. Although Baraduc refers to earlier experiments on fluidic photography in his book on The Human Soul (1896) and is usually mentioned as a precursor to parapsychological thought photography of the twentieth century, his work is presented as a genuine attempt at photographic soul-catching. Rather than producing mimetic representations of thoughts and imaginations, Baraduc claims to present the vital radiation of the psyche itself and therefore calls the images he produces psychicones. The article first discusses the difference between this method of soul photography and other kinds of occult media technologies of the time, emphasising the significance of its non-mimetic, abstract character: since the soul itself was considered an abstract entity, abstract traces seemed all the more convincing to the contemporary audience. Secondly, the article shows how the technological agency of photography allowed Baraduc's psychicones to be tied into related discourses in medicine and psychology. Insofar as the photographic plates displayed actual visual traces, Baraduc and his followers no longer considered hallucinations illusionary and pathological but emphasised the physical reality and normality of imagination. Yet, the greatest influence of soul photography was not on science but on art. As the third part of the paper argues, the abstract shapes on Baraduc's plates provided inspiration for contemporary avant-garde aesthetics, for example, Kandinsky's abstract paintings and the random streams of consciousness in surrealistic literature.

  11. Nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler supplementary testing - AEAT doc 2926-2-002

    REICH, F.R.

    1999-03-11

    This report summarizes the results of cold testing, completed by AEAT, as part of the proof-of-principle testing for a proposed nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampling system. This sampling system will provide waste samples from the PHMC feed tank to support the privatization contract with BNFL. Proof-of-principle tests were completed with 2 wt% and 10 wt% sand/water and 25 wt% kaolin clay/water simulants with a test setup that spanned the 24 ft to 57 ft height required in the feed tank. The tests demonstrated that the system could pump and sample waste materials with low and with high solids content. In addition, the tests demonstrated a need for some design upgrades to the sampling system, as there was material loss when the sample bottle was removed from the sampling needle. These were complementary tests, completed as part of an EM-50 Tank Focus Area (TFA) to develop a sampling system for validating LAW and HLW waste batches for the Privatization Contract.

  12. Transient dynamics of the flow around a NACA 0015 airfoil using fluidic vortex generators

    Siauw, W.L. [Institut Pprime, CNRS - Universite de Poitiers - ENSMA, UPR 3346, Departement Fluides, Thermique, Combustion, ENSMA - Teleport 2, 1 Avenue Clement Ader, BP 40109, F-86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Bonnet, J.-P., E-mail: Jean-Paul.Bonnet@univ-poitiers.f [Institut Pprime, CNRS - Universite de Poitiers - ENSMA, UPR 3346, Departement Fluides, Thermique, Combustion, CEAT, 43 rue de l' Aerodrome, F-86036 Poitiers Cedex (France); Tensi, J., E-mail: Jean.Tensi@lea.univ-poitiers.f [Institut Pprime, CNRS - Universite de Poitiers - ENSMA, UPR 3346, Departement Fluides, Thermique, Combustion, ENSMA - Teleport 2, 1 Avenue Clement Ader, BP 40109, F-86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Cordier, L., E-mail: Laurent.Cordier@univ-poitiers.f [Institut Pprime, CNRS - Universite de Poitiers - ENSMA, UPR 3346, Departement Fluides, Thermique, Combustion, CEAT, 43 rue de l' Aerodrome, F-86036 Poitiers Cedex (France); Noack, B.R., E-mail: Bernd.Noack@univ-poitiers.f [Institut Pprime, CNRS - Universite de Poitiers - ENSMA, UPR 3346, Departement Fluides, Thermique, Combustion, CEAT, 43 rue de l' Aerodrome, F-86036 Poitiers Cedex (France); Cattafesta, L., E-mail: cattafes@ufl.ed [Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion (FCAAP), Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 231 MAE-A, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The unsteady activation or deactivation of fluidic vortex generators on a NACA 0015 airfoil is studied to understand the transient dynamics of flow separation control. The Reynolds number is high enough and the boundary layer is tripped, so the boundary layer is fully turbulent prior to separation. Conditional PIV of the airfoil wake is obtained phase-locked to the actuator trigger signal, allowing reconstruction of the transient processes. When the actuators are impulsively turned on, the velocity field in the near wake exhibit a complex transient behavior associated with the formation and shedding of a starting vortex. When actuation is stopped, a more gradual process of the separation dynamics is found. These results are in agreement with those found in the literature in comparable configurations. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition of phase-locked velocity fields reveals low-dimensional transient dynamics for the attachment and separation processes, with 98% of the fluctuation energy captured by the first four modes. The behavior is quantitatively well captured by a four-dimensional dynamical system with the corresponding mode amplitudes. Analysis of the first temporal POD modes accurately determines typical time scales for attachment and separation processes to be respectively t{sup +}=10 and 20 in conventional non-dimensional values. This study adds to experimental investigations of this scale with essential insight for the targeted closed-loop control.

  13. Evaluation on thermal-hydraulic characteristics for passive safety device of APR1400

    Yoo, Seong Yeon; Lee, S. H.; Son, M. K. [Korea Association for Nuclear Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jee, M. S.; Chung, M. H. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-15

    To establish evaluation and verification guideline for the APR1400, thermal-hydraulic characteristics for fuel rod bundle, reactor vessel and fluidic device is analyzed using FLUENT. Scope and major results of research are as follows : Thermal-hydraulic characteristics for nuclear fuel rod bundle: design data for nuclear fuel rod bundle and structure are surveyed, and 3 x 3 sub-channel model is adopted to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics in fuel rod bundle. Computational results are compared with the heat transfer data measured by naphthalene sublimation method, and numerical analysis and evaluation are performed at various design conditions and flow conditions. Thermal-hydraulic characteristics for reactor vessel: reactor vessel design data are surveyed to develop numerical model. Porous media model is applied for fuel rod bundle, and full-scale, three dimensional simulation is performed at actual operating conditions. Distributions of velocity, pressure and temperature are discussed. Flow characteristics for fluidic device: three dimensional numerical model for fluidic device is developed, and numerical results are compared with experimental data obtained at KAERI in order to verify numerical simulation. In addition, variation of flow rate is investigated at various elapsed times after valve operating, and flow characteristics is analyzed at low and high flow rate conditions, respectively.

  14. Designing deoxidation inhibiting encapsulation of metal oxide nanostructures for fluidic and biological applications

    Ghosh, Moumita, E-mail: ghoshiisc@gmail.com [Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Centre for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); IV. Institute of Physics, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Ghosh, Siddharth [III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Seibt, Michael [IV. Institute of Physics, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Schaap, Iwan A.T. [III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Institute of Biological Chemistry, Biophysics and Bioengineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Schmidt, Christoph F. [III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Mohan Rao, G. [Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2016-12-30

    Graphical abstract: To retain atomic structure and morphology of ZnO nanostructures (caused by deoxidation of ZnO) in water/bio-fluids, we propose and demonstrate a robust and inexpensive encapsulation technique using bio-compatible non-ionic surfactant. - Highlights: • Aqueous solutions of ZnO nanorods with and without surfactant are prepared. • With time ZnO nanorods show structural deterioration in different aqueous solutions. • Crystallinity of ZnO nanorods in absence of aqueous solution remain unaffected. • Encapsulation of bio-compatible surfactant in alchohol avoid ZnO deoxidation. • Crystallinity and structure of ZnO nanorods after encapsulation remain unaffected. - Abstract: Due to their photoluminescence, metal oxide nanostructures such as ZnO nanostructures are promising candidates in biomedical imaging, drug delivery and bio-sensing. To apply them as label for bio-imaging, it is important to study their structural stability in a bio-fluidic environment. We have explored the effect of water, the main constituent of biological solutions, on ZnO nanostructures with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL) studies which show ZnO nanorod degeneration in water. In addition, we propose and investigate a robust and inexpensive method to encapsulate these nanostructures (without structural degradation) using bio-compatible non-ionic surfactant in non-aqueous medium, which was not reported earlier. This new finding is an immediate interest to the broad audience of researchers working in biophysics, sensing and actuation, drug delivery, food and cosmetics technology, etc.

  15. Fabrication and characterisation of fluidic based memristor sensor for liquid with hydroxyl group

    Nor Shahanim Mohamad Hadis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Two types of memristor sensor were fabricated using two different TiO2 deposition methods of sputtering and sol-gel spin coating. The surface morphology of the sensors and the behaviour of the sensors were analysed by using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray system and I-V characterisation system respectively. The sensors were applied with liquid with hydroxyl group to check the capability of this sensor in sensing different concentration of hydroxyl ion inside the liquid. For that purpose, d-glucose liquid with four concentrations of 10mM, 20mM, 30mM and 40mM were chosen. The liquids dispensed onto the TiO2 surface to act as sensing material. The TiO2 surface was initially covered with polydimethylsiloxane to control the liquid. The sensing capability of the sensors was determined via the current-voltage measurement and off-on resistance ratio. The sensitivity of the sensors was analysed from the off-on resistance ratio analysis. Type II memristor sensor which was fabricated using sol-gel spin coating technique recorded high sensitivity of 120.65 (mM−1, while Type I sensor fabricated using the sputtering technique recorded low sensitivity of 0.035 (mM−1. However, SEM-EDX image illustrated that the sputtering technique produced more uniform TiO2 thin film than sol-gel spin coating technique with larger atomic number of oxygen through the sol-gel spin coating technique. This indicates Type II sensor that has large number of oxygen atom produced more reaction with hydroxyl ion inside the liquid. While, Type I sensor produced less reaction compared with Type II and thus produced smaller off-on resistance ratio. Keywords: Fluidic based memristor, Hydroxyl ion, I-V characteristics, Off-on resistance ratio

  16. An SOI CMOS-Based Multi-Sensor MEMS Chip for Fluidic Applications.

    Mansoor, Mohtashim; Haneef, Ibraheem; Akhtar, Suhail; Rafiq, Muhammad Aftab; De Luca, Andrea; Ali, Syed Zeeshan; Udrea, Florin

    2016-11-04

    An SOI CMOS multi-sensor MEMS chip, which can simultaneously measure temperature, pressure and flow rate, has been reported. The multi-sensor chip has been designed keeping in view the requirements of researchers interested in experimental fluid dynamics. The chip contains ten thermodiodes (temperature sensors), a piezoresistive-type pressure sensor and nine hot film-based flow rate sensors fabricated within the oxide layer of the SOI wafers. The silicon dioxide layers with embedded sensors are relieved from the substrate as membranes with the help of a single DRIE step after chip fabrication from a commercial CMOS foundry. Very dense sensor packing per unit area of the chip has been enabled by using technologies/processes like SOI, CMOS and DRIE. Independent apparatuses were used for the characterization of each sensor. With a drive current of 10 µA-0.1 µA, the thermodiodes exhibited sensitivities of 1.41 mV/°C-1.79 mV/°C in the range 20-300 °C. The sensitivity of the pressure sensor was 0.0686 mV/(V excit kPa) with a non-linearity of 0.25% between 0 and 69 kPa above ambient pressure. Packaged in a micro-channel, the flow rate sensor has a linearized sensitivity of 17.3 mV/(L/min) -0.1 in the tested range of 0-4.7 L/min. The multi-sensor chip can be used for simultaneous measurement of fluid pressure, temperature and flow rate in fluidic experiments and aerospace/automotive/biomedical/process industries.

  17. An SOI CMOS-Based Multi-Sensor MEMS Chip for Fluidic Applications †

    Mansoor, Mohtashim; Haneef, Ibraheem; Akhtar, Suhail; Rafiq, Muhammad Aftab; De Luca, Andrea; Ali, Syed Zeeshan; Udrea, Florin

    2016-01-01

    An SOI CMOS multi-sensor MEMS chip, which can simultaneously measure temperature, pressure and flow rate, has been reported. The multi-sensor chip has been designed keeping in view the requirements of researchers interested in experimental fluid dynamics. The chip contains ten thermodiodes (temperature sensors), a piezoresistive-type pressure sensor and nine hot film-based flow rate sensors fabricated within the oxide layer of the SOI wafers. The silicon dioxide layers with embedded sensors are relieved from the substrate as membranes with the help of a single DRIE step after chip fabrication from a commercial CMOS foundry. Very dense sensor packing per unit area of the chip has been enabled by using technologies/processes like SOI, CMOS and DRIE. Independent apparatuses were used for the characterization of each sensor. With a drive current of 10 µA–0.1 µA, the thermodiodes exhibited sensitivities of 1.41 mV/°C–1.79 mV/°C in the range 20–300 °C. The sensitivity of the pressure sensor was 0.0686 mV/(Vexcit kPa) with a non-linearity of 0.25% between 0 and 69 kPa above ambient pressure. Packaged in a micro-channel, the flow rate sensor has a linearized sensitivity of 17.3 mV/(L/min)−0.1 in the tested range of 0–4.7 L/min. The multi-sensor chip can be used for simultaneous measurement of fluid pressure, temperature and flow rate in fluidic experiments and aerospace/automotive/biomedical/process industries. PMID:27827904

  18. Development of a Carbon Nanotube-Based Touchscreen Capable of Multi-Touch and Multi-Force Sensing

    Kim, Wonhyo; Oh, Haekwan; Kwak, Yeonhwa; Park, Kwangbum; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Kim, Kunnyun

    2015-01-01

    A force sensing touchscreen, which detects touch point and touch force simultaneously by sensing a change in electric capacitance, was designed and fabricated. It was made with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) which have better mechanical and chemical characteristics than the indium-tin-oxide transparent electrodes used in most contemporary touchscreen devices. The SWCNTs, with a transmittance of about 85% and electric conductivity of 400 Ω per square; were coated and patterned on glas...

  19. An Oxidase-Based Electrochemical Fluidic Sensor with High-Sensitivity and Low-Interference by On-Chip Oxygen Manipulation

    Chang-Soo Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing a simple fluidic structure, we demonstrate the improved performance of oxidase-based enzymatic biosensors. Electrolysis of water is utilized to generate bubbles to manipulate the oxygen microenvironment close to the biosensor in a fluidic channel. For the proper enzyme reactions to occur, a simple mechanical procedure of manipulating bubbles was developed to maximize the oxygen level while minimizing the pH change after electrolysis. The sensors show improved sensitivities based on the oxygen dependency of enzyme reaction. In addition, this oxygen-rich operation minimizes the ratio of electrochemical interference signal by ascorbic acid during sensor operation (i.e., amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide. Although creatinine sensors have been used as the model system in this study, this method is applicable to many other biosensors that can use oxidase enzymes (e.g., glucose, alcohol, phenol, etc. to implement a viable component for in-line fluidic sensor systems.

  20. Engineering task plan for development, fabrication, and deployment of nested, fixed depth fluidic sampling and at-tank analysis systems

    REICH, F.R.

    1999-01-01

    An engineering task plan was developed that presents the resources, responsibilities, and schedules for the development, test, and deployment of the nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampling and at-tank analysis system. The sampling system, deployed in the privatization contract double-shell tank feed tank, will provide waste samples for assuring the readiness of the tank for shipment to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The at-tank analysis system will provide ''real-time'' assessments of the sampled wastes' chemical and physical properties. These systems support the Hanford Phase 1B Privatization Contract

  1. A Carbon Nanotube-based NEMS Parametric Amplifier for Enhanced Radio Wave Detection and Electronic Signal Amplification

    Aleman, B J; Sussman, A; Zettl, A [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mickelson, W, E-mail: azettl@berkeley.edu [Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-07-20

    We propose a scheme for a parametric amplifier based on a single suspended carbon nanotube field-emitter. This novel electromechanical nanotube device acts as a phase-sensitive, variable-gain, band-pass-filtering amplifier for electronic signal processing and, at the same time, can operate as a variable-sensitivity, tuneable detector and transducer of radio frequency electromagnetic waves. The amplifier can exhibit infinite gain at pumping voltages much less than 10 Volts. Additionally, the amplifier's low overhead power consumption (10-1000 nW) make it exceptionally attractive for ultra-low-power applications.

  2. A Carbon Nanotube-based NEMS Parametric Amplifier for Enhanced Radio Wave Detection and Electronic Signal Amplification

    Aleman, B J; Sussman, A; Zettl, A; Mickelson, W

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for a parametric amplifier based on a single suspended carbon nanotube field-emitter. This novel electromechanical nanotube device acts as a phase-sensitive, variable-gain, band-pass-filtering amplifier for electronic signal processing and, at the same time, can operate as a variable-sensitivity, tuneable detector and transducer of radio frequency electromagnetic waves. The amplifier can exhibit infinite gain at pumping voltages much less than 10 Volts. Additionally, the amplifier's low overhead power consumption (10-1000 nW) make it exceptionally attractive for ultra-low-power applications.

  3. Advanced fluidic handling and use of two-phase flow for high throughput structural investigation of proteins on a microfluidic sample preparation platform

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Snakenborg, Detlef; Møller, M.

    2010-01-01

    Research on the structure of proteins can bring forth a wealth of information about biological function and can be used to better understand the processes in living cells. This paper reports a new microfluidic sample preparation system for the structural investigation of proteins by Small Angle X......-ray Scattering (SAXS). The system includes hardware and software features for precise fluidic control, synchrotron beamline control, UV absorbance measurements and automated data analysis. The precise fluidic handling capabilities are used to transport and precisely position samples as small as 500 n...

  4. Activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotube based electrochemical capacitor in 1 M LiPF6 electrolyte

    Azam, M.A.; Jantan, N.H.; Dorah, N.; Seman, R.N.A.R.; Manaf, N.S.A.; Kudin, T.I.T.; Yahya, M.Z.A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Activated carbon and single-walled CNT based electrochemical capacitor. • Electrochemical analysis by means of CV, charge/discharge and impedance. • 1 M LiPF 6 non-aqueous solution as an electrolyte. • AC/SWCNT electrode exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g −1 . - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their wide range of potential application such as in nanoscale electric circuits, textiles, transportation, health, and the environment. Carbon nanotubes feature extraordinary properties, such as electrical conductivities higher than those of copper, hardness and thermal conductivity higher than those of diamond, and strength surpassing that of steel, among others. This research focuses on the fabrication of an energy storage device, namely, an electrochemical capacitor, by using carbon materials, i.e., activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotubes, of a specific weight ratio as electrode materials. The electrolyte functioning as an ion carrier is 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate. Variations in the electrochemical performance of the device, including its capacitance, charge/discharge characteristics, and impedance, are reported in this paper. The electrode proposed in this work exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g −1 at a scan rate of 1 mV s −1

  5. Role of the Material Electrodes on Resistive Behaviour of Carbon Nanotube-Based Gas Sensors for H2S Detection

    M. Lucci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Miniaturized gas-sensing devices that use single-walled carbon nanotubes as active material have been fabricated using two different electrode materials, namely, Au/Cr and NbN. The resistive sensors have been assembled aligning by dielectrophoresis the nanotube bundles between 40 μm spaced Au/Cr or NbN multifinger electrodes. The sensing devices have been tested for detection of the H2S gas, in the concentration range 10–100 ppm, using N2 as carrier gas. No resistance changes were detected using sensor fabricated with NbN electrodes, whereas the response of the sensor fabricated with Au/Cr electrodes was characterized by an increase of the resistance upon gas exposure. The main performances of this sensor are a detection limit for H2S of 10 ppm and a recovery time of few minutes. The present study suggests that the mechanism involved in H2S gas detection is not a direct charge transfer between molecules and nanotubes. The hypothesis is that detection occurs through passivation of the Au surfaces by H2S molecules and modification of the contact resistance at the Au/nanotube interface.

  6. Activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotube based electrochemical capacitor in 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte

    Azam, M.A., E-mail: asyadi@utem.edu.my [Carbon Research Technology Research Group, Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Jantan, N.H.; Dorah, N.; Seman, R.N.A.R.; Manaf, N.S.A. [Carbon Research Technology Research Group, Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Kudin, T.I.T. [Ionics Materials & Devices Research Laboratory, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, M.Z.A. [Ionics Materials & Devices Research Laboratory, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); National Defence University of Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon and single-walled CNT based electrochemical capacitor. • Electrochemical analysis by means of CV, charge/discharge and impedance. • 1 M LiPF{sub 6} non-aqueous solution as an electrolyte. • AC/SWCNT electrode exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their wide range of potential application such as in nanoscale electric circuits, textiles, transportation, health, and the environment. Carbon nanotubes feature extraordinary properties, such as electrical conductivities higher than those of copper, hardness and thermal conductivity higher than those of diamond, and strength surpassing that of steel, among others. This research focuses on the fabrication of an energy storage device, namely, an electrochemical capacitor, by using carbon materials, i.e., activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotubes, of a specific weight ratio as electrode materials. The electrolyte functioning as an ion carrier is 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate. Variations in the electrochemical performance of the device, including its capacitance, charge/discharge characteristics, and impedance, are reported in this paper. The electrode proposed in this work exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1} at a scan rate of 1 mV s{sup −1}.

