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Sample records for n-terminal di-arginine motif

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum protein targeting of phospholamban: a common role for an N-terminal di-arginine motif in ER retention?

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    Parveen Sharma

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Phospholamban (PLN is an effective inhibitor of the sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+-ATPase, which transports Ca(2+ into the SR lumen, leading to muscle relaxation. A mutation of PLN in which one of the di-arginine residues at positions 13 and 14 was deleted led to a severe, early onset dilated cardiomyopathy. Here we were interested in determining the cellular mechanisms involved in this disease-causing mutation.Mutations deleting codons for either or both Arg13 or Arg14 resulted in the mislocalization of PLN from the ER. Our data show that PLN is recycled via the retrograde Golgi to ER membrane traffic pathway involving COP-I vesicles, since co-immunoprecipitation assays determined that COP I interactions are dependent on an intact di-arginine motif as PLN RDelta14 did not co-precipitate with COP I containing vesicles. Bioinformatic analysis determined that the di-arginine motif is present in the first 25 residues in a large number of all ER/SR Gene Ontology (GO annotated proteins. Mutations in the di-arginine motif of the Sigma 1-type opioid receptor, the beta-subunit of the signal recognition particle receptor, and Sterol-O-acyltransferase, three proteins identified in our bioinformatic screen also caused mislocalization of these known ER-resident proteins.We conclude that PLN is enriched in the ER due to COP I-mediated transport that is dependent on its intact di-arginine motif and that the N-terminal di-arginine motif may act as a general ER retrieval sequence.

  2. Motif decomposition of the phosphotyrosine proteome reveals a new N-terminal binding motif for SHIP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Hanke, S.; Hinsby, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    set of 481 unique phosphotyrosine (Tyr(P)) peptides by sequence similarity to known ligands of the Src homology 2 (SH2) and the phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains. From 20 clusters we extracted 16 known and four new interaction motifs. Using quantitative mass spectrometry we pulled down Tyr......(P)-specific binding partners for peptides corresponding to the extracted motifs. We confirmed numerous previously known interaction motifs and found 15 new interactions mediated by phosphosites not previously known to bind SH2 or PTB. Remarkably, a novel hydrophobic N-terminal motif ((L/V/I)(L/V/I)pY) was identified...

  3. Cyclization of the N-Terminal X-Asn-Gly Motif during Sample Preparation for Bottom-Up Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Højrup, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We, herein, report a novel -17 Da peptide modification corresponding to an N-terminal cyclization of peptides possessing the N-terminal motif of X-Asn-Gly. The cyclization occurs spontaneously during sample preparation for bottom-up proteomics studies. Distinct from the two well-known N-terminal ......We, herein, report a novel -17 Da peptide modification corresponding to an N-terminal cyclization of peptides possessing the N-terminal motif of X-Asn-Gly. The cyclization occurs spontaneously during sample preparation for bottom-up proteomics studies. Distinct from the two well-known N......-terminal cyclizations, cyclization of N-terminal glutamine and S-carbamoylmethylcysteine, it is dependent on pH instead of [NH(4)(+)]. The data set from our recent study on large-scale N(α)-modified peptides revealed a sequence requirement for the cyclization event similar to the well-known deamidation of Asn to iso...

  4. Powdery mildew fungal effector candidates share N-terminal Y/F/WxC-motif

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    Emmersen Jeppe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Powdery mildew and rust fungi are widespread, serious pathogens that depend on developing haustoria in the living plant cells. Haustoria are separated from the host cytoplasm by a plant cell-derived extrahaustorial membrane. They secrete effector proteins, some of which are subsequently transferred across this membrane to the plant cell to suppress defense. Results In a cDNA library from barley epidermis containing powdery mildew haustoria, two-thirds of the sequenced ESTs were fungal and represented ~3,000 genes. Many of the most highly expressed genes encoded small proteins with N-terminal signal peptides. While these proteins are novel and poorly related, they do share a three-amino acid motif, which we named "Y/F/WxC", in the N-terminal of the mature proteins. The first amino acid of this motif is aromatic: tyrosine, phenylalanine or tryptophan, and the last is always cysteine. In total, we identified 107 such proteins, for which the ESTs represent 19% of the fungal clones in our library, suggesting fundamental roles in haustoria function. While overall sequence similarity between the powdery mildew Y/F/WxC-proteins is low, they do have a highly similar exon-intron structure, suggesting they have a common origin. Interestingly, searches of public fungal genome and EST databases revealed that haustoria-producing rust fungi also encode large numbers of novel, short proteins with signal peptides and the Y/F/WxC-motif. No significant numbers of such proteins were identified from genome and EST sequences from either fungi which do not produce haustoria or from haustoria-producing Oomycetes. Conclusion In total, we identified 107, 178 and 57 such Y/F/WxC-proteins from the barley powdery mildew, the wheat stem rust and the wheat leaf rust fungi, respectively. All together, our findings suggest the Y/F/WxC-proteins to be a new class of effectors from haustoria-producing pathogenic fungi.

  5. Crystal Structure of the N-Terminal RNA Recognition Motif of mRNA Decay Regulator AUF1

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    Young Jun Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AU-rich element binding/degradation factor 1 (AUF1 plays a role in destabilizing mRNAs by forming complexes with AU-rich elements (ARE in the 3′-untranslated regions. Multiple AUF1-ARE complexes regulate the translation of encoded products related to the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inflammation. AUF1 contains two tandem RNA recognition motifs (RRM and a Gln- (Q- rich domain in their C-terminal region. To observe how the two RRMs are involved in recognizing ARE, we obtained the AUF1-p37 protein covering the two RRMs. However, only N-terminal RRM (RRM1 was crystallized and its structure was determined at 1.7 Å resolution. It appears that the RRM1 and RRM2 separated before crystallization. To demonstrate which factors affect the separate RRM1-2, we performed limited proteolysis using trypsin. The results indicated that the intact proteins were cleaved by unknown proteases that were associated with them prior to crystallization. In comparison with each of the monomers, the conformations of the β2-β3 loops were highly variable. Furthermore, a comparison with the RRM1-2 structures of HuR and hnRNP A1 revealed that a dimer of RRM1 could be one of the possible conformations of RRM1-2. Our data may provide a guidance for further structural investigations of AUF1 tandem RRM repeat and its mode of ARE binding.

  6. The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 is essential and sufficient for its caveolae-association

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    Wei, Zhuang [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Zou, Xinle [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Wang, Hongzhong; Lei, Jigang; Wu, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Liao, Kan, E-mail: kliao@sibs.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2015-01-16

    Highlight: • The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 determines caveolar association. • Different cellular localization of PTRF/cavin-1 influences its serine 389 and 391 phosphorylation state. • PTRF/cavin-1 regulates cell motility via its caveolar association. - Abstract: PTRF/cavin-1 is a protein of two lives. Its reported functions in ribosomal RNA synthesis and in caveolae formation happen in two different cellular locations: nucleus vs. plasma membrane. Here, we identified that the N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 was essential for the protein to be associated with caveolae in plasma membrane. It could counteract the effect of nuclear localization sequence in the molecule (AA 235–251). Deletion of this leucine-zipper motif from PTRF/cavin-1 caused the mutant to be exclusively localized in nuclei. The fusion of this leucine-zipper motif with histone 2A, which is a nuclear protein, could induce the fusion protein to be exported from nucleus. Cell migration was greatly inhibited in PTRF/cavin-1{sup −/−} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The inhibited cell motility could only be rescued by exogenous cavin-1 but not the leucine-zipper motif deleted cavin-1 mutant. Plasma membrane dynamics is an important factor in cell motility control. Our results suggested that the membrane dynamics in cell migration is affected by caveolae associated PTRF/cavin-1.

