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Sample records for nanoscale chemical templates

  1. Physical controls on directed virus assembly at nanoscale chemical templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C L; Chung, S; Chatterji, A; Lin, T; Johnson, J E; Hok, S; Perkins, J; De Yoreo, J

    2006-05-10

    Viruses are attractive building blocks for nanoscale heterostructures, but little is understood about the physical principles governing their directed assembly. In-situ force microscopy was used to investigate organization of Cowpea Mosaic Virus engineered to bind specifically and reversibly at nanoscale chemical templates with sub-30nm features. Morphological evolution and assembly kinetics were measured as virus flux and inter-viral potential were varied. The resulting morphologies were similar to those of atomic-scale epitaxial systems, but the underlying thermodynamics was analogous to that of colloidal systems in confined geometries. The 1D templates biased the location of initial cluster formation, introduced asymmetric sticking probabilities, and drove 1D and 2D condensation at subcritical volume fractions. The growth kinetics followed a t{sup 1/2} law controlled by the slow diffusion of viruses. The lateral expansion of virus clusters that initially form on the 1D templates following introduction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) into the solution suggests a significant role for weak interaction.

  2. Template Route to Chemically Engineering Cavities at Nanoscale: A Case Study of Zn(OH2 Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Junshu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A size-controlled Zn(OH2 template is used as a case study to explain the chemical strategy that can be executed to chemically engineering various nanoscale cavities. Zn(OH2 octahedron with 8 vertices and 14 edges is fabricated via a low temperature solution route. The size can be tuned from 1 to 30 μm by changing the reaction conditions. Two methods can be selected for the hollow process without loss of the original shape of Zn(OH2 template. Ion-replacement reaction is suitable for fabrication of hollow sulfides based on the solubility difference between Zn(OH2 and products. Controlled chemical deposition is utilized to coat an oxide layer on the surface of Zn(OH2 template. The abundant hydroxyl groups on Zn(OH2 afford strong coordination ability with cations and help to the coating of a shell layer. The rudimental Zn(OH2 core is eliminated with ammonia solution. In addition, ZnO-based heterostructures possessing better chemical or physical properties can also be prepared via this unique templating process. Room-temperature photoluminescence spectra of the heterostructures and hollow structures are also shown to study their optical properties.

  3. Templated Chemically Deposited Semiconductor Optical Fiber Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Justin R.; Sazio, Pier J. A.; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Badding, John V.

    2013-07-01

    Chemical deposition is a powerful technology for fabrication of planar microelectronics. Optical fibers are the dominant platform for telecommunications, and devices such as fiber lasers are forming the basis for new industries. High-pressure chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) allows for conformal layers and void-free wires of precisely doped crystalline unary and compound semiconductors inside the micro-to-nanoscale-diameter pores of microstructured optical fibers (MOFs). Drawing the fibers to serve as templates into which these semiconductor structures can be fabricated allows for geometric design flexibility that is difficult to achieve with planar fabrication. Seamless coupling of semiconductor optoelectronic and photonic devices with existing fiber infrastructure thus becomes possible, facilitating all-fiber technological approaches. The deposition techniques also allow for a wider range of semiconductor materials compositions to be exploited than is possible by means of preform drawing. Gigahertz bandwidth junction-based fiber devices can be fabricated from doped crystalline semiconductors, for example. Deposition of amorphous hydrogenated silicon, which cannot be drawn, allows for the exploitation of strong nonlinear optical function in fibers. Finally, crystalline compound semiconductor fiber cores hold promise for high-power infrared light-guiding fiber devices and subwavelength-resolution, large-area infrared imaging.

  4. Nanoparticle Array Assembly Using Chemical Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sarah Marie

    This dissertation demonstrates chemically-driven self-assembly techniques to produce assemblies of closely-spaced metal nanoparticles from colloidal nanoparticle solution in order to engineer enhanced optical fields. Planar nanoparticle assemblies provide a platform for a multitude of applications and material architectures. With nanoscale inter-particle spacing, metallic nanoparticles enable increased efficiency of photovoltaic devices due to light focusing and enhancement of electromagnetic fields useful for optical sensing of molecules due to coupling of the plasmon resonance in nanoparticle gaps. For molecular sensors, development of self-assembled two-dimensional assemblies of closely-spaced nanoparticles is useful for producing surface plasmon resonance sensors and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based sensing. Using chemical self-assembly, monodisperse, colloidal gold nanoparticles were attached on self-organized polymer templates in order to pattern assemblies of nanoparticle clusters with sub-10 nanometer inter-particle spacing. First citrate-stabilized Au nanoparticles were functionalized with thioctic acid ligands in solution. Then poly(methyl methacrylate) domains in phase-separated poly(styrene-block-methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) thin films were chemically modified with surface amine functional groups. Au nanoparticles were preferentially attached to the functionalized PMMA surface domains using cross-linking chemistry. This method allows for versatility of size, shape, and composition. In this dissertation, we demonstrated attachment of 5, 10, and 20 nm Au and 20 nm Ag nanoparticles. PS-b-PMMA thin films also exhibit versatility of domain size and morphology by varying polymer molecular weights. The nanoparticle diameter to PMMA domain size ratio influenced the cluster size. As the ratio decreased, larger clusters were observed on PMMA domains with increased frequency. SERS measurement of nanoparticle assemblies showed uniform signal

  5. Metal-organic frameworks as templates for nanoscale NaAlH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Raghunandan K; Herberg, Julie L; Jacobs, Benjamin; Highley, Aaron; Behrens, Richard; Ockwig, Nathan W; Greathouse, Jeffery A; Allendorf, Mark D

    2009-09-23

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offer an attractive alternative to traditional hard and soft templates for nanocluster synthesis because their ordered crystalline lattice provides a highly controlled and inherently understandable environment. We demonstrate that MOFs are stable hosts for metal hydrides proposed for hydrogen storage and their reactive precursors, providing platform to test recent theoretical predictions that some of these materials can be destabilized with respect to hydrogen desorption by reducing their critical dimension to the nanoscale. With the MOF HKUST-1 as template, we show that NaAlH(4) nanoclusters as small as eight formula units can be synthesized. The confinement of these clusters within the MOF pores dramatically accelerates the desorption kinetics, causing decomposition to occur at approximately 100 degrees C lower than bulk NaAlH(4). However, using simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry, we also show that the thermal decomposition mechanism of NaAlH(4) is complex and may involve processes such as nucleation and growth in addition to the normally assumed two-step chemical decomposition reactions.

  6. Nanoscale chemical sensor based on organic thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Fine, Daniel; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2004-12-01

    Nanoscale organic thin-film transistors were fabricated to investigate their chemical sensing properties. The use of a four-terminal geometry ensures that the sensor active area is truly nanoscale, and eliminates undesirable spreading currents. The sensor response was markedly different in nanoscale sensors compared to large-area sensors for the same analyte-semiconductor combination. The chemical sensing mechanisms in both microscale and nanoscale transistors are briefly discussed.

  7. DNA origami as a nanoscale template for protein assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzyk, Anton; Laitinen, Kimmo T [Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Toermae, Paeivi [Department of Applied Physics, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 5100, FIN-02015 (Finland)], E-mail: paivi.torma@hut.fi

    2009-06-10

    We describe two general approaches to the utilization of DNA origami structures for the assembly of materials. In one approach, DNA origami is used as a prefabricated template for subsequent assembly of materials. In the other, materials are assembled simultaneously with the DNA origami, i.e. the DNA origami technique is used to drive the assembly of materials. Fabrication of complex protein structures is demonstrated by these two approaches. The latter approach has the potential to be extended to the assembly of multiple materials with single attachment chemistry.

  8. Biomolecular Programming of Discrete Nanomaterials for Sensors, Templates and Mimics of Natural Nanoscale Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-17

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0343 BIOMOLECULAR PROGRAMMING OF DISCRETE NANOMATERIALS FOR SENSORS, TEMPLATES AND MIMICS OF NATURAL NANOSCALE ASSEMBLIES...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 2011 to 31 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BIOMOLECULAR PROGRAMMING OF DISCRETE NANOMATERIALS FOR SENSORS...responsive elements for assembly of complex morphology switchable nanomaterials , and have combined this with an effort in nature-inspired materials

  9. Nanoscale chemical imaging by photoinduced force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek; Morrison, William; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar; Jahng, Junghoon; Potma, Eric; Wan, Lei; Ruiz, Ricardo; Albrecht, Thomas R.; Schmidt, Kristin; Frommer, Jane; Sanders, Daniel P.; Park, Sung

    2016-01-01

    Correlating spatial chemical information with the morphology of closely packed nanostructures remains a challenge for the scientific community. For example, supramolecular self-assembly, which provides a powerful and low-cost way to create nanoscale patterns and engineered nanostructures, is not easily interrogated in real space via existing nondestructive techniques based on optics or electrons. A novel scanning probe technique called infrared photoinduced force microscopy (IR PiFM) directly measures the photoinduced polarizability of the sample in the near field by detecting the time-integrated force between the tip and the sample. By imaging at multiple IR wavelengths corresponding to absorption peaks of different chemical species, PiFM has demonstrated the ability to spatially map nm-scale patterns of the individual chemical components of two different types of self-assembled block copolymer films. With chemical-specific nanometer-scale imaging, PiFM provides a powerful new analytical method for deepening our understanding of nanomaterials. PMID:27051870

  10. Novel encoding methods for DNA-templated chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zheng, Wenlu; Liu, Ying; Li, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    Among various types of DNA-encoded chemical libraries, DNA-templated library takes advantage of the sequence-specificity of DNA hybridization, enabling not only highly effective DNA-templated chemical reactions, but also high fidelity in library encoding. This brief review summarizes recent advances that have been made on the encoding strategies for DNA-templated libraries, and it also highlights their respective advantages and limitations for the preparation of DNA-encoded libraries.

  11. Nanoscale growth and patterning of inorganic oxides using DNA nanostructure templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Wei, Bryan; Sun, Wei; Powell, Anna; O'Donnell, Christina; Yin, Peng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-05-08

    We describe a method to form custom-shaped inorganic oxide nanostructures by using DNA nanostructure templates. We show that a DNA nanostructure can modulate the rate of chemical vapor deposition of SiO2 and TiO2 with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. The resulting oxide nanostructure inherits its shape from the DNA template. This method generates both positive-tone and negative-tone patterns on a wide range of substrates and is compatible with conventional silicon nanofabrication processes. Our result opens the door to the use of DNA nanostructures as general-purpose templates for high-resolution nanofabrication.

  12. Characterization of a nanoscale S-layer protein based template for biomolecular patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wing Sze; Yung, Pun To

    2014-01-01

    Well organized template for biomolecular conjugation is the foundation for biosensing. Most of the current devices are fabricated using lithographic patterning processes and self-assembly monolayer (SAM) methods. However, the research toward developing a sub-10 nm patterned, self-regenerated template on various types of substrates is limited, mainly due to the limited functional groups of the building material. Bacterial surface layer proteins (S-layer proteins) can self-assemble into ordered lattice with regular pore sizes of 2-8 nm on different material supports and interfaces. The ordered structure can regenerate after extreme variations of solvent conditions. In this work, we developed a nanoscale biomolecular template based on S-layer proteins on gold surface for fabrication of sensing layer in biosensors. S-layer proteins were isolated from Bacillus cereus, Lysinibacillus sphaericus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. Protein concentrations were measured by Bradford assay. The protein purities were verified by SDS-PAGE, showing molecular weights ranging from 97-135 kDa. The hydrophilicity of the substrate surface was measured after surface treatments of protein recrystallization. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement was performed on substrate surface, indicating a successful immobilization of a monolayer of S-layer protein with 8-9 nm height on gold surface. The template can be applied on various material supports and acts as a self-regenerated sensing layer of biosensors in the future.

  13. Nanoscale carbon tubules deposited in anodic aluminium oxide template:a study of soft x-ray transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Li-Feng; Zhou Zhen-Ping; Yuan Hua-Jun; Ci Li-Jie; Liu Dong-Fang; Gao Yan; Wang Jian-Xiong; Wang Gang; Zhou Wei-Ya; Zhu Pei-Ping; Cui Ming-Qi; Zheng Lei; Zhu Jie; Zhao Yi-Dong; Song Li; Yan Xiao-Qin

    2004-01-01

    Well-aligned, catalyst-free nanoscale carbon tubules array was prepared by organic compound vapour deposition method using anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) as a template. The experiment of soft x-ray channelling in such carbon tubules array deposited in AAO template was performed at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The transmission of x-rays in carbon tubules array with AAO template support was found even higher than that in bare AAO template at high-energy part of energy spectrum though the porous area of the former was smaller than that of the latter. A qualitative explanation is presented to interpret our results.

  14. Nanoscale porosity in pigments for chemical sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Kemling, Jonathan W.; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2011-01-01

    Porous pigments in which chemically responsive dyes have been immobilized in a matrix of organically modified siloxanes (ormosils) have been prepared and characterized by AFM, TEM, EDS, and optical analysis. In typical chemical sensing applications, an array of 36 different porous ormosil pigments are deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film.

  15. Nanoscale porosity in pigments for chemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemling, Jonathan W; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2011-05-01

    Porous pigments in which chemically responsive dyes have been immobilized in a matrix of organically modified siloxanes (ormosils) have been prepared and characterized by AFM, TEM, EDS, and optical analysis. In typical chemical sensing applications, an array of 36 different porous ormosil pigments are deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film.

  16. Plasmon-mediated chemical surface functionalization at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Mai; Lamouri, Aazdine; Salameh, Chrystelle; Lévi, Georges; Grand, Johan; Boubekeur-Lecaque, Leïla; Mangeney, Claire; Félidj, Nordin

    2016-04-28

    Controlling the surface grafting of species at the nanoscale remains a major challenge, likely to generate many opportunities in materials science. In this work, we propose an original strategy for chemical surface functionalization at the nanoscale, taking advantage of localized surface plasmon (LSP) excitation. The surface functionalization is demonstrated through aryl film grafting (derived from a diazonium salt), covalently bonded at the surface of gold lithographic nanostripes. The aryl film is specifically grafted in areas of maximum near field enhancement, as confirmed by numerical calculation based on the discrete dipole approximation method. The energy of the incident light and the LSP wavelength are shown to be crucial parameters to monitor the aryl film thickness of up to ∼30 nm. This robust and versatile strategy opens up exciting prospects for the nanoscale confinement of functional layers on surfaces, which should be particularly interesting for molecular sensing or nanooptics.

  17. Periodic nanoscale patterning of polyelectrolytes over square centimeter areas using block copolymer templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oded, Meirav; Kelly, Stephen T; Gilles, Mary K; Müller, Axel H E; Shenhar, Roy

    2016-05-18

    Nano-patterned materials are beneficial for applications such as solar cells, opto-electronics, and sensing owing to their periodic structure and high interfacial area. Here, we present a non-lithographic approach for assembling polyelectrolytes into periodic nanoscale patterns over cm(2)-scale areas. Chemically modified block copolymer thin films featuring alternating charged and neutral domains are used as patterned substrates for electrostatic self-assembly. In-depth characterization of the deposition process using spectroscopy and microscopy techniques, including the state-of-the-art scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), reveals both the selective deposition of the polyelectrolyte on the charged copolymer domains as well as gradual changes in the film topography that arise from further penetration of the solvent molecules and possibly also the polyelectrolyte into these domains. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of creating nano-patterned polyelectrolyte layers, which opens up new opportunities for structured functional coating fabrication.

  18. Chemical Mechanical Planarization of Cu: Nanoscale Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Michael; Fishbeck, Kelly; Muessig, Kara; McDonald, James; Williams, Christine; White, Daniel; Koeck, Deborah; Perry, Scott; Galloway, Heather

    2002-10-01

    Interconnect lines in state of the art integrated circuits are made of copper in a process that requires the repeated planarization of the copper layer. During this process the material is subjected to an aqueous slurry containing active chemicals, corrosion inhibitors and abrasive particles. A model slurry buffered to pH2, pH4 and pH6, contained nitric acid, silica particles and benzotriazole (BTA) as a corrosion inhibitor. The degree of copper planarization was investigated as a function of slurry composition and pH using atomic force microscopy. Chemical surface changes can be explained by the effect of slurry composition on the charge at the material surface. This surface charge controls the amount of friction between the abrasive and the surface which, in turn, effects the global planarization of the material. Experiments using a macroscopic polishing system with AFM characterization along with the microscopic interaction of the AFM tip and sample provide insights into the fundamental mechanisms of a planarization process.

  19. Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with chemical resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Nabeel; Pfender, Matthias; Neumann, Philipp; Reuter, Rolf; Zappe, Andrea; Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Denisenko, Andrej; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a key analytical technique in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, conventional NMR spectroscopy requires an at least nanoliter-sized sample volume to achieve sufficient signal. We combined the use of a quantum memory and high magnetic fields with a dedicated quantum sensor based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to achieve chemical shift resolution in 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy of 20-zeptoliter sample volumes. We demonstrate the application of NMR pulse sequences to achieve homonuclear decoupling and spin diffusion measurements. The best measured NMR linewidth of a liquid sample was ~1 part per million, mainly limited by molecular diffusion. To mitigate the influence of diffusion, we performed high-resolution solid-state NMR by applying homonuclear decoupling and achieved a 20-fold narrowing of the NMR linewidth.

  20. Nanoscale wear as a stress-assisted chemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Tevis D B; Carpick, Robert W

    2013-02-01

    Wear of sliding contacts leads to energy dissipation and device failure, resulting in massive economic and environmental costs. Typically, wear phenomena are described empirically, because physical and chemical interactions at sliding interfaces are not fully understood at any length scale. Fundamental insights from individual nanoscale contacts are crucial for understanding wear at larger length scales, and to enable reliable nanoscale devices, manufacturing and microscopy. Observable nanoscale wear mechanisms include fracture and plastic deformation, but recent experiments and models propose another mechanism: wear via atom-by-atom removal ('atomic attrition'), which can be modelled using stress-assisted chemical reaction kinetics. Experimental evidence for this has so far been inferential. Here, we quantitatively measure the wear of silicon--a material relevant to small-scale devices--using in situ transmission electron microscopy. We resolve worn volumes as small as 25 ± 5 nm(3), a factor of 10(3) lower than is achievable using alternative techniques. Wear of silicon against diamond is consistent with atomic attrition, and inconsistent with fracture or plastic deformation, as shown using direct imaging. The rate of atom removal depends exponentially on stress in the contact, as predicted by chemical rate kinetics. Measured activation parameters are consistent with an atom-by-atom process. These results, by direct observation, establish atomic attrition as the primary wear mechanism of silicon in vacuum at low loads.

  1. Visualizing the enhanced chemical reactivity of mesoporous ceria; simulating templated crystallization in silica scaffolds at the atomic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayle, Thi X T; Sayle, Dean C

    2014-03-12

    Unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties can be engineered into functional nanomaterials via structural control. However, as the hierarchical structural complexity of a nanomaterial increases, so do the challenges associated with generating atomistic models, which are sufficiently realistic that they can be interrogated to reliably predict properties and processes. The structural complexity of a functional nanomaterial necessarily emanates during synthesis. Accordingly, to capture such complexity, we have simulated each step in the synthetic protocol. Specifically, atomistic models of mesoporous ceria were generated by simulating the infusion and confined crystallization of ceria in a mesoporous silica scaffold. After removing the scaffold, the chemical reactivity of the templated mesoporous ceria was calculated and predicted to be more reactive compared to mesoporous ceria generated without template; visual "reactivity fingerprints" are presented. The strategy affords a general method for generating atomistic models, with hierarchical structural complexity, which can be used to predict a variety of properties and processes enabling the nanoscale design of functional materials.

  2. Viable chemical approach for patterning nanoscale magnetoresistive random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taeseung; Kim, Younghee; Chen, Jack Kun-Chieh; Chang, Jane P., E-mail: jpchang@seas.ucla.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    A reactive ion etching process with alternating Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} exposures has been shown to chemically etch CoFe film that is an integral component in magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM). Starting with systematic thermodynamic calculations assessing various chemistries and reaction pathways leading to the highest possible vapor pressure of the etch products reactions, the potential chemical combinations were verified by etch rate investigation and surface chemistry analysis in plasma treated CoFe films. An ∼20% enhancement in etch rate was observed with the alternating use of Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} plasmas, in comparison with the use of only Cl{sub 2} plasma. This chemical combination was effective in removing metal chloride layers, thus maintaining the desired magnetic properties of the CoFe films. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy showed visually and spectroscopically that the metal chloride layers generated by Cl{sub 2} plasma were eliminated with H{sub 2} plasma to yield a clean etch profile. This work suggests that the selected chemistries can be used to etch magnetic metal alloys with a smooth etch profile and this general strategy can be applied to design chemically based etch processes to enable the fabrication of highly integrated nanoscale MRAM devices.

  3. Self-templated chemically stable hollow spherical covalent organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandambeth, Sharath; Venkatesh, V.; Shinde, Digambar B.; Kumari, Sushma; Halder, Arjun; Verma, Sandeep; Banerjee, Rahul

    2015-04-01

    Covalent organic frameworks are a family of crystalline porous materials with promising applications. Although active research on the design and synthesis of covalent organic frameworks has been ongoing for almost a decade, the mechanisms of formation of covalent organic frameworks crystallites remain poorly understood. Here we report the synthesis of a hollow spherical covalent organic framework with mesoporous walls in a single-step template-free method. A detailed time-dependent study of hollow sphere formation reveals that an inside-out Ostwald ripening process is responsible for the hollow sphere formation. The synthesized covalent organic framework hollow spheres are highly porous (surface area ~1,500 m2 g-1), crystalline and chemically stable, due to the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding. These mesoporous hollow sphere covalent organic frameworks are used for a trypsin immobilization study, which shows an uptake of 15.5 μmol g-1 of trypsin.

  4. Nanoscale patterning of self-assembled monolayers using DNA nanostructure templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surwade, S P; Zhou, F; Li, Z; Powell, A; O'Donnell, C; Liu, H

    2016-01-28

    We describe a method to pattern arbitrary-shaped silane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with nm scale resolution using DNA nanostructures as templates. The DNA nanostructures assembled on a silicon substrate act as a soft-mask to negatively pattern SAMs. Mixed SAMs can be prepared by back filling the negative tone patterns with a different silane.

  5. Electrochemistry at nanoscale electrodes: individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and SWNT-templated metal nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudin, Petr V; Snowden, Michael E; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2011-12-27

    Individual nanowires (NWs) and native single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be readily used as well-defined nanoscale electrodes (NSEs) for voltammetric analysis. Here, the simple photolithography-free fabrication of submillimeter long Au, Pt, and Pd NWs, with sub-100 nm heights, by templated electrodeposition onto ultralong flow-aligned SWNTs is demonstrated. Both individual Au NWs and SWNTs are employed as NSEs for electron-transfer (ET) kinetic quantification, using cyclic voltammetry (CV), in conjunction with a microcapillary-based electrochemical method. A small capillary with internal diameter in the range 30-70 μm, filled with solution containing a redox-active mediator (FcTMA(+) ((trimethylammonium)methylferrocene), Fe(CN)(6)(4-), or hydrazine) is positioned above the NSE, so that the solution meniscus completes an electrochemical cell. A 3D finite-element model, faithfully reproducing the experimental geometry, is used to both analyze the experimental CVs and derive the rate of heterogeneous ET, using Butler-Volmer kinetics. For a 70 nm height Au NW, intrinsic rate constants, k(0), up to ca. 1 cm s(-1) can be resolved. Using the same experimental configuration the electrochemistry of individual SWNTs can also be accessed. For FcTMA(+/2+) electrolysis the simulated ET kinetic parameters yield very fast ET kinetics (k(0) > 2 ± 1 cm s(-1)). Some deviation between the experimental voltammetry and the idealized model is noted, suggesting that double-layer effects may influence ET at the nanoscale.

  6. Self-Templated Stepwise Synthesis of Monodispersed Nanoscale Metalated Covalent Organic Polymers for In Vivo Bioimaging and Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanshu; Deng, Xiaoran; Bao, Shouxin; Liu, Bei; Liu, Bin; Ma, Ping'an; Cheng, Ziyong; Pang, Maolin; Lin, Jun

    2017-07-10

    Size- and shape-controlled growth of nanoscale microporous organic polymers (MOPs) is a big challenge scientists are confronted with; meanwhile, rendering these materials for in vivo biomedical applications is still scarce. In this study, a monodispersed nanometalated covalent organic polymer (MCOP, M=Fe, Gd) with sizes around 120 nm was prepared by a self-templated two-step solution-phase synthesis method. The metal ions (Fe(3+) , Gd(3+) ) played important roles in generating a small particle size and in the functionalization of the products during the reaction with p-phenylenediamine (Pa). The resultant Fe-Pa complex was used as a template for the subsequent formation of MCOP following the Schiff base reaction with 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol (Tp). A high tumor suppression efficiency for this Pa-based COP is reported for the first time. This study demonstrates the potential use of MCOP as a photothermal agent for photothermal therapy (PTT) and also provides an alternative route to fabricate nano-sized MCOPs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. PHOTOELECTROCHEMISTRY AND PHOTOCATALYSIS IN NANOSCALE INORGANIC CHEMICAL SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Mallouk

    2007-05-27

    The goal of our DOE-supported research has been to explore the use of solid state materials as organizing media for, and as active components of, artificial photosynthetic systems. In this work we strive to understand how photoinduced electron and energy transfer reactions occur in the solid state, and to elucidate design principles for using nanoscale inorganic materials in photochemical energy conversion schemes. A unifying theme in this project has been to move beyond the study of simple transient charge separation to integrated chemical systems that can effect permanent charge separation in the form of energy-rich chemicals. This project explored the use of zeolites as organizing media for electron donor-acceptor systems and artificial photosynthetic assemblies. Layer-by-layer synthetic methods were developed using lamellar semiconductors, and multi-step, visible light driven energy/electron transfer cascades were studied by transient specroscopic techniques. By combining molecular photosensitizers with lamellar semiconductors and intercalated catalyst particles, the first non-sacrificial systems for visible light driven hydrogen evolution were developed and studied. Oxygen evolving catalyst particles and semiconductor nanowires were also studied with the goal of achieving photocatalytic water splitting using visible light.

  8. Formation of patterned arrays of Au nanoparticles on SiC surface by template confined dewetting of normal and oblique deposited nanoscale films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, F., E-mail: francesco.ruffino@ct.infn.it; Grimaldi, M.G.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the formation of patterned arrays of Au nanoparticles (NPs) on 6H SiC surface. To this end, we exploit the thermal-induced dewetting properties of a template confined deposited nanoscale Au film. In this approach, the Au surface pattern order, on the SiC substrate, is established by a template confined deposition using a micrometric template. Then, a dewetting process of the patterned Au film is induced by thermal processes. We compare the results, about the patterns formation, obtained for normal and oblique deposited Au films. We show that the normal and oblique depositions, through the same template, originate different patterns of the Au film. As a consequence of these different starting patterns, after the thermal processes, different patterns for the arrays of NPs originating from the dewetting mechanisms are obtained. For each fixed deposition angle α, the pattern evolution is analyzed, by scanning electron microscopy, as a function of the annealing time at 1173 K (900 °C). From these analyses, quantitative evaluations on the NPs size evolution are drawn. - Highlights: • Micrometric template-confined nanoscale gold films are deposited on silicon carbide. • The dewetting process of template-confined gold films on silicon carbide is studied. • Comparison of dewetting process of normal and oblique deposited gold films is drawn. • Patterned arrays of gold nanoparticles on silicon carbide surface are produced.

  9. PREFACE: Selected papers from the Fourth Topical Conference on Nanoscale Science and Engineering of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael S.; Lee, Gil U.

    2005-07-01

    This special issue of Nanotechnology contains research papers contributed by the participants of the Fourth Topical Conference on Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the Annual Meeting of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), which was held in Austin, Texas, USA, 7-12 November, 2004. This conference saw 284 oral presentations from institutions around the world, which is the highest number for this topical conference series to date. These presentations were organized into 64 sessions, covering the range of nanotechnology subject areas in which chemical engineers are currently engaged. These sessions included the following areas. • Fundamentals: thermodynamics at the nanoscale; applications of nanostructured fluids; transport properties in nanophase and nanoscale systems; molecular modelling methods; self and directed assembly at the nanoscale; nanofabrication and nanoscale processing; manipulation of nanophases by external fields; nanoscale systems; adsorption and transport in carbon nanotubes; nanotribology; making the transition from materials and phenomena to new technologies; operation of micro-and nano-systems. • Materials: nanoparticle synthesis and stabilization; nanoscale structure in polymers; nanotemplating of polymers; synthesis of carbon nanotubes and nanotube-based materials; nanowires; nanoparticle assemblies and superlattices; nanoelectronic materials; self-assembly of templated inorganic materials; nanostructured hybrid organic/inorganic materials; gas phase synthesis of nanoparticles; multicomponent structured particles; nano energetic materials; liquid-phase synthesis of nanoparticles. • Energy: synthesis and characterization of nanostructured catalytic materials; nanomaterials and devices for energy applications. • Biotechnology: nanobiotechnology; nanotechnology for the biotechnology and pharmaceuticals industries; nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology for sensors; advances in biomaterials, bionanotechnology, biomimetic

  10. Chemical Strategies for Template Syntheses of Composite Micro and Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    syntheses can be accomplished within the pores of the alumina templates to make semiconductor tubules (27). Figure 5 shows that Ti02 tubules prepared...surface area forms have higher photo efficiencies (28). Ti02 /conductor nanocomposites may prove to be useful photocatalysts because the template...synthesized Ti02 nanostructures have very high surface areas (27). Furthermore, as discussed previously, each outer tubular Ti02 catalyst particle has

  11. Confined Chemical Etching for Electrochemical Machining with Nanoscale Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Dongping; Han, Lianhuan; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Kang; Zhou, Jian-Zhang; Tian, Zhao-Wu; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2016-11-15

    and the photo- or electrogenerated etchant in the electrolyte solution, the diffusion distance of the etchant is confined to micro- or nanometer scale, which ensures the nanoscale accuracy of electrochemical machining. To focus on the "confinement" of chemical etching reactions, external physical-field modulations have recently been introduced into CELT by introducing various factors such as light field, force field, hydrodynamics, and so on. Meanwhile, kinetic investigations of the confined chemical etching (CCE) systems are established based on the finite element analysis and simulations. Based on the obtained kinetic parameters, the machining accuracy is tunable and well controlled. CELT is now applicable for 1D milling, 2D polishing, and 3D microfabrication with an accuracy at nanometer scale. CELT not only inherits all the advantages of electrochemical machining but also provides advantages over photolithography and nanoimprint for its applicability to different functional materials without involving any photocuring and thermoplastic resists. Although there are some technical problems, for example, mass transfer and balance, which need to be solved, CELT has shown its prospective competitiveness in electrochemical micromachining, especially in the semiconductor industry.

  12. Chemical and mechanical properties of surfaces on the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broz, Margaret Elizabeth

    This research investigated the chemical and physical properties of materials on the nanoscale. Combinatorial atomic layer deposition was used to deposit conformal films with compositional gradients from 100% aluminum oxide to 100% zinc oxide. The films were characterized using ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy to determine their thickness and composition, respectively. Atomic layer deposition was confirmed individually for aluminum oxide and zinc oxide. Combinatorial experiments confirmed the etching of ZnO by the trimethyl aluminum precursor, which was compensated for by adjusting the pulse sequence. Thin diamond-like carbon films were studied using scanning probe microscopy techniques (atomic force microscopy, friction force microscopy, digital pulsed force mode atomic force microscopy) and a method for quantifying the friction coefficient of these films was refined. Friction forces and the friction coefficient were measured for diamond-like carbon films over a range of relative humidity values and hysteresis effects were also studied. The adhesion changes due to fluorinated lubricant top coats on the diamond-like carbon were studied using digital pulsed force mode atomic force microscopy over a range of relative humidity values. Special diamond-like carbon coated tips were used in both sets of experiments to simulate the head-disk interaction between the slider and media in hard disk drive systems. Monodisperse oleic acid-capped lead selenide nanocrystals were synthesized using a modified hot injection method. Size-tunable nanocrystals were obtained by adjusting synthetic parameters. Nanocrystals were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, absorbance spectroscopy and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Organic ligands were also synthesized and used in ligand exchange experiments. Drop cast films of the nanocrystals with new ligands showed some change in FTIR peak position.

  13. Anion-templated assembly and magnetocaloric properties of a nanoscale {Gd38} cage versus a {Gd48} barrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fu-Sheng; Chen, Yan-Cong; Mao, Ling-Ling; Lin, Wei-Quan; Leng, Ji-Dong; Tarasenko, Róbert; Orendáč, Martin; Prokleška, Jan; Sechovský, Vladimír; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2013-10-25

    The comprehensive study reported herein provides compelling evidence that anion templates are the main driving force in the formation of two novel nanoscale lanthanide hydroxide clusters, {Gd38(ClO4)6} (1) and {Gd48Cl2(NO3)} (2), characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, infrared spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements. {Gd38(ClO4)6}, encapsulating six ClO4(-) ions, features a cage core composed of twelve vertex-sharing {Gd4} tetrahedrons and one Gd⋅⋅⋅Gd pillar. When Cl(-) and NO3(-) were incorporated in the reaction instead of ClO4(-), {Gd48Cl2(NO3)} is obtained with a barrel shape constituted by twelve vertex-sharing {Gd4} tetrahedrons and six {Gd5} pyramids. What is more, the cage-like {Gd38} can be dynamically converted into the barrel-shaped {Gd48} upon Cl(-) and NO3(-) stimulus. To our knowledge, it is the first time that the linear M-O-M' fashion and the unique μ8-ClO4(-) mode have been crystallized in pure lanthanide complex, and complex 2 represents the largest gadolinium cluster. Both of the complexes display large magnetocaloric effect in units of J kg(-1) K(-1) and mJ cm(-3) K(-1) on account of the weak antiferromagnetic exchange, the high N(Gd)/M(W) ratio (magnetic density), and the relatively compact crystal lattice (mass density).

  14. Fabrication of chemical templates via selective laser-induced desorption of hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Anja; Mathieu, Mareike; Franzka, Steffen; Feydt, Jürgen; Irsen, Stephan; Hartmann, Nils

    2013-08-01

    A nonlinear photothermal laser patterning technique for rapid fabrication of chemical templates is demonstrated. Hexadecanethiol monolayers on Au-coated Si substrates are processed at λ = 532 nm, a 1/e2 spot diameter of d=2.8 μm and ambient conditions. Local laser irradiation at high laser powers and short irradiation times in the micro-/millisecond range induces desorption of thiol molecules. The laser-depleted areas are backfilled with mercaptohexadecanoic acid in order to build up chemical templates. Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and scanning Auger electron spectroscopy are used for characterization of these templates. In agreement with a selective laser process, the results indicate the formation of flat chemical patterns with well-defined boundaries. Complementary condensation experiments demonstrate the functionality of the patterns as hydrophilic/hydrophobic templates. In particular, upon decreasing the temperature below the dew point, selective formation of water droplets on the backfilled areas is observed.

  15. Nanoscale chemical analysis and imaging of solid oxide cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Bowen, Jacob R.; Kuhn, Luise Theil;

    2008-01-01

    The performance of solid oxide cells (SOCs) is highly dependent on triple phase boundaries (TPBs). Therefore, detailed TPB characterization is crucial for their further development. We demonstrate that it is possible to prepare a similar to 50 nm thick transmission electron microscopy (TEM) lamel...... of nanoscale impurity phases at the TPBs has been obtained with a few nanometers lateral resolution. (c) 2008 The Electrochemical Society....

  16. Solution-phase synthesis of inorganic nanostructures by chemical transformation from reactive templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The solution-phase synthesis by chemical transformation from reactive templates has proved to be very effective in morphology-controlled synthesis of inorganic nanostructures. This review paper summarizes the recent progress in solution-phase synthesis of one-dimensional and hollow inorganic nanostructures via reactive templates, focusing on the approaches developed in our lab. The formation mechanisms based on reactive templates are discussed in depth to show the general concepts for the preparation processes. An outlook on the future development in this area is also presented.

  17. Nanoscale chemical interaction enhances the physical properties of bioglass composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravarian, Roya; Zhong, Xia; Barbeck, Mike; Ghanaati, Shahram; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Murphy, Ciara M; Schindeler, Aaron; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Dehghani, Fariba

    2013-10-22

    Bioglasses are favorable biomaterials for bone tissue engineering; however, their applications are limited due to their brittleness. In addition, the early failure in the interface is a common problem of composites of bioglass and a polymer with high mechanical strength. This effect is due to the phase separation, nonhomogeneous mixture, nonuniform mechanical strength, and different degradation properties of two compounds. To address these issues, in this study a nanoscale interaction between poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and bioactive glass was formed via silane coupling agent (3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MPMA). A monolith was produced at optimum composition from this hybrid by the sol-gel method at 50 °C with a rapid gelation time (hybrid. The in vivo studies in mice demonstrated that the integrity of the hybrids was maintained in subcutaneous implantation. They induced mainly a mononuclear phagocytic tissue reaction with a low level of inflammation, while bioglass provoked a tissue reaction with TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells. These results demonstrated that the presence of a nanoscale interaction between bioglass and PMMA affects the properties of bioglass and broadens its potential applications for bone replacement.

  18. Nanoscale simultaneous chemical and mechanical imaging via peak force infrared microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Wang, Haomin; Wagner, Martin; Yan, Yong; Jakob, Devon S.; Xu, Xiaoji G.

    2017-01-01

    Nondestructive chemical and mechanical measurements of materials with ~10-nm spatial resolution together with topography provide rich information on the compositions and organizations of heterogeneous materials and nanoscale objects. However, multimodal nanoscale correlations are difficult to achieve because of the limitation on spatial resolution of optical microscopy and constraints from instrumental complexities. We report a novel noninvasive spectroscopic scanning probe microscopy method—peak force infrared (PFIR) microscopy—that allows chemical imaging, collection of broadband infrared spectra, and mechanical mapping at a spatial resolution of 10 nm. In our technique, chemical absorption information is directly encoded in the withdraw curve of the peak force tapping cycle after illumination with synchronized infrared laser pulses in a simple apparatus. Nanoscale phase separation in block copolymers and inhomogeneity in CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite crystals are studied with correlative infrared/mechanical nanoimaging. Furthermore, we show that the PFIR method is sensitive to the presence of surface phonon polaritons in boron nitride nanotubes. PFIR microscopy will provide a powerful analytical tool for explorations at the nanoscale across wide disciplines. PMID:28691096

  19. Oligonucleotide-templated chemical reactions: pushing the boundaries of a nature-inspired process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percivalle, Claudia; Bartolo, Jean-François; Ladame, Sylvain

    2013-01-07

    Widespread in nature, oligonucleotide-templated reactions of phosphodiester bond formation have inspired chemists who are now applying this elegant strategy to the catalysis of a broad range of otherwise inefficient reactions. This review highlights the increasing diversity of chemical reactions that can be efficiently catalysed by an oligonucleotide template, using Watson-Crick base-pairing to bring both reagents in close enough proximity to react, thus increasing significantly their effective molarity. The applications of this elegant concept for nucleic acid sensing and controlled organic synthesis will also be discussed.

  20. ChemT, an open-source software for building template-based chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, R M V; Froufe, H J C; Daniel, P O M; Queiroz, M J R P; Ferreira, I C F R

    2011-01-01

    In computational chemistry, vast quantities of compounds are generated, and there is a need for cheminformatic tools to efficiently build chemical compound libraries. Several software tools for drawing and editing compound structures are available, but they lack options for automatic generation of chemical libraries. We have implemented ChemT, an easy-to-use open-source software tool that automates the process of preparing custom-made template-based chemical libraries. ChemT automatically generates three-dimensional chemical libraries by inputting a chemical template and the functional groups of interest. The graphical user interface of ChemT is self-explanatory, and a complete tutorial is provided. Several file formats are accepted by ChemT, and it is possible to filter the generated compounds according to different physicochemical properties. The compounds can be subject to force field minimization, and the resulting three-dimensional structures recorded on commonly used file formats. ChemT may be a valuable tool for investigators interested in using in silico virtual screening tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship modelling or molecular docking, in order to prioritize compounds for further chemical synthesis. To demonstrate the usefulness of ChemT, we describe an example based on a thieno[3,2-b]pyridine template. ChemT is available free of charge from our website at http://www.esa.ipb.pt/~ruiabreu/chemt .

  1. Fabrication of chemical templates via selective laser-induced desorption of hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schröter, Anja; Mathieu, Mareike; Franzka, Steffen [Fakultät für Chemie, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany); CENIDE – Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Feydt, Jürgen; Irsen, Stephan [caesar – Center of Advanced European Studies and Research, 53175 Bonn (Germany); Hartmann, Nils, E-mail: nils.hartmann@uni-due.de [Fakultät für Chemie, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany); CENIDE – Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    A nonlinear photothermal laser patterning technique for rapid fabrication of chemical templates is demonstrated. Hexadecanethiol monolayers on Au-coated Si substrates are processed at λ = 532 nm, a 1/e{sup 2} spot diameter of d{sub 1/e{sup 2}}=2.8μm and ambient conditions. Local laser irradiation at high laser powers and short irradiation times in the micro-/millisecond range induces desorption of thiol molecules. The laser-depleted areas are backfilled with mercaptohexadecanoic acid in order to build up chemical templates. Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and scanning Auger electron spectroscopy are used for characterization of these templates. In agreement with a selective laser process, the results indicate the formation of flat chemical patterns with well-defined boundaries. Complementary condensation experiments demonstrate the functionality of the patterns as hydrophilic/hydrophobic templates. In particular, upon decreasing the temperature below the dew point, selective formation of water droplets on the backfilled areas is observed.

  2. Characterization of nano-scale protective oxide films: application on metal chemical mechanical planarization

    OpenAIRE

    Karagöz, Ayşe; Craciun, V.; Başım, Gül Bahar

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the characterization of nano-scale metal oxide films for chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) applications. The protective nature of the self-grown metal oxide layers in the CMP slurry environment enable topographic selectivity required for metallization of interconnects. Tungsten was selected as the model metal film to study the formation and characteristics of the metal oxide nano-layers since tungsten CMP is very well-established in conventional semiconductor manuf...

  3. Nanoscale metals and semiconductors for the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthiram, Karthish

    The transduction of electrical energy into chemical bonds represents one potential strategy for storing energy derived from intermittent sources such as solar and wind. Driving the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide using light requires (1) developing light absorbers which convert photons into electron-hole pairs and (2) catalysts which utilize these electrons and holes to reduce carbon dioxide and oxidize water, respectively. For both the light absorbers and catalysts, the use of nanoscale particles is advantageous, as charge transport length scales are minimized in the case of nanoscale light absorbers and catalytic surface-area-to-volume ratio is maximized for nanoscale catalysts. In many cases, although semiconductors and metals in the form of thin films and foils are increasingly well-characterized as photoabsorbers and electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide reduction, respectively, the properties of their nanoscale counterparts remain poorly understood. This dissertation explores the nature of the light absorption mode of non-stoichiometric semiconductors which are utilized as light absorbers and the development of catalysts with enhanced stability, activity, and selectivity for carbon dioxide reduction. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the state of development of methods of transducing the energy of photons into chemical bonds. Chapters 2 and 3 investigate the development of stable, active, and selective catalysts for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide. Chapter 2 examines how copper nanoparticles have enhanced activities and selectivities for methanation compared to copper foils. Chapter 3 focuses on the development of strategies to stabilize high-surface-area catalysts to prevent surface area loss during electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction. Chapters 4 and 5 entail a fundamental understanding of the light absorption mode of nanoscale photoabsorbers used in both photoelectrochemical cells and in photovoltaics. Chapter 4 focuses on the

  4. Load and Time Dependence of Interfacial Chemical Bond-Induced Friction at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kaiwen; Gosvami, Nitya N.; Goldsby, David L.; Liu, Yun; Szlufarska, Izabela; Carpick, Robert W.

    2017-02-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are widely used empirical relationships that describe the macroscale frictional behavior of a broad range of materials, including rocks found in the seismogenic zone of Earth's crust. A fundamental aspect of the RSF laws is frictional "aging," where friction increases with the time of stationary contact due to asperity creep and/or interfacial strengthening. Recent atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments and simulations found that nanoscale silica contacts exhibit aging due to the progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds. The role of normal load (and, thus, normal stress) on this interfacial chemical bond-induced (ICBI) friction is predicted to be significant but has not been examined experimentally. Here, we show using AFM that, for nanoscale ICBI friction of silica-silica interfaces, aging (the difference between the maximum static friction and the kinetic friction) increases approximately linearly with the product of the normal load and the log of the hold time. This behavior is attributed to the approximately linear dependence of the contact area on the load in the positive load regime before significant wear occurs, as inferred from sliding friction measurements. This implies that the average pressure, and thus the average bond formation rate, is load independent within the accessible load range. We also consider a more accurate nonlinear model for the contact area, from which we extract the activation volume and the average stress-free energy barrier to the aging process. Our work provides an approach for studying the load and time dependence of contact aging at the nanoscale and further establishes RSF laws for nanoscale asperity contacts.

  5. Cation exchange on the nanoscale: an emerging technique for new material synthesis, device fabrication, and chemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivest, Jessy B; Jain, Prashant K

    2013-01-01

    Cation exchange is an age-old technique for the chemical conversion of liquids or extended solids by place-exchanging the cations in an ionic material with a different set of cations. The technique is undergoing a major revival with the advent of high-quality nanocrystals: researchers are now able to overcome the limitations in bulk systems and fully exploit cation exchange for materials synthesis and discovery via rapid, low-temperature transformations in the solid state. In this tutorial review, we discuss cation exchange as a promising materials synthesis and discovery tool. Exchange on the nanoscale exhibits some unique attributes: rapid kinetics at room temperature (orders of magnitude faster than in the bulk) and the tuning of reactivity via control of nanocrystal size, shape, and surface faceting. These features make cation exchange a convenient tool for accessing nanocrystal compositions and morphologies for which conventional synthesis may not be established. A simple exchange reaction allows extension of nanochemistry to a larger part of the periodic table, beyond the typical gamut of II-VI, IV-VI, and III-V materials. Cation exchange transformations in nanocrystals can be topotactic and size- and shape-conserving, allowing nanocrystals synthesized by conventional methods to be used as templates for production of compositionally novel, multicomponent, or doped nanocrystals. Since phases and compositions resulting from an exchange reaction can be kinetically controlled, rather than governed by the phase diagram, nanocrystals of metastable and hitherto inaccessible compositions are attainable. Outside of materials synthesis, applications for cation exchange exist in water purification, chemical staining, and sensing. Since nanoscale cation exchange occurs rapidly at room temperature, it can be integrated with sensitive environments such as those in biological systems. Cation exchange is already allowing access to a variety of new materials and processes

  6. Direct-Liquid-Evaporation Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nanocrystalline Cobalt Metal for Nanoscale Copper Interconnect Encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jun; Gong, Xian; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G

    2017-03-29

    In advanced microelectronics, precise design of liner and capping layers become critical, especially when it comes to the fabrication of Cu interconnects with dimensions lower than its mean free path. Herein, we demonstrate that direct-liquid-evaporation chemical vapor deposition (DLE-CVD) of Co is a promising method to make liner and capping layers for nanoscale Cu interconnects. DLE-CVD makes pure, smooth, nanocrystalline, and highly conformal Co films with highly controllable growth characteristics. This process allows full Co encapsulation of nanoscale Cu interconnects, thus stabilizing Cu against diffusion and electromigration. Electrical measurements and high-resolution elemental imaging studies show that the DLE-CVD Co encapsulation layer can improve the reliability and thermal stability of Cu interconnects. Also, with the high conductivity of Co, the DLE-CVD Co encapsulation layer have the potential to further decrease the power consumption of nanoscale Cu interconnects, paving the way for Cu interconnects with higher efficiency in future high-end microelectronics.

  7. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of an Individual Catalyst Particle with Soft X-ray Ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Understanding Fe deposition in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysis is critical for the mitigation of catalyst degradation. Here we employ soft X-ray ptychography to determine at the nanoscale the distribution and chemical state of Fe in an aged FCC catalyst particle. We show that both particle swelling due to colloidal Fe deposition and Fe penetration into the matrix as a result of precracking of large organic molecules occur. The application of ptychography allowed us to provide direct visual evidence for these two distinct Fe-based deactivation mechanisms, which have so far been proposed only on the basis of indirect evidence. PMID:27076990

  8. Glass Imprint Templates by Spark Assisted Chemical Engraving for Microfabrication by Hot Embossing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Abia Hof

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the field of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS matures, new demands are being placed on the microfabrication of complex architectures in robust materials, such as hard plastics. Iterative design optimization in a timely manner—rapid prototyping—places challenges on template fabrication, for methods such as injection moulding and hot embossing. In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of using spark assisted chemical engraving (SACE to produce micro patterned glass templates. The direct, write-based approach enabled the facile fabrication of smooth microfeatures with variations in all three-dimensions, which could be replicated by hot embossing different thermoplastics. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated the technique for a high glass transition temperature polycarbonate. Good fidelity over more than 10 cycles provides evidence that the approach is viable for rapid prototyping and has the potential to satisfy commercial-grade production at medium-level output volumes. Glass imprint templates showed no degradation after use, but care must be taken due to brittleness. The technique has the potential to advance microfabrication needs in academia and could be used by MEMS product developers.

  9. Exploring aromatic chemical space with NEAT: novel and electronically equivalent aromatic template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Meihua; Rai, Brajesh K; Mathiowetz, Alan M; Didiuk, Mary; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Benbow, John; Guimarães, Cristiano R W; Mente, Scot; Hayward, Matthew M; Liras, Spiros

    2012-05-25

    In this paper, we describe a lead transformation tool, NEAT (Novel and Electronically equivalent Aromatic Template), which can help identify novel aromatic rings that are estimated to have similar electrostatic potentials, dipoles, and hydrogen bonding capabilities to a query template; hence, they may offer similar bioactivity profiles. In this work, we built a comprehensive heteroaryl database, and precalculated high-level quantum mechanical (QM) properties, including electrostatic potential charges, hydrogen bonding ability, dipole moments, chemical reactivity, and othe properties. NEAT bioisosteric similarities are based on the electrostatic potential surface calculated by Brood, using the precalculated QM ESP charges and other QM properties. Compared with existing commercial lead transformation software, (1) NEAT is the only one that covers the comprehensive heteroaryl chemical space, and (2) NEAT offers a better characterization of novel aryl cores by using high-evel QM properties that are relevant to molecular interactions. NEAT provides unique value to medicinal chemists quickly exploring the largely uncharted aromatic chemical space, and one successful example of its application is discussed herein.

  10. Aminoclay-templated nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) synthesis for efficient harvesting of oleaginous microalga, Chlorella sp. KR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Young-Chul; Lee, Kyubock; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of aminoclay-templated nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for efficient harvesting of oleaginous microalgae was demonstrated. According to various aminoclay loadings (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 aminoclay/nZVI ratios), the stability of nZVI was investigated as a function......ZVI composite (ratio 1.0) exhibited a highly positively charged surface (~+40 mV) and a ferromagnetic property (~30 emu/g). On the basis of these characteristics, oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 was harvested within 3 min at a > 20 g/L loading under a magnetic field. In a scaled-up (24L) microalga harvesting...... process using magnetic rods, microalgae were successfully collected by attachment to the magnetic rods or by precipitation. It is believed that this approach, thanks to the recyclability of aminoclay-nZVI composites, can be applied in a continuous harvesting mode....

  11. Synthesis of copper telluride nanowires using template-based electrodeposition method as chemical sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandeep Arya; Saleem Khan; Suresh Kumar; Rajnikant Verma; Parveen Lehana

    2013-08-01

    Copper telluride (CuTe) nanowires were synthesized electrochemically from aqueous acidic solution of copper (II) sulphate (CuSO4.5H2O) and tellurium oxide (TeO2) on a copper substrate by template-assisted electrodeposition method. The electrodeposition was conducted at 30 °C and the length of nanowires was controlled by adjusting deposition time. Structural characteristics were examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope which confirm the formation of CuTe nanowires. Investigation for chemical sensing was carried out using air and chloroform, acetone, ethanol, glycerol, distilled water as liquids having dielectric constants 1, 4.81, 8.93, 21, 24.55, 42.5 and 80.1, respectively. The results unequivocally prove that copper telluride nanowires can be fabricated as chemical sensors with enhanced sensitivity and reliability.

  12. Nanoscale Chemical and Electrical Stabilities of Graphene-covered Silver Nanowire Networks for Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Heon; Choi, Woon Ih; Kim, Kwang Hee; Yang, Dae Jin; Heo, Sung; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid structure of Ag nanowires (AgNWs) covered with graphene (Gr) shows synergetic effects on the performance of transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs). However, these effects have been mainly observed via large-scale characterization, and precise analysis at the nanoscale level remains inadequate. Here, we present the nanoscale verification and visualization of the improved chemical and electrical stabilities of Gr-covered AgNW networks using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering technique. Specifically by transferring island Gr on top of the AgNW network, we were able to create samples in which both covered and uncovered AgNWs are simultaneously accessible to various surface-characterization techniques. Furthermore, our ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation elucidated the specific mechanistic pathway and a strong propensity for AgNW sulfidation, even in the presence of ambient oxidant gases.

  13. Nanoscale Chemical and Electrical Stabilities of Graphene-covered Silver Nanowire Networks for Transparent Conducting Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Heon; Choi, Woon Ih; Kim, Kwang Hee; Yang, Dae Jin; Heo, Sung; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2016-09-13

    The hybrid structure of Ag nanowires (AgNWs) covered with graphene (Gr) shows synergetic effects on the performance of transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs). However, these effects have been mainly observed via large-scale characterization, and precise analysis at the nanoscale level remains inadequate. Here, we present the nanoscale verification and visualization of the improved chemical and electrical stabilities of Gr-covered AgNW networks using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering technique. Specifically by transferring island Gr on top of the AgNW network, we were able to create samples in which both covered and uncovered AgNWs are simultaneously accessible to various surface-characterization techniques. Furthermore, our ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation elucidated the specific mechanistic pathway and a strong propensity for AgNW sulfidation, even in the presence of ambient oxidant gases.