  7. Fabrication, sensation and control of fluidic elastomer actuators and their application towards hand orthotics and prosthetics

    Zhao, Huichan

    Due to their continuous and natural motion, fluidic elastomer actuators (FEAs) have shown potential in a range of robotic applications including prosthetics and orthotics. Despite their advantages and rapid developments, robots using these actuators still have several challenging issues to be addressed. First, the reliable production of low cost and complex actuators that can apply high forces is necessary, yet none of existing fabrication methods are both easy to implement and of high force output. Next, compliant or stretchable sensors that can be embedded into their bodies for sophisticated functions are required, however, many of these sensors suffer from hysteresis, fabrication complexity, chemical safety and environmental instability, and material incompatibility with soft actuators. Finally, feedback control for FEAs is necessary to achieve better performance, but most soft robots are still "open-loop". In this dissertation, I intend to help solve the above issues and drive the applications of soft robotics towards hand orthotics and prosthetics. First, I adapt rotational casting as a new manufacturing method for soft actuators. I present a cuboid soft actuator that can generate a force of >25 N at its tip, a near ten-fold increase over similar actuators previously reported. Next, I propose a soft orthotic finger with position control enabled via embedded optical fiber. I monitor both the static and dynamic states via the optical sensor and achieve the prescribed curvatures accurately and with stability by a gain-scheduled proportional-integral-derivative controller. Then I develop the soft orthotic fingers into a low-cost, closed-loop controlled, soft orthotic glove that can be worn by a typical human hand and helpful for grasping light objects, while also providing finger position control. I achieve motion control with inexpensive, binary pneumatic switches controlled by a simple finite-state-machine. Finally, I report the first use of stretchable optical

  8. Vibration analysis of carbon nanotubes-based zeptogram masses sensors and taking into account their rotatory inertia

    Azrar A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, the transverse vibration behaviour of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SCNT based mass sensors is studied using the Timoshenko beam and nonlocal elasticity theories. The nonlocal constitutive equations are used in the formulations and the CNT with different lengths, attached mass (viruses and bacteria and the general boundary conditions are considered. The dimensionless frequencies and associated modes are obtained for one and two attached masses and different boundary conditions. The effects of transverse shear deformation and rotatory inertia, nonlocal parameter, length of the carbon nanotubes, and attached mass and its location are investigated in detail for each considered problem. The relationship between the frequencies and mode shapes of the sensor and the attached zeptogramme masses are obtained. The sensing devices for biological objects including viruses and bacteria can be elaborated based on the developed sensitivity and frequency shift methodological approach.

  9. High-performance carbon-nanotube-based complementary field-effect-transistors and integrated circuits with yttrium oxide

    Liang, Shibo; Zhang, Zhiyong, E-mail: zyzhang@pku.edu.cn; Si, Jia; Zhong, Donglai; Peng, Lian-Mao, E-mail: lmpeng@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-08-11

    High-performance p-type carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors utilizing yttrium oxide as gate dielectric are presented by optimizing oxidization and annealing processes. Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect-transistors (FETs) are then fabricated on CNTs, and the p- and n-type devices exhibit symmetrical high performances, especially with low threshold voltage near to zero. The corresponding CMOS CNT inverter is demonstrated to operate at an ultra-low supply voltage down to 0.2 V, while displaying sufficient voltage gain, high noise margin, and low power consumption. Yttrium oxide is proven to be a competitive gate dielectric for constructing high-performance CNT CMOS FETs and integrated circuits.

  10. Effects of surface properties on droplet formation inside a microfluidic device

    Steinhaus, Ben; Shen, Amy

    2004-11-01

    Micro-fluidic devices offer a unique method of creating and controlling droplets on small length scales. A microfluidic device is used to study the effects of surface properties on droplet formation of a 2-phase flow system. Four phase diagrams are generated to compare the dynamics of the 2 immiscible fluid system (silicone oil and water) inside microchannels with different surface properties. Results show that the channel surface plays an important role in determining the flow patterns and the droplet formation of the 2-phase fluid system.

  11. Microfluidic device for continuous single cells analysis via Raman spectroscopy enhanced by integrated plasmonic nanodimers

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Candeloro, Patrizio; De Grazia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In this work a Raman flow cytometer is presented. It consists of a microfluidic device that takes advantages of the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and flow cytometry. The microfluidic device integrates calibrated microfluidic channels-where the cells can flow one-by-one -, allowing single...... cell Raman analysis. The microfluidic channel integrates plasmonic nanodimers in a fluidic trapping region. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on single cell. These allow a label-free analysis, providing information about the biochemical content of membrane and cytoplasm...

  12. Micro-electro-fluidic grids for nematodes: a lens-less, image-sensor-less approach for on-chip tracking of nematode locomotion.

    Liu, Peng; Martin, Richard J; Dong, Liang

    2013-02-21

    This paper reports on the development of a lens-less and image-sensor-less micro-electro-fluidic (MEF) approach for real-time monitoring of the locomotion of microscopic nematodes. The technology showed promise for overcoming the constraint of the limited field of view of conventional optical microscopy, with relatively low cost, good spatial resolution, and high portability. The core of the device was microelectrode grids formed by orthogonally arranging two identical arrays of microelectrode lines. The two microelectrode arrays were spaced by a microfluidic chamber containing a liquid medium of interest. As a nematode (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) moved inside the chamber, the invasion of part of its body into some intersection regions between the microelectrodes caused changes in the electrical resistance of these intersection regions. The worm's presence at, or absence from, a detection unit was determined by a comparison between the measured resistance variation of this unit and a pre-defined threshold resistance variation. An electronic readout circuit was designed to address all the detection units and read out their individual electrical resistances. By this means, it was possible to obtain the electrical resistance profile of the whole MEF grid, and thus, the physical pattern of the swimming nematode. We studied the influence of a worm's body on the resistance of an addressed unit. We also investigated how the full-frame scanning and readout rates of the electronic circuit and the dimensions of a detection unit posed an impact on the spatial resolution of the reconstructed images of the nematode. Other important issues, such as the manufacturing-induced initial non-uniformity of the grids and the electrotaxic behaviour of nematodes, were also studied. A drug resistance screening experiment was conducted by using the grids with a good resolution of 30 × 30 μm(2). The phenotypic differences in the locomotion behaviours (e.g., moving speed and oscillation

  13. Development of a Carbon Nanotube-Based Touchscreen Capable of Multi-Touch and Multi-Force Sensing.

    Kim, Wonhyo; Oh, Haekwan; Kwak, Yeonhwa; Park, Kwangbum; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Kim, Kunnyun

    2015-11-13

    A force sensing touchscreen, which detects touch point and touch force simultaneously by sensing a change in electric capacitance, was designed and fabricated. It was made with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) which have better mechanical and chemical characteristics than the indium-tin-oxide transparent electrodes used in most contemporary touchscreen devices. The SWCNTs, with a transmittance of about 85% and electric conductivity of 400 Ω per square; were coated and patterned on glass and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) film substrates. The constructed force sensing touchscreen has a total size and thickness of 62 mm × 100 mm × 1.4 mm, and is composed of 11 driving line and 19 receiving line channels. The gap between the channels was designed to be 20 µm, taking visibility into consideration, and patterned by a photolithography and plasma etching processes. The mutual capacitance formed by the upper and lower transparent electrodes was initially about 2.8 pF and, on applying a 500 gf force with a 3 mm diameter tip, it showed a 25% capacitance variation. Furthermore, the touchscreen can detect multiple touches and forces simultaneously and is unaffected by touch material characteristics, such as conductance or non-conductance.

  14. Impact of the atomic layer deposition precursors diffusion on solid-state carbon nanotube based supercapacitors performances

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vollebregt, Sten; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Sarro, Pasqualina M; Tichelaar, F D

    2015-01-01

    A study on the impact of atomic layer deposition (ALD) precursors diffusion on the performance of solid-state miniaturized nanostructure capacitor array is presented. Three-dimensional nanostructured capacitor array based on double conformal coating of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) bundles is realized using ALD to deposit Al 2 O 3 as dielectric layer and TiN as high aspect-ratio conformal counter-electrode on 2 μm long MWCNT bundles. The devices have a small footprint (from 100 μm 2 to 2500 μm 2 ) and are realized using an IC wafer-scale manufacturing process with high reproducibility (≤0.3E-12F deviation). To evaluate the enhancement of the electrode surface, the measured capacitance values are compared to a lumped circuital model. The observed discrepancies are explained with a partial coating of the CNT, that determine a limited use of the available electrode surface area. To analyze the CNT coating effectiveness, the ALD precursors diffusions inside the CNT bundle is studied using a Knudsen diffusion mechanism. (paper)

  15. Impact of the atomic layer deposition precursors diffusion on solid-state carbon nanotube based supercapacitors performances

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vollebregt, Sten; Tichelaar, F. D.; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Sarro, Pasqualina M.

    2015-02-01

    A study on the impact of atomic layer deposition (ALD) precursors diffusion on the performance of solid-state miniaturized nanostructure capacitor array is presented. Three-dimensional nanostructured capacitor array based on double conformal coating of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) bundles is realized using ALD to deposit Al2O3 as dielectric layer and TiN as high aspect-ratio conformal counter-electrode on 2 μm long MWCNT bundles. The devices have a small footprint (from 100 μm2 to 2500 μm2) and are realized using an IC wafer-scale manufacturing process with high reproducibility (≤0.3E-12F deviation). To evaluate the enhancement of the electrode surface, the measured capacitance values are compared to a lumped circuital model. The observed discrepancies are explained with a partial coating of the CNT, that determine a limited use of the available electrode surface area. To analyze the CNT coating effectiveness, the ALD precursors diffusions inside the CNT bundle is studied using a Knudsen diffusion mechanism.

  16. Development of a Carbon Nanotube-Based Touchscreen Capable of Multi-Touch and Multi-Force Sensing

    Wonhyo Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A force sensing touchscreen, which detects touch point and touch force simultaneously by sensing a change in electric capacitance, was designed and fabricated. It was made with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs which have better mechanical and chemical characteristics than the indium-tin-oxide transparent electrodes used in most contemporary touchscreen devices. The SWCNTs, with a transmittance of about 85% and electric conductivity of 400 Ω per square; were coated and patterned on glass and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET film substrates. The constructed force sensing touchscreen has a total size and thickness of 62 mm × 100 mm × 1.4 mm, and is composed of 11 driving line and 19 receiving line channels. The gap between the channels was designed to be 20 µm, taking visibility into consideration, and patterned by a photolithography and plasma etching processes. The mutual capacitance formed by the upper and lower transparent electrodes was initially about 2.8 pF and, on applying a 500 gf force with a 3 mm diameter tip, it showed a 25% capacitance variation. Furthermore, the touchscreen can detect multiple touches and forces simultaneously and is unaffected by touch material characteristics, such as conductance or non-conductance.

  17. Polymer microfluidic device replacing fluids using only capillary force

    Chung, Kwang Hyo; Lee, Dae Sik; Yang, Haesik; Kim, Sung Jin; Pyo, Hyun Bong

    2005-02-01

    A novel polymer microfluidic device for self-wash using only capillary force is presented. A liquid filled in a reaction chamber is replaced by another liquid with no external actuation. All the fluidic actuations in the device is pre-programmed about time and sequence, and accomplished by capillary force naturally. Careful design is necessary for exact actions. The fluidic conduits were designed by the newly derived theoretical equations about the capillary stop pressure and flow time. Simulations using CFD-ACE+ were conducted to check the validity of theory and the performance of the chip. These analytic results were consistent with experimental ones. The chip was made of polymers for the purpose of single use and low price. It was fabricated by sealing the hot-embossed PMMA substrate with a PET film. For simpler fabrication, the chip was of a single height. The embossing master was produced from a nickel-electroplating on a SU8-patterned Ni-plate followed by CMP. The contact angles of liquids on substrates were manipulated through the mixing of surfactants, and the temporal variations were monitored for a more exact design. The real actuation steps in experiment revealed the stable performance of selfwash, and coincided well with the designed ones. The presented microfluidic method can be applicable to other LOCs of special purposes through simple modification. For example, array or serial types would be possible for multiple selfwashes.

  18. A bladder-free, non-fluidic, conductive McKibben artificial muscle operated electro-thermally

    Sangian, Danial; Foroughi, Javad; Farajikhah, Syamak; Naficy, Sina; Spinks, Geoffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    Fluidic McKibben artificial muscles that operate pneumatically or hydraulically provide excellent performance, but require bulky pumps/compressors, valves and connecting lines. Use of a pressure generating material, such as thermally expanding paraffin wax, can eliminate the need for these pumps and associated infrastructure. Here we further develop this concept by introducing the first bladderless McKibben muscle wherein molten paraffin is contained by surface tension within a tailored braid. Incorporation of electrically conductive wires in the braid allows for convenient Joule heating of the paraffin. The muscle is light (0.14 g) with a diameter of 1.4 mm and is capable of generating a tensile stress of 50 kPa (0.039 N) in 20 s. The maximum contraction strain of 10% (7.6 kPa given load) was achieved in 60 s with an applied electrical power of 0.35 W.

  19. A mathematical model for surface roughness of fluidic channels produced by grinding aided electrochemical discharge machining (G-ECDM

    Ladeesh V. G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Grinding aided electrochemical discharge machining is a hybrid technique, which combines the grinding action of an abrasive tool and thermal effects of electrochemical discharges to remove material from the workpiece for producing complex contours. The present study focuses on developing fluidic channels on borosilicate glass using G-ECDM and attempts to develop a mathematical model for surface roughness of the machined channel. Preliminary experiments are conducted to study the effect of machining parameters on surface roughness. Voltage, duty factor, frequency and tool feed rate are identified as the significant factors for controlling surface roughness of the channels produced by G-ECDM. A mathematical model was developed for surface roughness by considering the grinding action and thermal effects of electrochemical discharges in material removal. Experiments are conducted to validate the model and the results obtained are in good agreement with that predicted by the model.

  20. A High-Voltage Integrated Circuit Engine for a Dielectrophoresis-based Programmable Micro-Fluidic Processor

    Current, K. Wayne; Yuk, Kelvin; McConaghy, Charles; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Schwartz, Jon A.; Vykoukal, Jody V.; Andrews, Craig

    2010-01-01

    A high-voltage (HV) integrated circuit has been demonstrated to transport droplets on programmable paths across its coated surface. This chip is the engine for a dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based micro-fluidic lab-on-a-chip system. This chip creates DEP forces that move and help inject droplets. Electrode excitation voltage and frequency are variable. With the electrodes driven with a 100V peak-to-peak periodic waveform, the maximum high-voltage electrode waveform frequency is about 200Hz. Data communication rate is variable up to 250kHz. This demonstration chip has a 32×32 array of nominally 100V electrode drivers. It is fabricated in a 130V SOI CMOS fabrication technology, dissipates a maximum of 1.87W, and is about 10.4 mm × 8.2 mm. PMID:23989241

  1. Implementation of a safe-by-design approach in the development of new open pilot lines for the manufacture of carbon nanotube-based nano-enabled products

    López de Ipiña, Jesús M.; Hernan, Angel; Cenigaonaindia, Xabier; Insunza, Mario; Florez, Sonia; Seddon, Richard; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Kostopoulos, Vasilios; Latko, Paulina; Durałek, Paweł; Kchit, Nadir

    2017-06-01

    The project PLATFORM (H2020, GA 646307) aims to develop three new pilot lines (PPLs) for the manufacture of carbon nanotube-based nano-enabled products (buckypapers, treated prepregs, doped veils), for the European aeronautics and automotive industries (a Technology Readiness Level 6 - TRL6 - is expected at the end of the project). The Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC (MD) - transposed into the respective national legislations - is the European regulatory framework for the design and construction of new machinery, as the future PPLs. PPLs are not required to comply with the provisions of the MD until they are put into service - expected in 2020, after project completion - but then, the MD will be fully applicable. In this regulatory context, the project PLATFORM is aligning the design of the PPLs according to the MD requirements, in order to facilitate the CE marking in 2020 (TRL9) and avoid potential economic costs associated with future re-adaptations or modifications needed to ensure compliance with the MD. This paper discusses the methodological approach followed by the project PLATFORM to integrate all the nanosafety aspects in the design of the PPLs, in order to achieve safe designs in conformity with the relevant Essential Health and Safety Requirements (EHSRs) of the MD. Since machinery must be designed and constructed taking into account the results of the risk assessment (RA), this paper describes the systematic and iterative approach for RA and risk reduction followed to eliminate hazards as far practicable and to adequately reduce risks by the implementation of protective measures. This process has been guided by the harmonized standards EN ISO 12100 and EN ISO 14123, taking the relevant phases of life cycle, expected uses and operation modes of the PPLs into account. A specific tool to guide the safe design of the PPLs and facilitate the RA process has also been produced by the project (PLATFORM - SbD toolkit).

  2. Implementation of a safe-by-design approach in the development of new open pilot lines for the manufacture of carbon nanotube-based nano-enabled products

    López de Ipiña, Jesús M; Hernan, Angel; Cenigaonaindia, Xabier; Insunza, Mario; Florez, Sonia; Seddon, Richard; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Kostopoulos, Vasilios; Latko, Paulina; Durałek, Paweł; Kchit, Nadir

    2017-01-01

    The project PLATFORM (H2020, GA 646307) aims to develop three new pilot lines (PPLs) for the manufacture of carbon nanotube-based nano-enabled products (buckypapers, treated prepregs, doped veils), for the European aeronautics and automotive industries (a Technology Readiness Level 6 - TRL6 - is expected at the end of the project). The Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC (MD) - transposed into the respective national legislations - is the European regulatory framework for the design and construction of new machinery, as the future PPLs. PPLs are not required to comply with the provisions of the MD until they are put into service - expected in 2020, after project completion - but then, the MD will be fully applicable. In this regulatory context, the project PLATFORM is aligning the design of the PPLs according to the MD requirements, in order to facilitate the CE marking in 2020 (TRL9) and avoid potential economic costs associated with future re-adaptations or modifications needed to ensure compliance with the MD. This paper discusses the methodological approach followed by the project PLATFORM to integrate all the nanosafety aspects in the design of the PPLs, in order to achieve safe designs in conformity with the relevant Essential Health and Safety Requirements (EHSRs) of the MD. Since machinery must be designed and constructed taking into account the results of the risk assessment (RA), this paper describes the systematic and iterative approach for RA and risk reduction followed to eliminate hazards as far practicable and to adequately reduce risks by the implementation of protective measures. This process has been guided by the harmonized standards EN ISO 12100 and EN ISO 14123, taking the relevant phases of life cycle, expected uses and operation modes of the PPLs into account. A specific tool to guide the safe design of the PPLs and facilitate the RA process has also been produced by the project (PLATFORM – SbD toolkit). (paper)

  3. Label-free tracking of single extracellular vesicles in a nano-fluidic optical fiber (Conference Presentation)

    van der Pol, Edwin; Weidlich, Stefan; Lahini, Yoav; Coumans, Frank A. W.; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk; Schmidt, Markus A.; Faez, Sanli; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-03-01

    Background: Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are abundantly present in human body fluids. Since the size, concentration and composition of these vesicles change during disease, vesicles have promising clinical applications, including cancer diagnosis. However, since ~70% of the vesicles have a diameter <70 nm, detection of single vesicles remains challenging. Thus far, vesicles <70 nm have only be studied by techniques that require the vesicles to be adhered to a surface. Consequently, the majority of vesicles have never been studied in their physiological environment. We present a novel label-free optical technique to track single vesicles <70 nm in suspension. Method: Urinary vesicles were contained within a single-mode light-guiding silica fiber containing a 600 nm nano-fluidic channel. Light from a diode laser (660 nm wavelength) was coupled to the fiber, resulting in a strongly confined optical mode in the nano-fluidic channel, which continuously illuminated the freely diffusing vesicles inside the channel. The elastic light scattering from the vesicles, in the direction orthogonal to the fiber axis, was collected using a microscope objective (NA=0.95) and imaged with a home-built microscope. Results: We have tracked single urinary vesicles as small as 35 nm by elastic light scattering. Please note that vesicles are low-refractive index (n<1.4) particles, which we confirmed by combining data on thermal diffusion and light scattering cross section. Conclusions: For the first time, we have studied vesicles <70 nm freely diffusing in suspension. The ease-of-use and performance of this technique support its potential for vesicle-based clinical applications.

  4. Quality Control Method for a Micro-Nano-Channel Microfabricated Device

    Grattoni, Alessandro; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Xuewu

    2012-01-01

    A variety of silicon-fabricated devices is used in medical applications such as drug and cell delivery, and DNA and protein separation and analysis. When a fluidic device inlet is connected to a compressed gas reservoir, and the outlet is at a lower pressure, a gas flow occurs through the membrane toward the outside. The method relies on the measurement of the gas pressure over the elapsed time inside the upstream and downstream environments. By knowing the volume of the upstream reservoir, the gas flow rate through the membrane over the pressure drop can be calculated. This quality control method consists of measuring the gas flow through a device and comparing the results with a standard curve, which can be obtained by testing standard devices. Standard devices can be selected through a variety of techniques, both destructive and nondestructive, such as SEM, AFM, and standard particle filtration.

  5. Simple Check Valves for Microfluidic Devices

    Willis, Peter A.; Greer, Harold F.; Smith, J. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    A simple design concept for check valves has been adopted for microfluidic devices that consist mostly of (1) deformable fluorocarbon polymer membranes sandwiched between (2) borosilicate float glass wafers into which channels, valve seats, and holes have been etched. The first microfluidic devices in which these check valves are intended to be used are micro-capillary electrophoresis (microCE) devices undergoing development for use on Mars in detecting compounds indicative of life. In this application, it will be necessary to store some liquid samples in reservoirs in the devices for subsequent laboratory analysis, and check valves are needed to prevent cross-contamination of the samples. The simple check-valve design concept is also applicable to other microfluidic devices and to fluidic devices in general. These check valves are simplified microscopic versions of conventional rubber- flap check valves that are parts of numerous industrial and consumer products. These check valves are fabricated, not as separate components, but as integral parts of microfluidic devices. A check valve according to this concept consists of suitably shaped portions of a deformable membrane and the two glass wafers between which the membrane is sandwiched (see figure). The valve flap is formed by making an approximately semicircular cut in the membrane. The flap is centered over a hole in the lower glass wafer, through which hole the liquid in question is intended to flow upward into a wider hole, channel, or reservoir in the upper glass wafer. The radius of the cut exceeds the radius of the hole by an amount large enough to prevent settling of the flap into the hole. As in a conventional rubber-flap check valve, back pressure in the liquid pushes the flap against the valve seat (in this case, the valve seat is the adjacent surface of the lower glass wafer), thereby forming a seal that prevents backflow.