  7. The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 is essential and sufficient for its caveolae-association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Zhuang; Zou, Xinle; Wang, Hongzhong; Lei, Jigang; Wu, Yuan; Liao, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Highlight: • The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 determines caveolar association. • Different cellular localization of PTRF/cavin-1 influences its serine 389 and 391 phosphorylation state. • PTRF/cavin-1 regulates cell motility via its caveolar association. - Abstract: PTRF/cavin-1 is a protein of two lives. Its reported functions in ribosomal RNA synthesis and in caveolae formation happen in two different cellular locations: nucleus vs. plasma membrane. Here, we identified that the N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 was essential for the protein to be associated with caveolae in plasma membrane. It could counteract the effect of nuclear localization sequence in the molecule (AA 235–251). Deletion of this leucine-zipper motif from PTRF/cavin-1 caused the mutant to be exclusively localized in nuclei. The fusion of this leucine-zipper motif with histone 2A, which is a nuclear protein, could induce the fusion protein to be exported from nucleus. Cell migration was greatly inhibited in PTRF/cavin-1 −/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The inhibited cell motility could only be rescued by exogenous cavin-1 but not the leucine-zipper motif deleted cavin-1 mutant. Plasma membrane dynamics is an important factor in cell motility control. Our results suggested that the membrane dynamics in cell migration is affected by caveolae associated PTRF/cavin-1

  8. Nuclear import of influenza B virus nucleoprotein: Involvement of an N-terminal nuclear localization signal and a cleavage-protection motif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanitchang, Asawin; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2013-01-01

    The nucleoprotein of influenza B virus (BNP) shares several characteristics with its influenza A virus counterpart (ANP), including localization in the host's nucleus. However, while the nuclear localization signal(s) (NLS) of ANP are well characterized, little is known about those of BNP. In this study, we showed that the fusion protein bearing the BNP N-terminus fused with GFP (N70–GFP) is exclusively nuclear, and identified a highly conserved KRXR motif spanning residues 44–47 as a putative NLS. In addition, we demonstrated that residues 3–15 of BNP, though not an NLS, are also crucial for nuclear import. Results from mutational analyses of N70–GFP and the full-length BNP suggest that this region may be required for protection of the N-terminus from proteolytic cleavage. Altogether, we propose that the N-terminal region of BNP contains the NLS and cleavage-protection motif, which together drive its nuclear localization. - Highlights: • The N-terminal region of BNP is required for nuclear accumulation. • The conserved motif at position 44–47 is a putative nuclear localization signal. • The first 15 amino acids of BNP may function as a cleavage-protection motif. • BNP may get access to the nucleus via a mechanism distinct from ANP

  9. Nuclear import of influenza B virus nucleoprotein: Involvement of an N-terminal nuclear localization signal and a cleavage-protection motif

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    Wanitchang, Asawin; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Jongkaewwattana, Anan, E-mail: anan.jon@biotec.or.th

    2013-08-15

    The nucleoprotein of influenza B virus (BNP) shares several characteristics with its influenza A virus counterpart (ANP), including localization in the host's nucleus. However, while the nuclear localization signal(s) (NLS) of ANP are well characterized, little is known about those of BNP. In this study, we showed that the fusion protein bearing the BNP N-terminus fused with GFP (N70–GFP) is exclusively nuclear, and identified a highly conserved KRXR motif spanning residues 44–47 as a putative NLS. In addition, we demonstrated that residues 3–15 of BNP, though not an NLS, are also crucial for nuclear import. Results from mutational analyses of N70–GFP and the full-length BNP suggest that this region may be required for protection of the N-terminus from proteolytic cleavage. Altogether, we propose that the N-terminal region of BNP contains the NLS and cleavage-protection motif, which together drive its nuclear localization. - Highlights: • The N-terminal region of BNP is required for nuclear accumulation. • The conserved motif at position 44–47 is a putative nuclear localization signal. • The first 15 amino acids of BNP may function as a cleavage-protection motif. • BNP may get access to the nucleus via a mechanism distinct from ANP.

  10. The N-Terminal GYPSY Motif Is Required for Pilin-Specific Sortase SrtC1 Functionality in Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain GG.

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    François P Douillard

    Full Text Available Predominantly identified in pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili are also found in commensal species, such as the probiotic-marketed strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG. Pili are typically associated with host colonization, immune signalling and biofilm formation. Comparative analysis of the N-terminal domains of pilin-specific sortases from various piliated Gram-positive bacteria identified a conserved motif, called GYPSY, within the signal sequence. We investigated the function and role of the GYPSY residues by directed mutagenesis in homologous (rod-shaped and heterologous (coccoid-shaped expression systems for pilus formation. Substitutions of some of the GYPSY residues, and more specifically the proline residue, were found to have a direct impact on the degree of piliation of Lb. rhamnosus GG. The present findings uncover a new signalling element involved in the functionality of pilin-specific sortases controlling the pilus biogenesis of Lb. rhamnosus GG and related piliated Gram-positive species.

  11. The N-Terminal GYPSY Motif Is Required for Pilin-Specific Sortase SrtC1 Functionality in Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain GG

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    Douillard, François P.; Rasinkangas, Pia; Bhattacharjee, Arnab; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    Predominantly identified in pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili are also found in commensal species, such as the probiotic-marketed strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG. Pili are typically associated with host colonization, immune signalling and biofilm formation. Comparative analysis of the N-terminal domains of pilin-specific sortases from various piliated Gram-positive bacteria identified a conserved motif, called GYPSY, within the signal sequence. We investigated the function and role of the GYPSY residues by directed mutagenesis in homologous (rod-shaped) and heterologous (coccoid-shaped) expression systems for pilus formation. Substitutions of some of the GYPSY residues, and more specifically the proline residue, were found to have a direct impact on the degree of piliation of Lb. rhamnosus GG. The present findings uncover a new signalling element involved in the functionality of pilin-specific sortases controlling the pilus biogenesis of Lb. rhamnosus GG and related piliated Gram-positive species. PMID:27070897

  12. N-Terminal Cu-Binding Motifs (Xxx-Zzz-His, Xxx-His) and Their Derivatives: Chemistry, Biology and Medicinal Applications.

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    Gonzalez, Paulina; Bossak, Karolina; Stefaniak, Ewelina; Hureau, Christelle; Raibaut, Laurent; Bal, Wojciech; Faller, Peter

    2018-06-07

    Peptides and proteins with N-terminal amino acid sequences NH 2 -Xxx-His (XH) and NH 2 -Xxx-Zzz-His (XZH) form well-established high-affinity Cu II -complexes. Key examples are Asp-Ala-His (in serum albumin) and Gly-His-Lys, the wound healing factor. This opens a straightforward way to add a high-affinity Cu II -binding site to almost any peptide or protein, by chemical or recombinant approaches. Thus, these motifs, NH 2 -Xxx-Zzz-His in particular, have been used to equip peptides and proteins with a multitude of functions based on the redox activity of Cu, including nuclease, protease, glycosidase, or oxygen activation properties, useful in anticancer or antimicrobial drugs. More recent research suggests novel biological functions, mainly based on the redox inertness of Cu II in XZH, like PET imaging (with 64 Cu), chelation therapies (for instance in Alzheimer's disease and other types of neurodegeneration), antioxidant units, Cu transporters and activation of biological functions by strong Cu II binding. This Review gives an overview of the chemical properties of Cu-XH and -XZH motifs and discusses the pros and cons of the vastly different biological applications, and how they could be improved depending on the application. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Adenovirus fibre shaft sequences fold into the native triple beta-spiral fold when N-terminally fused to the bacteriophage T4 fibritin foldon trimerisation motif.

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    Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; Teixeira, Susana; Belrhali, Hassan; Forsyth, V Trevor; Mitraki, Anna; van Raaij, Mark J

    2004-09-03

    Adenovirus fibres are trimeric proteins that consist of a globular C-terminal domain, a central fibrous shaft and an N-terminal part that attaches to the viral capsid. In the presence of the globular C-terminal domain, which is necessary for correct trimerisation, the shaft segment adopts a triple beta-spiral conformation. We have replaced the head of the fibre by the trimerisation domain of the bacteriophage T4 fibritin, the foldon. Two different fusion constructs were made and crystallised, one with an eight amino acid residue linker and one with a linker of only two residues. X-ray crystallographic studies of both fusion proteins shows that residues 319-391 of the adenovirus type 2 fibre shaft fold into a triple beta-spiral fold indistinguishable from the native structure, although this is now resolved at a higher resolution of 1.9 A. The foldon residues 458-483 also adopt their natural structure. The intervening linkers are not well ordered in the crystal structures. This work shows that the shaft sequences retain their capacity to fold into their native beta-spiral fibrous fold when fused to a foreign C-terminal trimerisation motif. It provides a structural basis to artificially trimerise longer adenovirus shaft segments and segments from other trimeric beta-structured fibre proteins. Such artificial fibrous constructs, amenable to crystallisation and solution studies, can offer tractable model systems for the study of beta-fibrous structure. They can also prove useful for gene therapy and fibre engineering applications.