  14. Photothermal laser fabrication of micro- and nanostructured chemical templates for directed protein immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Anja; Franzka, Steffen; Hartmann, Nils

    2014-12-16

    Photothermal patterning of poly(ethylene glycol) terminated organic monolayers on surface-oxidized silicon substrates is carried out using a microfocused beam of a CW laser operated at a wavelength of 532 nm. Trichlorosilane and trimethoxysilane precursors are used for coating. Monolayers from trimethoxysilane precursors show negligible unspecific protein adsorption in the background, i.e., provide platforms of superior protein repellency. Laser patterning results in decomposition of the monolayers and yields chemical templates for directed immobilization of proteins at predefined positions. Characterization is carried out via complementary analytical methods including fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Appropriate labeling techniques (fluorescent markers and gold clusters) and substrates (native and thermally oxidized silicon substrates) are chosen in order to facilitate identification of protein adsorption and ensure high sensitivity and selectivity. Variation of the laser parameters at a 1/e(2) spot diameter of 2.8 μm allows for fabrication of protein binding domains with diameters on the micrometer and nanometer length scale. Minimum domain sizes are about 300 nm. In addition to unspecific protein adsorption on as-patterned monolayers, biotin-streptavidin coupling chemistry is exploited for specific protein binding. This approach represents a novel facile laser-based means for fabrication of protein micro- and nanopatterns. The routine is readily applicable to femtosecond laser processing of glass substrates for the fabrication of transparent templates.

  15. A Chemical Template for Synthesis of Molecular Sheets of Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianasari, Ina; Benyettou, Farah; Sharma, Sudhir Kumar; Blanton, Thomas; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Jagannathan, Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Inspired by the discovery of graphene and its unique properties, we focused our research to develop a scheme to create nacre like lamellar structures of molecular sheets of CaCO3 interleaved with an organic material, namely carbon. We developed a facile, chemical template technique, using a formulation of poly(acrylic) acid (PAA) and calcium acetate to create lamellar stacks of single crystal sheets of CaCO3, with a nominal thickness of 17 Å, the same as a unit-cell dimension for calcite (c-axis = 17.062 Å), interleaved with amorphous carbon with a nominal thickness of 8 Å. The strong binding affinity between carboxylate anions and calcium cations in the formulation was used as a molecular template to guide CaCO3 crystallization. Computational modeling of the FTIR spectra showed good agreement with experimental data and confirmed that calcium ions are bridged between polymer chains, resulting in a net-like polymer structure. The process readily lends itself to explore the feasibility of creating molecular sheets of other important inorganic materials and potentially find applications in many fields such as super capacitors and “low k di-electric” systems.

  16. Probing Structural and Catalytic Characteristics of Galactose Oxidase Confined in Nanoscale Chemical Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hideki; Mossin, Susanne; Ulstrup, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    Galactose oxidase (GAOX) is a special metalloenzyme in terms of its active site structure and catalytic mechanisms. This work reports a study where the enzyme confined in a nanoscale chemical environment provided by mesoporous silicas (MPS) is probed. Two types of MPS, i.e. SBA-15 and MCF, were...... synthesized and used to accommodate GAOX. SBA-15-ROD is rod-shaped particles with periodically ordered nanopores (9.5 nm), while MCF has a mesocellular foam-like structure with randomly distributed pores (23 nm) interconnected by smaller windows (8.8 nm). GAOX is non-covalently confined in SBA-15- ROD, while...... constant (KM) of the enzyme is largely unchanged upon immobilization, while the turnover number (kcat) is slightly reduced. The overall catalytic efficiency, represented by the ratio of kcat/KM, is retained around 70% and 60% for SBA-15 and MCF immobilization, respectively. The thermal resistance...

  17. Synthesis of nanoscale materials via a novel chemical vapor deposition based apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Kevin L.

    Nanoscale materials are of interest due to the unusual properties afforded by their size. Two such morphologies, nanoparticles and the recently discovered "nanobelt" materials, are explored in this thesis. A novel nanoscale material synthesis apparatus was constructed. It consists of four primary components: an evaporation chamber, a chemical vapor deposition furnace, a collection chamber, and a powder reservoir. A two-stage subsonic jet separates the first two components, permitting nanoparticle production to occur independently of subsequent chemical and thermal treatment. An experimental design was conducted to examine the roles of several variables during the formation of graphite-encapsulated nickel nanoparticles. Coating morphology was strongly dependent on furnace temperature, which exhibited a more subtle influence on mean particle size. The percentage of nickel surviving acid treatment depended primarily on hydrocarbon identity, as well as furnace temperature and carbon atom flux. Acetylene at high temperature yielded crystalline carbon coatings and the greatest percentage of protected nickel achieved, but with an excess of carbon in the product. Additional encapsulated nickel experiments were conducted with reduced acetylene flowrates and a staggered furnace temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis of the as-collected powder revealed that the coating was a crystalline and amorphous carbon hybrid. While this coating effectively protected large clumps of embedded nickel, removal of the amorphous carbon by oxidation rendered individual particles susceptible to hydrochloric acid attack. Amorphous silica was introduced as an alternative coating material via tetraethoxysilane decomposition. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the production of well-dispersed, acid-resistant particles with a nickel core and silica shell. The synthesis of nanoscale alumina heterogeneous catalyst substrates was investigated. Exposure of aluminum nanoparticles to large

  18. 3D Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of the Distribution of Aluminum Coordination Environments in Zeolites with Soft X-Ray Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aramburo, Luis R.; Liu, Yijin; Tyliszczak, Tolek; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Andrews, Joy C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the first nanoscale chemical imaging study revealing the spatial distribution of the amount and coordination environment of aluminum in zeolite materials with 3D scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). For this purpose, we have focused on two showcase samples involving the in

  19. Probing nanoscale chemical segregation and surface properties of antifouling hybrid xerogel films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destino, Joel F; Gatley, Caitlyn M; Craft, Andrew K; Detty, Michael R; Bright, Frank V

    2015-03-24

    Over the past decade there has been significant development in hybrid polymer coatings exhibiting tunable surface morphology, surface charge, and chemical segregation-all believed to be key properties in antifouling (AF) coating performance. While a large body of research exists on these materials, there have yet to be studies on all the aforementioned properties in a colocalized manner with nanoscale spatial resolution. Here, we report colocalized atomic force microscopy, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy, and confocal Raman microscopy on a model AF xerogel film composed of 1:9:9 (mol:mol:mol) 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), n-octyltriethoxysilane (C8), and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) formed on Al2O3. This AF film is found to consist of three regions that are chemically and physically unique in 2D and 3D across multiple length scales: (i) a 1.5 μm thick base layer derived from all three precursors; (ii) 2-4 μm diameter mesa-like features that are enriched in free amine (from APTES), depleted in the other species and that extend 150-400 nm above the base layer; and (iii) 1-2 μm diameter subsurface inclusions within the base layer that are enriched in hydrogen-bonded amine (from APTES) and depleted in the other species.

  20. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first.

  1. Nano-scale chemical evolution in a proton-and neutron-irradiated Zr alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Allan; Topping, M.; Frankel, P.; Jädernäs, D.; Romero, J.; Hallstadius, L.; Darby, E. C.; Preuss, M.

    2017-04-01

    Proton-and neutron-irradiated Zircaloy-2 are compared in terms of the nano-scale chemical evolution within second phase particles (SPPs) Zr(Fe,Cr)2 and Zr2(Fe,Ni). This is accomplished through ultra-high spatial resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and the use of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic methods. Fe-depletion is observed from both SPP types after irradiation with both irradiative species, but is heterogeneous in the case of Zr(Fe,Cr)2, predominantly from the edge region, and homogeneously in the case of Zr2(Fe,Ni). Further, there is evidence of a delay in the dissolution of the Zr2(Fe,Ni) SPP with respect to the Zr(Fe,Cr)2. As such, SPP dissolution results in matrix supersaturation with solute under both irradiative species and proton irradiation is considered well suited to emulate the effects of neutron irradiation in this context. The mechanisms of solute redistribution processes from SPPs and the consequences for irradiation-induced growth phenomena are discussed.

  2. Optical techniques for nanoscale probing and chemical detection in aqueous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pristinski, Denis

    We present an investigation of charge-dependent physical properties of water-soluble synthetic polymers and polymer-based layered structures, using optical detection methods in a visible range. We apply in situ nanoscale optical techniques to study response of polymer systems to changes in pH, polymer concentration, and concentration and type of counterions. This work describes three optical techniques and custom built instrumental setups for nanoscale polymer characterization in aqueous environment. Phase-modulated ellipsometry was applied to determine the refraction coefficient and the thickness of a hydrogel-like polymer layer on a substrate. The present study describes the sensitivity of the phase modulated ellipsometry to errors of measurement and determines conditions for decoupling film thickness and refraction index. It is shown that, for a certain range of film thickness, both the thickness and the refractive index can be determined from a single measurement with high precision. This optimal range of the film thickness is calculated for organic thin films, and the analysis is tested on crosslinked poly(methacrylic acid) polymer films in air and in water. Fluorescent correlation spectroscopy was used to investigate diffusion of a synthetic polyelectrolyte in aqueous solutions. Translational diffusion of Alexa-labeled poly(methacrylic acid) chains was studied in very dilute, 10-4 mg/ml, solutions as a function of polymer charge density and counterion concentration. The results illustrate the utility of the technique for studying hydrodynamic sizes of polyelectrolyte coils in response to variation in solution pH or concentration of salt and polyelectrolytes. We apply surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for studying of enhancement capabilities of individual silver nanoparticles attached to glass and silicon substrates. Nanoparticles were electrostatically bound to a self-assembled polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) monolayer, which was deposited on

  3. Correlation between magnetic spin structure and the three-dimensional geometry in chemically synthesized nanoscale magnetite rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltschka, M.; Klaui, M.; Rudiger, U;

    2008-01-01

    The correlation between magnetic spin structure and geometry in nanoscale chemically synthesized Fe3O4 rings has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. We find primarily the flux closure vortex states but in rings with thickness variations, an effective stray field occurs. Using....... The interaction between exchange coupled rings leads to antiparallel vortex states and extended onion states. (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics....

  4. Phase-selective chemical extraction of selenium and sulfur from nanoscale metal chalcogenides: a general strategy for synthesis, purification, and phase targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sines, Ian T; Schaak, Raymond E

    2011-02-09

    Controlling the composition and phase formation of bulk and nanoscale solids underpins efforts to control physical properties. Here, we introduce a powerful new chemical pathway that facilitates composition-tunable synthesis, post-synthesis purification, and precise phase targeting in metal chalcogenide systems. When metal selenides and sulfides react with trioctylphosphine (TOP) at temperatures that range from 65 to 270 °C, selenium and sulfur are selectively extracted to produce the most metal-rich chalcogenide that is stable in a particular binary system. This general approach is demonstrated for SnSe(2), FeS(2), NiSe(2), and CoSe(2), which convert to SnSe, FeS, Ni(3)Se(2), and Co(9)Se(8), respectively. In-depth studies of the Fe-Se system highlight the precise phase targeting and purification that is achievable, with PbO-type FeSe (the most metal-rich stable Fe-Se phase) forming exclusively when other Fe-Se phases, including mixtures, react with TOP. This chemistry also represents a new template-based nanoparticle "conversion chemistry" reaction, transforming hollow NiSe(2) nanospheres into hollow NiSe nanospheres with morphological retention.

  5. Chemical template-assisted synthesis of monodisperse rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres as drug carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lin; Ruan, Weimin; Zou, Bingfang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yongqiang

    2017-08-01

    A chemical template strategy was put forward to synthesize monodisperse rattle-type magnetic carbon (Fe3O4@C) hollow microspheres. During the synthesis procedure, monodisperse Fe2O3 microspheres were used as chemical template, which released Fe(3+) ions in acidic solution and initiated the in-situ polymerization of pyrrole into polypyrrole (PPy) shell. With the continual acidic etching of Fe2O3 microspheres, rattle-type Fe2O3@PPy microspheres were generated with the cavity appearing between the PPy shell and left Fe2O3 core, which were then transformed into Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres through calcination in nitrogen atmosphere. Compared with traditional physical template, the shell and cavity of rattle-type hollow microspheres were generated in one step using the chemical template method, which obviously saved the complex procedures including the coating and removal of middle shells. The experimental results exhibited that the rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres with different parameters could be regulated through controlled synthesis of the intermediate Fe2O3@PPy product. Moreover, when the rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres were investigated as drug carrier, they manifested sustained-release behaviour of doxorubicin, justifying their promising applications as carriers in drug delivery. The aim of the present study was first to synthesize rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres through a simple synthesis method as a drug carrier. Here a chemical template synthesis of rattle-type hollow microspheres was developed, which saved the complex procedures including the coating and removal of middle shells in traditional physical template. Second, all the influence factors in the reaction processes were systematically investigated to obtain rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres with controlled parameters. Third, the rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres were studied as drug carriers and the influences of their structural parameters on drug loading and

  6. Effects of confinement on the thermodynamics and kinetics of metal hydrides templated in ordered nanoporous frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, M.D.; Bhakta, R.; Behrens, R. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Majzoub, E.H.; Liu, X.; Peaslee, D. [Missouri Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Herberg, J.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Wagner, L.K.; Grossman, J.C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this work is to use Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) and Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs) as templates for the synthesis of metal hydride nanoparticles with controlled size and chemical environment to establish the origins of the nanoscale destabilization predicted by theory and reported experimentally. (orig.)

  7. A nano-scale mirror-like surface of Ti-6Al-4V attained by chemical mechanical polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenliang, Liang; Weili, Liu; Shasha, Li; Hui, Kong; Zefang, Zhang; Zhitang, Song

    2016-05-01

    Metal Ti and its alloys have been widely utilized in the fields of aviation, medical science, and micro-electro-mechanical systems, for its excellent specific strength, resistance to corrosion, and biological compatibility. As the application of Ti moves to the micro or nano scale, however, traditional methods of planarization have shown their short slabs. Thus, we introduce the method of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) to provide a new way for the nano-scale planarization method of Ti alloys. We obtain a mirror-like surface, whose flatness is of nano-scale, via the CMP method. We test the basic mechanical behavior of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) in the CMP process, and optimize the composition of CMP slurry. Furthermore, the possible reactions that may take place in the CMP process have been studied by electrochemical methods combined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). An equivalent circuit has been built to interpret the dynamic of oxidation. Finally, a model has been established to explain the synergy of chemical and mechanical effects in the CMP of Ti-6Al-4V. Project supported by the National Major Scientific and Technological Special Project during the Twelfth Five-year Plan Period of China (Grant No. 2009ZX02030-1), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51205387), the Support by Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai City, China (Grant No. 11nm0500300), and the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai City, China (Grant No. 14XD1425300).

  8. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Dynamic Molecular Phase Boundary with Ultrahigh Vacuum Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Chiang, Naihao; Madison, Lindsey R; Pozzi, Eric A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Seideman, Tamar; Ratner, Mark A; Hersam, Mark C; Schatz, George C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-06-08

    Nanoscale chemical imaging of a dynamic molecular phase boundary has broad implications for a range of problems in catalysis, surface science, and molecular electronics. While scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is commonly used to study molecular phase boundaries, its information content can be severely compromised by surface diffusion, irregular packing, or three-dimensional adsorbate geometry. Here, we demonstrate the simultaneous chemical and structural analysis of N-N'-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-1,7-(4'-t-butylphenoxy)perylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PPDI) molecules by UHV tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Both condensed and diffusing domains of PPDI coexist on Ag(100) at room temperature. Through comparison with time-dependent density functional theory simulations, we unravel the orientation of PPDI molecules at the dynamic molecular domain boundary with unprecedented ∼4 nm spatial resolution.

  9. Study of chemically synthesized ZnO nano particles under a bio template using radioactive ion beam

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a project proposal to study nano sized semiconductor ZnO system, useful in biology and medicinal purposes, using radioactive ion beam from ISOLDE. Doping of the nano particles with Cu, Cd and Ga ions (in their variable valancy states) are expected to impart changes in the electrical structure and properties in the said system under study. The morphological changes, chemical environment, micro structure, electrical and optical properties of the nano size particles of ZnO system (developed under a bio template of folic acid) after the interaction with radioactive ion beam will be studied. The provision of perturbed angular correlation (PAC) study with respect to the changes in chemical environment, where ever possible will be attempted.

  10. Tribology of Si/SiO2 in humid air: transition from severe chemical wear to wearless behavior at nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; He, Hongtu; Wang, Xiaodong; Kim, Seong H; Qian, Linmao

    2015-01-13

    Wear at sliding interfaces of silicon is a main cause for material loss in nanomanufacturing and device failure in microelectromechanical system (MEMS) applications. However, a comprehensive understanding of the nanoscale wear mechanisms of silicon in ambient conditions is still lacking. Here, we report the chemical wear of single crystalline silicon, a material used for micro/nanoscale devices, in humid air under the contact pressure lower than the material hardness. A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of the wear track confirmed that the wear of silicon in humid conditions originates from surface reactions without significant subsurface damages such as plastic deformation or fracture. When rubbed with a SiO2 ball, the single crystalline silicon surface exhibited transitions from severe wear in intermediate humidity to nearly wearless states at two opposite extremes: (a) low humidity and high sliding speed conditions and (b) high humidity and low speed conditions. These transitions suggested that at the sliding interfaces of Si/SiO2 at least two different tribochemical reactions play important roles. One would be the formation of a strong "hydrogen bonding bridge" between hydroxyl groups of two sliding interfaces and the other the removal of hydroxyl groups from the SiO2 surface. The experimental data indicated that the dominance of each reaction varies with the ambient humidity and sliding speed.

  11. Applying Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion for Template-Free, Kilogram-Scale Production of SnO2 Hollow Nanospheres via Spray Drying System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung Sang; Ju, Hyeon Seok; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-01-01

    A commercially applicable and simple process for the preparation of aggregation-free metal oxide hollow nanospheres is developed by applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion to a large-scale spray drying process. The precursor powders prepared by spray drying are transformed into homogeneous metal oxide hollow nanospheres through a simple post-treatment process. Aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres are selected as the first target material for lithium ion storage applications. Amorphous carbon microspheres with uniformly dispersed Sn metal nanopowder are prepared in the first step of the post-treatment process under a reducing atmosphere. The post-treatment of the Sn-C composite powder at 500 °C under an air atmosphere produces carbon- and aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres through nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion. The hollow and filled SnO2 nanopowders exhibit different cycling performances, with their discharge capacities after 300 cycles being 643 and 280 mA h g−1, respectively, at a current density of 2 A g−1. The SnO2 hollow nanospheres with high structural stability exhibit superior cycling and rate performances for lithium ion storage compared to the filled ones. PMID:27033088

  12. Applying Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion for Template-Free, Kilogram-Scale Production of SnO2 Hollow Nanospheres via Spray Drying System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung Sang; Ju, Hyeon Seok; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-04-01

    A commercially applicable and simple process for the preparation of aggregation-free metal oxide hollow nanospheres is developed by applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion to a large-scale spray drying process. The precursor powders prepared by spray drying are transformed into homogeneous metal oxide hollow nanospheres through a simple post-treatment process. Aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres are selected as the first target material for lithium ion storage applications. Amorphous carbon microspheres with uniformly dispersed Sn metal nanopowder are prepared in the first step of the post-treatment process under a reducing atmosphere. The post-treatment of the Sn-C composite powder at 500 °C under an air atmosphere produces carbon- and aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres through nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion. The hollow and filled SnO2 nanopowders exhibit different cycling performances, with their discharge capacities after 300 cycles being 643 and 280 mA h g‑1, respectively, at a current density of 2 A g‑1. The SnO2 hollow nanospheres with high structural stability exhibit superior cycling and rate performances for lithium ion storage compared to the filled ones.

  13. The Load and Time Dependence of Chemical Bonding-Induced Frictional Ageing of Silica at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, K.; Gosvami, N. N.; Goldsby, D. L.; Carpick, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are empirical relationships that describe the frictional behavior of rocks and other materials in experiments, and reproduce a variety of observed natural behavior when employed in earthquake models. A pervasive observation from rock friction experiments is the linear increase of static friction with the log of contact time, or 'ageing'. Ageing is usually attributed to an increase in real area of contact associated with asperity creep. However, recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrate that ageing of nanoscale silica-silica contacts is due to progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds in the absence of plastic deformation, in a manner consistent with the multi-contact ageing behavior of rocks [Li et al., 2011]. To further investigate chemical bonding-induced ageing, we explored the influence of normal load (and thus contact normal stress) and contact time on ageing. Experiments that mimic slide-hold-slide rock friction experiments were conducted in the AFM for contact loads and hold times ranging from 23 to 393 nN and 0.1 to 100 s, respectively, all in humid air (~50% RH) at room temperature. Experiments were conducted by sequentially sliding the AFM tip on the sample at a velocity V of 0.5 μm/s, setting V to zero and holding the tip stationary for a given time, and finally resuming sliding at 0.5 μm/s to yield a peak value of friction followed by a drop to the sliding friction value. Chemical bonding-induced ageing, as measured by the peak friction minus the sliding friction, increases approximately linearly with the product of normal load and the log of the hold time. Theoretical studies of the roles of reaction energy barriers in nanoscale ageing indicate that frictional ageing depends on the total number of reaction sites and the hold time [Liu & Szlufarska, 2012]. We combine chemical kinetics analyses with contact mechanics models to explain our results, and develop a new approach for curve

  14. Nanoscale chemical imaging of Bacillus subtilis spores by combining tip-enhanced Raman scattering and advanced statistical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusciano, Giulia; Zito, Gianluigi; Isticato, Rachele; Sirec, Teja; Ricca, Ezio; Bailo, Elena; Sasso, Antonio

    2014-12-23

    Tip-enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) has recently emerged as a powerful spectroscopic technique capable of providing subdiffraction morphological and chemical information on samples. In this work, we apply TERS spectroscopy for surface analysis of the Bacillus subtilis spore, a very attractive biosystem for a wide range of applications regulated by the spore surface properties. The observed spectra reflect the complex and heterogeneous environment explored by the plasmonic tip, therefore exhibiting significant point-to-point variations at the nanoscale. Herein, we demonstrate that TERS data processing via principal component analysis allows handling such spectral changes, thus enabling an unbiased correlative imaging based on TERS. Our experimental outcomes suggest a denser arrangement of both proteins and carbohydrates on specific spore surface regions simultaneously revealed by AFM phase imaging. Successful TERS analysis of spores' surface is useful for bacterial surface-display systems and drug delivery applications.

  15. Nanoscale multilayered and porous carbide interphases prepared by pressure-pulsed reactive chemical vapor deposition for ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, S., E-mail: jacques@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, University of Bordeaux 1, CNRS, Herakles-Safran, CEA, 3 allee de la Boetie, F-33600 Pessac (France); Jouanny, I.; Ledain, O.; Maillé, L.; Weisbecker, P. [LCTS, University of Bordeaux 1, CNRS, Herakles-Safran, CEA, 3 allee de la Boetie, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2013-06-15

    In Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) reinforced by continuous fibers, a good toughness is achieved by adding a thin film called “interphase” between the fiber and the brittle matrix, which acts as a mechanical fuse by deflecting the matrix cracks. Pyrocarbon (PyC), with or without carbide sub-layers, is typically the material of choice to fulfill this role. The aim of this work was to study PyC-free nanoscale multilayered carbide coatings as interphases for CMCs. Nanoscale multilayered (SiC–TiC){sub n} interphases were deposited by pressure-Pulsed Chemical Vapor Deposition (P-CVD) on single filament Hi-Nicalon fibers and embedded in a SiC matrix sheath. The thicknesses of the carbide interphase sub-layers could be made as low as a few nanometers as evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. By using the P-ReactiveCVD method (P-RCVD), in which the TiC growth involves consumption of SiC, it was not only possible to obtain multilayered (SiC–TiC){sub n} films but also TiC films with a porous multilayered microstructure as a result of the Kirkendall effect. The porosity in the TiC sequences was found to be enhanced when some PyC was added to SiC prior to total RCVD consumption. Because the porosity volume fraction was still not high enough, the role of mechanical fuse of the interphases could not be evidenced from the tensile curves, which remained fully linear even when chemical attack of the fiber surface was avoided.

  16. Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage Lithium–Manganese Rich NMC Composite Cathodes with Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of chemical composition and morphology of battery materials during electrochemical cycling is fundamental to extending battery cycle life and ensuring safety. This is particularly true for the much debated high energy density (high voltage) lithium–manganese rich cathode material of composition Li1 + xM1 – xO2 (M = Mn, Co, Ni). In this study we combine full-field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) with X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) to spatially resolve changes in chemical phase, oxidation state, and morphology within a high voltage cathode having nominal composition Li1.2Mn0.525Ni0.175Co0.1O2. Nanoscale microscopy with chemical/elemental sensitivity provides direct quantitative visualization of the cathode, and insights into failure. Single-pixel (∼30 nm) TXM XANES revealed changes in Mn chemistry with cycling, possibly to a spinel conformation and likely including some Mn(II), starting at the particle surface and proceeding inward. Morphological analysis of the particles revealed, with high resolution and statistical sampling, that the majority of particles adopted nonspherical shapes after 200 cycles. Multiple-energy tomography showed a more homogeneous association of transition metals in the pristine particle, which segregate significantly with cycling. Depletion of transition metals at the cathode surface occurs after just one cycle, likely driven by electrochemical reactions at the surface. PMID:25054780

  17. Nanoscale morphological and chemical changes of high voltage lithium-manganese rich NMC composite cathodes with cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feifei; Liu, Yijin; Martha, Surendra K; Wu, Ziyu; Andrews, Joy C; Ice, Gene E; Pianetta, Piero; Nanda, Jagjit

    2014-08-13

    Understanding the evolution of chemical composition and morphology of battery materials during electrochemical cycling is fundamental to extending battery cycle life and ensuring safety. This is particularly true for the much debated high energy density (high voltage) lithium-manganese rich cathode material of composition Li(1 + x)M(1 - x)O2 (M = Mn, Co, Ni). In this study we combine full-field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) with X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) to spatially resolve changes in chemical phase, oxidation state, and morphology within a high voltage cathode having nominal composition Li1.2Mn0.525Ni0.175Co0.1O2. Nanoscale microscopy with chemical/elemental sensitivity provides direct quantitative visualization of the cathode, and insights into failure. Single-pixel (∼ 30 nm) TXM XANES revealed changes in Mn chemistry with cycling, possibly to a spinel conformation and likely including some Mn(II), starting at the particle surface and proceeding inward. Morphological analysis of the particles revealed, with high resolution and statistical sampling, that the majority of particles adopted nonspherical shapes after 200 cycles. Multiple-energy tomography showed a more homogeneous association of transition metals in the pristine particle, which segregate significantly with cycling. Depletion of transition metals at the cathode surface occurs after just one cycle, likely driven by electrochemical reactions at the surface.

  18. Integrated Raman and electron microscopy : correlative chemical specificity and nanoscale resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Frank Jan

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the integration of a Raman microscope in a focused ion beam - scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM). Raman micro-spectroscopy enables chemical specific characterization, while electron microscopy enables high resolution imaging. The Raman - SEM combination thus enables the

  19. AFM-IR: Technology and Applications in Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzi, Alexandre; Prater, Craig B

    2016-12-13

    Atomic force microscopy-based infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) is a rapidly emerging technique that provides chemical analysis and compositional mapping with spatial resolution far below conventional optical diffraction limits. AFM-IR works by using the tip of an AFM probe to locally detect thermal expansion in a sample resulting from absorption of infrared radiation. AFM-IR thus can provide the spatial resolution of AFM in combination with the chemical analysis and compositional imaging capabilities of infrared spectroscopy. This article briefly reviews the development and underlying technology of AFM-IR, including recent advances, and then surveys a wide range of applications and investigations using AFM-IR. AFM-IR applications that will be discussed include those in polymers, life sciences, photonics, solar cells, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, and cultural heritage. In the Supporting Information , the authors provide a theoretical section that reviews the physics underlying the AFM-IR measurement and detection mechanisms.

  20. Nanoscale carbon materials from hydrocarbons pyrolysis: Structure, chemical behavior, utilisation for non-aqueous supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savilov, Serguei V., E-mail: savilov@chem.msu.ru [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation); Strokova, Natalia E.; Ivanov, Anton S.; Arkhipova, Ekaterina A. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation); Desyatov, Andrey V. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia (Russian Federation); Hui, Xia [Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology (China); Aldoshin, Serguei M. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Physical and Chemical Engineering (Russian Federation); Lunin, Valery V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • N-doped and regular carbon nanomaterials were obtained by pyrolitic technique. • Dynamic vapor sorption of different solvents reveals smaller S{sub BET} values. • Steric hindrance and specific chemical interactions are the reasons for this. • Nitrogen doping leads to raise of capacitance and coulombic efficiency with non-aqueous N-containing electrolyte. - Abstract: This work systematically studies adsorption properties of carbon nanomaterials that are synthesized through hydrocarbons that is a powerful technique to fabricate different kinds of carbon materials, e.g., nanotubes, nanoshells, onions, including nitrogen substituted. The adsorption properties of the as-synthesized carbons are achieved by low temperature nitrogen adsorption and organic vapors sorption. Heptane, acetonitrile, water, ethanol, benzene and 1-methylimidazole, which are of great importance for development of supercapacitors, are used as substrates. It is discovered that while nitrogen adsorption reveals a high specific surface area, this parameter for most of organic compounds is rather small depending not only on the size of its molecule but also on chemical interactions for a pair adsorbent–adsorbate. The experimental values of heat of adsorption for carbon and N-substituted structures, when Coulomb cross-coupling of nitrogen atoms in adsorbent and adsorbate takes place, confirms this supposition.

  1. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L.; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition. PMID:27283116

  2. Nanoscale Chemical Evolution of Silicon Negative Electrodes Characterized by Low-Loss STEM-EELS

    CERN Document Server

    Boniface, Maxime; Danet, Julien; Guyomard, Dominique; Moreau, Philippe; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Continuous solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formation remains the limiting factor of the lifetime of silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs) based negative electrodes. Methods that could provide clear diagnosis of the electrode degradation are of utmost necessity to streamline further developments. We demonstrate that electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can be used to quickly map SEI components and quantify LixSi alloys from single experiments, with resolutions down to 5 nm. Exploiting the low-loss part of the EEL spectrum allowed us to circumvent the degradation phenomena that have so far crippled the application of this technique on such beam-sensitive compounds. Our results provide unprecedented insight into silicon aging mechanisms in full cell configuration. We observe the morphology of the SEI to be extremely heterogeneous at the particle scale but with clear chemical evolutions with extended cycling coming from both SEI accumulation and a transition fro...

  3. Total reflection of x-ray fluorescence (TXRF): a mature technique for environmental chemical nanoscale metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgese, L.; Zacco, A.; Bontempi, E.; Colombi, P.; Bertuzzi, R.; Ferretti, E.; Tenini, S.; Depero, L. E.

    2009-08-01

    Total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is a technique well established for chemical analysis of samples deposited as a thin layer. Nowadays it is mainly employed for electronic industry quality control. Recently, very compact and economic TXRF instrumentation was proposed. Combining this with the capability to analyze liquid samples, this technique is suitable to be employed in many different applications, comprising the very critical field of environmental analysis. Comparisons with the standard atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) technique show that TXRF is a practical, accurate, and reliable technique. Indeed, round-robin activities have already been started. Despite the efficiency and economy of the developed portable TXRF instrumentation, this is not widely employed for chemical laboratory analysis probably because TXRF is not an officially recognized technique, i.e. it is not yet normative-subjected. This fact could also be due to the long background of analytical applications developed for AAS, ICPS or inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) up to now. In this paper, we present a work of environmental monitoring of an industrial site, performed by means of bioindicators (lichens). The analysis of trace elements concentration in lichen was usually conducted with spectrophotometric techniques, such as AAS and ICP-MS, which were accepted by common regulations and normative-subjected. In this study, we accomplished a comparative lichen analysis by AAS and TXRF. The reproducibility of the obtained results showed the high correspondence between the two techniques. This comparison highlighted the versatility of the TXRF apparatus that allowed more rapid and simultaneous element detection. The obtained results suggested that this portable TXRF system could be suitable for regulation to produce certificated analysis upto ppb concentrations for some elements.

  4. Correlating the nanoscale mechanical and chemical properties of knockout mice bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavukcuoglu, Nadire Beril

    Bone is a mineral-organic composite where the organic matrix is mainly type I collagen plus small amounts of non-collagenous proteins including osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OC) and fibrillin 2 (Fbn2). Mature bone undergoes remodeling continually so new bone is formed and old bone resorbed. Uncoupling between the bone resorption and bone formation causes an overall loss of bone mass and leads to diseases like osteoporosis and osteopenia. These are characterized by structural deterioration of the bone tissue and an increased risk of fracture. The non-collagenous bone proteins are known to have a role in regulating bone turnover and to affect the structural integrity of bone. OPN and OC play a key role in bone resorption and formation, while absence of Fbn-2 causes a connective tissue disorder (congenital contractural arachnodactyly) and has been associated with decreased bone mass. In this thesis nanoindentation and Raman-microspectroscopy techniques were used to investigate and correlate the mechanical and chemical properties of cortical femoral bones from OPN deficient (OPN-/-), OC deficient (OC-/-) and Fbn-2 deficient (Fbn2-/-) mice and their age, sex and background matched wild-type controls (OPN+/+, OC+/+ and Fbn2+/+). For OPN the hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) of under 12 week OPN-/- bones were significantly lower than for OPN+/+ bones, but Raman showed no significant difference. Mechanical properties of bones from mice older than 12 weeks were not significantly different with genotype. However, mineralization and crystallinity from >50 week OPN-/- bones were significantly higher than for OPN+/+ bones. Mechanical properties of OPN-/- bones showed no variation with age, but mineralization, crystallinity and type-B carbonate substitution increased for both genotypes. For OC-/- intra-bone analyses showed that the hardness and crystallinity of the bones were significantly higher, especially in the mid-cortical sections, compared to OC+/+ bones. Fbn2

  5. A new route to nanoscale tomographic chemical analysis: Focused ion beam-induced auger electron spectrosocpy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvaneh, Hamed

    This research project is aimed to study the application of ion-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (IAES) in combination with the characteristics of focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy for performing chemical spectroscopy and further evaluate its potential for 3-dimensional chemical tomography applications. The mechanism for generation of Auger electrons by bombarding ions is very different from its electron induced counterpart. In the conventional electron-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (EAES), an electron beam with energy typically in the range 1-10kV is used to excite inner-shell (core) electrons of the solid. An electron from a higher electron energy state then de-excites to fill the hole and the extra energy is then transferred to either another electron, i.e. the Auger electron, or generation of an X-ray (photon). In both cases the emitting particles have charac-teristic energies and could be used to identify the excited target atoms. In IAES, however, large excitation cross sections can occur by promotion of in-ner shell electrons through crossing of molecular orbitals. Originally such phenomenological excitation processes were first proposed [3] for bi-particle gas phase collision systems to explain the generation of inner shell vacancies in violent collisions. In addition to excitation of incident or target atoms, due to a much heavier mass of ions compared to electrons, there would also be a substantial momentum transfer from the incident to the target atoms. This may cause the excited target atom to recoil from the lattice site or alternatively sputter off the surface with the possibility of de-excitation while the atom is either in motion in the matrix or traveling in vacuum. As a result, one could expect differences between the spectra induced by incident electrons and ions and interpretation of the IAE spectra requires separate consideration of both excitation and decay processes. In the first stage of the project, a state-of-the-art mass

  6. Electrodeposition of Nanometer-Sized Ferric Oxide Materials in Colloidal Templates for Conversion of Light to Chemical Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Gardner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal crystal templates were prepared by gravitational sedimentation of 0.5 micron polystyrene particles onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO electrodes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM shows that the particles were close packed and examination of successive layers indicated a predominantly face-centered-cubic (fcc crystal structure where the direction normal to the substrate surface corresponds to the (111 direction. Oxidation of aqueous ferrous solutions resulted in the electrodeposition of ferric oxide into the templates. Removal of the colloidal templates yielded ordered macroporous electrodes (OMEs that were the inverse structure of the colloidal templates. Current integration during electrodeposition and cross-sectional SEM images revealed that the OMEs were about 2 μm thick. Comparative X-ray diffraction and infrared studies of the OMEs did not match a known phase of ferric oxide but suggested a mixture of goethite and hematite. The spectroscopic properties of the OMEs were insensitive to heat treatments at 300∘C. The OMEs were utilized for photoassisted electrochemical oxidation. A sustained photocurrent was observed from visible light in aqueous photoelectrochemical cells. Analysis of photocurrent action spectra revealed an indirect band gap of 1.85 eV. Addition of formate to the aqueous electrolytes resulted in an approximate doubling of the photocurrent.

  7. Nanoscale Chemical and Valence Evolution at the Metal/Oxide Interface: A Case Study of Ti/SrTiO 3

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yangyang

    2016-06-27

    Metal/oxide interfaces are ubiquitous in a wide range of applications such as electronics, photovoltaics, memories, catalysis, and sensors. However, there have been few investigations dedicated to the nanoscale structural and chemical characteristics of these buried interfaces. In this work, the metal/oxide interface between Ti and SrTiO3 (STO) is examined as a prototypical system using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. An atomic-thin Ti2O3-like layer at the Ti/STO interface prepared at room temperature is discovered, and first-principles calculations predict a metallic band structure of this 2D electron system. As a universal feature of such interfaces prepared at different temperatures, near the interface nanoscale oxygen-deficient domains and continuous modulation of Ti oxidation states are found. Overall, these results directly reveal complex chemical and valence evolutions at the metal/oxide interfaces, providing microscopic insights on such heterostructures. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  8. Selective solid-phase extraction of artificial chemicals from milk samples using multiple-template surface molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Ni, Yan-li; Wang, Ling-ling; Ma, Jin-qin; Zhang, Zhi-qi

    2015-08-01

    A novel multiple-template surface molecularly imprinted polymer (MTMIP) was synthesized using ofloxacin and 17β-estradiol as templates and modified monodispersed poly(glycidylmethacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (PGMA/EDMA ) beads as the support material. Static adsorption, solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography were performed to investigate the adsorption properties and selective recognition characteristics of the polymer templates and their structural analogs. The maximum binding capacities of ofloxacin and 17β-estradiol on the MTMIP were 9.0 and 6.6 mg/g, respectively. Compared with the corresponding nonimprinted polymer, the MTMIP exhibited a much higher adsorption performance and selectivity toward three quinolones and three estrogens, which are common drug residues in food. The MTMIP served as a simple and effective pretreatment method and could be successfully applied to the simultaneous analysis of multiple target components in complex samples. Furthermore, the MTMIP may find useful applications as a solid-phase absorbent in the simultaneous determination of trace quinolones and estrogens in milk samples, as the recoveries were in the range 77.6-98.0%.

  9. Fibrous TiO2 prepared by chemical vapor deposition using activated carbon fibers as template via adsorption, hydrolysis and calcinations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-na YANG; Li-fen LIU; Feng-lin YANG; Jimmy C. YU

    2008-01-01

    TiO2 fibers were prepared via alternatively introducing water vapor and Ti precursor carried by Ne to an APCVD (chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure) reactor at <200 ℃. Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were used as templates for deposition and later removed by calcinations. The obtained catalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brtmauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysisThe pores within TiO2 fibers included micro-range and meso-range, e.g., 7 nm, and the specific surface areas for TiO2 fibers were 141 m2/g and 148 m2/g for samples deposited at 100 ℃ and 200 ℃ (using ACF1700 as template), respectively. The deposition temperature significantly influenced TiO2 morphology. The special advantages of this technique for preparing porous nano-material include no consumption of organic solvent in the process and easy control of deposition conditions and speeds.

  10. Preparation of Aligned Ultra-long and Diameter-controlled Silicon Oxide Nanotubes by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Electrospun PVP Nanofiber Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Ming

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Well-aligned and suspended polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP nanofibers with 8 mm in length were obtained by electrospinning. Using the aligned suspended PVP nanofibers array as template, aligned ultra-long silicon oxide (SiOx nanotubes with very high aspect ratios have been prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD process. The inner diameter (20–200 nm and wall thickness (12–90 nm of tubes were controlled, respectively, by baking the electrospun nanofibers and by coating time without sacrificing the orientation degree and the length of arrays. The micro-PL spectrum of SiOx nanotubes shows a strong blue–green emission with a peak at about 514 nm accompanied by two shoulders around 415 and 624 nm. The blue–green emission is caused by the defects in the nanotubes.

  11. NANOSCALE PROCESS ENGINEERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qixiang Wang; Fei Wei

    2003-01-01

    The research of nanoscale process engineering (NPE) is based on the interdisciplinary nature of nanoscale science and technology. It mainly deals with transformation of materials and energy into nanostructured materials and nanodevices, and synergizes the multidisciplinary convergence between materials science and technology, biotechnology, and information technology. The core technologies of NPE concern all aspects of nanodevice construction and operation, such as manufacture of nanomaterials "by design", concepts and design of nanoarchitectures, and manufacture and control of customizable nanodevices. Two main targets of NPE at present are focused on nanoscale manufacture and concept design of nanodevices. The research progress of nanoscale manufacturing processes focused on creating nanostructures and assembling them into nanosystems and larger scale architectures has built the interdiscipline of NPE. The concepts and design of smart, multi-functional, environmentally compatible and customizable nanodevice prototypes built from the nanostructured systems of nanocrystalline, nanoporous and microemulsion systems are most challenging tasks of NPE. The development of NPE may also impel us to consider the curriculum and educational reform of chemical engineering in universities.

  12. Template-free TiO2 photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cell via modified chemical route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, M A; Mane, A A; Desai, S P; Moholkar, A V

    2017-02-15

    Surfactant and template-free Titanium dioxide (TiO2) spheres have been deposited via ultrasonic rinsing assisted modified successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (M-SILAR) method. The effect of M-SILAR cycle variation on the growth of TiO2 films and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has been reported. Also, the significant influence of the dye adsorption time of photoelectrodes on the overall PCE of TiO2 based DSSCs has been investigated systematically. The SEM images reveal that the TiO2 microspheres are made up of densely packed and interconnected nanospheres. After dye loading maximum absorption peak around 500nm is seen with broader coverage in the visible region of the solar spectrum. The excess amount of dye for dye loading time 15h did not contribute to current and is suspected to be present either in multilayers or physisorbed on the surface of TiO2. The DSSC prepared using photoelectrode TO125 and dye loading time of 12h exhibited the highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.16% with short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 8.17mA/cm(2), open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.42V and fill factor of 0.34. The PCE is attributed to the large molecular interconnected TiO2 spheres diffusing visible light to enhance the light absorption. Also, it possesses relatively superior 3-D microsphere like structure and thus provides the effective pathway to the photogenerated electrons with low recombination rate, leading to attaining the high PCE.

  13. DNA-templated nickel nanostructures and protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Hector A; Ludtke, Paul; Willardson, Barry M; Woolley, Adam T

    2006-11-21

    We report a straightforward method for the fabrication of DNA-templated nickel nanostructures on surfaces. These nickel nanomaterials have potential to be applied as nanowires, as templated catalyst lines, as nanoscale magnetic domains, or in directed protein localization. Indeed, we show here that histidine-tagged phosducin-like protein (His-PhLP) binds with high selectivity to both Ni2+-treated surface DNA and DNA-templated nickel metal to create linear protein assemblies on surfaces. The association of His-PhLP with DNA-templated nickel ions or metal is reversible under appropriate rinsing conditions. Nanoscale DNA-templated protein assemblies might be useful in the construction of high-density protein lines for proteomic analysis, for example. Importantly, these nanofabrication procedures are not limited to linear DNA and can be applied readily to other self-assembled DNA topologies.

  14. Nanoscale Hydrophobic Recovery: A Chemical Force Microscopy Study of UV/Ozone-Treated Cross-Linked Poly(dimethylsiloxane)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillborg, Henrik; Tomczak, Nikodem; Oláh, Attila; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, G. Julius

    2004-01-01

    Chemical force microscopy (CFM) in water was used to map the surface hydrophobicity of UV/ozone-treated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS; Sylgard 184) as a function of the storage/recovery time. In addition to CFM pull-off force mapping, we applied indentation mapping to probe the changes in the normali

  15. Preparation of well-aligned carbon nanotubes/silicon nanowires core-sheath composite structure arrays in porous anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦轲; 陆梅; 王成伟; 力虎林

    2002-01-01

    The well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arrays with opened ends were prepared in ordered pores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. After then, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were deposited in the hollow cavities of CNTs. By using this method, CNTs/SiNWs core-sheath composite structure arrays were synthesized successfully. Growing structures and physical properties of the CNTs/SiNWs composite structure arrays were analyzed and researched by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction spectrum (XRD), respectively. The field emission (FE) behavior of the CNTs/SiNWs composite structure arrays was studied based on Fowler- Nordheim tunneling mechanism and current-voltage (I -V) curve. And the photoluminescence (PL) was also characterized. Significantly, the CNTs/SiNWs core-sheath composite structure nanowire fabricated by AAO template method is characteristic of a metal/semiconductor (M/S) behavior and can be utilized to synthesize nanoscale PN junction or Schottky diode device. This process also could be useful for the fabrication of SiNWs and other nanoscale core-sheath composite structure nanowires with chemically inert interfaces for nanoscale electronic and device applications where surface oxidation is undesirable. The diameters and lengths of nanoscale composite structure arrays can be dominated easily, and the experimental result shows that the curling and twisting structures are fewer than those prepared by other synthesized methods.

  16. Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage Lithium–Manganese Rich NMC Composite Cathodes with Cycling

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of chemical composition and morphology of battery materials during electrochemical cycling is fundamental to extending battery cycle life and ensuring safety. This is particularly true for the much debated high energy density (high voltage) lithium–manganese rich cathode material of composition Li1 + x M1 – x O2 (M = Mn, Co, Ni). In this study we combine full-field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) with X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) to spatially re...

  17. Nano-scale stick-slip friction model for the chatter scratch generated by chemical mechanical polishing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Jin; Yang, Ji Chul; Yoon, Bo Un; Lee, Hyeon-Deok; Kim, Taesung

    2012-07-01

    Although Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) process is a still promising technology for the fabrication of the next generation devices, CMP-induced defects tackle further development of CMP process. In particular, even nano-sized scratches generated by CMP process kill the device directly. However mechanism of scratch formation was not clearly understood yet. CMP-induced scratches are classified as razor, chatter mark and skipping scratch. Among them, chatter mark scratch (or chatter scratch) is the most critical defect for the device yield loss. Chatter scratch has a periodic pattern of scars, which is reminiscent of a stick-slip friction pattern. Based on that similarity, stick-slip model was proposed in this paper in order to explain how chatter scratch is formed. And controlling parameters for chatter scratch are defined. During stick period the friction force that exceeds the yield strength of wafer surface makes chatter scratch and the distance between chatter marks is determined by slip period.

  18. Nanoscale Ferroelectric Switchable Polarization and Leakage Current Behavior in (Ba0.50Sr0.50(Ti0.80Sn0.20O3 Thin Films Prepared Using Chemical Solution Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Sreenivas Puli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale switchable ferroelectric (Ba0.50Sr0.50(Ti0.80Sn0.20O3-BSTS polycrystalline thin films with a perovskite structure were prepared on Pt/TiOx/SiO2/Si substrate by chemical solution deposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD spectra indicate that a cubic perovskite crystalline structure and Raman spectra revealed that a tetragonal perovskite crystalline structure is present in the thin films. Sr2+ and Sn4+ cosubstituted film exhibited the lowest leakage current density. Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM technique has been employed to acquire out-of-plane (OPP piezoresponse images and local piezoelectric hysteresis loop in polycrystalline BSTS films. PFM phase and amplitude images reveal nanoscale ferroelectric switching behavior at room temperature. Square patterns with dark and bright contrasts were written by local poling and reversible nature of the piezoresponse behavior was established. Local piezoelectric butterfly amplitude and phase hysteresis loops display ferroelectric nature at nanoscale level. The significance of this paper is to present ferroelectric/piezoelectric nature in present BSTS films at nanoscale level and corroborating ferroelectric behavior by utilizing Raman spectroscopy. Thus, further optimizing physical and electrical properties, BSTS films might be useful for practical applications which include nonvolatile ferroelectric memories, data-storage media, piezoelectric actuators, and electric energy storage capacitors.

  19. Structure and properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films grown on ZnO template via metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhonghua [School of Electronic Science & Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Gu, Shulin, E-mail: slgu@nju.edu.cn [School of Electronic Science & Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Huang, Shimin [School of Electronic Science & Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Tang, Kun, E-mail: ktang@nju.edu.cn [School of Electronic Science & Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Ye, Jiandong; Zhu, Shunming [School of Electronic Science & Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Xu, Mingxiang [Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Zheng, Youdou [School of Electronic Science & Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2015-07-01

    We report the structure and properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films grown on ZnO template by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The thick and thin Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films have been grown with thickness of 500 nm and 50 nm, respectively, to study the quality and interface property of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/ZnO structure. Vacuum annealing has been employed to study its stability. X-ray diffraction measurement revealed the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} film deposited on ZnO (0001) layer in (111) orientation with a Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} transitional layer at interface due to Zn diffusion. It is well supported by the observation on Raman scatting that the vacuum annealing improved the structural quality of the remainder Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} film for thick sample and formed ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} layer for the thin one. X-ray photoelectron spectra employed on the thin sample confirmed that the formation of Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} transition layer at the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/ZnO interface. The Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratio increases along the growth direction, indicating the diffused Zn atoms prefer to replace Fe{sup 3+} in Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4}. Magnetization curve measurement results are well consistent with the structural evolution for both samples. This study indicates that high-quality Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} film grown by MOCVD on ZnO template layer is feasible, but the influence of the formed Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} transition layer on spin injection should be researched and even inhibited in the further study. - Highlights: • We grow single phase Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films by MOCVD successfully. • The formation mechanism of Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} transition layer was revealed in detail. • Our study provides a clue to obtain sharp heterostructure interface.

  20. Synthesis of Nanoscale Heterostructures Comprised of Metal Nanowires, Carbon Nanotubes, and Metal Nanoparticles: Investigation of Their Structure and Electrochemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Chopra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional nanoscale heterostructures comprised of multisegment gold-nickel nanowires, carbon nanotube, and nickel nanoparticles were fabricated in a unique approach combining top-down and bottom-up assembly methods. Porous alumina template was utilized for sequential electrodeposition of gold and nickel nanowire segments. This was followed by chemical vapor deposition growth of carbon nanotubes on multisegment gold-nickel nanowires, where nickel segment also acted as a carbon nanotube growth catalyst. The aligned arrays of these gold-nickel-carbon nanotube heterostructures were released from porous alumina template and then subjected to wet-chemical process to be decorated with nickel/nickel oxide core/shell nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were utilized for morphology, interface, defect, and structure characterization. The electrochemical performance of these heterostructures was studied using cyclic voltammetry method and the specific capacitance of various heterostructures was estimated and compared.

  1. Nanoscale hydrophobic recovery: A chemical force microscopy study of UV/ozone-treated cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillborg, Henrik; Tomczak, Nikodem; Olàh, Attila; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, G Julius

    2004-02-01

    Chemical force microscopy (CFM) in water was used to map the surface hydrophobicity of UV/ozone-treated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS; Sylgard 184) as a function of the storage/recovery time. In addition to CFM pull-off force mapping, we applied indentation mapping to probe the changes in the normalized modulus. These experiments were complemented by results on surface properties assessed on the micrometer scale by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact-angle measurements. Exposure times of < or = 30 min resulted in laterally homogeneously oxidized surfaces, which are characterized by an increased modulus and a high segmental mobility of PDMS. As detected on a sub-50-nm level, the subsequent "hydrophobic recovery" was characterized by a gradual increase in the pull-off forces and a decrease in the normalized modulus, approaching the values of unexposed PDMS after 8-50 days. Lateral imaging on briefly exposed PDMS showed the appearance of liquid PDMS in the form of droplets with an increasing recovery time. Longer exposure times (60 min) led to the formation of a hydrophilic silica-like surface layer. Under these conditions, a gradual surface reconstruction within the silica-like layer occurred with time after exposure, where a hydrophilic SiOx-enriched phase formed < 100-nm-sized domains, surrounded by a more hydrophobic matrix with lower normalized modulus. These results provide new insights into the lateral homogeneity of oxidized PDMS with a resolution in the sub-50-nm range.

  2. Template-stripped, ultraflat gold surfaces with coplanar, embedded titanium micropatterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Nagaiyanallur V; Pei, Jia; Cremmel, Clément V M; Rossi, Antonella; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2013-08-01

    Ultraflat gold surfaces with coplanar, embedded titanium micropatterns, exhibiting extremely low roughness over the entire surface, have been obtained by a modified template-stripping procedure. Titanium is deposited onto photolithographically predefined regions of a silicon template. Following photoresist lift-off, the entire surface is backfilled with gold, template stripping is conducted, and an ultraflat micropatterned surface is revealed. Atomic force microscopy confirms a roughness of surface-chemical maps of the patterned surfaces have been obtained by means of imaging X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (i-XPS) as well as time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). They confirm the presence of well-separated Ti and Au regions, with a chemical contrast that is sharp (as determined by ToF-SIMS) and complete (as determined by i-XPS) across the Ti-Au interface. Thus, a surface has been fabricated that is physically homogeneous down to the nanoscale incorporating chemically distinct micropatterns consisting of two different metals, with totally contrasting surface chemistries.