  6. Development of kinetic models for photoassisted electrochemical process using Ti/RuO2 anode and carbon nanotube-based O2-diffusion cathode

    Akbarpour, Amaneh; Khataee, Alireza; Fathinia, Mehrangiz; Vahid, Behrouz

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Preparation and characterization of carbon nanotube-based O 2 -diffusion cathode. • Photoassisted electrochemical process using Ti/RuO 2 anode and O 2 -diffusion cathode. • Degradation of C.I. Basic Yellow 28 under recirculation mode. • Development of kinetic models for photoassisted electrochemical process. - Abstract: A coupled photoassisted electrochemical system was utilized for degradation of C.I. Basic Yellow 28 (BY28) as a cationic azomethine dye under recirculation mode. Experiments were carried out by utilizing active titanium/ruthenium oxide (Ti/RuO 2 ) anode and O 2 -diffusion cathode with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the CNTs demonstrated that CNTs had approximately an inner and outer diameter of 5 nm and 19 nm, respectively. Then, the dye degradation kinetics was experimentally examined under various operational parameters including BY28 initial concentration (mg/L), current density (mA/cm 2 ), flow rate (L/h) and pH. Based on the generally accepted intrinsic elementary reactions for photoassisted electrochemical process (PEP), a novel kinetic model was proposed and validated for predicting the k app . The developed kinetic model explicitly describes the dependency of the k app on BY28 initial concentration and current density. A good agreement was obtained between the predicted values of k app and experimental results (correlation coefficient (R 2 ) = 0.996, mean squared error (MSE) = 2.10 × 10 −4 and mean absolute error (MAE) = 1.10 × 10 −2 ). Finally, in order to profoundly evaluate and compare the accuracy of the suggested intrinsic kinetic model, an empirical kinetic model was also developed as a function of main operational parameters, and an artificial neural network model (ANN) by 3-layer feed-forward back propagation network with topology of 5:9:1. The performance of the mentioned models was compared based on the error functions and analysis of variance (ANOVA). A

  7. Photovoltaic device

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  8. Photovoltaic device

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  9. Photovoltaic device

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  10. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics (Open Access, Publisher’s Version)

    2015-12-30

    millifluidics to mix linear double stranded DNA with enzymes to assemble plasmids via Golden Gate biochemistry . The assembly reac- tions occurred at...used, a constitutively expressed yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) reporter, and a plasmid backbone containing an ampicillin selection marker ( AMP ) and...proof-of- principle that 3D printed devices can adequately mix the Golden Gate enzymes and DNA and that the Golden Gate biochemistry proceeds

  11. A fast and reliable way to establish fluidic connections to planar microchips

    Snakenborg, Detlef; Perozziello, Gerardo; Geschke, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we present a non-permanent method to connect microfluidic devices. The approach uses short flexible tubes that are plugged into bottom-flat holes and ensure fast and reliable interconnections. The small available dimensions allow the tube to be directly attached to the side of plana...... microchips. A theoretical model to estimate the maximum applicable pressure was developed, and verified with experimental data. Furthermore, the tube connections were compared to other non-permanent interconnection types....

  12. Carbon nanotubes based vacuum gauge

    Rudyk, N. N.; Il'in, O. I.; Il'ina, M. V.; Fedotov, A. A.; Klimin, V. S.; Ageev, O. A.

    2017-11-01

    We have created an ionization type Vacuum gauge with sensor element based on an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Obtained asymmetrical current-voltage characteristics at different voltage polarity on the electrode with the CNTs. It was found that when applying a negative potential on an electrode with the CNTs, the current in the gap is higher than at a positive potential. In the pressure range of 1 ÷ 103 Torr vacuum gauge sensitivity was 6 mV/Torr (at a current of 4.5·10-5 A) and in the range of 10-5 ÷ 1 Torr was 10 mV/Torr (at a current of 1.3·10-5 A). It is shown that the energy efficiency of vacuum gauge can be increased in the case where electrode with CNT operates as an emitter of electrons.

  13. The thermal-hydraulic for the new technologies: the micro-fluidics; La thermohydraulique au service des nouvelles technologies: la microfluidique

    Crecy, F. de; Gruss, A.; Bricard, A.; Excoffon, J

    2000-07-01

    The micro-fluidics can be defined as the fluid flow in little canals. This scale offers a great interest for the biotechnology type. In this paper, the authors present this fluids form and detail the researches performed at the Department of Physics and Thermal-hydraulics of the CEA, in the domain of the physical properties characterization and of the numerical two-phase direct simulation. (A.L.B.)

  14. Preparation and Testing of Impedance-based Fluidic Biochips with RTgill-W1 Cells for Rapid Evaluation of Drinking Water Samples for Toxicity

    2016-03-07

    109 | e53555 | Page 1 of 8 Video Article Preparation and Testing of Impedance-based Fluidic Biochips with RTgill-W1 Cells for Rapid Evaluation of...www.jove.com/ video /53555 DOI: doi:10.3791/53555 Keywords: Environmental Sciences, Issue 109, Fish cells, impedance, sensors, biochip, water toxicity...sensitivity to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides . Applications for this toxicity detector are for rapid field-portable testing of drinking water

  15. Recent results of the investigation of a micro-fluidic sampling chip and sampling system for hot cell aqueous processing streams

    Tripp, J.; Smith, T.; Law, J.

    2013-01-01

    A Fuel Cycle Research and Development project has investigated an innovative sampling method that could evolve into the next generation sampling and analysis system for metallic elements present in aqueous processing streams. Initially sampling technologies were evaluated and micro-fluidic sampling chip technology was selected and tested. A conceptual design for a fully automated microcapillary-based system was completed and a robotic automated sampling system was fabricated. The mechanical and sampling operation of the completed sampling system was investigated. Different sampling volumes have been tested. It appears that the 10 μl volume has produced data that had much smaller relative standard deviations than the 2 μl volume. In addition, the production of a less expensive, mass produced sampling chip was investigated to avoid chip reuse thus increasing sampling reproducibility/accuracy. The micro-fluidic-based robotic sampling system's mechanical elements were tested to ensure analytical reproducibility and the optimum robotic handling of micro-fluidic sampling chips. (authors)

  16. Design of an optical and micro-fluidic sensor for concentration measurement by photo-thermal effect

    Schimpf, A.

    2011-01-01

    This work has been done in the context of fuel reprocessing in the nuclear industry. In fact, the handling of nuclear waste is one of the major issues in the nuclear industry. Its implications reach from economical to political to ecological dimensions. Since used nuclear fuel consists of 97% of recyclable substances, many countries have chosen to reprocess used fuel, not only for economical reasons but also to limit the quantity of nuclear waste. The most widely employed extraction technique is the PUREX process where the used fuel is diluted in nitric acid. The recyclable compounds can then be extracted by solvent techniques. Such processes need to be monitored crucially. However, nowadays, the process supervision is carried out by manually sampling the radioactive effluents and analyzing them in external laboratories. Not only prone to potential risks, this approach is little responsive and produces radio-toxic samples that cannot be reintroduced in the nuclear fuel cycle. In this study, we therefore present the developpement of a micro-fluidic glass sensor, based on the detection of a photothermal effect induced in the sample fluid. Micro-fluidic allows fluid handling on a microliter-scale and can therefore significantly reduce the sample volume and thereby the radio-toxicity of the analyzed fluids. Photothermal spectrometry is well suited for small-scale sample analysis since its sensitivity does not rely on the length of optical interaction with the analyte. The photothermal effect is a local refractive index variation due to the absorption of photons by the analyte species which are contained in the sample. On the sensor chip, the index refraction change is being sensed by an integrated Young interferometer made by ion-exchange in glass. The probed volume in the channel was (33.5± 3.5) pl. The interferometric system can sense refractive index changes as low as Δn(min)=7.5*10 -6 , allowing to detect a minimum concentration of cobalt(II) in ethanol c

  17. Non-invasive paper-based microfluidic device for ultra-low detection of urea through enzyme catalysis

    Suresh, Vignesh; Qunya, Ong; Kanta, Bera Lakshmi; Yuh, Lee Yeong; Chong, Karen S. L.

    2018-03-01

    This work describes the design, fabrication and characterization of a paper-based microfluidic device for ultra-low detection of urea through enzyme catalysis. The microfluidic system comprises an entry port, a fluidic channel, a reaction zone and two electrodes (contacts). Wax printing was used to create fluidic channels on the surface of a chromatography paper. Pre-conceptualized designs of the fluidic channel are wax-printed on the paper substrate while the electrodes are screen-printed. The paper printed with wax is heated to cause the wax reflow along the thickness of the paper that selectively creates hydrophilic and hydrophobic zones inside the paper. Urease immobilized in the reaction zone catalyses urea into releasing ions and, thereby, generating a current flow between the electrodes. A measure of current with respect to time at a fixed potential enables the detection of urea. The methodology enabled urea concentration down to 1 pM to be detected. The significance of this work lies in the use of simple and inexpensive paper-based substrates to achieve detection of ultra-low concentrations of analytes such as urea. The process is non-invasive and employs a less cumbersome two-electrode assembly.

  18. Modeling the Peano fluidic muscle and the effects of its material properties on its static and dynamic behavior

    Veale, Allan Joshua; Xie, Sheng Quan; Anderson, Iain Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The promise of wearable assistive robotics cannot be realized without the development of actuators that mimic the behavior and form of biological muscles. Planar fluidic muscles known as Peano muscles or pouch motors have the potential to provide the high force and compliance of McKibben pneumatic artificial muscles with the low threshold pressure of pleated pneumatic artificial muscles. Yet they do so in a soft and slim form that can be discreetly distributed over the human body. This work is an investigation into the empirical modeling of the Peano muscle, the effect of its material on its performance, and its capabilities and limitations. We discovered that the Peano muscle could provide responsive and discreet actuation of soft and rigid bodies requiring strains between 15% and 30%. Ideally, they are made of non-viscoelastic materials with high tensile and low bending stiffnesses. While Sarosi et al’s empirical model accurately captures its static behavior with an root mean square error of 10.2 N, their dynamic model overestimates oscillation frequency and damping. We propose that the Peano muscle be modeled by a parallel ideal contractile unit and viscoelastic element, both in series with another viscoelastic element.

  19. Static investigation of two fluidic thrust-vectoring concepts on a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    A static investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel of two thrust-vectoring concepts which utilize fluidic mechanisms for deflecting the jet of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. One concept involved using the Coanda effect to turn a sheet of injected secondary air along a curved sidewall flap and, through entrainment, draw the primary jet in the same direction to produce yaw thrust vectoring. The other concept involved deflecting the primary jet to produce pitch thrust vectoring by injecting secondary air through a transverse slot in the divergent flap, creating an oblique shock in the divergent channel. Utilizing the Coanda effect to produce yaw thrust vectoring was largely unsuccessful. Small vector angles were produced at low primary nozzle pressure ratios, probably because the momentum of the primary jet was low. Significant pitch thrust vector angles were produced by injecting secondary flow through a slot in the divergent flap. Thrust vector angle decreased with increasing nozzle pressure ratio but moderate levels were maintained at the highest nozzle pressure ratio tested. Thrust performance generally increased at low nozzle pressure ratios and decreased near the design pressure ratio with the addition of secondary flow.

  20. Sealing device

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  1. Microfluidic Device

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  2. Gauging device

    Qurnell, F.D.; Patterson, C.B.

    1979-01-01

    A gauge supporting device for measuring say a square tube comprises a pair of rods or guides in tension between a pair of end members, the end members being spaced apart by a compression member or members. The tensioned guides provide planes of reference for measuring devices moved therealong on a carriage. The device is especially useful for making on site dimensional measurements of components, such as irradiated and therefore radioactive components, that cannot readily be transported to an inspection laboratory. (UK)

  3. Bio-Inspired Micro-Fluidic Angular-Rate Sensor for Vestibular Prostheses

    Charalambos M. Andreou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an alternative approach for angular-rate sensing based on the way that the natural vestibular semicircular canals operate, whereby the inertial mass of a fluid is used to deform a sensing structure upon rotation. The presented gyro has been fabricated in a commercially available MEMS process, which allows for microfluidic channels to be implemented in etched glass layers, which sandwich a bulk-micromachined silicon substrate, containing the sensing structures. Measured results obtained from a proof-of-concept device indicate an angular rate sensitivity of less than 1 °/s, which is similar to that of the natural vestibular system. By avoiding the use of a continually-excited vibrating mass, as is practiced in today’s state-of-the-art gyroscopes, an ultra-low power consumption of 300 μW is obtained, thus making it suitable for implantation.

  4. Fusion devices

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included

  5. BRAKE DEVICE

    O'Donnell, T.J.

    1959-03-10

    A brake device is described for utilization in connection with a control rod. The device comprises a pair of parallelogram link mechanisms, a control rod moveable rectilinearly therebetween in opposite directions, and shoes resiliently supported by the mechanism for frictional engagement with the control rod.

  6. PLASMA DEVICE

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  7. Comparison between simulation and experimentally observed interactions between two magnetic beads in a fluidic system

    Oduwole, Olayinka, E-mail: olayinka.oduwole@eng.ox.ac.uk; Grob, David Tim, E-mail: tim.grob@eng.ox.ac.uk; Sheard, Steve, E-mail: steve.sheard@eng.ox.ac.uk

    2016-06-01

    Continuous flow separation of magnetic particles within a microfluidic device could lead to improved performance of magnetic bead-based assays but the undesirable formation of bead clusters reduces its efficiency; this efficiency refers to the ability to separate bound magnetic beads from a mixture of particles. Such agglomerates are formed due to magnetic binding forces while hydrodynamic interactions strongly influence the particles' movement. This paper presents a model for interactions between a pair of equal sized super-paramagnetic beads suspended in water within a uniform magnetic field. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time a comparison between simulated trajectories and the beads' movement captured on video; the beads were suspended in a stationary fluid placed within a uniform magnetic field. In conclusion, the model is a good approximation for beads interacting with their nearest neighbours and is able to predict the trajectory pattern of these particles in a magnetic bead-based assay. Predicting the magnetically induced interaction of nearby beads will help in determining the density of beads in an assay and in avoiding agglomeration over a fixed time duration. - Highlights: • We modelled the interactions between a pair of super-paramagnetic beads suspended in water within a uniform magnetic field. • We tracked the movement of the bead pair and captured it on video. • We compared the numerical results with the video data and achieved a good agreement. • We predicted the agglomeration time as a function of the separation distance.

  8. Evolution of the electrical resistivity anisotropy during saline tracer tests: insights from geoelectrical milli-fluidic experiments

    Jougnot, D.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.; Legendre, R.; Le Borgne, T.; Meheust, Y.; Linde, N.

    2017-12-01

    The use of time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography has been largely developed in environmental studies to remotely monitor water saturation and contaminant plumes migration. However, subsurface heterogeneities, and corresponding preferential transport paths, yield a potentially large anisotropy in the electrical properties of the subsurface. In order to study this effect, we have used a newly developed geoelectrical milli-fluidic experimental set-up with a flow cell that contains a 2D porous medium consisting of a single layer of cylindrical solid grains. We performed saline tracer tests under full and partial water saturations in that cell by jointly injecting air and aqueous solutions with different salinities. The flow cell is equipped with four electrodes to measure the bulk electrical resistivity at the cell's scale. The spatial distribution of the water/air phases and the saline solute concentration field in the water phase are captured simultaneously with a high-resolution camera by combining a fluorescent tracer with the saline solute. These data are used to compute the longitudinal and transverse effective electrical resistivity numerically from the measured spatial distributions of the fluid phases and the salinity field. This approach is validated as the computed longitudinal effective resistivities are in good agreement with the laboratory measurements. The anisotropy in electrical resistivity is then inferred from the computed longitudinal and transverse effective resistivities. We find that the spatial distribution of saline tracer, and potentially air phase, drive temporal changes in the effective resistivity through preferential paths or barriers for electrical current at the pore scale. The resulting heterogeneities in the solute concentrations lead to strong anisotropy of the effective bulk electrical resistivity, especially for partially saturated conditions. Therefore, considering the electrical resistivity as a tensor could improve our

  9. Effect of conductivity variations within the electric double layer on the streaming potential estimation in narrow fluidic confinements.

    Das, Siddhartha; Chakraborty, Suman

    2010-07-06

    In this article, we investigate the implications of ionic conductivity variations within the electrical double layer (EDL) on the streaming potential estimation in pressure-driven fluidic transport through narrow confinements. Unlike the traditional considerations, we do not affix the ionic conductivities apriori by employing preset values of dimensionless parameters (such as the Dukhin number) to estimate the streaming potential. Rather, utilizing the Gouy-Chapman-Grahame model for estimating the electric potential and charge density distribution within the Stern layer, we first quantify the Stern layer electrical conductivity as a function of the zeta potential and other pertinent parameters quantifying the interaction of the ionic species with the charged surface. Next, by invoking the Boltzmann model for cationic and anionic distribution within the diffuse layer, we obtain the diffuse layer electrical conductivity. On the basis of these two different conductivities pertaining to the two different portions of the EDL as well as the bulk conductivity, we define two separate Dukhin numbers that turn out to be functions of the dimensionless zeta potential and the channel height to Debye length ratio. We derive analytical expressions for the streaming potential as a function of the fundamental governing parameters, considering the above. The results reveal interesting and significant deviations between the streaming potential predictions from the present considerations against the corresponding predictions from the classical considerations in which electrochemically consistent estimates of variable EDL conductivity are not traditionally accounted for. In particular, it is revealed that the variations of streaming potential with zeta potential are primarily determined by the competing effects of EDL electromigration and ionic advection. Over low and high zeta potential regimes, the Stern layer and diffuse layer conductivities predominantly dictate the streaming

  10. Understanding Fish Linear Acceleration Using an Undulatory Biorobotic Model with Soft Fluidic Elastomer Actuated Morphing Median Fins.

    Wen, Li; Ren, Ziyu; Di Santo, Valentina; Hu, Kainan; Yuan, Tao; Wang, Tianmiao; Lauder, George V

    2018-04-10

    Although linear accelerations are an important common component of the diversity of fish locomotor behaviors, acceleration is one of the least-understood aspects of propulsion. Analysis of acceleration behavior in fishes with both spiny and soft-rayed median fins demonstrates that fin area is actively modulated when fish accelerate. We implemented an undulatory biomimetic robotic fish model with median fins manufactured using multimaterial three-dimensional printing-a spiny-rayed dorsal fin, soft-rayed dorsal/anal fins, and a caudal fin-whose stiffnesses span three orders of magnitude. We used an array of fluidic elastomeric soft actuators to mimic the dorsal/anal inclinator and erector/depressor muscles of fish, which allowed the soft fins to be erected or folded within 0.3 s. We experimentally show that the biomimetic soft dorsal/anal fin can withstand external loading. We found that erecting the soft dorsal/anal fins significantly enhanced the linear acceleration rate, up to 32.5% over the folded fin state. Surprisingly, even though the projected area of the body (in the lateral plane) increased 16.9% when the median fins were erected, the magnitude of the side force oscillation decreased by 24.8%, which may have led to significantly less side-to-side sway in the robotic swimmer. Visualization of fluid flow in the wake of median fins reveals that during linear acceleration, the soft dorsal fin generates a wake flow opposite in direction to that of the caudal fin, which creates propulsive jets with time-variant circulations and jet angles. Erectable/foldable fins provide a new design space for bioinspired underwater robots with structures that morph to adapt to different locomotor behaviors. This biorobotic fish model is also a potentially promising system for studying the dynamics of complex multifin fish swimming behaviors, including linear acceleration, steady swimming, and burst and coast, which are difficult to analyze in freely swimming fishes.

  11. Sealing devices

    Coulson, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A sealing device for minimising the leakage of toxic or radioactive contaminated environments through a biological shield along an opening through which a flexible component moves that penetrates the shield. The sealing device comprises an outer tubular member which extends over a length not less than the maximum longitudinal movement of the component along the opening. An inner sealing block is located intermediate the length of the component by connectors and is positioned in the bore of the outer tubular member to slide in the bore and effect a seal over the entire longitudinal movement of the component. The cross-section of the device may be circular and the block may be of polytetrafluoroethylene or of nylon impregnated with molybdenum or may be metallic. A number of the sealing devices may be combined into an assembly for a plurality of adjacent longitudinally movable components, each adapted to sustain a tensile load, providing the various drives of a master-slave manipulator. (author)

  12. Ferroelectric devices

    Uchino, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Updating its bestselling predecessor, Ferroelectric Devices, Second Edition assesses the last decade of developments-and setbacks-in the commercialization of ferroelectricity. Field pioneer and esteemed author Uchino provides insight into why this relatively nascent and interdisciplinary process has failed so far without a systematic accumulation of fundamental knowledge regarding materials and device development.Filling the informational void, this collection of information reviews state-of-the-art research and development trends reflecting nano and optical technologies, environmental regulat

  13. Ghost Particle Velocimetry implementation in millimeters devices and comparison with μPIV

    Riccomi, Marco; Alberini, Federico; Brunazzi, Elisabetta; Vigolo, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Micro/milli-fluidic devices are becoming an important reference for several disciplines and are quickly increasing their applications in scientific, as well as industrial, environment. As a consequence, the development of techniques able to analyse these kinds of systems is required to allow their progress. Here we show the implementation of the Ghost Particle Velocimetry (GPV) for the flow velocity field investigation in milli-fluidic devices. This innovative technique has been recently introduced, and has been already proven to be useful in describing rapid phenomenon at a small scale. In this work, the GPV has been used to characterize the trapping of light suspended material in a branching junction. Experiments have been performed to identify the flow velocity field close to a millimeters scale T-junction, at different Reynolds numbers. Particularly interesting are the complex structures, such as vortices and recirculation zones, induced by the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The results obtained have been deeply validated and compared with the well-established μPIV, highlighting the differences in terms of qualitative and quantitative parameters. A performance comparison has been designed to underline the strengths and weaknesses of the two experimental techniques.