  14. A Conserved Acidic Motif in the N-Terminal Domain of Nitrate Reductase Is Necessary for the Inactivation of the Enzyme in the Dark by Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Binding1

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    Pigaglio, Emmanuelle; Durand, Nathalie; Meyer, Christian

    1999-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the N-terminal domain of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) nitrate reductase (NR) is involved in the inactivation of the enzyme by phosphorylation, which occurs in the dark (L. Nussaume, M. Vincentz, C. Meyer, J.P. Boutin, and M. Caboche [1995] Plant Cell 7: 611–621). The activity of a mutant NR protein lacking this N-terminal domain was no longer regulated by light-dark transitions. In this study smaller deletions were performed in the N-terminal domain of tobacco NR that removed protein motifs conserved among higher plant NRs. The resulting truncated NR-coding sequences were then fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and introduced in NR-deficient mutants of the closely related species Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. We found that the deletion of a conserved stretch of acidic residues led to an active NR protein that was more thermosensitive than the wild-type enzyme, but it was relatively insensitive to the inactivation by phosphorylation in the dark. Therefore, the removal of this acidic stretch seems to have the same effects on NR activation state as the deletion of the N-terminal domain. A hypothetical explanation for these observations is that a specific factor that impedes inactivation remains bound to the truncated enzyme. A synthetic peptide derived from this acidic protein motif was also found to be a good substrate for casein kinase II. PMID:9880364

  15. Localization of Daucus carota NMCP1 to the nuclear periphery: the role of the N-terminal region and an NLS-linked sequence motif, RYNLRR, in the tail domain

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    Yuta eKimura

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent ultrastructural studies revealed that a structure similar to the vertebrate nuclear lamina exists in the nuclei of higher plants. However, plant genomes lack genes for lamins and intermediate-type filament proteins, and this suggests that plant-specific nuclear coiled-coil proteins make up the lamina-like structure in plants. NMCP1 is a protein, first identified in Daucus carota cells, that localizes exclusively to the nuclear periphery in interphase cells. It has a tripartite structure comprised of head, rod, and tail domains, and includes putative nuclear localization signal (NLS motifs. We identified the functional NLS of DcNMCP1 (carrot NMCP1 and determined the protein regions required for localizing to the nuclear periphery using EGFP-fused constructs transiently expressed in Apium graveolens epidermal cells. Transcription was driven under a CaMV35S promoter, and the genes were introduced into the epidermal cells by a DNA-coated microprojectile delivery system. Of the NLS motifs, KRRRK and RRHK in the tail domain were highly functional for nuclear localization. Addition of the N-terminal 141 amino acids from DcNMCP1 shifted the localization of a region including these NLSs from the entire nucleus to the nuclear periphery. Using this same construct, the replacement of amino acids in RRHK or its preceding sequence, YNL, with alanine residues abolished localization to the nuclear periphery, while replacement of KRRRK did not affect localization. The sequence R/Q/HYNLRR/H, including YNL and the first part of the sequence of RRHK, is evolutionarily conserved in a subclass of NMCP1 sequences from many plant species. These results show that NMCP1 localizes to the nuclear periphery by a combined action of a sequence composed of R/Q/HYNLRR/H, NLS, and the N-terminal region including the head and a portion of the rod domain, suggesting that more than one binding site is implicated in localization of NMCP1.

  16. In vivo mutational analysis of the N-terminal region of HIV-1 Nef reveals critical motifs for the development of an AIDS-like disease in CD4C/HIV transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Zaher; Priceputu, Elena; Kay, Denis G.; Poudrier, Johanne; Chrobak, Pavel; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2004-01-01

    HIV-1 Nef is a critical determinant of pathogenicity in humans and transgenic (Tg) mice. To gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which Nef induces an AIDS-like disease in Tg mice, a mutational analysis of the N-terminal domain, involved in anchoring Nef to the plasma membrane, was carried out. The pathogenic effects of these Nef mutant alleles were evaluated in Tg mice by FACS analysis and by histopathological assessment. Mutation of the myristoylation site (G2A) completely abrogated the development of the AIDS-like organ disease in Tg mice, although partial downregulation of the CD4 cell surface protein and depletion of peripheral CD4 + T-cells, but not of CD4 + CD8 + thymocytes, still occurred. Despite that, the peripheral CD4 + T cells expressing Nef G2A show normal spontaneous proliferation in vivo or after stimulation in vitro, including in an allogenic mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR). Three other internal deletion mutants of Nef, spanning amino acids 8-17 (Nef Δ8-17 ), 25-35 (Nef Δ25-35 ), and 57-66 (Nef Δ57-66 ), were also studied. Nef Δ8-17 retained full pathogenic potential, although Nef Δ25-35 and Nef Δ57-66 Tg mice were free of organ disease. However, Nef Δ25-35 Tg mice exhibited disorganization of thymic architecture and a partial depletion of peripheral CD4 + T cells. These data indicate that myristoylation and other regions at the N-terminus of Nef (aa 25-35 and 57-66) are involved in mediating severe T-cell phenotypes and organ disease, although residues 8-17 are dispensable for these Nef functions. In addition, these results indicate that at least some of the CD4 + T-cell phenotypes can develop independently of the other AIDS-like organ phenotypes. This apparent segregation of different Nef-mediated phenotypes suggests distinct mechanisms of Nef action in different populations of target cells, and may be relevant to human AIDS

  17. An N-Terminal ER Export Signal Facilitates the Plasma Membrane Targeting of HCN1 Channels in Photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuan; Laird, Joseph G; Yamaguchi, David M; Baker, Sheila A

    2015-06-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated 1 (HCN1) channels are widely expressed in the retina. In photoreceptors, the hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) carried by HCN1 is important for shaping the light response. It has been shown in multiple systems that trafficking HCN1 channels to specific compartments is key to their function. The localization of HCN1 in photoreceptors is concentrated in the plasma membrane of the inner segment (IS). The mechanisms controlling this localization are not understood. We previously identified a di-arginine endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention motif that negatively regulates the surface targeting of HCN1. In this study, we sought to identify a forward trafficking signal that could counter the function of the ER retention signal. We studied trafficking of HCN1 and several mutants by imaging their subcellular localization in transgenic X. laevis photoreceptors. Velocity sedimentation was used to assay the assembly state of HCN1 channels. We found the HCN1 N-terminus can redirect a membrane reporter from outer segments (OS) to the plasma membrane of the IS. The sequence necessary for this behavior was mapped to a 20 amino acid region containing a leucine-based ER export motif. The ER export signal is necessary for forward trafficking but not channel oligomerization. Moreover, this ER export signal alone counteracted the di-arginine ER retention signal. We identified an ER export signal in HCN1 that functions with the ER retention signal to maintain equilibrium of HCN1 between the endomembrane system and the plasma membrane.

  18. Towards the N-terminal acetylome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Højrup, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-terminal acetylation (N(α)-acetylation) is observed widely from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. It gains increased importance in biological field, due to its multiple roles in many aspects of the protein life, such as assembly, stability, activity, and location. Today, mass spectrometry (MS...

  19. Carbamylation of N-terminal proline.

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    Olajuyigbe, Folasade M; Demitri, Nicola; Ajele, Joshua O; Maurizio, Elisa; Randaccio, Lucio; Geremia, Silvano

    2010-09-09

    Protein carbamylation is of great concern both in vivo and in vitro. Here, we report the first structural characterization of a protein carbamylated at the N-terminal proline. The unexpected carbamylation of the α-amino group of the least reactive codified amino acid has been detected in high-resolution electron density maps of a new crystal form of the HIV-1 protease/saquinavir complex. The carbamyl group is found coplanar to the proline ring with a trans conformation. The reaction of N-terminal with cyanate ion derived from the chaotropic agent urea was confirmed by mass spectra analysis on protease single crystals. Implications of carbamylation process in vitro and in vivo are discussed.

  20. Intrinsic structural differences in the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C from different species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Rivas, L; Casals, C

    2001-01-01

    Predictive studies suggest that the known sequences of the N-terminal segment of surfactant protein SP-C from animal species have an intrinsic tendency to form beta-turns, but there are important differences on the probable location of these motifs in different SP-C species. Our hypothesis...