  3. Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films:sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buriedinterfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweskin, Sasha Joseph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy was used to characterize interfaces pertinent to current surface engineering applications, such as thin film polymers and novel catalysts. An array of advanced surface science techniques like scanning probe microscopy (SPM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gas chromatography (GC) and electron microscopy were used to obtain experimental measurements complementary to SFG data elucidating polymer and catalyst surface composition, surface structure, and surface mechanical behavior. Experiments reported in this dissertation concentrate on three fundamental questions: (1) How does the interfacial molecular structure differ from that of the bulk in real world applications? (2) How do differences in chemical environment affect interface composition or conformation? (3) How do these changes correlate to properties such as mechanical or catalytic performance? The density, surface energy and bonding at a solid interface dramatically alter the polymer configuration, physics and mechanical properties such as surface glass transition, adhesion and hardness. The enhanced sensitivity of SFG at the buried interface is applied to three systems: a series of acrylates under compression, the compositions and segregation behavior of binary polymer polyolefin blends, and the changes in surface structure of a hydrogel as a function of hydration. In addition, a catalytically active thin film of polymer coated nanoparticles is investigated to evaluate the efficacy of SFG to provide in situ information for catalytic reactions involving small mass adsorption and/or product development. Through the use of SFG, in situ total internal reflection (TIR) was used to increase the sensitivity of SFG and provide the necessary specificity to investigate interfaces of thin polymer films and nanostructures previously considered unfeasible. The dynamic nature of thin film surfaces is examined and it is found that the non

  4. Nanoscale 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenders, Ludger; Ducourtieux, Sebastien

    2014-04-01

    The accurate determination of the properties of micro- and nano-structures is essential in research and development. It is also a prerequisite in process control and quality assurance in industry. In most cases, especially at the nanometer range, knowledge of the dimensional properties of structures is the fundamental base, to which further physical properties are linked. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments, suitable measurement procedures as well as calibration artifacts and methods. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the NanoScale 2013 seminar held in Paris, France, on 25 and 26 April. It was the 6th Seminar on NanoScale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 10th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized with the Nanometrology Group of the Technical Committee-Length of EURAMET, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and the Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais. Three satellite meetings related to nanometrology were coupled to the seminar. The first one was an open Symposium on Scanning Probe Microscopy Standardization organized by the ISO/TC 201/SC9 technical committee. The two others were specific meetings focused on two European Metrology Research Projects funded by the European Association of National Metrology Institutes (EURAMET) (see www.euramet.org), the first one focused on the improvement of the traceability for high accuracy devices dealing with sub-nm length measurement and implementing optical interferometers or capacitive sensors (JRP SIB08 subnano), the second one aiming to develop a new metrological traceability for the measurement of the mechanical properties of nano-objects (JRP NEW05 MechProNo). More than 100 experts from industry, calibration laboratories and metrology institutes from around the world joined the NanoScale 2013 Seminar to attend 23 oral and 64 poster

  5. Code Generation with Templates

    CERN Document Server

    Arnoldus, Jeroen; Serebrenik, A

    2012-01-01

    Templates are used to generate all kinds of text, including computer code. The last decade, the use of templates gained a lot of popularity due to the increase of dynamic web applications. Templates are a tool for programmers, and implementations of template engines are most times based on practical experience rather than based on a theoretical background. This book reveals the mathematical background of templates and shows interesting findings for improving the practical use of templates. First, a framework to determine the necessary computational power for the template metalanguage is presen

  6. High-rate nanoscale offset printing process using directed assembly and transfer of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hanchul; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Lee, Jin Young; Jeong, Hobin; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2015-03-11

    High-rate nanoscale offset printing using a newly developed reusable template enables the assembly of nanomaterials into nanostructures followed by their transfer onto a flexible substrate in a few minutes. The developed template can potentially be reused more than 100 times in the offset printing process without any additional functionalization. This approach provides a new way for the printing of flexible devices with nanoscale patterns.

  7. DNA-templated nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Héctor A; Woolley, Adam T

    2009-02-01

    Nanofabrication, or the organizational control over matter at the nanometre scale, is an intriguing scientific challenge requiring multidisciplinary tools for its solution. DNA is a biomolecule that can be combined with other nanometre-scale entities through chemical self-assembly to form a broad variety of nanomaterials. In this tutorial review we present the principles that allow DNA to interact with other chemical species, and describe the challenges and potential applications of DNA as a template for making both biological and inorganic features with nanometre resolution. As such, this report should be of interest to chemists, surface and materials scientists, biologists, and nanotechnologists, as well as others who seek to use DNA in nanofabrication.

  8. Phy-chemical Attributes of Nano-scale V2O5/TiO2 Catalyst and Its’ Effect on Soot Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Deqing Mei; Lichang Li; Chen Zhu; Xiang Zhao; Yinnan Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The V2O5 catalysts which supported on nano-scale TiO2 with variation of vanadium contents (5%, 10%, 20% and 40%) were prepared by an incipient-wetness impregnation method. The phase structures of nano-scale V2O5/TiO2 catalysts with different loading rates were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra. The oxidation activities of catalysts over diesel soot were performed in a themogravimetric analysis (TGA) syst...

  9. The growth and applications of silicides for nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chen; Chen, Yu; Huang, Yu

    2012-03-01

    Metal silicides have been used in silicon technology as contacts to achieve high device performance and desired device functions. The growth and applications of silicide materials have recently attracted increasing interest for nanoscale device applications. Nanoscale silicide materials have been demonstrated with various synthetic approaches. Solid state reaction wherein high quality silicides form through diffusion of metal atoms into silicon nano-templates and the subsequent phase transformation caught significant attention for the fabrication of nanoscale Si devices. Very interestingly, studies on the diffusion and phase transformation processes at the nanoscale have indicated possible deviations from the bulk and the thin film system. Here we present a review of fabrication, growth kinetics, electronic properties and device applications of nanoscale silicides formed through solid state reaction.

  10. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suo, Zhigang [Harvard University

    2013-04-29

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  11. Block copolymer templated etching on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yinghong; Wang, Dong; Buriak, Jillian M

    2007-02-01

    The use of self-assembled polymer structures to direct the formation of mesoscopic (1-100 nm) features on silicon could provide a fabrication-compatible means to produce nanoscale patterns, supplementing conventional lithographic techniques. Here we demonstrate nanoscale etching of silicon, applying standard aqueous-based fluoride etchants, to produce three-dimensional nanoscale features with controllable shapes, sizes, average spacing, and chemical functionalization. The block copolymers serve to direct the silicon surface chemistry by controlling the spatial location of the reaction as well as concentration of reagents. The interiors of the resulting etched nanoscale features may be selectively functionalized with organic monolayers, metal nanoparticles, and other materials, leading to a range of ordered arrays on silicon.

  12. Review of Research on Template Methods in Preparation of Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadian Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanomaterials have been widely used in various fields, such as photonics, catalysis, and adsorption, because of their unique physical and chemical properties. Therefore, their production methods are of utmost importance. Compared with traditional synthetic methods, the template method can effectively control the morphology, particle size, and structure during the preparation of nanomaterials, which is an effective method for their synthesis. The key for the template method is to choose different templates, which are divided into hard template and soft template according to their different structures. In this paper, the effects of different types of templates on the morphology of nanomaterials during their preparation are investigated from two aspects: hard template and soft template, combined with the mechanism of action.

  13. Nanoscale thermal probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Yue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

  14. Template-Framework Interactions in Tetraethylammonium-Directed Zeolite Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Fu, Donglong; Deem, Michael W.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-01-01

    Zeolites, having widespread applications in chemical industries, are often synthesized using organic templates. These can be cost-prohibitive, motivating investigations into their role in promoting crystallization. Herein, the relationship between framework structure, chemical composition, synthesis

  15. Atomic layer deposition: an enabling technology for the growth of functional nanoscale semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyikli, Necmi; Haider, Ali

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the progress in the growth of nanoscale semiconductors grown via atomic layer deposition (ALD). After the adoption by semiconductor chip industry, ALD became a widespread tool to grow functional films and conformal ultra-thin coatings for various applications. Based on self-limiting and ligand-exchange-based surface reactions, ALD enabled the low-temperature growth of nanoscale dielectric, metal, and semiconductor materials. Being able to deposit wafer-scale uniform semiconductor films at relatively low-temperatures, with sub-monolayer thickness control and ultimate conformality, makes ALD attractive for semiconductor device applications. Towards this end, precursors and low-temperature growth recipes are developed to deposit crystalline thin films for compound and elemental semiconductors. Conventional thermal ALD as well as plasma-assisted and radical-enhanced techniques have been exploited to achieve device-compatible film quality. Metal-oxides, III-nitrides, sulfides, and selenides are among the most popular semiconductor material families studied via ALD technology. Besides thin films, ALD can grow nanostructured semiconductors as well using either template-assisted growth methods or bottom-up controlled nucleation mechanisms. Among the demonstrated semiconductor nanostructures are nanoparticles, nano/quantum-dots, nanowires, nanotubes, nanofibers, nanopillars, hollow and core-shell versions of the afore-mentioned nanostructures, and 2D materials including transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene. ALD-grown nanoscale semiconductor materials find applications in a vast amount of applications including functional coatings, catalysis and photocatalysis, renewable energy conversion and storage, chemical sensing, opto-electronics, and flexible electronics. In this review, we give an overview of the current state-of-the-art in ALD-based nanoscale semiconductor research including the already demonstrated and future applications.

  16. Breath Figures of Nanoscale Bricks: A Universal Method for Creating Hierarchic Porous Materials from Inorganic Nanoparticles Stabilized with Mussel-Inspired Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuta; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Yabu, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    High-performance catalysts and photovoltaics are required for building an environmentally sustainable society. Because catalytic and photovoltaic reactions occur at the interfaces between reactants and surfaces, the chemical, physical, and structural properties of interfaces have been the focus of much research. To improve the performance of these materials further, inorganic porous materials with hierarchic porous architectures have been fabricated. The breath figure technique allows preparing porous films by using water droplets as templates. In this study, a valuable preparation method for hierarchic porous inorganic materials is shown. Hierarchic porous materials are prepared from surface-coated inorganic nanoparticles with amphiphilic copolymers having catechol moieties followed by sintering. Micron-scale pores are prepared by using water droplets as templates, and nanoscale pores are formed between the nanoparticles. The fabrication method allows the preparation of hierarchic porous films from inorganic nanoparticles of various shapes and materials.

  17. Ferritin-templated quantum dots for quantum logic gates (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Kim, Seon-Jeong; Elliott, James R.

    2005-05-01

    Quantum logic gates (QLGs) or other logic systems are based on quantum-dots (QD) with a stringent requirement of size uniformity. The QD are widely known building units for QLGs. The size control of QD is a critical issue in quantum-dot fabrication. The work presented here offers a new method to develop quantum-dots using a bio-template, called ferritin, that ensures QD production in uniform size of nano-scale proportion. This technology is essential for NASA, DoD, and industrial nanotechnology applications such as: ultra-high density data storage, quantum electronic devices, biomedical nanorobots, molecular tagging, terahertz radiation sources, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), etc. The bio-template for uniform yield of QD is based on a ferritin protein that allows reconstitution of core material through the reduction and chelation processes. By either the magnetic or electrical property of reconstituted core materials, the QD can be used for logic gates which are fundamental building blocks for quantum computing. However, QLGs are in an incubation stage and still have many potential obstacles that need to be addressed, such as an error collection, a decoherence, and a hardware architecture. One of the biggest challenges for developing QLG is the requirement of ordered and uniform size of QD for arrays on a substrate with nanometer precision. The other methods known so far, such as self-assembled QD grown in the Stranski-Krastanov mode, are usually randomly organized. The QD development by bio-template includes the electrochemical/chemical reconstitution of ferritins with different core materials, such as iron, cobalt, manganese, platinum, and nickel. The other bio-template method used in our laboratory is dendrimers, precisely defined chemical structures. With ferritin-templated QD, we fabricated the heptagon-shaped patterned array via direct nano manipulation of the ferritin molecules with a tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). We also designed various

  18. Templating mesoporous zeolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Kresten; Christensen, Christina Hviid; Kustova, Marina

    2008-01-01

    The application of templating methods to produce zeolite materials with hierarchical bi- or trimodal pore size distributions is reviewed with emphasis on mesoporous materials. Hierarchical zeolite materials are categorized into three distinctly different types of materials: hierarchical zeolite...... crystals, nanosized zeolite crystals, and supported zeolite crystals. For the pure zeolite materials in the first two categories, the additional meso- or macroporosity can be classified as being either intracrystalline or intercrystalline, whereas for supported zeolite materials, the additional porosity...... originates almost exclusively from the support material. The methods for introducing mesopores into zeolite materials are discussed and categorized. In general, mesopores can be templated in zeolite materials by use of solid templating, supramolecular templating, or indirect templating...

  19. Surface Chemistry in Nanoscale Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex V. Hamza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although surfaces or, more precisely, the surface atomic and electronic structure, determine the way materials interact with their environment, the influence of surface chemistry on the bulk of the material is generally considered to be small. However, in the case of high surface area materials such as nanoporous solids, surface properties can start to dominate the overall material behavior. This allows one to create new materials with physical and chemical properties that are no longer determined by the bulk material, but by their nanoscale architectures. Here, we discuss several examples, ranging from nanoporous gold to surface engineered carbon aerogels that demonstrate the tuneability of nanoporous solids for sustainable energy applications.

  20. Bio-Conjugates for Nanoscale Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Klaus

    Bio-conjugates for Nanoscale Applications is the title of this thesis, which covers three different projects in chemical bio-conjugation research, namely synthesis and applications of: Lipidated fluorescent peptides, carbohydrate oxime-azide linkers and N-aryl O-R2 oxyamine derivatives. Lipidated...

  1. Adsorption Kinetics in Nanoscale Porous Coordination Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nune, Satish K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, Benard Peter; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Karri, Naveen; Alvine, Kyle J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2015-10-07

    Nanoscale porous coordination polymers were synthesized using simple wet chemical method. The effect of various polymer surfactants on colloidal stability and shape selectivity was investigated. Our results suggest that the nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved adsorption kinetics compared to bulk crystals due to decreased diffusion path lengths and preferred crystal plane interaction.

  2. Bio-Conjugates for Nanoscale Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Klaus

    Bio-conjugates for Nanoscale Applications is the title of this thesis, which covers three different projects in chemical bio-conjugation research, namely synthesis and applications of: Lipidated fluorescent peptides, carbohydrate oxime-azide linkers and N-aryl O-R2 oxyamine derivatives. Lipidated...

  3. Templated growth of graphenic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Nolan W; Connors, L Matthew [Department of Physics, Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, TX (United States); Ding, Feng [Institute of Textile and Clothing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Yakobson, Boris I [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, TX (United States); Schmidt, Howard K; Hauge, Robert H [Richard E Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: nolan.nicholas@matricresearch.com

    2009-06-17

    A novel strategy is proposed for the topologically controlled synthesis of extended graphenic sheets by additively reacting carbon into a pre-existing graphene sheet which is on top of a templating substrate. This concept is implemented and demonstrated using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Novel morphological features observed in this study suggest unusual aspects of the CVD growth process. CVD results demonstrate the basic soundness of the synthesis strategy but highlight the sensitivity of the process to certain types of disruption and the need for alternative forms of embodiment.

  4. Oxygen content modulation by nanoscale chemical and electrical patterning in epitaxial SrCoO3-δ (0 < δ ≤ 0.5) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S.; Seidel, J.

    2016-08-01

    Fast controllable redox reactions in solid materials at room temperature are a promising strategy for enhancing the overall performance and lifetime of many energy technology materials and devices. Easy control of oxygen content is a key concept for the realisation of fast catalysis and bulk diffusion at room temperature. Here, high quality epitaxial brownmillerite SrCoO2.5 thin films have been oxidised to perovskite (P) SrCoO3 with NaClO. X-ray diffraction, scanning probe microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were performed to investigate the structural and electronic changes of the material. The oxidised thin films were found to exhibit distinct morphological changes from an atomically flat terrace structure to forming small nanosized islands with boundaries preferentially in [100] or [010] directions all over the surface, relaxing the in-plane strain imposed by the substrate. The conductivity, or oxygen content, of each single island is confined by these textures, which can be locally patterned even further with electric poling. The high charging level at the island boundaries indicates a magnified electric capacity of SCO thin films, which could be exploited in future device geometries. This finding represents a new way of oxygen modulation with associated self-assembled charge confinement to nanoscale boundaries, offering interesting prospects in nanotechnology applications.

  5. Spintronics in nanoscale devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hedin, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    By exploiting the novel properties of quantum dots and nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm rings together with the electronic and magnetic properties of various semiconductor materials and graphene, researchers have conducted numerous theoretical and computational modeling studies and experimental tests that show promising behavior for spintronics applications. Spin polarization and spin-filtering capabilities and the ability to manipulate the electron spin state through external magnetic or electric fields have demonstrated the promise of workable nanoscale devices for computing and memory applications.

  6. Strategies for Controlled Placement of Nanoscale Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh SeongJin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe capability of placing individual nanoscale building blocks on exact substrate locations in a controlled manner is one of the key requirements to realize future electronic, optical, and magnetic devices and sensors that are composed of such blocks. This article reviews some important advances in the strategies for controlled placement of nanoscale building blocks. In particular, we will overview template assisted placement that utilizes physical, molecular, or electrostatic templates, DNA-programmed assembly, placement using dielectrophoresis, approaches for non-close-packed assembly of spherical particles, and recent development of focused placement schemes including electrostatic funneling, focused placement via molecular gradient patterns, electrodynamic focusing of charged aerosols, and others.

  7. Nanochannel Arrays for Molecular Sieving and Electrochemical Analysis by Nanosphere Lithography Templated Graphoepitaxy of Block Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kaiyu; Bohn, Paul W

    2017-07-26

    The ability to design, fabricate, and manipulate materials at the nanoscale is fundamental to the quest to develop technologies to assemble nanometer-scale pieces into larger-scale components and materials, thereby transferring unique nanometer-scale properties to macroscopic objects. In this work, we describe a new approach to the fabrication of highly ordered, ultrahigh density nanochannel arrays that employs nanosphere lithography to template the graphoepitaxy of polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane, diblock copolymers. By optimizing the well-controlled solvent vapor annealing, overcoating conditions, and the subsequent reactive ion etching processes, silica nanochannel (SNC) arrays with areal densities, ρA, approaching 1000 elements μm(-2), are obtained over macroscopic scales. The integrity and functionality of the SNC arrays was tested by using them as permselective ion barriers to nanopore-confined disk electrodes. The nanochannels allow cations to pass to the disk electrode but reject anions, as demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry. This ion gating behavior can be reversed from cation-permselective to anion-permselective by chemically inverting the surface charge from negative to positive. Furthermore, the conformal SNC array structures obtained could easily be lifted, detached, and transferred to another substrate, preserving the hierarchical organization while transferring the nanostructure-derived properties to a different substrate. These results demonstrate how nanoscale behavior can be replicated over macroscale distances, using electrochemical analysis as a model.

  8. The Trouble With Templates

    CERN Document Server

    Sampson, Laura; Yunes, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Waveform templates are a powerful tool for extracting and characterizing gravitational wave signals, acting as highly restrictive priors on the signal morphologies that allow us to extract weak events buried deep in the instrumental noise. The templates map the waveform shapes to physical parameters, thus allowing us to produce posterior probability distributions for these parameters. However, there are attendant dangers in using highly restrictive signal priors. If strong field gravity is not accurately described by General Relativity (GR), then using GR templates may result in fundamental bias in the recovered parameters, or even worse, a complete failure to detect signals. Here we study such dangers, concentrating on three distinct possibilities. First, we show that there exist modified theories compatible with all existing tests that would fail to be detected by the LIGO/Virgo network using searches based on GR templates, but which would be detected using a one parameter post-Einsteinian extension. Second...

  9. E3 Charter Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a charter template which includes decisions made during the project planning phase, as well as local project goals, a communication strategy, an outreach strategy, distribution of responsibilities and a schedule.

  10. images_template

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website template go here. It will not change their names or locations, but will hopefully help to organize them. Oh, but for a directory structure...

  11. Nanoscale resolution immersion scanning thermal microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Tovee, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale thermal properties are becoming of extreme importance for modern electronic circuits that dissipate increasing power on the length scale of few tens of nanometers, and for chemical and physical properties sensors and biosensors using nanoscale sized features. While Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) is known for its ability to probe thermal properties and heat generation with nanoscale resolution, until today it was perceived impossible to use it in the liquid environment due to dominating direct heat exchange between microfabricated thermal probe and surrounding liquid that would deteriorate spatial resolution. Nonetheless, our theoretical analysis of SThM in liquids showed that for certain design of SThM probe with resistive heater located near the probe tip, their thermal signal is only moderately affected, by less than half on immersion in a dodecane environment. More significantly, its spatial resolution, surprisingly, would remain practically unaffected, and the thermal contact between the tip...

  12. Sensing at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    label-free detection of DNA at concentrations as low as 1-10 fM, a sensitivity comparable to the best signal amplification-assisted electrochemical sensors reported [12]. In another study actin-conjugated gold and silver nanorods are used to detect ATP, a common indicator of cell viability [13]. They show how aggregation induced by ATP-induced polymerization of the G-actin gives rise to a measurable change in the plasmon resonance absorbance of the nanorods. A review of the use of fluorescent silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications is provided by researchers at Dublin City University in Ireland [14]. The first scanning tunnelling microscope in the early 1980s and subsequent scanning probe developments brought the world of nanoscale structures into view in a manner that gorged the imaginations of scientists and the public. New ways of probing structures at this scale revealed a wealth of curious properties that triggered a surge of research activity in nanotechnology, now a multibillion dollar industry. One good turn deserves another and in fact nanostructures provide the perfect tools for the type of sensing and imaging applications that brought such widespread research interest to nanotechnology. This special issue highlights just how broad and innovative the range of sensing nanotechnologies has grown. References [1] Zappa D, Comini E and Sberveglieri G 2013 Thermally-oxidized zinc oxide nanowires chemical sensors Nanotechnology 24 444008 [2] Kemmler J A, Pokhrel S, Mädler L, Weimar U and Barsan N 2013 Flame spray pyrolysis for sensing at the nanoscale Nanotechnology 24 442001 [3] Bache M et al 2013 Nanomechanical recognition of prognostic biomarker suPAR with DVD-ROM optical technology Nanotechnology 24 444011 [4] Hu C-F, Wang J-Y, Liu Y-C, Tsai M-H and Fang W 2013 Development of 3D carbon nanotubes interdigitated finger electrodes on polymer substrate for flexible capacitive sensor application Nanotechnology 24 444006 [5] Neumann C, Volk C, Engels S and

  13. Geometrical assembly of ultrastable protein templates for nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Dominic J.; Giger, Lars; Kim, Steve S.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    The fabrication of nanoscale devices requires architectural templates on which to position functional molecules in complex arrangements. Protein scaffolds are particularly promising templates for nanomaterials due to inherent molecular recognition and self-assembly capabilities combined with genetically encoded functionalities. However, difficulties in engineering protein quaternary structure into stable and well-ordered shapes have hampered progress. Here we report the development of an ultrastable biomolecular construction kit for the assembly of filamentous proteins into geometrically defined templates of controllable size and symmetry. The strategy combines redesign of protein-protein interaction specificity with the creation of tunable connector proteins that govern the assembly and projection angles of the filaments. The functionality of these nanoarchitectures is illustrated by incorporation of nanoparticles at specific locations and orientations to create hybrid materials such as conductive nanowires. These new structural components facilitate the manufacturing of nanomaterials with diverse shapes and functional properties over a wide range of processing conditions.

  14. Development of Computer Aided Modelling Templates for Model Re-use in Chemical and Biochemical Process and Product Design: Importand export of models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    been established, in order to provide a wider range of modelling capabilities. Through this link, developed models can be exported/imported to/from other modelling-simulation software environments to allow model reusability in chemical and biochemical product and process design. The use of this link......This paper focuses on the challenges in model development related to model reuse and compatibility and integration of different tools that are used in modelling. A link between two modelling tools, the computer-aided modelling framework of the ICAS system and the modelling environment, MOSAIC, has...

  15. Development of One Meter Long Double-Sided CeO2 Buffered Ni-5at.%W Templates by Reel-to-Reel Chemical Solution Deposition Route

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Konstantopoulou, K.; Wulff, Anders Christian

    2013-01-01

    High performance long-length coated conductors fabricated using various techniques have attracted a lot of interest recently. In this work, a reel-to-reel design for depositing double-sided coatings on long-length flexible metallic tapes via a chemical solution method is proposed and realized....... The major achievement of the design is to combine the dip coating and drying processes in order to overcome the technical difficulties of dealing with the wet films on both sides of the tape. We report the successful application of the design to fabricate a one-meterlong double side coated CeO2/Ni − 5at...... layer are 7.2◦ and 5.8◦ with standard deviation of 0.26◦ and 0.34◦, respectively, being indicative of the high quality epitaxial growth of the films prepared in the continuous manner. An all chemical solution derived YBCOLow−TFA/Ce0.9La0.1O2/Gd2Zr2O7/CeO2 structure is obtained on a short sample...

  16. Fatigue behavior of Ti–6Al–4V alloy in saline solution with the surface modified at a micro- and nanoscale by chemical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claros, Cesar Adolfo Escobar; Oliveira, Diego Pedreira; Campanelli, Leonardo Contri; Pereira da Silva, Paulo Sergio Carvalho; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-10-01

    This work evaluated the influence of the surface modification using acid etching combined with alkaline treatment on the fatigue strength of Ti–6Al–4V ELI alloy. The topography developed by chemical surface treatments (CST) was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Increased roughness and effective surface area were investigated and compared with the Ti–6Al–4V samples without modification. Surface composition was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Axial fatigue resistance of polished and modified surfaces was determined by stepwise load increase tests and staircase test method. Light microscopy and SEM were employed to examine the fracture surface of the tested specimens. According to the results, a similar fatigue behavior was found and a negligible difference in the fatigue crack nucleation was observed for the Ti–6Al–4V with CST in comparison to the samples without treatment. - Highlights: • Fatigue behavior of Ti–6Al–4V with the surface modified by chemical treatments • The topography developed did not induce differences in the fatigue resistance. • Untreated and chemically treated surfaces presented fractographic similarities.

  17. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  18. Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaoye

    Continuous downscaling in microelectronics has pushed conventional CMOS technology to its physical limits, while Moore's Law has correctly predicted the trend for decades, each step forward is accompanied with unprecedented technological difficulties and near-exponential increase in cost. At the same time, however, demands for low-power, low-cost and high-speed devices have never diminished, instead, even more stringent requirements have been imposed on device performances. It is therefore crucial to explore alternative materials and device architectures in order to alleviate the pressure caused by downscaling. To this end, we investigated two different approaches: (1) InSb nanowire based field effect transistors (NWFETs) and (2) single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) -- peptide nucleic acid (PNA) --SWCNT conjugate. Two types of InSb nanowires were synthesized by template-assisted electrochemistry and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) respectively. In both cases, NWFETs were fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL) and crystallinity was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns. For electrochemistry nanowire, ambipolar conduction was observed with strong p-type conduction, the effect of thermal annealing on the conductivity was analyzed, a NWFET model that took into consideration the underlapped region in top-gated NWFET was proposed. Hole mobility in the channel was calculated to be 292.84 cm2V-1s -1 with a density of 1.5x1017/cm3. For CVD nanowire, the diameter was below 40nm with an average of 20nm. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process was speculated to be the mechanism responsible for nanowire growth. The efficient gate control was manifested by high ION/I OFF ratio which was on the order of 106 and a small inverse subthreshold slope (<200 mV/decade). Scale analysis was used to successfully account for disparities observed among a number of sample devices. N-type conduction was found in all NWFETs with

  19. Investigation of metal hydride nanoparticles templated in metal organic frameworks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Herberg, Julie L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Highley, Aaron M.; Grossman, Jeffrey (MIT, Cambridge, MA); Wagner, Lucas (MIT, Cambridge, MA); Bhakta, Raghu; Peaslee, D. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO); Allendorf, Mark D.; Liu, X. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO); Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, St. Louis, MO)

    2010-11-01

    Hydrogen is proposed as an ideal carrier for storage, transport, and conversion of energy. However, its storage is a key problem in the development of hydrogen economy. Metal hydrides hold promise in effectively storing hydrogen. For this reason, metal hydrides have been the focus of intensive research. The chemical bonds in light metal hydrides are predominantly covalent, polar covalent or ionic. These bonds are often strong, resulting in high thermodynamic stability and low equilibrium hydrogen pressures. In addition, the directionality of the covalent/ionic bonds in these systems leads to large activation barriers for atomic motion, resulting in slow hydrogen sorption kinetics and limited reversibility. One method for enhancing reaction kinetics is to reduce the size of the metal hydrides to nano scale. This method exploits the short diffusion distances and constrained environment that exist in nanoscale hydride materials. In order to reduce the particle size of metal hydrides, mechanical ball milling is widely used. However, microscopic mechanisms responsible for the changes in kinetics resulting from ball milling are still being investigated. The objective of this work is to use metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as templates for the synthesis of nano-scale NaAlH4 particles, to measure the H2 desorption kinetics and thermodynamics, and to determine quantitative differences from corresponding bulk properties. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offer an attractive alternative to traditional scaffolds because their ordered crystalline lattice provides a highly controlled and understandable environment. The present work demonstrates that MOFs are stable hosts for metal hydrides and their reactive precursors and that they can be used as templates to form metal hydride nanoclusters on the scale of their pores (1-2 nm). We find that using the MOF HKUST-1 as template, NaAlH4 nanoclusters as small as 8 formula units can be synthesized inside the pores. A detailed picture of

  20. Cellular nanoscale sensory wave computing

    CERN Document Server

    Baatar, Chagaan; Roska, Tamas

    2010-01-01

    This fresh perspective of sensory computing successfully bridges the gap between nanoscale devices and CMOS integrated circuits. Practical and complex algorithms are also discussed, in addition to new developments like the nanoscale antenna.

  1. Fabrication of volcano-shaped nano-patterned sapphire substrates using colloidal self-assembly and wet chemical etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chong; Zheng, Lu; Fang, Huajing; Yan, Qingfeng; Wei, Tongbo; Hao, Zhibiao; Wang, Xiaoqing; Shen, Dezhong

    2013-08-23

    Patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) have been widely used to enhance the light output power in GaN-based light emitting diodes. The shape and feature size of the pattern in a PSS affect its enhancement efficiency to a great degree. In this work we demonstrate the nanoscale fabrication of volcano-shaped PSS using a wet chemical etching approach in combination with a colloidal monolayer templating strategy. Detailed analysis by scanning electron microscopy reveals that the unique pattern shape is a result of the different corrosion-resistant abilities of silica masks of different effective heights during wet chemical etching. The formation of silica etching masks of different effective heights has been ascribed to the silica precursor solution in the interstice of the colloidal monolayer template being distributed unevenly after infiltration. In the subsequent wet chemical etching process, the active reaction sites altered as etching duration was prolonged, resulting in the formation of volcano-shaped nano-patterned sapphire substrates.

  2. Joomla! 3 template essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Frankowski, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    Using this hands-on, step-by step tutorial filled with practical examples, the readers will be able to create beautiful templates and themes for your websites that will make them stand out from others.This book is written for all of you who wish to create your own unique templates for Joomla! 3.x. This book can be used by Joomla! administrators or visual designers (with no programming experience) or those of you who are used to working with common web developer tools like HTML/CSS editors for coding purposes. You would need basic knowledge of Joomla! and some knowledge of CSS and HTML.

  3. Synthesis of RNA oligomers on heterogeneous templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, G.; Ferris, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of an RNA world in the chemical origin of life is appealing, as nucleic acids are capable of both information storage and acting as templates that catalyse the synthesis of complementary molecules. Template-directed synthesis has been demonstrated for homogeneous oligonucleotides that, like natural nucleic acids, have 3',5' linkages between the nucleotide monomers. But it seems likely that prebiotic routes to RNA-like molecules would have produced heterogeneous molecules with various kinds of phosphodiester linkages and both linear and cyclic nucleotide chains. Here we show that such heterogeneity need be no obstacle to the templating of complementary molecules. Specifically, we show that heterogeneous oligocytidylates, formed by the montmorillonite clay-catalysed condensation of actuated monomers, can serve as templates for the synthesis of oligoguanylates. Furthermore, we show that oligocytidylates that are exclusively 2',5'-linked can also direct synthesis of oligoguanylates. Such heterogeneous templating reactions could have increased the diversity of the pool of protonucleic acids from which life ultimately emerged.

  4. Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James N Culver; Michael T Harris

    2011-08-31

    The goals of this project were directed at the identification and characterization of bio-mineralization processes and patterning methods for the development of nano scale materials and structures with novel energy and conductive traits. This project utilized a simple plant virus as a model template to investigate methods to attach and coat metals and other inorganic compounds onto biologically based nanotemplates. Accomplishments include: the development of robust biological nanotemplates with enhanced inorganic coating activities; novel coating strategies that allow for the deposition of a continuous inorganic layer onto a bio-nanotemplate even in the absence of a reducing agent; three-dimensional patterning methods for the assemble of nano-featured high aspect ratio surfaces and the demonstrated use of these surfaces in enhancing battery and energy storage applications. Combined results from this project have significantly advanced our understanding and ability to utilize the unique self-assembly properties of biologically based molecules to produce novel materials at the nanoscale level.

  5. Computing layouts with deformable templates

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Chihan

    2014-07-27

    In this paper, we tackle the problem of tiling a domain with a set of deformable templates. A valid solution to this problem completely covers the domain with templates such that the templates do not overlap. We generalize existing specialized solutions and formulate a general layout problem by modeling important constraints and admissible template deformations. Our main idea is to break the layout algorithm into two steps: a discrete step to lay out the approximate template positions and a continuous step to refine the template shapes. Our approach is suitable for a large class of applications, including floorplans, urban layouts, and arts and design. Copyright © ACM.

  6. Interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öner, S.Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with material interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics. Interface properties between the absorbing semiconductor and other employed materials are crucial for an efficient solar cell. While the optical properties are largely unaffected by a few nanometer thin layer, the electronic prop

  7. Interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öner, S.Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with material interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics. Interface properties between the absorbing semiconductor and other employed materials are crucial for an efficient solar cell. While the optical properties are largely unaffected by a few nanometer thin layer, the electronic prop

  8. Template Composite Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drach, Vincent; Hietanen, Ari; Pica, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We present a non perturbative study of SU(2) gauge theory with two fundamental Dirac flavours. We discuss how the model can be used as a template for composite Dark Matter (DM). We estimate one particular interaction of the DM candidate with the Standard Model : the interaction through photon...

  9. Template Composite Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drach, Vincent; Hietanen, Ari; Pica, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We present a non perturbative study of SU(2) gauge theory with two fundamental Dirac flavours. We discuss how the model can be used as a template for composite Dark Matter (DM). We estimate one particular interaction of the DM candidate with the Standard Model : the interaction through photon...

  10. Biometric template revocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Craig M.

    2004-08-01

    Biometric are a powerful technology for identifying humans both locally and at a distance. In order to perform identification or verification biometric systems capture an image of some biometric of a user or subject. The image is then converted mathematical to representation of the person call a template. Since we know that every human in the world is different each human will have different biometric images (different fingerprints, or faces, etc.). This is what makes biometrics useful for identification. However unlike a credit card number or a password to can be given to a person and later revoked if it is compromised and biometric is with the person for life. The problem then is to develop biometric templates witch can be easily revoked and reissued which are also unique to the user and can be easily used for identification and verification. In this paper we develop and present a method to generate a set of templates which are fully unique to the individual and also revocable. By using bases set compression algorithms in an n-dimensional orthogonal space we can represent a give biometric image in an infinite number of equally valued and unique ways. The verification and biometric matching system would be presented with a given template and revocation code. The code will then representing where in the sequence of n-dimensional vectors to start the recognition.

  11. Vortex pinning in superconductors laterally modulated by nanoscale self-assembled arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanacken, J.; Vinckx, W.; Moshchalkov, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Being the exponent of the so-called "bottom-up" approach, self-assembled structures are now-a-days attracting a lot of attention in the fields of science and technology. In this work, we show that nanoscale self-assembled arrays used as templates can provide periodic modulation in superconducting...

  12. Nanoscale Polysulfides Reactors Achieved by Chemical Au-S Interaction: Improving the Performance of Li-S Batteries on the Electrode Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao-Ying; Xiao, Pin; Li, Huan-Huan; Wang, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Lin-Lin; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Wu, Xing-Long; Xie, Hai-Ming; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2015-12-23

    In this work, the chemical interaction of cathode and lithium polysulfides (LiPSs), which is a more targeted approach for completely preventing the shuttle of LiPSs in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, has been established on the electrode level. Through simply posttreating the ordinary sulfur cathode in atmospheric environment just for several minutes, the Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) were well-decorated on/in the surface and pores of the electrode composed of commercial acetylene black (CB) and sulfur powder. The Au NPs can covalently stabilize the sulfur/LiPSs, which is advantageous for restricting the shuttle effect. Moreover, the LiPSs reservoirs of Au NPs with high conductivity can significantly control the deposition of the trapped LiPSs, contributing to the uniform distribution of sulfur species upon charging/discharging. The slight modification of the cathode with <3 wt % Au NPs has favorably prospered the cycle capacity and stability of Li-S batteries. Moreover, this cathode exhibited an excellent anti-self-discharge ability. The slight decoration for the ordinary electrode, which can be easily accessed in the industrial process, provides a facile strategy for improving the performance of commercial carbon-based Li-S batteries toward practical application.

  13. Tube Formation in Nanoscale Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chenglin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The formation of tubular nanostructures normally requires layered, anisotropic, or pseudo-layered crystal structures, while inorganic compounds typically do not possess such structures, inorganic nanotubes thus have been a hot topic in the past decade. In this article, we review recent research activities on nanotubes fabrication and focus on three novel synthetic strategies for generating nanotubes from inorganic materials that do not have a layered structure. Specifically, thermal oxidation method based on gas–solid reaction to porous CuO nanotubes has been successfully established, semiconductor ZnS and Nb2O5nanotubes have been prepared by employing sacrificial template strategy based on liquid–solid reaction, and an in situ template method has been developed for the preparation of ZnO taper tubes through a chemical etching reaction. We have described the nanotube formation processes and illustrated the detailed key factors during their growth. The proposed mechanisms are presented for nanotube fabrication and the important pioneering studies are discussed on the rational design and fabrication of functional materials with tubular structures. It is the intention of this contribution to provide a brief account of these research activities.

  14. Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Robert K.; Bogart, Gregory R.; Rogers, John A.

    2011-12-20

    Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

  15. Synthesis of 3D ordered porous polystyrene using silica template

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A rigid colloidal silica template was formed by self-assembly ofthe monodispersed silica spheres prepared according to St-ber method. The silica template is highly ordered, which was verified by bright color effect due to Bragg diffraction and the results of SEM. The free radical polymerization of styrene was allowed within the interstices of the rigid template to result in the formation of the three- dimensional periodic silica/polystyrene nano-composites. The titled porous polystyrene was prepared by chemical decom- position of the template with concentrated aqueous hydro- fluoric acid. Scanning electron microscopy characterization showed that the macroporous polystyrene has ordered arrays of the uniform pores replicated from the template. Moreover, it was found that the morphology of the as-synthesized macroporous polystyrene was greatly affected by the connectivity of the silica spheres treated under different conditions.

  16. Surface nanoscale axial photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Sumetsky, M

    2011-01-01

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger equation. These modes can be steered with dramatically small nanoscale variation of the fiber radius, which is quite simple to introduce in practice. The extremely low loss of SNAP devices is achieved due to the fantastically low surface roughness inherent in a drawn fiber surface. In excellent agreement with the developed theory, we experimentally demonstrate localization of light in quantum wells, halting light by a point source, tunneling through potential barriers, dark states, etc. This demonstration, prototyping basi...

  17. Ellipsometry at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Hingerl, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    This book presents and introduces ellipsometry in nanoscience and nanotechnology making a bridge between the classical and nanoscale optical behaviour of materials. It delineates the role of the non-destructive and non-invasive optical diagnostics of ellipsometry in improving science and technology of nanomaterials and related processes by illustrating its exploitation, ranging from fundamental studies of the physics and chemistry of nanostructures to the ultimate goal of turnkey manufacturing control. This book is written for a broad readership: materials scientists, researchers, engineers, as well as students and nanotechnology operators who want to deepen their knowledge about both basics and applications of ellipsometry to nanoscale phenomena. It starts as a general introduction for people curious to enter the fields of ellipsometry and polarimetry applied to nanomaterials and progresses to articles by experts on specific fields that span from plasmonics, optics, to semiconductors and flexible electronics...

  18. Nanoscale Organic Hybrid Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Nugent, Jennifer L.

    2010-08-20

    Nanoscale organic hybrid electrolytes are composed of organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures, each with a metal oxide or metallic nanoparticle core densely grafted with an ion-conducting polyethylene glycol corona - doped with lithium salt. These materials form novel solvent-free hybrid electrolytes that are particle-rich, soft glasses at room temperature; yet manifest high ionic conductivity and good electrochemical stability above 5V. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Electroanalysis at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Karen; O'Riordan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of silicon chip-based nanoelectrochemical devices for sensing applications. We first describe analyte mass transport to nanoscale electrodes and emphasize understanding the importance of mass transport for the design of nanoelectrode arrays. We then describe bottom-up and top-down approaches to nanoelectrode fabrication and integration at silicon substrates. Finally, we explore recent examples of on-chip nanoelectrodes employed as sensors and diagnostics, finishing with a brief look at future applications.

  20. Manufacturing ontology through templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diciuc Vlad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing industry contains a high volume of knowhow and of high value, much of it being held by key persons in the company. The passing of this know-how is the basis of manufacturing ontology. Among other methods like advanced filtering and algorithm based decision making, one way of handling the manufacturing ontology is via templates. The current paper tackles this approach and highlights the advantages concluding with some recommendations.

  1. The Watermark Template Attack

    OpenAIRE

    Herrigel, Alexander; Voloshynovskyy, Svyatoslav; Rytsar, Yuriy

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new attack, called the watermark template attach, for watermarked images. In contrast to the Stirmark benchmark, this attack does not severely reduce the quality of the image. This attack maintains, therefore, the commercial value of the watermarked image. In contrast to previous approaches, it is not the aim of the attack to change the statistics of embedded watermarks fooling the detection process but to utilize specific concepts that have been recently developed for m...

  2. Template-Mediated Biomineralization for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiendecker, Alexander; Witzleben, Steffen; Schulze, Margit; Tobiasch, Edda

    2017-01-01

    Template-mediated mineralization describes a research field of materials chemistry that deals with templates influencing product formation of foremost inorganic functional materials and composites. These templates are usually organic compounds - as far as molecules with natural origin are involved, the terminology "biomineralization" or "biomimetic mineralization: is used. The present review gives insight into recent developments in the research area of bone-tissue engineering with focus on chemical templates and cell-based approaches. The review is structured as follows: (1) a brief general overview about the principle of templating and recently used template materials, (2) important analytical methods, (3) examples of template-guided mineralization of various bone-related materials, (4) natural bone mineralization, (5) scaffolds for bone-tissue regeneration and (6) cell-based therapeutic approaches. For this purpose, a literature screening with emphasis on promising potential practical applications was performed. In particular, macromolecular structures and polymer composites with relation to naturally occurring compounds were favored. Priority was given to publications of the last five years. Although the present review does not cover the whole topic to full extent, it should provide information about current trends and the most promising approaches in the research area of bone-tissue engineering based on applications of organic templates/scaffolds as well as cell-based strategies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  4. Soft templating strategies for the synthesis of mesoporous materials: inorganic, organic-inorganic hybrid and purely organic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Nabanita; Bhaumik, Asim

    2013-03-01

    With the discovery of MCM-41 by Mobil researchers in 1992 the journey of the research on mesoporous materials started and in the 21st century this area of scientific investigation have extended into numerous branches, many of which contribute significantly in emerging areas like catalysis, energy, environment and biomedical research. As a consequence thousands of publications came out in large varieties of national and international journals. In this review, we have tried to summarize the published works on various synthetic pathways and formation mechanisms of different mesoporous materials viz. inorganic, organic-inorganic hybrid and purely organic solids via soft templating pathways. Generation of nanoscale porosity in a solid material usually requires participation of organic template (more specifically surfactants and their supramolecular assemblies) called structure-directing agent (SDA) in the bottom-up chemical reaction process. Different techniques employed for the syntheses of inorganic mesoporous solids, like silicas, metal doped silicas, transition and non-transition metal oxides, mixed oxides, metallophosphates, organic-inorganic hybrids as well as purely organic mesoporous materials like carbons, polymers etc. using surfactants are depicted schematically and elaborately in this paper. Moreover, some of the frontline applications of these mesoporous solids, which are directly related to their functionality, composition and surface properties are discussed at the appropriate places.

  5. Engineering Nanoscale Biological Molecular Motors

    OpenAIRE

    Korosec, Chapin; Forde, Nancy R.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the operation of biological molecular motors, nanoscale machines that transduce electrochemical energy into mechanical work, is enhanced by bottom-up strategies to synthesize novel motors.

  6. Complex Phenomena in Nanoscale Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale physics has become one of the rapidly developing areas of contemporary physics because of its direct relevance to newly emerging area, nanotechnologies. Nanoscale devices and quantum functional materials are usually constructed based on the results of fundamental studies on nanoscale physics. Therefore studying physical phenomena in nanosized systems is of importance for progressive development of nanotechnologies. In this context study of complex phenomena in such systems and using them for controlling purposes is of great practical importance. Namely, such studies are brought together in this book, which contains 27 papers on various aspects of nanoscale physics and nonlinear dynamics.

  7. Designing nanoscale constructs from atomic thin sheets of graphene, boron nitride and gold nanoparticles for advanced material applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasuja, Kabeer

    2011-12-01

    Nanoscale materials invite immense interest from diverse scientific disciplines as these provide access to precisely understand the physical world at their most fundamental atomic level. In concert with this aim of enhancing our understanding of the fundamental behavior at nanoscale, this dissertation presents research on three nanomaterials: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs), Graphene and ultra-thin Boron Nitride sheets (UTBNSs). The three-fold goals which drive this research are: incorporating mobility in nanoparticle based single-electron junction constructs, developing effective strategies to functionalize graphene with nano-forms of metal, and exfoliating ultrathin sheets of Boron Nitride. Gold nanoparticle based electronic constructs can achieve a new degree of operational freedom if nanoscale mobility is incorporated in their design. We achieved such a nano-electromechanical construct by incorporating elastic polymer molecules between GNPs to form 2-dimensional (2-D) molecular junctions which show a nanoscale reversible motion on applying macro scale forces. This GNP-polymer assembly works like a molecular spring opening avenues to maneuver nano components and store energy at nano-scale. Graphene is the first isolated nanomaterial that displays single-atom thickness. It exhibits quantum confinement that enables it to possess a unique combination of fascinating electronic, optical, and mechanical properties. Modifying the surface of graphene is extremely significant to enable its incorporation into applications of interest. We demonstrated the ability of chemically modified graphene sheets to act as GNP stabilizing templates in solution, and utilized this to process GNP composites of graphene. We discovered that GNPs synthesized by chemical or microwave reduction stabilize on graphene-oxide sheets to form snow-flake morphologies and bare-surfaces respectively. These hybrid nano constructs were extensively studied to understand the effect and nature of GNPs

  8. Biomimetic Templating of Porous Lamellar Silicas by Vesicular Surfactant Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanev, Peter T.; Pinnavaia, Thomas J.

    1996-03-01

    A biomimetic templating approach to the synthesis of lamellar silicas is demonstrated. The procedure is based on the hydrolysis and cross-linking of a neutral silicon alkoxide precursor in the interlayered regions of multilamellar vesicles formed from a neutral diamine bola-amphiphile. Unlike earlier surfactant-templating approaches, this method produces porous lamellar silicas (designated MSU-V) with vesicular particle morphology, exceptional thermal stability, a high degree of framework cross-linking, unusually high specific surface area and pore volume, and sorption properties that are typical of pillared lamellar materials. This approach circumvents the need for a separate pillaring step in building porosity into a lamellar host structure and offers new opportunities for the direct fabrication of adsorbents, catalysts, and nanoscale devices.

  9. The Cadastral Template Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; Steudler, Daniel; Williamson, Ian P.

    2004-01-01

      While many country reports have been compiled in the area of land administration over the last decade, there has not much attention been given to the basic cadastral issues. As a result, one of the objectives of Working Group 3 ?Cadastre? of the PCGIAP is the establishment of a cadastral template....... The work of the PCGIAP-Working Group 3 ?Cadastre? is being done in collaboration with Comission 7 ?Cadastre and Land Management? of the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), which has extensive experience in comparative cadastral studies. This article describes the creation and the content...

  10. One-pot, template- and surfactant-free solvothermal synthesis of high-crystalline Fe3O4 nanostructures with adjustable morphologies and high magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yan; Xin, Hongna; Zhang, Jiarui; Li, Xinghua; Feng, Juan; Deng, Xia; Sun, Yong; Zheng, Xinliang

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, high-crystalline and well-defined Fe3O4 nanostructures with tunable morphologies were fabricated through a facile one-pot solvothermal approach. The morphology, crystal structure and chemical compositions of the products were characterized at the nanoscale. X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns indicate that the products have a pure spinel phase without the presence of any other impurity. Based on the transmission electron microscope technology, shape evolution of the products were investigated. Several morphologies including irregular particles, clusters, hollow sphere and octahedrons can be obtained by only adjusting the amount of NaOH without using any surfactant. Magnetism investigations show that all the products perform ferromagnetic behavior with high saturation magnetization at room temperature, which mainly originates from their high crystalline nature and template-free fabrication process.

  11. A flexible nanobrush pad for the chemical mechanical planarization of Cu/ultra-low-к materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guiquan; Liu, Yuhong; Lu, Xinchun; Luo, Jianbin

    2012-10-01

    A new idea of polishing pad called flexible nanobrush pad (FNP) has been proposed for the low down pressure chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process of Cu/ultra-low-к materials. The FNP was designed with a surface layer of flexible brush-like nanofibers which can `actively' carry nanoscale abrasives in slurry independent of the down pressure. Better planarization performances including high material removal rate, good planarization, good polishing uniformity, and low defectivity are expected in the CMP process under the low down pressure with such kind of pad. The FNP can be made by template-assisted replication or template-based synthesis methods, which will be driven by the development of the preparation technologies for ordered nanostructure arrays. The present work would potentially provide a new solution for the Cu/ultra-low-к CMP process.

  12. A flexible nanobrush pad for the chemical mechanical planarization of Cu/ultra-low-к materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guiquan; Liu, Yuhong; Lu, Xinchun; Luo, Jianbin

    2012-10-30

    A new idea of polishing pad called flexible nanobrush pad (FNP) has been proposed for the low down pressure chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process of Cu/ultra-low-к materials. The FNP was designed with a surface layer of flexible brush-like nanofibers which can 'actively' carry nanoscale abrasives in slurry independent of the down pressure. Better planarization performances including high material removal rate, good planarization, good polishing uniformity, and low defectivity are expected in the CMP process under the low down pressure with such kind of pad. The FNP can be made by template-assisted replication or template-based synthesis methods, which will be driven by the development of the preparation technologies for ordered nanostructure arrays. The present work would potentially provide a new solution for the Cu/ultra-low-к CMP process.

  13. Nanoscale Confinement and Fluorescence Effects of Bacterial Light Harvesting Complex LH2 in Mesoporous Silicas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hideki; Tubasum, Sumera; Pullerits, Tonu;

    2013-01-01

    harvesting complex LH2 in nanoscale chemical environments. Mesoporous silicas (SBA-15 family) with different shapes and pore sizes were synthesized and used to create nanoscale biomimetic environments for molecular confinement of LH2. A combination of UV-vis absorption, wide-field fluorescence microscopy...

  14. Magnetic and conductive magnetite nanowires by DNA-templating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hasan Daw A; Watson, Scott M D; Horrocks, Benjamin R; Houlton, Andrew

    2012-09-28

    The synthesis of nanowires made of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) phase iron oxide was achieved using DNA as a template to direct formation of the metal oxide and confine its growth in two dimensions. This simple solution-based approach involves initial association of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) to the DNA "template" molecules, and subsequent co-precipitation of the Fe(3)O(4) material, upon increasing the solution pH, to give the final metal oxide nanowires. Analysis of the DNA-templated material, using a combination of FTIR, XRD, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy, confirmed the iron oxide formed to be the Fe(3)O(4) crystal phase. Investigation of the structural character of the nanowires, carried out by AFM, revealed the metal oxide to form regular coatings of nanometre-scale thickness around the DNA templates. Statistical analysis showed the size distribution of the nanowires to follow a trimodal model, with the modal diameter values identified as 5-6 nm, 14-15 nm, and 23-24 nm. Additional scanning probe microscopy techniques (SCM, MFM) were also used to verify that the nanowire structures are electrically conducting and exhibit magnetic behaviour. Such properties, coupled with the small dimensions of these materials, make them potentially good candidates for application in a host of future nanoscale device technologies.

  15. Apoferritin fibers: a new template for 1D fluorescent hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Rocío; Castello, Fabio; Bondia, Patricia; Casado, Santiago; Flors, Cristina; Cuesta, Rafael; Domínguez-Vera, José M.; Orte, Angel; Gálvez, Natividad

    2016-05-01

    Recently, research in the field of protein amyloid fibers has gained great attention due to the use of these materials as nanoscale templates for the construction of functional hybrid materials. The formation of apoferritin amyloid-like protein fibers is demonstrated herein for the first time. The morphology, size and stiffness of these one-dimensional structures are comparable to the fibers formed by β-lactoglobulin, a protein frequently used as a model in the study of amyloid-like fibrillar proteins. Nanometer-sized globular apoferritin is capable of self-assembling to form 1D micrometer-sized structures after being subjected to a heating process. Depending on the experimental conditions, fibers with different morphologies and sizes are obtained. The wire-like protein structure is rich in functional groups and allows chemical functionalization with diverse quantum dots (QD), as well as with different Alexa Fluor (AF) dyes, leading to hybrid fluorescent fibers with variable emission wavelengths, from green to near infrared, depending on the QD and AFs coupled. For fibers containing the pair AF488 and AF647, efficient fluorescence energy transfer from the covalently coupled donor (AF488) to acceptor tags (AF647) takes place. Apoferritin fibers are proposed here as a new promising template for obtaining hybrid functional materials.Recently, research in the field of protein amyloid fibers has gained great attention due to the use of these materials as nanoscale templates for the construction of functional hybrid materials. The formation of apoferritin amyloid-like protein fibers is demonstrated herein for the first time. The morphology, size and stiffness of these one-dimensional structures are comparable to the fibers formed by β-lactoglobulin, a protein frequently used as a model in the study of amyloid-like fibrillar proteins. Nanometer-sized globular apoferritin is capable of self-assembling to form 1D micrometer-sized structures after being subjected to a

  16. Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography using cyclodextrin-based porous template for pattern failure reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    An approach to ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprint lithography using a cyclodextrin-based porous template was investigated for the reduction of air trapping and template damage caused by gases such as nitrogen and oxygen generated from UV cross-linked materials. The accuracy of the printed pattern using UV nanoimprint lithography with the porous transparent template was improved because of enhanced material adsorption and increased permeability to gaseous species. The use of volatile solvents in the UV cross-linked materials for nanoimprint lithography has been limited because of high pattern failure rates. However, using the cyclodextrin-based porous template, the UV cross-linked materials with a 5 wt. % volatile solvent exhibited well-defined nanoscale patterns. Based on this study, acceptable chemistries for the UV cross-linked materials have been expanded, which will be beneficial for future device applications using UV nanoimprint lithography.