  14. Low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology: general processing aspects and fabrication of 3-D structures for micro-fluidic devices

    Birol, Hansu; Maeder, Thomas; Ryser, Peter

    2005-01-01

    LTCC technology is based on sintering of multi-layered thick-film sheets (50-250 µm) or so-called green tapes, which are screen-printed with thick-film pastes such as conductors, resistors, etc. The terms low temperature and co-fired originate from the relatively low sintering temperatures (

  15. Guide device

    Brammer, C.M. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel handling guide tube centering device for use in nuclear reactors during fuel assembly handling operations. The device comprises an outer ring secured to the flange of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, a rotatable table rotatably coupled to the outer ring, and a plurality of openings through the table. Truncated locating cones are positioned in each of the openings in the table, and the locating cones center the guide tube during fuel handling operations. The openings in the table are located such that each fuel assembly in the nuclear core may be aligned with one of the openings by a suitable rotation of the table. The locating cones thereby provide alignment between the fuel handling mechanism located in the guide tube and the individual fuel assemblies of the cone. The need for a device to provide alignment is especially critical for floating nuclear power plants, where wave motion may exist during fuel handling operations. 5 claims, 4 figures

  16. Medical Devices

    Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Mahieu, H.F.; Geertsema, A.A.; Hermann, I.F.; van Horn, J.R.; Hummel, J. Marjan; van Loon, J.P.; Mihaylov, D.; van der Plaats, A.; Schraffordt Koops, H.; Schutte, H.K.; Veth, R.P.H.; de Vries, M.P.; Rakhorst, G.; Shi, Donglu

    2004-01-01

    The development of new medical devices is a very time-consuming and costly process. Besides the time between the initial idea and the time that manufacturing and testing of prototypes takes place, the time needed for the development of production facilities, production of test series, marketing,

  17. Assistive Devices

    If you have a disability or injury, you may use a number of assistive devices. These are tools, products or types of equipment that help you perform tasks and activities. They may help you move around, see, communicate, eat, or get ...

  18. Detection device

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  19. Cooling device in thermonuclear device

    Honda, Tsutomu.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent loss of cooling effect over the entire torus structure directly after accidental toubles in a cooling device of a thermonuclear device. Constitution: Coolant recycling means of a cooling device comprises two systems, which are alternately connected with in-flow pipeways and exit pipeways of adjacent modules. The modules are cooled by way of the in-flow pipeways and the exist pipeways connected to the respective modules by means of the coolant recycling means corresponding to the respective modules. So long as one of the coolant recycling means is kept operative, since every one other modules of the torus structure is still kept cooled, the heat generated from the module put therebetween, for which the coolant recycling is interrupted, is removed by means of heat conduction or radiation from the module for which the cooling is kept continued. No back-up emergency cooling system is required and it can provide high economic reliability. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. A multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics method for device simulations.

    Yam, ChiYung; Meng, Lingyi; Zhang, Yu; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-07

    Multiscale modeling has become a popular tool for research applying to different areas including materials science, microelectronics, biology, chemistry, etc. In this tutorial review, we describe a newly developed multiscale computational method, incorporating quantum mechanics into electronic device modeling with the electromagnetic environment included through classical electrodynamics. In the quantum mechanics/electromagnetics (QM/EM) method, the regions of the system where active electron scattering processes take place are treated quantum mechanically, while the surroundings are described by Maxwell's equations and a semiclassical drift-diffusion model. The QM model and the EM model are solved, respectively, in different regions of the system in a self-consistent manner. Potential distributions and current densities at the interface between QM and EM regions are employed as the boundary conditions for the quantum mechanical and electromagnetic simulations, respectively. The method is illustrated in the simulation of several realistic systems. In the case of junctionless field-effect transistors, transfer characteristics are obtained and a good agreement between experiments and simulations is achieved. Optical properties of a tandem photovoltaic cell are studied and the simulations demonstrate that multiple QM regions are coupled through the classical EM model. Finally, the study of a carbon nanotube-based molecular device shows the accuracy and efficiency of the QM/EM method.

  1. Microfluidic device for continuous single cells analysis via Raman spectroscopy enhanced by integrated plasmonic nanodimers

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2015-12-11

    In this work a Raman flow cytometer is presented. It consists of a microfluidic device that takes advantages of the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and flow cytometry. The microfluidic device integrates calibrated microfluidic channels- where the cells can flow one-by-one -, allowing single cell Raman analysis. The microfluidic channel integrates plasmonic nanodimers in a fluidic trapping region. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on single cell. These allow a label-free analysis, providing information about the biochemical content of membrane and cytoplasm of the each cell. Experiments are performed on red blood cells (RBCs), peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and myelogenous leukemia tumor cells (K562). © 2015 Optical Society of America.

  2. Thermonuclear device

    Tezuka, Masaru.

    1993-01-01

    Protrusions and recesses are formed to a vacuum vessel and toroidal magnetic coils, and they are engaged. Since the vacuum vessel is generally supported firmly by a rack or the like by support legs, the toroidal magnetic field coils can be certainly supported against tumbling force. Then, there can be attained strong supports for the toroidal magnetic field coils, in addition to support by wedges on the side of inboard and support by share panels on the side of outboard, capable of withstanding great electromagnetic forces which may occur in large-scaled next-generation devices. That is, toroidal magnetic field coils excellent from a view point of deformation and stress can be obtained, to provide a thermonuclear device of higher reliability. (N.H.)

  3. Thermonuclear device

    Oosaki, Osamu; Masuda, Kenju.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide excellent electric properties and high reliability in a thermonuclear device by improving a current collecting board connected to a coil device. Constitution: A current collecting board element perforated with an opening for enserting a connecting terminal is sized to be inserted into a plating tank, and is surface treated in the plating tank. Only the current collecting board element preferably surface treated is picked up. A plurality of such current collecting board elements are connected and welded to form a large current collecting board. In this manner, the current collecting board having several m 2 to several ten order m 2 in area can be obtained as preferably surface treated at the connecting terminal hole. The current collecting board element can be determined in shape with the existing facility without increasing the size of a surface treating tank. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Thermonuclear device

    Yagi, Yasuomi; Takahashi, Ken; Hashimoto, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the plasma confining performances by bringing the irregular magnetic fields nearly to zero and decreasing the absolute value of the irregular magnetic fields at every positions. Constitution: The winding direction of a plurality of coil elements, for instance, double pan cake coils of toroidal coils in a torus type or mirror type thermonuclear device are reversed to each other in their laminating direction, whereby the irregular magnetic fields due to the coil-stepped portions in each toroidal coils are brought nearly to zero. This enables to bring the average irregular magnetic fields as a whole in the thermonuclear device nearly to zero, as well as, decrease the absolute value of the irregular magnetic fields in each positions. Thus, the plasma confining performances can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. "Distinvar" device

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The alignment of one of the accelerator magnets being checked by the AR Division survey group. A "distinvar" device, invented by the group, using calibrated invar wires stretched between the fixed survey pillar (on the left) and a fixed point on the magnet. In two days it is thus possible to measure the alignment of the 100 magnets with an accuracy better than 1/10.

  6. Latching device

    Ulrich, G. W. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A latching device is suited for use in establishing a substantially motionless connection between a stationary receiver and a movable latching mechanism. The latching mechanism includes a pivotally supported restraining hook continuously urged into a capturing relationship with the receiver, characterized by a spring-biased pawl having a plurality of aligned teeth. The teeth are seated in the surface of the throat of the hook and positionable into restraining engagement with a rigid restraining shoulder projected from the receiver.

  7. 3D direct writing fabrication of electrodes for electrochemical storage devices

    Wei, Min; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Wei; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Zhou, Chi; Wu, Gang

    2017-06-01

    Among different printing techniques, direct ink writing is commonly used to fabricate 3D battery and supercapacitor electrodes. The major advantages of using the direct ink writing include effectively building 3D structure for energy storage devices and providing higher power density and higher energy density than traditional techniques due to the increased surface area of electrode. Nevertheless, direct ink writing has high standards for the printing inks, which requires high viscosity, high yield stress under shear and compression, and well-controlled viscoelasticity. Recently, a number of 3D-printed energy storage devices have been reported, and it is very important to understand the printing process and the ink preparation process for further material design and technology development. We discussed current progress of direct ink writing technologies by using various electrode materials including carbon nanotube-based material, graphene-based material, LTO (Li4Ti5O12), LFP (LiFePO4), LiMn1-xFexPO4, and Zn-based metallic oxide. Based on achieve electrochemical performance, these 3D-printed devices deliver performance comparable to the energy storage device fabricated using traditional methods still leaving large room for further improvement. Finally, perspectives are provided on the potential future direction of 3D printing for all solid-state electrochemical energy storage devices.

  8. Nanoscale surface modifications to control capillary flow characteristics in PMMA microfluidic devices

    Mukhopadhyay Subhadeep

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA microfluidic devices have been fabricated using a hot embossing technique to incorporate micro-pillar features on the bottom wall of the device which when combined with either a plasma treatment or the coating of a diamond-like carbon (DLC film presents a range of surface modification profiles. Experimental results presented in detail the surface modifications in the form of distinct changes in the static water contact angle across a range from 44.3 to 81.2 when compared to pristine PMMA surfaces. Additionally, capillary flow of water (dyed to aid visualization through the microfluidic devices was recorded and analyzed to provide comparison data between filling time of a microfluidic chamber and surface modification characteristics, including the effects of surface energy and surface roughness on the microfluidic flow. We have experimentally demonstrated that fluid flow and thus filling time for the microfluidic device was significantly faster for the device with surface modifications that resulted in a lower static contact angle, and also that the incorporation of micro-pillars into a fluidic device increases the filling time when compared to comparative devices.

  9. Damping device

    Banks, E.L. Jr.; Dowell, T.P.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a damper which includes a pair of telescopic components interconnected by relative linear movement one in relation to the other, by a screw and ball nut device, with a braking surface on one of the components, a brake engaging the braking surface, an inertia mass entrained by the other components, non-deformable and distinct brake actuating gear, independently mobile in relation to the other braking system and fixed and controlled by the inertia mass, positively to engage the braking surface. This damper is for retaining the parts of a nuclear power station so that can withstand earthquakes [fr

  10. Thermonuclear device

    Inoue, Toyokazu; Murata, Toru.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To shield superconducting coils for use in the generation of magnetic field against neutron irradiation thereby preventing tritium contamination. Constitution: The thermonuclear device comprises, in its inside, a vacuum container for containing plasmas, superconducting coils disposed to the outside of the vacuum container and neutron absorbers disposed between the super-conducting coils and the vacuum container. since neutrons issued from the plasma are absorbed by neutron absorbers and not irradiated to the superconducting coils, generation of tritium due to the reaction between 3 He in the liquid helium as the coolants for the super-conducting coils and the neutrons is prevented. (Aizawa, K.)

  11. Strainer device

    Mokuya, Kenji.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a strainer device, which is adapted to facilitate flushing and is particularly suited for installation in the cooling system of a liquid metal cooled fast breeding reactor. Structure: A casing accommodating a strainer and a blind plate for the selection of a flow path is provided at a suitable portion of the duct line. The blind plate is adapted to be rotated by an opening and closing means consisting of a rod. bellows, shaft and so forth. At the time of flushing, the duct line is sealed by the blind plate. (Nakamura, S.)

  12. Scalable devices

    Krüger, Jens J.

    2014-01-01

    In computer science in general and in particular the field of high performance computing and supercomputing the term scalable plays an important role. It indicates that a piece of hardware, a concept, an algorithm, or an entire system scales with the size of the problem, i.e., it can not only be used in a very specific setting but it\\'s applicable for a wide range of problems. From small scenarios to possibly very large settings. In this spirit, there exist a number of fixed areas of research on scalability. There are works on scalable algorithms, scalable architectures but what are scalable devices? In the context of this chapter, we are interested in a whole range of display devices, ranging from small scale hardware such as tablet computers, pads, smart-phones etc. up to large tiled display walls. What interests us mostly is not so much the hardware setup but mostly the visualization algorithms behind these display systems that scale from your average smart phone up to the largest gigapixel display walls.

  13. Thermonuclear device

    Honda, Takuro; Maki, Koichi.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a thermonuclear device, in which integrity of a measuring device is kept, the reactor wall temperature and wear of armour materials are monitored accurately even under intense radiation rays, so that the flow rate of coolants and plasma power can be controlled by using the signals. Infrared rays generated from the surface of the armour materials disposed on a first wall are detected to measure the reactor wall temperature. Coolant flow rate and plasma power are controlled based on the obtained reactor wall temperature. In addition, infrared rays generated from the back of the armour materials are detected to obtain the surface temperature in order to avoid intense radiation rays from plasmas. The coolant flow rate and the plasma power are controlled based on the obtained temperature on the surface of the reactor thereby controlling the temperature of the first wall and the armour material to 300degC or lower in a case of the first wall made of stainless steel and 1000degC or lower in a case of the armour material made of graphite. (I.S.)

  14. Thermonuclear device

    Kuriyama, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Furuyama, Masayuki; Saito, Ryusei.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the efficient and rapid cooling of a vacuum vessel by cooling with gas when the temperature of the vacuum vessel is higher than the boiling point of water and cooling with water when the temperature is lower than the boiling point of water. Constitution: A cooling pipe is provided through an insulating pipe on the outer periphery of a vacuum vessel. The cooling pipe communicates through a cooling gas valve and a coolant valve with a cooling gas supply device and a coolant supply device, and a heat exchanger is disposed at the pipe. When the vessel is higher than the boiling point of the coolant the coolant valve is closed and the cooling gas valve is opened and gas is supplied to cool the vessel. The gas is recoverd through a heat exchanger. On the other hand, when the temperature of vessel is lower than the boiling point of the coolant, the gas valve is closed, the coolant valve is opened, and the vessel is cooled with coolant. The vacuum vessel can be cooled for short time employing both the gas and the coolant together. (Yoshino, Y.)

  15. Thermonuclear device

    Takano, Hirohisa; Nakamoto, Kazunari; Hanai, Satoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To provide coils of high mechanical strength for use at the center of a torus type thermonuclear device. Constitution: A plurality of copper plates having cooling holes and bolt holes and insulation paper sheets of the same shape are prepared. The copper plate is different from the insulation paper sheet only in that the position-phase angle of the opening portion is larger by 15 - 30 0 . The copper plates and the insulation paper sheets are alternately stacked by a required number of turns while displacing the angle, and then clamped by bolts to form a mechanically strong coil with no metallurgical joining. Further, since the insulation paper sheets are not present in the radial direction and only one insulation paper sheet is inserted for each turn in the direction of the coil height, the space occupied by the coil can be decreased. According to this invention, the magnetic flux density at the center of the device can be increased as compared with the conventional case to thereby apply a higher voltage on the side of plasmas. (Moriyama, K.)

  16. Irradiation device

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu.

    1989-01-01

    In an irradiation device for irradiating radiation rays such as electron beams to pharmaceuticals, etc., since the distribution of scanned electron rays was not monitored, the electron beam intensity could be determined only indirectly and irradiation reliability was not satisfactory. In view of the above, a plurality of monitor wires emitting secondary electrons are disposed in the scanning direction near a beam take-out window of a scanning duct, signals from the monitor wires are inputted into a display device such as a cathode ray tube, as well as signals from the monitor wires at the central portion are inputted into counting rate meters to measure the radiation dose as well. Since secondary electrons are emitted when electron beams pass through the monitor wires and the intensity thereof is in proportion with the intensity of incident electron beams, the distribution of the radiation dose can be monitored by measuring the intensity of the emitted secondary electrons. Further, uneven irradiation, etc. can also be monitored to make the radiation of irradiation rays reliable. (N.H.)

  17. Evaluation of a X-ray imaging method in micro-fluidics: the case of T-shaped micro-channels filling up

    Vabre, A.; Legoupil, S.; Manach, E.; Gal, O.; Colin, St.; Geoffroy, S.; Gue, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    X-rays methods assessment in micro-fluidics: case of 'T' shaped microchannels filling. Fluid flows within 'T' or 'Y' shaped microchannels are deeply studied in order to develop adapted modeling approaches and experimental techniques. Our technological choice lies on the attenuation measurement of X-ray in matter. The main advantage of this non-intrusive technique is to be implemented on media opaque to visible light. Moreover, X-rays methods may achieve better spatial resolutions as compared to optical methods because of their much lower wavelength. In order to validate this X-ray method, measurements obtained by this technique are compared with direct measurements carried out on similar microchannels. Finally, experimental results are compared with a theoretical model. (author)

  18. Deployment of a fluidic pulse jet mixing system for horizontal waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Kent, T.E.; Hylton, T.D.; Moore, J.W.

    1998-08-01

    A fluidic pulse jet mixing system, designed and fabricated by AEA Technology, was successfully demonstrated for mobilization of remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) sludge for retrieval from three 50,000-gal horizontal waste storage tanks (W-21, W-22, and W-23) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The pulse jet system is unique because it does not contain any moving parts except for some solenoid valves which can be easily replaced if necessary. The pulse jet system consisted of seven modular equipment skids and was installed and commissioned in about 7 weeks. The system used specially designed fluidic jet pumps and charge vessels, along with existing submerged nozzles for mixing the settled sludges with existing supernate in the tank. The operation also used existing piping and progressive cavity pumps for retrieval and transfer of the waste mixtures. The pulse jet system operated well and experienced no major equipment malfunctions. The modular design, use of quick-connect couplings, and low-maintenance aspects of the system minimized radiation exposure during installation and operation of the system. The extent of sludge removal from the tanks was limited by the constraints of using the existing tank nozzles and the physical characteristics of the sludge. Removing greater than 98% of this sludge would require aggressive use of the manual sluicer (and associated water additions), a shielded sluicer system that utilizes supernate from existing inventory, or a more costly and elaborate robotic retrieval system. The results of this operation indicate that the pulse jet system should be considered for mixing and bulk retrieval of sludges in other horizontal waste tanks at ORNL and US Department of Energy sites

  19. Practical microwave electron devices

    Meurant, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Practical Microwave Electron Devices provides an understanding of microwave electron devices and their applications. All areas of microwave electron devices are covered. These include microwave solid-state devices, including popular microwave transistors and both passive and active diodes; quantum electron devices; thermionic devices (including relativistic thermionic devices); and ferrimagnetic electron devices. The design of each of these devices is discussed as well as their applications, including oscillation, amplification, switching, modulation, demodulation, and parametric interactions.

  20. Thermonuclear device

    Furuyama, Masayuki.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide the subject device wherein a conductive short-circuiting ring is installed in the vicinity of the bonded part of bellows and thick portion of vacuum vessel in the small circumferential direction of torus, thereby to reduce the electromagnetic force generated at the bellows. Constitution: A conductive short-circuiting ring is provided in the vicinity of the connected part of a thick portion and bellows portion. By this organization, a saddle type current generated at the thick portion by a vertical magnetic field flows through the short-circuiting ring because the resistance at a part where the short-circuiting ring is provided is reduced, and the current flowing through the bellows is remarkably reduced. For this reason, the electromagnetic force generated at the bellows is reduced thereby to prevent the bellows from being destroyed by the electromagnetic force. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. Electrophoresis device

    Rhodes, P. H.; Snyder, R. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A device for separating cellular particles of a sample substance into fractionated streams of different cellular species includes a casing having a distribution chamber, a separation chamber, and a collection chamber. The electrode chambers are separated from the separation chamber interior by means of passages such that flow variations and membrane variations around the slotted portion of the electrode chamber do not enduce flow perturbations into the laminar buffer curtain flowing in the separation chamber. The cellular particles of the sample are separated under the influence of the electrical field and the separation chamber into streams of different cellular species. The streams of separated cells enter a partition array in the collection chamber where they are fractionated and collected.

  2. Thermonuclear device

    Suzuki, Shohei

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain high voltage withstanding current introduction terminals not suffering from the effects of the reduction in the creeping voltage withstanding property by the application of magnetic fields. Constitution: This invention concerns a current introduction terminal for supplying electric current to coils for use in a thermonuclear device, etc. The conductor of the current introduction terminal on the side of vacuum is completely covered with solid insulator. This can eliminate the portion of securing the creeping withstanding voltage. The voltage withstanding characteristics of the solid insulator covering the portion of the conductor on the side of vacuum has a constant value irrespective of the atmosphere or the absence or presence of magnetic fields. Accordingly, the voltage withstanding characteristics of the current introduction terminal on the side of vacuum are determined by the property of the solid insulator, which is not reduced by the application of magnetic fields. (Ikeda, J.)

  3. Safety device of thermonuclear device

    Aoki, Isao; Ueda, Shuzo; Seki, Yasushi; Sakurai, Akiko; Kasahara, Fumio; Obara, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Michinori.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a safety device against an event of intrusion of coolants in a vacuum vessel. Namely, a coolant supply system comprises cooling tubes for supplying coolants to main reactor structure components including a vacuum vessel. A detection means detects leakage of coolants in the vacuum vessel. A coolant supply control means controls the supply of coolants to the main reactor structural components based on the leakage detection signals of the detection means. A stagnated material discharging means discharges stagnated materials in the main reactor structural components caused by the leakage of coolants. The leakage of coolants (for example, water) in the vacuum vessel can thus be detected by the water detection device in the vacuum vessel. A control value of a coolant supply means is closed by the leakage detection signals. The supply of coolants to the main reactor structural components is restricted to suppress the leakage. The stagnated materials are discharged to a tank by way of a water draining valve. (I.S.)

  4. Laser patterning and welding of transparent polymers for microfluidic device fabrication

    Pfleging, W.; Baldus, O.

    2006-02-01

    CO II-laser-assisted micro-patterning of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or cyclo-olefin copolymer (COC) has a great potential for the rapid manufacturing of polymeric devices including cutting and structuring. Channel widths of about 50 μm as well as large area patterning of reservoir structures or drilling of vias are established. For this purpose a high quality laser beam is necessary as well as an appropriate beam forming system. In combination with laser transmission welding a fast fabrication of two- and three-dimensional micro-fluidic devices was possible. Welding as well as multilayer welding of transparent polymers was investigated for different polymers such as PMMA, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), COC, and polystyrene (PS). The laser transmission welding process is performed with a high-power diode laser (wavelength 940 nm). An absorption layer with a thickness of several nanometers is deposited onto the polymer surfaces. The welding process has been established for the welding of polymeric parts containing microchannels, if the width of the channels is equal or larger than 100μm. For smaller feature sizes the absorption layer is structured by UV-laser radiation in order to get a highly localized welding seam, e.g., for the limitation of thermal penetration and thermal damaging of functional features such as channels, thin walls or temperature-sensitive substances often contained in micro-fluidic devices. This process strategy was investigated for the welding of capillary electrophoresis chips and capillary blood separation chips, including channel widths of 100 μm and 30 μm. Analysis of the thickness of the absorption layer was carried out with optical transmission spectroscopy.