  1. The AAA+ ATPase TRIP13 remodels HORMA domains through N-terminal engagement and unfolding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Qiaozhen; Kim, Dong Hyun; Dereli, Ihsan; Rosenberg, Scott C.; Hagemann, Goetz; Herzog, Franz; Tóth, Attila; Cleveland, Don W.; Corbett, Kevin D.

    2017-06-28

    Proteins of the conserved HORMA domain family, including the spindle assembly checkpoint protein MAD2 and the meiotic HORMADs, assemble into signaling complexes by binding short peptides termed “closure motifs”. The AAA+ ATPase TRIP13 regulates both MAD2 and meiotic HORMADs by disassembling these HORMA domain–closure motif complexes, but its mechanisms of substrate recognition and remodeling are unknown. Here, we combine X-ray crystallography and crosslinking mass spectrometry to outline how TRIP13 recognizes MAD2 with the help of the adapter protein p31comet. We show that p31comet binding to the TRIP13 N-terminal domain positions the disordered MAD2 N-terminus for engagement by the TRIP13 “pore loops”, which then unfold MAD2 in the presence of ATP. N-terminal truncation of MAD2 renders it refractory to TRIP13 action in vitro, and in cells causes spindle assembly checkpoint defects consistent with loss of TRIP13 function. Similar truncation of HORMAD1 in mouse spermatocytes compromises its TRIP13-mediated removal from meiotic chromosomes, highlighting a conserved mechanism for recognition and disassembly of HORMA domain–closure motif complexes by TRIP13.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Full-Length Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Capsid Protein Shows an N-Terminal β-Hairpin in the Absence of N-Terminal Proline

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    Christelle Folio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is a member of the Retroviridae family. It is the causative agent of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS in cats and wild felines. Its capsid protein (CA drives the assembly of the viral particle, which is a critical step in the viral replication cycle. Here, the first atomic structure of full-length FIV CA to 1.67 Å resolution is determined. The crystallized protein exhibits an original tetrameric assembly, composed of dimers which are stabilized by an intermolecular disulfide bridge induced by the crystallogenesis conditions. The FIV CA displays a standard α-helical CA topology with two domains, separated by a linker shorter than other retroviral CAs. The β-hairpin motif at its amino terminal end, which interacts with nucleotides in HIV-1, is unusually long in FIV CA. Interestingly, this functional β-motif is formed in this construct in the absence of the conserved N-terminal proline. The FIV CA exhibits a cis Arg–Pro bond in the CypA-binding loop, which is absent in known structures of lentiviral CAs. This structure represents the first tri-dimensional structure of a functional, full-length FIV CA.

  3. Interaction of the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C with interfacial phospholipid films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, Inés; Keough, Kevin M W; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C is a 35-residue polypeptide composed of a hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helix and a polycationic, palmitoylated-cysteine containing N-terminal segment. This segment is likely the only structural motif the protein projects out of the bilayer in which SP-C is ins......Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C is a 35-residue polypeptide composed of a hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helix and a polycationic, palmitoylated-cysteine containing N-terminal segment. This segment is likely the only structural motif the protein projects out of the bilayer in which SP...... or anionic phospholipid monolayers. The peptide expands the pi-A compression isotherms of interfacial phospholipid/peptide films, and perturbs the lipid packing of phospholipid films during compression-driven liquid-expanded to liquid-condensed lateral transitions, as observed by epifluorescence microscopy....... These results demonstrate that the sequence of the SP-C N-terminal region has intrinsic ability to interact with, insert into, and perturb the structure of zwitterionic and anionic phospholipid films, even in the absence of the palmitic chains attached to this segment in the native protein. This effect has been...

  4. BayesMotif: de novo protein sorting motif discovery from impure datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Fan

    2010-01-18

    Protein sorting is the process that newly synthesized proteins are transported to their target locations within or outside of the cell. This process is precisely regulated by protein sorting signals in different forms. A major category of sorting signals are amino acid sub-sequences usually located at the N-terminals or C-terminals of protein sequences. Genome-wide experimental identification of protein sorting signals is extremely time-consuming and costly. Effective computational algorithms for de novo discovery of protein sorting signals is needed to improve the understanding of protein sorting mechanisms. We formulated the protein sorting motif discovery problem as a classification problem and proposed a Bayesian classifier based algorithm (BayesMotif) for de novo identification of a common type of protein sorting motifs in which a highly conserved anchor is present along with a less conserved motif regions. A false positive removal procedure is developed to iteratively remove sequences that are unlikely to contain true motifs so that the algorithm can identify motifs from impure input sequences. Experiments on both implanted motif datasets and real-world datasets showed that the enhanced BayesMotif algorithm can identify anchored sorting motifs from pure or impure protein sequence dataset. It also shows that the false positive removal procedure can help to identify true motifs even when there is only 20% of the input sequences containing true motif instances. We proposed BayesMotif, a novel Bayesian classification based algorithm for de novo discovery of a special category of anchored protein sorting motifs from impure datasets. Compared to conventional motif discovery algorithms such as MEME, our algorithm can find less-conserved motifs with short highly conserved anchors. Our algorithm also has the advantage of easy incorporation of additional meta-sequence features such as hydrophobicity or charge of the motifs which may help to overcome the limitations of

  5. NetAcet: prediction of N-terminal acetylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiemer, Lars; Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Blom, Nikolaj

    2005-01-01

    Summary: We present here a neural network based method for prediction of N-terminal acetylation-by far the most abundant post-translational modification in eukaryotes. The method was developed on a yeast dataset for N-acetyltransferase A (NatA) acetylation, which is the type of N-acetylation for ......Summary: We present here a neural network based method for prediction of N-terminal acetylation-by far the most abundant post-translational modification in eukaryotes. The method was developed on a yeast dataset for N-acetyltransferase A (NatA) acetylation, which is the type of N...

  6. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  7. Interaction of N-terminal peptide analogues of the Na+,K+-ATPase with membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoa; Garcia, Alvaro; Sani, Marc-Antoine; Diaz, Dil; Dubey, Vikas; Clayton, Daniel; Dal Poggetto, Giovanni; Cornelius, Flemming; Payne, Richard J; Separovic, Frances; Khandelia, Himanshu; Clarke, Ronald J

    2018-06-01

    The Na + ,K + -ATPase, which is present in the plasma membrane of all animal cells, plays a crucial role in maintaining the Na + and K + electrochemical potential gradients across the membrane. Recent studies have suggested that the N-terminus of the protein's catalytic α-subunit is involved in an electrostatic interaction with the surrounding membrane, which controls the protein's conformational equilibrium. However, because the N-terminus could not yet be resolved in any X-ray crystal structures, little information about this interaction is so far available. In measurements utilising poly-l-lysine as a model of the protein's lysine-rich N-terminus and using lipid vesicles of defined composition, here we have identified the most likely origin of the interaction as one between positively charged lysine residues of the N-terminus and negatively charged headgroups of phospholipids (notably phosphatidylserine) in the surrounding membrane. Furthermore, to isolate which segments of the N-terminus could be involved in membrane binding, we chemically synthesized N-terminal fragments of various lengths. Based on a combination of results from RH421 UV/visible absorbance measurements and solid-state 31 P and 2 H NMR using these N-terminal fragments as well as MD simulations it appears that the membrane interaction arises from lysine residues prior to the conserved LKKE motif of the N-terminus. The MD simulations indicate that the strength of the interaction varies significantly between different enzyme conformations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Binding of the N-Terminal Domain of the Lactococcal Bacteriophage TP901-1 CI Repressor to Its Target DNA: A Crystallography, Small Angle Scattering, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner; Rasmussen, Kim K.; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing

    2013-01-01

    In most temperate bacteriophages, regulation of the choice of lysogenic or lytic life cycle is controlled by a CI repressor protein. Inhibition of transcription is dependent on a helix–turn–helix motif, often located in the N-terminal domain (NTD), which binds to specific DNA sequences (operator ...