  17. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  18. Characterizing Nanoscale Transient Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifan; Anwar, Putri Santi; Huang, Limin; Asvial, Muhamad

    2016-04-01

    We consider the novel paradigm of nanoscale transient communication (NTC), where certain components of the small-scale communication link are physically transient. As such, the transmitter and the receiver may change their properties over a prescribed lifespan due to their time-varying structures. The NTC systems may find important applications in the biomedical, environmental, and military fields, where system degradability allows for benign integration into life and environment. In this paper, we analyze the NTC systems from the channel-modeling and capacity-analysis perspectives and focus on the stochastically meaningful slow transience scenario, where the coherence time of degeneration Td is much longer than the coding delay Tc. We first develop novel and parsimonious models to characterize the NTC channels, where three types of physical layers are considered: electromagnetism-based terahertz (THz) communication, diffusion-based molecular communication (DMC), and nanobots-assisted touchable communication (TouchCom). We then revisit the classical performance measure of ϵ-outage channel capacity and take a fresh look at its formulations in the NTC context. Next, we present the notion of capacity degeneration profile (CDP), which describes the reduction of channel capacity with respect to the degeneration time. Finally, we provide numerical examples to demonstrate the features of CDP. To the best of our knowledge, the current work represents a first attempt to systematically evaluate the quality of nanoscale communication systems deteriorating with time.

  19. Synthesis, dynamics and photophysics of nanoscale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Tihana

    The emerging field of nanotechnology, which spans diverse areas such as nanoelectronics, medicine, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, biotechnology and computation, focuses on the development of devices whose improved performance is based on the utilization of self-assembled nanoscale components exhibiting unique properties owing to their miniaturized dimensions. The first phase in the conception of such multifunctional devices based on integrated technologies requires the study of basic principles behind the functional mechanism of nanoscale components, which could originate from individual nanoobjects or result as a collective behaviour of miniaturized unit structures. The comprehensive studies presented in this thesis encompass the mechanical, dynamical and photophysical aspects of three nanoscale systems. A newly developed europium sulfide nanocrystalline material is introduced. Advances in synthetic methods allowed for shape control of surface-functionalized EuS nanocrystals and the fabrication of multifunctional EuS-CdSe hybrid particles, whose unique structural and optical properties hold promise as useful attributes of integrated materials in developing technologies. A comprehensive study based on a new class of multifunctional nanomaterials, derived from the basic unit of barcoded metal nanorods is presented. Their chemical composition affords them the ability to undergo autonomous motion in the presence of a suitable fuel. The nature of their chemically powered self-propulsion locomotion was investigated, and plausible mechanisms for various motility modes were presented. Furthermore functionalization of striped metallic nanorods has been realized through the incorporation of chemically controlled flexible hinges displaying bendable properties. The structural aspect of the light harvesting machinery of a photosynthetic cryptophyte alga, Rhodomonas CS24, and the mobility of the antenna protein, PE545, in vivo were investigated. Information obtained

  20. A Deformable Template Model, with Special Reference to Elliptical Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asger; Pedersen, Jan; Jensen, Eva Bjørn Vedel

    2002-01-01

    This paper suggests a high-level continuous image model for planar star-shaped objects. Under this model, a planar object is a stochastic deformation of a star-shaped template. The residual process, describing the difference between the radius-vector function of the template and the object...

  1. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  2. Resonant Effects in Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Guo, Songpo; Liu, Tao; Kinzel, Edward; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas can be used to focus light well below the diffraction limit with extremely high transmission efficiencies. This paper studies the spectral dependence of the transmission through nanoscale bowtie apertures defined in a silver film. A realistic bowtie aperture is numerically modeled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Results show that the transmission spectrum is dominated by Fabry-Pérot (F-P) waveguide modes and plasmonic modes. The F-P resonance is sensitive to the thickness of the film and the plasmonic resonant mode is closely related to the gap distance of the bowtie aperture. Both characteristics significantly affect the transmission spectrum. To verify these numerical results, bowtie apertures are FIB milled in a silver film. Experimental transmission measurements agree with simulation data. Based on this result, nanoscale bowtie apertures can be optimized to realize deep sub-wavelength confinement with high transmission efficiency with applications to nanolithography, data storage, and bio-chemical sensing. PMID:27250995

  3. Templated quasicrystalline molecular layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerdon, Joe; Young, Kirsty; Lowe, Michael; Hars, Sanger; Yadav, Thakur; Hesp, David; Dhanak, Vinod; Tsai, An-Pang; Sharma, Hem Raj; McGrath, Ronan

    2014-03-01

    Quasicrystals are materials with long range ordering but no periodicity. We report scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations of quasicrystalline molecular layers on five-fold quasicrystal surfaces. The molecules adopt positions and orientations on the surface consistent with the quasicrystalline ordering of the substrate. Carbon-60 adsorbs atop sufficiently-separated Fe atoms on icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe to form a unique quasicrystalline lattice whereas further C60 molecules decorate remaining surface Fe atoms in a quasi-degenerate fashion. Pentacene (Pn) adsorbs at tenfold-symmetric points around surface-bisected rhombic triacontahedral clusters in icosahedral Ag-In-Yb. These systems constitute the first demonstrations of quasicrystalline molecular ordering on a template. EPSRC EP/D05253X/1, EP/D071828/1, UK BIS.

  4. High resolution nanoimprint templates for dual damascene: fabrication and imprint results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmscher, Mathias; Butschke, Joerg; Carpio, Ron; Chao, Brook; Jen, Wei-Lun; Koepernik, Corinna; Nedelmann, Lorenz; Owens, Jordan; Palmieri, Frank; Pritschow, Marcus; Reuter, Christian; Sailer, Holger; Satoodeh, Ken; Wetzel, Jeff; Wilks, Bruce; Willson, Grant

    2008-03-01

    A dual damascene template fabrication process has been developed, which enables the structuring of high-resolution, high-aspect pillars on top of lines. Based on this technology templates with three different designs have been fabricated and characterized. Two templates are dedicated for an assessment of the fabrication process using a regular test design on one hand and an arbitrary CMOS design on the other hand. With the third template via chains shall be later realized as demonstrator for electrical tests. The templates have been imprinted in resist and sacrificial material on an Imprio 55 and an Imprio 100 tool. The usability of each fabricated template could be confirmed for the specific application. For the template manufacturing a Vistec variable shape e-beam (VSB) writer SB352HR and appropriate positive-tone and negative-tone chemically amplified resists (CAR) have been used.

  5. Template-synthesized opal hydrogels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; JI Lijun; RONG Jianhua; YANG Zhenzhong

    2003-01-01

    Opal hydrogels could be synthesized with polymer inverse opal template. A pH responsive opal N-iso- propylacrylamide/acrylic acid copolymerized hydrogel was prepared as an example. The ordered structure and response to pH were investigated. Through the sol-gel process of tetrabutyl titanate, opal titania was obtained with the opal hydrogel template.

  6. Non-oxidic nanoscale composites: single-crystalline titanium carbide nanocubes in hierarchical porous carbon monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenburg, Kirstin; Smarsly, Bernd M; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2009-05-07

    We report the preparation of nanoscale carbon-titanium carbide composites with carbide contents of up to 80 wt%. The synthesis yields single-crystalline TiC nanocubes 20-30 nm in diameter embedded in a hierarchical porous carbon matrix. These composites were generated in the form of cylindrical monoliths but can be produced in various shapes using modern sol-gel and nanocasting methods in conjunction with carbothermal reduction. The monolithic material is characterized by a combination of microscopy, diffraction and physisorption. Overall, the results presented in this work represent a concrete design template for the synthesis of non-oxidic nanoscale composites with high surface areas.

  7. Nanoscale investigation of organic - inorganic halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacovich, S.; Divitini, G.; Vrućinić, M.; Sadhanala, A.; Friend, R. H.; Sirringhaus, H.; Deschler, F.; Ducati, C.

    2015-10-01

    Over the last few years organic - inorganic halide perovskite-based solar cells have exhibited a rapid evolution, reaching certified power conversion efficiencies now surpassing 20%. Nevertheless the understanding of the optical and electronic properties of such systems on the nanoscale is still an open problem. In this work we investigate two model perovskite systems (based on iodine - CH3NH3PbI3 and bromine - CH3NH3PbBr3), analysing the local elemental composition and crystallinity and identifying chemical inhomogeneities.

  8. Nanoscale waveguiding methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Jean; Lin, Lih Y

    2007-05-01

    While 32 nm lithography technology is on the horizon for integrated circuit (IC) fabrication, matching the pace for miniaturization with optics has been hampered by the diffraction limit. However, development of nanoscale components and guiding methods is burgeoning through advances in fabrication techniques and materials processing. As waveguiding presents the fundamental issue and cornerstone for ultra-high density photonic ICs, we examine the current state of methods in the field. Namely, plasmonic, metal slot and negative dielectric based waveguides as well as a few sub-micrometer techniques such as nanoribbons, high-index contrast and photonic crystals waveguides are investigated in terms of construction, transmission, and limitations. Furthermore, we discuss in detail quantum dot (QD) arrays as a gain-enabled and flexible means to transmit energy through straight paths and sharp bends. Modeling, fabrication and test results are provided and show that the QD waveguide may be effective as an alternate means to transfer light on sub-diffraction dimensions.

  9. Anatomy of Nanoscale Propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinita; Duan, Wentao; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-01-01

    Nature supports multifaceted forms of life. Despite the variety and complexity of these forms, motility remains the epicenter of life. The applicable laws of physics change upon going from macroscales to microscales and nanoscales, which are characterized by low Reynolds number (Re). We discuss motion at low Re in natural and synthetic systems, along with various propulsion mechanisms, including electrophoresis, electrolyte diffusiophoresis, and nonelectrolyte diffusiophoresis. We also describe the newly uncovered phenomena of motility in non-ATP-driven self-powered enzymes and the directional movement of these enzymes in response to substrate gradients. These enzymes can also be immobilized to function as fluid pumps in response to the presence of their substrates. Finally, we review emergent collective behavior arising from interacting motile species, and we discuss the possible biomedical applications of the synthetic nanobots and microbots.

  10. Making Deformable Template Models Operational

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Rune

    2000-01-01

    Deformable template models are a very popular and powerful tool within the field of image processing and computer vision. This thesis treats this type of models extensively with special focus on handling their common difficulties, i.e. model parameter selection, initialization and optimization...... published during the Ph.D. project. To put these articles into the general context of deformable template models and to pass on an overview of the deformable template model literature, the thesis starts with a compact survey of the deformable template model literature with special focus on representation....... A proper handling of the common difficulties is essential for making the models operational by a non-expert user, which is a requirement for intensifying and commercializing the use of deformable template models. The thesis is organized as a collection of the most important articles, which has been...

  11. Porous Materials with Tunable Structure and Mechanical Properties via Templated Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziminska, Monika; Dunne, Nicholas; Hamilton, Andrew R

    2016-08-31

    The deposition of stiff and strong coatings onto porous templates offers a novel strategy for fabricating macroscale materials with controlled architectures at the micro- and nanoscale. Here, layer-by-layer assembly is utilized to fabricate nanocomposite-coated foams with highly customizable properties by depositing polymer-nanoclay coatings onto open-cell foam templates. The compressive mechanical behavior of these materials evolves in a predictable manner that is qualitatively captured by scaling laws for the mechanical properties of cellular materials. The observed and predicted properties span a remarkable range of density-stiffness space, extending from regions of very soft elastomer foams to very stiff, lightweight honeycomb and lattice materials.

  12. One-dimensional Si-in-Si(001) template for single-atom wire growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, J. H. G.; Bianco, F.; Köster, S. A.; Mazur, D.; Bowler, D. R.; Renner, Ch.

    2010-08-01

    Single atom metallic wires of arbitrary length are of immense technological and scientific interest. We present atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscope data of a silicon-only template, which modeling predicts to enable the self-organized growth of isolated micrometer long surface and subsurface single-atom chains. It consists of a one-dimensional, defect-free Si reconstruction four dimers wide—the Haiku core—formed by hydrogenation of self-assembled Bi-nanolines on Si(001) terraces, independent of any step edges. We discuss the potential of this Si-in-Si template as an appealing alternative to vicinal surfaces for nanoscale patterning.

  13. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties—all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts. PMID:27330220

  14. High-performance fabrication process for 2xnm hole-NIL template production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagawa, Keisuke; Suenaga, Machiko; Motokawa, Takeharu; Tanabe, Mana; Ando, Akihiko; Yamanaka, Eiji; Morishita, Keiko; Kanamitsu, Shingo; Saito, Masato; Itoh, Masamitsu

    2016-10-01

    UV nano imprint lithography (UV-NIL) has high-throughput and cost-effective for complex nano-scale patterns and is considered as a candidate for next generation lithography tool. In addition, NIL is the unmagnified lithography and contact transfer technique using template. Therefore, the lithography performance depends greatly on the quality of the template pattern. According to ITRS 2013, the minimum half pitch size of Line and Space (LS) pattern will reach 1x nm level within next five years. On the other hand, in hole pattern, half pith of 2x nm level will be required in five years. Pattern shrink rate of hole pattern size is slower than LS pattern, but shot counts increase explosively compared to LS pattern due to its data volume. Therefore, high throughput and high resolution EB lithography process is required. In previous study, we reported the result of hole patterning on master template which has high resolution resist material and etching process. This study indicated the potential for fabricating 2xnm hole master template [1]. After above study, we aim at fabricating the good quality of 2xnm master template which is assured about defect, CD uniformity(CDU), and Image placement(IP). To product high quality master template, we develop not only high resolution patterning process but also high accuracy quality assurance technology. We report the development progress about hole master template production.

  15. CHEMICALS

    CERN Document Server

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  16. Silicon template preparation for the fabrication of thin patterned gold films via template stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidl, G.; Dellith, J.; Dellith, A.; Teller, N.; Zopf, D.; Li, G.; Dathe, A.; Mayer, G.; Hübner, U.; Zeisberger, M.; Stranik, O.; Fritzsche, W.

    2015-12-01

    Metallic nanostructures play an important role in the vast field of modern nanophotonics, which ranges from the life sciences to biomedicine and beyond. Gold is a commonly-used and attractive material for plasmonics in the visible wavelength range, most importantly due to its chemical stability. In the present work, we focused on the different methods of plasmonic nanostructure fabrication that possess the greatest potential for cost-efficient fabrication. Initially, reusable (1 0 0) silicon templates were prepared. For this purpose, three different lithography methods (i.e. e-beam, optical, and nanoparticle lithography) were used that correspond to the desired structural scales. The application of a subsequent anisotropic crystal orientation-dependent wet etching process produced well-defined pyramidal structures in a wide variety of sizes, ranging from several microns to less than 100 nm. Finally, a 200 nm-thick gold layer was deposited by means of confocal sputtering on the silicon templates and stripped in order to obtain gold films that feature a surface replica of the initial template structure. The surface roughness that was achieved on the stripped films corresponds well with the roughness of the template used. This makes it possible to prepare cost-efficient high-quality structured films in large quantities with little effort. The gold films produced were thoroughly characterized, particularly with respect to their plasmonic response.

  17. Versatile Particle-Based Route to Engineer Vertically Aligned Silicon Nanowire Arrays and Nanoscale Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnathan, Roey; Isa, Lucio; Brodoceanu, Daniel; Nelson, Adrienne; Harding, Frances J; Delalat, Bahman; Kraus, Tobias; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-10-28

    Control over particle self-assembly is a prerequisite for the colloidal templating of lithographical etching masks to define nanostructures. This work integrates and combines for the first time bottom-up and top-down approaches, namely, particle self-assembly at liquid-liquid interfaces and metal-assisted chemical etching, to generate vertically aligned silicon nanowire (VA-SiNW) arrays and, alternatively, arrays of nanoscale pores in a silicon wafer. Of particular importance, and in contrast to current techniques, including conventional colloidal lithography, this approach provides excellent control over the nanowire or pore etching site locations and decouples nanowire or pore diameter and spacing. The spacing between pores or nanowires is tuned by adjusting the specific area of the particles at the liquid-liquid interface before deposition. Hence, the process enables fast and low-cost fabrication of ordered nanostructures in silicon and can be easily scaled up. We demonstrate that the fabricated VA-SiNW arrays can be used as in vitro transfection platforms for transfecting human primary cells.

  18. Pure Nanoscale Morphology Effect Enhancing the Energy Storage Characteristics of Processable Hierarchical Polypyrrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannapob, Rodtichoti; Vagin, Mikhail Yu; Jeerapan, Itthipon; Mak, Wing Cheung

    2015-11-03

    We report a new synthesis approach for the precise control of wall morphologies of colloidal polypyrrole microparticles (PPyMPs) based on a time-dependent template-assisted polymerization technique. The resulting PPyMPs are water processable, allowing the simple and direct fabrication of multilevel hierarchical PPyMPs films for energy storage via a self-assembly process, whereas convention methods creating hierarchical conducting films based on electrochemical polymerization are complicated and tedious. This approach allows the rational design and fabrication of PPyMPs with well-defined size and tunable wall morphology, while the chemical composition, zeta potential, and microdiameter of the PPyMPs are well characterized. By precisely controlling the wall morphology of the PPyMPs, we observed a pure nanoscale morphological effect of the materials on the energy storage performance. We demonstrated by controlling purely the wall morphology of PPyMPs to around 100 nm (i.e., thin-walled PPyMPs) that the thin-walled PPyMPs exhibit typical supercapacitor characteristics with a significant enhancement of charge storage performance of up to 290% compared to that of thick-walled PPyMPs confirmed by cyclic voltametry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We envision that the present design concept could be extended to different conducting polymers as well as other functional organic and inorganic dopants, which provides an innovative model for future study and understanding of the complex physicochemical phenomena of energy-related materials.

  19. Cloning nanocrystal morphology with soft templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Dev Kumar; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-08-01

    In most template directed preparative methods, while the template decides the nanostructure morphology, the structure of the template itself is a non-general outcome of its peculiar chemistry. Here we demonstrate a template mediated synthesis that overcomes this deficiency. This synthesis involves overgrowth of silica template onto a sacrificial nanocrystal. Such templates are used to copy the morphologies of gold nanorods. After template overgrowth, gold is removed and silver is regrown in the template cavity to produce a single crystal silver nanorod. This technique allows for duplicating existing nanocrystals, while also providing a quantifiable breakdown of the structure - shape interdependence.

  20. Aligned carbon nanotube-Pt composite fuel cell catalyst by template electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Lorraine C.; Rohan, James F. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2008-10-15

    Solution phase deposition of aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a platinum (Pt) matrix composite is demonstrated. The catalyst material is electrodeposited in an oriented manner on the nanoscale using anodised aluminium oxide (AAO) templates. The catalyst performance of the composite for the oxidation of methanol is shown. The carbon monoxide (CO) tolerance is increased and the catalyst function is improved by minimising the influence of adsorbed CO on the kinetics of the methanol oxidation reaction. (author)

  1. Quantum machines at the nanoscale

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic machines have been studied for two centuries. The rapid advancement in fabrication techniques of the last decades has lead to size reduction from the macroscale to nanoscale. At the nanoscale, quantum properties become important and have thus to be fully taken into account. Quantum heat engines have been the subject of extensive theoretical studies in the last fifty years. However, while classical micro heat engines have been fabricated, to date no quantum heat engine has bee...

  2. Nanoscale technology in biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Greco, Ralph S; Smith, R Lane

    2004-01-01

    Reviewing recent accomplishments in the field of nanobiology Nanoscale Technology in Biological Systems introduces the application of nanoscale matrices to human biology. It focuses on the applications of nanotechnology fabrication to biomedical devices and discusses new physical methods for cell isolation and manipulation and intracellular communication at the molecular level. It also explores the application of nanobiology to cardiovascular diseases, oncology, transplantation, and a range of related disciplines. This book build a strong background in nanotechnology and nanobiology ideal for

  3. Energy Use in Nanoscale Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Teresa; Boyd, Sarah; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of key nanoscale manufacturing technologies, and qualitatively examines their fundamental process requirements with respect to energy demand. The processes requirements are related to semiconductor manufacturing, where applicable, and gaps in our understanding of these processes on the production scale are identified as goals for the research community. Finally, the paper proposes a framework for the systematic analysis of energy use in nanoscale manufacturing ...

  4. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  5. Smart templates for peak pattern matching with comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E; Carr, Peter W; Stoll, Dwight R; Tao, Qingping

    2009-04-17

    Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LCxLC) generates information-rich but complex peak patterns that require automated processing for rapid chemical identification and classification. This paper describes a powerful approach and specific methods for peak pattern matching to identify and classify constituent peaks in data from LCxLC and other multidimensional chemical separations. The approach records a prototypical pattern of peaks with retention times and associated metadata, such as chemical identities and classes, in a template. Then, the template pattern is matched to the detected peaks in subsequent data and the metadata are copied from the template to identify and classify the matched peaks. Smart Templates employ rule-based constraints (e.g., multispectral matching) to increase matching accuracy. Experimental results demonstrate Smart Templates, with the combination of retention-time pattern matching and multispectral constraints, are accurate and robust with respect to changes in peak patterns associated with variable chromatographic conditions.

  6. Temperature mapping of operating nanoscale devices by scanning probe thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Fabian; Mensch, Philipp; Schmid, Heinz; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Imaging temperature fields at the nanoscale is a central challenge in various areas of science and technology. Nanoscopic hotspots, such as those observed in integrated circuits or plasmonic nanostructures, can be used to modify the local properties of matter, govern physical processes, activate chemical reactions and trigger biological mechanisms in living organisms. The development of high-resolution thermometry techniques is essential for understanding local thermal non-equilibrium processes during the operation of numerous nanoscale devices. Here we present a technique to map temperature fields using a scanning thermal microscope. Our method permits the elimination of tip-sample contact-related artefacts, a major hurdle that so far has limited the use of scanning probe microscopy for nanoscale thermometry. We map local Peltier effects at the metal-semiconductor contacts to an indium arsenide nanowire and self-heating of a metal interconnect with 7 mK and sub-10 nm spatial temperature resolution.

  7. Thermoelectric efficiency of nanoscale devices in the linear regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, G.; Grosso, G.; Menichetti, G.; Pastori Parravicini, G.

    2016-12-01

    We study quantum transport through two-terminal nanoscale devices in contact with two particle reservoirs at different temperatures and chemical potentials. We discuss the general expressions controlling the electric charge current, heat currents, and the efficiency of energy transmutation in steady conditions in the linear regime. With focus in the parameter domain where the electron system acts as a power generator, we elaborate workable expressions for optimal efficiency and thermoelectric parameters of nanoscale devices. The general concepts are set at work in the paradigmatic cases of Lorentzian resonances and antiresonances, and the encompassing Fano transmission function: the treatments are fully analytic, in terms of the trigamma functions and Bernoulli numbers. From the general curves here reported describing transport through the above model transmission functions, useful guidelines for optimal efficiency and thermopower can be inferred for engineering nanoscale devices in energy regions where they show similar transmission functions.

  8. Microscale and Nanoscale Process Systems Engineering: Challenge and Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨友麒

    2008-01-01

    This is an overview of the development of process systems engineering (PSE) in a smaller world. Two different spatio-temporal scopes are identified for microscale and nanoscale process systems. The features and challenges for each scale are reviewed, and different methodologies used by them discussed. Comparison of these two new areas with traditional process systems engineering is described. If microscale PSE could be considered as an extension of traditional PSE, nanoscale PSE should be accepted as a new discipline which has looser connection with the extant core of chemical engineering. Since "molecular factories" is the next frontier of processing scale, nanoscale PSE will be the new theory to handle the design, simulation and operation of those active processing systems.

  9. Nanoscale waveguiding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chia-Jean

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWhile 32 nm lithography technology is on the horizon for integrated circuit (IC fabrication, matching the pace for miniaturization with optics has been hampered by the diffraction limit. However, development of nanoscale components and guiding methods is burgeoning through advances in fabrication techniques and materials processing. As waveguiding presents the fundamental issue and cornerstone for ultra-high density photonic ICs, we examine the current state of methods in the field. Namely, plasmonic, metal slot and negative dielectric based waveguides as well as a few sub-micrometer techniques such as nanoribbons, high-index contrast and photonic crystals waveguides are investigated in terms of construction, transmission, and limitations. Furthermore, we discuss in detail quantum dot (QD arrays as a gain-enabled and flexible means to transmit energy through straight paths and sharp bends. Modeling, fabrication and test results are provided and show that the QD waveguide may be effective as an alternate means to transfer light on sub-diffraction dimensions.

  10. Capillarity at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Honschoten, Joost W; Brunets, Nataliya; Tas, Niels R

    2010-03-01

    In this critical review we treat the phenomenon of capillarity in nanoscopic confinement, based on application of the Young-Laplace equation. In classical capillarity the curvature of the meniscus is determined by the confining geometry and the macroscopic contact angle. We show that in narrow confinement the influence of the disjoining pressure and the related wetting films have to be considered as they may significantly change the meniscus curvature. Nanochannel based static and dynamic capillarity experiments are reviewed. A typical effect of nanoscale confinement is the appearance of capillarity induced negative pressure. Special attention is paid to elasto-capillarity and electro-capillarity. The presence of electric fields leads to an extra stress term to be added in the Young-Laplace equation. A typical example is the formation of the Taylor cone, essential in the theory of electrospray. Measurements of the filling kinetics of nanochannels with water and aqueous salt solutions are discussed. These experiments can be used to characterize viscosity and apparent viscosity effects of water in nanoscopic confinement. In the final section we show four examples of appearances of capillarity in engineering and in nature (112 references).

  11. Deep eutectic solvents: sustainable media for nanoscale and functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A

    2014-08-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) represent an alternative class of ionic fluids closely resembling room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), although, strictly speaking, they are distinguished by the fact that they also contain an organic molecular component (typically, a hydrogen bond donor like a urea, amide, acid, or polyol), frequently as the predominant constituent. Practically speaking, DESs are attractive alternatives to RTILs, sharing most of their remarkable qualities (e.g., tolerance to humidity, negligible vapor pressure, thermostability, wide electrochemical potential windows, tunability) while overcoming several limitations associated with their RTIL cousins. Particularly, DESs are typically, less expensive, more synthetically accessible (typically, from bulk commodity chemicals using solvent/waste-free processes), nontoxic, and biodegradable. In this Account, we provide an overview of DESs as designer solvents to create well-defined nanomaterials including shape-controlled nanoparticles, electrodeposited films, metal-organic frameworks, colloidal assemblies, hierarchically porous carbons, and DNA/RNA architectures. These breakthroughs illustrate how DESs can fulfill multiple roles in directing chemistry at the nanoscale: acting as supramolecular template, metal/carbon source, sacrificial agent (e.g., ammonia release from urea), and/or redox agent, all in the absence of formal stabilizing ligand (here, solvent and stabilizer are one and the same). The ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of DESs is central to controlling their interfacial behavior. The preorganized "supramolecular" nature of DESs provides a soft template to guide the formation of bimodal porous carbon networks or the evolution of electrodeposits. A number of essential parameters (viscosity, polarity, surface tension, hydrogen bonding), plus coordination with solutes/surfaces, all play significant roles in modulating species reactivity and mass transport properties governing the

  12. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  13. Design, Sustainable Synthesis, and Programmed Reactions of Templated N-Heteroaryl-Fused Vinyl Sultams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, Joydev K; Sharma, Shubhra; Kirar, Seema; Banerjee, Uttam C

    2017-09-15

    A de novo design and synthesis of N-heteroaryl-fused vinyl sultams as templates for programming chemical reactions on vinyl sultam periphery or (hetero)aryl ring is described. The key features include rational designing and sustainable synthesis of the template, customized reactions of vinyl sultams at C═C bond or involving N-S bond cleavage, and reactions on the periphery of the heteroaryl ring for late-stage diversification. The simple, easy access to the template coupled with opportunities for the synthesis of diversely functionalized heterocyles from a single template constitutes a rare study in contemporary organic synthesis.

  14. Formation and Characterization of Stacked Nanoscale Layers of Polymers and Silanes on Silicon Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Rosie; Davis, Brian; Conley, Hiram; Hurd, Katie; Linford, Matthew R.; Davis, Robert C.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical surface patterning at the nanoscale is a critical component of chemically directed assembly of nanoscale devices or sensitive biological molecules onto surfaces. Complete and consistent formation of nanoscale layers of silanes and polymers is a necessary first step for chemical patterning. We explored methods of silanizing silicon substrates for the purpose of functionalizing the surfaces. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was characterized by use of ellipsometry, water contact angle, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). We found that forming the highest quality functionalized surfaces was accomplished through use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Specifically, surfaces were plasma cleaned and hydrolyzed before the silane was applied. A polymer layer less then 2 nm in thickness was electrostatically bound to the silane layer. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was also characterized for the polymer layer using ellipsometry, water contact angle, and AFM.

  15. The LOLITA User-Definable Template Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Košmelj, Katarina

    2001-01-01

    The development of user-definable templates interfaces which allow the user to design new templates definitions in a user-friendly way is a new issue in the field of information extraction. The LOLITA user-definable templates interface allows the user to define new templates using sentences in natural language text with a few restrictions and formal elements. This approach is rather different from previous approaches to information extraction which require developers to code the template defi...

  16. Automating embedded analysis capabilities using template-based generic programming

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlowski, Roger P; Salinger, Andrew G

    2012-01-01

    An approach for incorporating embedded simulation and analysis capabilities in complex simulation codes through template-based generic programming is presented. This approach relies on templating and operator overloading within the C++ language to transform a given calculation into one that can compute a variety of additional quantities that are necessary for many state-of-the-art simulation and analysis algorithms. An approach for incorporating these ideas into complex simulation codes through general graph-based assembly is also presented. These ideas have been implemented within a set of packages in the Trilinos framework and are demonstrated on a simple problem from chemical engineering.

  17. Synthesis of templated carbons starting from clay and clay-derived zeolites for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clay and its recrystallized zeolitic derivatives were used in this study as templating agents for carbon nanostructured materials. The conventional nanocasting process that involves impregnation with furfural alcohol and subsequent chemical vapour...

  18. Nanoscale phase change memory materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Marissa A; Jeyasingh, Rakesh Gnana David; Wong, H-S Philip; Milliron, Delia J

    2012-08-01

    Phase change memory materials store information through their reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states. For typical metal chalcogenide compounds, their phase transition properties directly impact critical memory characteristics and the manipulation of these is a major focus in the field. Here, we discuss recent work that explores the tuning of such properties by scaling the materials to nanoscale dimensions, including fabrication and synthetic strategies used to produce nanoscale phase change memory materials. The trends that emerge are relevant to understanding how such memory technologies will function as they scale to ever smaller dimensions and also suggest new approaches to designing materials for phase change applications. Finally, the challenges and opportunities raised by integrating nanoscale phase change materials into switching devices are discussed.

  19. Nanoscale optical imaging of semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmler, Miriam; Hartschuh, Achim [Department Chemie, CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Myalitsin, Anton; Mews, Alf [Department Chemie, Universitaet Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Inorganic semiconducting nanowires (NWs) feature size-related optical properties which make them interesting for a wide range of applications, e.g. nanoscale optoelectronics, sensors, and photovoltaics. Their relevant length scales that are determined by nanowire diameter and exciton Bohr radius, however, can not be resolved by conventional diffraction limited methods. We illustrate the prospects of tip-enhanced near-field optical microscopy (TENOM) as a method to investigate single nanowires. In TENOM a sharp metallic tip acts as optical antenna thereby enhancing the detected signal and increasing the optical resolution to about 15 nm. We present our investigations of CdSe NWs which have been grown by the wet chemical solution liquid solid technique. Here, TENOM provides the possibility to simultaneously image photoluminescence (PL) as well as Raman scattering of individual NWs with nanoscale resolution. We observe spatial variations of the PL intensity and energy on a length scale of about 15 nm indicating crystal phase transitions and diameter fluctuations.

  20. Fabrication of nanoscale electrostatic lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, I.; Sanz-Velasco, A.; Kang, S.; Jansen, H.; Olsson, E.; Enoksson, P.; Svensson, K.

    2010-09-01

    The fabrication of cylindrical multi-element electrostatic lenses at the nanoscale presents a challenge; they are high-aspect-ratio structures that should be rotationally symmetric, well aligned and freestanding, with smooth edges and flat, clean surfaces. In this paper, we present the fabrication results of a non-conventional process, which uses a combination of focused gallium ion-beam milling and hydrofluoric acid vapor etching. This process makes it possible to fabricate nanoscale electrostatic lenses down to 140 nm in aperture diameter and 4.2 µm in column length, with a superior control of the geometry as compared to conventional lithography-based techniques.

  1. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  2. Template-Directed Biopolymerization: Tape-Copying Turing Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajeet K.; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2012-10-01

    DNA, RNA and proteins are among the most important macromolecules in a living cell. These molecules are polymerized by molecular machines. These natural nano-machines polymerize such macromolecules, adding one monomer at a time, using another linear polymer as the corresponding template. The machine utilizes input chemical energy to move along the template which also serves as a track for the movements of the machine. In the Alan Turing year 2012, it is worth pointing out that these machines are "tape-copying Turing machines". We review the operational mechanisms of the polymerizer machines and their collective behavior from the perspective of statistical physics, emphasizing their common features in spite of the crucial differences in their biological functions. We also draw the attention of the physics community to another class of modular machines that carry out a different type of template-directed polymerization. We hope this review will inspire new kinetic models for these modular machines.

  3. Template-directed biopolymerization: tape-copying Turing machines

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Ajeet K; 10.1142/S1793048012300083

    2013-01-01

    DNA, RNA and proteins are among the most important macromolecules in a living cell. These molecules are polymerized by molecular machines. These natural nano-machines polymerize such macromolecules, adding one monomer at a time, using another linear polymer as the corresponding template. The machine utilizes input chemical energy to move along the template which also serves as a track for the movements of the machine. In the Alan Turing year 2012, it is worth pointing out that these machines are "tape-copying Turing machines". We review the operational mechanisms of the polymerizer machines and their collective behavior from the perspective of statistical physics, emphasizing their common features in spite of the crucial differences in their biological functions. We also draw attention of the physics community to another class of modular machines that carry out a different type of template-directed polymerization. We hope this review will inspire new kinetic models for these modular machines.

  4. Template synthesized chitosan nano test tubes for drug delivery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jillian L. Moulton

    There is tremendous current interest in developing nanoscale drug delivery vehicles. Though intensive efforts have focused on developing spherical drug delivery vehicles, cylindrically shaped vehicles such as nanotubes offer many advantages. Typically, nanotubes can carry a larger inner payload than nanoparticles of the same diameter. Also, we can prepare nanotubes in templates whose geometries can be controlled, in turn allowing precise control over the length and diameter of the tubes. In addition, template synthesized nanotubes can be differentially functionalized on the inner and outer surfaces. Furthermore, templates that are closed on one end can be used to fabricate nano test tubes (closed on one end). The geometry of these nano test tubes allows them to be easily filled with a payload, the open end sealed with a nanoparticle to protect the payload from leaking out, and then the exterior of the tube can be functionalized with a targeting moiety. In an effort to develop such a system, we explored the fabrication of chitosan nano test tubes. Defect-free, chitosan nano test tubes of uniform size were synthesized within the pores of a nanoporous alumina template membrane. While the nano test tubes remained within the template membrane, their inner cavities were filled with a model payload. The payload was then trapped inside the nano test tubes by sealing the open ends of the tubes with latex nanoparticle caps. For proof-of-principle studies, imine linkages were used to attach the caps to the nano test tubes. To create a self-disassembling system, disulfide chemistry was used to covalently cap the nano test tubes. Once removed from the template, the exterior of the nano test tubes were modified with a targeting moiety, allowing them to be targeted to pathological sites. We have also shown that the chitosan nano test tubes are biodegradable by two systems: enzymatic cleavage by lysozymes and disulfide cleavage of the crosslinker by reducing environments

  5. Biometric template transformation: a security analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Abhishek; Nandakumar, Karthik; Jain, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the critical steps in designing a secure biometric system is protecting the templates of the users that are stored either in a central database or on smart cards. If a biometric template is compromised, it leads to serious security and privacy threats because unlike passwords, it is not possible for a legitimate user to revoke his biometric identifiers and switch to another set of uncompromised identifiers. One methodology for biometric template protection is the template transformation approach, where the template, consisting of the features extracted from the biometric trait, is transformed using parameters derived from a user specific password or key. Only the transformed template is stored and matching is performed directly in the transformed domain. In this paper, we formally investigate the security strength of template transformation techniques and define six metrics that facilitate a holistic security evaluation. Furthermore, we analyze the security of two wellknown template transformation techniques, namely, Biohashing and cancelable fingerprint templates based on the proposed metrics. Our analysis indicates that both these schemes are vulnerable to intrusion and linkage attacks because it is relatively easy to obtain either a close approximation of the original template (Biohashing) or a pre-image of the transformed template (cancelable fingerprints). We argue that the security strength of template transformation techniques must consider also consider the computational complexity of obtaining a complete pre-image of the transformed template in addition to the complexity of recovering the original biometric template.

  6. Quantificational Etching of AAO Template

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guojun SONG; Dong CHEN; Zhi PENG; Xilin SHE; Jianjiang LI; Ping HAN

    2007-01-01

    Ni nanowires were prepared by electrodeposition in porous anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template from a composite electrolyte solution. Well-ordered Ni nanowire arrays with controllable length were then made by the partial removal of AAO using a mixture of phosphoric acid and chromic acid (6 wt pct H3PO4:1.8 wt pct H3CrO4). The images of Ni nanowire arrays were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the relationship between etching time and the length of Ni nanowire arrays. The results indicate that the length of nanowires exposed from the template can be accurately controlled by controlling etching time.

  7. DNA-templated nanowires as sacrificial materials for creating nanocapillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jacob T.; Becerril, Hector A.; Yang, Weichun; Larsen, Megan G.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2008-08-01

    DNA has shown great promise as a template for the controlled localization of various materials and the construction of wires with nanometer-dimension cross sections. We have recently developed a strategy for fabrication of nanocapillaries, using DNA-templated nanowires as a sacrificial material. We first form metal nanowires through the selective electrochemical deposition of nickel atop a surface-aligned DNA molecule. We then deposit a thin layer of silicon dioxide on top of the DNA nanostructures. Next, we photolithographically pattern openings over the ends of the wires and etch through the silicon dioxide layer to expose the metal nanowires. Finally, we etch out the DNA-templated nickel nanowires. This process results in the formation of nanocapillaries having the same dimensions as the originally formed DNA-templated nanowires. We have characterized these DNA-templated nanocapillaries using atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. These constructs have potential for application in nanofluidics, power generation, sample preconcentration, and chemical sensing.

  8. Implementation of perception and action at nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Marlière, Sylvain; Marchi, Florence; Luciani, Annie; Chevrier, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Real time combination of nanosensors and nanoactuators with virtual reality environment and multisensorial interfaces enable us to efficiently act and perceive at nanoscale. Advanced manipulation of nanoobjects and new strategies for scientific education are the key motivations. We have no existing intuitive representation of the nanoworld ruled by laws foreign to our experience. A central challenge is then the construction of nanoworld simulacrum that we can start to visit and to explore. In this nanoworld simulacrum, object identifications will be based on probed entity physical and chemical intrinsic properties, on their interactions with sensors and on the final choices made in building a multisensorial interface so that these objects become coherent elements of the human sphere of action and perception. Here we describe a 1D virtual nanomanipulator, part of the Cit\\'e des Sciences EXPO NANO in Paris, that is the first realization based on this program.

  9. Exploring Carbon Nanotubes for Nanoscale Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Dai; Anantram; Jaffe; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are shown to promise great opportunities in nanoelectronic devices and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) because of their inherent nanoscale sizes, intrinsic electric conductivities, and seamless hexagonal network architectures. I present our collaborative work with Stanford on exploring CNTs for nanodevices in this talk. The electrical property measurements suggest that metallic tubes are quantum wires. Furthermore, two and three terminal CNT junctions have been observed experimentally. We have proposed and studied CNT-based molecular switches and logic devices for future digital electronics. We also have studied CNTs based NEMS inclusing gears, cantilevers, and scanning probe microscopy tips. We investigate both chemistry and physics based aspects of the CNT NEMS. Our results suggest that CNT have ideal stiffness, vibrational frequencies, Q-factors, geometry-dependent electric conductivities, and the highest chemical and mechanical stabilities for the NEMS. The use of CNT SPM tips for nanolithography is presented for demonstration of the advantages of the CNT NEMS.

  10. Nanoscale wicking methods and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jijie (Inventor); Bronikowski, Michael (Inventor); Noca, Flavio (Inventor); Sansom, Elijah B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A fluid transport method and fluid transport device are disclosed. Nanoscale fibers disposed in a patterned configuration allow transport of a fluid in absence of an external power source. The device may include two or more fluid transport components having different fluid transport efficiencies. The components may be separated by additional fluid transport components, to control fluid flow.

  11. Fabrication of nanoscale electrostatic lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinno, I.; Sanz-Velasco, A.; Kang, S.; Jansen, H.; Olsson, E.; Enoksson, P.; Svensson, K.

    2010-01-01

    The fabrication of cylindrical multi-element electrostatic lenses at the nanoscale presents a challenge; they are high-aspect-ratio structures that should be rotationally symmetric, well aligned and freestanding, with smooth edges and flat, clean surfaces. In this paper, we present the fabrication r

  12. IR nanoscale spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Yarrow, Fiona; Rice, James H.

    2011-10-01

    Sub diffraction limited infrared absorption imaging was applied to hemoglobin by coupling IR optics with an atomic force microscope. Comparisons between the AFM topography and IR absorption images of micron sized hemoglobin features are presented, along with nanoscale IR spectroscopic analysis of the metalloprotein.

  13. Engineering Platinum Alloy Electrocatalysts in Nanoscale for PEMFC Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Ting [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    Fuel cells are expected to be a key next-generation energy source used for vehicles and homes, offering high energy conversion efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. However, due to large overpotentials on anode and cathode, the efficiency is still much lower than theoretically predicted. During the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate synergy effect of platinum alloyed with base metals. But, engineering the alloy particles in nanoscale has been a challenge. Most important challenges in developing nanostructured materials are the abilities to control size, monodispersity, microcomposition, and even morphology or self-assembly capability, so called Nanomaterials-by-Design, which requires interdisciplinary collaborations among computational modeling, chemical synthesis, nanoscale characterization as well as manufacturing processing. Electrocatalysts, particularly fuel cell catalysts, are dramatically different from heterogeneous catalysts because the surface area in micropores cannot be electrochemically controlled on the same time scale as more transport accessible surfaces. Therefore, electrocatalytic architectures need minimal microporous surface area while maximizing surfaces accessible through mesopores or macropores, and to "pin" the most active, highest performance physicochemical state of the materials even when exposed to thermodynamic forces, which would otherwise drive restructuring, crystallization, or densification of the nanoscale materials. In this presentation, results of engineering nanoscale platinum alloy particles down to 2 ~ 4 nm will be discussed. Based on nature of alloyed base metals, various synthesis technologies have been studied and developed to achieve capabilities of controlling particle size and particle microcomposition, namely, core-shell synthesis, microemulsion technique, thermal decomposition process, surface organometallic chemical method, etc. The results show that by careful engineering the

  14. Study of the Role of Porous AAO Template for Synthesizing Nano-materials by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method%阳极多孔三氧化二铝模板孔对化学蒸气沉积合成纳米材料的作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    权铭会; 郑昌熙; 黄芝贤; 申容淑; 朴钟允

    2009-01-01

    在各种化学蒸气沉积生长排列整齐的纳米材料的合成方法中,阳极三氧化二铝(AAO)模板被广泛采用主要由于容易通过电压和阳极氧化时间来控制其孔径.这里,我们表征存在/不存在催化剂时生长在AAO模板上的碳纳米管和氧化物材料的生长机理.我们还研究了在合成密集整齐排列的纳米结构生长过程中氢气的还原效应.实验结果显示AAO模板本身促进Ga2O3生长机理,氧化物催化剂氢化还原提高了碳纳米管的生长速率和结晶度.氢化还原中使用AAO模板可以很好地控制排列整齐的纳米材料的直径和密度.%Among various synthesis methods for aligned nanostmcture materials growth using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template has been widely use because of its easy controlling of pore diameter by voltage and anodized time. In this study, we characterized growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes and oxide nano-materials on AAO template with/without catalyst. Also, we investigated reduction effects of hydrogen gas in the synthesis processes for well aligned and densely grown nanostmctures. Those experimental results showed that AAO template itself ignited VS growth mechanism for Ga2O3,and hydrogen reduction of oxide catalysts improved the growth rate and crystallinity of CNTs. Using AAO template with hydrogen reduction, we can control the diameter and density of well aligned nanostructure materials.

  15. A bio-originated porous template for the fabrication of very long, inorganic nanotubes and nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, F; Kemell, M; Leskelä, M; Sikorski, P

    2010-06-01

    A biopolymer-based template assembly constructed around the spines of the bristle worm Aphrodita aculeata (sea mouse) was used to fabricate very high aspect ratio nanowires and nanotubes using established methods adopted from nanofabrication in porous membranes. The easily available bio-originated template contains more than 100 000 highly ordered, very high aspect ratio nanochannels, each about 150 to 200 nm in diameter but up to a centimetre in length. Their parallel, hexagonal arrangement in the spine constitutes a photonic crystal, which gives the animal its colourful, iridescent appearance. Around the nanochannels, the spines consist of a chitin/protein composite material, which has been shown to withstand the chemical and thermal conditions needed for established template-assisted nanofabrication strategies. A template preparation procedure was developed and the template was used to fabricate copper and nickel nanowires by electrodeposition and aluminium oxide nanotubes by atomic layer deposition. Due to their high thermal and chemical stability, decomposition of the filled templates proved to be difficult, and different approaches to obtain separated nanostructures are described and discussed. Alongside this, the presented system of parallel nanowires or nanotubes in a biopolymer matrix might be utilized in applications, where such separated structures are not needed. Comparing to porous membranes, the presented template allows us to increase the maximum length of nanotubes and nanowires produced using nanochannel-based templates by at least one order of magnitude.

  16. A bio-originated porous template for the fabrication of very long, inorganic nanotubes and nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumm, F; Sikorski, P [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Kemell, M; Leskelae, M, E-mail: mumm@phys.ntnu.n, E-mail: pawel.sikorski@phys.ntnu.n [Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-06-15

    A biopolymer-based template assembly constructed around the spines of the bristle worm Aphrodita aculeata (sea mouse) was used to fabricate very high aspect ratio nanowires and nanotubes using established methods adopted from nanofabrication in porous membranes. The easily available bio-originated template contains more than 100 000 highly ordered, very high aspect ratio nanochannels, each about 150 to 200 nm in diameter but up to a centimetre in length. Their parallel, hexagonal arrangement in the spine constitutes a photonic crystal, which gives the animal its colourful, iridescent appearance. Around the nanochannels, the spines consist of a chitin/protein composite material, which has been shown to withstand the chemical and thermal conditions needed for established template-assisted nanofabrication strategies. A template preparation procedure was developed and the template was used to fabricate copper and nickel nanowires by electrodeposition and aluminium oxide nanotubes by atomic layer deposition. Due to their high thermal and chemical stability, decomposition of the filled templates proved to be difficult, and different approaches to obtain separated nanostructures are described and discussed. Alongside this, the presented system of parallel nanowires or nanotubes in a biopolymer matrix might be utilized in applications, where such separated structures are not needed. Comparing to porous membranes, the presented template allows us to increase the maximum length of nanotubes and nanowires produced using nanochannel-based templates by at least one order of magnitude.

  17. Progress of NIL template making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusa, Satoshi; Hiraka, Takaaki; Kobiki, Ayumi; Sasaki, Shiho; Itoh, Kimio; Toyama, Nobuhito; Kurihara, Masaaki; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2007-05-01

    Nano-imprint lithography (NIL) has been counted as one of the lithography solutions for hp32nm node and beyond. Recently, the small line edge roughness (LER) as well as the potentially high resolution that will ensure no-OPC mask feature is attracting many researchers. The template making is one of the most critical issues for the realization of NIL. Especially when we think of a practical template fabrication process on a 65mm square format that is going to be the industry standard, the resolution of the template making process showed a limitation. We have achieved for the first time an hp22nm resolution on the 65nm template format. Both line and space patterns and hole patterns were well resolved. Regarding dot patterns, we still need improvement, but we have achieved resolution down to hp28nm. Although so far we cannot achieve these resolution limits of various pattern category at the same time on one substrate, an intermediate process condition showed sufficient uniformity both in lateral CD and in vertical depth. Global pattern image placement also showed sufficient numbers at this stage of lithography development. A 20nm feature (with a pitch of 80nm) showed sufficient imprint result.

  18. Supply-Chain Optimization Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiett, William F.; Sealing, Scott L.

    2009-01-01

    The Supply-Chain Optimization Template (SCOT) is an instructional guide for identifying, evaluating, and optimizing (including re-engineering) aerospace- oriented supply chains. The SCOT was derived from the Supply Chain Council s Supply-Chain Operations Reference (SCC SCOR) Model, which is more generic and more oriented toward achieving a competitive advantage in business.

  19. Viral-templated Palladium Nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cuixian

    Despite recent progress on nanocatalysis, there exist several critical challenges in simple and readily controllable nanocatalyst synthesis including the unpredictable particle growth, deactivation of catalytic activity, cumbersome catalyst recovery and lack of in-situ reaction monitoring. In this dissertation, two novel approaches are presented for the fabrication of viral-templated palladium (Pd) nanocatalysts, and their catalytic activities for dichromate reduction reaction and Suzuki Coupling reaction were thoroughly studied. In the first approach, viral template based bottom-up assembly is employed for the Pd nanocatalyst synthesis in a chip-based format. Specifically, genetically displayed cysteine residues on each coat protein of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) templates provide precisely spaced thiol functionalities for readily controllable surface assembly and enhanced formation of catalytically active Pd nanoparticles. Catalysts with the chip-based format allow for simple separation and in-situ monitoring of the reaction extent. Thorough examination of synthesis-structure-activity relationship of Pd nanoparticles formed on surface-assembled viral templates shows that Pd nanoparticle size, catalyst loading density and catalytic activity of viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts can be readily controlled simply by tuning the synthesis conditions. The viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts with optimized synthesis conditions are shown to have higher catalytic activity per unit Pd mass than the commercial Pd/C catalysts. Furthermore, tunable and selective surface assembly of TMV biotemplates is exploited to control the loading density and location of Pd nanocatalysts on solid substrates via preferential electroless deposition. In addition, the catalytic activities of surface-assembled TMV-templated Pd nanocatalysts were also investigated for the ligand-free Suzuki Coupling reaction under mild reaction conditions. The chip-based format enables simple catalyst separation and

  20. Tailoring local density of optical states to control emission intensity and anisotropy of quantum dots in hybrid photonic-plasmonic templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indukuri, Chaitanya; Mukherjee, Arnab; Basu, J. K.

    2015-03-01

    We report results of controlled tuning of the local density of states (LDOS) in versatile, flexible, and hierarchical self assembled plasmonic templates. Using 5 nm diameter gold (Au) spherical nanoantenna within a polymer template randomly dispersed with quantum dots, we show how the photoluminescence intensity and lifetime anisotropy of these dots can be significantly enhanced through LDOS tuning. Finite difference time domain simulations corroborate the experimental observations and extend the regime of enhancement to a wider range of geometric and spectral parameters bringing out the versatility of these functional plasmonic templates. It is also demonstrated how the templates act as plasmonic resonators for effectively engineer giant enhancement of the scattering efficiency of these nano antenna embedded in the templates. Our work provides an alternative method to achieve spontaneous emission intensity and anisotropy enhancement with true nanoscale plasmon resonators.

  1. Template-stripped asymmetric metallic pyramids for tunable plasmonic nanofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukulappurath, Sudhir; Johnson, Timothy W; Lindquist, Nathan C; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel scheme for plasmonic nanofocusing with internally illuminated asymmetric metallic pyramidal tips using linearly polarized light. A wafer-scale array of sharp metallic pyramids is fabricated via template stripping with films of different thicknesses on opposing pyramid facets. This structural asymmetry is achieved through a one-step angled metal deposition that does not require any additional lithography processing and when internally illuminated enables the generation of plasmons using a Kretschmann-like coupling method on only one side of the pyramids. Plasmons traveling toward the tip on one side will converge at the apex, forming a nanoscale "hotspot." The asymmetry is necessary for these focusing effects since symmetric pyramids display destructive plasmon interference at the tip. Computer simulations confirm that internal illumination with linearly polarized light at normal incidence on these asymmetric pyramids will focus optical energy into nanoscale volumes. Far-field optical experiments demonstrate large field enhancements as well as angle-dependent spectral tuning of the reradiated light. Because of the low background light levels, wafer-scale fabrication, and a straightforward excitation scheme, these asymmetric pyramidal tips will find applications in near-field optical microscopy and array-based optical trapping.

  2. National Wildlife Refuge System Survey Protocol Template

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This template was developed for drafting National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) Survey Protocols. The template is arranged in the same order as the eight basic...

  3. Web Template Extraction Based on Hyperlink Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Alarte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Web templates are one of the main development resources for website engineers. Templates allow them to increase productivity by plugin content into already formatted and prepared pagelets. For the final user templates are also useful, because they provide uniformity and a common look and feel for all webpages. However, from the point of view of crawlers and indexers, templates are an important problem, because templates usually contain irrelevant information such as advertisements, menus, and banners. Processing and storing this information is likely to lead to a waste of resources (storage space, bandwidth, etc.. It has been measured that templates represent between 40% and 50% of data on the Web. Therefore, identifying templates is essential for indexing tasks. In this work we propose a novel method for automatic template extraction that is based on similarity analysis between the DOM trees of a collection of webpages that are detected using menus information. Our implementation and experiments demonstrate the usefulness of the technique.

  4. Templated Control of Au nanospheres in Silica Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tringe, J W; Vanamu, G; Zaidi, S H

    2007-03-15

    The formation of regularly-spaced metal nanostructures in selectively-placed insulating nanowires is an important step toward realization of a wide range of nano-scale electronic and opto-electronic devices. Here we report templated synthesis of Au nanospheres embedded in silica nanowires, with nanospheres consistently spaced with a period equal to three times their diameter. Under appropriate conditions, nanowires form exclusively on Si nanostructures because of enhanced local oxidation and reduced melting temperatures relative to templates with larger dimensions. We explain the spacing of the nanospheres with a general model based on a vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, in which an Au/Si alloy dendrite remains liquid in the nanotube until a critical Si concentration is achieved locally by silicon oxide-generated nanowire growth. Additional Si oxidation then locally reduces the surface energy of the Au-rich alloy by creating a new surface with minimum area inside of the nanotube. The isolated liquid domain subsequently evolves to become an Au nanosphere, and the process is repeated.