  5. A new UV-curing elastomeric substrate for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2012-03-01

    Rapid prototyping in the design cycle of new microfluidic devices is very important for shortening time-to-market. Researchers are facing the challenge to explore new and suitable substrates with simple and efficient microfabrication techniques. In this paper, we introduce and characterize a UV-curing elastomeric polyurethane methacrylate (PUMA) for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. The swelling and solubility of PUMA in different chemicals is determined. Time-dependent measurements of water contact angle show that the native PUMA is hydrophilic without surface treatment. The current monitoring method is used for measurement of the electroosmotic flow mobility in the microchannels made from PUMA. The optical, physical, thermal and mechanical properties of PUMA are evaluated. The UV-lithography and molding process is used for making micropillars and deep channel microfluidic structures integrated to the supporting base layer. Spin coating is characterized for producing different layer thicknesses of PUMA resin. A device is fabricated and tested for examining the strength of different bonding techniques such as conformal, corona treating and semi-curing of two PUMA layers in microfluidic application and the results show that the bonding strengths are comparable to that of PDMS. We also report fabrication and testing of a three-layer multi inlet/outlet microfluidic device including a very effective fluidic interconnect for application demonstration of PUMA as a promising new substrate. A simple micro-device is developed and employed for observing the pressure deflection of membrane made from PUMA as a very effective elastomeric valve in microfluidic devices.

  6. Assistive acting movement therapy devices with pneumatic rotary-type soft actuators.

    Wilkening, André; Baiden, David; Ivlev, Oleg

    2012-12-01

    Inherent compliance and assistive behavior are assumed to be essential properties for safe human-robot interaction. Rehabilitation robots demand the highest standards in this respect because the machine interacts directly with weak persons who are often sensitive to pain. Using novel soft fluidic actuators with rotary elastic chambers (REC actuators), compact, lightweight, and cost-effective therapeutic devices can be developed. This article describes modular design and control strategies for new assistive acting robotic devices for upper and lower extremities. Due to the inherent compliance and natural back-drivability of pneumatic REC actuators, these movement therapy devices provide gentle treatment, whereby the interaction forces between humans and the therapy device are estimated without the use of expensive force/torque sensors. An active model-based gravity compensation based on separated models of the robot and of the individual patient's extremity provides the basis for effective assistive control. The utilization of pneumatic actuators demands a special safety concept, which is merged with control algorithms to provide a sufficient level of safeness and to catch any possible system errors and/or emergency situations. A self-explanatory user interface allows for easy, intuitive handling. Prototypes are very comfortable for use due to several control routines that work in the background. Assistive devices have been tested extensively with several healthy persons; the knee/hip movement therapy device is now under clinical trials at the Clinic for Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery at the Klinikum Stuttgart.

  7. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) devices: Production and applications for sustained protein delivery.

    Lee, Parker W; Pokorski, Jonathan K

    2018-03-13

    Injectable or implantable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) devices for the sustained delivery of proteins have been widely studied and utilized to overcome the necessity of repeated administrations for therapeutic proteins due to poor pharmacokinetic profiles of macromolecular therapies. These devices can come in the form of microparticles, implants, or patches depending on the disease state and route of administration. Furthermore, the release rate can be tuned from weeks to months by controlling the polymer composition, geometry of the device, or introducing additives during device fabrication. Slow-release devices have become a very powerful tool for modern medicine. Production of these devices has initially focused on emulsion-based methods, relying on phase separation to encapsulate proteins within polymeric microparticles. Process parameters and the effect of additives have been thoroughly researched to ensure protein stability during device manufacturing and to control the release profile. Continuous fluidic production methods have also been utilized to create protein-laden PLGA devices through spray drying and electrospray production. Thermal processing of PLGA with solid proteins is an emerging production method that allows for continuous, high-throughput manufacturing of PLGA/protein devices. Overall, polymeric materials for protein delivery remain an emerging field of research for the creation of single administration treatments for a wide variety of disease. This review describes, in detail, methods to make PLGA devices, comparing traditional emulsion-based methods to emerging methods to fabricate protein-laden devices. This article is categorized under: Biology-Inspired Nanomaterials > Protein and Virus-Based Structures Implantable Materials and Surgical Technologies > Nanomaterials and Implants Biology-Inspired Nanomaterials > Peptide-Based Structures. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Thermonuclear device

    Suzuki, Shohei.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the plasma confining efficiency in a thermonuclear device having magnet coils using super-conducting wires by decreasing the uneven magnetic field resulted from current supply terminals and wirings. Constitution: Current introduction terminals of magnet coils using superconducting wires are short circuitted with a superconducting short circuit wire. Upon supplying current to the coils, the resistance of the coils is rendered superconductive and the resistance of the short circuit wire is rendered normally conductive heated by a heater and the switch is closed. In this case, most parts of the current are flown through the resistance of the coils and the switch is opened when the current arrives at a predetermined value to render the resistance of the short circuit wire superconductive. Then, the current transfers from the thyristor power source to the resistance of the short circuit wire, whereby the resistance of the coils and that of the short circuit wire from a permanent current loop. In this conditions, since current flows through the short circuit wire and the coils and not to the current introduction terminals, no uniform magnetic field is generated. (Kawakami, Y.)

  9. Reluctance device

    Claridge, A.N.; Smith, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    A reluctance device comprises two or more phases, each of which has a rotor mounted for rotation within a tubular member and an annular stator positioned externally of the tubular member. The rotor and the internal surface of the tubular member are each provided with aligned, axially spaced apart annular arrays of teeth, the teeth on the rotor confronting those on the tubular member in radially spaced apart relationship. The stator encloses a coil which, when electrically energised, creates a plurality of magnetic flux paths each of which extends radially between the rotor and stator via the confronting teeth and the tubular member, and axially along both the rotor and the portion of the stator located radially outwardly of the coil. The portion of the tubular member intermediate the teeth thereon is provided with a non-magnetic insert in order to resist the axial passage of magnetic flux therethrough. In one of the claims, the tubular member comprises a portion of a nuclear reactor which is adapted to contain a reactor control rod, the rotor constituting a portion of the drive mechanism for the control rod contained in operation within the tubular member. (author)

  10. Protection device for a thermonuclear device

    Kawashima, Shuichi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To exactly detect the void coefficients of coolants even under high magnetic fields thereby detect the overheat of a thermonuclear device at an early stage. Constitution: The protecting device of this invention comprises a laser beam generation device, a laser beam detection device and an accident detection device. The laser generation device always generates laser beams, which are permeated through coolants and detected by the laser beam detection device, the optical amount of which is transmitted to the accident detection device. The accident detection device judges the excess or insufficiency of the detected optical amount with respect to the optical amount of the laser beams under the stationary state as a reference and issues an accident signal. Since only the optical cables that do not undergo the effect of the magnetic fields are exposed to high magnetic fields in the protection device of this invention, a high reliability can be maintained. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Simultaneous pre-concentration and separation on simple paper-based analytical device for protein analysis.

    Niu, Ji-Cheng; Zhou, Ting; Niu, Li-Li; Xie, Zhen-Sheng; Fang, Fang; Yang, Fu-Quan; Wu, Zhi-Yong

    2018-02-01

    In this work, fast isoelectric focusing (IEF) was successfully implemented on an open paper fluidic channel for simultaneous concentration and separation of proteins from complex matrix. With this simple device, IEF can be finished in 10 min with a resolution of 0.03 pH units and concentration factor of 10, as estimated by color model proteins by smartphone-based colorimetric detection. Fast detection of albumin from human serum and glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c) from blood cell was demonstrated. In addition, off-line identification of the model proteins from the IEF fractions with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was also shown. This PAD IEF is potentially useful either for point of care test (POCT) or biomarker analysis as a cost-effective sample pretreatment method.

  12. Cardiac supporting device using artificial rubber muscle: preliminary study to active dynamic cardiomyoplasty.

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Goto, Takeshi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic cardiomyoplasty is a surgical treatment that utilizes the patient's skeletal muscle to support circulation. To overcome the limitations of autologous skeletal muscles in dynamic cardiomyoplasty, we studied the use of a wrapped-type cardiac supporting device using pneumatic muscles. Four straight rubber muscles (Fluidic Muscle, FESTO, Esslingen, Germany) were used and connected to pressure sensors, solenoid valves, a controller and an air compressor. The driving force was compressed air. A proportional-integral-derivative system was employed to control the device movement. An overflow-type mock circulation system was used to analyze the power and the controllability of this new device. The device worked powerfully with pumped flow against afterload of 88 mmHg, and the beating rate and contraction/dilatation time were properly controlled using simple software. Maximum pressure inside the ventricle and maximum output were 187 mmHg and 546.5 ml/min, respectively, in the setting of 50 beats per minute, a contraction/dilatation ratio of 1:2, a preload of 18 mmHg, and an afterload of 88 mmHg. By changing proportional gain, contraction speed could be modulated. This study showed the efficacy and feasibility of a pneumatic muscle for use in a cardiac supporting device.

  13. Numerical flow simulation methods and additive manufacturing methods for the development of a flow optimised design of a novel point-of-care diagnostic device

    Dethloff Manuel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available For the development of a novel, user-friendly and low cost point-of-care diagnostic device for the detection of disease specific biomarker a flow optimised design of the test system has to be investigated. The resulting test system is characterised by a reduced execution period, a reduction of execution steps and an integrated waste management. Based on previous results, the current study focused on the design implementation of the fluidic requirements, e. g. tightness, inside the test device. With the help of fluid flow simulations (CFD – computational fluid dynamics the flow behaviour inside the test device was analysed for different designs and arrangements. Prototypes generated from additive manufacturing technologies (PolyJet modeling are used for validating the simulation results and further experimental tests.

  14. Co-integration of optical and micro-fluidic approaches on glass for chemical analysis in harsh environment

    Jardinier, E.

    2013-01-01

    The current will of reducing environment and human hazards has led the scientists to imagine new solutions for nuclear waste reprocessing. Miniaturized online chemical analysis of industrial processes has in particular an important role to play to reduce effluent volumes, response times and costs. In this context, we present the design, fabrication and characterization of an integrated spectrophotometric sensor on glass for chemical analysis of radioactive cations. The device is called a - nano-channel waveguide - and is fabricated by reactive ion etching and ion exchange on glass. It is made of two borosilicate glass wafers bonded together. The first one contains a strip core and the second one a (100 ±10) nm deep nano-channel and a slab core. It allows the propagation of a hybrid mode, optimizing the fluid/guide wave interaction on a large wavelength range. Spectrometric measurements of a neodymium nitrate in nitric acid (pH 2) followed by statistical treatment have led to a limit of detection in terms of absorption coefficient of (3.7 ± 0.9) * 10 -3 cm -1 for a device length of (3.70 ± 0.05) cm and fluid volume as low as (7 ± 3) nL. A structure allowing to increase the interaction length and therefore further decrease the detection limit has been proposed as an outlook of this work, and a preliminary study for use in a nuclear environment has been performed. (author) [fr

  15. Medical Device Safety

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They ... may need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep ...

  16. Optimized anion exchange column isolation of zirconium-89 (89Zr) from yttrium cyclotron target: Method development and implementation on an automated fluidic platform.

    O'Hara, Matthew J; Murray, Nathaniel J; Carter, Jennifer C; Morrison, Samuel S

    2018-04-13

    Zirconium-89 ( 89 Zr), produced by the (p, n) reaction from naturally monoisotopic yttrium ( nat Y), is a promising positron emitting isotope for immunoPET imaging. Its long half-life of 78.4 h is sufficient for evaluating slow physiological processes. A prototype automated fluidic system, coupled to on-line and in-line detectors, has been constructed to facilitate development of new 89 Zr purification methodologies. The highly reproducible reagent delivery platform and near-real time monitoring of column effluents allows for efficient method optimization. The separation of Zr from dissolved Y metal targets was evaluated using several anion exchange resins. Each resin was evaluated against its ability to quantitatively capture Zr from a load solution high in dissolved Y. The most appropriate anion exchange resin for this application was identified, and the separation method was optimized. The method is capable of a high Y decontamination factor (>10 5 ) and has been shown to remove Fe, an abundant contaminant in Y foils, from the 89 Zr elution fraction. Finally, the method was evaluated using cyclotron bombarded Y foil targets; the method was shown to achieve >95% recovery of the 89 Zr present in the foils. The anion exchange column method described here is intended to be the first 89 Zr isolation stage in a dual-column purification process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Implantable electronic medical devices

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  18. Liquid as template for next generation micro devices

    Charmet, Jerome; Haquette, Henri; Laux, Edith; Keppner, Herbert; Gorodyska, Ganna; Textor, Marcus; Durante, Guido Spinola; Portuondo-Campa, Erwin; Knapp, Helmut; Bitterli, Roland; Noell, Wilfried

    2009-01-01

    Liquids have fascinated generations of scientists and engineers. Since ancient Greece, the perfect natural shape of liquids has been used to create optical systems. Nowadays, the natural shape of liquid is used in the fabrication of microlens arrays that rely on the melting of glass or photoresist to generate high quality lenses. However shrinkage normally associated to the liquid to solid phase transition will affect the initial shape and quality of the liquid structure. In this contribution, a novel fabrication technique that enables the encapsulation and replication of liquid templates without affecting their natural shape is presented. The SOLID (SOlid on LIquid Deposition) process allows for a transparent solid film to be deposited and grown onto a liquid template (droplet, film, line) in a way that the liquid shapes the overgrowing solid layer. The resulting configuration of the SOLID devices is chemically and mechanically stable and is the base of a huge variety of new micro-nano systems in the field of microfluidics, biomedical devices and micro-optics among others. The SOLID process enables in a one step process the encapsulation of liquid microlenses, fluidics channels, drug reservoir or any naturally driven liquid structure. The phenomenon and solid-liquid interface resulting from the SOLID process is new and still unexploited. The solid layer used for the SOLID process chosen in this paper is poly-para-xylylene called Parylene, a transparent biocompatible polymer with excellent mechanical and chemical properties. Moreover, as the solid layer is growing over a liquid template, atomically smooth surfaces channels can be obtained. The polymerization of Parylene does not exert stress and does not change the shape of the liquid; this latter aspect is particularly interesting for manufacturing naturally driven liquid structures. In this paper the authors explore the limits of this new method by testing different designs of SOLID encapsulated structures and

  19. Screen printed paper-based diagnostic devices with polymeric inks.

    Sun, Ju-Yen; Cheng, Chao-Min; Liao, Ying-Chih

    2015-01-01

    A simple and low-cost fabrication method for paper-based diagnostic devices (PBDDs) is described in this study. Street-available polymer solutions were screen printed onto filter papers to create hydrophobic patterns for fluidic channels. In order to obtain fully functional hydrophobic patterns for fluids, the original polymer solutions were diluted with butyl acetate to yield a suitable viscosity range between 30-200 cP for complete patterning on paper. Typical pH and glucose tests with color indicators were performed on the screen printed PBDDs. Images of the PBDDs were analyzed by computers to obtain calibration curves for pH between 2 and 12 and glucose concentration ranging from 10-1000 mmol dm(-3). Detection of formaldehyde in acetone was also carried out to show the possibility of using this PBBD for analytical detection with organic solvents. An exemplar PBDD with simultaneous pH and glucose detection was also used to demonstrate the feasibility of applying this technique for realistic diagnostic applications.

  20. Biogrid--a microfluidic device for large-scale enzyme-free dissociation of stem cell aggregates.

    Wallman, Lars; Åkesson, Elisabet; Ceric, Dario; Andersson, Per Henrik; Day, Kelly; Hovatta, Outi; Falci, Scott; Laurell, Thomas; Sundström, Erik

    2011-10-07

    Culturing stem cells as free-floating aggregates in suspension facilitates large-scale production of cells in closed systems, for clinical use. To comply with GMP standards, the use of substances such as proteolytic enzymes should be avoided. Instead of enzymatic dissociation, the growing cell aggregates may be mechanically cut at passage, but available methods are not compatible with large-scale cell production and hence translation into the clinic becomes a severe bottle-neck. We have developed the Biogrid device, which consists of an array of micrometerscale knife edges, micro-fabricated in silicon, and a manifold in which the microgrid is placed across the central fluid channel. By connecting one side of the Biogrid to a syringe or a pump and the other side to the cell culture, the culture medium with suspended cell aggregates can be aspirated, forcing the aggregates through the microgrid, and ejected back to the cell culture container. Large aggregates are thereby dissociated into smaller fragments while small aggregates pass through the microgrid unaffected. As proof-of-concept, we demonstrate that the Biogrid device can be successfully used for repeated passage of human neural stem/progenitor cells cultured as so-called neurospheres, as well as for passage of suspension cultures of human embryonic stem cells. We also show that human neural stem/progenitor cells tolerate transient pressure changes far exceeding those that will occur in a fluidic system incorporating the Biogrid microgrids. Thus, by using the Biogrid device it is possible to mechanically passage large quantities of cells in suspension cultures in closed fluidic systems, without the use of proteolytic enzymes.

  1. Development of a real-world direct interface for integrated DNA extraction and amplification in a microfluidic device.

    Shaw, Kirsty J; Joyce, Domino A; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenway, Gillian M; Greenman, John; Haswell, Stephen J

    2011-02-07

    Integrated DNA extraction and amplification have been carried out in a microfluidic device using electro-osmotic pumping (EOP) for fluidic control. All the necessary reagents for performing both DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification were pre-loaded into the microfluidic device following encapsulation in agarose gel. Buccal cells were collected using OmniSwabs [Whatman™, UK] and manually added to a chaotropic binding/lysis solution pre-loaded into the microfluidic device. The released DNA was then adsorbed onto a silica monolith contained within the DNA extraction chamber and the microfluidic device sealed using polymer electrodes. The washing and elution steps for DNA extraction were carried out using EOP, resulting in transfer of the eluted DNA into the PCR chamber. Thermal cycling, achieved using a Peltier element, resulted in amplification of the Amelogenin locus as confirmed using conventional capillary gel electrophoresis. It was demonstrated that the PCR reagents could be stored in the microfluidic device for at least 8 weeks at 4 °C with no significant loss of activity. Such methodology lends itself to the production of 'ready-to-use' microfluidic devices containing all the necessary reagents for sample processing, with many obvious applications in forensics and clinical medicine.

  2. Carbon nanotube-based coatings on titanium

    Administrator

    mon method is the deposition of bioactive ceramic mate- rials on the metal ... tion of nanoparticle layer, including carbon nanoparti- ... Coatings made of CNTs provide implants with .... reaches composite of CNT built into titanium oxide formed.

  3. A carbon nanotube-based pressure sensor

    Karimov, Kh S; Saleem, M; Khan, Adam; Qasuria, T A; Mateen, A; Karieva, Z M

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based Al/CNT/Al pressure sensor was designed, fabricated and investigated. The sensor was fabricated by depositing CNTs on an adhesive elastic polymer tape and placing this in an elastic casing. The diameter of multiwalled nanotubes varied between 10 and 30 nm. The nominal thickness of the CNT layers in the sensors was in the range ∼300-430 μm. The inter-electrode distance (length) and the width of the surface-type sensors were in the ranges 4-6 and 3-4 mm, respectively. The dc resistance of the sensors decreased 3-4 times as the pressure was increased up to 17 kN m -2 . The resistance-pressure relationships were simulated.

  4. Carbon Nanotube-Based Chemical Sensors.

    Meyyappan, M

    2016-04-27

    The need to sense gases and vapors arises in numerous scenarios in industrial, environmental, security and medical applications. Traditionally, this activity has utilized bulky instruments to obtain both qualitative and quantitative information on the constituents of the gas mixture. It is ideal to use sensors for this purpose since they are smaller in size and less expensive; however, their performance in the field must match that of established analytical instruments in order to gain acceptance. In this regard, nanomaterials as sensing media offer advantages in sensitivity, preparation of chip-based sensors and construction of electronic nose for selective detection of analytes of interest. This article provides a review of the use of carbon nanotubes in gas and vapor sensing. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Chemical Gas Sensor

    Kaul, Arunpama B.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional thermal conductivity gauges (e.g. Pirani gauges) lend themselves to applications such as leak detectors, or in gas chromatographs for identifying various gas species. However, these conventional gauges are physically large, operate at high power, and have a slow response time. A single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT)-based chemical sensing gauge relies on differences in thermal conductance of the respective gases surrounding the CNT as it is voltage-biased, as a means for chemical identification. Such a sensor provides benefits of significantly reduced size and compactness, fast response time, low-power operation, and inexpensive manufacturing since it can be batch-fabricated using Si integrated-circuit (IC) process technology.

  6. Pristine carbon nanotubes based resistive temperature sensor

    Alam, Md Bayazeed; Saini, Sudhir Kumar; Sharma, Daya Shankar; Agarwal, Pankaj B.

    2016-01-01

    A good sensor must be highly sensitive, faster in response, of low cost cum easily producible, and highly reliable. Incorporation of nano-dimensional particles/ wires makes conventional sensors more effective in terms of fulfilling the above requirements. For example, Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are promising sensing element because of its large aspect ratio, unique electronic and thermal properties. In addition to their use for widely reported chemical sensing, it has also been explored for temperature sensing. This paper presents the fabrication of CNTs based temperature sensor, prepared on silicon substrate using low cost spray coating method, which is reliable and reproducible method to prepare uniform CNTs thin films on any substrate. Besides this, simple and inexpensive method of preparation of dispersion of single walled CNTs (SWNTs) in 1,2 dichlorobenzene by using probe type ultrasonicator for debundling the CNTs for improving sensor response were used. The electrical contacts over the dispersed SWNTs were taken using silver paste electrodes. Fabricated sensors clearly show immediate change in resistance as a response to change in temperature of SWNTs. The measured sensitivity (change in resistance with temperature) of the sensor was found ∼ 0.29%/°C in the 25°C to 60°C temperature range.