  9. The N-terminal domain of the repressor of Staphylococcus aureus phage Φ11 possesses an unusual dimerization ability and DNA binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Biswas

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage Φ11 uses Staphylococcus aureus as its host and, like lambdoid phages, harbors three homologous operators in between its two divergently oriented repressor genes. None of the repressors of Φ11, however, showed binding to all three operators, even at high concentrations. To understand why the DNA binding mechanism of Φ11 repressors does not match that of lambdoid phage repressors, we studied the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 lysogenic repressor, as it harbors a putative helix-turn-helix motif. Our data revealed that the secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal domain were different from those of the full-length repressor. Nonetheless, the N-terminal domain was able to dimerize and bind to the operators similar to the intact repressor. In addition, the operator base specificity, binding stoichiometry, and binding mechanism of this domain were nearly identical to those of the whole repressor. The binding affinities of the repressor and its N-terminal domain were reduced to a similar extent when the temperature was increased to 42°C. Both proteins also adequately dislodged a RNA polymerase from a Φ11 DNA fragment carrying two operators and a promoter. Unlike the intact repressor, the binding of the N-terminal domain to two adjacent operator sites was not cooperative in nature. Taken together, we suggest that the dimerization and DNA binding abilities of the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 repressor are distinct from those of the DNA binding domains of other phage repressors.

  10. Structure of the EMMPRIN N-terminal domain 1: Dimerization via [beta]-strand swapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jinquan; Teplyakov, Alexey; Obmolova, Galina; Malia, Thomas; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Beil, Eric; Baker, Audrey; Swencki-Underwood, Bethany; Zhao, Yonghong; Sprenkle, Justin; Dixon, Ken; Sweet, Raymond; Gilliland, Gary L.; (Centocor)

    2010-09-27

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), also known as Hab18G, CD147, Basigin, M6, and neurothelin, is a membrane glycoprotein expressed on the surface of various cell types and many cancer cells. EMMPRIN stimulates adjacent fibroblasts and tumor cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases and plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, spermatogensis and fertilization, cell-cell adhesion and communication, and other biological processes (reviewed in Ref. 1 and references therein). It was demonstrated that the EMMPRIN extracellular domain (ECD), which structurally belongs to the IgG superfamily, can form homo-oligomers in a cis dependent manner and the N-terminal domain 1 (residues 22-101) was necessary and sufficient to mediate this interaction. The crystal structure of the ECD of recombinant human EMMPRIN (Hab18G/CD147) expressed in E. coli was reported at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution (Yu et al. 2008). The construct consists of residues 22-205 of the mature protein and has both an N-terminal IgC2 domain (ND1, residues 22-101) and a C-terminal IgC2 domain (ND2, residues 107-205). The two domains are joined by a five amino acid residue linker that constitutes a flexible hinge between the two domains. The crystal form has four copies of the molecule in the asymmetric unit, each of which has a different inter-domain angle that varies from 121{sup o} to 144{sup o}. The two domains each have a conserved disulfide bridge and both are comprised of two {beta}-sheets formed by strands EBA and GFCC, and DEBA and AGFCC for ND1 and ND2, respectively. Based on the crystal packing in this structure, the authors proposed that lateral packing between the two IgG domains of EMMPRIN ECD represents a potential mechanism for cell adhesion. Here we report the 2.0-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of EMMPRIN ECD (ND1) expressed in mammalian cells. The overall structure of the domain is very similar to that in the full length

  11. X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal region of Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase and its implications for viral DNA recognition: N-Terminal Region of M-MuLV Integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Rongjin [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Aiyer, Sriram [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Cote, Marie L. [Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Xiao, Rong [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Jiang, Mei [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Acton, Thomas B. [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Roth, Monica J. [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Montelione, Gaetano T. [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ, Piscataway New Jersey 08854

    2017-02-03

    The retroviral integrase (IN) carries out the integration of a dsDNA copy of the viral genome into the host DNA, an essential step for viral replication. All IN proteins have three general domains, the N-terminal domain (NTD), the catalytic core domain, and the C-terminal domain. The NTD includes an HHCC zinc finger-like motif, which is conserved in all retroviral IN proteins. Two crystal structures of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) IN N-terminal region (NTR) constructs that both include an N-terminal extension domain (NED, residues 1–44) and an HHCC zinc-finger NTD (residues 45–105), in two crystal forms are reported. The structures of IN NTR constructs encoding residues 1–105 (NTR1–105) and 8–105 (NTR8–105) were determined at 2.7 and 2.15 Å resolution, respectively and belong to different space groups. While both crystal forms have similar protomer structures, NTR1–105 packs as a dimer and NTR8–105 packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of the NED consists of three anti-parallel β-strands and an α-helix, similar to the NED of prototype foamy virus (PFV) IN. These three β-strands form an extended β-sheet with another β-strand in the HHCC Zn2+ binding domain, which is a unique structural feature for the M-MuLV IN. The HHCC Zn2+ binding domain structure is similar to that in HIV and PFV INs, with variations within the loop regions. Differences between the PFV and MLV IN NEDs localize at regions identified to interact with the PFV LTR and are compared with established biochemical and virological data for M-MuLV. Proteins 2017; 85:647–656.

  12. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiheido, Hirokazu, E-mail: shiheido@ak.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND3{sub 56–58}, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. - Highlights: • BEND3 localizes to the nucleus. • The N-terminal 60 amino acids region of BEND3 contains NLS. • Amino acids located between 56 and 58 of BEND3 (KRK) are part of NLS. • KRK motif is highly conserved among BEND3 homologs.

  13. Identity and functions of CxxC-derived motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenko, Dmitri E; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2003-09-30

    Two cysteines separated by two other residues (the CxxC motif) are employed by many redox proteins for formation, isomerization, and reduction of disulfide bonds and for other redox functions. The place of the C-terminal cysteine in this motif may be occupied by serine (the CxxS motif), modifying the functional repertoire of redox proteins. Here we found that the CxxC motif may also give rise to a motif, in which the C-terminal cysteine is replaced with threonine (the CxxT motif). Moreover, in contrast to a view that the N-terminal cysteine in the CxxC motif always serves as a nucleophilic attacking group, this residue could also be replaced with threonine (the TxxC motif), serine (the SxxC motif), or other residues. In each of these CxxC-derived motifs, the presence of a downstream alpha-helix was strongly favored. A search for conserved CxxC-derived motif/helix patterns in four complete genomes representing bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes identified known redox proteins and suggested possible redox functions for several additional proteins. Catalytic sites in peroxiredoxins were major representatives of the TxxC motif, whereas those in glutathione peroxidases represented the CxxT motif. Structural assessments indicated that threonines in these enzymes could stabilize catalytic thiolates, suggesting revisions to previously proposed catalytic triads. Each of the CxxC-derived motifs was also observed in natural selenium-containing proteins, in which selenocysteine was present in place of a catalytic cysteine.

  14. N-terminal protein processing: A comparative proteogenomic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonissone, Stefano; Gupta, Nitin; Romine, Margaret F.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Terminal Methionine Excision (NME) is a universally conserved mechanism with the same specificity across all life forms that removes the first Methionine in proteins when the second residue is Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr, Pro, or Val. In spite of its necessity for proper cell functioning, the functional role of NME remains unclear. In 1988, Arfin and Bradshaw connected NME with the N-end protein degradation rule and postulated that the role of NME is to expose the stabilizing residues with the goal to resist protein degradation. While this explanation (that treats 7 stabilizing residues in the same manner) has become the de facto dogma of NME, comparative proteogenomics analysis of NME tells a different story. We suggest that the primary role of NME is to expose only two (rather than seven) amino acids Ala and Ser for post-translational modifications (e.g., acetylation) rather than to regulate protein degradation. We argue that, contrary to the existing view, NME is not crucially important for proteins with 5 other stabilizing residue at the 2nd positions that are merely bystanders (their function is not affected by NME) that become exposed to NME because their sizes are comparable or smaller than the size of Ala and Ser.