  5. Optical antennas as nanoscale resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Agio, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to fabricate subwavelength architectures that function as antennas for improving the exchange of optical energy with nanoscale matter. We describe the main features of optical antennas for enhancing quantum emitters and review designs that increase the spontaneous emission rate by orders of magnitude from the ultraviolet up to the near-infrared spectral range. To further explore how optical antennas may lead to unprecedented regimes of light-matter interaction, we draw a relationship between metal nanoparticles, radio-wave antennas and optical resonators. Our analysis points out how optical antennas may function as nanoscale resonators and how these may offer unique opportunities with respect to state-of-the-art microcavities.

  6. Optical antennas as nanoscale resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agio, Mario

    2012-02-07

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to fabricate sub-wavelength architectures that function as antennas for improving the exchange of optical energy with nanoscale matter. We describe the main features of optical antennas for enhancing quantum emitters and review the designs that increase the spontaneous emission rate by orders of magnitude from the ultraviolet up to the near-infrared spectral range. To further explore how optical antennas may lead to unprecedented regimes of light-matter interactions, we draw a relationship between metal nanoparticles, radio-wave antennas and optical resonators. Our analysis points out how optical antennas may function as nanoscale resonators and how these may offer unique opportunities with respect to state-of-the-art microcavities.

  7. Nanoscale deformation mechanisms in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Himadri S; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Zickler, Gerald A; Raz-Ben Aroush, D; Funari, Sérgio S; Roschger, Paul; Wagner, H Daniel; Fratzl, Peter

    2005-10-01

    Deformation mechanisms in bone matrix at the nanoscale control its exceptional mechanical properties, but the detailed nature of these processes is as yet unknown. In situ tensile testing with synchrotron X-ray scattering allowed us to study directly and quantitatively the deformation mechanisms at the nanometer level. We find that bone deformation is not homogeneous but distributed between a tensile deformation of the fibrils and a shearing in the interfibrillar matrix between them.

  8. Template electrodeposition of catalytic nanomotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The combination of nanomaterials with electrode materials has opened new horizons in electroanalytical chemistry, and in electrochemistry in general. Over the past two decades we have witnessed an enormous activity aimed at designing new electrochemical devices based on nanoparticles, nanotubes or nanowires, and towards the use of electrochemical routes--particularly template-assisted electrodeposition--for preparing nanostructured materials. The power of template-assisted electrochemical synthesis is demonstrated in this article towards the preparation and the realization of self-propelled catalytic nanomotors, ranging from Pt-Au nanowire motors to polymer/Pt microtube engines. Design considerations affecting the propulsion behavior of such catalytic nanomotors are discussed along with recent bioanalytical and environmental applications. Despite recent major advances, artificial nanomotors have a low efficiency compared to their natural counterparts. Hopefully, the present Faraday Discussion will stimulate other electrochemistry teams to contribute to the fascinating area of artificial nanomachines.

  9. LTL - The Little Template Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gössl, C. A.; Drory, N.; Snigula, J.

    2004-07-01

    The Little Template Library is an expression templates based C++ library for array processing, image processing, FITS and ASCII I/O, and linear algebra. It is released under the GNU Public License (GPL). Although the library is developed with application to astronomical image and data processing in mind, it is by no means restricted to these fields of application. In fact, it qualifies as a fully general array processing package. Focus is laid on a high abstraction level regarding the handling of expressions involving arrays or parts thereof and linear algebra related operations without the usually involved negative impact on performance. The price to pay is dependence on a compiler implementing enough of the current ANSI C++ specification, as well as significantly higher demand on resources at compile time. The LTL provides dynamic arrays of up to 5 dimensions, sub-arrays and slicing, support for fixed size vectors and matrices including basic linear algebra operations, expression templates based evaluation, and I/O facilities for columnar ASCII and FITS format files. In addition it supplies utility classes for statistics, linear and non-linear least squares fitting, and command line and configuration file parsing. YODA (Drory 2002) and all elements of the WeCAPP reduction pipeline (Riffeser et al. 2001, Gössl & Riffeser 2002, 2003) were implemented using the LTL.

  10. Speciation of nanoscale objects by nanoparticle imprinted matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitrik, Maria; Pisman, Yamit; Wittstock, Gunther; Mandler, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The toxicity of nanoparticles is not only a function of the constituting material but depends largely on their size, shape and stabilizing shell. Hence, the speciation of nanoscale objects, namely, their detection and separation based on the different species, similarly to heavy metals, is of outmost importance. Here we demonstrate the speciation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their electrochemical detection using the concept of "nanoparticles imprinted matrices" (NAIM). Negatively charged AuNPs are adsorbed as templates on a conducting surface previously modified with polyethylenimine (PEI). The selective matrix is formed by the adsorption of either oleic acid (OA) or poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) on the non-occupied areas. The AuNPs are removed by electrooxidation to form complementary voids. These voids are able to recognize the AuNPs selectively based on their size. Furthermore, the selectivity could be improved by adsorbing an additional layer of 1-hexadecylamine, which deepened the voids. Interestingly, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were also recognized if their size matched those of the template AuNPs. The steps in assembling the NAIMs and the reuptake of the nanoparticles were characterized carefully. The prospects for the analytical use of NAIMs, which are simple, of small dimension, cost-efficient and portable, are in the sensing and separation of nanoobjects.

  11. Multifunctional Graphene/Platinum/Nafion Hybrids via Ice Templating

    KAUST Repository

    Estevez, Luis

    2011-04-27

    We report the synthesis of multifunctional hybrids in both films and bulk form, combining electrical and ionic conductivity with porosity and catalytic activity. The hybrids are synthesized by a two-step process: (a) ice templation of an aqueous suspension comprised of Nafion, graphite oxide, and chloroplatinic acid to form a microcellular porous network and (b) mild reduction in hydrazine or monosodium citrate which leads to graphene-supported Pt nanoparticles on a Nafion scaffold. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Cu(I)/Cu(II) templated functional pseudorotaxanes and rotaxanes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subrata Saha; Pradyut Ghosh

    2012-11-01

    Threaded complexes like pseudorotaxanes, rotaxanes based on Cu(I)/Cu(II) ions have shown to be promising for the construction of mechanically interlocked molecular-level architectures. In this short review, we focus on the synthetic strategies developed to construct pseudorotaxanes and rotaxanes using Cu(I)/Cu(II) ions as template. Further, brief discussions on chemical and mechanical properties associated with some of the selected to Cu(I)/Cu(II) based pseudorotaxanes and rotaxanes are presented.

  13. Testing sensory evidence against mnemonic templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Nicholas E; Rohenkohl, Gustavo; Wyart, Valentin; Woolrich, Mark W; Nobre, Anna C; Stokes, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    Most perceptual decisions require comparisons between current input and an internal template. Classic studies propose that templates are encoded in sustained activity of sensory neurons. However, stimulus encoding is itself dynamic, tracing a complex trajectory through activity space. Which part of this trajectory is pre-activated to reflect the template? Here we recorded magneto- and electroencephalography during a visual target-detection task, and used pattern analyses to decode template, stimulus, and decision-variable representation. Our findings ran counter to the dominant model of sustained pre-activation. Instead, template information emerged transiently around stimulus onset and quickly subsided. Cross-generalization between stimulus and template coding, indicating a shared neural representation, occurred only briefly. Our results are compatible with the proposal that template representation relies on a matched filter, transforming input into task-appropriate output. This proposal was consistent with a signed difference response at the perceptual decision stage, which can be explained by a simple neural model.

  14. Growth control of carbon nanotubes using by anodic aluminum oxide nano templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Seob; Choi, Won Seek; Yi, Junsin; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2014-05-01

    Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) template prepared in acid electrolyte possess regular and highly anisotropic porous structure with pore diameter range from five to several hundred nanometers, and with a density of pores ranging from 10(9) to 10(11) cm(-2). AAO can be used as microfilters and templates for the growth of CNTs and metal or semiconductor nanowires. Varying anodizing conditions such as temperature, electrolyte, applied voltage, anodizing and widening time, one can control the diameter, the length, and the density of pores. In this work, we deposited Al thin film by radio frequency magnetron sputtering method to fabricate AAO nano template and synthesized multi-well carbon nanotubes on a glass substrate by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD). AAO nano-porous templates with various pore sizes and depths were introduced to control the dimension and density of CNT arrays. The AAO nano template was synthesize on glass by two-step anodization technique. The average diameter and interpore distance of AAO nano template are about 65 nm and 82 nm. The pore density and AAO nano template thickness are about 2.1 x 10(10) pores/cm2 and 1 microm, respectively. Aligned CNTs on the AAO nano template were synthesized by MPECVD at 650 degrees C with the Ni catalyst layer. The length and diameter of CNTs were grown 2 microm and 50 nm, respectively.

  15. Self-assembled nanostructured resistive switching memory devices fabricated by templated bottom-up growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji-Min; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-01-07

    Metal-oxide-based resistive switching memory device has been studied intensively due to its potential to satisfy the requirements of next-generation memory devices. Active research has been done on the materials and device structures of resistive switching memory devices that meet the requirements of high density, fast switching speed, and reliable data storage. In this study, resistive switching memory devices were fabricated with nano-template-assisted bottom up growth. The electrochemical deposition was adopted to achieve the bottom-up growth of nickel nanodot electrodes. Nickel oxide layer was formed by oxygen plasma treatment of nickel nanodots at low temperature. The structures of fabricated nanoscale memory devices were analyzed with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope (AFM). The electrical characteristics of the devices were directly measured using conductive AFM. This work demonstrates the fabrication of resistive switching memory devices using self-assembled nanoscale masks and nanomateirals growth from bottom-up electrochemical deposition.

  16. Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (Program website, free access)   Currently there is no database matching your keyword search, but the NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology website may be of interest. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology enables science and industry by providing essential measurement methods, instrumentation, and standards to support all phases of nanotechnology development, from discovery to production.

  17. A de novo designed monomeric, compact three helix bundle protein on a carbohydrate template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malik, Leila; Nygård, Jesper; Christensen, Niels Johan

    2015-01-01

    De novo design and chemical synthesis of proteins and of other artificial structures, which mimic them, is a central strategy for understanding protein folding and for accessing proteins with novel functions. We have previously described carbohydrates as templates for the assembly of artificial...... proteins, so called carboproteins. The hypothesis is that the template pre-organizes the secondary structure elements and directs the formation of a tertiary structure, thus achieving structural economy in the combination of peptide, linker, and template. We speculate that the structural information from...

  18. Template Transfer Nanoimprint for Uniform Nanopores and Nanopoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology is developed for the fabrication of nanostructures on substrate based on anodized Al2O3 (AAO porous template transfer process. It includes (1 forming amorphous alloy, negative UV-resist resin (i.e., SU-8, or PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate plate nanorod arrays by hot-press molding amorphous alloy, negative UV-resist resin (i.e., SU-8, or PMMA plate into the anodized Al2O3 porous substrates; (2 removing AAO templates by chemical etching process after suitable posttreatment (annealing and/or irradiation to improve the mechanical strength of the nanorod arrays; (3 reforming nanopore films by hot-embossing the nanorod arrays into a thin layer of polymer film on substrates (e.g., silica; (4 cleaning the bottom residues in pores of the films by oxygen plasmon. The results indicate that the diameters of amorphous alloy (or negative UV-resist resin or PMMA nanorod arrays can be ranged from 32 nm to 200 nm. The diameters of the imprinted ILR-1050 photoresist nanopores are about 94.5 ± 12.2 nm and the diameters of the imprinted or SU-8 resin on glass slides nanopores are about 207 ± 26.4 nm, which inherit the diameters of AAO templates. This methodology provides a general method to fabricate nanorods arrays and/or thin nanopore films by template transfer nanoimprint process.

  19. Quantifying dissipative contributions in nanoscale interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sergio; Gadelrab, Karim R; Souier, Tewfik; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2012-02-01

    Imaging with nanoscale resolution has become routine practice with the use of scanning probe techniques. Nevertheless, quantification of material properties and processes has been hampered by the complexity of the tip-surface interaction and the dependency of the dynamics on operational parameters. Here, we propose a framework for the quantification of the coefficients of viscoelasticity, surface energy, surface energy hysteresis and elastic modulus. Quantification of these parameters at the nanoscale will provide a firm ground to the understanding and modelling of tribology and nanoscale sciences with true nanoscale resolution.

  20. Fine grain tungsten produced with nanoscale powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Lin; Fang Zhao; Liying Zhang; Chengyi Wu; Zhimeng Guo

    2005-01-01

    Nanoscale tungsten powder was prepared by reducing nanoscale tungsten trioxide in hydrogen to WO2.90 and further to W powder. After compacted with a rubber die, the nanoscale tungsten powder was sintered in a high-temperature dilatometer to investigate its shrinkage process. The results show that the compact of the nanoscale tungsten powder starts to shrink at 1050℃ and ends at 1500℃. The shrinkage rate reaches the maximum value at 1210℃. The relative density of sintered samples is 96.4%, and its grain size is about 5.8 μm.

  1. Biosynthetic Polypeptides as Templates in Materials Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiick, Kristi

    2007-03-01

    Biosynthetic routes to protein-based polymeric materials offer important opportunities for the production of well-defined macromolecular templates, owing to the control of sequence and molecular weight inherent in the biosynthesis of proteins. In particular, the biosynthesis of polypeptides with controlled presentation of functional groups in multiple positions, coupled with their subsequent chemical modification with biologically relevant ligands, will permit the production of well-defined, bioactive macromolecules that may provide insight into biological binding events in which multivalent binding is important. Modification of the well-defined macromolecules with ligands such as saccharides has application in the study of events such as toxin neutralization and mediation of the immune and inflammatory responses. In this work, alanine-rich polypeptides of both random coil and helical conformations, equipped with glutamic acid residues to impart chemical versatility, have been produced via biosynthetic strategies. Analysis via spectroscopic and calorimetric methods indicates that the polypeptides adopt helical, beta-sheet, or random-coil conformations that can be controlled with variations in temperature, pH, and salt concentration; the conformational behavior of the polypeptides is not compromised upon chemical modification with saccharides. The binding of these macromolecules to bacterial toxins has been characterized via immunochemical and spectroscopic methods; results indicate that specific architectural features of the glycopolymer scaffold cause changes in the binding of these molecules to multivalent receptors. Given the chemical flexibility in the design of such scaffolds, they can be modified with many different moieties in addition to saccharides, so multiple opportunities exist for their application in areas where control of active side chains is important, such as in biomaterials, electronic devices, and bioinorganic structures.

  2. Template-assisted synthesis and characterisation of quasi-one-dimensional ceramic nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The major results of the present work are the template-assisted (porous alumina or polycarbonate) manufacturing of nanowires, nanorods or nanotubes with tailored dimensions, composition, and physical-chemical properties, as well as optimisation of routine producing of alumina templates with the nanochannels open through from both ends. A successful attempt to alter the geometry of silicon-based ceramic nanowires by means of anodic alumina pore size tailoring has been made. However, diverse op...

  3. Quantum Transport Simulations of Nanoscale Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Obodo, Tobechukwu Joshua

    2016-01-07

    Nanoscale materials have many potential advantages because of their quantum confinement, cost and producibility by low-temperature chemical methods. Advancement of theoretical methods as well as the availability of modern high-performance supercomputers allow us to control and exploit their microscopic properties at the atomic scale, hence making it possible to design novel nanoscale molecular devices with interesting features (e.g switches, rectifiers, negative differential conductance, and high magnetoresistance). In this thesis, state-of-the-art theoretical calculations have been performed for the quantum transport properties of nano-structured materials within the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Nonequilibrium Green\\'s Function (NEGF) formalism. The switching behavior of a dithiolated phenylene-vinylene oligomer sandwiched between Au(111) electrodes is investigated. The molecule presents a configurational bistability, which can be exploited in constructing molecular memories, switches, and sensors. We find that protonation of the terminating thiol groups is at the origin of the change in conductance. H bonding at the thiol group weakens the S-Au bond, and thus lowers the conductance. Our results allow us to re-interpret the experimental data originally attributing the conductance reduction to H dissociation. Also examined is current-induced migration of atoms in nanoscale devices that plays an important role for device operation and breakdown. We studied the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes under finite bias. We demonstrate that current-induced forces within DFT are non-conservative, which so far has only been shown for model systems, and can lower migration barrier heights. Further, we investigated the quantum transport behavior of an experimentally observed diblock molecule by varying the amounts of phenyl (donor) and pyrimidinyl (acceptor) rings under finite bias. We show that a tandem configuration of

  4. I - Template Metaprogramming for Massively Parallel Scientific Computing - Expression Templates

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Large scale scientific computing raises questions on different levels ranging from the fomulation of the problems to the choice of the best algorithms and their implementation for a specific platform. There are similarities in these different topics that can be exploited by modern-style C++ template metaprogramming techniques to produce readable, maintainable and generic code. Traditional low-level code tend to be fast but platform-dependent, and it obfuscates the meaning of the algorithm. On the other hand, object-oriented approach is nice to read, but may come with an inherent performance penalty. These lectures aim to present he basics of the Expression Template (ET) idiom which allows us to keep the object-oriented approach without sacrificing performance. We will in particular show to to enhance ET to include SIMD vectorization. We will then introduce techniques for abstracting iteration, and introduce thread-level parallelism for use in heavy data-centric loads. We will show to to apply these methods i...

  5. Optically Transparent Wood from a Nanoporous Cellulosic Template: Combining Functional and Structural Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Fu, Qiliang; Yu, Shun; Yan, Min; Berglund, Lars

    2016-04-11

    Optically transparent wood (TW) with transmittance as high as 85% and haze of 71% was obtained using a delignified nanoporous wood template. The template was prepared by removing the light-absorbing lignin component, creating nanoporosity in the wood cell wall. Transparent wood was prepared by successful impregnation of lumen and the nanoscale cellulose fiber network in the cell wall with refractive-index-matched prepolymerized methyl methacrylate (MMA). During the process, the hierarchical wood structure was preserved. Optical properties of TW are tunable by changing the cellulose volume fraction. The synergy between wood and PMMA was observed for mechanical properties. Lightweight and strong transparent wood is a potential candidate for lightweight low-cost, light-transmitting buildings and transparent solar cell windows.

  6. Nanoscale self-templating for oxide epitaxy with large symmetry mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Lee, Shinbuhm; Nichols, John; Meyer, Tricia L.; Ward, Thomas Z.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-12-01

    Direct observations using scanning transmission electron microscopy unveil an intriguing interfacial bi-layer that enables epitaxial growth of a strain-free, monoclinic, bronze-phase VO2(B) thin film on a perovskite SrTiO3 (STO) substrate. We observe an ultrathin (2-3 unit cells) interlayer best described as highly strained VO2(B) nanodomains combined with an extra (Ti,V)O2 layer on the TiO2 terminated STO (001) surface. By forming a fully coherent interface with the STO substrate and a semi-coherent interface with the strain-free epitaxial VO2(B) film above, the interfacial bi-layer enables the epitaxial connection of the two materials despite their large symmetry and lattice mismatch.

  7. A template for design personas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene; Storgaard Nielsen, Kira; Stage, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The persona method is gaining widespread use and support. Many researchers have reported from single cases and from novel domains on how they have used the method. However, the way companies and design groups describe personas has not been the focus of attention. This paper analyses 47 descriptions...... from 13 companies and compares these to an analysis of recommendations from 11 templates from literature. Furthermore, 28 interviews with Danish practitioners with experience in using personas are analyzed for content on persona descriptions. The study finds that a Danish persona style has developed...

  8. Nanoscale Properties of Boric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Nanoscale properties of boric acid were studied by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanome-chanical testing system. XPS was used to research on the transform behaviors of H3BO3 at different temperatures.The crystal structure, surface morphology, and mechanical properties of H3BO3 were described. The results showthat H3BO3 has layered structure, and can be transformed to boron oxide at high temperature. In addition there area lot of defects in H3BO3 crystal.

  9. Synthesis of nanoscale antimony particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balan, L.; Dailly, A. [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UMR 7555 CNRS (France); Schneider, R. [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Laboratoire de Synthese organometallique et Reactivite, UMR 7565 CNRS (France); Billaud, D., E-mail: Denis.Billaud@lcsm.uhp-nancy.fr [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UMR 7555 CNRS (France); Willmann, P. [Centre National d' Etudes Spatiales, (France); Olivier-Fourcade, J.; Jumas, J.-C. [Universite Montpellier, Laboratoire des Agregats Moleculaires et Materiaux Inorganiques, UMR 5072 CNRS (France)

    2005-09-15

    For the search of new negative electrodes of Li-ion batteries, a low-temperature method has been developed for the preparation of nanoscale antimony particles which uses an alkoxide-activated sodium hydride as reducing agent of antimony pentachloride. X-ray diffraction and TEM studies confirm the obtaining of amorphous Sb nanoparticles dispersed in an organic matrix. {sup 121}Sb Moessbauer spectroscopy gives evidence for the occurrence of interactions between antimony and the matrix. These interactions are modified by the washing treatments.

  10. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, D

    2016-04-27

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined.

  11. Electron turbulence at nanoscale junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushong, Neil; Gamble, John; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-06-01

    Electron transport through a nanostructure can be characterized in part using concepts from classical fluid dynamics. It is thus natural to ask how far the analogy can be taken and whether the electron liquid can exhibit nonlinear dynamical effects such as turbulence. Here we present an ab initio study of the electron dynamics in nanojunctions which reveals that the latter indeed exhibits behavior quite similar to that of a classical fluid. In particular, we find that a transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurs with increasing current, corresponding to increasing Reynolds numbers. These results reveal unexpected features of electron dynamics and shed new light on our understanding of transport properties of nanoscale systems.

  12. Nanoscale tomography in materials science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter Möbus

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In materials science, various techniques for three-dimensional reconstruction of microstructures have been applied successfully for decades, such as X-ray tomography and mechanical sectioning. However, in the last decade the family tree of methods has grown significantly. This is partly through advances in instrumentation. The introduction of the focused ion beam microscope and the transformation of transmission electron microscopy into a multipurpose analytical and structural tool have made major impacts. The main driving force for progress is perhaps the advent of nanotechnology with the need to achieve nanometer-scale resolution and the desire to get a real three-dimensional view of the nanoscale world.

  13. Hard template synthesis of metal nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go eKawamura

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Metal nanowires (NWs have attracted much attention because of their high electron conductivity, optical transmittance and tunable magnetic properties. Metal NWs have been synthesized using soft templates such as surface stabilizing molecules and polymers, and hard templates such as anodic aluminum oxide, mesoporous oxide, carbon nanotubes. NWs prepared from hard templates are composites of metals and the oxide/carbon matrix. Thus, selecting appropriate elements can simplify the production of composite devices. The resulting NWs are immobilized and spatially arranged, as dictated by the ordered porous structure of the template. This avoids the NWs from aggregating, which is common for NWs prepared with soft templates in solution. Herein, the hard template synthesis of metal NWs is reviewed, and the resulting structures, properties and potential applications are discussed.

  14. Exposure and Health Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Dioxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive - NOW IN PRINT IN THE JOURNAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels that are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (Ce02) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coatin...

  15. Exposure, Health and Ecological Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Oxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels which are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (CeO(2)) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coa...

  16. Nanoscale aluminum concaves for light-trapping in organic thin-films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jaroslaw; Adam, Jost; Cielecki, Pawel Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, fabricated from oxalic acid and phosphoric acid, lead to non-periodic nanoscale concave structures in their underlying aluminum layer, which are investigated for their field-enhancement properties by applying a thin-film polymer coating based laser ablation...... technique. Local ablation spots, corresponding to field enhancement on the ridge edges of the aluminum concave nanostructures, are observed in surface-covering polymer films, and confirmed with FDTD studies. The field enhancement leads to improved light absorption in the applied polymer layers, which may...

  17. Nanoscale aluminum concaves for light-trapping in organic thin-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław; Adam, Jost; Cielecki, Paweł Piotr; Fiutowski, Jacek; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Madsen, Morten

    2016-07-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, fabricated from oxalic acid and phosphoric acid, lead to non-periodic nanoscale concave structures in their underlying aluminum layer, which are investigated for their field-enhancement properties by applying a thin-film polymer coating based laser ablation technique. Local ablation spots, corresponding to field enhancement on the ridge edges of the aluminum concave nanostructures, are observed in surface-covering polymer films, and confirmed with FDTD studies. The field enhancement leads to improved light absorption in the applied polymer layers, which may be used as an efficient method for enhancing the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells.

  18. Vertical Carbon Nanotube Device in Nanoporous Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschmann, Matthew Ralph (Inventor); Fisher, Timothy Scott (Inventor); Sands, Timothy (Inventor); Bashir, Rashid (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A modified porous anodic alumina template (PAA) containing a thin CNT catalyst layer directly embedded into the pore walls. CNT synthesis using the template selectively catalyzes SWNTs and DWNTs from the embedded catalyst layer to the top PAA surface, creating a vertical CNT channel within the pores. Subsequent processing allows for easy contact metallization and adaptable functionalization of the CNTs and template for a myriad of applications.

  19. Maximal Heat Generation in Nanoscale Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Ling; LI Shu-Shen; ZENG Zhao-Yang

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the heat generation in a nanoscale system coupled to normal leads and find that it is maximal when the average occupation of the electrons in the nanoscale system is 0.5,no matter what mechanism induces the heat generation.

  20. Influence of template fill in graphoepitaxy DSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doise, Jan; Bekaert, Joost; Chan, Boon Teik; Hong, SungEun; Lin, Guanyang; Gronheid, Roel

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) is considered a promising patterning approach for the 7 nm node and beyond. Specifically, a grapho-epitaxy process using a cylindrical phase BCP may offer an efficient solution for patterning randomly distributed contact holes with sub-resolution pitches, such as found in via and cut mask levels. In any grapho-epitaxy process, the pattern density impacts the template fill (local BCP thickness inside the template) and may cause defects due to respectively over- or underfilling of the template. In order to tackle this issue thoroughly, the parameters that determine template fill and the influence of template fill on the resulting pattern should be investigated. In this work, using three process flow variations (with different template surface energy), template fill is experimentally characterized as a function of pattern density and film thickness. The impact of these parameters on template fill is highly dependent on the process flow, and thus pre-pattern surface energy. Template fill has a considerable effect on the pattern transfer of the DSA contact holes into the underlying layer. Higher fill levels give rise to smaller contact holes and worse critical dimension uniformity. These results are important towards DSA-aware design and show that fill is a crucial parameter in grapho-epitaxy DSA.

  1. Dendrimer Templates for the Formation of Silver Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-ping; LUO Yun-jun; XU Hou-cai; TAN Hui-min

    2006-01-01

    In order to control the size and shape of Ag nanoparticles obtained by using poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as template, the complexation between Ag+ ions and dendrimer studied extensively by UVVis spectroscopy and FTIR. After the Ag+/PAMAM demdrimer being reduced by direct chemical reduction,Ag (0) nanoparticles was formed, whose structure and characterization were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy,transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction (ED) respectively. The results reveal that Ag nanoparticles is a kind of face center cubic crystal and its average size is 4.5 nm. The solubility and stability of the solution containing Ag nanoparticles also indicate that dendrimer is a good kind of template, as well as a protective agent.

  2. Heat transfer across the interface between nanoscale solids and gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun; Fan, Wen; Cao, Jinbo; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Ji, Jie; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Wu, Junqiao

    2011-12-27

    When solid materials and devices scale down in size, heat transfer from the active region to the gas environment becomes increasingly significant. We show that the heat transfer coefficient across the solid-gas interface behaves very differently when the size of the solid is reduced to the nanoscale, such as that of a single nanowire. Unlike for macroscopic solids, the coefficient is strongly pressure dependent above ∼10 Torr, and at lower pressures it is much higher than predictions of the kinetic gas theory. The heat transfer coefficient was measured between a single, free-standing VO(2) nanowire and surrounding air using laser thermography, where the temperature distribution along the VO(2) nanowire was determined by imaging its domain structure of metal-insulator phase transition. The one-dimensional domain structure along the nanowire results from the balance between heat generation by the focused laser and heat dissipation to the substrate as well as to the surrounding gas, and thus serves as a nanoscale power-meter and thermometer. We quantified the heat loss rate across the nanowire-air interface, and found that it dominates over all other heat dissipation channels for small-diameter nanowires near ambient pressure. As the heat transfer across the solid-gas interface is nearly independent of the chemical identity of the solid, the results reveal a general scaling relationship for gaseous heat dissipation from nanostructures of all solid materials, which is applicable to nanoscale electronic and thermal devices exposed to gaseous environments.

  3. Degradation of chlorinated phenols by nanoscale zero-valent iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong CHENG; Jianlong WANG; Weixian ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Chlorophenols (CPs), as important contami-nants in groundwater, are toxic and difficult to biode-grade. Recently nanoscale zero-valent iron received a great deal of attention because of its excellent performance in treating recalcitrant compounds. In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron particles were prepared using chemical reduction, and the reductive transformations of three kinds of chlorinated phenols (2-CP, 3-CP, and 4-CP) by nanoscale zero-valent iron under different conditions were investigated. The transformation process of the CPs was shown to be dechlorination first, then cleavage of the benzene ring. The removal efficiency of the CPs varied as follows: 2-CP3-CP4-CP. The reactivity of CPs was associated with their energy of lowest unoccupied molecular orbit (ELUMO). With the increase in initial concentrations of CPs, removal efficiency decreased a little. But the quantities of CPs reduced increased evidently. Temperature had influence on not only the removal efficiency, but also the transformation pathway. At higher temperatures, dechlorination occurred prior to benzene ring cleavage. At lower temperatures, however, the oxidation product was formed more easily.

  4. Characteristics for electrochemical machining with nanoscale voltage pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E S; Back, S Y; Lee, J T

    2009-06-01

    Electrochemical machining has traditionally been used in highly specialized fields, such as those of the aerospace and defense industries. It is now increasingly being applied in other industries, where parts with difficult-to-cut material, complex geometry and tribology, and devices of nanoscale and microscale are required. Electric characteristic plays a principal function role in and chemical characteristic plays an assistant function role in electrochemical machining. Therefore, essential parameters in electrochemical machining can be described current density, machining time, inter-electrode gap size, electrolyte, electrode shape etc. Electrochemical machining provides an economical and effective method for machining high strength, high tension and heat-resistant materials into complex shapes such as turbine blades of titanium and aluminum alloys. The application of nanoscale voltage pulses between a tool electrode and a workpiece in an electrochemical environment allows the three-dimensional machining of conducting materials with sub-micrometer precision. In this study, micro probe are developed by electrochemical etching and micro holes are manufactured using these micro probe as tool electrodes. Micro holes and microgroove can be accurately achieved by using nanoscale voltages pulses.

  5. Atomic origin of ultrafast resistance switching in nanoscale electrometallization cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    Nanoscale resistance-switching cells that operate via the electrochemical formation and disruption of metallic filaments that bridge two electrodes are among the most promising devices for post-CMOS electronics. Despite their importance, the mechanisms that govern their remarkable properties are not fully understood, especially for nanoscale devices operating at ultrafast rates, limiting our ability to assess the ultimate performance and scalability of this technology. We present the first atomistic simulations of the operation of conductive bridging cells using reactive molecular dynamics with a charge equilibration method extended to describe electrochemical reactions. The simulations predict the ultrafast switching observed in these devices, with timescales ranging from hundreds of picoseconds to a few nanoseconds for devices consisting of Cu active electrodes and amorphous silica dielectrics and with dimensions corresponding to their scaling limit (cross-sections below 10 nm). We find that single-atom-chain bridges often form during device operation but that they are metastable, with lifetimes below a nanosecond. The formation of stable filaments involves the aggregation of ions into small metallic clusters, followed by a progressive chemical reduction as they become connected to the cathode. Contrary to observations in larger cells, the nanoscale conductive bridges often lack crystalline order. An atomic-level mechanistic understanding of the switching process provides guidelines for materials optimization for such applications and the quantitative predictions over an ensemble of devices provide insight into their ultimate scaling and performance.

  6. Nanoscale biomemory composed of recombinant azurin on a nanogap electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yong-Ho; Lee, Taek; Park, Hyung Ju; Yun, Wan Soo; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2013-09-13

    We fabricate a nanoscale biomemory device composed of recombinant azurin on nanogap electrodes. For this, size-controllable nanogap electrodes are fabricated by photolithography, electron beam lithography, and surface catalyzed chemical deposition. Moreover, we investigate the effect of gap distance to optimize the size of electrodes for a biomemory device and explore the mechanism of electron transfer from immobilized protein to a nanogap counter-electrode. As the distance of the nanogap electrode is decreased in the nanoscale, the absolute current intensity decreases according to the distance decrement between the electrodes due to direct electron transfer, in contrast with the diffusion phenomenon of a micro-electrode. The biomemory function is achieved on the optimized nanogap electrode. These results demonstrate that the fabricated nanodevice composed of a nanogap electrode and biomaterials provides various advantages such as quantitative control of signals and exclusion of environmental effects such as noise. The proposed bioelectronics device, which could be mass-produced easily, could be applied to construct a nanoscale bioelectronics system composed of a single biomolecule.

  7. Comparison between the standard SPM2 template and Korean-standard template in FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hee; Lee, Byeong Il; Song, Ho Chun; Min, Jung Joon; Bom, Hee Seung [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The preprocessing step of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) requires the procedure of spatial normalization that consists of applying the nonlinear deformations needed to force every particular PET scan to match a reference template. The purpose of this study is to asses the statistic influence of using 2 different templates (the standard SPM2-PET template and Korean-standard PET template) in the normalization. We compared the regional metabolic patterns on 18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) images obtained from 4 patients with Alzheimers disease (AD) and 16 normal subjects. The statistical outcome of between- group comparison was analyzed with SPM2 and was applied into two levels of thresholds (an uncorrected P value of P <0.001, a corrected P value of P < 0.05). As a result, the most significant hypometabolic region was commonly found in the left temporal gyrus regardless of template type or thresholds. However, inconsistent results including different extent and the t-score statistics representing metabolic changes could be also observed between two templates. While the standard SPM2 template showed hypometabolic regions corresponding to Brodman area (BA) 7 and 9, Korean-standard template was not observed these regions. In addition, hypometabolic regions corresponding to BA 38 and 46 indicated not the standard SPM2 template but Korean-standard template. Statistic result showed that the standard SPM2 template effectively reflects the dorsal region of the brain while Korean-standard template is more sensitive to the medial region of the brain.

  8. A SCHEME FOR TEMPLATE SECURITY AT FEATURE FUSION LEVEL IN MULTIMODAL BIOMETRIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Selwal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biometric is the science of human recognition based upon using their biological, chemical or behavioural traits. These systems are used in many real life applications simply from biometric based attendance system to providing security at very sophisticated level. A biometric system deals with raw data captured using a sensor and feature template extracted from raw image. One of the challenges being faced by designers of these systems is to secure template data extracted from the biometric modalities of the user and protect the raw images. To minimize spoof attacks on biometric systems by unauthorised users one of the solutions is to use multi-biometric systems. Multi-modal biometric system works by using fusion technique to merge feature templates generated from different modalities of the human. In this work a new scheme is proposed to secure template during feature fusion level. Scheme is based on union operation of fuzzy relations of templates of modalities during fusion process of multimodal biometric systems. This approach serves dual purpose of feature fusion as well as transformation of templates into a single secured non invertible template. The proposed technique is cancelable and experimentally tested on a bimodal biometric system comprising of fingerprint and hand geometry. Developed scheme removes the problem of an attacker learning the original minutia position in fingerprint and various measurements of hand geometry. Given scheme provides improved performance of the system with reduction in false accept rate and improvement in genuine accept rate.

  9. Canopy Dynamics in Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Jespersen, Michael L.

    2010-07-27

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMS) are organic - inorganic hybrids in which a core nanostructure is functionalized with a covalently attached corona and an ionically tethered organic canopy. NIMS are engineered to be liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and are of interest for a variety of applications. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and pulse-field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments to measure the canopy dynamics of NIMS prepared from 18-nm silica cores modified by an alkylsilane monolayer possessing terminal sulfonic acid functionality, paired with an amine-terminated ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymer canopy. Carbon NMR studies show that the block copolymer canopy is mobile both in the bulk and in the NIMS and that the fast (ns) dynamics are insensitive to the presence of the silica nanoparticles. Canopy diffusion in the NIMS is slowed relative to the neat canopy, but not to the degree predicted from the diffusion of hard-sphere particles. Canopy diffusion is not restricted to the surface of the nanoparticles and shows unexpected behavior upon addition of excess canopy. Taken together, these data indicate that the liquid-like behavior in NIMS is due to rapid exchange of the block copolymer canopy between the ionically modified nanoparticles. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  10. Templates for integrated nanofiber growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de

    Para-hexaphenylene (p6P) molecules have the ability to self-assemble into organic nanofibers. These nanofibers hold unique optoelectronic properties, which make them interesting candidates as elements in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Typically these nanofibers are grown on specific single......, high-volume integration. Besides such single-crystalline templates, the nanofibers can also be grown on non-crystalline gold surfaces, on which the orientation of the nanofibers can be manipulated by structuring the gold surface prior to p6P deposition. In this work, a novel method for in-situ growth...... of p6P nanofibers on nano-structured gold surfaces is presented. The substrates are prepared by conventional nanofabrication techniques such as e-beam lithography and metal deposition, which increase their potential as device platforms. Some of the results presented here demonstrate, that both...

  11. Testing by C++ template metaprograms

    CERN Document Server

    Pataki, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Testing is one of the most indispensable tasks in software engineering. The role of testing in software development has grown significantly because testing is able to reveal defects in the code in an early stage of development. Many unit test frameworks compatible with C/C++ code exist, but a standard one is missing. Unfortunately, many unsolved problems can be mentioned with the existing methods, for example usually external tools are necessary for testing C++ programs. In this paper we present a new approach for testing C++ programs. Our solution is based on C++ template metaprogramming facilities, so it can work with the standard-compliant compilers. The metaprogramming approach ensures that the overhead of testing is minimal at runtime. This approach also supports that the specification language can be customized among other advantages. Nevertheless, the only necessary tool is the compiler itself.

  12. A Template for Design Personas:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene; Hansen, Kira Storgaard; Stage, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    The persona method is gaining widespread use and support. Many researchers have reported from single cases and from novel domains on how they have used the method. However, the way companies and design groups describe personas has not been the focus of attention. This paper analyses 47 descriptions...... from 13 companies and compares these to an analysis of recommendations from 11 templates from literature. Furthermore, 28 interviews with Danish practitioners with experience in using personas are analyzed for content on persona descriptions. The study finds that a Danish persona style has developed...... that is different from the recommendations in the lack of marketing and business related information and the absence of goals as differentiator for personas. Furthermore, the inspiration and knowledge on personas originates from co-workers and seminars and not much from literature. This indicates that the community...

  13. A Review of Atomic Layer Deposition for Nanoscale Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Riyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atomic layer deposition (ALD is a thin film growth technique that utilizes alternating, self-saturation chemical reactions between gaseous precursors to achieve a deposited nanoscale layers. It has recently become a subject of great interest for ultrathin film deposition in many various applications such as microelectronics, photovoltaic, dynamic random access memory (DRAM, and microelectromechanic system (MEMS. By using ALD, the conformability and extreme uniformity of layers can be achieved in low temperature process. It facilitates to be deposited onto the surface in many variety substrates that have low melting temperature. Eventually it has advantages on the contribution to the wider nanodevices.

  14. Destructive impact of molecular noise on nanoscale electrochemical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosi, Filippo G.; Krischer, Katharina

    2017-06-01

    We study the loss of coherence of electrochemical oscillations on meso- and nanosized electrodes with numeric simulations of the electrochemical master equation for a prototypical electrochemical oscillator, the hydrogen peroxide reduction on Pt electrodes in the presence of halides. On nanoelectrodes, the electrode potential changes whenever a stochastic electron-transfer event takes place. Electrochemical reaction rate coefficients depend exponentially on the electrode potential and become thus fluctuating quantities as well. Therefore, also the transition rates between system states become time-dependent which constitutes a fundamental difference to purely chemical nanoscale oscillators. Three implications are demonstrated: (a) oscillations and steady states shift in phase space with decreasing system size, thereby also decreasing considerably the oscillating parameter regions; (b) the minimal number of molecules necessary to support correlated oscillations is more than 10 times as large as for nanoscale chemical oscillators; (c) the relation between correlation time and variance of the period of the oscillations predicted for chemical oscillators in the weak noise limit is only fulfilled in a very restricted parameter range for the electrochemical nano-oscillator.

  15. Template synthesis of ordered macroporous hydroxyapatite bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lijun; Jell, Gavin; Dong, Yixiang; Jones, Julian R; Stevens, Molly M

    2011-08-28

    Hydroxyapatite has found wide application in bone tissue engineering. Here we use a macroporous carbon template to generate highly ordered macroporous hydroxyapatite bioceramics composed of close-packed hollow spherical pores with interconnected channels. The template has advantages for the preparation of ordered materials.

  16. Screening for templates that promote crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, J.; Roelands, C.P.M.; Horst, J.H. ter; Verdoes, D.; Jansens, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    In Situ Product Recovery (ISPR) applied in fermentation processes leads to improved yield and productivity of these processes. In principle, ISPR can be achieved using Template Induced Crystallization (TIC), which is one possible ISPR technique. With TIC, templates are added to the solution as a spe

  17. Indexing Images: Testing an Image Description Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Corinne

    1996-01-01

    A template for pictorial image description to be used by novice image searchers in recording their descriptions of images was tested; image attribute classes derived in previous research were used to model the template. Results indicated that users may need training and/or more guidance to correctly assign descriptors to higher-level classes.…

  18. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  19. Synthesis of mesoporous carbon as electrode material for supercapacitor by modified template method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jia-chang; LAI Chun-yan; DAI Yang; XIE Jing-ying

    2005-01-01

    The pore structures and electrochemical performances of mesoporous carbons prepared by silica sol template method as electrode material for supercapacitor were investigated. The mean pore size and mass specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbons increase with the increase of mass ratio of silica sol to carbon source (glucose). A modified template method, combining silica sol template method and ZnCl2 chemical activation method, was proposed to improve the mass specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbon with an improved BET surface area. The correlation of rate capability and pore structure was studied by constant current discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A commercially available microporous carbon was used for comparison. The result shows that mesoporous carbon with a larger pore size displays a higher rate capability. Mesoporous carbon synthesized by modified template method has both high mass specific capacitance and good rate capability.

  20. Microwave Absorption Behavior of Mesoporous Transition Metal Oxide Templated from SBA-15 and KIT-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongjing; Wang, Liuding; Wang, Yiming

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we have synthesized meso-oxides (i.e., Co3O4 and NiO) by using mesoporous silica as hard template. The microstructures and chemical compositions of the corresponding meso-oxides were characterized by the Transmission electron microscope-selected area electron diffusion (TEM-SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), respectively. And, their electromagnetic and microwave absorption properties were investigated in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The results indicate that meso-oxide templated from KIT-6 (i.e., meso-K-Co/Ni) exhibit a dual absorption characteristic compared with those using SBA-15 as hard template. This phenomenon suggests that meso-oxides templated from SBA-15 and KIT-6 can exhibit different microwave absorption behaviors due to their respective microstructures.

  1. Fast patterning and dry-etch of SiNχ for high resolution nanoimprint templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Zhen; Wan Jing; Lu Bingrui; Xie Shenqi; Chen Yifang; Qu Xinping; Liu Ran

    2009-01-01

    We developed a simplified nanofabrication process for imprint templates by fast speed electron beam lithography (EBL) and a dry etch technique on a SiNx substrate, intended for large area manufacturing. To this end,the highly sensitive chemically amplified resist (CAR), NEB-22, with negative tone was used. The EBL process first defines the template pattern in NEB-22, which is then directly used as an etching mask in the subsequent reactive ion etching (RIE) on the SiNx to form the desired templates. The properties of both e-beam lithography and dry etch of NEB-22 were carefully studied, indicating significant advantages of this process with some drawbacks compared to when Cr was used as an etching mask. Nevertheless, our results open up a good opportunity to fabricate high resolution imprint templates with the prospect of wafer scale manufacturing.

  2. Attosecond physics at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Ciappina, M F; Landsman, A S; Okell, W; Zherebtsov, S; Förg, B; Schötz, J; Seiffert, J L; Fennel, T; Shaaran, T; Zimmermann, T; Chacón, A; Guichard, R; Zaïr, A; Tisch, J W G; Marangos, J P; Witting, T; Braun, A; Maier, S A; Roso, L; Krüger, M; Hommelhoff, P; Kling, M F; Krausz, F; Lewenstein, M

    2016-01-01

    Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this article we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spati...

  3. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bennett E; Roder, Paden B; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J

    2015-04-28

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. This mini-review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.

  4. Optical Spectroscopy at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiaoping

    Recent advances in material science and fabrication techniques enabled development of nanoscale applications and devices with superior performances and high degree of integration. Exotic physics also emerges at nanoscale where confinement of electrons and phonons leads to drastically different behavior from those in the bulk materials. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to investigate and understand material properties at the nanoscale. Optical spectroscopy, one of the most versatile techniques for studying material properties and light-matter interactions, can provide new insights into the nanomaterials. In this thesis, I explore advanced laser spectroscopic techniques to probe a variety of different nanoscale phenomena. A powerful tool in nanoscience and engineering is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Its capability in atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy unveiled the mystical quantum world of atoms and molecules. However identification of molecular species under investigation is one of the limiting functionalities of the STM. To address this need, we take advantage of the molecular `fingerprints' - vibrational spectroscopy, by combining an infrared light sources with scanning tunneling microscopy. In order to map out sharp molecular resonances, an infrared continuous wave broadly tunable optical parametric oscillator was developed with mode-hop free fine tuning capabilities. We then combine this laser with STM by shooting the beam onto the STM substrate with sub-monolayer diamondoids deposition. Thermal expansion of the substrate is detected by the ultrasensitive tunneling current when infrared frequency is tuned across the molecular vibrational range. Molecular vibrational spectroscopy could be obtained by recording the thermal expansion as a function of the excitation wavelength. Another interesting field of the nanoscience is carbon nanotube, an ideal model of one dimensional physics and applications. Due to the small light absorption with

  5. Nanoscale metal-organic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carné, Arnau; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Metal-organic materials are found to be a fascinating novel class of functional nanomaterials. The limitless combinations between inorganic and organic building blocks enable researchers to synthesize 0- and 1-D metal-organic discrete nanostructures with varied compositions, morphologies and sizes, fabricate 2-D metal-organic thin films and membranes, and even structure them on surfaces at the nanometre length scale. In this tutorial review, the synthetic methodologies for preparing these miniaturized materials as well as their potential properties and future applications are discussed. This review wants to offer a panoramic view of this embryonic class of nanoscale materials that will be of interest to a cross-section of researchers working in chemistry, physics, medicine, nanotechnology, materials chemistry, etc., in the next years.

  6. One-Dimensional (1-D) Nanoscale Heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guozhen SHEN; Di CHEN; Yoshio BANDO; Dmitri GOLBERG

    2008-01-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures have been attracted much attention as a result of their exceptional properties, which are different from bulk materials. Among 1-D nanostructures, 1-D heterostructures with modulated compositions and interfaces have recently become of particular interest with respect to potential applications in nanoscale building blocks of future optoelectronic devices and systems. Many kinds of methods have been developed for the synthesis of 1-D nanoscale heterostructures. This article reviews the most recent development, with an emphasize on our own recent efforts, on 1-D nanoscale heterostructures, especially those synthesized from the vapor deposition methods, in which all the reactive precursors are mixed together in the reaction chamber. Three types of 1-D nanoscale heterostructures, defined from their morphologies characteristics, are discussed in detail, which include 1-D co-axial core-shell heterostructures, 1-D segmented heterostructures and hierarchical heterostructures. This article begins with a brief survey of various methods that have been developed for synthesizing 1-D nanoscale heterostructures and then mainly focuses on the synthesis, structures and properties of the above three types of nanoscale heterostructures. Finally, this review concludes with personal views towards the topic of 1-D nanoscale heterostructures.

  7. Template Assembly for Detailed Urban Reconstruction

    KAUST Repository

    Nan, Liangliang

    2015-05-04

    We propose a new framework to reconstruct building details by automatically assembling 3D templates on coarse textured building models. In a preprocessing step, we generate an initial coarse model to approximate a point cloud computed using Structure from Motion and Multi View Stereo, and we model a set of 3D templates of facade details. Next, we optimize the initial coarse model to enforce consistency between geometry and appearance (texture images). Then, building details are reconstructed by assembling templates on the textured faces of the coarse model. The 3D templates are automatically chosen and located by our optimization-based template assembly algorithm that balances image matching and structural regularity. In the results, we demonstrate how our framework can enrich the details of coarse models using various data sets.

  8. Solvable model for template coexistence in protocells

    CERN Document Server

    Fontanari, J F

    2012-01-01

    Compartmentalization of self-replicating molecules (templates) in protocells is a necessary step towards the evolution of modern cells. However, coexistence between distinct template types inside a protocell can be achieved only if there is a selective pressure favoring protocells with a mixed template composition. Here we study analytically a group selection model for the coexistence between two template types using the diffusion approximation of population genetics. The model combines competition at the template and protocell levels as well as genetic drift inside protocells. At the steady state, we find a continuous phase transition separating the coexistence and segregation regimes, with the order parameter vanishing linearly with the distance to the critical point. In addition, we derive explicit analytical expressions for the critical steady-state probability density of protocell compositions.

  9. Solvable model for template coexistence in protocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanari, J. F.; Serva, M.

    2013-02-01

    Compartmentalization of self-replicating molecules (templates) in protocells is a necessary step towards the evolution of modern cells. However, coexistence between distinct template types inside a protocell can be achieved only if there is a selective pressure favoring protocells with a mixed template composition. Here we study analytically a group selection model for the coexistence between two template types using the diffusion approximation of population genetics. The model combines competition at the template and protocell levels as well as genetic drift inside protocells. At the steady state, we find a continuous phase transition separating the coexistence and segregation regimes, with the order parameter vanishing linearly with the distance to the critical point. In addition, we derive explicit analytical expressions for the critical steady-state probability density of protocell compositions.

  10. Research methodology on interfaces of physics and chemistry in micro and nanoscale materials

    CERN Document Server

    Guarrotxena, Nekane

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a selection of recent research studies and new developments in physics and chemistry in micro and nanoscale materials. It brings together research contributions from eminent experts in the field from both academic and industry, providing the latest developments in advanced materials chemical domains.

  11. Nanoscale mapping of catalytic activity using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N; Stephanidis, B; Zenobi, R; Wain, A J; Roy, D

    2015-04-28

    Chemical mapping of a photocatalytic reaction with nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated for the first time using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). An ultrathin alumina film applied to the Ag-coated TERS tip blocks catalytic interference whilst maintaining near-field electromagnetic enhancement, thus enabling spectroscopic imaging of catalytic activity on nanostructured Ag surfaces.

  12. Nano sand filter with functionalized nanoparticles embedded in anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Nguyenthi; Andisetiawan, Anugrah; van Lam, Do; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Choi, Doo-Sun; Whang, Kyung-Hyun; Nham, Jeasun; Lee, Yun Jung; Yoo, Yeong-Eun; Yoon, Jae Sung

    2016-11-01

    Since the ancient Egyptians had used sand as filter media for water purification, its principle has been inherited through generations and it is still being used now in industries. The sand filter consists of sand literally, and the voids within the sand bed are the pores for filtration. Here we present a filtration principle using nanoparticles, so that the voids between the nanoparticles can be considered as effective pores in nanoscale dimension. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane has been used as the working template, and the nanoparticles have been injected and embedded within the pores of the AAO template. Nanoparticles with multiple sizes have been used in order to obtain smaller voids. Moreover, the nanoparticles have been functionalized, or electrically charged, with arginine/phenylalanine (RF) peptide group. In this way, filtration performance for charged particles or molecules, such as methylene blue, has been enhanced. Consequently, this study is expected to provide a new principle for fabrication of nano voids, or nano pores, and for filtration in nanoscale dimension.

  13. Investigating Nanoscale Electrochemistry with Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Stephanie; Wilson, Andrew J; Mattei, Michael; Chen, Xu; Goubert, Guillaume; Cardinal, M Fernanda; Willets, Katherine A; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-09-20

    The chemical sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) methodologies allows for the investigation of heterogeneous chemical reactions with high sensitivity. Specifically, SERS methodologies are well-suited to study electron transfer (ET) reactions, which lie at the heart of numerous fundamental processes: electrocatalysis, solar energy conversion, energy storage in batteries, and biological events such as photosynthesis. Heterogeneous ET reactions are commonly monitored by electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry, observing billions of electrochemical events per second. Since the first proof of detecting single molecules by redox cycling, there has been growing interest in examining electrochemistry at the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. Doing so unravels details that would otherwise be obscured by an ensemble experiment. The use of optical spectroscopies, such as SERS, to elucidate nanoscale electrochemical behavior is an attractive alternative to traditional approaches such as scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). While techniques such as single-molecule fluorescence or electrogenerated chemiluminescence have been used to optically monitor electrochemical events, SERS methodologies, in particular, have shown great promise for exploring electrochemistry at the nanoscale. SERS is ideally suited to study nanoscale electrochemistry because the Raman-enhancing metallic, nanoscale substrate duly serves as the working electrode material. Moreover, SERS has the ability to directly probe single molecules without redox cycling and can achieve nanoscale spatial resolution in combination with super-resolution or scanning probe microscopies. This Account summarizes the latest progress from the Van Duyne and Willets groups toward understanding nanoelectrochemistry using Raman spectroscopic methodologies. The first half of this Account highlights three techniques that have been recently used to probe few- or single-molecule electrochemical

  14. Molecular structure design and soft template synthesis of aza-, oxaaza- and thiaazamacrocyclic metal chelates in the gelatin matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Mikhailov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The data about of soft template synthesis proceeding in gelatin matrices in [3d-element M(II ion – (N,S- or (N,O,S-ambidentate ligson – mono- or dicarbonyl ligson] systems, have been considered and discussed. The chemical nature of the final products of template synthesis formed under these specific conditions, has been compared with the chemical nature of the final products formed by template synthesis in solutions. It has been noted that in many cases, the nature and chemical composition of these products differ substantially. Specific features of the DFT calculated molecular structures of the macrocyclic compounds that can be formed due to the template synthesis in the systems indicated above, have been discussed, too. The review covers the period 1990–2015.