  7. Pristine carbon nanotubes based resistive temperature sensor

    Alam, Md Bayazeed, E-mail: bayazeed786@gmail.com [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI, Pilani, India) (India); Jamia Millia Islamia (New Delhi, India) (India); Saini, Sudhir Kumar, E-mail: sudhirsaini1310@gmail.com [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI, Pilani, India) (India); Sharma, Daya Shankar, E-mail: dssharmanit15@gmail.com [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI, Pilani, India) (India); Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology (MANIT, Bhopal, India) (India); Agarwal, Pankaj B., E-mail: agarwalbpankj@gmail.com [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI, Pilani, India) (India); Academy for Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR, Delhi, India) (India)

    2016-04-13

    A good sensor must be highly sensitive, faster in response, of low cost cum easily producible, and highly reliable. Incorporation of nano-dimensional particles/ wires makes conventional sensors more effective in terms of fulfilling the above requirements. For example, Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are promising sensing element because of its large aspect ratio, unique electronic and thermal properties. In addition to their use for widely reported chemical sensing, it has also been explored for temperature sensing. This paper presents the fabrication of CNTs based temperature sensor, prepared on silicon substrate using low cost spray coating method, which is reliable and reproducible method to prepare uniform CNTs thin films on any substrate. Besides this, simple and inexpensive method of preparation of dispersion of single walled CNTs (SWNTs) in 1,2 dichlorobenzene by using probe type ultrasonicator for debundling the CNTs for improving sensor response were used. The electrical contacts over the dispersed SWNTs were taken using silver paste electrodes. Fabricated sensors clearly show immediate change in resistance as a response to change in temperature of SWNTs. The measured sensitivity (change in resistance with temperature) of the sensor was found ∼ 0.29%/°C in the 25°C to 60°C temperature range.

  8. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-07-08

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube diameter and axial strain. The nanotubes are found to be semiconductors with a sensitive indirect band gap that allows flexible tuning.

  9. Carbon nanotube-based ethanol sensors

    Brahim, Sean; Colbern, Steve; Gump, Robert; Moser, Alex; Grigorian, Leonid

    2009-01-01

    Sensors containing metal-carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid materials as the active sensing layer were demonstrated for ethanol vapor detection at room temperature. The metal-CNT hybrid materials were synthesized by infiltrating single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with the transition metals Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Pd or Pt. Each sensor was prepared by drop-casting dilute dispersions of a metal-CNT hybrid onto quartz substrate electrodes and the impedimetric responses to varying ethanol concentration were recorded. Upon exposure to ethanol vapor, the ac impedance (Z') of the sensors was found to decrease to different extents. The sensor containing pristine CNT material was virtually non-responsive at low ethanol concentrations (<50 ppm). In contrast, all metal-CNT hybrid sensors showed extremely high sensitivity to trace ethanol levels with 100-fold or more gains in sensitivity relative to the starting SWNT sensor. All hybrid sensors, with the exception of Ni filled CNT, exhibited significantly larger sensor responses to ethanol vapor up to 250 ppm compared to the starting SWNT sensor.

  10. Carbon nanotube-based black coatings

    Lehman, J.; Yung, C.; Tomlin, N.; Conklin, D.; Stephens, M.

    2018-03-01

    Coatings comprising carbon nanotubes are very black, that is, characterized by uniformly low reflectance over a broad range of wavelengths from the visible to far infrared. Arguably, there is no other material that is comparable. This is attributable to the intrinsic properties of graphitic material as well as the morphology (density, thickness, disorder, and tube size). We briefly describe a history of other coatings such as nickel phosphorous, gold black, and carbon-based paints and the comparable structural morphology that we associate with very black coatings. The need for black coatings is persistent for a variety of applications ranging from baffles and traps to blackbodies and thermal detectors. Applications for space-based instruments are of interest and we present a review of space qualification and the results of outgassing measurements. Questions of nanoparticle safety depend on the nanotube size and aspect ratio as well as the nature and route of exposure. We describe the growth of carbon nanotube forests along with the catalyst requirements and temperature limitations. We also describe coatings derived from carbon nanotubes and applied like paint. Building the measurement apparatus and determining the optical properties of something having negligible reflectance are challenging and we summarize the methods and means for such measurements. There exists information in the literature for effective media approximations to model the dielectric function of vertically aligned arrays. We summarize this along with the refractive index of graphite from the literature that is necessary for modeling the optical properties. In our experience, the scientific questions can be overshadowed by practical matters, so we provide an appendix of recipes for making as-grown and sprayed coatings along with an example of reflectance measurements.

  11. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    Montes Muñ oz, Enrique; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube

  12. Hip supporting device

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for limiting movements in one or more anatomical joints, such as a device for limiting movement in the human hip joint after hip replacement surgery. This is provided by a device for limiting movement in the human hip joint, said device comprising: at least...

  13. Power source device for thermonuclear device

    Ozaki, Akira.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a small sized and economical power source device for a thermonuclear device. That is, the device comprises a conversion device having a rated power determined by a power required during a plasma current excitation period and a conversion device having a rated power determined by a power required during a plasma current maintaining period, connected in series to each other. Then, for the former conversion device, power is supplied from an electric power generator and, for the latter, power is supplied from a power system. With such a constitution, during the plasma electric current maintaining period for substantially continuous operation, it is possible to conduct bypassing paired operation for the former conversion device while the electric power generator is put under no load. Further, since a short period rated power may be suffice for the former conversion device and the electric power generator having the great rated power required for the plasma electric current excitation period, they can be reduced in the size and made economical. On the other hand, since the power required for the plasma current maintaining period is relatively small, the capacity of the continuous rated conversion device may be small, and the power can be received from the power system. (I.S.)

  14. Modeling electro-magneto-hydrodynamic thermo-fluidic transport of biofluids with new trend of fractional derivative without singular kernel

    Abdulhameed, M.; Vieru, D.; Roslan, R.

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the electro-magneto-hydrodynamic flow of the non-Newtonian behavior of biofluids, with heat transfer, through a cylindrical microchannel. The fluid is acted by an arbitrary time-dependent pressure gradient, an external electric field and an external magnetic field. The governing equations are considered as fractional partial differential equations based on the Caputo-Fabrizio time-fractional derivatives without singular kernel. The usefulness of fractional calculus to study fluid flows or heat and mass transfer phenomena was proven. Several experimental measurements led to conclusion that, in such problems, the models described by fractional differential equations are more suitable. The most common time-fractional derivative used in Continuum Mechanics is Caputo derivative. However, two disadvantages appear when this derivative is used. First, the definition kernel is a singular function and, secondly, the analytical expressions of the problem solutions are expressed by generalized functions (Mittag-Leffler, Lorenzo-Hartley, Robotnov, etc.) which, generally, are not adequate to numerical calculations. The new time-fractional derivative Caputo-Fabrizio, without singular kernel, is more suitable to solve various theoretical and practical problems which involve fractional differential equations. Using the Caputo-Fabrizio derivative, calculations are simpler and, the obtained solutions are expressed by elementary functions. Analytical solutions of the biofluid velocity and thermal transport are obtained by means of the Laplace and finite Hankel transforms. The influence of the fractional parameter, Eckert number and Joule heating parameter on the biofluid velocity and thermal transport are numerically analyzed and graphic presented. This fact can be an important in Biochip technology, thus making it possible to use this analysis technique extremely effective to control bioliquid samples of nanovolumes in microfluidic devices used for biological

  15. Optimized anion exchange column isolation of zirconium-89 ( 89 Zr) from yttrium cyclotron target: Method development and implementation on an automated fluidic platform

    O’Hara, Matthew J.; Murray, Nathaniel J.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Morrison, Samuel S.

    2018-04-01

    Zirconium-89 (89Zr), produced by the (p,n) reaction from naturally monoisotopic yttrium (natY), is a promising positron emitting isotope for immunoPET imaging. Its long half-life of 78.4 h is sufficient for evaluating slow physiological processes. A prototype automated fluidic system, coupled to on-line and in-line detectors, has been constructed to facilitate development of new 89Zr purification methodologies. The highly reproducible reagent delivery platform and near-real time monitoring of column effluents allows for efficient method optimization. The separation of Zr from dissolved Y metal targets was evaluated using several anion exchange resins. Each resin was evaluated against its ability to quantitatively capture Zr from a load solution that is high in dissolved Y. The most appropriate anion exchange resin for this application was identified, and the separation method was optimized. The method is capable of a high Y decontamination factor (>105) and has been shown to separate Fe, an abundant contaminant in Y foils, from the 89Zr elution fraction. Finally, the performance of the method was evaluated using cyclotron bombarded Y foil targets. The separation method was shown to achieve >95% recovery of the 89Zr present in the foils. The 89Zr eluent, however, was in a chemical matrix not immediately conducive to labeling onto proteins. The main intent of this study was to develop a tandem column 89Zr purification process, wherein the anion exchange column method described here is the first separation in a dual-column purification process.

  16. Impact of small-scale saline tracer heterogeneity on electrical resistivity monitoring in fully and partially saturated porous media: Insights from geoelectrical milli-fluidic experiments

    Jougnot, Damien; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín; Legendre, Raphaël; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Méheust, Yves; Linde, Niklas

    2018-03-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a geophysical method widely used to remotely monitor the migration of electrically-conductive tracers and contaminant plumes in the subsurface. Interpretations of time-lapse ERT inversion results are generally based on the assumption of a homogeneous solute concentration below the resolution limits of the tomogram depicting inferred electrical conductivity variations. We suggest that ignoring small-scale solute concentration variability (i.e., at the sub-resolution scale) is a major reason for the often-observed apparent loss of solute mass in ERT tracer studies. To demonstrate this, we developed a geoelectrical milli-fluidic setup where the bulk electric conductivity of a 2D analogous porous medium, consisting of cylindrical grains positioned randomly inside a Hele-Shaw cell, is monitored continuously in time while saline tracer tests are performed through the medium under fully and partially saturated conditions. High resolution images of the porous medium are recorded with a camera at regular time intervals, and provide both the spatial distribution of the fluid phases (aqueous solution and air), and the saline solute concentration field (where the solute consists of a mixture of salt and fluorescein, the latter being used as a proxy for the salt concentration). Effective bulk electrical conductivities computed numerically from the measured solute concentration field and the spatial distributions of fluid phases agree well with the measured bulk conductivities. We find that the effective bulk electrical conductivity is highly influenced by the connectivity of high electrical conductivity regions. The spatial distribution of air, saline tracer fingering, and mixing phenomena drive temporal changes in the effective bulk electrical conductivity by creating preferential paths or barriers for electrical current at the pore-scale. The resulting heterogeneities in the solute concentrations lead to strong anisotropy

  17. On the synthesis of a bio-inspired dual-cellular fluidic flexible matrix composite adaptive structure based on a non-dimensional dynamics model

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K W

    2013-01-01

    A recent study investigated the dynamic characteristics of an adaptive structure concept featuring dual fluidic flexible matrix composite (F 2 MC) cells inspired by the configuration of plant cells and cell walls. This novel bio-inspired system consists of two F 2 MC cells with different fiber angles connected through internal fluid circuits. It was discovered that the dual F 2 MC cellular structure can be characterized as a two degree of freedom damped mass–spring oscillator, and can be utilized as a vibration absorber or an enhanced actuator under different operation conditions. These results demonstrated that the concept is promising and further investigations are needed to develop methodologies for synthesizing future multi-cellular F 2 MC structural systems. While interesting, the previous study focused on specific case studies and analysis. That is, the outcome did not provide insight that could be generalized, or tools for synthesizing a multiple F 2 MC cellular structure. This paper attempts to address this important issue by developing a non-dimensional dynamic model, which reveals good physical insights as well as identifying crucial constitutive parameters for F 2 MC cellular design. Working with these parameters, rather than physical variables, can greatly simplify the mathematics involved in the study. A synthesis tool is then developed for the dual-cellular structure, and it is found that for each set of achievable target poles and zero, there exist multiple F 2 MC cellular designs, forming a design space. The presented physical insights and synthesis tool for the dual-cellular structure will be the building blocks for future investigation on cellular structures with a larger number of cells. (paper)

  18. Fabrication and Characterization of All-Polystyrene Microfluidic Devices with Integrated Electrodes and Tubing.

    Pentecost, Amber M; Martin, R Scott

    2015-01-01

    A new method of fabricating all-polystyrene devices with integrated electrodes and fluidic tubing is described. As opposed to expensive polystyrene (PS) fabrication techniques that use hot embossing and bonding with a heated lab press, this approach involves solvent-based etching of channels and lamination-based bonding of a PS cover, all of which do not need to occur in a clean room. PS has been studied as an alternative microchip substrate to PDMS, as it is more hydrophilic, biologically compatible in terms of cell adhesion, and less prone to absorption of hydrophobic molecules. The etching/lamination-based method described here results in a variety of all-PS devices, with or without electrodes and tubing. To characterize the devices, micrographs of etched channels (straight and intersected channels) were taken using confocal and scanning electron microscopy. Microchip-based electrophoresis with repetitive injections of fluorescein was conducted using a three-sided PS (etched pinched, twin-tee channel) and one-sided PDMS device. Microchip-based flow injection analysis, with dopamine and NO as analytes, was used to characterize the performance of all-PS devices with embedded tubing and electrodes. Limits of detection for dopamine and NO were 130 nM and 1.8 μM, respectively. Cell immobilization studies were also conducted to assess all-PS devices for cellular analysis. This paper demonstrates that these easy to fabricate devices can be attractive alternative to other PS fabrication methods for a wide variety of analytical and cell culture applications.

  19. A Microfluidic Device with an Integrated Waveguide Beam Splitter for Velocity Measurements of Flowing Particles by Fourier Transformation

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kwok, Y.C.; Eijkel, J.C.T.

    2003-01-01

    A microfabricated capillary electrophoresis device for velocity measurements of flowing particles is presented. It consists of a 1 x 128 planar waveguide beam splitter monolithically integrated with an electrically insulated fluidic channel network for fluorescence excitation at multiple points...... optics. The integrated planar waveguide beam splitter was, furthermore, permanently connected to the light source by a glued-on optical fiber, to achieve a robust and alignment-free operation of the system. The velocity was measured using a Fourier transformation with a Shah function, since the response...... of the fight array was designed to approximate a square profile. Deviations from this response were observed as a result of the multimode nature of the integrated waveguides....

  20. Inexpensive, rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices using overhead transparencies and a laser print, cut and laminate fabrication method.

    Thompson, Brandon L; Ouyang, Yiwen; Duarte, Gabriela R M; Carrilho, Emanuel; Krauss, Shannon T; Landers, James P

    2015-06-01

    We describe a technique for fabricating microfluidic devices with complex multilayer architectures using a laser printer, a CO2 laser cutter, an office laminator and common overhead transparencies as a printable substrate via a laser print, cut and laminate (PCL) methodology. The printer toner serves three functions: (i) it defines the microfluidic architecture, which is printed on the overhead transparencies; (ii) it acts as the adhesive agent for the bonding of multiple transparency layers; and (iii) it provides, in its unmodified state, printable, hydrophobic 'valves' for fluidic flow control. By using common graphics software, e.g., CorelDRAW or AutoCAD, the protocol produces microfluidic devices with a design-to-device time of ∼40 min. Devices of any shape can be generated for an array of multistep assays, with colorimetric detection of molecular species ranging from small molecules to proteins. Channels with varying depths can be formed using multiple transparency layers in which a CO2 laser is used to remove the polyester from the channel sections of the internal layers. The simplicity of the protocol, availability of the equipment and substrate and cost-effective nature of the process make microfluidic devices available to those who might benefit most from expedited, microscale chemistry.

  1. A microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices for Raman spectroscopy analysis on trapped single living cells

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    In this work we developed a microfluidic device integrating nanoplasmonic devices combined with fluidic trapping regions. The microfuidic traps allow to capture single cells in areas where plasmonic sensors are placed. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman analysis on the cell membranes. Moreover, by changing direction of the flux it is possible to change the orientation of the cell in the trap, so that it is possible to analyze different points of the membrane of the same cell. We shows an innovative procedure to fabricate and assembly the microfluidic device which combine photolithography, focused ion beam machining, and hybrid bonding between a polymer substrate and lid of Calcium fluoride. This procedure is compatible with the fabrication of the plasmonic sensors in close proximity of the microfluidic traps. Moreover, the use of Calcium fluoride as lid allows full compatibility with Raman measurements producing negligible Raman background signal and avoids Raman artifacts. Finally, we performed Raman analysis on cells to monitor their oxidative stress under particular non physiological conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices for Raman spectroscopy analysis on trapped single living cells

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Catalano, Rossella; Francardi, Marco; Rondanina, Eliana; Pardeo, Francesca; De Angelis, Francesco De; Malara, Natalia Maria; Candeloro, Patrizio; Morrone, Giovanni; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we developed a microfluidic device integrating nanoplasmonic devices combined with fluidic trapping regions. The microfuidic traps allow to capture single cells in areas where plasmonic sensors are placed. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman analysis on the cell membranes. Moreover, by changing direction of the flux it is possible to change the orientation of the cell in the trap, so that it is possible to analyze different points of the membrane of the same cell. We shows an innovative procedure to fabricate and assembly the microfluidic device which combine photolithography, focused ion beam machining, and hybrid bonding between a polymer substrate and lid of Calcium fluoride. This procedure is compatible with the fabrication of the plasmonic sensors in close proximity of the microfluidic traps. Moreover, the use of Calcium fluoride as lid allows full compatibility with Raman measurements producing negligible Raman background signal and avoids Raman artifacts. Finally, we performed Raman analysis on cells to monitor their oxidative stress under particular non physiological conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Implantable Medical Devices

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Implantable Medical Devices Updated:Sep 16,2016 For Rhythm Control ... a Heart Attack Introduction Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack ...

  4. Devices for hearing loss

    ... the sounds you want to hear. Assistive listening devices bring certain sounds directly to your ears. This can ... a small room or on a stage. Other devices can bring the sound from your TV, radio, or music ...

  5. Novel Magnetic Devices

    Schuller, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    ...: ballistic magnetoresistance, magnetic field proximity effect and spin drag. These three phenomena would then be exploited for the design of novel device architectures and to investigate the physical principles behind these devices...

  6. Smart devices are different

    Stisen, Allan; Blunck, Henrik; Bhattacharya, Sourav

    2015-01-01

    research results. This is due to variations in training and test device hardware and their operating system characteristics among others. In this paper, we systematically investigate sensor-, device- and workload-specific heterogeneities using 36 smartphones and smartwatches, consisting of 13 different...... device models from four manufacturers. Furthermore, we conduct experiments with nine users and investigate popular feature representation and classification techniques in HAR research. Our results indicate that on-device sensor and sensor handling heterogeneities impair HAR performances significantly...

  7. Heterostructures and quantum devices

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1994-01-01

    Heterostructure and quantum-mechanical devices promise significant improvement in the performance of electronic and optoelectronic integrated circuits (ICs). Though these devices are the subject of a vigorous research effort, the current literature is often either highly technical or narrowly focused. This book presents heterostructure and quantum devices to the nonspecialist, especially electrical engineers working with high-performance semiconductor devices. It focuses on a broad base of technical applications using semiconductor physics theory to develop the next generation of electrical en

  8. Rooting an Android Device

    2015-09-01

    1. Overview The purpose of this document is to demonstrate how to gain administrative privileges on an Android device. The term “rooting” is...is applicable for the Samsung Galaxy S3 as well as many other Android devices, but there are several steps involved in rooting an Android device (as...root access has been granted. 4. Conclusion This document serves as a tutorial on how to grant user administrative privilege to an Android device by

  9. Photovoltaic device and method

    Cleereman, Robert J; Lesniak, Michael J; Keenihan, James R; Langmaid, Joe A; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K; Boven, Michelle L

    2015-01-27

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  10. Radioactive waste processing device

    Inaguma, Masahiko; Takahara, Nobuaki; Hara, Satomi.

    1996-01-01

    In a processing device for filtering laundry liquid wastes and shower drains incorporated with radioactive materials, a fiber filtration device is disposed and an activated carbon filtration device is also disposed subsequent to the fiber filtration device. In addition, a centrifugal dewatering device is disposed for dewatering spent granular activated carbon in the activated carbon filtration device, and a minute filtering device is disposed for filtering the separated dewatering liquid. Filtrates filtered by the minute filtration device are recovered in a collecting tank. Namely, at first, suspended solid materials in laundry liquid wastes and shower drains are captured, and then, ingredients concerning COD are adsorbed in the activated carbon filtration device. The radioactive liquid wastes of spent granular activated carbon in the activated carbon filtration device are reduced by dewatering them by the centrifugal dewatering device, and then the granular activated carbon is subjected to an additional processing. Further, it is separated by filtration using the minute filtration device and removed as cakes. Since the filtrates are recovered to the collecting tank and filtered again, the water quality of the drains is not degraded. (N.H.)

  11. Inspection device in liquid

    Nagaoka, Etsuo.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides an inspection device in PWR reactor core in which inspection operations are made efficient by stabilizing a posture of the device in front-to-back, vertical and left-to-right directions by a simple structure. When the device conducts inspection while running in liquid, the front and the back directions of the device main body are inspected using a visual device while changing the posture by operating a front-to-back direction propulsion device and a right-to-left direction propulsion device, and a vertical direction propulsion device against to rolling, pitching and yawing of the device main body. In this case, a spherical magnet moves freely in the gravitational direction in a vibration-damping fluid in a non-magnetic spherical shell following the change of the posture of the device main body, in which the vibrations due to the movement of the spherical magnet is settled by the vibration-damping fluid thereby stabilizing the posture of the device main body. At a typical inspection posture, the settling effect is enhanced by the attraction force between the spherical magnets in the spherical shell and each of magnetic force-attracted magnetic members disposed to the outer circumference of the shell, and the posture of the device main body can be confirmed in front-to-back, right-to-left and vertical directions by each of the posture confirming magnetic sensors. (N.H.)