  15. Nickel Ligation of the N-Terminal Amine of HypA Is Required for Urease Maturation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Heidi Q; Johnson, Ryan C; Merrell, D Scott; Maroney, Michael J

    2017-02-28

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori requires nickel for colonization of the acidic environment of the stomach. HypA, a Ni metallochaperone that is typically associated with hydrogenase maturation, is also required for urease maturation and acid survival of H. pylori. There are two proposed Ni site structures for HypA; one is a paramagnetic six-coordinate site characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in unmodified HypA, while another is a diamagnetic four-coordinate planar site characterized by solution nuclear magnetic resonance in an N-terminally modified HypA construct. To determine the role of the N-terminal amine in Ni binding of HypA, an N-terminal extension variant, L2*-HypA, in which a leucine residue was inserted into the second position of the amino acid sequence in the proposed Ni-binding motif, was characterized in vitro and in vivo. Structural characterization of the Ni site using XAS showed a coordination change from six-coordinate in wild-type HypA (WT-HypA) to five-coordinate pyramidal in L2*-HypA, which was accompanied by the loss of two N/O donor protein ligands and the addition of an exogenous bromide ligand from the buffer. The magnetic properties of the Ni sites in WT-HypA compared to those of the Ni sites in L2*-HypA confirmed that a spin-state change from high to low spin accompanied this change in structure. The L2*-HypA H. pylori strain was shown to be acid sensitive and deficient in urease activity in vivo. In vitro characterization showed that L2*-HypA did not disrupt the HypA-UreE interaction that is essential for urease maturation but was at least 20-fold weaker in Ni binding than WT-HypA. Characterization of the L2*-HypA variant clearly demonstrates that the N-terminal amine of HypA is involved in proper Ni coordination and is necessary for urease activity and acid survival.

  16. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vif N-Terminal Residues Selectively Counteract Feline APOBEC3s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qinyong; Zhang, Zeli; Cano Ortiz, Lucía; Franco, Ana Cláudia; Häussinger, Dieter; Münk, Carsten

    2016-12-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif protein counteracts feline APOBEC3s (FcaA3s) restriction factors by inducing their proteasomal degradation. The functional domains in FIV Vif for interaction with FcaA3s are poorly understood. Here, we have identified several motifs in FIV Vif that are important for selective degradation of different FcaA3s. Cats (Felis catus) express three types of A3s: single-domain A3Z2, single-domain A3Z3, and double-domain A3Z2Z3. We proposed that FIV Vif would selectively interact with the Z2 and the Z3 A3s. Indeed, we identified two N-terminal Vif motifs (12LF13 and 18GG19) that specifically interacted with the FcaA3Z2 protein but not with A3Z3. In contrast, the exclusive degradation of FcaA3Z3 was regulated by a region of three residues (M24, L25, and I27). Only a FIV Vif carrying a combination of mutations from both interaction sites lost the capacity to degrade and counteract FcaA3Z2Z3. However, alterations in the specific A3s interaction sites did not affect the cellular localization of the FIV Vif protein and binding to feline A3s. Pulldown experiments demonstrated that the A3 binding region localized to FIV Vif residues 50 to 80, outside the specific A3 interaction domain. Finally, we found that the Vif sites specific to individual A3s are conserved in several FIV lineages of domestic cat and nondomestic cats, while being absent in the FIV Vif of pumas. Our data support a complex model of multiple Vif-A3 interactions in which the specific region for selective A3 counteraction is discrete from a general A3 binding domain. Both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif proteins counteract their host's APOBEC3 restriction factors. However, these two Vif proteins have limited sequence homology. The molecular interaction between FIV Vif and feline APOBEC3s are not well understood. Here, we identified N-terminal FIV Vif sites that regulate the selective interaction of Vif with either feline APOBEC3Z

  17. N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide as a cardiac biomarker in Japanese hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Minako; Doi, Shigehiro; Nakashima, Ayumu; Naito, Takayuki; Masaki, Takao

    2018-03-01

    This study examined the clinical significance of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide level as a cardiac marker in Japanese hemodialysis patients. This was a multicenter cross-sectional study involving 1428 Japanese hemodialysis patients. Ultrasonic cardiography data at post-hemodialysis were obtained from 395 patients. We examined whether serum N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide levels were associated with cardiac parameters and assessed cut-off values and investigated factors associated with a reduced ratio of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide levels pre- and post-hemodialysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that pre- and post-hemodialysis N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide levels were associated with left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiogram (odds ratio: 3.10; p N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide levels were also significantly associated with ejection fraction on urine chorionic gonadotrophin (ultrasonic cardiography; odds ratio: 35.83; p N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide reduction ratio during a hemodialysis session correlated with Kt/V, membrane area, membrane type, modality, body weight gain ratio, treatment time, and ultrafiltration rate with multiple linear regression ( R: 0.53; p N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide are associated with the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy in this population. The post-hemodialysis N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide level is a useful marker for systolic dysfunction.

  18. N-terminal tetrapeptide T/SPLH motifs contribute to multimodal activation of human TRPA1 channel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hynková, Anna; Maršáková, Lenka; Vašková, Jana; Vlachová, Viktorie

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Jun 27 (2016), s. 28700 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15839S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ankyrin receptor subtype 1 * transient receptor potential * gating * ankyrin repeat * whole-cell electrophysiology * N-terminus * mutagenesis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  19. Basolateral localisation of KCNQ1 potassium channels in MDCK cells: molecular identification of an N-terminal targeting motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Grunnet, Morten

    2004-01-01

    of the tyrosine residue at position 51 resulted in a non-polarized steady-state distribution of the channel. The importance of tyrosine 51 in basolateral localisation was emphasized by the fact that a short peptide comprising this tyrosine was able to redirect the p75 neurotrophin receptor, an otherwise apically...

  20. N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qiuping; Minaisah, Rose-Marie; Ferraro, Elisa; Li, Chen; Porter, Lauren J.; Zhou, Can; Gao, Fang; Zhang, Junyi; Rajgor, Dipen; Autore, Flavia; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Warren, Derek T., E-mail: derek.warren@kcl.ac.uk

    2016-07-15

    The spatial compartmentalisation of biochemical signalling pathways is essential for cell function. Nesprins are a multi-isomeric family of proteins that have emerged as signalling scaffolds, herein, we investigate the localisation and function of novel nesprin-2 N-terminal variants. We show that these nesprin-2 variants display cell specific distribution and reside in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that nesprin-2 N-terminal variants colocalised with β-catenin at cell-cell junctions in U2OS cells. Calcium switch assays demonstrated that nesprin-2 and β-catenin are lost from cell-cell junctions in low calcium conditions whereas emerin localisation at the NE remained unaltered, furthermore, an N-terminal fragment of nesprin-2 was sufficient for cell-cell junction localisation and interacted with β-catenin. Disruption of these N-terminal nesprin-2 variants, using siRNA depletion resulted in loss of β-catenin from cell-cell junctions, nuclear accumulation of active β-catenin and augmented β-catenin transcriptional activity. Importantly, we show that U2OS cells lack nesprin-2 giant, suggesting that the N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling independently of the NE. Together, these data identify N-terminal nesprin-2 variants as novel regulators of β-catenin signalling that tether β-catenin to cell-cell contacts to inhibit β-catenin transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • N-terminal nesprin-2 variants display cell specific expression patterns. • N-terminal spectrin repeats of nesprin-2 interact with β-catenin. • N-terminal nesprin-2 variants scaffold β-catenin at cell-cell junctions.. • Nesprin-2 variants play multiple roles in β-catenin signalling.

  1. Improving N-terminal protein annotation of Plasmodium species based on signal peptide prediction of orthologous proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neto Armando

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal peptide is one of the most important motifs involved in protein trafficking and it ultimately influences protein function. Considering the expected functional conservation among orthologs it was hypothesized that divergence in signal peptides within orthologous groups is mainly due to N-terminal protein sequence misannotation. Thus, discrepancies in signal peptide prediction of orthologous proteins were used to identify misannotated proteins in five Plasmodium species. Methods Signal peptide (SignalP and orthology (OrthoMCL were combined in an innovative strategy to identify orthologous groups showing discrepancies in signal peptide prediction among their protein members (Mixed groups. In a comparative analysis, multiple alignments for each of these groups and gene models were visually inspected in search of misannotated proteins and, whenever possible, alternative gene models were proposed. Thresholds for signal peptide prediction parameters were also modified to reduce their impact as a possible source of discrepancy among orthologs. Validation of new gene models was based on RT-PCR (few examples or on experimental evidence already published (ApiLoc. Results The rate of misannotated proteins was significantly higher in Mixed groups than in Positive or Negative groups, corroborating the proposed hypothesis. A total of 478 proteins were reannotated and change of signal peptide prediction from negative to positive was the most common. Reannotations triggered the conversion of almost 50% of all Mixed groups, which were further reduced by optimization of signal peptide prediction parameters. Conclusions The methodological novelty proposed here combining orthology and signal peptide prediction proved to be an effective strategy for the identification of proteins showing wrongly N-terminal annotated sequences, and it might have an important impact in the available data for genome-wide searching of potential vaccine and drug