  15. Metal-Organic Framework Templated Synthesis of Ultrasmall Catalyst Loaded ZnO/ZnCo2O4 Hollow Spheres for Enhanced Gas Sensing Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Won-Tae; Choi, Seon-Jin; Jang, Ji-Soo; Kim, Il-Doo

    2017-03-01

    To achieve the rational design of nanostructures for superior gas sensors, the ultrasmall nanoparticles (NPs) loaded on ternary metal oxide (TMO) hollow spheres (HS) were synthesized by using the polystyrene (PS) sphere template and bimetallic metal-organic framework (BM-MOFs) mold. The zinc and cobalt based zeolite imidazole frameworks (BM-ZIFs) encapsulating ultrasmall Pd NPs (2-3 nm) were assembled on PS spheres at room temperature. After calcination at 450 °C, these nanoscale Pd particles were effectively infiltrated on the surface of ZnO/ZnCo2O4 HSs. In addition, the heterojunctions of Pd-ZnO, Pd-ZnCo2O4, and ZnO-ZnCo2O4 were formed on each phase. The synthesized Pd-ZnO/ZnCo2O4 HSs exhibited extremely high selectivity toward acetone gas with notable sensitivity (S = 69% to 5 ppm at 250 °C). The results demonstrate that MOF driven ultrasmall catalyst loaded TMO HSs were highly effective platform for high performance chemical gas sensors.

  16. Giant increase in the metal-enhanced fluorescence of organic molecules in nanoporous alumina templates and large molecule-specific red/blue-shift of the fluorescence peak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S; Kanchibotla, B; Nelson, J D; Edwards, J D; Anderson, J; Tepper, G C; Bandyopadhyay, S

    2014-10-08

    The fluorescence of organic fluorophore molecules is enhanced when they are placed in contact with certain metals (Al, Ag, Cu, Au, etc.) whose surface plasmon waves couple into the radiative modes of the molecules and increase the radiative efficiency. Here, we report a hitherto unknown size dependence of this metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effect in the nanoscale. When the molecules are deposited in nanoporous anodic alumina films with exposed aluminum at the bottom of the pores, they form organic nanowires standing on aluminum nanoparticles whose plasmon waves have much larger amplitudes. This increases the MEF strongly, resulting in several orders of magnitude increase in the fluorescence intensity of the organic fluorophores. The increase in intensity shows an inverse superlinear dependence on nanowire diameter because the nanowires also act as plasmonic "waveguides" that concentrate the plasmons and increase the coupling of the plasmons with the radiative modes of the molecules. Furthermore, if the nanoporous template housing the nanowires has built-in electric fields due to space charges, a strong molecule-specific red- or blue-shift is induced in the fluorescence peak owing to a renormalization of the dipole moment of the molecule. This can be exploited to detect minute amounts of target molecules in a mixture using their optical signature (fluorescence) despite the presence of confounding background signals. It can result in a unique new technology for biosensing and chemical sensing.

  17. Metal-Organic Framework Templated Synthesis of Ultrasmall Catalyst Loaded ZnO/ZnCo2O4 Hollow Spheres for Enhanced Gas Sensing Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Won-Tae; Choi, Seon-Jin; Jang, Ji-Soo; Kim, Il-Doo

    2017-01-01

    To achieve the rational design of nanostructures for superior gas sensors, the ultrasmall nanoparticles (NPs) loaded on ternary metal oxide (TMO) hollow spheres (HS) were synthesized by using the polystyrene (PS) sphere template and bimetallic metal-organic framework (BM-MOFs) mold. The zinc and cobalt based zeolite imidazole frameworks (BM-ZIFs) encapsulating ultrasmall Pd NPs (2–3 nm) were assembled on PS spheres at room temperature. After calcination at 450 °C, these nanoscale Pd particles were effectively infiltrated on the surface of ZnO/ZnCo2O4 HSs. In addition, the heterojunctions of Pd-ZnO, Pd-ZnCo2O4, and ZnO-ZnCo2O4 were formed on each phase. The synthesized Pd-ZnO/ZnCo2O4 HSs exhibited extremely high selectivity toward acetone gas with notable sensitivity (S = 69% to 5 ppm at 250 °C). The results demonstrate that MOF driven ultrasmall catalyst loaded TMO HSs were highly effective platform for high performance chemical gas sensors. PMID:28327599

  18. DSA template optimization for contact layer in 1D standard cell design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zigang; Du, Yuelin; Tian, Haitong; Wong, Martin D. F.; Yi, He; Wong, H.-S. Philip

    2014-03-01

    At the 7 nm technology node, the contact layers of integrated circuits (IC) are too dense to be printed by single exposure lithography. Block copolymer directed self-assembly (DSA) has shown its advantage in contact/via patterning with high throughput and low cost. To pattern contacts with DSA, guiding templates are usually printed first with conventional lithography, e.g., 193 nm immersion lithography (193i) that has a coarser pitch resolution. Contact holes are then patterned with DSA process. The guiding templates play the role of controlling the DSA patterns inside, which have a finer resolution than the templates. The DSA contact pitch depends on the chemical property of block copolymer and it can be adjusted within a certain range under strong lateral confinement to deviate from the natural pitch. As a result, different patterns can be obtained through different parameters. Although the guiding template shapes can be arbitrary, the overlay accuracy of the contact holes patterned are different and largely depend on the templates. Thus, the guiding templates that have tolerable variations are considered as feasible, and those have large overlays are considered as infeasible. To pattern the contact layer in a layout with DSA technology, we must ensure that all the DSA templates in the layout are feasible. However, the original layout may not be designed in a DSA-friendly way. Moreover, the routing process may introduce contacts that can only be patterned by infeasible templates. In this paper, we propose an optimization algorithm that optimize the contact layer for DSA patterning in 1D standard cell design. In particular, the algorithm modifies the layout via wire permutation technique to redistribute the contacts such that the use of infeasible templates is avoided and the feasible patterns that with better overlay control are favored. The experimental result demonstrate the ability of the proposed algorithm in helping to reduce the design and manufacturing

  19. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  20. Speciation of nanoscale objects by nanoparticle imprinted matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitrik, Maria; Pisman, Yamit; Wittstock, Gunther; Mandler, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The toxicity of nanoparticles is not only a function of the constituting material but depends largely on their size, shape and stabilizing shell. Hence, the speciation of nanoscale objects, namely, their detection and separation based on the different species, similarly to heavy metals, is of outmost importance. Here we demonstrate the speciation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their electrochemical detection using the concept of ``nanoparticles imprinted matrices'' (NAIM). Negatively charged AuNPs are adsorbed as templates on a conducting surface previously modified with polyethylenimine (PEI). The selective matrix is formed by the adsorption of either oleic acid (OA) or poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) on the non-occupied areas. The AuNPs are removed by electrooxidation to form complementary voids. These voids are able to recognize the AuNPs selectively based on their size. Furthermore, the selectivity could be improved by adsorbing an additional layer of 1-hexadecylamine, which deepened the voids. Interestingly, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were also recognized if their size matched those of the template AuNPs. The steps in assembling the NAIMs and the reuptake of the nanoparticles were characterized carefully. The prospects for the analytical use of NAIMs, which are simple, of small dimension, cost-efficient and portable, are in the sensing and separation of nanoobjects.The toxicity of nanoparticles is not only a function of the constituting material but depends largely on their size, shape and stabilizing shell. Hence, the speciation of nanoscale objects, namely, their detection and separation based on the different species, similarly to heavy metals, is of outmost importance. Here we demonstrate the speciation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their electrochemical detection using the concept of ``nanoparticles imprinted matrices'' (NAIM). Negatively charged AuNPs are adsorbed as templates on a conducting surface previously modified with polyethylenimine (PEI). The

  1. Semiconductor nanowires and templates for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Xiang

    2009-07-15

    This thesis starts by developing a platform for the organized growth of nanowires directly on a planar substrate. For this, a method to fabricate horizontal porous alumina membranes is studied. The second part of the thesis focuses on the study of nanowires. It starts by the understanding of the growth mechanisms of germanium nanowires and follows by the structural and electrical properties at the single nanowire level. Horizontally aligned porous anodic alumina (PAA) was used as a template for the nanowire synthesis. Three PAA arrangements were studied: - high density membranes - micron-sized fingers - multi-contacts Membranes formed by a high density of nanopores were obtained by anodizing aluminum thin films. Metallic and semiconducting nanowires were synthesized into the PAA structures via DC deposition, pulsed electro-depostion and CVD growth. The presence of gold, copper, indium, nickel, tellurium, and silicon nanowires inside PAA templates was verified by SEM and EDX analysis. Further, room-temperature transport measurements showed that the pores are completely filled till the bottom of the pores. In this dissertation, single crystalline and core-shell germanium nanowires are synthesized using indium and bismuth as catalyst in a chemical vapor deposition procedure with germane (GeH{sub 4}) as growth precursor. A systematic growth study has been performed to obtain high aspect-ratio germanium nanowires. The influence of the growth conditions on the final morphology and the crystalline structure has been determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In the case of indium catalyzed germanium nanowires, two different structures were identified: single crystalline and crystalline core-amorphous shell. The preferential growth axis of both kinds of nanowires is along the [110] direction. The occurrence of the two morphologies was found to only depend on the nanowire dimension. In the case of bismuth

  2. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    , nanopowders) were discussed. Ab initio simulations on the atomic and electronic structure of single-walled BN nanotubes and nanoarches were illustrated by Yu F Zhukovskii. M B Muradov talked about nanoparticles of cadmium selenide and cadmium sulfide, which yield one of the perspective materials for application to solar cell elements, high-speed computing systems, catalyses and biomarkers in medicine. In the presentation, the process of transformation of nanoparticles cadmium of sulfide to nanoparticles of cadmium selenide by an ionic exchange from solutions of electrolytes was considered. The size of particles was controlled by the quantity of growth cycles. After manufacturing, the structures were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Structures CdS:polymer transformed into CdSe:polymer with the help of ion-exchange. For the realization of the process of ionic exchange, solutions were prepared containing bivalent ions of selenium as follows: NaBH4 and Se in a weight parity 2:1 added in water 4NaBH4+2Se+7H2O→2NaHSe+Na2B4O7+14H2 In the prepared solution nanostructures CdS:polymer were immersed. Time of endurance was 2 h. After an ionic exchange the obtained structures were investigated by means of EDAX on a chemical composition. Results of analyses have shown that atoms of sulfur are completely replaced by selenium. The band gap of nanoparticles in comparison with initial samples is displaced in the long-wave area. It is connected with the fact that the width of the band gap of bulk crystals CdSe (1.74 eV) is smaller than the band gap of CdS (2.42 eV). Optical microscopy with spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit obtained by using near field techniques was the subject of S Prato's talk. Scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) has developed into a powerful tool to investigate local optical properties that depend on heterogeneity of materials at nanoscale and to study nanoenvironment of biosystems. Crucial topics in SNOM are: force sensitivity and

  3. Nanoscale Distribution of Sulfonic Acid Groups Determines Structure and Binding of Water in Nafion Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xiao; Bonn, Mischa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The connection between the nanoscale structure of two chemically equivalent, yet morphologically distinct Nafion fuel‐cell membranes and their macroscopic chemical properties is demonstrated. Quantification of the chemical interactions between water and Nafion reveals that extruded membranes have smaller water channels with a reduced sulfonic acid head group density compared to dispersion‐cast membranes. As a result, a disproportionally large amount of non‐bulk water molecules exists in extruded membranes, which also exhibit larger proton conductivity and larger water mobility compared to cast membranes. The differences in the physicochemical properties of the membranes, that is, the chemical constitution of the water channels and the local water structure, and the accompanying differences in macroscopic water and proton transport suggest that the chemistry of nanoscale channels is an important, yet largely overlooked parameter that influences the functionality of fuel‐cell membranes. PMID:26895211

  4. Directed assembly of conducting polymers on sub-micron templates by electrical fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jia; Wei, Ming [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Busnaina, Ahmed [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Barry, Carol [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Mead, Joey, E-mail: Joey_Mead@uml.edu [National Science Foundation (NSF) Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoscale patterns with dimensions of assembled PANi down to 100 nm were fabricated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly to deposit PANi. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly of PANi finished in less than 1 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of process parameters on assembly of PANi onto nanoscale pattern was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assembled PANi can be transferred to other flexible substrates. - Abstract: Patterning of conducting polymer into sub-micron patterns over large areas at high rate and low cost is significant for commercial manufacturing of novel devices. Electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly provide an easily scaled approach with high fabrication rates. In this work, electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic assembly were used to assemble polyaniline (PANi) into multiscale sub-micron size patterns in less than 1 min. The process was controlled by assembly time, amplitude, and frequency of the electric field. Dielectrophoretic assembly is preferable for manufacturing as it reduces damage to the templates used to control the assembly. Using this method, sub-micron patterns with dimensions of the assembled PANi down to 100 nm were fabricated over large areas in short times. The assembled PANi was further transferred to other flexible polymer substrates by a thermoforming process, providing a fast, easily controlled and promising approach for fabrication of nanoscale devices.

  5. A Bayesian method for pulsar template generation

    CERN Document Server

    Imgrund, M; Kramer, M; Lesch, H

    2015-01-01

    Extracting Times of Arrival from pulsar radio signals depends on the knowledge of the pulsars pulse profile and how this template is generated. We examine pulsar template generation with Bayesian methods. We will contrast the classical generation mechanism of averaging intensity profiles with a new approach based on Bayesian inference. We introduce the Bayesian measurement model imposed and derive the algorithm to reconstruct a "statistical template" out of noisy data. The properties of these "statistical templates" are analysed with simulated and real measurement data from PSR B1133+16. We explain how to put this new form of template to use in analysing secondary parameters of interest and give various examples: We implement a nonlinear filter for determining ToAs of pulsars. Applying this method to data from PSR J1713+0747 we derive ToAs self consistently, meaning all epochs were timed and we used the same epochs for template generation. While the average template contains fluctuations and noise as unavoida...

  6. Electrodeposition of gold templated by patterned thiol monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zhe; Di Falco, Andrea; Hähner, Georg; Buck, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    The electrochemical deposition of Au onto Au substrates modified by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was studied by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Patterned SAMs exhibiting electrochemical contrast were prepared by two different methods. One used microcontact printing (μCP) to generate a binary SAM of ω-(4‧-methyl-biphenyl-4-yl)-propane thiol (CH3-C6H4-C6H4-(CH2)3-SH, MBP3) and octadecane thiol (CH3(CH2)17SH, ODT). Templated by the SAM, a gold microelectrode structure was electrodeposited featuring a line 15 μm wide and 3 mm long. After transfer to an epoxy substrate the structure proved to be electrically conductive across the full length. The other patterning method applied electron beam lithography (EBL) where electrochemical contrast was achieved by crosslinking molecules in a single component SAM of MBP3. An electron dose above 250 mC/cm2 results in a high deposition contrast. The choice of parameters for the deposition/lift-off process is found to be more critical for Au compared to Cu studied previously. The origin of the differences and implications for nanoscale patterning are discussed.

  7. Defect reduction of patterned media templates and disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kang; Ha, Steven; Fretwell, John; Ramos, Rick; Ye, Zhengmao; Schmid, Gerard; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2010-05-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for the replication of nano-scale features. Acceptance of imprint lithography for manufacturing will require a demonstration of defect levels commensurate with cost-effective device production. This work summarizes the results of defect inspections of hard disks patterned using Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM). Inspections were performed with optical based automated inspection tools. For the hard drive market, it is important to understand the defectivity of both the template and the imprinted disk. This work presents a methodology for automated pattern inspection and defect classification for imprint-patterned media. Candela CS20 and 6120 tools from KLA-Tencor map the optical properties of the disk surface, producing highresolution grayscale images of surface reflectivity and scattered light. Defects that have been identified in this manner are further characterized according to the morphology. The imprint process was tested after optimizing both the disk cleaning and adhesion layers processes that precede imprinting. An extended imprint run was performed and both the defect types and trends are reported.

  8. Templated Growth of Magnetic Recording Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Vignesh

    Current and potential next-generation magnetic recording technologies are based on the writing and reading of bits on a magnetic thin film with a granular microstructure, with grains of the magnetic material surrounded by an amorphous segregant. In order to realize the highest achievable data storage capabilities, there is a need for better control of the magnetic media microstructure, particularly in terms of minimizing grain size and grain boundary thickness distributions. In this work, a guided magnetic media growth is attempted by creating a pre-fabricated template with a specific material and morphology. The template is designed in such a way that, when magnetic media consisting of the magnetic alloy and segregant are sputtered, the sites on the template result in a controlled two-phase growth of magnetic media. The template is fabricated using self-assembling block copolymers, which can be used to fabricate nanostructures with a regular hexagonal lattice of spheres of one block in the other's matrix. These are then used as etch-masks to fabricate the template. In this thesis, we describe the approach used to fabricate these templates and demonstrate the two-phase growth of magnetic recording media. In such an approach, the magnetic grain size is defined by the uniform pitch of the block copolymer pattern, resulting in a uniform microstructure with much better grain size distribution than can be obtained with conventional un-templated media growth. The templated growth technique is also a suitable additive technique for the fabrication of Bit Patterned Media, another potential next-generation technology wherein the magnetic bits are isolated patterned islands. Combining nanoimprint lithography with templated growth, we can generate a long range spatially ordered array of magnetic islands with no etching of the magnetic material.

  9. A novel supramolecular organogel nanotubular template approach for conducting nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilkumar, P; Jayakannan, M

    2010-01-21

    We report a unique supramolecular organogel template approach for conducting polyaniline nanomaterials. A novel organogel based on sulfonic acid dopant was designed and developed from renewable resource 3-pentadecyl phenol via ring-opening of 1,4-butane sultone. The amphiphilic dopant molecule formed thermo-reversible supramolecular organogel in highly polar solvents like alcohols. The self-assembled fibril network morphology of the gel was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the inner part of the fibrous gel is nanotubular with the pore diameter of approximately 75 nm. The organogel nanotubular morphology was retained even in the presence of aniline+dopant complex, and the aniline monomers occupied the hydrophobic nanopockets provided by the amphiphilic dopant. The chemical oxidative polymerization of the dopant+aniline organogel template produced well-defined polyaniline nanofibers. The polymerization was carried out at various temperatures to establish the role of the physical state and stability of the organogel on the morphology. The sulfonic acid molecule acts both as self-assembled molecular template for the synthesis of polymer nanomaterial as well as anionic counterpart for stabilizing the positively charged conducting polymer chains. The gel template played a pivotal role in directing polyaniline chains to form nanofibers and also manipulating the number of other properties such as conductivity, solubility, percent crystallinity, and solid-state ordering, etc. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity measurements revealed that the nanomaterials showed typical linear ohmic behavior and also followed the 3-D VRH model at elevated temperatures.

  10. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)]|[Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Templating irreversible covalent macrocyclization by using anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataev, Evgeny A; Kolesnikov, Grigory V; Arnold, Rene; Lavrov, Herman V; Khrustalev, Victor N

    2013-03-11

    Inorganic anions were used as templates in the reaction between a diamine and an activated diacid to form macrocyclic amides. The reaction conditions were found to perform the macrocyclization sufficiently slow to observe a template effect. A number of analytical methods were used to clarify the reaction mechanisms and to show that the structure of the intermediate plays a decisive role in determining the product distribution. For the macrocyclization under kinetic control, it was shown that the amount of a template, the conformational rigidity of building blocks, and the anion affinities of reaction components and intermediates are important parameters that one should take into consideration to achieve high yields.

  12. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-in

    2016-02-14

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.

  13. Super-Resolution Molecular and Functional imaging of Nanoscale Architectures in Life and Materials Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eHabuchi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the super-resolution microscopy. I discuss the applications of super-resolution microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-nanotechnology.

  14. Super-Resolution Molecular and Functional Imaging of Nanoscale Architectures in Life and Materials Science

    KAUST Repository

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2014-06-12

    Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

  15. Status of study on biological and toxicological effects of nanoscale materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Bing; FENG; Weiyue; ZHAO; Yuliang; XING; Gengmei; CH

    2005-01-01

    Because the physical and chemical properties of nanosized materials mostly differ from the existing microsized materials, their potential impacts on human health and the environment will be topics under the serious discussions in press and in a number of international scientific journals. We analyze and summarize the existing data of the experimental study on the biological activities and adverse effects of nanoscale materials/particles including single wall carbon nanotubes, multi wall carbon nanotubes, titanium oxide and iron powders. Though some biological behaviors of nanoscale materials observed cannot be understood on the basis of the current knowledge, as the existing data are mostly preliminary, it is too early to make some exclusive conclusions on biological activities (or the toxicity) of any of nanoscale materials. The experimental techniques, the current topics, and the future research directions for this new research field are also discussed.

  16. Nanoscale Mixing of Soft Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Sangwoo; Soto, Haidy E.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S. (UMM); (Texas)

    2013-03-07

    Assessing the state of mixing on the molecular scale in soft solids is challenging. Concentrated solutions of micelles formed by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers in squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}) adopt a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice, with glassy PS cores. Utilizing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and isotopic labeling ({sup 1}H and {sup 2}H (D) polystyrene blocks) in a contrast-matching solvent (a mixture of squalane and perdeuterated squalane), we demonstrate quantitatively the remarkable fact that a commercial mixer can create completely random mixtures of micelles with either normal, PS(H), or deuterium-labeled, PS(D), cores on a well-defined bcc lattice. The resulting SANS intensity is quantitatively modeled by the form factor of a single spherical core. These results demonstrate both the possibility of achieving complete nanoscale mixing in a soft solid and the use of SANS to quantify the randomness.

  17. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-03

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  18. Molecular Photovoltaics in Nanoscale Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Pakoulev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the intrinsic charge transport in organic photovoltaic (PVC devices and field-effect transistors (SAM-OFETs fabricated by vapor phase molecular self-assembly (VP-SAM method. The dynamics of charge transport are determined and used to clarify a transport mechanism. The 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic diphenylimide (NTCDI SAM devices provide a useful tool to study the fundamentals of polaronic transport at organic surfaces and to discuss the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in nanoscale. Time-resolved photovoltaic studies allow us to separate the charge annihilation kinetics in the conductive NTCDI channel from the overall charge kinetic in a SAM-OFET device. It has been demonstrated that tuning of the type of conductivity in NTCDI SAM-OFET devices is possible by changing Si substrate doping. Our study of the polaron charge transfer in organic materials proposes that a cation-radical exchange (redox mechanism is the major transport mechanism in the studied SAM-PVC devices. The role and contribution of the transport through delocalized states of redox active surface molecular aggregates of NTCDI are exposed and investigated. This example of technological development is used to highlight the significance of future technological development of nanotechnologies and to appreciate a structure-property paradigm in organic nanostructures.

  19. Dielectrophoretic Forces on the Nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaldach, C M; Bourcier, W L; Wilson, W D; Paul, P H

    2004-03-30

    We have developed a method of calculation of the dielectrophoretic force on a nanoparticle in a fluid environment where variations in the electric field and electric field gradients are on the same nanoscale as the particle. The Boundary Element Dielectrophoretic Force (BEDF) method involves constructing a solvent-accessible or molecular surface surrounding the particle, calculating the normal component of the electric field at the surface boundary elements and then solving a system of linear equations for the induced surface polarization charge on each element. Different surface elements of the molecule may experience quite different polarizing electric fields, unlike the situation in the point dipole approximation. A single 100 Angstrom radius ring test configuration is employed to facilitate comparison with the well-known point dipole approximation (PDA). We find remarkable agreement between the forces calculated by the BEDF and PDA methods for a 1 Angstrom polarizable sphere. However, for larger particles, the differences between the methods become qualitative as well as quantitative; the character of the force changes from attractive at the origin of the ring for a 50 Angstrom sphere, to repulsive for a 75 Angstrom sphere. Equally dramatic differences are found in a more complex electrical environment involving two sets of 10 rings.

  20. Fabrication and properties of nanoscale multiferroic heterostructures for application in magneto-electric random access memory (MERAM) devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunwoo

    Magnetoelectric random access memory (MERAM) has emerged as a promising new class of non-volatile solid-state memory device. It offers nondestructive reading along with low power consumption during the write operation. A common implementation of MERAM involves use of multiferroic tunneling junctions (MFTJs), which besides offering non-volatility are both electrically and magnetically tunable. Fundamentally, a MFTJ consists of a heterostructure of an ultrathin multiferroic or ferroelectric material as the active tunneling barrier sandwiched between ferromagnetic electrodes. Thereby, the MFTJ exhibits both tunnel electroresistance (TER) and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effects with application of an electric and magnetic field, respectively. In this thesis work, we have developed two-dimensional (2D) thin-film multiferroic heterostructure METJ prototypes consisting of ultrathin ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO) layer and a conducting ferromagnetic La0.67Sr 0.33MnO3 (LSMO) electrode. The heteroepitaxial films are grown using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. This oxide heterostructure offers the opportunity to study the nano-scale details of the tunnel electroresistance (TER) effect using scanning probe microscopy techniques. We performed the measurements using the MFP-3D (Asylum Research) scanning probe microscope. The ultrathin BTO films (1.2-2.0 nm) grown on LSMO electrodes display both ferro- and piezo-electric properties and exhibit large tunnel resistance effect. We have explored the growth and properties of one-dimensional (1D) heterostructures, referred to as multiferoric nanowire (NW) heterostructures. The ferromagnetic/ferroelectric composite heterostructures are grown as sheath layers using PLD on lattice-matched template NWs, e.g. MgO, that are deposited by chemical vapor deposition utilizing the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. The one-dimensional geometry can substantially overcome the clamping effect of the substrate present in two

  1. Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura; Xu, Jennifer C.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    A report describes the fabrication and testing of nanoscale metal oxide semiconductors (MOSs) for gas and chemical sensing. This document examines the relationship between processing approaches and resulting sensor behavior. This is a core question related to a range of applications of nanotechnology and a number of different synthesis methods are discussed: thermal evaporation- condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed, providing a processing overview to developers of nanotechnology- based systems. The results of a significant amount of testing and comparison are also described. A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. The TECsynthesized single-crystal nanowires offer uniform crystal surfaces, resistance to sintering, and their synthesis may be done apart from the substrate. The TECproduced nanowire response is very low, even at the operating temperature of 200 C. In contrast, the electrospun polycrystalline nanofiber response is high, suggesting that junction potentials are superior to a continuous surface depletion layer as a transduction mechanism for chemisorption. Using a catalyst deposited upon the surface in the form of nanoparticles yields dramatic gains in sensitivity for both nanostructured, one-dimensional forms. For the nanowire materials, the response magnitude and response rate uniformly increase with increasing operating temperature. Such changes are interpreted in terms of accelerated surface diffusional processes, yielding greater access to chemisorbed oxygen species and faster dissociative chemisorption, respectively. Regardless of operating temperature, sensitivity of the nanofibers is a factor of 10 to 100 greater than that of nanowires with the same catalyst for the same test condition. In summary, nanostructure appears critical to governing the reactivity, as measured by electrical

  2. Nanoscale pinning effect evaluated from deformed nanobubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Hideaki; Nishiyama, Takashi; Takahashi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Classical thermodynamics theory predicts that nanosized bubbles should disappear in a few hundred microseconds. The surprisingly long lifetime and stability of nanobubbles are therefore interesting research subjects. It has been proposed that the stability of nanobubbles arises through pinning of the three-phase contact line, which results from intrinsic nanoscale geometrical and chemical heterogeneities of the substrate. However, a definitive explanation of nanobubble stability is still lacking. In this work, we examined the stability mechanism by introducing a "pinning force." We investigated nanobubbles at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/pure water interface by peak force quantitative nano-mechanical mapping and estimated the pinning force and determined its maximum value. We then observed the shape of shrinking nanobubbles. Because the diameter of the shrinking nanobubbles was pinned, the height decreased and the contact angle increased. This phenomenon implies that the stability results from the pinning force, which flattens the bubble through the pinned three-phase contact line and prevents the Laplace pressure from increasing. The pinning force can also explain the metastability of coalesced nanobubbles, which have two semispherical parts that are joined to form a dumbbell-like shape. The pinning force of the semispherical parts was stronger than that of the joint region. This result demonstrates that the contact line of the semispherical parts is pinned strongly to keep the dumbbell-like shape. Furthermore, we proposed a nanobubble generation mechanism for the solvent-exchange method and explained why the pinning force of large nanobubbles was not initially at its maximum value, as it was for small nanobubbles.

  3. Templated and template-free fabrication strategies for zero-dimensional hollow MOF superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyehyun; Lah, Myoung Soo

    2017-03-23

    Various fabrication strategies for hollow metal-organic framework (MOF) superstructures are reviewed and classified using various types of external templates and their properties. Hollow MOF superstructures have also been prepared without external templates, wherein unstable intermediates obtained during reactions convert to the final hollow MOF superstructures. Many hollow MOF superstructures have been fabricated using hard templates. After the core-shell core@MOF structure was prepared using a hard template, the core was selectively etched to generate a hollow MOF superstructure. Another approach for generating hollow superstructures is to use a solid reactant as a sacrificial template; this method requires no additional etching process. Soft templates such as discontinuous liquid/emulsion droplets and gas bubbles in a continuous soft phase have also been employed to prepare hollow MOF superstructures.

  4. Nanoscale imaging of freestanding nitrogen doped single layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R S; Wang, Jian; Wells, Garth; Bradley, Michael P; Borondics, Ferenc

    2015-02-14

    Graphene can be p-type or n-type doped by introduction of specific species. Doping can modulate the electronic properties of graphene, but opening a sizable-well-tuned bandgap is essential for graphene-based tunable electronic devices. N-doped graphene is widely used for device applications and is mostly achieved by introducing ammonia into the synthesis gas during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Post synthesis treatment studies to fine-tune the electron hole doping in graphene are limited. In this work realization of N-doping in large area freestanding single layer graphene (LFG) is achieved by post treatment in nitrogen plasma. The changes in the chemical and electronic properties of graphene are followed with Raman microscopy and mapped via synchrotron based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the nanoscale.

  5. Selective surface functionalization of silicon nanowires via nanoscale joule heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Inkyu; Li, Zhiyong; Pisano, Albert P; Williams, R Stanley

    2007-10-01

    In this letter, we report a novel approach to selectively functionalize the surface of silicon nanowires located on silicon-based substrates. This method is based upon highly localized nanoscale Joule heating along silicon nanowires under an applied electrical bias. Numerical simulation shows that a high-temperature (>800 K) with a large thermal gradient can be achieved by applying an appropriate electrical bias across silicon nanowires. This localized heating effect can be utilized to selectively ablate a protective polymer layer from a region of the chosen silicon nanowire. The exposed surface, with proper postprocessing, becomes available for surface functionalization with chemical linker molecules, such as 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilanes, while the surrounding area is still protected by the chemically inert polymer layer. This approach is successfully demonstrated on silicon nanowire arrays fabricated on SOI wafers and visualized by selective attachment of gold nanoparticles.

  6. Template for safety reports with descriptive example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    This report provides a template for future safety reports on long-term safety in support of important decisions and permit applications in connection with the construction of a deep repository system. The template aims at providing a uniform structure for describing long-term safety, after the repository has been closed and sealed. The availability of such a structure will simplify both preparation and review of the safety reports, and make it possible to follow how safety assessments are influenced by the progressively more detailed body of data that emerges. A separate section containing `descriptive examples` has been appended to the template. This section illustrates what the different chapters of the template should contain. 279 refs.

  7. Surgical Templates for Dental Implant Positioning; Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    applied scientifically based research techniques to develop an endosseous implant that forms ... KEYWORDS: Dental implants, surgical templates, surgical procedure, stent .... during the surgical stage for single implant therapy.[24] Afterward,.

  8. Nanowires and nanostructures fabrication using template methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Vlad, A.;

    2009-01-01

    One of the great challenges of today is to find reliable techniques for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization are the most promising due to their easiness and low cost. This paper focuses on the electrochemical synthesis ...... of nanowires and nanostructures using nanoporous host materials such as supported anodic aluminum considering it as a key template for nanowires based devices. New ways are opened for applications by combining such template synthesis methods with nanolithographic techniques.......One of the great challenges of today is to find reliable techniques for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization are the most promising due to their easiness and low cost. This paper focuses on the electrochemical synthesis...

  9. Template Approach for Adaptive Learning Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbing, Jana; Koidl, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Abbing, J. & Koidl, K. (2006). Template Approach for Adaptive Learning Strategies. Proceedings of Adaptive Hypermedia. June, Dublin, Ireland. Retrieved June 30th, 2006, from http://dspace.learningnetworks.org

  10. Performance Evaluation of Biometric Template Update

    CERN Document Server

    Giot, Romain; Dorizzi, Bernadette

    2012-01-01

    Template update allows to modify the biometric reference of a user while he uses the biometric system. With such kind of mechanism we expect the biometric system uses always an up to date representation of the user, by capturing his intra-class (temporary or permanent) variability. Although several studies exist in the literature, there is no commonly adopted evaluation scheme. This does not ease the comparison of the different systems of the literature. In this paper, we show that using different evaluation procedures can lead in different, and contradictory, interpretations of the results. We use a keystroke dynamics (which is a modality suffering of template ageing quickly) template update system on a dataset consisting of height different sessions to illustrate this point. Even if we do not answer to this problematic, it shows that it is necessary to normalize the template update evaluation procedures.

  11. Fast Legendre moment computation for template matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing C.

    2017-05-01

    Normalized cross correlation (NCC) based template matching is insensitive to intensity changes and it has many applications in image processing, object detection, video tracking and pattern recognition. However, normalized cross correlation implementation is computationally expensive since it involves both correlation computation and normalization implementation. In this paper, we propose Legendre moment approach for fast normalized cross correlation implementation and show that the computational cost of this proposed approach is independent of template mask sizes which is significantly faster than traditional mask size dependent approaches, especially for large mask templates. Legendre polynomials have been widely used in solving Laplace equation in electrodynamics in spherical coordinate systems, and solving Schrodinger equation in quantum mechanics. In this paper, we extend Legendre polynomials from physics to computer vision and pattern recognition fields, and demonstrate that Legendre polynomials can help to reduce the computational cost of NCC based template matching significantly.

  12. Macroporous polymer foams by hydrocarbon templating

    OpenAIRE

    Shastri, Venkatram Prasad; Martin, Ivan; Langer, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Porous polymeric media (polymer foams) are utilized in a wide range of applications, such as thermal and mechanical insulators, solid supports for catalysis, and medical devices. A process for the production of polymer foams has been developed. This process, which is applicable to a wide range of polymers, uses a hydrocarbon particulate phase as a template for the precipitation of the polymer phase and subsequent pore formation. The use of a hydrocarbon template allows for enhanced control ov...

  13. Scalable, Fast Cloud Computing with Execution Templates

    OpenAIRE

    Mashayekhi, Omid; Qu, Hang; Shah, Chinmayee; Levis, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Large scale cloud data analytics applications are often CPU bound. Most of these cycles are wasted: benchmarks written in C++ run 10-51 times faster than frameworks such as Naiad and Spark. However, calling faster implementations from those frameworks only sees moderate (3-5x) speedups because their control planes cannot schedule work fast enough. This paper presents execution templates, a control plane abstraction for CPU-bound cloud applications, such as machine learning. Execution template...

  14. Template synthesis of monodisperse carbon nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdyukov, D. A.; Eurov, D. A.; Stovpiaga, E. Yu.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Konyakhin, S. V.; Shvidchenko, A. V.; Golubev, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    Monodisperse carbon nanodots in pores of mesoporous silica particles are obtained by template synthesis. This method is based on introducing a precursor (organosilane) into pores, its thermal decomposition with formation of carbon nanodots, and the template removal. Structural analysis of the nanomaterial has been performed, which showed that carbon nanodots have an approximately spherical form and a graphite-like structure. According to dynamic light scattering data, the size of carbon nanodots is 3.3 ± 0.9 nm.

  15. Lipid bilayers on nano-templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Aleksandr; Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Bakajin, Olgica; Stoeve, Pieter

    2009-08-04

    A lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising a nanotube or nanowire and a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire. One embodiment provides a method of fabricating a lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising the steps of providing a nanotube or nanowire and forming a lipid bilayer around the polymer cushion. One embodiment provides a protein pore in the lipid bilayer. In one embodiment the protein pore is sensitive to specific agents

  16. Nanoscale imaging of freestanding nitrogen doped single layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R. S.; Wang, Jian; Wells, Garth; Bradley, Michael P.; Borondics, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    Graphene can be p-type or n-type doped by introduction of specific species. Doping can modulate the electronic properties of graphene, but opening a sizable-well-tuned bandgap is essential for graphene-based tunable electronic devices. N-doped graphene is widely used for device applications and is mostly achieved by introducing ammonia into the synthesis gas during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Post synthesis treatment studies to fine-tune the electron hole doping in graphene are limited. In this work realization of N-doping in large area freestanding single layer graphene (LFG) is achieved by post treatment in nitrogen plasma. The changes in the chemical and electronic properties of graphene are followed with Raman microscopy and mapped via synchrotron based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the nanoscale.Graphene can be p-type or n-type doped by introduction of specific species. Doping can modulate the electronic properties of graphene, but opening a sizable-well-tuned bandgap is essential for graphene-based tunable electronic devices. N-doped graphene is widely used for device applications and is mostly achieved by introducing ammonia into the synthesis gas during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Post synthesis treatment studies to fine-tune the electron hole doping in graphene are limited. In this work realization of N-doping in large area freestanding single layer graphene (LFG) is achieved by post treatment in nitrogen plasma. The changes in the chemical and electronic properties of graphene are followed with Raman microscopy and mapped via synchrotron based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the nanoscale. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05385k

  17. Multi-template polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kalle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available PCR is a formidable and potent technology that serves as an indispensable tool in a wide range of biological disciplines. However, due to the ease of use and often lack of rigorous standards many PCR applications can lead to highly variable, inaccurate, and ultimately meaningless results. Thus, rigorous method validation must precede its broad adoption to any new application. Multi-template samples possess particular features, which make their PCR analysis prone to artifacts and biases: multiple homologous templates present in copy numbers that vary within several orders of magnitude. Such conditions are a breeding ground for chimeras and heteroduplexes. Differences in template amplification efficiencies and template competition for reaction compounds undermine correct preservation of the original template ratio. In addition, the presence of inhibitors aggravates all of the above-mentioned problems. Inhibitors might also have ambivalent effects on the different templates within the same sample. Yet, no standard approaches exist for monitoring inhibitory effects in multitemplate PCR, which is crucial for establishing compatibility between samples.

  18. Liquid as template for next generation micro devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charmet, Jerome; Haquette, Henri; Laux, Edith; Keppner, Herbert [HES-SO ARC, Institut des Microtechnologies Appliquees, La Chaux de Fonds (Switzerland); Gorodyska, Ganna; Textor, Marcus [ETHZ, BioInterfaceGroup, Zuerich (Switzerland); Durante, Guido Spinola; Portuondo-Campa, Erwin; Knapp, Helmut [CSEM Centre Suisse d' Electronique et de Microtechnique SA, Alpnach (Switzerland); Bitterli, Roland; Noell, Wilfried, E-mail: Jerome.Charmet@he-arc.c [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institute of Microengineering, Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems laboratory, Rue Jaquet Droz 1, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2009-08-01

    Liquids have fascinated generations of scientists and engineers. Since ancient Greece, the perfect natural shape of liquids has been used to create optical systems. Nowadays, the natural shape of liquid is used in the fabrication of microlens arrays that rely on the melting of glass or photoresist to generate high quality lenses. However shrinkage normally associated to the liquid to solid phase transition will affect the initial shape and quality of the liquid structure. In this contribution, a novel fabrication technique that enables the encapsulation and replication of liquid templates without affecting their natural shape is presented. The SOLID (SOlid on LIquid Deposition) process allows for a transparent solid film to be deposited and grown onto a liquid template (droplet, film, line) in a way that the liquid shapes the overgrowing solid layer. The resulting configuration of the SOLID devices is chemically and mechanically stable and is the base of a huge variety of new micro-nano systems in the field of microfluidics, biomedical devices and micro-optics among others. The SOLID process enables in a one step process the encapsulation of liquid microlenses, fluidics channels, drug reservoir or any naturally driven liquid structure. The phenomenon and solid-liquid interface resulting from the SOLID process is new and still unexploited. The solid layer used for the SOLID process chosen in this paper is poly-para-xylylene called Parylene, a transparent biocompatible polymer with excellent mechanical and chemical properties. Moreover, as the solid layer is growing over a liquid template, atomically smooth surfaces channels can be obtained. The polymerization of Parylene does not exert stress and does not change the shape of the liquid; this latter aspect is particularly interesting for manufacturing naturally driven liquid structures. In this paper the authors explore the limits of this new method by testing different designs of SOLID encapsulated structures and

  19. Template-controlled mineralization: Determining film granularity and structure by surface functionality patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina J. Blumenstein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a promising first example towards controlling the properties of a self-assembling mineral film by means of the functionality and polarity of a substrate template. In the presented case, a zinc oxide film is deposited by chemical bath deposition on a nearly topography-free template structure composed of a pattern of two self-assembled monolayers with different chemical functionality. We demonstrate the template-modulated morphological properties of the growing film, as the surface functionality dictates the granularity of the growing film. This, in turn, is a key property influencing other film properties such as conductivity, piezoelectric activity and the mechanical properties. A very pronounced contrast is observed between areas with an underlying fluorinated, low energy template surface, showing a much more (almost two orders of magnitude coarse-grained film with a typical agglomerate size of around 75 nm. In contrast, amino-functionalized surface areas induce the growth of a very smooth, fine-grained surface with a roughness of around 1 nm. The observed influence of the template on the resulting clear contrast in morphology of the growing film could be explained by a contrast in surface adhesion energies and surface diffusion rates of the nanoparticles, which nucleate in solution and subsequently deposit on the functionalized substrate.

  20. Nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics key processes and characterization issues, and nanoscale effects

    CERN Document Server

    Alguero, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the key issues in processing and characterization of nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics, and provides a comprehensive description of their properties, with an emphasis in differentiating size effects of extrinsic ones like boundary or interface effects. Recently described nanoscale novel phenomena are also addressed. Organized into three parts it addresses key issues in processing (nanostructuring), characterization (of the nanostructured materials) and nanoscale effects. Taking full advantage of the synergies between nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics, it covers materials nanostructured at all levels, from ceramic technologies like ferroelectric nanopowders, bulk nanostructured ceramics and thick films, and magnetoelectric nanocomposites, to thin films, either polycrystalline layer heterostructures or epitaxial systems, and to nanoscale free standing objects with specific geometries, such as nanowires and tubes at different levels of development. The book is developed from t...

  1. Synthesis of mesoporous zeolite catalysts by in situ formation of carbon template over nickel nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Kegnæs, Marina; Hytoft, Glen

    2016-01-01

    oxide, a carbon-silica composite is obtained and exploited as a combined carbon template/silica source for zeolite synthesis. This approach has several advantages in comparison with conventional carbon templating methods, where relatively complicated preparative strategies involving multistep...... impregnation procedures and rather expensive chemicals are used. Removal of the carbon template by combustion results in zeolite single crystals with intracrystalline pore volumes between 0.28 and 0.48 cm3/g. The prepared zeolites are characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM and physisorption analysis. The isomerization...

  2. Attosecond Physics at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappina, Marcelo F; Perez-Hernandez, J; Landsman, Alexandra; Okell, William; Zherebtsov, Sergey; Förg, Benjamin; Schötz, Johannes; Seiffert, Lennart; Fennel, Thomas; Shaaran, Tahir; Zimmermann, Tomas; Chacón, Alexis; Guichard, Roland; Zair, Amelle; Tisch, John; Marangos, J; Witting, Tobias; Braun, Avi; Maier, Stefan; Roso, Luis; Krüger, Michael; Hommelhoff, Peter; Kling, Matthias; Krausz, Ferenc; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2017-01-06

    Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. For comparison, the revolution of an electron on a 1s orbital of a hydrogen atom is 152 as. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this report on progress we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metal- lic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as above-threshold ionization and high-order harmonic generation. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nano physics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the induced fields and the unique electron dynamics initiated

  3. Vortex pinning in superconductors laterally modulated by nanoscale self-assembled arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacken, J.; Vinckx, W.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, S.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Michotte, S.; Piraux, L.; Ye, X.

    2008-04-01

    Being the exponent of the so-called "bottom-up" approach, self-assembled structures are now-a-days attracting a lot of attention in the fields of science and technology. In this work, we show that nanoscale self-assembled arrays used as templates can provide periodic modulation in superconducting thin films by studying their vortex pinning properties. In this work advantage was made of the fact that self-organized assemblies of identical units such as colloidal crystals and anodic aluminum oxide provide extended periodic topographic surfaces. By directly growing Nb on top of these self-assembled arrays, the templating effect was exploited in order to achieve triangular and honeycomb arrays of pinning centers in thin superconducting films. We show experimentally that periodic matching is achieved in both systems at magnetic fields, well above those present in lithographically prepared pinning arrays (up to 1 T!). Furthermore, we demonstrate in the case of anodic aluminum oxide that the presence of porous antidots in Nb not only provides strongly increased critical currents but also conserves matching at temperatures well below the critical temperature. The studies conducted on these systems indicate that the method of template growth might be considered as a viable alternative for the incorporation of periodic pinning arrays in superconducting applications of today and the future.

  4. Carbon as a hard template for nano material catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kake Zhu; Junming Sun; He Zhang; Jun Liu; Yong Wang

    2012-01-01

    As one of the naturally abundant elements,carbon can present in different molecular structures (allotropes) and thus lead to various physical/chemical properties of carbon-based materials which have found wide applications in a variety of fields including electrochemistry,optical,adsorption and catalysis,etc.On the other hand,its different allotropes also endow carbon-based materials with various morphostructures,which have been recently explored to prepare oxides and zeolites/zeotypes with tailored structures.In this review,we mainly summarize the recent advances in using carbon materials as hard templates to synthesize structural materials.Specifically,we focus on the development in the synthetic strategies,such as endotemplating,exotemplating approaches and using carbon materials as chemical reagents for the synthesis of metal carbides or nitrides,with an emphasis laid on the control of morphostructure.Meanwhile,the applications of the obtained materials will be highlighted,especially,in the field of heterogeneous catalysis where enhanced performances have been achieved with the materials derived from carbon-templated methods.

  5. Nanoscale thermal imaging of dissipation in quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbertal, D.; Cuppens, J.; Shalom, M. Ben; Embon, L.; Shadmi, N.; Anahory, Y.; Naren, H. R.; Sarkar, J.; Uri, A.; Ronen, Y.; Myasoedov, Y.; Levitov, L. S.; Joselevich, E.; Geim, A. K.; Zeldov, E.

    2016-11-01

    Energy dissipation is a fundamental process governing the dynamics of physical, chemical and biological systems. It is also one of the main characteristics that distinguish quantum from classical phenomena. In particular, in condensed matter physics, scattering mechanisms, loss of quantum information or breakdown of topological protection are deeply rooted in the intricate details of how and where the dissipation occurs. Yet the microscopic behaviour of a system is usually not formulated in terms of dissipation because energy dissipation is not a readily measurable quantity on the micrometre scale. Although nanoscale thermometry has gained much recent interest, existing thermal imaging methods are not sensitive enough for the study of quantum systems and are also unsuitable for the low-temperature operation that is required. Here we report a nano-thermometer based on a superconducting quantum interference device with a diameter of less than 50 nanometres that resides at the apex of a sharp pipette: it provides scanning cryogenic thermal sensing that is four orders of magnitude more sensitive than previous devices—below 1 μK Hz-1/2. This non-contact, non-invasive thermometry allows thermal imaging of very low intensity, nanoscale energy dissipation down to the fundamental Landauer limit of 40 femtowatts for continuous readout of a single qubit at one gigahertz at 4.2 kelvin. These advances enable the observation of changes in dissipation due to single-electron charging of individual quantum dots in carbon nanotubes. They also reveal a dissipation mechanism attributable to resonant localized states in graphene encapsulated within hexagonal boron nitride, opening the door to direct thermal imaging of nanoscale dissipation processes in quantum matter.

  6. Nanoscale thermal imaging of dissipation in quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbertal, D; Cuppens, J; Shalom, M Ben; Embon, L; Shadmi, N; Anahory, Y; Naren, H R; Sarkar, J; Uri, A; Ronen, Y; Myasoedov, Y; Levitov, L S; Joselevich, E; Geim, A K; Zeldov, E

    2016-11-17

    Energy dissipation is a fundamental process governing the dynamics of physical, chemical and biological systems. It is also one of the main characteristics that distinguish quantum from classical phenomena. In particular, in condensed matter physics, scattering mechanisms, loss of quantum information or breakdown of topological protection are deeply rooted in the intricate details of how and where the dissipation occurs. Yet the microscopic behaviour of a system is usually not formulated in terms of dissipation because energy dissipation is not a readily measurable quantity on the micrometre scale. Although nanoscale thermometry has gained much recent interest, existing thermal imaging methods are not sensitive enough for the study of quantum systems and are also unsuitable for the low-temperature operation that is required. Here we report a nano-thermometer based on a superconducting quantum interference device with a diameter of less than 50 nanometres that resides at the apex of a sharp pipette: it provides scanning cryogenic thermal sensing that is four orders of magnitude more sensitive than previous devices-below 1 μK Hz(-1/2). This non-contact, non-invasive thermometry allows thermal imaging of very low intensity, nanoscale energy dissipation down to the fundamental Landauer limit of 40 femtowatts for continuous readout of a single qubit at one gigahertz at 4.2 kelvin. These advances enable the observation of changes in dissipation due to single-electron charging of individual quantum dots in carbon nanotubes. They also reveal a dissipation mechanism attributable to resonant localized states in graphene encapsulated within hexagonal boron nitride, opening the door to direct thermal imaging of nanoscale dissipation processes in quantum matter.

  7. Imprinted photonic crystal chemical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A.; Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Saalmink, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the use of Photonic Crystals as chemical sensors. These 2D nanostructured sensors were prepared by nano-imprint lithography during which a nanostructure is transferred from a nickel template into a responsive polymer, that is be specifically tuned to interact with the chemic

  8. Treatment of distillery wastewater by the nano-scale zero-valent iron and the supported nano-scale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homhoul, Phatkanok; Pengpanich, Sitthiphong; Hunsom, Mali

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of wastewater from the distillery industry was carried out by using nano-scale- and supported nano-scale zero-valent iron at a laboratory scale and ambient temperature. Effects of dilution, pH, mixing rate, zero-valent iron dosage, and amount of support for the zero-valent iron were investigated. All parameters had a significant effect on the removal efficiency of all investigated pollutants. Increasing the number of dilutions and the nano-scale zero-valent iron dosage led to the increase of removal efficiency of pollutants. Higher removal efficiency was achieved in an acidic initial pH of wastewater. The reduction of all pollutants was limited by the kinetics of the pollutant destruction/reduction by nano-scale zero-valent iron particles at a mixing rate greater than 170 rpm. At optimum condition, greater than 95, 94, and 64% of color, chemical oxygen demand, and biochemical oxygen demand were removed, respectively, within 6 hours. Additionally, the presence of a support had a significant effect on pollutant removal.

  9. Electrospun human keratin matrices as templates for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, Wan Ting; Lui, Yuan Siang; Ng, Kee Woei

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of fabricating human hair keratin matrices through electrospinning and to evaluate the potential of these matrices for tissue regeneration. Keratin was extracted from human hair using Na2S and blended with poly(ethylene oxide) in the weight ratio of 60:1 for electrospinning. Physical morphology and chemical properties of the matrices were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Cell viability and morphology of murine and human fibroblasts cultured on the matrices were evaluated through the Live/Dead(®) assay and scanning electron microscopy. Electrospun keratin matrices were successfully produced without affecting the chemical conformation of keratin. Fibroblasts cultured on keratin matrices showed healthy morphology and penetration into matrices at day 7. Electrospun human hair keratin matrices provide a bioinductive and structural environment for cell growth and are thus attractive as alternative templates for tissue regeneration.

  10. Metal-organic framework templated synthesis of Fe2O3/TiO2 nanocomposite for hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deKrafft, Kathryn E; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Wenbin

    2012-04-17

    A new metal-organic framework (MOF)-templated method has been developed for the synthesis of a metal oxide nanocomposite with interesting photophysical properties. Fe-containing nanoscale MOFs are coated with amorphous titania, then calcined to produce crystalline Fe(2)O(3)/TiO(2) composite nanoparticles. This material enables photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using visible light, which cannot be achieved by either Fe(2)O(3) or TiO(2) alone or a mixture of the two. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Nanoscale Bonding between Human Bone and Titanium Surfaces: Osseohybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Sik Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Until now, the chemical bonding between titanium and bone has been examined only through a few mechanical detachment tests. Therefore, in this study, a sandblasted and acid-etched titanium mini-implant was removed from a human patient after 2 months of placement in order to identify the chemical integration mechanism for nanoscale osseointegration of titanium implants. To prepare a transmission electron microscopy (TEM specimen, the natural state was preserved as much as possible by cryofixation and scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam (SEM-FIB milling without any chemical treatment. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and scanning TEM (STEM/electron energy loss spectroscopic analysis (EELS were used to investigate the chemical composition and structure at the interface between the titanium and bone tissue. HRTEM and EDS data showed evidence of crystalline hydroxyapatite and intermixing of bone with the oxide layer of the implant. The STEM/EELS experiment provided particularly interesting results: carbon existed in polysaccharides, calcium and phosphorus existed as tricalcium phosphate (TCP, and titanium existed as oxidized titanium. In addition, the oxygen energy loss near edge structures (ELNESs showed a possibility of the presence of CaTiO3. These STEM/EELS results can be explained by structures either with or without a chemical reaction layer. The possible existence of the osseohybridization area and the form of the carbon suggest that reconsideration of the standard definition of osseointegration is necessary.

  12. Simplification of Template-free Method to Prepare Polyaniline Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Introduction Conducting polymer nanostructures (e.g.nanotubes or nanofibers) have received considerable attention owing their unique properties and promising applications in technology and nano-devices[1]. Conducting polymer nanostructures can be generally synthesized through "hard" and "soft" template method.Usually an external hard template in a "hard-template" method is required and the post-treatment of removing template is rather tedious."Soft-template" method is advantageous of omitting external...