  12. Containment and surveillance devices

    Campbell, J.W.; Johnson, C.S.; Stieff, L.R.

    The growing acceptance of containment and surveillance as a means to increase safeguards effectiveness has provided impetus to the development of improved surveillance and containment devices. Five recently developed devices are described. The devices include one photographic and two television surveillance systems and two high security seals that can be verified while installed

  13. Radiation emitting devices act

    1970-01-01

    This Act, entitled the Radiation Emitting Devices Act, is concerned with the sale and importation of radiation emitting devices. Laws relating to the sale, lease or import, labelling, advertising, packaging, safety standards and inspection of these devices are listed as well as penalties for any person who is convicted of breaking these laws

  14. Solar panel foundation device

    Hawley, W.W.

    1983-03-29

    A transportable solar panel foundation device which has a bottom member, at least one upstanding side member, and an essentially open top. The side members are angled to permit nesting of a plurality of the foundation devices, and reinforcement pads are carried by the foundation device to support legs for one or more solar panels.

  15. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  16. Ultrasensitive detection and quantification of E. coli O157:H7 using a giant magneto impedance sensor in an open-surface micro fluidic cavity covered with an antibody-modified gold surface

    Yang, Zhen; Liu, Yan; Lei, Chong; Sun, Xue-cheng; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method for ultrasensitive detection and quantification of the pathogen Escherichia coli (E. coli), type O157:H7. It is using a tortuous-shaped giant magneto impedance (GMI) sensor in combination with an open-surface micro fluidic system coated with a gold film for performing the sandwich immuno binding on its surface. Streptavidin-coated super magnetic Dynabeads were loaded with biotinylated polyclonal antibody to capture E. coli O157:H7. The E. coli-loaded Dynabeads are then injected into the microfluidics system where it comes into contact with the surface of gold nanofilm carrying the monoclonal antibody to form the immuno complex. As a result, the GMI ratio is strongly reduced at high frequencies if E. coli O157:H7 is present. The sensor has a linear response in the 50 to 500 cfu·mL"−"1 concentration range, and the detection limit is 50 cfu·mL"−"1 at a working frequency of 2.2 MHz. In our perception, this method provides a valuable tool for developing GMI-based micro fluidic sensors systems for ultrasensitive and quantitative analysis of pathogenic bacteria. The method may also be extended to other sensing applications by employing respective immuno reagents. (author)

  17. Radiation emitting devices regulations

    1970-01-01

    The Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations are the regulations referred to in the Radiation Emitting Devices Act and relate to the operation of devices. They include standards of design and construction, standards of functioning, warning symbol specifications in addition to information relating to the seizure and detention of machines failing to comply with the regulations. The radiation emitting devices consist of the following: television receivers, extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, microwave ovens, baggage inspection x-ray devices, demonstration--type gas discharge devices, photofluorographic x-ray equipment, laser scanners, demonstration lasers, low energy electron microscopes, high intensity mercury vapour discharge lamps, sunlamps, diagnostic x-ray equipment, ultrasound therapy devices, x-ray diffraction equipment, cabinet x-ray equipment and therapeutic x-ray equipment

  18. Improved sensitivity and limit-of-detection of lateral flow devices using spatial constrictions of the flow-path.

    Katis, Ioannis N; He, Peijun J W; Eason, Robert W; Sones, Collin L

    2018-05-03

    We report on the use of a laser-direct write (LDW) technique that allows the fabrication of lateral flow devices with enhanced sensitivity and limit of detection. This manufacturing technique comprises the dispensing of a liquid photopolymer at specific regions of a nitrocellulose membrane and its subsequent photopolymerisation to create impermeable walls inside the volume of the membrane. These polymerised structures are intentionally designed to create fluidic channels which are constricted over a specific length that spans the test zone within which the sample interacts with pre-deposited reagents. Experiments were conducted to show how these constrictions alter the fluid flow rate and the test zone area within the constricted channel geometries. The slower flow rate and smaller test zone area result in the increased sensitivity and lowered limit of detection for these devices. We have quantified these via the improved performance of a C-Reactive Protein (CRP) sandwich assay on our lateral flow devices with constricted flow paths which demonstrate an improvement in its sensitivity by 62x and in its limit of detection by 30x when compared to a standard lateral flow CRP device. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Automated microfluidic devices integrating solid-phase extraction, fluorescent labeling, and microchip electrophoresis for preterm birth biomarker analysis.

    Sahore, Vishal; Sonker, Mukul; Nielsen, Anna V; Knob, Radim; Kumar, Suresh; Woolley, Adam T

    2018-01-01

    We have developed multichannel integrated microfluidic devices for automated preconcentration, labeling, purification, and separation of preterm birth (PTB) biomarkers. We fabricated multilayer poly(dimethylsiloxane)-cyclic olefin copolymer (PDMS-COC) devices that perform solid-phase extraction (SPE) and microchip electrophoresis (μCE) for automated PTB biomarker analysis. The PDMS control layer had a peristaltic pump and pneumatic valves for flow control, while the PDMS fluidic layer had five input reservoirs connected to microchannels and a μCE system. The COC layers had a reversed-phase octyl methacrylate porous polymer monolith for SPE and fluorescent labeling of PTB biomarkers. We determined μCE conditions for two PTB biomarkers, ferritin (Fer) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). We used these integrated microfluidic devices to preconcentrate and purify off-chip-labeled Fer and CRF in an automated fashion. Finally, we performed a fully automated on-chip analysis of unlabeled PTB biomarkers, involving SPE, labeling, and μCE separation with 1 h total analysis time. These integrated systems have strong potential to be combined with upstream immunoaffinity extraction, offering a compact sample-to-answer biomarker analysis platform. Graphical abstract Pressure-actuated integrated microfluidic devices have been developed for automated solid-phase extraction, fluorescent labeling, and microchip electrophoresis of preterm birth biomarkers.

  20. Smart portable rehabilitation devices

    Leahey Matt

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. These devices induce quicker recovery and are more effective at restoring proper biomechanics and improving muscle function. However, their shortcoming is in their inability to be adjusted in real-time, which is the most ideal form of a device for rehabilitation. This introduces a second class of devices beyond passive orthotics. It is comprised of "active" or powered devices, and although more complicated in design, they are definitely the most versatile. An active or powered orthotic, usually employs some type of actuator(s. Methods In this paper we present several new advancements in the area of smart rehabilitation devices that have been developed by the Northeastern University Robotics and Mechatronics Laboratory. They are all compact, wearable and portable devices and boast re-programmable, real time computer controlled functions as the central theme behind their operation. The sensory information and computer control of the three described devices make for highly efficient and versatile systems that represent a whole new breed in wearable rehabilitation devices. Their applications range from active-assistive rehabilitation to resistance exercise and even have applications in gait training. The three devices described are: a transportable continuous passive motion elbow device, a wearable electro-rheological fluid based knee resistance device, and a wearable electrical stimulation and biofeedback knee device. Results Laboratory tests of the devices

  1. Smart portable rehabilitation devices.

    Mavroidis, Constantinos; Nikitczuk, Jason; Weinberg, Brian; Danaher, Gil; Jensen, Katherine; Pelletier, Philip; Prugnarola, Jennifer; Stuart, Ryan; Arango, Roberto; Leahey, Matt; Pavone, Robert; Provo, Andrew; Yasevac, Dan

    2005-07-12

    The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. These devices induce quicker recovery and are more effective at restoring proper biomechanics and improving muscle function. However, their shortcoming is in their inability to be adjusted in real-time, which is the most ideal form of a device for rehabilitation. This introduces a second class of devices beyond passive orthotics. It is comprised of "active" or powered devices, and although more complicated in design, they are definitely the most versatile. An active or powered orthotic, usually employs some type of actuator(s). In this paper we present several new advancements in the area of smart rehabilitation devices that have been developed by the Northeastern University Robotics and Mechatronics Laboratory. They are all compact, wearable and portable devices and boast re-programmable, real time computer controlled functions as the central theme behind their operation. The sensory information and computer control of the three described devices make for highly efficient and versatile systems that represent a whole new breed in wearable rehabilitation devices. Their applications range from active-assistive rehabilitation to resistance exercise and even have applications in gait training. The three devices described are: a transportable continuous passive motion elbow device, a wearable electro-rheological fluid based knee resistance device, and a wearable electrical stimulation and biofeedback knee device. Laboratory tests of the devices demonstrated that they were able to meet their design

  2. Fluid circulation control device

    Benard, Henri; Henocque, Jean.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontal fluid circulation control device, of the type having a pivoting flap. This device is intended for being fitted in the pipes of hydraulic installation, particularly in a bleed and venting system of a nuclear power station shifting radioactive or contaminated liquids. The characteristic of this device is the cut-out at the top of the flap to allow the air contained in the pipes to flow freely [fr

  3. Mobile Device Encryption Systems

    Teufl , Peter; Zefferer , Thomas; Stromberger , Christof

    2013-01-01

    Part 4: Software Security; International audience; The initially consumer oriented iOS and Android platforms, and the newly available Windows Phone 8 platform start to play an important role within business related areas. Within the business context, the devices are typically deployed via mobile device management (MDM) solutions, or within the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) context. In both scenarios, the security depends on many platform security functions, such as permission systems, manageme...

  4. Flow analysis for efficient design of wavy structured microchannel mixing devices

    Kanchan, Mithun; Maniyeri, Ranjith

    2018-04-01

    Microfluidics is a rapidly growing field of applied research which is strongly driven by demands of bio-technology and medical innovation. Lab-on-chip (LOC) is one such application which deals with integrating bio-laboratory on micro-channel based single fluidic chip. Since fluid flow in such devices is restricted to laminar regime, designing an efficient passive modulator to induce chaotic mixing for such diffusion based flow is a major challenge. In the present work two-dimensional numerical simulation of viscous incompressible flow is carried out using immersed boundary method (IBM) to obtain an efficient design for wavy structured micro-channel mixing devices. The continuity and Navier-Stokes equations governing the flow are solved by fractional step based finite volume method on a staggered Cartesian grid system. IBM uses Eulerian co-ordinates to describe fluid flow and Lagrangian co-ordinates to describe solid boundary. Dirac delta function is used to couple both these co-ordinate variables. A tether forcing term is used to impose the no-slip boundary condition on the wavy structure and fluid interface. Fluid flow analysis by varying Reynolds number is carried out for four wavy structure models and one straight line model. By analyzing fluid accumulation zones and flow velocities, it can be concluded that straight line structure performs better mixing for low Reynolds number and Model 2 for higher Reynolds number. Thus wavy structures can be incorporated in micro-channels to improve mixing efficiency.

  5. Sensitive paper-based analytical device for fast colorimetric detection of nitrite with smartphone.

    Zhang, Xiu-Xiu; Song, Yi-Zhen; Fang, Fang; Wu, Zhi-Yong

    2018-04-01

    On-site rapid monitoring of nitrite as an assessment indicator of the environment, food, and physiological systems has drawn extensive attention. Here, electrokinetic stacking (ES) was combined with colorimetric reaction on a paper-based device (PAD) to achieve colorless nitrite detection with smartphone. In this paper, nitrite was stacked on the paper fluidic channel as a narrow band by electrokinetic stacking. Then, Griess reagent was introduced to visualize the stacking band. Under optimal conditions, the sensitivity of nitrite was 160-fold increased within 5 min. A linear response in the range of 0.075 to 1.0 μg mL -1 (R 2  = 0.99) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 73 ng mL -1 (0.86 μM) were obtained. The LOD was 10 times lower than the reported PAD, and close to that achieved by a desktop spectrophotometer. The applicability was demonstrated by nitrite detection from saliva and water with good selectivity, adding 100 times more concentrated co-ions. High recovery (91.0~108.7%) and reasonable intra-day and inter-day reproducibility (RSD work shows that the sensitivity of colorless analyte detection-based colorimetric reaction can be effectively enhanced by integration of ES on a PAD. Graphical abstract Schematic of the experimental setups (left) and the corresponding images (right) of the actual portable device.

  6. Temperature indicating device

    Angus, J.P.; Salt, D.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature indicating device comprises a plurality of planar elements some undergoing a reversible change in appearance at a given temperature the remainder undergoing an irreversible change in appearance at a given temperature. The device is useful in indicating the temperature which an object has achieved as well as its actual temperature. The reversible change is produced by liquid crystal devices. The irreversible change is produced by an absorbent surface carrying substances e.g. waxes which melt at predetermined temperatures and are absorbed by the surface; alternatively paints may be used. The device is used for monitoring processes of encapsulation of radio active waste. (author)

  7. Ion trap device

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  8. Recoil transporter devices

    Madhavan, N.

    2005-01-01

    The study of sparsely produced nuclear reaction products in the direction of intense primary beam is a challenging task, the pursuit of which has given rise to the advent or several types of selective devices. These range from a simple parallel plate electrostatic deflector to state-of-the-art electromagnetic separators. There is no single device which can satisfy all the requirements of an ideal recoil transporter, simultaneously. An overview of such devices and their building blocks is presented, which may help in the proper choice of the device as per the experimental requirements. (author)

  9. Establishment Registration & Device Listing

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This searchable database contains establishments (engaged in the manufacture, preparation, propagation, compounding, assembly, or processing of medical devices...

  10. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  11. Fluidic Control of Virtual Aerosurfaces

    Glezer, Ari

    2007-01-01

    ...) angles of attack when the baseline flow is fully attached. Using hybrid actuators, trapped vorticity concentrations at the leading and trailing edges affect aerodynamic forces and moment without control surfaces...

  12. Transport processes at fluidic interfaces

    Reusken, Arnold

    2017-01-01

    There are several physico-chemical processes that determine the behavior of multiphase fluid systems – e.g., the fluid dynamics in the different phases and the dynamics of the interface(s), mass transport between the fluids, adsorption effects at the interface, and transport of surfactants on the interface – and result in heterogeneous interface properties. In general, these processes are strongly coupled and local properties of the interface play a crucial role. A thorough understanding of the behavior of such complex flow problems must be based on physically sound mathematical models, which especially account for the local processes at the interface. This book presents recent findings on the rigorous derivation and mathematical analysis of such models and on the development of numerical methods for direct numerical simulations. Validation results are based on specifically designed experiments using high-resolution experimental techniques. A special feature of this book is its focus on an interdisciplina...

  13. High heat flux device of thermonuclear device

    Tachikawa, Nobuo.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention provides an equipments for high heat flux device (divertor) of a thermonuclear device, which absorbs thermal deformation during operation, has a high installation accuracy, and sufficiently withstands for thermal stresses. Namely, a heat sink member is joined to a structural base. Armour tiles are joined on the heat sink member. Cooling pipes are disposed between the heat sink member and the armour tiles. With such a constitution, the heat sink member using a highly heat conductive material having ductility, such as oxygen free copper, the cooling pipes using a material having excellent high temperature resistance and excellent elongation, such as aluminum-dispersed reinforced copper, and the armour tiles are completely joined on the structural base. Therefore, when thermal deformation tends to cause in the high heat flux device such as a divertor, cooling pipes cause no plastic deformation because of their high temperature resistance, but the heat sink member such as a oxygen free copper causes plastic deformation to absorb thermal deformation. As a result, the high heat flux device such as a divertor causes no deformation. (I.S.)

  14. Repairing method and device for thermonuclear device

    Sakurai, Akiko; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Tachikawa, Nobuo.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and a device for repairing a first wall and a divertor disposed in a vacuum vessel of a thermonuclear device. Namely, an armour tile of the divertor secured, by a brazing material, in a vacuum vessel of the thermonuclear device in which high temperature plasmas of deuterium and tritium are confined to cause fusion reaction is induction-heated or heated by microwaves to melt the brazing material. Only the armour tile is thus exchanged by its attachment/detachment. This device comprises, in the vacuum vessel, an armour tile attaching/detaching manipulator and a repairing manipulator comprising a heating manipulator having induction heating coils at the top end thereof. Induction heating coils are connected to an AC power source. According to the present invention, the armour tile is exchanged without taking the divertor out of the vacuum vessel. Therefore, cutting of a divertor cooling tube for taking the divertor out of the vacuum vessel and re-welding of the divertor for attaching it to the vacuum vessel again are no more necessary. (I.S.)

  15. Partial Device Fingerprints

    Ciere, M.; Hernandez Ganan, C.; van Eeten, M.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    In computing, remote devices may be identified by means of device fingerprinting, which works by collecting a myriad of clientside attributes such as the device’s browser and operating system version, installed plugins, screen resolution, hardware artifacts, Wi-Fi settings, and anything else

  16. Unconventional Quantum Computing Devices

    Lloyd, Seth

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates a variety of unconventional quantum computation devices, including fermionic quantum computers and computers that exploit nonlinear quantum mechanics. It is shown that unconventional quantum computing devices can in principle compute some quantities more rapidly than `conventional' quantum computers.

  17. Magnetic sensor device

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a sensor device and a method for detg. the presence and/or amt. of target moieties in a sample fluid, the target moieties being labeled with magnetic or magnetizable objects. The sensor device comprises a magnetic field generating means adapted for applying a retention

  18. Process control device

    Hayashi, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    A process control device comprises a memory device for memorizing a plant operation target, a plant state or a state of equipments related with each other as control data, a read-only memory device for storing programs, a plant instrumentation control device or other process control devices, an input/output device for performing input/output with an operator, and a processing device which conducts processing in accordance with the program and sends a control demand or a display demand to the input/output device. The program reads out control data relative to a predetermined operation target, compares and verify them with actual values to read out control data to be a practice premise condition which is further to be a practice premise condition if necessary, thereby automatically controlling the plant or requiring or displaying input. Practice presuming conditions for the operation target can be examined succesively in accordance with the program without constituting complicated logical figures and AND/OR graphs. (N.H.)

  19. EPICS GPIB device support

    Winans, J.

    1993-01-01

    A GPIB device support module is used to provide access to the operating parameters of a GPIB device. GPIB devices may be accessed via National Instruments 1014 cards or via Bitbus Universal Gateways. GPIB devices typically have many parameters, each of which may be thought of in terms of the standard types of database records available in EPICS. It is the job of the device support module designer to decide how the mapping of these parameters will be made to the available record types. Once this mapping is complete, the device support module may be written. The writing of the device support module consists primarily of the construction of a parameter table. This table is used to associate the database record types with the operating parameters of the GPIB instrument. Other aspects of module design include the handling of SRQ events and errors. SRQ events are made available to the device support module if so desired. The processing of an SRQ event is completely up to the designer of the module. They may be ignored, tied to event based record processing, or anything else the designer wishes. Error conditions may be handled in a similar fashion

  20. Positioning devices for patients

    Heavens, M.

    1981-01-01

    It has been suggested that it is very important to position patients reproducibly at different stages of radiotherapy treatment planning and treatment, or similar procedures. Devices have been described for positioning a patient's upper and lower thorax. This invention provides reproducible positioning for a female patient's breasts, for example in planning treatment of and treating breast tumours. The patient is placed prone, using for example an upper thorax device. A support device is placed central to and beneath her breasts to partially displace them outwards. The device may be triangular in section with one apex contacting the chest wall at the sternum. Restraining straps may be provided to hold the breasts against the support device. Means may be provided to take a healthy breast from the path of radiation through the tumour. (author)

  1. Safety rod driving device

    Murakami, Kiyonobu; Kurosaki, Akira.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly insert safety rods for a criticality experiment device into a reactor core container to stop the criticality reaction thereby prevent reactivity accidents. Constitution: A cylinder device having a safety rod as a cylinder rod attached with a piston at one end is constituted. The piston is elevated by pressurized air and attracted and fixed by an electromagnet which is a stationary device disposed at the upper portion of the cylinder. If the current supply to the electromagnet is disconnected, the safety rod constituting the cylinder rod is fallen together with the piston to the lower portion of the cylinder. Since the cylinder rod driving device has neither electrical motor nor driving screw as in the conventional device, necessary space can be reduced and the weight is decreased. In addition, since the inside of the nuclear reactor can easily be shielded completely from the external atmosphere, leakage of radioactive materials can be prevented. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. Compound semiconductor device modelling

    Miles, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor devices form the foundation of solid-state microwave and optoelectronic technologies used in many modern communication systems. In common with their low frequency counterparts, these devices are often represented using equivalent circuit models, but it is often necessary to resort to physical models in order to gain insight into the detailed operation of compound semiconductor devices. Many of the earliest physical models were indeed developed to understand the 'unusual' phenomena which occur at high frequencies. Such was the case with the Gunn and IMPATI diodes, which led to an increased interest in using numerical simulation methods. Contemporary devices often have feature sizes so small that they no longer operate within the familiar traditional framework, and hot electron or even quantum­ mechanical models are required. The need for accurate and efficient models suitable for computer aided design has increased with the demand for a wider range of integrated devices for operation at...

  3. Metallic spintronic devices

    Wang, Xiaobin

    2014-01-01

    Metallic Spintronic Devices provides a balanced view of the present state of the art of metallic spintronic devices, addressing both mainstream and emerging applications from magnetic tunneling junction sensors and spin torque oscillators to spin torque memory and logic. Featuring contributions from well-known and respected industrial and academic experts, this cutting-edge work not only presents the latest research and developments but also: Describes spintronic applications in current and future magnetic recording devicesDiscusses spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device architectures and modelingExplores prospects of STT-MRAM scaling, such as detailed multilevel cell structure analysisInvestigates spintronic device write and read optimization in light of spintronic memristive effectsConsiders spintronic research directions based on yttrium iron garnet thin films, including spin pumping, magnetic proximity, spin hall, and spin Seebeck effectsProposes unique solutions for ...