  2. Structure and catalytic regulatory function of ubiquitin specific protease 11 N-terminal and ubiquitin-like domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Stephen; Gratton, Hayley E; Cornaciu, Irina; Oberer, Monika; Scott, David J; Emsley, Jonas; Dreveny, Ingrid

    2014-05-13

    The ubiquitin specific protease 11 (USP11) is implicated in DNA repair, viral RNA replication, and TGFβ signaling. We report the first characterization of the USP11 domain architecture and its role in regulating the enzymatic activity. USP11 consists of an N-terminal "domain present in USPs" (DUSP) and "ubiquitin-like" (UBL) domain, together referred to as DU domains, and the catalytic domain harboring a second UBL domain. Crystal structures of the DU domains show a tandem arrangement with a shortened β-hairpin at the two-domain interface and altered surface characteristics compared to the homologues USP4 and USP15. A conserved VEVY motif is a signature feature at the two-domain interface that shapes a potential protein interaction site. Small angle X-ray scattering and gel filtration experiments are consistent with the USP11DU domains and full-length USP11 being monomeric. Unexpectedly, we reveal, through kinetic assays of a series of deletion mutants, that the catalytic activity of USP11 is not regulated through intramolecular autoinhibition or activation by the N-terminal DU or UBL domains. Moreover, ubiquitin chain cleavage assays with all eight linkages reveal a preference for Lys(63)-, Lys(6)-, Lys(33)-, and Lys(11)-linked chains over Lys(27)-, Lys(29)-, and Lys(48)-linked and linear chains consistent with USP11's function in DNA repair pathways that is mediated by the protease domain. Our data support a model whereby USP11 domains outside the catalytic core domain serve as protein interaction or trafficking modules rather than a direct regulatory function of the proteolytic activity. This highlights the diversity of USPs in substrate recognition and regulation of ubiquitin deconjugation.

  3. Antral content, secretion and peripheral metabolism of N-terminal progastrin fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Hansen, Carsten Palnaes; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In addition to the acid-stimulatory gastrins, progastrin also release N-terminal fragments. In order to examine the cellular content, secretion and peripheral metabolism of these fragments, we developed an immunoassay specific for the N-terminal sequence of human progastrin. RESULTS......-terminal progastrin fragments. The basal concentration of N-terminal fragments in normal human plasma was almost 30-fold higher than that of the amidated, acid-stimulatory gastrins (286 pmol/l versus 9.8 pmol/l, n=26, P...-35 in circulation was 30 min, and a pig model revealed the kidneys and the vasculature to the head as the primary sites of degradation. CONCLUSION: The cellular and circulatory concentration profiles of N-terminal progastrin fragments differ markedly from those of the acid-stimulatory gastrins. The high basal...

  4. Structural diversity and evolution of the N-terminal isoform-specific region of ecdysone receptor-A and -B1 isoforms in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubo Takeo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ecdysone receptor (EcR regulates various cellular responses to ecdysteroids during insect development. Insects have multiple EcR isoforms with different N-terminal A/B domains that contain the isoform-specific activation function (AF-1 region. Although distinct physiologic functions of the EcR isoforms have been characterized in higher holometabolous insects, they remain unclear in basal direct-developing insects, in which only A isoform has been identified. To examine the structural basis of the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions, we performed a comprehensive structural comparison of the isoform-specific region of the EcR-A and -B1 isoforms in insects. Results The EcR isoforms were newly identified in 51 species of insects and non-insect arthropods, including direct-developing ametabolous and hemimetabolous insects. The comprehensive structural comparison revealed that the isoform-specific region of each EcR isoform contained evolutionally conserved microdomain structures and insect subgroup-specific structural modifications. The A isoform-specific region generally contained four conserved microdomains, including the SUMOylation motif and the nuclear localization signal, whereas the B1 isoform-specific region contained three conserved microdomains, including an acidic activator domain-like motif. In addition, the EcR-B1 isoform of holometabolous insects had a novel microdomain at the N-terminal end. Conclusions Given that the nuclear receptor AF-1 is involved in cofactor recruitment and transcriptional regulation, the microdomain structures identified in the isoform-specific A/B domains might function as signature motifs and/or as targets for cofactor proteins that play essential roles in the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions. Moreover, the novel microdomain in the isoform-specific region of the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 isoform suggests that the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 acquired additional transcriptional

  5. Conserved binding of GCAC motifs by MEC-8, couch potato, and the RBPMS protein family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufari, Heddy

    2017-01-01

    Precise regulation of mRNA processing, translation, localization, and stability relies on specific interactions with RNA-binding proteins whose biological function and target preference are dictated by their preferred RNA motifs. The RBPMS family of RNA-binding proteins is defined by a conserved RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain found in metazoan RBPMS/Hermes and RBPMS2, Drosophila couch potato, and MEC-8 from Caenorhabditis elegans. In order to determine the parameters of RNA sequence recognition by the RBPMS family, we have first used the N-terminal domain from MEC-8 in binding assays and have demonstrated a preference for two GCAC motifs optimally separated by >6 nucleotides (nt). We have also determined the crystal structure of the dimeric N-terminal RRM domain from MEC-8 in the unbound form, and in complex with an oligonucleotide harboring two copies of the optimal GCAC motif. The atomic details reveal the molecular network that provides specificity to all four bases in the motif, including multiple hydrogen bonds to the initial guanine. Further studies with human RBPMS, as well as Drosophila couch potato, confirm a general preference for this double GCAC motif by other members of the protein family and the presence of this motif in known targets. PMID:28003515

  6. N-terminal Proteomics Assisted Profiling of the Unexplored Translation Initiation Landscape in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Patrick; Ndah, Elvis; Jonckheere, Veronique; Stael, Simon; Sticker, Adriaan; Martens, Lennart; Van Breusegem, Frank; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Petra

    2017-06-01

    Proteogenomics is an emerging research field yet lacking a uniform method of analysis. Proteogenomic studies in which N-terminal proteomics and ribosome profiling are combined, suggest that a high number of protein start sites are currently missing in genome annotations. We constructed a proteogenomic pipeline specific for the analysis of N-terminal proteomics data, with the aim of discovering novel translational start sites outside annotated protein coding regions. In summary, unidentified MS/MS spectra were matched to a specific N-terminal peptide library encompassing protein N termini encoded in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. After a stringent false discovery rate filtering, 117 protein N termini compliant with N-terminal methionine excision specificity and indicative of translation initiation were found. These include N-terminal protein extensions and translation from transposable elements and pseudogenes. Gene prediction provided supporting protein-coding models for approximately half of the protein N termini. Besides the prediction of functional domains (partially) contained within the newly predicted ORFs, further supporting evidence of translation was found in the recently released Araport11 genome re-annotation of Arabidopsis and computational translations of sequences stored in public repositories. Most interestingly, complementary evidence by ribosome profiling was found for 23 protein N termini. Finally, by analyzing protein N-terminal peptides, an in silico analysis demonstrates the applicability of our N-terminal proteogenomics strategy in revealing protein-coding potential in species with well- and poorly-annotated genomes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Structures of minute virus of mice replication initiator protein N-terminal domain: Insights into DNA nicking and origin binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewary, Sunil K.; Liang, Lingfei; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Annie; Cotmore, Susan F.; Tattersall, Peter; Zhao, Haiyan; Tang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Parvoviridae family all encode a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) that directs replication of single-stranded viral DNA, packages viral DNA into capsid, and serves as a potent transcriptional activator. Here we report the X-ray structure of the minute virus of mice (MVM) NS1 N-terminal domain at 1.45 Å resolution, showing that sites for dsDNA binding, ssDNA binding and cleavage, nuclear localization, and other functions are integrated on a canonical fold of the histidine-hydrophobic-histidine superfamily of nucleases, including elements specific for this Protoparvovirus but distinct from its Bocaparvovirus or Dependoparvovirus orthologs. High resolution structural analysis reveals a nickase active site with an architecture that allows highly versatile metal ligand binding. The structures support a unified mechanism of replication origin recognition for homotelomeric and heterotelomeric parvoviruses, mediated by a basic-residue-rich hairpin and an adjacent helix in the initiator proteins and by tandem tetranucleotide motifs in the replication origins. - Highlights: • The structure of a parvovirus replication initiator protein has been determined; • The structure sheds light on mechanisms of ssDNA binding and cleavage; • The nickase active site is preconfigured for versatile metal ligand binding; • The binding site for the double-stranded replication origin DNA is identified; • A single domain integrates multiple functions in virus replication