  13. Simultaneous topographical, electrical and optical microscopy of optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Zoladek-Lemanczyk, Alina; Guilbert, Anne A Y; Su, Weitao; Tuladhar, Sachetan M; Kirchartz, Thomas; Schroeder, Bob C; McCulloch, Iain; Nelson, Jenny; Roy, Debdulal; Castro, Fernando A

    2017-02-23

    Novel optoelectronic devices rely on complex nanomaterial systems where the nanoscale morphology and local chemical composition are critical to performance. However, the lack of analytical techniques that can directly probe these structure-property relationships at the nanoscale presents a major obstacle to device development. In this work, we present a novel method for non-destructive, simultaneous mapping of the morphology, chemical composition and photoelectrical properties with performance. For instance, the direct measurement of fullerene phase purity can distinguish between high purity aggregates that lead to poor performance and lower purity aggregates (fullerene intercalated with polymer) that result in strong photocurrent generation and collection. We show that the reliable determination of the structure-property relationship at the nanoscale can remove ambiguity from macroscopic device data and support the identification of the best routes for device optimisation. The multi-parameter measurement approach demonstrated herein is expected to play a significant role in guiding the rational design of nanomaterial-based optoelectronic devices, by opening a new realm of possibilities for advanced investigation via the combination of nanoscale optical spectroscopy with a whole range of scanning probe microscopy modes.

  14. Conversion of Radiology Reporting Templates to the MRRT Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Charles E; Genereaux, Brad; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2015-10-01

    In 2013, the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) Radiology workgroup developed the Management of Radiology Report Templates (MRRT) profile, which defines both the format of radiology reporting templates using an extension of Hypertext Markup Language version 5 (HTML5), and the transportation mechanism to query, retrieve, and store these templates. Of 200 English-language report templates published by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), initially encoded as text and in an XML schema language, 168 have been converted successfully into MRRT using a combination of automated processes and manual editing; conversion of the remaining 32 templates is in progress. The automated conversion process applied Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) scripts, an XML parsing engine, and a Java servlet. The templates were validated for proper HTML5 and MRRT syntax using web-based services. The MRRT templates allow radiologists to share best-practice templates across organizations and have been uploaded to the template library to supersede the prior XML-format templates. By using MRRT transactions and MRRT-format templates, radiologists will be able to directly import and apply templates from the RSNA Report Template Library in their own MRRT-compatible vendor systems. The availability of MRRT-format reporting templates will stimulate adoption of the MRRT standard and is expected to advance the sharing and use of templates to improve the quality of radiology reports.

  15. Fabrication of nanostructure via self-assembly of nanowires within the AAO template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brust Mathias

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe novel nanostructures are fabricated by the spatial chemical modification of nanowires within the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO template. To make the nanowires better dispersion in the aqueous solution, the copper is first deposited to fill the dendrite structure at the bottom of template. During the process of self-assembly, the dithiol compound was used as the connector between the nanowires and nanoparticles by a self-assembly method. The nanostructures of the nano cigars and structure which is containing particles junction are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. These kinds of novel nanostructure will be the building blocks for nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices.

  16. Thermochemical scanning probe lithography of protein gradients at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, E.; Carroll, K. M.; Lu, X.; Curtis, J. E.; Petti, D.; Bertacco, R.; Riedo, E.

    2016-08-01

    Patterning nanoscale protein gradients is crucial for studying a variety of cellular processes in vitro. Despite the recent development in nano-fabrication technology, combining nanometric resolution and fine control of protein concentrations is still an open challenge. Here, we demonstrate the use of thermochemical scanning probe lithography (tc-SPL) for defining micro- and nano-sized patterns with precisely controlled protein concentration. First, tc-SPL is performed by scanning a heatable atomic force microscopy tip on a polymeric substrate, for locally exposing reactive amino groups on the surface, then the substrate is functionalized with streptavidin and laminin proteins. We show, by fluorescence microscopy on the patterned gradients, that it is possible to precisely tune the concentration of the immobilized proteins by varying the patterning parameters during tc-SPL. This paves the way to the use of tc-SPL for defining protein gradients at the nanoscale, to be used as chemical cues e.g. for studying and regulating cellular processes in vitro.

  17. Plant virus directed fabrication of nanoscale materials and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, James N; Brown, Adam D; Zang, Faheng; Gnerlich, Markus; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Bottom-up self-assembly methods in which individual molecular components self-organize to form functional nanoscale patterns are of long-standing interest in the field of materials sciences. Such self-assembly processes are the hallmark of biology where complex macromolecules with defined functions assemble from smaller molecular components. In particular, plant virus-derived nanoparticles (PVNs) have drawn considerable attention for their unique self-assembly architectures and functionalities that can be harnessed to produce new materials for industrial and biomedical applications. In particular, PVNs provide simple systems to model and assemble nanoscale particles of uniform size and shape that can be modified through molecularly defined chemical and genetic alterations. Furthermore, PVNs bring the added potential to "farm" such bio-nanomaterials on an industrial scale, providing a renewable and environmentally sustainable means for the production of nano-materials. This review outlines the fabrication and application of several PVNs for a range of uses that include energy storage, catalysis, and threat detection.

  18. Biological responses to immobilized microscale and nanoscale surface topographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Shelby A; Kumar, Girish; Narayan, Roger J; Goering, Peter L

    2017-07-16

    Cellular responses are highly influenced by biochemical and biomechanical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Due to the impact of ECM architecture on cellular responses, significant research has been dedicated towards developing biomaterials that mimic the physiological environment for design of improved medical devices and tissue engineering scaffolds. Surface topographies with microscale and nanoscale features have demonstrated an effect on numerous cellular responses, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, gene expression, protein production, and differentiation; however, relationships between biological responses and surface topographies are difficult to establish due to differences in cell types and biomaterial surface properties. Therefore, it is important to optimize implant surface feature characteristics to elicit desirable biological responses for specific applications. The goal of this work was to review studies investigating the effects of microstructured and nanostructured biomaterials on in vitro biological responses through fabrication of microscale and nanoscale surface topographies, physico-chemical characterization of material surface properties, investigation of protein adsorption dynamics, and evaluation of cellular responses in specific biomedical applications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Automated Template Quantification for DNA Sequencing Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanetich, Kathryn M.; Yan, Wilson; Wunderlich, Kathleen M.; Weston, Jennifer; Walkup, Ward G.; Simeon, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The quantification of plasmid DNA by the PicoGreen dye binding assay has been automated, and the effect of quantification of user-submitted templates on DNA sequence quality in a core laboratory has been assessed. The protocol pipets, mixes and reads standards, blanks and up to 88 unknowns, generates a standard curve, and calculates template concentrations. For pUC19 replicates at five concentrations, coefficients of variance were 0.1, and percent errors were from 1% to 7% (n = 198). Standard curves with pUC19 DNA were nonlinear over the 1 to 1733 ng/μL concentration range required to assay the majority (98.7%) of user-submitted templates. Over 35,000 templates have been quantified using the protocol. For 1350 user-submitted plasmids, 87% deviated by ≥ 20% from the requested concentration (500 ng/μL). Based on data from 418 sequencing reactions, quantification of user-submitted templates was shown to significantly improve DNA sequence quality. The protocol is applicable to all types of double-stranded DNA, is unaffected by primer (1 pmol/μL), and is user modifiable. The protocol takes 30 min, saves 1 h of technical time, and costs approximately $0.20 per unknown. PMID:16461949

  20. Nanoscale thermometry using point contact thermocouples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Seid; Tan, Aaron; Chua, Yi Jie; Reddy, Pramod

    2010-07-14

    Probing temperature fields with nanometer resolution is critical to understanding nanoscale thermal transport as well as dissipation in nanoscale devices. Here, we demonstrate an atomic force microscope (AFM)-based technique capable of mapping temperature fields in metallic films with approximately 10 mK temperature resolution and thermocouples on a grid. The local temperature at each point contact is obtained by measuring the thermoelectric voltage of the platinum-gold point contact and relating it to the local temperature. These results demonstrate a direct measurement of the temperature field of a metallic surface without using specially fabricated scanning temperature-probes.

  1. Nanoscale Lasers Based on Carbon Peapods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shao-Long; SHEN Jian-Qi

    2006-01-01

    A scheme of nanoscale lasers based on the so-called carbon peapods is examined in detail.Since there is considerable cylindrical empty space in the middle of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT),it can serve as a laser resonant cavity that consists of two highly reflecting alignment "mirrors" separated by a distance.These mirrors refer to ordered arrays of C60 inside SWCNTs,which have photonic bandgap structures.Meanwhile,ideally single-mode lasers are supposed to be produced in the nanoscale resonant cavity.

  2. Atomic nanoscale technology in the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2011-01-01

    Developments at the nanoscale are leading to new possibilities and challenges for nuclear applications in areas ranging from medicine to international commerce to atomic power production/waste treatment. Progress in nanotech is helping the nuclear industry slash the cost of energy production. It also continues to improve application reliability and safety measures, which remain a critical concern, especially since the reactor disasters in Japan. Exploring the new wide-ranging landscape of nuclear function, Atomic Nanoscale Technology in the Nuclear Industry details the breakthroughs in nanosca

  3. Nanoscale chirality in metal and semiconductor nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jatish; Thomas, K George; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2016-10-18

    The field of chirality has recently seen a rejuvenation due to the observation of chirality in inorganic nanomaterials. The advancements in understanding the origin of nanoscale chirality and the potential applications of chiroptical nanomaterials in the areas of optics, catalysis and biosensing, among others, have opened up new avenues toward new concepts and design of novel materials. In this article, we review the concept of nanoscale chirality in metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots, then focus on recent experimental and theoretical advances in chiral metal nanoparticles and plasmonic chirality. Selected examples of potential applications and an outlook on the research on chiral nanomaterials are additionally provided.

  4. Chromosome congression explained by nanoscale electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, L John; Shain, Daniel H

    2014-02-24

    Nanoscale electrostatic microtubule disassembly forces between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charges on plus ends of microtubules have been implicated in poleward chromosome motions and may also contribute to antipoleward chromosome movements. We propose that chromosome congression can be understood in terms of antipoleward nanoscale electrostatic microtubule assembly forces between negatively charged microtubule plus ends and like-charged chromosome arms, acting in conjunction with poleward microtubule disassembly forces. Several other aspects of post-attachment prometaphase chromosome motions, as well as metaphase oscillations, are consistently explained within this framework.

  5. Functionalising surfaces at the nanoscale using plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R

    2009-01-01

    Plasma technology offers a highly effective toolbox for nanoscale surface engineering of materials. The potential variety of nanoscale features and new properties that can be achieved are reviewed here.

  6. Effect of Ag Templates on the Formation of Au-Ag Hollow/Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shih-Yun; Song, Jenn-Ming; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Au-Ag alloy nanostructures with various shapes were synthesized using a successive reduction method in this study. By means of galvanic replacement, twined Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and single-crystalline Ag nanowires (NWs) were adopted as templates, respectively, and alloyed with the same amount of Au(+) ions. High angle annular dark field-scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images observed from different rotation angles confirm that Ag NPs turned into AuAg alloy rings with an Au/Ag ratio of 1. The shifts of surface plasmon resonance and chemical composition reveal the evolution of the alloy ring formation. On the other hand, single-crystalline Ag NWs became Ag@AuAg core-shell wires instead of hollow nanostructure through a process of galvanic replacement. It is proposed that in addition to the ratio of Ag templates and Au ion additives, the twin boundaries of the Ag templates were the dominating factor causing hollow alloy nanostructures.

  7. Improvement of sub-20nm pattern quality with dose modulation technique for NIL template production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagawa, Keisuke; Ugajin, Kunihiro; Suenaga, Machiko; Kanamitsu, Shingo; Motokawa, Takeharu; Hagihara, Kazuki; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Saito, Masato; Ito, Masamitsu

    2016-04-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technology is in the spotlight as a next-generation semiconductor manufacturing technique for integrated circuits at 22 nm and beyond. NIL is the unmagnified lithography technique using template which is replicated from master templates. On the other hand, master templates are currently fabricated by electron-beam (EB) lithography[1]. In near future, finer patterns less than 15nm will be required on master template and EB data volume increases exponentially. So, we confront with a difficult challenge. A higher resolution EB mask writer and a high performance fabrication process will be required. In our previous study, we investigated a potential of photomask fabrication process for finer patterning and achieved 15.5nm line and space (L/S) pattern on template by using VSB (Variable Shaped Beam) type EB mask writer and chemically amplified resist. In contrast, we found that a contrast loss by backscattering decreases the performance of finer patterning. For semiconductor devices manufacturing, we must fabricate complicated patterns which includes high and low density simultaneously except for consecutive L/S pattern. Then it's quite important to develop a technique to make various size or coverage patterns all at once. In this study, a small feature pattern was experimentally formed on master template with dose modulation technique. This technique makes it possible to apply the appropriate exposure dose for each pattern size. As a result, we succeed to improve the performance of finer patterning in bright field area. These results show that the performance of current EB lithography process have a potential to fabricate NIL template.

  8. Polymer templated nickel cobaltate for energy storage★

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albohani Shaymaa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to take advantage of the increasing sophistication of technology for harnessing renewable energy resources, serious attention must be paid to how to store and re-access this energy. Electrochemical storage, in the guise of batteries, supercapacitors and pseudocapacitors, has attracted much attention as a viable option for enhanced energy storage applications. But in order for these technologies to be implemented successfully we need to find materials that perform better and are relatively easy to synthesise. Bimetallic transition metal oxides are materials that are readily synthesised and may be multifunctional, i.e. have a role at the electrochemical atomic level as well as the device level. In order for these materials to work efficiently in new generation systems based on sodium and lithium they also need to be mesoporous. This can be achieved by trying to find synthetic techniques that produce specific, highly regulated nanostructures or by adding a ‘templating’ agent during the bulk synthesis step. We have investigated the simple hydrothermal preparation of a number of nickel cobaltate (NiCo2O4 materials using polymer templates, eggshell membrane (ESM and poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA, as potential electrode materials for supercapacitors. The ESM was expected to act as a fibrous, random polymeric template while the PMMA should produce a much more ordered material. Electrochemical testing showed that the different templates have led to changes in material morphology and these have resulted in a difference in electrochemical properties. Templated materials increased specific capacitance compared to non-templated and the choice of template could influence the capacitance by as much as 30%.

  9. Nanoscale sensors for assuring the safety of food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Duncan, Timothy V

    2017-04-01

    As far as chemical analysis is concerned, foods are among the most difficult matrices to work with because they are complex, heterogeneous substances with a high degree of variety. Assaying foods for trace levels of chemical and microbiological substances is a challenge that often requires the application of time-consuming, expensive analytical instrumentation in dedicated facilities populated by highly trained personnel. Therefore there is a continued demand for new analytical technologies that can detect small concentrations of chemicals or microbes in a more cost- and time-effective manner, preferably in the field, on the production line, and/or non-destructively, with little to no sample pre-treatment, and possibly by individuals with scant scientific training. In the last decade, nanotechnology - a branch of science that takes advantage of the unique chemical and physical properties of matter on the nanoscale - has created new opportunities for both qualitative and quantitative detection of vapors/gasses, small molecules, biopolymers, and even living microbes in a fraction of the time and expense of traditional analytical techniques. This article offers a focused review of recent progress in nanotechnology-enabled biosensing as applied to foods and related matrices, paying particular attention to trends in the field, recent breakthroughs, and current areas of need. Special focus is paid to two primary categories of nanobiosensors - optical and electrochemical - and the discussion includes a comparison of their various strengths and weaknesses as they pertain ensuring the safety of the food supply.

  10. Microwave assisted template synthesis of silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K J Sreeram; M Nidhin; B U Nair

    2008-12-01

    Easier, less time consuming, green processes, which yield silver nanoparticles of uniform size, shape and morphology are of interest. Various methods for synthesis, such as conventional temperature assisted process, controlled reaction at elevated temperatures, and microwave assisted process have been evaluated for the kind of silver nanoparticles synthesized. Starch has been employed as a template and reducing agent. Electron microscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance have been employed to characterize the silver nanoparticles synthesized. Compared to conventional methods, microwave assisted synthesis was faster and provided particles with an average particle size of 12 nm. Further, the starch functions as template, preventing the aggregation of silver nanoparticles.

  11. Templates for Deposition of Microscopic Pointed Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugel, Diane E.

    2008-01-01

    Templates for fabricating sharply pointed microscopic peaks arranged in nearly regular planar arrays can be fabricated by a relatively inexpensive technique that has recently been demonstrated. Depending on the intended application, a semiconducting, insulating, or metallic film could be deposited on such a template by sputtering, thermal evaporation, pulsed laser deposition, or any other suitable conventional deposition technique. Pointed structures fabricated by use of these techniques may prove useful as photocathodes or field emitters in plasma television screens. Selected peaks could be removed from such structures and used individually as scanning tips in atomic force microscopy or mechanical surface profiling.

  12. Preparation of porous lanthanum phosphate with templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoda, Hiroaki, E-mail: onoda@kpu.ac.jp [Department of Informatics and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, 1-5, Shimogamo Nakaragi-cyo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan); Ishima, Yuya [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Takenaka, Atsushi [Department of Materials Science, Yonago National College of Technology, 4448, Hikona-cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8502 (Japan); Tanaka, Isao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-08-05

    Malonic acid, propionic acid, glycine, n-butylamine, and urea were added to the preparation of lanthanum phosphate from lanthanum nitrate and phosphoric acid solutions. All additives were taken into lanthanum phosphate particles. The additives that have a basic site were easy to contain in precipitates. The addition of templates improved the specific surface area of lanthanum phosphate. The amount of pore, with radius smaller than 4 nm, increased with the addition of templates. The remained additives had influence on the acidic properties of lanthanum phosphate.

  13. Vertex finding with deformable templates at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanov, N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Khanov, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1997-04-11

    We present a novel vertex finding technique. The task is formulated as a discrete-continuous optimisation problem in a way similar to the deformable templates approach for the track finding. Unlike the track finding problem, ``elastic hedgehogs`` rather than elastic arms are used as deformable templates. They are initialised by a set of procedures which provide zero level approximation for vertex positions and track parameters at the vertex point. The algorithm was evaluated using the simulated events for the LHC CMS detector and demonstrated good performance. (orig.).

  14. Electrodeposition of gold templated by patterned thiol monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She, Zhe [EaStCHEM School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Di Falco, Andrea [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Hähner, Georg [EaStCHEM School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Buck, Manfred, E-mail: mb45@st-andrews.ac.uk [EaStCHEM School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, KY16 9ST (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • First demonstration of electrodeposition/lift-off of gold using thiol monolayers. • Microelectrode structures with large length to width ratio were generated. • Performance of two different patterning techniques was investigated. • Conditions for achieving good contrast in the electrodeposition were established. - Abstract: The electrochemical deposition of Au onto Au substrates modified by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was studied by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Patterned SAMs exhibiting electrochemical contrast were prepared by two different methods. One used microcontact printing (μCP) to generate a binary SAM of ω-(4′-methyl-biphenyl-4-yl)-propane thiol (CH{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}-SH, MBP3) and octadecane thiol (CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 17}SH, ODT). Templated by the SAM, a gold microelectrode structure was electrodeposited featuring a line 15 μm wide and 3 mm long. After transfer to an epoxy substrate the structure proved to be electrically conductive across the full length. The other patterning method applied electron beam lithography (EBL) where electrochemical contrast was achieved by crosslinking molecules in a single component SAM of MBP3. An electron dose above 250 mC/cm{sup 2} results in a high deposition contrast. The choice of parameters for the deposition/lift-off process is found to be more critical for Au compared to Cu studied previously. The origin of the differences and implications for nanoscale patterning are discussed.

  15. Functionalized Stress Component onto Bio-template as a Pathway of Cytocompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Meysam; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2016-10-01

    This in-vitro study introduces residual stress as a third dimension of cell stimulus to modulate the interaction between cells and bio-template, without the addition of either chemical or physical stimuli onto the bio-template surface. Ultrashort Pulsed Laser (USPL) irradiation of silicon-based bio-template causes recrystallization of silicon, which mismatches the original crystal orientation of the virgin silicon. Consequently, subsurface Induced Residual Stress (IRS) is generated. The IRS components demonstrated a strong cytocompatibility, whereas the peripheral of IRS, which is the interface between the IRS component and the virgin silicon surface, a significant directional cell alignment was observed. Fibroblast cells shown to be more sensitive to the stress component than Hela cancer cells. It revealed that cytocompatibility in terms of cell migration and directional cell alignment is directly proportional to the level of the IRS component. Higher stress level results in more cell alignment and border migration width. There is a stress threshold below which the stress component completely loses the functionality. These results pointed to a functionalized bio-template with tunable cytocompatibility. This study may lead to a new tool for the designing and engineering of bio-template.

  16. High resolution hole patterning with EB lithography for NIL template production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Mana; Yagawa, Keisuke; Motokawa, Takeharu; Hagihara, Kazuki; Suenaga, Machiko; Saito, Masato; Kanamitsu, Shingo; Itoh, Masamitsu

    2016-05-01

    Nano imprint lithography (NIL) is one to one lithography and contact transfer technique using template. Therefore, the lithography performance depends greatly on the quality of the template pattern. In this study, we investigated the resolution and the defect level for hole patterning using chemical amplified resists (CAR) and VSB type EB writer, EBM9000. To form smaller pattern with high quality, high resolution resist process and high sensitivity etching process are needed. After these elements were optimized, we succeeded to form 24 nm dense hole pattern on template. In general, it is difficult to suppress the defect density in a large area because of fogging effect and process loading and so forth. However, from the view point of defect quality, 26 nm hole pattern is achieved to form with practical level in a large area. Therefore, we indicate the capability of forming 26 nm hole master template which will be required in 2019 from ITRS2013. These results show that this process is possible to obtain less than 30 nm hole pattern without enormous writing time. As future work, we will imprint master to replica template and check the printability.

  17. Thermoresponsive composite hydrogels with aligned macroporous structure by ice-templated assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hao; Polini, Alessandro; Delattre, Benjamin; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2013-10-26

    Natural tissues, such as bone, tendon, and muscle, have well defined hierarchical structures, which are crucial for their biological and mechanical functions. However, mimicking these structural features still remains a great challenge. In this study, we use ice-templated assembly and UV-initiated cryo-polymerization to fabricate a novel kind of composite hydrogel which have both aligned macroporous structure at micrometer scale and a nacre-like layered structure at nanoscale. Such hydrogels are macroporous, thermoresponsive, and exhibit excellent mechanical performance (tough and high stretchable), attractive properties that are of significant impact on the wide applications of composite hydrogels, especially as tissue-engineering scaffolds. The fabrication method in this study including freeze-casting and cryo-polymerization can also be applied to other materials, which makes it promising for designing and developing smart and multifunctional composite hydrogels with hierar chical structures.

  18. Nanoscale surface modification for enhanced biosensing a journey toward better glucose monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guigen

    2015-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive overview of electrochemical-based biosensors and their crucial components. Practical examples are given throughout the text to illustrate how the performance of electrochemical-based biosensors can be improved by nanoscale surface modification and how an optimal design can be achieved. All essential aspects of biosensors are considered, including electrode functionalization, efficiency of the mass transport of reactive species, and long term durability and functionality of the sensor. This book also: ·       Explains how the performance of an electrochemical-based biosensor can be improved by nanoscale surface modification ·       Gives readers the tools to evaluate and improve the performance of a biosensor with a multidisciplinary approach that considers electrical, electrostatic, electrochemical, chemical, and biochemical events ·       Links the performance of a sensor to the various governing physical and chemical principles so readers can fully unders...

  19. Nanoscale thermal imaging of dissipation in quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Halbertal, Dorri; Shalom, Moshe Ben; Embon, Lior; Shadmi, Nitzan; Anahory, Yonathan; Naren, HR; Sarkar, Jayanta; Uri, Aviram; Ronen, Yuval; Myasoedov, Yury; Levitov, Leonid; Joselevich, Ernesto; Geim, Andre Konstantin; Zeldov, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Energy dissipation is a fundamental process governing the dynamics of physical, chemical, and biological systems. It is also one of the main characteristics distinguishing quantum and classical phenomena. In condensed matter physics, in particular, scattering mechanisms, loss of quantum information, or breakdown of topological protection are deeply rooted in the intricate details of how and where the dissipation occurs. Despite its vital importance the microscopic behavior of a system is usually not formulated in terms of dissipation because the latter is not a readily measureable quantity on the microscale. Although nanoscale thermometry is gaining much recent interest, the existing thermal imaging methods lack the necessary sensitivity and are unsuitable for low temperature operation required for study of quantum systems. Here we report a superconducting quantum interference nano-thermometer device with sub 50 nm diameter that resides at the apex of a sharp pipette and provides scanning cryogenic thermal se...

  20. Nanoscale elemental quantification in heterostructured SiGe nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourani, W; Periwal, P; Bassani, F; Baron, T; Patriarche, G; Martinez, E

    2015-05-14

    The nanoscale chemical characterization of axial heterostructured Si1-xGex nanowires (NWs) has been performed using scanning Auger microscopy (SAM) through local spectroscopy, line-scan and depth profile measurements. Local Auger profiles are realized with sufficient lateral resolution to resolve individual nanowires. Axial and radial composition heterogeneities are highlighted. Our results confirm the phenomenon of Ge radial growth forming a Ge shell around the nanowire. Moreover, quantification is performed after verifying the absence of preferential sputtering of Si or Ge on a bulk SiGe sample. Hence, reliable results are obtained for heterostructured NW diameters higher than 100 nm. However, for smaller sizes, we have noticed that the sensitivity factors evaluated from bulk samples cannot be used because of edge effects occurring for highly topographical features and a modified contribution of backscattered electrons.

  1. Controlled propulsion and separation of helical particles at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Alcanzare, Maria Michiko T; Ollila, Santtu T T; Karttunen, Mikko; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the motion of nano and microscale objects in a fluid environment is a key factor in designing optimized tiny machines that perform mechanical tasks such as transport of drugs or genetic material in cells, fluid mixing to accelerate chemical reactions, and cargo transport in microfluidic chips. Directed motion is made possible by the coupled translational and rotational motion of asymmetric particles. A current challenge in achieving directed and controlled motion at the nanoscale lies in overcoming random Brownian motion due to thermal fluctuations in the fluid. We demonstrate that controlled propulsion of nanohelices in an aqueous environment is possible using full-scale hydrodynamic simulations. We optimize the propulsion velocity and the efficiency of externally driven nanohelices. We quantify the importance of the thermal effects on the directed motion by calculating the P\\'eclet number for various shapes, number of turns and pitch lengths of the helices. Consistent with the experimental micro...

  2. Nanoscale temperature sensing using the Seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F. L.; Flipse, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the effect of Joule heating on the electron temperature in metallic nanoscale devices and compare the results with a diffusive 3D finite element model. The temperature is probed using four thermocouples located at different distances from the heater. A good quantitative agree

  3. Status and perspectives of nanoscale device modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macucci, M.; Lannaccone, G.; Greer, J.;

    2001-01-01

    and the future perspectives of nanoscale device modelling. The outcome of such a discussion is summarized in the present paper, outlining the major challenges for the future, such as the integration of nonequilibrium phenomena and of molecular scale properties. We believe that modelling has a growing importance...

  4. Benchtop Nanoscale Patterning Using Soft Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenakshi, Viswanathan; Babayan, Yelizaveta; Odom, Teri W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines several benchtop nanoscale patterning experiments that can be incorporated into undergraduate laboratories or advanced high school chemistry curricula. The experiments, supplemented by an online video lab manual, are based on soft lithographic techniques such as replica molding, micro-molding in capillaries, and micro-contact…

  5. Anomalous freezing behavior of nanoscale liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangler, E. J.; Kumar, P. B. S.; Laradji, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the finite size of one-component liposomes on their phase behavior is investigated via simulations of an implicit-solvent model of self-assembled lipid bilayers. We found that the high curvature of nanoscale liposomes has a significant effect on their freezing behavior. While...

  6. Selective nanoscale growth of lattice mismatched materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Chang; Brueck, Steven R. J.

    2017-06-20

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods of forming high-quality semiconductor devices using lattice-mismatched materials. In one embodiment, a composite film including one or more substantially-single-particle-thick nanoparticle layers can be deposited over a substrate as a nanoscale selective growth mask for epitaxially growing lattice-mismatched materials over the substrate.

  7. Nanoscale temperature sensing using the Seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F. L.; Flipse, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the effect of Joule heating on the electron temperature in metallic nanoscale devices and compare the results with a diffusive 3D finite element model. The temperature is probed using four thermocouples located at different distances from the heater. A good quantitative

  8. Direct temperature mapping of nanoscale plasmonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2014-02-12

    Side by side with the great advantages of plasmonics in nanoscale light confinement, the inevitable ohmic loss results in significant joule heating in plasmonic devices. Therefore, understanding optical-induced heat generation and heat transport in integrated on-chip plasmonic devices is of major importance. Specifically, there is a need for in situ visualization of electromagnetic induced thermal energy distribution with high spatial resolution. This paper studies the heat distribution in silicon plasmonic nanotips. Light is coupled to the plasmonic nanotips from a silicon nanowaveguide that is integrated with the tip on chip. Heat is generated by light absorption in the metal surrounding the silicon nanotip. The steady-state thermal distribution is studied numerically and measured experimentally using the approach of scanning thermal microscopy. It is shown that following the nanoscale heat generation by a 10 mW light source within a silicon photonic waveguide the temperature in the region of the nanotip is increased by ∼ 15 °C compared with the ambient temperature. Furthermore, we also perform a numerical study of the dynamics of the heat transport. Given the nanoscale dimensions of the structure, significant heating is expected to occur within the time frame of picoseconds. The capability of measuring temperature distribution of plasmonic structures at the nanoscale is shown to be a powerful tool and may be used in future applications related to thermal plasmonic applications such as control heating of liquids, thermal photovoltaic, nanochemistry, medicine, heat-assisted magnetic memories, and nanolithography.

  9. Fats, Oils, & Colors of a Nanoscale Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisensky, George C.; Horoszewski, Dana; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Zenner, Greta M.; Crone, Wendy C .

    2006-01-01

    Phase changes and intermolecular forces are important physical science concepts but are not always easy to present in an active learning format. This article presents several interactive activities in which students plot the melting points of some fatty acids and explore the effect that the nanoscale size and shape of molecules have on the…

  10. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I. [National Metrology Laboratory SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), Lot PT 4803, Bandar Baru Salak Tinggi, 43900 Sepang (Malaysia)

    2012-06-29

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  11. Powdered Hexagonal Boron Nitride Reducing Nanoscale Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhartishvili, L.; Matcharashvili, T.; Esiava, R.; Tsagareishvili, O.; Gabunia, D.; Margiev, B.; Gachechiladze, A.

    2013-05-01

    A morphology model is suggested for nano-powdered hexagonal boron nitride that can serve as an effective solid additive to liquid lubricants. It allows to estimate the specific surface, that is a hard-to-measure parameter, based on average size of powder particles. The model can be used also to control nanoscale wear processes.

  12. Simultaneous topographical, electrical and optical microscopy of optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Naresh

    2017-01-12

    Novel optoelectronic devices rely on complex nanomaterial systems where the nanoscale morphology and local chemical composition are critical to performance. However, the lack of analytical techniques that can directly probe these structure-property relationships at the nanoscale presents a major obstacle to device development. In this work, we present a novel method for non-destructive, simultaneous mapping of the morphology, chemical composition and photoelectrical properties with <20 nm spatial resolution by combining plasmonic optical signal enhancement with electrical-mode scanning probe microscopy. We demonstrate that this combined approach offers subsurface sensitivity that can be exploited to provide molecular information with a nanoscale resolution in all three spatial dimensions. By applying the technique to an organic solar cell device, we show that the inferred surface and subsurface composition distribution correlates strongly with the local photocurrent generation and explains macroscopic device performance. For instance, the direct measurement of fullerene phase purity can distinguish between high purity aggregates that lead to poor performance and lower purity aggregates (fullerene intercalated with polymer) that result in strong photocurrent generation and collection. We show that the reliable determination of the structure-property relationship at the nanoscale can remove ambiguity from macroscopic device data and support the identification of the best routes for device optimisation. The multi-parameter measurement approach demonstrated herein is expected to play a significant role in guiding the rational design of nanomaterial-based optoelectronic devices, by opening a new realm of possibilities for advanced investigation via the combination of nanoscale optical spectroscopy with a whole range of scanning probe microscopy modes.

  13. Bio-inspired routes for synthesizing efficient nanoscale platinum electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jennifer N. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Wang, Joseph [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-08-31

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to use fundamental advances in bionanotechnology to design powerful platinum nanocrystal electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. The new economically-viable, environmentally-friendly, bottom-up biochemical synthetic strategy will produce platinum nanocrystals with tailored size, shape and crystal orientation, hence leading to a maximum electrochemical reactivity. There are five specific aims to the proposed bio-inspired strategy for synthesizing efficient electrocatalytic platinum nanocrystals: (1) isolate peptides that both selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum and promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies, (2) pattern nanoscale 2-dimensional arrays of platinum nucleating peptides from DNA scaffolds, (3) investigate the combined use of substrate patterned peptides and soluble peptides on nanocrystal morphology and growth (4) synthesize platinum crystals on planar and large-area carbon electrode supports, and (5) perform detailed characterization of the electrocatalytic behavior as a function of catalyst size, shape and morphology. Project Description and Impact: This bio-inspired collaborative research effort will address key challenges in designing powerful electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications by employing nucleic acid scaffolds in combination with peptides to perform specific, environmentally-friendly, simultaneous bottom-up biochemical synthesis and patterned assembly of highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts. Bulk synthesis of nanoparticles usually produces a range of sizes, accessible catalytic sites, crystal morphologies, and orientations, all of which lead to inconsistent catalytic activities. In contrast, biological systems routinely demonstrate exquisite control over inorganic syntheses at neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressures. Because the orientation and arrangement of the templating biomolecules can be precisely

  14. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. II - Selective adsorption of mononucleotides on adsorbed polynucleotide templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the specific interaction step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The experimental system consisted of gypsum as the mineral to which an oligonucleotide template attaches (Poly-C or Poly-U) and (5-prime)-AMP, (5-prime)-GMP, (5-prime)-CMP and (5-prime)-UMP as the interacting biomonomers. When Poly-C or Poly-U were used as adsorbed templates, (5-prime)-GMP and (5-prime)-AMP, respectively, were observed to be the most strongly adsorbed species.

  15. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. II - Selective adsorption of mononucleotides on adsorbed polynucleotide templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the specific interaction step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The experimental system consisted of gypsum as the mineral to which an oligonucleotide template attaches (Poly-C or Poly-U) and (5-prime)-AMP, (5-prime)-GMP, (5-prime)-CMP and (5-prime)-UMP as the interacting biomonomers. When Poly-C or Poly-U were used as adsorbed templates, (5-prime)-GMP and (5-prime)-AMP, respectively, were observed to be the most strongly adsorbed species.

  16. Liquid Spreading under Nanoscale Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checco, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy in the noncontact regime is used to study the morphology of a nonvolatile liquid (squalane) as it spreads along wettable nanostripes embedded in a nonwettable surface. Results show that the liquid profile depends on the amount of lateral confinement imposed by the nanostripes, and it is truncated at the microscopic contact line in good qualitative agreement with classical mesoscale hydrodynamics. However, the width of the contact line is found to be significantly larger than expected theoretically. This behavior may originate from small chemical inhomogeneity of the patterned stripes as well as from thermal fluctuations of the contact line.

  17. The use of arrayed nano-dimensional template structures for controlled growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chih-Yi

    The objective of this research is to develop a fabrication procedure for producing nanowires and nanoribbons in arrays and circuits without the need for any post-synthesis pick-and-place processing. A general procedure for the fabrication of nano-dimensional channels and their use as templates for the formation of nanomaterial arrays is presented in this thesis. The approach developed uses nanodimensional channels as permanent templates for the formation of nanomaterial arrays with precise dimensional, positional, and orientational control as well as with built-in electrical access, when appropriate. The procedure is general, allowing the synthesis of different materials inside the nanochannels, and opens the door to "grow-in-place" manufacturing. Two versions of nanochannels for the nanomaterial growth were fabricated, and different nanomaterials grown in the nanochannels were demonstrated. The first version of the template is a nanochannel without the built-in electrodes. The nanochannel template can be completely open and allows nanowire growth, alignment, precise positioning, and geometrical confinement. In the case of polymers this template approach allows different kinds of chain-growth polymerization, such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by radical polymerization, polythiophene (PT) by photopolymerization. It was also shown that polymer nanofilaments can even be released without breaking. The oxygen plasma etching and atomic force microscope tip cutting were used to verify the presence of polymer material. We also demonstrated the carbon nanofiber growth in this first version of the nanochannels using a catalyst metal in the middle in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Carbon nanofibers can grow inside and even grow out of the nanochannels, and the dimension, location and orientation of carbon nanofibers followed the pre-designed nanochannels which establish that the nanochannel is also an effective growth template for carbon nanofibers. Fully

  18. Controlling monomer-sequence using supramolecular templates

    OpenAIRE

    ten Brummelhuis, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The transcription and translation of information contained in nucleic acids that has been perfected by nature serves as inspiration for chemists to devise strategies for the creation of polymers with welldefined monomer sequences. In this review the various approaches in which templates (either biopolymers or synthetic ones) are used to influence the monomer-sequence are discussed.

  19. A lightweight approach for biometric template protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Assam, Hisham; Sellahewa, Harin; Jassim, Sabah

    2009-05-01

    Privacy and security are vital concerns for practical biometric systems. The concept of cancelable or revocable biometrics has been proposed as a solution for biometric template security. Revocable biometric means that biometric templates are no longer fixed over time and could be revoked in the same way as lost or stolen credit cards are. In this paper, we describe a novel and an efficient approach to biometric template protection that meets the revocability property. This scheme can be incorporated into any biometric verification scheme while maintaining, if not improving, the accuracy of the original biometric system. However, we shall demonstrate the result of applying such transforms on face biometric templates and compare the efficiency of our approach with that of the well-known random projection techniques. We shall also present the results of experimental work on recognition accuracy before and after applying the proposed transform on feature vectors that are generated by wavelet transforms. These results are based on experiments conducted on a number of well-known face image databases, e.g. Yale and ORL databases.

  20. Effect of nanoscale particles incorporation on microhardness of polymers for oral prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Zuccolotti, Bruna Carolina Rossatti; Moreno, Amalia; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; Paulini, Marcela Borghi; Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the incorporation of pigments on surface hardness of four acrylic resins subjected to thermocycling and analyze their elemental composition using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Materials and Methods: Twenty-one discs of each resin were fabricated, whereas seven had no additive, seven had 3% of nanoscale pigments and last seven had 10% of them. The percentage was obtained by measuring the total weight of each resin disc. Besides, seven discs composed by only nanoscale pigments were also fabricated, totalizing 91 discs. The pigment was weighed by using an analytical balance (BEL Analytical Equipment, SP, Brazil). The surface hardness was measured through a hardness tester machine before and after thermocycling (5–55°C, for 2000 cycles). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). The chemical composition of the discs composed only by nanoscale pigments was analyzed with EDS test. Results: Hardness of all resins decreased after thermocycling. The lowest values were observed on the discs with 3% of nanoscale pigments and discs fabricated only with them. EDS showed the presence of titanium dioxide. Conclusion: Discs with 7% of pigments (after thermocycling) showed higher hardness values. PMID:27630492

  1. Nanoscale Surface Modifications of Medical Implants for Cartilage Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, MF; Szarko, M; Seifailan, A; Butler, PE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Natural cartilage regeneration is limited after trauma or degenerative processes. Due to the clinical challenge of reconstruction of articular cartilage, research into developing biomaterials to support cartilage regeneration have evolved. The structural architecture of composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is vital in guiding cell adhesion, migration and formation of cartilage. Current technologies have tried to mimic the cell’s nanoscale microenvironment to improve implants to improve cartilage tissue repair. Methods: This review evaluates nanoscale techniques used to modify the implant surface for cartilage regeneration. Results: The surface of biomaterial is a vital parameter to guide cell adhesion and consequently allow for the formation of ECM and allow for tissue repair. By providing nanosized cues on the surface in the form of a nanotopography or nanosized molecules, allows for better control of cell behaviour and regeneration of cartilage. Chemical, physical and lithography techniques have all been explored for modifying the nanoscale surface of implants to promote chondrocyte adhesion and ECM formation. Conclusion: Future studies are needed to further establish the optimal nanoscale modification of implants for cartilage tissue regeneration. PMID:28217208

  2. Mapping nanoscale thermal transfer in-liquid environment-immersion scanning thermal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovee, Peter D; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2013-11-22

    Nanoscale heat transport is of increasing importance as it often defines performance of modern processors and thermoelectric nanomaterials, and affects functioning of chemical sensors and biosensors. Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is the leading tool for nanoscale mapping of thermal properties, but it is often negatively affected by unstable tip-surface thermal contacts. While operating SThM in-liquid environment may allow unimpeded thermal contact and open new application areas, it has so far been regarded as impossible due to increased heat dissipation into the liquid, and the perceived reduced spatial thermal resolution. Nevertheless, in this paper we show that such liquid immersion SThM (iSThM) is fully feasible and, while its thermal sensitivity and spatial resolution is somewhat below that of in-air SThM, it has sufficient thermal contrast to detect thermal conductivity variations in few tens of nm thick graphite nanoflake and metal-polymer nanostructured interconnects. Our results confirm that thermal sensing in iSThM can provide nanoscale resolution on the order of 30 nm, that, coupled with the absence of tip snap-in due to the elimination of capillary forces, opens the possibility for nanoscale thermal mapping in liquids, including thermal phenomena in energy storage devices, catalysts and biosystems.

  3. Translation of rod-like template sequences into homochiral assemblies of stacked helical oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Quan; Wang, Xiang; Kauffmann, Brice; Rosu, Frédéric; Ferrand, Yann; Huc, Ivan

    2017-05-01

    At the molecular level, translation refers to the production of a new entity according to a template that has a different chemical composition. In this way, chemical information may be translated from one molecule to another. The process is useful to synthesize structures and thus functions that might be difficult to create otherwise, and it reaches exquisite levels of efficiency in biological systems, as illustrated by protein expression from mRNA templates or by the assembly of the tobacco mosaic virus capsid protein according to the length of its RNA. In synthetic systems, examples of template-directed syntheses are numerous, but general and versatile schemes in which a non-natural sequence actually encodes the information necessary to produce a different sequence are few and far from being optimized. Here we show a high-fidelity enzyme-free translation of long rod-like alkylcarbamate oligomers into well-defined sequences of stacked helical aromatic oligoamides. The features present in the rods, which include the number and distance between carbamate functions and stereogenic centres, template the self-assembly of complementary stacks of helices that each have a defined right (P) or left (M) handedness, length and single or double helicity. This process enables the production of very large (>20 kDa) abiotic artificial folded architectures (foldamers) that may, for example, serve as scaffolds to organize appended functional features at positions in space defined with atomic precision across nanometric distances.

  4. Emergency department documentation templates: variability in template selection and association with physical examination and test ordering in dizziness presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meurer William J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical documentation systems, such as templates, have been associated with process utilization. The T-System emergency department (ED templates are widely used but lacking are analyses of the templates association with processes. This system is also unique because of the many different template options available, and thus the selection of the template may also be important. We aimed to describe the selection of templates in ED dizziness presentations and to investigate the association between items on templates and process utilization. Methods Dizziness visits were captured from a population-based study of EDs that use documentation templates. Two relevant process outcomes were assessed: head computerized tomography (CT scan and nystagmus examination. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the probability of each outcome for patients who did or did not receive a relevant-item template. Propensity scores were also used to adjust for selection effects. Results The final cohort was 1,485 visits. Thirty-one different templates were used. Use of a template with a head CT item was associated with an increase in the adjusted probability of head CT utilization from 12.2% (95% CI, 8.9%-16.6% to 29.3% (95% CI, 26.0%-32.9%. The adjusted probability of documentation of a nystagmus assessment increased from 12.0% (95%CI, 8.8%-16.2% when a nystagmus-item template was not used to 95.0% (95% CI, 92.8%-96.6% when a nystagmus-item template was used. The associations remained significant after propensity score adjustments. Conclusions Providers use many different templates in dizziness presentations. Important differences exist in the various templates and the template that is used likely impacts process utilization, even though selection may be arbitrary. The optimal design and selection of templates may offer a feasible and effective opportunity to improve care delivery.

  5. Fabrication of Nanostructured PLGA Scaffolds Using Anodic Aluminum Oxide Templates

    CERN Document Server

    Hsueh, Cheng-Chih; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Hung, Huey-Shan

    2008-01-01

    PLGA (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)) is one of the most used biodegradable and biocompatible materials. Nanostructured PLGA even has great application potentials in tissue engineering. In this research, a fabrication technique for nanostructured PLGA membrane was investigated and developed. In this novel fabrication approach, an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) film was use as the template ; the PLGA solution was then cast on it ; the vacuum air-extraction process was applied to transfer the nano porous pattern from the AAO membrane to the PLGA membrane and form nanostures on it. The cell culture experiments of the bovine endothelial cells demonstrated that the nanostructured PLGA membrane can double the cell growing rate. Compared to the conventional chemical-etching process, the physical fabrication method proposed in this research not only is simpler but also does not alter the characteristics of the PLGA. The nanostructure of the PLGA membrane can be well controlled by the AAO temperate.

  6. Ion channel mimetic membranes and silica nanotubes prepared from porous aluminum oxide templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David Tanner

    Chapter 1 provides background information on the template synthesis of nanomaterials. The template synthesis method is examined with special attention to the use of membranes containing monodisperse cylindrical pores as templates. Several examples of the utility of template-synthesized nanomaterials are given. The production of one type of template membrane, nanopore alumina, is reviewed. Reviews of sol-gel and silane chemistry are also provided. In Chapter 2, a sol-gel template synthesis process is used to produce silica nanotubes within the pores of alumina templates. The nanotubes can be modified using a variety of chemistries, typically via a silanization process. Because the nanotubes are formed in a template, the interior and exterior surface can be modified independently. Modified nanotubes can be used for drug detoxification or as extractants for the removal of metal ions. The nanotube surface can also be biotinylated, which causes binding to avidinated surfaces. Composite microtubes of silica and various polymers are also prepared. Additionally, Au nanowires are shown to assemble with colloidal Au particles using dithiols as linkers. Chapter 3 describes the attachment of proteins onto template-synthesized silica nanotubes. The proteins are covalently linked via an aldehyde silane bridge that binds to pendant primary amino moieties on the protein. Protein-modified nanotubes function as highly specific extractants. Avidin-modified nanotubes extract biotin-coated Au nanoparticles from solution with high extraction efficiency. Immunoprotein-modified nanotubes extract the corresponding antibody from solution with high specificity. Antibody-modified nanotubes extract one enantiomer from a racemic mix. Enzymes, including drug detoxification enzymes, were also attached to the nanotubes and were shown to retain their catalytic activity. Immunoproteins on the outside of nanotubes can be used to direct nanotube binding, creating specific labeling agents. Chapter 4

  7. Novel combination of near-field s-SNOM microscopy with peak-force tapping for nano-chemical and nano-mechanical material characterization with sub-20 nm spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Martin; Carneiro, Karina; Habelitz, Stefan; Mueller, Thomas; BNS Team; UCSF Team

    Heterogeneity in material systems requires methods for nanoscale chemical identification. Scattering scanning near-field microscopy (s-SNOM) is chemically sensitive in the infrared fingerprint region while providing down to 10 nm spatial resolution. This technique detects material specific tip-scattering in an atomic force microscope. Here, we present the first combination of s-SNOM with peak-force tapping (PFT), a valuable AFM technique that allows precise force control between tip and sample down to 10s of pN. The latter is essential for imaging fragile samples, but allows also quantitative extraction of nano-mechanical properties, e.g. the modulus. PFT can further be complemented by KPFM or conductive AFM for nano-electrical mapping, allowing access to nanoscale optical, mechanical and electrical information in a single instrument. We will address several questions ranging from graphene plasmonics to material distributions in polymers. We highlight a biological application where dental amelogenin protein was studied via s-SNOM to learn about its self-assembly into nanoribbons. At the same time PFT allows to track crystallization to distinguish protein from apatite crystals for which amelogenin is supposed to act as a template.

  8. Business Process Variability : A Tool for Declarative Template Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulanov, P.; Groefsema, H.; Aiello, M.

    2012-01-01

    To lower both implementation time and cost, many Business Process Management tools use process templates to implement highly recurring processes. However, in order for such templates to be used, a process has to adhere substantially to the template. Therefore, current practice for processes which de

  9. Templated electrodeposition of functional nanostructures: nanowires, nanotubes and nanocubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maijenburg, Albert Wouter

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is entitled “Templated electrodeposition of functional nanostructures: nanowires, nanotubes and nanocubes”. Templated electrodeposition is the synthesis technique that was used throughout this thesis, and it comprises the use of a template with specific shape and dimensions for the forma

  10. Volume changes at macro- and nano-scale in epoxy resins studied by PALS and PVT experimental techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somoza, A. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina) and CICPBA, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)]. E-mail: asomoza@exa.unicen.edu.ar; Salgueiro, W. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [LPMPyMC, Depto. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ramos, J. [Materials and Technology Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente, Escuela University Politecnica, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pz. Europa 1, 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain); Mondragon, I. [Materials and Technology Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente, Escuela University Politecnica, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pz. Europa 1, 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    A systematic study on changes in the volumes at macro- and nano-scale in epoxy systems cured with selected aminic hardeners at different pre-cure temperatures is presented. Free- and macroscopic specific-volumes were measured by PALS and pressure-volume-temperature techniques, respectively. An analysis of the relation existing between macro- and nano-scales of the thermosetting networks developed by the different chemical structures is shown. The result obtained indicates that the structure of the hardeners governs the packing of the molecular chains of the epoxy network.

  11. Fabrication and investigation of regular arrays of Fe, Ni and Co nanowires using template synthesizing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Nina; Lei, Yong; Wilde, Gerhard [Institute of Materials Physics and Center for Nanotechnology, University of Muenster, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Regular arrays of magnetic nanowires with a high aspect ratio have possible applications in high density magnetic recording media. Basic knowledge about magnetism may be obtained from these nanowire arrays as transition of multi-domain to single-domain wires occurs at the nanoscale. Modified Porous Alumina Membranes (PAMs) with pore diameters from 20 to 80 nm are well suited as templates for electrodeposition due to their high pore regularity. The pores of the PAM were filled with nickel, iron, cobalt, and multilayer structures of these metals, resulting in different metallic nanowire arrays. The deposition conditions for growing metallic nanowires are investigated in detail. The homogeneous structure and morphology of the template-prepared nanowire arrays is observed by SEM and TEM. The TEM and X-ray measurements indicate that the crystalline structure is either polycrystalline or amorphous depending on the deposition conditions. The magnetic properties of the nanowire arrays are investigated with vibrating sample magnetometry, which shows a preferential direction of magnetization along the wire axis due to the high aspect ratio of the nanowires. The wire interaction in the array is observed qualitatively with magnetic force microscopy.

  12. Rapid Detection of miRNA Using Nucleic Acids-templated AgNCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pratik

    /AgNCs). I have showed that rapid, simple, sensitive and specific miRNA detection is possible. Two aspects of my research are 1) the implication of DNA secondary structure on the photoluminescence properties of DNA/AgNCs, 2) the development of a novel tool for miRNA detection in complex biological samples......-clusters (AgNCs) has increasingly been used to create nanoscale bio-sensing systems for selective and specific detection of bio-molecules. During the course of my Ph.D., I have focused on developing a novel diagnostic tool for miRNA detection using the fluorescent properties of DNA encapsulated AgNCs (DNA....... In the former, I revealed that the mismatched secondary structures of DNA-templates are important for the rapid formation of bright red fluorescence. Further, I suggest that the chromatic properties of DNA/AgNCs are modulated not only by sequence but also by secondary structure of DNA-templates. Moreover...

  13. Sub-5 nm nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition using a carbon nanotube template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Hyo; Kim, Ji Weon; Lee, Seung-Mo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Shim, Joon Hyung; Han, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The fabrication of nanostructures having diameters of sub-5 nm is very a important issue for bottom-up nanofabrication of nanoscale devices. In this work, we report a highly controllable method to create sub-5 nm nano-trenches and nanowires by combining area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as templates. Alumina nano-trenches having a depth of 2.6 ∼ 3.0 nm and SiO2 nano-trenches having a depth of 1.9 ∼ 2.2 nm fully guided by the SWNTs have been formed on SiO2/Si substrate. Through infilling ZnO material by ALD in alumina nano-trenches, well-defined ZnO nanowires having a thickness of 3.1 ∼ 3.3 nm have been fabricated. In order to improve the electrical properties of ZnO nanowires, as-fabricated ZnO nanowires by ALD were annealed at 350 °C in air for 60 min. As a result, we successfully demonstrated that as-synthesized ZnO nanowire using a specific template can be made for various high-density resistive components in the nanoelectronics industry.

  14. Templated CaCO3 Crystallization by Submicrometer and Nanosized Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira-Carrillo, Andrónico; Gentsch, Rafael; Börner, Hans G; Acevedo, Diego Fernando; Barbero, Cesar Alfredo; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    Electrospun submicrometer-sized poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) meshes and nanosized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as a template for preparing porous and interconnected inorganic-organic hybrid materials composed of CaCO3. Herein, we describe the proportion and incorporation method of submicrometer-sized plasma-treated PCL meshes over areas >1 mm(2) with CaCO3 using three crystallization methods including the use of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). We found that flexible and rigid acid-functionalized MWCNTs showed a clear capacity and effects to penetrate calcite particles. MWCNTs interacted differently with the individual growth planes of CaCO3, indicating that fibers can undergo changes depending on sulfonate or carboxylate groups, adopt different orientations in solution, and thereby elicit changes in CaCO3 morphology. In summary, the use of PCL and acidic MWCNT fibers as an additive for substrate templates and experimental crystallization provides a viable approach for studying various aspects of biomineralization, including the production of controlled particles, control of porosities, and defined morphologies at microscale and nanoscale levels.

  15. CMOS compatible nanoscale nonvolatile resistance switching memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sung Hyun; Lu, Wei

    2008-02-01

    We report studies on a nanoscale resistance switching memory structure based on planar silicon that is fully compatible with CMOS technology in terms of both materials and processing techniques employed. These two-terminal resistance switching devices show excellent scaling potential well beyond 10 Gb/cm2 and exhibit high yield (99%), fast programming speed (5 ns), high on/off ratio (10(3)), long endurance (10(6)), retention time (5 months), and multibit capability. These key performance metrics compare favorably with other emerging nonvolatile memory techniques. Furthermore, both diode-like (rectifying) and resistor-like (nonrectifying) behaviors can be obtained in the device switching characteristics in a controlled fashion. These results suggest that the CMOS compatible, nanoscale Si-based resistance switching devices may be well suited for ultrahigh-density memory applications.