  4. Device for cutting protrusions

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M [Knoxville, TN

    2011-07-05

    An apparatus for clipping a protrusion of material is provided. The protrusion may, for example, be a bolt head, a nut, a rivet, a weld bead, or a temporary assembly alignment tab protruding from a substrate surface of assembled components. The apparatus typically includes a cleaver having a cleaving edge and a cutting blade having a cutting edge. Generally, a mounting structure configured to confine the cleaver and the cutting blade and permit a range of relative movement between the cleaving edge and the cutting edge is provided. Also typically included is a power device coupled to the cutting blade. The power device is configured to move the cutting edge toward the cleaving edge. In some embodiments the power device is activated by a momentary switch. A retraction device is also generally provided, where the retraction device is configured to move the cutting edge away from the cleaving edge.

  5. Baking exhaustion device in thermonuclear device

    Kondo, Mitsunori.

    1987-02-02

    Purpose: To rapidly remove tritium and impurity from the vacuum region in the access port of the baking exhaustion device in a thermonuclear device. Constitution: Each of the gaps at the boundary between a fixed shielding member and a blanket module and at the boundary between the blanket and a divertor is made extremely small so as to minimize the neutron streaming from plasmas. Accordingly, in the case of evacuating the vacuum region in the access port, the gap conductance is extremely poor and the exhaustion speed is low. Then, baking pipeways for flowing high temperature fluids are embedded to the surface layer at the position facing to the vacuum region and the plasma evacuation duct and the vacuum region are connected with an evacuation duct of the access port. By flowing high temperature fluids in the pipeways and conducting evacuation, baking exhaustion can be carried out rapidly. (Kamimura, M.).

  6. Plasma facing device of thermonuclear device

    Sumita, Hideo; Ioki, Kimihiro.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention improves integrity of thermal structures of a plasma facing device. That is, in the plasma facing device, an armour block portion from a metal cooling pipe to a carbon material comprises a mixed material of the metal as the constituent material of the cooling pipe and ceramics. Then, the mixing ratio of the composition is changed continuously or stepwise to suppress peakings of remaining stresses upon production and thermal stresses upon exertion of thermal loads. Accordingly, thermal integrity of the structural materials can further be improved. In this case, a satisfactory characteristic can be obtained also by using ceramics instead of carbon for the mixed material, and the characteristic such as heat expansion coefficient is similar to that of the armour tile. (I.S.)

  7. Output channel design for collecting closely-spaced particle streams from spiral inertial separation devices

    Caffiyar Mohamed Yousuff

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in inertial microfluidics designs have enabled high throughput, label-free separation of cells for a variety of bioanalytical applications. Various device configurations have been proposed for binary separation with a focus on enhancing the separation distance between particle streams to improve the efficiency of separate particle collection. These configurations have not demonstrated scaling beyond 3 particle streams either because the channel width is a constraint at the collection outlets or particle streams would be too closely spaced to be collected separately. We propose a method to design collection outlets for inertial focusing and separation devices which can collect closely-spaced particle streams and easily scale to an arbitrary number of collection channels without constraining the outlet channel width, which is the usual cause of clogging or cell damage. According to our approach, collection outlets are a series of side-branching channels perpendicular to the main channel of egress. The width and length of the outlets can be chosen subject to constraints from the position of the particle streams and fluidic resistance ratio computed from fluid dynamics simulations. We show the efficacy of this approach by demonstrating a successful collection of upto 3 particle streams of 7μm, 10μm and 15μm fluorescent beads which have been focused and separated by a spiral inertial device with a separation distance of only 10μm -15μm. With a throughput of 1.8mL/min, we achieved collection efficiency exceeding 90% for each particle at the respective collection outlet. The flexibility to use wide collection channels also enabled us to fabricate the microfluidic device with an epoxy mold that was created using xurography, a low cost, and imprecise fabrication technique.

  8. Position measuring device

    Maeda, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Shuichi; Maruyama, Mayumi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device capable of measuring accurate position and distance easily even at places where operator can not easily access, such as cell facilities for vitrifying radioactive wastes. Referring to a case of the vitrifying cell, an objective equipment settled in the cell is photographed by a photographing device. The image is stored in a position measuring device by way of an image input device. After several years, when the objective equipment is exchanged, a new objective equipment is photographed by a photographing device. The image is also stored in the position measuring device. The position measuring device compares the data of both of the images on the basis of pixel unit. Based on the image of the equipment before the exchange as a reference, extent of the displacement of the installation position of the equipment on the image after the exchange caused by installation error and manufacturing error is determined to decide the position of the equipment after exchange relative to the equipment before exchange. (I.S.)

  9. Incore instrumentation device

    Fujita, Kazuhiko.

    1996-01-01

    A position of a detector is detected by a driving device, and the detected values are sampled by a newly disposed central processing unit for sampling the detected values depending on the sampling position of the detected values. Since the sampling position of the detected values is detected by the driving device, the sampling position for the detection values does not rely on the speed of the driving motor of the driving device. The load on the central processing device for controlling the device is lowered by newly disposing the central processing unit for sampling detected values. When the values for the position of the detector counted after conversion to digital values reach the digital values corresponding to the detection value sampling position outputted from the central processing unit for controlling the device, a counted value comparison circuit causes the central processing unit for controlling the device to sample the detection values outputted from the detector. Then, the processing speed can be increased without interruption processings, which can save the central processing unit for sampling detection values. In addition, software can be simplified and loads can be lowered. (N.H.)

  10. Fuel pattern recognition device

    Sato, Tomomi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention monitors normal fuel exchange upon fuel exchanging operation carried out in a reactor of a nuclear power plant. Namely, a fuel exchanger is movably disposed to the upper portion of the reactor and exchanges fuels. An exclusive computer receives operation signals of the fuel exchanger during operation as inputs, and outputs reactor core fuel pattern information signals to a fuel arrangement diagnosis device. An underwater television camera outputs image signals of a fuel pattern in the reactor core to an image processing device. If there is any change in the image signals for the fuel pattern as a result of the fuel exchange operation of the fuel exchanger, the image processing device outputs the change as image signals to the fuel pattern diagnosis device. The fuel pattern diagnosis device compares the pattern information signals from the exclusive computer with the image signals from the image processing device, to diagnose the result of the fuel exchange operation performed by the fuel exchanger and inform the diagnosis by means of an image display. (I.S.)

  11. Diamond semiconducting devices

    Polowczyk, M.; Klugmann, E.

    1999-01-01

    Many efforts to apply the semiconducting diamond for construction of electronic elements: resistors, thermistors, photoresistors, piezoresistors, hallotrons, pn diodes, Schottky diodes, IMPATT diodes, npn transistor, MESFETs and MISFETs are reviewed. Considering the possibilities of acceptor and donor doping, electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of diamond as well as high electric-field breakdown points, that diamond devices could be used at about 30-times higher frequency and more then 8200 times power than silicon devices. Except that, due to high heat resistant of diamond, it is concluded that diamond devices can be used in environment at high temperature, range of 600 o C. (author)

  12. Fundamentals of semiconductor devices

    Lindmayer, Joseph

    1965-01-01

    Semiconductor properties ; semiconductor junctions or diodes ; transistor fundamentals ; inhomogeneous impurity distributions, drift or graded-base transistors ; high-frequency properties of transistors ; band structure of semiconductors ; high current densities and mechanisms of carrier transport ; transistor transient response and recombination processes ; surfaces, field-effect transistors, and composite junctions ; additional semiconductor characteristics ; additional semiconductor devices and microcircuits ; more metal, insulator, and semiconductor combinations for devices ; four-pole parameters and configuration rotation ; four-poles of combined networks and devices ; equivalent circuits ; the error function and its properties ; Fermi-Dirac statistics ; useful physical constants.

  13. Electronic devices and circuits

    Pridham, Gordon John

    1972-01-01

    Electronic Devices and Circuits, Volume 3 provides a comprehensive account on electronic devices and circuits and includes introductory network theory and physics. The physics of semiconductor devices is described, along with field effect transistors, small-signal equivalent circuits of bipolar transistors, and integrated circuits. Linear and non-linear circuits as well as logic circuits are also considered. This volume is comprised of 12 chapters and begins with an analysis of the use of Laplace transforms for analysis of filter networks, followed by a discussion on the physical properties of

  14. Evolution of atherectomy devices.

    Al Khoury, G; Chaer, R

    2011-08-01

    Percutaneous atherectomy provides an alternative approach to the endovascular treatment of peripheral atherosclerotic occlusive disease beyond angioplasty and stenting, and has the theoretical advantage of lesion debulking and minimizing barotrauma to the vessel wall. Atherectomy has evolved greatly during the last decade, with currently four FDA approved devices for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease. Several reports have focused on the initial technical success rates, and demonstrated the safety and short as well as mid-term efficacy of atherectomy devices. This article will review the evolution of current atherectomy devices and the associated literature.

  15. Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

    Brennan, Kevin F.

    2005-03-01

    This volume offers a solid foundation for understanding the most important devices used in the hottest areas of electronic engineering today, from semiconductor fundamentals to state-of-the-art semiconductor devices in the telecommunications and computing industries. Kevin Brennan describes future approaches to computing hardware and RF power amplifiers, and explains how emerging trends and system demands of computing and telecommunications systems influence the choice, design and operation of semiconductor devices. In addition, he covers MODFETs and MOSFETs, short channel effects, and the challenges faced by continuing miniaturization. His book is both an excellent senior/graduate text and a valuable reference for practicing engineers and researchers.

  16. Proton therapy device

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  17. Nanoelectronic device applications handbook

    Morris, James E

    2013-01-01

    Nanoelectronic Device Applications Handbook gives a comprehensive snapshot of the state of the art in nanodevices for nanoelectronics applications. Combining breadth and depth, the book includes 68 chapters on topics that range from nano-scaled complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices through recent developments in nano capacitors and AlGaAs/GaAs devices. The contributors are world-renowned experts from academia and industry from around the globe. The handbook explores current research into potentially disruptive technologies for a post-CMOS world.These include: Nanoscale advance

  18. Physics of photonic devices

    Chuang, Shun Lien

    2009-01-01

    The most up-to-date book available on the physics of photonic devices This new edition of Physics of Photonic Devices incorporates significant advancements in the field of photonics that have occurred since publication of the first edition (Physics of Optoelectronic Devices). New topics covered include a brief history of the invention of semiconductor lasers, the Lorentz dipole method and metal plasmas, matrix optics, surface plasma waveguides, optical ring resonators, integrated electroabsorption modulator-lasers, and solar cells. It also introduces exciting new fields of research such as:

  19. Output hardcopy devices

    Durbeck, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Output Hardcopy Devices provides a technical summary of computer output hardcopy devices such as plotters, computer output printers, and CRT generated hardcopy. Important related technical areas such as papers, ribbons and inks, color techniques, controllers, and character fonts are also covered. Emphasis is on techniques primarily associated with printing, as well as the plotting capabilities of printing devices that can be effectively used for computer graphics in addition to their various printing functions. Comprised of 19 chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to vector and ras

  20. A gauge device

    Qurnell, F.D.; Patterson, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    A readily transportable device of relative light weight comprising a pair of tensioned guides for providing accurate and stable reference planes. An embodiment comprises a pair of rods or guides in tension between a pair of end members, the end members being spaced apart by a pair of arcuate compression members. The tensioned guides provide planes of reference for measuring devices moved therealong adjacent to a component to be measured. The device is especially useful for making on-site dimensional measurements of components, such as irradiated and therefore radioactive components, that cannot readily be transported to an inspection laboratory. (author)

  1. Compound semiconductor device physics

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    This book provides one of the most rigorous treatments of compound semiconductor device physics yet published. A complete understanding of modern devices requires a working knowledge of low-dimensional physics, the use of statistical methods, and the use of one-, two-, and three-dimensional analytical and numerical analysis techniques. With its systematic and detailed**discussion of these topics, this book is ideal for both the researcher and the student. Although the emphasis of this text is on compound semiconductor devices, many of the principles discussed will also be useful to those inter

  2. Digital communication device

    2005-01-01

    The invention concerns a digital communication device like a hearing aid or a headset. The hearing aid or headset has a power supply, a signal processing device, means for receiving a wireless signal and a receiver or loudspeaker, which produces an audio signal based on a modulated pulsed signal...... point is provided which is in electrical contact with the metal of the metal box and whereby this third connection point is connected to the electric circuitry of the communication device at a point having a stable and well defined electrical potential. In this way the electro-and magnetic radiation...

  3. Powering biomedical devices

    Romero, Edwar

    2013-01-01

    From exoskeletons to neural implants, biomedical devices are no less than life-changing. Compact and constant power sources are necessary to keep these devices running efficiently. Edwar Romero's Powering Biomedical Devices reviews the background, current technologies, and possible future developments of these power sources, examining not only the types of biomedical power sources available (macro, mini, MEMS, and nano), but also what they power (such as prostheses, insulin pumps, and muscular and neural stimulators), and how they work (covering batteries, biofluids, kinetic and ther

  4. A novel highly flexible, simple, rapid and low-cost fabrication tool for paper-based microfluidic devices (μPADs) using technical drawing pens and in-house formulated aqueous inks.

    Nuchtavorn, Nantana; Macka, Mirek

    2016-05-05

    Paper-based microfluidic devices (μPADs) are capable of achieving rapid quantitative measurements of a variety of analytes inexpensively. μPADs rely on patterning hydrophilic-hydrophobic regions on a sheet of paper in order to create capillary channels within impermeable fluidic brakes on the paper. Here, we present a novel, highly flexible and low-cost fabrication method using a desktop digital craft plotter/cutter and technical drawing pens with tip size of 0.5 mm. The pens were used with either commercial black permanent ink for drawing fluidic brakes, or with specialty in-house formulated aqueous inks. With the permanent marker ink it was possible to create barriers on paper rapidly and in a variety of designs in a highly flexible manner. For instance, a design featuring eight reservoirs can be produced within 10 s for each μPAD with a consistent line width of brakes (%RSD drawing pens provides flexibility in the use of in-house formulated inks, short fabrication time, simplicity and low cost. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sodium aerosol recovering device

    Fujimori, Koji; Ueda, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Kazuhisa.

    1997-01-01

    A main body of a recovering device is disposed in a sodium cooled reactor or a sodium cooled test device. Air containing sodium aerosol is sucked into the main body of the recovering device by a recycling fan and introduced to a multi-staged metal mesh filter portion. The air about against each of the metal mesh filters, and the sodium aerosol in the air is collected. The air having a reduced sodium aerosol concentration circulates passing through a recycling fan and pipelines to form a circulation air streams. Sodium aerosol deposited on each of the metal mesh filters is scraped off periodically by a scraper driving device to prevent clogging of each of the metal filters. (I.N.)

  6. Incore monitoring device

    Tai, Ichiro; Shirayama, Shin-pei; Nozaki, Shin-ichi.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an incore monitoring device wherein both radiation monitoring and acoustic monitoring are carried out simultaneously by one detector, whereby installation of the device and signal pick-up are facilitated. Incore conditions are accurately grasped. Constitution: When a neutron is irradiated in a state where a DC voltage is applied between the electrode and the vessel in the device, an ionization current is occured by (n.γ) reaction of the transformed substance as in an ionization chamber, Accordingly, a voltage drop occurs at both ends of the resistor of the radiation signal processing system, as a result of which a neutron flux can be detected. Further, when a sound is generated in the reactor, the monitoring device bottom wall which formed by a piezoelectric element detects the sound-waves. This output signal is picked up by the acoustic signal processing system to judge the generation of sound. (Aizawa, K.)

  7. Authenticated sensor interface device

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Poland, Richard W.

    2018-05-01

    A system and method for the secure storage and transmission of data is provided. A data aggregate device can be configured to receive secure data from a data source, such as a sensor, and encrypt the secure data using a suitable encryption technique, such as a shared private key technique, a public key encryption technique, a Diffie-Hellman key exchange technique, or other suitable encryption technique. The encrypted secure data can be provided from the data aggregate device to different remote devices over a plurality of segregated or isolated data paths. Each of the isolated data paths can include an optoisolator that is configured to provide one-way transmission of the encrypted secure data from the data aggregate device over the isolated data path. External data can be received through a secure data filter which, by validating the external data, allows for key exchange and other various adjustments from an external source.

  8. Plant abnormality inspection device

    Takenaka, Toshio.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a plant abnormality inspection device for conducting remote or automatic patrolling inspection in a plant and, more particularly, relates to such a device as capable of detecting abnormal odors. That is, the device comprises a moving device for moving to a predetermined position in the plant, a plurality of gas sensors for different kind of gases to be inspected mounted thereon, a comparator for comparing the concentration of a gas detected by the gas sensor with the normal gas concentration at the predetermined position and a judging means for judging the absence or presence of abnormality depending on the combination of the result of the comparison and deliverying a signal if the state is abnormal. As a result, a slight amount of gas responsible to odors released upon abnormality of the plant can be detected by a plurality of gas sensors for different kinds gases to rapidly and easily find abnormal portions in the plant. (I.S.)

  9. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  10. Reactor noise monitoring device

    Yamanaka, Hiroto.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor noise monitoring device by detecting abnormal sounds in background noises. Vibration sounds detected by accelerometers are applied to a loose parts detector. The detector generates high alarm if there are sudden impact sounds in the background noises and applies output signals to an accumulation device. If there is slight impact sounds in the vicinity of any of the accelerometers, the accumulation device accumulates the abnormal sounds assumed to be generated from an identical site while synchronizing the waveforms for all of the channels. Then, the device outputs signals in which the background noises are cancelled, as detection signals. Therefore, S/N ratio can be improved and the abnormal sounds contained in the background noises can be detected, to thereby improve the accuracy for estimating the position where the abnormal sounds are generated. (I.S.)

  11. Marine Sanitation Devices (MSDs)

    Marine sanitation devices treat or retain sewage from vessels, and have performance standards set by the EPA. This page provides information on MSDs, including who must use an MSD, states' roles, types of MSDs and standards.

  12. MDR (Medical Device Reporting)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database allows you to search the CDRH's database information on medical devices which may have malfunctioned or caused a death or serious injury during the...

  13. Tokapole II device

    Sprott, J.G.

    1978-05-01

    A discussion is given of the design and operation of the Tokapole II device. The following topics are considered: physics considerations, vacuum vessel, poloidal field, ring and support design, toroidal field, vacuum system, initial results, and future plans

  14. Plasma shutdown device

    Hosogane, Nobuyuki; Nakayama, Takahide.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent concentration of plasma currents to the plasma center upon plasma shutdown in a torus type thermonuclear device by the injection of fuels to the plasma center thereby prevent plasma disruption at the plasma center. Constitution: The plasma shutdown device comprises a plasma current measuring device that measures the current distribution of plasmas confined within a vacuum vessel and outputs a control signal for cooling the plasma center when the plasma currents concentrate to the plasma center and a fuel supply device that supplies fuels to the plasma center for cooling the center. The fuels are injected in the form of pellets into the plasmas. The direction and the velocity of the injection are set such that the pellets are ionized at the center of the plasmas. (Horiuchi, T.)

  15. Ion funnel device

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Harrer, Marques B.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-11-21

    An ion funnel device is disclosed. A first pair of electrodes is positioned in a first direction. A second pair of electrodes is positioned in a second direction. The device includes an RF voltage source and a DC voltage source. A RF voltage with a superimposed DC voltage gradient is applied to the first pair of electrodes, and a DC voltage gradient is applied to the second pair of electrodes.

  16. Atherectomy devices: technology update

    Akkus, Nuri I; Abdulbaki, Abdulrahman; Jimenez, Enrique; Tandon, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Atherectomy is a procedure which is performed to remove atherosclerotic plaque from diseased arteries. Atherosclerotic plaques are localized in either coronary or peripheral arterial vasculature and may have different characteristics depending on the texture of the plaque. Atherectomy has been used effectively in treatment of both coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Atherectomy devices are designed differently to either cut, shave, sand, or vaporize these plaques and have different indications. In this article, current atherectomy devices are reviewed. PMID:25565904

  17. Flexural pivot device

    Flaherty, Robert.

    1986-01-01

    A flexural pivot device or rotational actuator comprises first and sceond tubular members connected by flexural members of shape-memory-alloy. These are curved in the austenitic phase at a first temperature and after cooling to the martensitic phase are flattened. On heating one of the flexural members, it bends causing relative rotation of the tubular members. Heating of another member can produce opposite rotation. Heating is electrical or by hot gas. The device may be used in a nuclear reactor. (author)

  18. Infrared thermal annealing device

    Gladys, M.J.; Clarke, I.; O'Connor, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    A device for annealing samples within an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscopy system was designed, constructed, and tested. The device is based on illuminating the sample with infrared radiation from outside the UHV chamber with a tungsten projector bulb. The apparatus uses an elliptical mirror to focus the beam through a sapphire viewport for low absorption. Experiments were conducted on clean Pd(100) and annealing temperatures in excess of 1000 K were easily reached

  19. RFQ1 diagnostic devices

    Chidley, B.G.; Arbique, G.M.; de Jong, M.S.; McMichael, G.E.; Michel, W.L.; Smith, B.H.

    1991-01-01

    The diagnostic devices in use on RFQ1 will be described. They consist of a double-slit emittance-measuring unit, a 45 degree deflection energy-analysis magnet, parametric current transformers, optical beam sensors, beam-stop current monitors, and an x-ray end-point analyzer. All of these devices are able to operate up to the full output current of RFQ1 (75 mA cw at 0.6 MeV)

  20. Commercialization of microfluidic devices.

    Volpatti, Lisa R; Yetisen, Ali K

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic devices offer automation and high-throughput screening, and operate at low volumes of consumables. Although microfluidics has the potential to reduce turnaround times and costs for analytical devices, particularly in medical, veterinary, and environmental sciences, this enabling technology has had limited diffusion into consumer products. This article analyzes the microfluidics market, identifies issues, and highlights successful commercialization strategies. Addressing niche markets and establishing compatibility with existing workflows will accelerate market penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.