  16. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  17. Controlling carrier dynamics at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas, Enrique; Bonn, Mischa

    2016-10-01

    This Special issue is motivated by the occasion of the International Conference on Charge Carrier Dynamics at the Nanoscale (CCDNano), held in Santiago de Compostela (Spain) in September 2015. As chairs for the CCDNano meeting, we aimed at bringing together experts from different scientific fields in order to trigger interdisciplinary discussions and collaborations; the ultimate goal of the conference was to serve as a platform to advance and help unifying methodologies and theories from different research sub-fields. We also aimed at a deeper understanding of charge dynamics to contribute to the development of improved or novel nanostructured devices. This special issue keeps that spirit, and intends to provide an overview of ongoing research efforts regarding charge carrier dynamics at the nanoscale.

  18. Scanning nanoscale multiprobes for conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Kuhn, Oliver;

    2000-01-01

    We report fabrication and measurements with two- and four-point probes with nanoscale dimensions, for high spatial resolution conductivity measurements on surfaces and thin films. By combination of conventional microfabrication and additive three-dimensional nanolithography, we have obtained...... electrode spacings down to 200 nm. At the tips of four silicon oxide microcantilevers, narrow carbon tips are grown in converging directions and subsequently coated with a conducting layer. The probe is placed in contact with a conducting surface, whereby the electrode resistance can be determined....... The nanoelectrodes withstand considerable contact force before breaking. The probe offers a unique possibility to position the voltage sensors, as well as the source and drain electrodes in areas of nanoscale dimensions. ©2000 American Institute of Physics....

  19. MEMS & microsystems design, manufacture, and nanoscale engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Tai-Ran

    2008-01-01

    A bestselling MEMS text...now better than ever. An engineering design approach to Microelectromechanical Systems, MEMS and Microsystems remains the only available text to cover both the electrical and the mechanical aspects of the technology. In the five years since the publication of the first edition, there have been significant changes in the science and technology of miniaturization, including microsystems technology and nanotechnology. In response to the increasing needs of engineers to acquire basic knowledge and experience in these areas, this popular text has been carefully updated, including an entirely new section on the introduction of nanoscale engineering. Following a brief introduction to the history and evolution of nanotechnology, the author covers the fundamentals in the engineering design of nanostructures, including fabrication techniques for producing nanoproducts, engineering design principles in molecular dynamics, and fluid flows and heat transmission in nanoscale substances.

  20. Nanoscale plasmonic stamp lithography on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fenglin; Luber, Erik J; Huck, Lawrence A; Olsen, Brian C; Buriak, Jillian M

    2015-02-24

    Nanoscale lithography on silicon is of interest for applications ranging from computer chip design to tissue interfacing. Block copolymer-based self-assembly, also called directed self-assembly (DSA) within the semiconductor industry, can produce a variety of complex nanopatterns on silicon, but these polymeric films typically require transformation into functional materials. Here we demonstrate how gold nanopatterns, produced via block copolymer self-assembly, can be incorporated into an optically transparent flexible PDMS stamp, termed a plasmonic stamp, and used to directly functionalize silicon surfaces on a sub-100 nm scale. We propose that the high intensity electric fields that result from the localized surface plasmons of the gold nanoparticles in the plasmonic stamps upon illumination with low intensity green light, lead to generation of electron-hole pairs in the silicon that drive spatially localized hydrosilylation. This approach demonstrates how localized surface plasmons can be used to enable functionalization of technologically relevant surfaces with nanoscale control.

  1. Nanoscale Surface Modification of Layered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Aaron

    2011-11-01

    A scanning electron microscope can magnify a sample many times greater than a standard microscope, down to nanoscale dimensions. It can also be used to form patterns on the surfaces of certain materials, a technique used to create microchips. We have developed a technique that simplifies and expedites this process using an unmodified scanning electron microscope. Using this technique, we are able to alter the surface chemistry in a controlled pattern on a special class of materials called transition metal dichalcogenides. These materials have many useful applications: industrial lubricants; high strength nanocomposites; advanced solar cells; and next generation electronics. Altering the surface chemistry of these materials at the nanoscale results in unusual quantum behavior, which is useful in nanotechnology.

  2. Fabrication of Single, Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes in 3D Nanoscale Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; Von Allmen, Paul A.; Baron, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and high-throughput manufacturing techniques for integrating single, aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into novel 3D nanoscale architectures have been developed. First, the PECVD growth technique ensures excellent alignment of the tubes, since the tubes align in the direction of the electric field in the plasma as they are growing. Second, the tubes generated with this technique are all metallic, so their chirality is predetermined, which is important for electronic applications. Third, a wafer-scale manufacturing process was developed that is high-throughput and low-cost, and yet enables the integration of just single, aligned tubes with nanoscale 3D architectures with unprecedented placement accuracy and does not rely on e-beam lithography. Such techniques should lend themselves to the integration of PECVD grown tubes for applications ranging from interconnects, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), sensors, bioprobes, or other 3D electronic devices. Chemically amplified polyhydroxystyrene-resin-based deep UV resists were used in conjunction with excimer laser-based (lambda = 248 nm) step-and-repeat lithography to form Ni catalyst dots = 300 nm in diameter that nucleated single, vertically aligned tubes with high yield using dc PECVD growth. This is the first time such chemically amplified resists have been used, resulting in the nucleation of single, vertically aligned tubes. In addition, novel 3D nanoscale architectures have been created using topdown techniques that integrate single, vertically aligned tubes. These were enabled by implementing techniques that use deep-UV chemically amplified resists for small-feature-size resolution; optical lithography units that allow unprecedented control over layer-to-layer registration; and ICP (inductively coupled plasma) etching techniques that result in near-vertical, high-aspect-ratio, 3D nanoscale architectures, in conjunction with the use of materials that are

  3. DOE - BES Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beecher, Cathy Jo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-14

    These are slides from a powerpoint shown to guests during tours of Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It shows the five DOE-BES nanoscale science research centers (NSRCs), which are located at different national laboratories throughout the country. Then it goes into detail specifically about the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at LANL, including statistics on its user community and CINT's New Mexico industrial users.

  4. Nanoscale photonics using coupled hybrid plasmonic architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles; Su, Yiwen; Helmy, Amr S.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic waveguides, which support surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, offer strong field confinement and are ideal for the design of integrated nano-scale photonic devices. However, due to free-carrier absorption in the metal, the enhanced mode confinement inevitably entails an increase in the waveguide loss. This lowers the device figure-of-merit achievable with passive plasmonic components and in turn hinders the performance of active plasmonic components such as optical modulators.

  5. Infochemistry Information Processing at the Nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Szacilowski, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Infochemistry: Information Processing at the Nanoscale, defines a new field of science, and describes the processes, systems and devices at the interface between chemistry and information sciences. The book is devoted to the application of molecular species and nanostructures to advanced information processing. It includes the design and synthesis of suitable materials and nanostructures, their characterization, and finally applications of molecular species and nanostructures for information storage and processing purposes. Divided into twelve chapters; the first three chapters serve as an int

  6. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bradley R.; Talley, Chad E.

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  7. Current-Induced Effects in Nanoscale Conductors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We present an overview of current-induced effects in nanoscale conductors with emphasis on their description at the atomic level. In particular, we discuss steady-state current fluctuations, current-induced forces, inelastic scattering and local heating. All of these properties are calculated in terms of single-particle wavefunctions computed using a scattering approach within the static density-functional theory of many-electron systems. Examples of current-induced effects in atomic and mole...

  8. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, David G., E-mail: d-cahill@illinois.edu; Braun, Paul V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Clarke, David R. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Fan, Shanhui [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Goodson, Kenneth E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Keblinski, Pawel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); King, William P. [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Mahan, Gerald D. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Majumdar, Arun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Maris, Humphrey J. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainseville, Florida 32611 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, Autin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ∼1 nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and

  9. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  10. Attosecond physics at a nanoscale metal tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemell Christoph

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available With few-cycle laser oscillator pulses at 800 nm we observe strong-field and attosecond physics phenomena in electron spectra recorded at a nanoscale tungsten tip. We observe the rescattering plateau as well as a strong carrier-envelope phase dependence of the spectra. We model the results with the semiclassical three-step model as well as with time-dependent density functional theory.

  11. Fourth International Conference on Nanoscale Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, Bekir; Advances in Nanoscale Magnetism

    2009-01-01

    The book aims to provide an overview of recent progress in the understanding of magnetic properties in nanoscale through recent results of various theoretical and experimental investigations. The papers describe a wide range of physical aspects, together with theoretical and experimental methods. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in magnetism and magnetic materials science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students.

  12. Using mathematical models to understand the effect of nanoscale roughness on protein adsorption for improving medical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan B

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Batur Ercan,1 Dongwoo Khang,2 Joseph Carpenter,3 Thomas J Webster1 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2School of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for PRC and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South Korea; 3School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Surface roughness and energy significantly influence protein adsorption on to biomaterials, which, in turn, controls select cellular adhesion to determine the success and longevity of an implant. To understand these relationships at a fundamental level, a model was originally proposed by Khang et al to correlate nanoscale surface properties (specifically, nanoscale roughness and energy to protein adsorption, which explained the greater cellular responses on nanostructured surfaces commonly reported in the literature today. To test this model for different surfaces from what was previously used to develop that model, in this study we synthesized highly ordered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid surfaces of identical chemistry but altered nanoscale surface roughness and energy using poly(dimethylsiloxane molds of polystyrene beads. Fibronectin and collagen type IV adsorption studies showed a linear adsorption behavior as the surface nanoroughness increased. This supported the general trends observed by Khang et al. However, when fitting such data to the mathematical model established by Khang et al, a strong correlation did not result. Thus, this study demonstrated that the equation proposed by Khang et al to predict protein adsorption should be modified to accommodate for additional nanoscale surface property contributions (ie, surface charge to make the model more accurate. In summary, results from this study provided an important step in developing future mathematical models that can correlate surface properties (such as nanoscale roughness and surface energy to initial protein adsorption events important to

  13. Nanoscale piezoelectric vibration energy harvester design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Foruzande

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of new nanoscale devices has increased the demand for new types of small-scale energy resources such as ambient vibrations energy harvesters. Among the vibration energy harvesters, piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs can be easily miniaturized and fabricated in micro and nano scales. This change in the dimensions of a PEH leads to a change in its governing equations of motion, and consequently, the predicted harvested energy comparing to a macroscale PEH. In this research, effects of small scale dimensions on the nonlinear vibration and harvested voltage of a nanoscale PEH is studied. The PEH is modeled as a cantilever piezoelectric bimorph nanobeam with a tip mass, using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory in conjunction with Hamilton’s principle. A harmonic base excitation is applied as a model of the ambient vibrations. The nonlocal elasticity theory is used to consider the size effects in the developed model. The derived equations of motion are discretized using the assumed-modes method and solved using the method of multiple scales. Sensitivity analysis for the effect of different parameters of the system in addition to size effects is conducted. The results show the significance of nonlocal elasticity theory in the prediction of system dynamic nonlinear behavior. It is also observed that neglecting the size effects results in lower estimates of the PEH vibration amplitudes. The results pave the way for designing new nanoscale sensors in addition to PEHs.

  14. Static electric field enhancement in nanoscale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Bruno; Lemoine, Didier; Márquez-Mijares, Maykel

    2016-08-01

    We study the effect of local atomic- and nano-scale protrusions on field emission and, in particular, on the local field enhancement which plays a key role as known from the Fowler-Nordheim model of electronic emission. We study atomic size defects which consist of right angle steps forming an infinite length staircase on a tungsten surface. This structure is embedded in a 1 GV/m ambient electrostatic field. We perform calculations based upon density functional theory in order to characterize the total and induced electronic densities as well as the local electrostatic fields taking into account the detailed atomic structure of the metal. We show how the results must be processed to become comparable with those of a simple homogeneous tungsten sheet electrostatic model. We also describe an innovative procedure to extrapolate our results to nanoscale defects of larger sizes, which relies on the microscopic findings to guide, tune, and improve the homogeneous metal model, thus gaining predictive power. Furthermore, we evidence analytical power laws for the field enhancement characterization. The main physics-wise outcome of this analysis is that limited field enhancement is to be expected from atomic- and nano-scale defects.

  15. Static electric field enhancement in nanoscale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.lepetit@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Lemoine, Didier, E-mail: didier.lemoine@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Márquez-Mijares, Maykel, E-mail: mmarquez@instec.cu [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias Aplicadas, Avenida Salvador Allende 1110, Quinta de los Molinos, La Habana (Cuba)

    2016-08-28

    We study the effect of local atomic- and nano-scale protrusions on field emission and, in particular, on the local field enhancement which plays a key role as known from the Fowler-Nordheim model of electronic emission. We study atomic size defects which consist of right angle steps forming an infinite length staircase on a tungsten surface. This structure is embedded in a 1 GV/m ambient electrostatic field. We perform calculations based upon density functional theory in order to characterize the total and induced electronic densities as well as the local electrostatic fields taking into account the detailed atomic structure of the metal. We show how the results must be processed to become comparable with those of a simple homogeneous tungsten sheet electrostatic model. We also describe an innovative procedure to extrapolate our results to nanoscale defects of larger sizes, which relies on the microscopic findings to guide, tune, and improve the homogeneous metal model, thus gaining predictive power. Furthermore, we evidence analytical power laws for the field enhancement characterization. The main physics-wise outcome of this analysis is that limited field enhancement is to be expected from atomic- and nano-scale defects.

  16. MEMS-enabled Dip Pen Nanolithography for directed nanoscale deposition and high-throughput nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaheim, J. R.; Nafday, O. A.; Levesque, T.; Fragala, J.; Shile, R.

    2009-02-01

    Precision nanoscale deposition is a fundamental requirement for nanoscience research, development, and commercial implementation. Dip Pen Nanolithography(R) (DPN) is an inherently additive SPM-based technique which operates under ambient conditions, making it suitable to deposit a wide range of biological and inorganic materials. This technique is fundamentally enabled by a portfolio of MEMS devices tailored for microfluidic ink delivery, directed placement of nanoscale materials via actuated cantilevers, and cm2 tip arrays for high-throughput nanofabrication. Multiplexed deposition of nanoscale materials is a challenging problem, but we have implemented InkWells(TM) to enable selective delivery of ink materials to different tips in multiple probe arrays, while preventing cross-contamination. Active Pens(TM) can take advantage of this, directly place a variety of materials in nanoscale proximity, and do so in a "clean" fashion since the cantilevers can be manipulated in Z. Further, massively parallel two-dimensional nanopatterning with DPN is now commercially available via NanoInk's 2D nano PrintArray(TM), making DPN a highthroughput, flexible and versatile method for precision nanoscale pattern formation. By fabricating 55,000 tip-cantilevers across a 1 cm2 chip, we leverage the inherent versatility of DPN and demonstrate large area surface coverage, routinely achieving throughputs of 3×107 μm2 per hour. Further, we have engineered the device to be easy to use, wire-free, and fully integrated with the NSCRIPTOR's scanner, stage, and sophisticated lithography routines. In this talk we discuss the methods of operating this commercially available device, and subsequent results showing sub-100 nm feature sizes and excellent uniformity (standard deviation portfolio including: 1) rapidly and flexibly generating nanostructures; 2) chemically directed assembly and 3) directly writing biological materials.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Templated Asembly of Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes a novel general strategy for fabricating protein-polyion multilayers by electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly on a carbon nanotube (CNT) template. Such a noncovalent functionalization method is important for preserving the activity of biomolecules and the mechanical and electrical properties of CNTs. Glucose oxidase and poly (diallydimethylammonium) chloride polymer were used as a model to investigate the LBL process on a CNT template. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electrochemical characterization confirm the formation of LBL nanostructures on carboxyl functionalized CNTs. We have also demonstrated the applications of these nanoshell bioreactors to the direct electrochemistry of proteins and biosensing. This strategy can be applied to assemble other biological molecules, such as antibodies, antigens, and DNA, for wide bioassay applications.

  18. Physical synthesis of quantum circuits using templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkhani, Zahra; Mohammadzadeh, Naser

    2016-10-01

    Similar to traditional CMOS circuits, quantum circuit design flow is divided into two main processes: logic synthesis and physical design. Addressing the limitations imposed on optimization of the quantum circuit metrics because of no information sharing between logic synthesis and physical design processes, the concept of " physical synthesis" was introduced for quantum circuit flow, and a few techniques were proposed for it. Following that concept, in this paper a new approach for physical synthesis inspired by template matching idea in quantum logic synthesis is proposed to improve the latency of quantum circuits. Experiments show that by using template matching as a physical synthesis approach, the latency of quantum circuits can be improved by more than 23.55 % on average.

  19. Metathesis depolymerization for removable surfactant templates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zifer, Thomas (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Wheeler, David Roger; Rahimian, Kamayar; McElhanon, James Ross (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Long, Timothy Michael; Jamison, Gregory Marks; Loy, Douglas Anson (Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, NM); Kline, Steven R. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD); Simmons, Blake Alexander (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-03-01

    Current methodologies for the production of meso- and nanoporous materials include the use of a surfactant to produce a self-assembled template around which the material is formed. However, post-production surfactant removal often requires centrifugation, calcination, and/or solvent washing which can damage the initially formed material architecture(s). Surfactants that can be disassembled into easily removable fragments following material preparation would minimize processing damage to the material structure, facilitating formation of templated hybrid architectures. Herein, we describe the design and synthesis of novel cationic and anionic surfactants with regularly spaced unsaturation in their hydrophobic hydrocarbon tails and the first application of ring closing metathesis depolymerization to surfactant degradation resulting in the mild, facile decomposition of these new compounds to produce relatively volatile nonsurface active remnants.

  20. Relating Nanoscale Accessibility within Plant Cell Walls to Improved Enzyme Hydrolysis Yields in Corn Stover Subjected to Diverse Pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Jacob D; Zarger, Rachael A; Hodge, David B

    2017-10-04

    Simultaneous chemical modification and physical reorganization of plant cell walls via alkaline hydrogen peroxide or liquid hot water pretreatment can alter cell wall structural properties impacting nanoscale porosity. Nanoscale porosity was characterized using solute exclusion to assess accessible pore volumes, water retention value as a proxy for accessible water-cell walls surface area, and solute-induced cell wall swelling to measure cell wall rigidity. Key findings concluded that delignification by alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment decreased cell wall rigidity and that the subsequent cell wall swelling resulted increased nanoscale porosity and improved enzyme binding and hydrolysis compared to limited swelling and increased accessible surface areas observed in liquid hot water pretreated biomass. The volume accessible to a 90 Å dextran probe within the cell wall was found to be correlated to both enzyme binding and glucose hydrolysis yields, indicating cell wall porosity is a key contributor to effective hydrolysis yields.

  1. Deep Human Parsing with Active Template Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaodan; Liu, Si; Shen, Xiaohui; Yang, Jianchao; Liu, Luoqi; Dong, Jian; Lin, Liang; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the human parsing task, namely decomposing a human image into semantic fashion/body regions, is formulated as an active template regression (ATR) problem, where the normalized mask of each fashion/body item is expressed as the linear combination of the learned mask templates, and then morphed to a more precise mask with the active shape parameters, including position, scale and visibility of each semantic region. The mask template coefficients and the active shape parameters together can generate the human parsing results, and are thus called the structure outputs for human parsing. The deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) is utilized to build the end-to-end relation between the input human image and the structure outputs for human parsing. More specifically, the structure outputs are predicted by two separate networks. The first CNN network is with max-pooling, and designed to predict the template coefficients for each label mask, while the second CNN network is without max-pooling to preserve sensitivity to label mask position and accurately predict the active shape parameters. For a new image, the structure outputs of the two networks are fused to generate the probability of each label for each pixel, and super-pixel smoothing is finally used to refine the human parsing result. Comprehensive evaluations on a large dataset well demonstrate the significant superiority of the ATR framework over other state-of-the-arts for human parsing. In particular, the F1-score reaches 64.38 percent by our ATR framework, significantly higher than 44.76 percent based on the state-of-the-art algorithm [28].

  2. Multibiometric Systems: Fusion Strategies and Template Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    gratitude to Linda Moore, Debbie Kruch, Cathy Davison, Starr Portice, Norma Teague, Kim Thompson, Cathy Sparks, Sue Watson and Adam Pitcher for their...Weighted sum rule Red, Green , Blue channels for face [109] Match score Sum and min rules [166] Feature; match score Feature selection and concatenation...FVC2002-DB2 database, mosaiced template leads to a GAR of 94% and 3The core point was detected using the commercial Neurotechnologija Verifinger software

  3. CPU and GPU (Cuda Template Matching Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaldas Borcovas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Image processing, computer vision or other complicated opticalinformation processing algorithms require large resources. It isoften desired to execute algorithms in real time. It is hard tofulfill such requirements with single CPU processor. NVidiaproposed CUDA technology enables programmer to use theGPU resources in the computer. Current research was madewith Intel Pentium Dual-Core T4500 2.3 GHz processor with4 GB RAM DDR3 (CPU I, NVidia GeForce GT320M CUDAcompliable graphics card (GPU I and Intel Core I5-2500K3.3 GHz processor with 4 GB RAM DDR3 (CPU II, NVidiaGeForce GTX 560 CUDA compatible graphic card (GPU II.Additional libraries as OpenCV 2.1 and OpenCV 2.4.0 CUDAcompliable were used for the testing. Main test were made withstandard function MatchTemplate from the OpenCV libraries.The algorithm uses a main image and a template. An influenceof these factors was tested. Main image and template have beenresized and the algorithm computing time and performancein Gtpix/s have been measured. According to the informationobtained from the research GPU computing using the hardwarementioned earlier is till 24 times faster when it is processing abig amount of information. When the images are small the performanceof CPU and GPU are not significantly different. Thechoice of the template size makes influence on calculating withCPU. Difference in the computing time between the GPUs canbe explained by the number of cores which they have.

  4. A new method to produce nanoscale iron for nitrate removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.-S., E-mail: f10919@ntut.edu.tw; Hsu, H.-D.; Li, C.-W. [Institute of Environmental Planning and Management, National Taipei University of Technology (China)

    2004-12-15

    This article proposes a novel technology combining electrochemical and ultrasonic methods to produce nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI). With platinum placed in the cathode and the presence of the dispersion agent, 0.2g/l cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cation surfactant, in the solution, the nanoscale iron particle was successfully produced with diameter of 1-20 nm and specific surface area of 25.4m{sup 2}/g. The produced NZVI was tested in batch experiments for nitrate removal. The results showed that the nitrate reduction was affected by pH. Al low pH, nitrate was shown faster decline and more reduction in term of g NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N/g NZVI. The reaction was first order and kinetic coefficients for the four pHs were directly related to pH with R {sup 2} >0.95. Comparing with microscale zero-valent iron (45{mu}m, 0.183m{sup 2}/g), microscale zero-valent iron converted nitrate to ammonia completely, but NZVI converted nitrate to ammonia partially from 36.2 to 45.3% dependent on pH. For mass balance of iron species, since the dissolved iron in the solution was very low (<1mg/l), Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) was used for identification of oxidation state of the surface species on the NZVI and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was recognized. Thus the reaction mechanisms can be determined.

  5. UV NIL template making and imprint evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shiho; Hiraka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Jun; Sakai, Yuko; Yusa, Satoshi; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2009-01-01

    UV NIL shows excellent resolution capability with remarkable low line edge roughness, and has been attracting pioneers in the industry who were searching for the finest patterns. We have been focused on the resolution improvement in NIL template making with a 100keV acceleration voltage spot beam EB writer process, and have established a template making process to meet the requirements of the pioneers. Usually such templates needed just a small field (several hundred microns square or so) Now, for several semiconductor devices, the UV NIL is considered not only as a patterning solution for R&D purpose but eventually as a potential candidate for production, and instead of a small field, a full chip field mask is required. Although the 100kV EB writers have excellent resolution capability, they are adopting spot beams (SB) to generate the pattern and have a fatally low throughput if we need full chip writing. In this paper, we are focusing on the 50keV variable shaped beam (VSB) EB writers, which are used in current 4X photomask manufacturing. The 50keV VSB writers can generate full chip pattern in a reasonable time, and by choosing the right patterning material and process, we achieved resolution down to hp28nm, and initial promising results of hp22nm (partial resolution) for line and spaces, and hp26nm for dense holes were observed..

  6. Template learning in morphological neural nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jennifer L.; Sun, K.

    1991-07-01

    This paper presents an application of morphology neural networks to a template learning problem. Morphology neural networks are a nonlinear version of the familiar artificial neural networks. Typically, an artificial neural net is used to solve pattern classification problems One useful characterization of many neural network algorithms is the ability to 'learn' to respond correctly to new data based only on a selection of known data responses. For example, in the multilayer perceptron model, the 'learning' is a procedure whereby parameters are fed back from output to input neurons and the weights changed to give a better response. The morphological neural net in this paper solves a different type of image processing problem. Specifically, given an input image and an output image which corresponds to a dilated version of the input, one would like to determine what template produced the output. The problem corresponds to teaching the network to solve for the weights in a morphological net, as the weights are the template's values. A reasonable method has been investigated for the boolean case; in this paper results are presented for gray scale images. Image algebra has been shown to provide a succinct expression of neural networks algorithms and also to allow a generalization of neural networks, and thus the authors describe the algorithm in image algebra. The remainder of the paper gives a brief discussion of image algebra, the relationship of image algebra and neural networks, a recap of the dilation morphology neural network boolean for boolean images, and the generalization to grayscale data.

  7. Non-surfactant synthesis of mesoporous silica with dye as template

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel non-surfactant method was described to synthesize mesoporous silica using dye basic fuchsin as template. Chemical reactions were introduced into the formation of mesopores rather than the weak electrostatic or hydrogen-bonding interactions in the traditional surfactant routes. The reactant composition was found to be crucial to the pore structure of objective product. The formation mechanism of mesopore was also proved.

  8. Template-directed synthesis of nets based upon octahemioctahedral cages that encapsulate catalytically active metalloporphyrins

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, ZhenJie

    2012-01-18

    meso-Tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphine tetratosylate (TMPyP) templates the synthesis of six new metal-organic materials by the reaction of benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate with transition metals, five of which exhibit HKUST-1 or tbo topology (M = Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Mg). The resulting materials, porph@MOMs, selectively encapsulate the corresponding metalloporphyrins in octahemioctahedral cages and can serve as size-selective heterogeneous catalysts for oxidation of olefins. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  9. Vertically oriented hexagonal mesoporous zirconia thin films by block copolymer templating

    OpenAIRE

    Miko, Annamaria ; Demirel, A. Levent ; Somer, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vertically oriented, long-range ordered hexagonal mesoporous zirconia thin ?lms. The orientation of hexagonally ordered cylindrical mesopores in thin ?lms was effectively controlled by taking advantage of the temperature dependent hydrophobicity of the templating block copolymer PEO–PPO–PEO. Vertical orientation was obtained when temperature was 30 C or above throughout the process. Dehydration and enhanced chemical incompatibility between the PEO and PPO b...

  10. Synthesis of Nanorods of Crystalline Co304 Using Carbon Nanotubes as Templates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU,Hua-Qiang(吴华强); SHAO,Ming-Wang(邵明望); WEI,Xian-Wen(魏先文); GU,Jia-Shan(顾家山); QU,Mei-Zhen(瞿美臻)

    2002-01-01

    Synthesis of cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanorods was achieved by templating against carbon nanotubes via wet chemical technique. The products with crystalline structure were mainly composed of Co3O4 nanorods with diameters in the range of ca. 75-100 mn and lengths in the range of 0.12-1μm, and were characterized by XRD, TEM, SAED and HRTEM.

  11. Converting Basic D3 Charts into Reusable Style Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jonathan; Agrawala, Maneesh

    2017-02-07

    We present a technique for converting a basic D3 chart into a reusable style template. Then, given a new data source we can apply the style template to generate a chart that depicts the new data, but in the style of the template. To construct the style template we first deconstruct the input D3 chart to recover its underlying structure: the data, the marks and the mappings that describe how the marks encode the data. We then rank the perceptual effectiveness of the deconstructed mappings. To apply the resulting style template to a new data source we first obtain importance ranks for each new data field. We then adjust the template mappings to depict the source data by matching the most important data fields to the most perceptually effective mappings. We show how the style templates can be applied to source data in the form of either a data table or another D3 chart. While our implementation focuses on generating templates for basic chart types (e.g. variants of bar charts, line charts, dot plots, scatterplots, etc.), these are the most commonly used chart types today. Users can easily find such basic D3 charts on the Web, turn them into templates, and immediately see how their own data would look in the visual style (e.g. colors, shapes, fonts, etc.) of the templates. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by applying a diverse set of style templates to a variety of source datasets.

  12. From surface to intracellular non-invasive nanoscale study of living cells impairments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewald, Dr. Maxime [University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon, France.; Tetard, Laurene [ORNL; Elie-Caille, Dr. Cecile [Institut FEMTO-ST UMR CNRS 6174, University Franche-Comté, 25044 Besancon, France; Nicod, Laurence [University of Franche-Comte, Laboratoire de Biologie Cellulaire; Passian, Ali [ORNL; Bourillot, Dr. Eric [University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon, France.; Lesniewska, Prof. Eric [University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon, France.

    2014-01-01

    Among the enduring challenges in nanoscience, subsurface characterization of live cells holds major stakes. Developments in nanometrology for soft matter thriving on the sensitivity and high resolution benefits of atomic force microscopy have enabled detection of subsurface structures at the nanoscale (1,2,3). However, measurements in liquid environments remain complex (4,5,6,7), in particular in the subsurface domain. Here we introduce liquid-Mode Synthesizing Atomic Force Microscopy (l-MSAFM) to study both the inner structures and the chemically induced intracellular impairments of living cells. Specifically, we visualize the intracellular stress effects of glyphosate on living keratinocytes skin cells. This new approach for living cell nanoscale imaging, l-MSAFM, in their physiological environment or in presence of a chemical stress agent confirmed the loss of inner structures induced by glyphosate. The ability to monitor the cell's inner response to external stimuli, non-destructively and in real time, has the potential to unveil critical nanoscale mechanisms of life science.

  13. Versatile RHDV virus-like particles: incorporation of antigens by genetic modification and chemical conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacey, Matthew; Wilson, Sarah; Baird, Margaret A; Ward, Vernon K

    2007-12-01

    Virus-like particles have proved to be excellent molecular scaffolds, yet the individual characteristics and immune responses generated against each VLP requires the development of a wide range of capsids for use as vaccines, molecular delivery vessels, and nanoscale templates. Here we describe the development of Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV)-like particles as a rapidly versatile molecular workbench, overcoming limitations imposed by established genetic antigen incorporation procedures with chimeric VLP. Production of the RHDV capsid protein in a baculovirus system led to the self-assembly of VLP which were recovered at over 99% purity and manipulated both genetically and chemically. Fusion of small peptide sequences to RHDV VLP was well tolerated, forming chimeric capsids that enhanced the presentation of foreign peptide to hybridoma T helper cells 700-fold. Rapid and simple conjugation techniques employing the hetero-bifunctional chemical linker sulfo-SMCC enabled both small peptides and whole proteins to be conjugated to the surface of RHDV VLP, overcoming limitations imposed on VLP formation and yield experienced with chimeric VLP. Administration of VLP/ovalbumin conjugate provoked high titre ovalbumin-specific antibody in mice, demonstrating the immune stimulatory properties of the capsid were conferred to conjugated foreign antigen. VLP facilitated delivery of conjugated antigen to dendritic cells, eliciting proliferative responses in naïve TCR transgenic T helper cells that were at least 10-fold greater than ovalbumin antigen delivered alone.

  14. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HIERARCHICALLY POROUS SILICA WITH POPLAR TISSUE AS TEMPLATE WITH ASSISTANCE OF SUPERCRITICAL CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ni

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchically porous silica samples, ranging from mesopores to macropores, were prepared by “nanoscale casting using supercritical (SC fluids” (NC-SCF technology and bionics, achieving a biomineralization process in an environmentally friendly and efficient way. These wood-templated SiO2 samples, having special hierarchical pore sizes from 3.3 nm up to 50 μm, were obtained with SC-CO2 precursor solution by a wood-silication method. For this method, the precursor, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, was dissolved in SC-CO2 and impregnated into poplar tissue cells using SC-CO2 as a mass carrier. After removal of the wood template by calcination in air at suitable temperatures, the porous silica was obtained. The effects of CO2 pressure and precursor concentration on the impregnating ratio were studied, and the products were characterized. SEM experimental results showed that the obtained silica had the same external and internal structures of the original wood. XRD and N2 absorption-desorption results indicated that the silica was amorphous but crystallized with the calcination temperature up to 1000℃, and had a preferable BET surface area being up to 469 m2/g (600℃. So this work provides a simple and timesaving route to obtain and control the special microstructure of silica with the aid of a wood template in supercritical CO2.

  15. WO3 Nanofiber-Based Biomarker Detectors Enabled by Protein-Encapsulated Catalyst Self-Assembled on Polystyrene Colloid Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon-Jin; Kim, Sang-Joon; Cho, Hee-Jin; Jang, Ji-Soo; Lin, Yi-Min; Tuller, Harry L; Rutledge, Gregory C; Kim, Il-Doo

    2016-02-17

    A novel catalyst functionalization method, based on protein-encapsulated metallic nanoparticles (NPs) and their self-assembly on polystyrene (PS) colloid templates, is used to form catalyst-loaded porous WO3 nanofibers (NFs). The metallic NPs, composed of Au, Pd, or Pt, are encapsulated within a protein cage, i.e., apoferritin, to form unagglomerated monodispersed particles with diameters of less than 5 nm. The catalytic NPs maintain their nanoscale size, even following high-temperature heat-treatment during synthesis, which is attributed to the discrete self-assembly of NPs on PS colloid templates. In addition, the PS templates generate open pores on the electrospun WO3 NFs, facilitating gas molecule transport into the sensing layers and promoting active surface reactions. As a result, the Au and Pd NP-loaded porous WO3 NFs show superior sensitivity toward hydrogen sulfide, as evidenced by responses (R(air)/R(gas)) of 11.1 and 43.5 at 350 °C, respectively. These responses represent 1.8- and 7.1-fold improvements compared to that of dense WO3 NFs (R(air)/R(gas) = 6.1). Moreover, Pt NP-loaded porous WO3 NFs exhibit high acetone sensitivity with response of 28.9. These results demonstrate a novel catalyst loading method, in which small NPs are well-dispersed within the pores of WO3 NFs, that is applicable to high sensitivity breath sensors.

  16. A Neonatal Bimodal MR-CT Head Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtasebi, Mehrana; Abrishami Moghaddam, Hamid; Grebe, Reinhard; Gity, Masoumeh; Wallois, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal MR templates are appropriate for brain structural analysis and spatial normalization. However, they do not provide the essential accurate details of cranial bones and fontanels-sutures. Distinctly, CT images provide the best contrast for bone definition and fontanels-sutures. In this paper, we present, for the first time, an approach to create a fully registered bimodal MR-CT head template for neonates with a gestational age of 39 to 42 weeks. Such a template is essential for structural and functional brain studies, which require precise geometry of the head including cranial bones and fontanels-sutures. Due to the special characteristics of the problem (which requires inter-subject inter-modality registration), a two-step intensity-based registration method is proposed to globally and locally align CT images with an available MR template. By applying groupwise registration, the new neonatal CT template is then created in full alignment with the MR template to build a bimodal MR-CT template. The mutual information value between the CT and the MR template is 1.17 which shows their perfect correspondence in the bimodal template. Moreover, the average mutual information value between normalized images and the CT template proposed in this study is 1.24±0.07. Comparing this value with the one reported in a previously published approach (0.63±0.07) demonstrates the better generalization properties of the new created template and the superiority of the proposed method for the creation of CT template in the standard space provided by MR neonatal head template. The neonatal bimodal MR-CT head template is freely downloadable from https://www.u-picardie.fr/labo/GRAMFC. PMID:28129340

  17. Integration of molecular functions into Si device for nanoscale molecular devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakayama, Yutaka, E-mail: WAKAYAMA.Yutaka@nims.go.jp; Hayakawa, Ryoma

    2014-03-03

    Recent progress on nanoscale molecular devices is reviewed. The advantages of organic molecules are highlighted in terms of their unique features such as quantum effects based on their nanometer size, optical properties originating from photochromism and chemical syntheses for various structural designs. This review covers three topics: a scanning probe microscope-based evaluation of individual molecules, nano-gap electrodes for electrical current through single-molecules and the incorporation of molecular functions into Si-based devices. In particular, the importance of the incorporation of organic molecules into Si-device architecture is emphasized with a view to realizing the large-scale integration of nanoscale molecular devices. - Highlights: • Scanning probe microscope-based evaluation of individual molecules; • Nano-gap electrodes for electrical current through single-molecules; • Incorporation of molecular functions into Si-based devices.

  18. 纳米制备与表征%Nanoscale Fabrication and Characterisation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭全民

    2003-01-01

    @@ Are there great things to be discovered at the nanoscale? The answer is almost certainly"yes".From the microscale to the nanoscale,it is far from just scaling down,it is a "great leap forward"into a complete new regime where the physical and chemical properties of materials exhibit size dependent behaviour.A thorough understanding of the new physics and chemistry at the nanometer scale will lead to the design and fabrication of smart new functional materials and devices, for instance,electronic devices that operate on the basic principles of quantum mechanics.Nanofabrication will not go far without reliable measurement and characterisation methods.Indeed,the boom in nanotechnology all started when the scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) was invented in 1982, which enabled surface imagning with atomic resolution.

  19. Interfibrillar stiffening of echinoderm mutable collagenous tissue demonstrated at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jingyi; Blowes, Liisa M.; Egertová, Michaela; Terrill, Nicholas J.; Wang, Wen; Elphick, Maurice R.; Gupta, Himadri S.

    2016-01-01

    The mutable collagenous tissue (MCT) of echinoderms (e.g., sea cucumbers and starfish) is a remarkable example of a biological material that has the unique attribute, among collagenous tissues, of being able to rapidly change its stiffness and extensibility under neural control. However, the mechanisms of MCT have not been characterized at the nanoscale. Using synchrotron small-angle X-ray diffraction to probe time-dependent changes in fibrillar structure during in situ tensile testing of sea cucumber dermis, we investigate the ultrastructural mechanics of MCT by measuring fibril strain at different chemically induced mechanical states. By measuring a variable interfibrillar stiffness (EIF), the mechanism of mutability at the nanoscale can be demonstrated directly. A model of stiffness modulation via enhanced fibrillar recruitment is developed to explain the biophysical mechanisms of MCT. Understanding the mechanisms of MCT quantitatively may have applications in development of new types of mechanically tunable biomaterials. PMID:27708167

  20. AFM Study on Reliability of Nanoscale DLC Films Deposited by ECR-MPCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shou-xing; ZHU Shi-gen; DING Jian-ning

    2004-01-01

    Nanoindentation, scratch and wear tests based on an atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried out to study the reliability of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, deposited by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (ECR-MPCVD). The predictors for film reliability were given to investigate the resistance of DLC films to indent, scratch, and wear. Experimental results showed that the films at 64.9nm and 12.07nm exhibited better reliability than thin one at 2.78nm, 4.48nm. In addition, the reliability strength of films above 12.07nm went stable, and the films showed good performance of anti-indentation, anti-scratch and anti-wear. Finally, size effect of nanoscale monolayer film was introduced to explain the reliability of nanoscale DLC films.

  1. Planarization for three-dimensional photonic crystals and other multi-level nanoscale structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramania, G

    2007-01-24

    We describe an approach for achieving local as well as global planarization in the fabrication of multi-level nanoscale structures. Using a 'pre-fill-in' technique, where trenches are filled with SiO(2) prior to the application of a planarizing liquid, we demonstrate that the global degree of planarization can be improved from a mere approximately 25% to over approximately 90%. The first layer of a woodpile photonic lattice with a period of approximately 0.5 microm and a minimum feature size of approximately 0.2 microm is used as an example structure to illustrate the issues involved in planarization. This method provides an attractive and simpler alternative to the traditional chemical mechanical polishing approach, which can be quite complicated at nanoscale features involving non-traditional materials.

  2. Stabilizing the body centered cubic crystal in titanium alloys by a nano-scale concentration modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H. L.; Shah, S. A. A.; Hao, Y. L.; Prima, F.; Li, T.; Cairney, J. M.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y.; Obbard, E. G.; Li, S. J.; Yang, R.

    2017-04-01

    It is well-known that the body centered cubic (bcc) crystal in titanium alloys reaches its stability limit as the electron-to-atom (e/a) ratio of the alloy drops down to ~4.24. This critical value, however, is much higher than that of a multifunctional bcc type alloy (e/a = 4.15). Here we demonstrate that a nano-scale concentration modulation created by spinodal decomposition is what stabilizes the bcc crystal of the alloy. Aided by such a nano-scale concentration heterogeneity, unexpected properties from its chemically homogeneous counterpart are obtained. This provides a new strategy to design functional titanium alloys by tuning the spinodal decomposition.

  3. Controlled isotropic or anisotropic nanoscale growth of coordination polymers: formation of hybrid coordination polymer particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Jung; Cho, Yea Jin; Cho, Won; Oh, Moonhyun

    2013-01-22

    The ability to fabricate multicompositional hybrid materials in a precise and controlled manner is one of the primary goals of modern materials science research. In addition, an understanding of the phenomena associated with the systematic growth of one material on another can facilitate the evolution of multifunctional hybrid materials. Here, we demonstrate precise manipulation of the isotropic and/or anisotropic nanoscale growth of various coordination polymers (CPs) to obtain heterocompositional hybrid coordination polymer particles. Chemical composition analyses conducted at every growth step reveal the formation of accurately assembled hybrid nanoscale CPs, and microscopy images are used to examine the morphology of the particles and visualize the hybrid structures. The dissimilar growth behavior, that is, growth in an isotropic or anisotropic fashion, is found to be dependent on the size of the metal ions involved within the CPs.

  4. Progress in Nanoscale Studies of Hydrogen Reactions in Construction Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, J. S.; Livingston, R. A.; Cheung, J.; Rolfs, C.; Becker, H.-W.; Kubsky, S.; Spillane, T.; Zickefoose, J.; Castellote, M.; Bengtsson, N.; Galan, I.; de Viedma, P. G.; Brendle, S.; Bumrongjaroen, W.; Muller, I.

    Nuclear resonance reaction analysis (NRRA) has been applied to measure the nanoscale distribution of hydrogen with depth in the hydration of cementitious phases. This has provided a better understanding of the mechanisms and kinetics of cement hydration during the induction period that is critical to improved concrete technology. NRRA was also applied to measure the hydrogen depth profiles in other materials used in concrete construction such as fly ash and steel. By varying the incident beam energy one measures a profile with a depth resolution of a few nanometers. Time-resolved measurements are achieved by stopping the chemical reactions at specific times. Effects of temperature, sulfate concentration, accelerators and retarders, and superplasticizers have been investigated. Hydration of fly ashes has been studied with synthetic glass specimens whose chemical compositions are modeled on those of actual fly ashes. A combinatorial chemistry approach was used where glasses of different compositions are hydrated in various solutions for a fixed time. The resulting hydrogen depth profiles show significant differences in hydrated phases, rates of depth penetration and amount of surface etching. Hydrogen embrittlement of steel was studied on slow strain rate specimens under different corrosion potentials.

  5. Simultaneous Removal of Surfactant Template from MCM-41 and Implantation of Transition Metal Complexes into Mesopores with Supercritical Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The simultaneous removal of up to 92% of the surfactant template and chemical implantation of transition metal complexes into mesopores has been successfully achieved by treating as-synthesized pure siliceous MCM-41 with supercritical CO2 modified with CH2Cl2/MeOH mixture, resulting in the formation of functionalized material with uniform pore structure.

  6. Precise Coating of a Wide Range of DNA Templates by a Protein Polymer with a DNA Binding Domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Armando; Estrich, Nicole A.; Werten, Marc W.T.; Maarel, van der Johan R.C.; Labean, Thomas H.; Wolf, de Frits A.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Vries, de Renko

    2017-01-01

    Emerging DNA-based nanotechnologies would benefit from the ability to modulate the properties (e.g., solubility, melting temperature, chemical stability) of diverse DNA templates (single molecules or origami nanostructures) through controlled, self-assembling coatings. We here introduce a DNA

  7. Precise Coating of a Wide Range of DNA Templates by a Protein Polymer with a DNA Binding Domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez-Garcia, Armando; Estrich, Nicole A.; Werten, Marc W.T.; Maarel, van der Johan R.C.; Labean, Thomas H.; Wolf, de Frits A.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Vries, de Renko

    2017-01-01

    Emerging DNA-based nanotechnologies would benefit from the ability to modulate the properties (e.g., solubility, melting temperature, chemical stability) of diverse DNA templates (single molecules or origami nanostructures) through controlled, self-assembling coatings. We here introduce a DNA coatin

  8. The Application of Template Selectophores for the Preparation of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylec, Basil; Schwarz, Lachlan J; Harris, Simon J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-09-23

    Molecularly imprinted polymers are versatile materials with wide application scope for the detection, capture and separation of specific compounds present in complex feed stocks. A major challenge associated with their preparation has been the need to sacrifice one mole equivalent of the template molecule to generate the complementary polymer cavities that selectively bind the target molecule. Moreover, template molecules can often be difficult to synthesise, expensive or lack stability. In this study, we describe a new approach, directed at the use of synthetic selectophores, chosen as readily prepared and low cost structural analogues with recognition groups in similar three-dimensional arrangements as found in the target molecule. To validate the approach, a comparative study of selectophores related to the polyphenolic compound (E)-resveratrol has been undertaken using traditional and green chemical synthetic approaches. These molecular mimic compounds were employed as polymer templates and also as binding analytes to interrogate the recognition sites associated with the molecularly imprinted polymers. Importantly, the study confirms that the use of selectophores has the potential to confer practical advantages, including access to more efficient methods for selection and preparation of suitable template molecules with a broader range of molecular diversity, as well as delivering imprinted polymers capable of recognizing the target compound and structurally related products.

  9. The Application of Template Selectophores for the Preparation of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil Danylec

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly imprinted polymers are versatile materials with wide application scope for the detection, capture and separation of specific compounds present in complex feed stocks. A major challenge associated with their preparation has been the need to sacrifice one mole equivalent of the template molecule to generate the complementary polymer cavities that selectively bind the target molecule. Moreover, template molecules can often be difficult to synthesise, expensive or lack stability. In this study, we describe a new approach, directed at the use of synthetic selectophores, chosen as readily prepared and low cost structural analogues with recognition groups in similar three-dimensional arrangements as found in the target molecule. To validate the approach, a comparative study of selectophores related to the polyphenolic compound (E-resveratrol has been undertaken using traditional and green chemical synthetic approaches. These molecular mimic compounds were employed as polymer templates and also as binding analytes to interrogate the recognition sites associated with the molecularly imprinted polymers. Importantly, the study confirms that the use of selectophores has the potential to confer practical advantages, including access to more efficient methods for selection and preparation of suitable template molecules with a broader range of molecular diversity, as well as delivering imprinted polymers capable of recognizing the target compound and structurally related products.

  10. [Exploration of research approaches of Chinese medicine's pharmacology based on "imprinting templates" (medical element) of supramolecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fu-yuan; He, Hong; Deng, Kai-wen; Zhou, Yi-qun; Shi, Ji-lian; Liu, Wen-long; Yang, Yan-tao; Tang, Yu

    2015-11-01

    The paper, based on the previous publication as special impact of Chinese medicine theories on supramolcular chemistry, aims to analyze the natural origination for the Chinese medicine and to explain the special impact of "Qi chromatography" reaction on "imprinting templates" in supramolcular host of human being with Chinese medicine, in order to reveal the CM's properties of "medical element" with "imprinting templates" autonomisation generally took place in natural supramolecules, and also to discover that the CM's pharmacology are satisfied with its own approaches different form western pharmacology. It was decided, for CM's pharmacology guided by CM's theories, to "Qi chromatography" relations between the CM's ingredient groups and the meridian zang-fu viscera. The supramolcular chemistry played an all-through role in procession of making macro-regularities and special presentation on behavior of "Qi chromatography" impulse owning to the matching action of all kinds of ingredients on the meridian zang-fu viscera with similar "imprinting templates". The CM's pharmacology were guided by CM's theories, owing to its interpretation of supramolecular chemistry. The pharmacology was achieved to construct up completely on base of classical chemical single molecular bonds whereas the CM's pharmacology be configured to big building by way of "imprinting templates" as multi-weak bonds among "supramolecular society". CM's pharmacology was supramolcular pharmacology dealt with "molecular society" on the base of western pharmacology, and employed to double research approaches both math-physical quantitative representation on macroscope and qualitative analyses in microscope.

  11. DNA repair by RNA: Templated, or not templated, that is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meers, Chance; Keskin, Havva; Storici, Francesca

    2016-08-01

    Cells are continuously exposed to both endogenous and exogenous sources of genomic stress. To maintain chromosome stability, a variety of mechanisms have evolved to cope with the multitude of genetic abnormalities that can arise over the life of a cell. Still, failures to repair these lesions are the driving force of cancers and other degenerative disorders. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most toxic genetic lesions, inhibiting cell ability to replicate, and are sites of mutations and chromosomal rearrangements. DSB repair is known to proceed via two major mechanisms: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). HR reliance on the exchange of genetic information between two identical or nearly identical DNA molecules offers increased accuracy. While the preferred substrate for HR in mitotic cells is the sister chromatid, this is limited to the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. However, abundant amounts of homologous genetic substrate may exist throughout the cell cycle in the form of RNA. Considered an uncommon occurrence, the direct transfer of information from RNA to DNA is thought to be limited to special circumstances. Studies have shown that RNA molecules reverse transcribed into cDNA can be incorporated into DNA at DSB sites via a non-templated mechanism by NHEJ or a templated mechanism by HR. In addition, synthetic RNA molecules can directly template the repair of DSBs in yeast and human cells via an HR mechanism. New work suggests that even endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a homologous template to repair a DSB in chromosomal DNA. In this perspective, we will review and discuss the recent advancements in DSB repair by RNA via non-templated and templated mechanisms. We will provide current findings, models and future challenges investigating RNA and its role in DSB repair.

  12. Ear Authentication and Template Protection using Bio-key

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Annapurani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biometric authentication is gaining popularity in the current scenario. Biometric based authentication is the science of using physical or behavioral characteristic for ensuring that the person is the claimed identity. Biometric authentication system is also vulnerable to attacks in various phases. The biometric data stored in the template has to be protected, since variety of attacks like circumvent, covert acquisition affects the normal functioning of the system. An attacker may create new biometric data or steal the template or modify the template. Once the biometric template is compromised then the entire system is lost. So securing biometric template is an important aspect in biometric authentication system. In this study ear biometric template is secured by a new method of generating bio key from the ear fused template. Here the transformed template is stored in the database. During verification phase, for the new biometric sample a bio key is generated. Using this bio key the person is authenticated if the transformed feature generated is matched with the stored one. Hence the template is protected with the bio key. The authenticated person alone can access the system, since the key to decrypt the encrypted template is obtained from the ear trait of the authenticated person. FAR and FRR are used to evaluate the system performance.

  13. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  14. 75 FR 49487 - Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... AGENCY Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray AGENCY: Environmental Protection... period for the draft document ``Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray'' (EPA.... ] ADDRESSES: The draft ``Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray'' is available...

  15. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  16. Nanoscale characterization of surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    DiNardo, N John

    2008-01-01

    Derived from the highly acclaimed series Materials Science and Technology, this book provides in-depth coverage of STM, AFM, and related non-contact nanoscale probes along with detailed applications, such as the manipulation of atoms and clusters on a nanometer scale. The methods are described in terms of the physics and the technology of the methods and many high-quality images demonstrate the power of these techniques in the investigation of surfaces and the processes which occur on them.Topics include:Semiconductor Surfaces and Interfaces * Insulators * Layered Compounds * Charg

  17. Nonlinear Quantum Optics in Optomechanical Nanoscale Waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Zoubi, Hashem

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of achieving a significant nonlinear phase shift among photons propagating in nanoscale waveguides exploiting interactions among photons that are mediated by vibrational modes and induced through Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). We introduce a configuration that allows slowing down the photons by several orders of magnitude via SBS involving sound waves and two pump fields. We extract the conditions for maintaining vanishing amplitude gain or loss for slowly propagating photons while keeping the influence of thermal phonons to the minimum. The nonlinear phase among two counter-propagating photons can be used to realize a deterministic phase gate.

  18. Nanoscale atomic waveguides with suspended carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Peano, V; Kasper, A; Egger, R

    2005-01-01

    We propose an experimentally viable setup for the realization of one-dimensional ultracold atom gases in a nanoscale magnetic waveguide formed by single doubly-clamped suspended carbon nanotubes. We show that all common decoherence and atom loss mechanisms are small guaranteeing a stable operation of the trap. Since the extremely large current densities in carbon nanotubes are spatially homogeneous, our proposed architecture allows to overcome the problem of fragmentation of the atom cloud. Adding a second nanowire allows to create a double-well potential with a moderate tunneling barrier which is desired for tunneling and interference experiments with the advantage of tunneling distances being in the nanometer regime.

  19. Attosecond nanoscale near-field sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Förg, Benjamin; Suessmann, Frederik; Foerster, Michael; Krueger, Michael; Ahn, Byung-Nam; Wintersperger, Karen; Zherebtsov, Sergey; Guggenmos, Alexander; Pervak, Vladimir; Kessel, Alexander; Trushin, Sergei; Azzeer, Abdallah; Stockman, Mark; Kim, Dong-Eon; Krausz, Ferenc; Hommelhoff, Peter; Kling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The promise of ultrafast light field driven electronic nanocircuits has stimulated the development of the new research field of attosecond nanophysics. An essential prerequisite for advancing this new area is the ability to characterize optical nearfields from light interaction with nanostructures with sub cycle resolution. Here, we experimentally demonstrate attosecond nearfield retrieval with a gold nanotip using streaking spectroscopy. By comparison of the results from gold nanotips to those obtained for a noble gas, the spectral response of the nanotip near field arising from laser excitation can be extracted. Monte Carlo MC trajectory simulations in near fields obtained with the macroscopic Maxwells equations elucidate the streaking mechanism on the nanoscale.

  20. Nanoscale Morphology Control in Functional Polymer Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joachim; Loos; Svetlana; Chevtchenko

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In high-performance organic solar cells,the photoactive layer consists of a blend of an electron donor and an electron acceptor constituent,a so-called bulk heterojunction.The requirements to morphology of the efficient photoactive layer are nanoscale phase separation,which provides large interface area for exciton dissociation,and at the same time continuous pathways for transport of free charge carriers to the appropriate electrodes.In this context,the research is now focused on a better und...