  8. Structures of minute virus of mice replication initiator protein N-terminal domain: Insights into DNA nicking and origin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewary, Sunil K.; Liang, Lingfei; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Annie [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Cotmore, Susan F. [Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Tattersall, Peter [Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Departments of Genetics, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Zhao, Haiyan, E-mail: zhaohy@ku.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Tang, Liang, E-mail: tangl@ku.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Members of the Parvoviridae family all encode a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) that directs replication of single-stranded viral DNA, packages viral DNA into capsid, and serves as a potent transcriptional activator. Here we report the X-ray structure of the minute virus of mice (MVM) NS1 N-terminal domain at 1.45 Å resolution, showing that sites for dsDNA binding, ssDNA binding and cleavage, nuclear localization, and other functions are integrated on a canonical fold of the histidine-hydrophobic-histidine superfamily of nucleases, including elements specific for this Protoparvovirus but distinct from its Bocaparvovirus or Dependoparvovirus orthologs. High resolution structural analysis reveals a nickase active site with an architecture that allows highly versatile metal ligand binding. The structures support a unified mechanism of replication origin recognition for homotelomeric and heterotelomeric parvoviruses, mediated by a basic-residue-rich hairpin and an adjacent helix in the initiator proteins and by tandem tetranucleotide motifs in the replication origins. - Highlights: • The structure of a parvovirus replication initiator protein has been determined; • The structure sheds light on mechanisms of ssDNA binding and cleavage; • The nickase active site is preconfigured for versatile metal ligand binding; • The binding site for the double-stranded replication origin DNA is identified; • A single domain integrates multiple functions in virus replication.

  9. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  10. Blocking an N-terminal acetylation–dependent protein interaction inhibits an E3 ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Daniel C.; Hammill, Jared T.; Min, Jaeki; Rhee, David Y.; Connelly, Michele; Sviderskiy, Vladislav O.; Bhasin, Deepak; Chen, Yizhe; Ong, Su-Sien; Chai, Sergio C.; Goktug, Asli N.; Huang, Guochang; Monda, Julie K.; Low, Jonathan; Kim, Ho Shin; Paulo, Joao A.; Cannon, Joe R.; Shelat, Anang A.; Chen, Taosheng; Kelsall, Ian R.; Alpi, Arno F.; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Wang, Xusheng; Peng, Junmin; Singh , Bhuvanesh; Harper, J. Wade; Schulman, Brenda A.; Guy, R. Kip (MSKCC); (Dundee); (SJCH); (Harvard-Med); (MXPL)

    2017-06-05

    N-terminal acetylation is an abundant modification influencing protein functions. Because ~80% of mammalian cytosolic proteins are N-terminally acetylated, this modification is potentially an untapped target for chemical control of their functions. Structural studies have revealed that, like lysine acetylation, N-terminal acetylation converts a positively charged amine into a hydrophobic handle that mediates protein interactions; hence, this modification may be a druggable target. We report the development of chemical probes targeting the N-terminal acetylation–dependent interaction between an E2 conjugating enzyme (UBE2M or UBC12) and DCN1 (DCUN1D1), a subunit of a multiprotein E3 ligase for the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. The inhibitors are highly selective with respect to other protein acetyl-amide–binding sites, inhibit NEDD8 ligation in vitro and in cells, and suppress anchorage-independent growth of a cell line with DCN1 amplification. Overall, our data demonstrate that N-terminal acetyl-dependent protein interactions are druggable targets and provide insights into targeting multiprotein E2–E3 ligases.

  11. CompariMotif: quick and easy comparisons of sequence motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Richard J; Davey, Norman E; Shields, Denis C

    2008-05-15

    CompariMotif is a novel tool for making motif-motif comparisons, identifying and describing similarities between regular expression motifs. CompariMotif can identify a number of different relationships between motifs, including exact matches, variants of degenerate motifs and complex overlapping motifs. Motif relationships are scored using shared information content, allowing the best matches to be easily identified in large comparisons. Many input and search options are available, enabling a list of motifs to be compared to itself (to identify recurring motifs) or to datasets of known motifs. CompariMotif can be run online at http://bioware.ucd.ie/ and is freely available for academic use as a set of open source Python modules under a GNU General Public License from http://bioinformatics.ucd.ie/shields/software/comparimotif/

  12. c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0431 TITLE: “c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis ” PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE “c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Scelerosis” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER... Lateral   Sclerosis ”   Final  Report:  Project  Period  Sept  2012-­‐Dec  2014     Personnel  List:     Feng,  Yangbo

  13. New OprM structure highlighting the nature of the N-terminal anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eMONLEZUN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Among the different mechanisms used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, active efflux plays a major role. In gram-negative bacteria, active efflux is carried out by tripartite efflux pumps that form a macromolecular assembly spanning both membranes of the cellular wall. At the outer membrane level, a well-conserved Outer Membrane Factor (OMF protein acts as an exit duct, but its sequence varies greatly among different species. The OMFs share a similar tri-dimensional structure that includes a beta-barrel pore domain that stabilizes the channel within the membrane. In addition, OMFs are often subjected to different N-terminal post-translational modifications, such as an acylation with a lipid. The role of additional N-terminal anchors is all the more intriguing since it is not always required among the OMFs family. Understanding this optional post-translational modification could open new research lines in the field of antibiotics resistance. In E. coli, it has been shown that CusC is modified with a tri-acylated lipid, whereas TolC does not show any. In the case of OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the N-terminal modification remains a matter of debate, therefore, we used several approaches to investigate this issue. As definitive evidence, we present a new X ray structure at 3.8Å resolution that was solved in a new space group, making it possible to model the N-terminal residue as a palmitylated cysteine.

  14. The influence of the N-terminal region of antimicrobial peptide pleurocidin on fungal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun

    2013-10-28

    In our previous study, the 25-mer antimicrobial peptide pleurocidin (Ple) had been thought to induce apoptosis in Candida albicans. This study demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was a major cause of Ple-induced apoptosis. Four truncated analogs were synthesized to understand the functional roles in the N- and C-terminal regions of Ple on the apoptosis. Ple, Ple (4-25), Ple (1-22), and Ple (1-19) produced ROS, including hydroxyl radicals, on the order of [Ple > Ple (1-22) > Ple (4-25) > Ple (1-19)], whereas Ple (7-25) did not induce any ROS production. The results suggested that the N-terminal deletion affected the ROS-inducing activities much more than that of the C-terminal deletion, and net hydrophobicity [Ple > Ple (1-22) > Ple (4-25) > Ple (1-19) > Ple (7-25)] was related to ROS generation rather than other primary factors like net charge. Hence, we focused on the N-terminal-truncated peptides, Ple (4-25) and Ple (7-25), and examined other apoptotic features, including mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine externalization, and DNA and nuclear fragmentation. The results also confirmed the disappearance of apoptotic activity of Ple (7-25) by the truncation of the N-terminal region (1-6) and the specific activity patterns between Ple and analogs. In conclusion, the N-terminal region of Ple played an important role in apoptosis.

  15. The membranotropic activity of N-terminal peptides from the pore ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The membranotropic activity of N-terminal peptides from the pore-forming proteins sticholysin I and II is modulated by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions ... Center for Protein Studies, Biology Faculty, University of Havana, Havana, Cuba; Department of Applied Physics, Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São ...

  16. Diagnostic Usefulness of N-terminal Pro-brain Natriuretic Peptide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) is useful in the diagnosis and management of adult patients with heart failure. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine the usefulness of NT-proBNP in diagnosing congestive heart failure (CHF) in children and its correlation with left ...

  17. Improving cell penetration of helical peptides stabilized by N-terminal crosslinked aspartic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Jiang, Yanhong; Tian, Yuan; Yang, Dan; Qin, Xuan; Li, Zigang

    2017-01-04

    Cell penetration and nucleus translocation efficiency are important for the cellular activities of peptide therapeutics. For helical peptides stabilized by N-terminal crosslinked aspartic acid, correlations between their penetration efficiency/nucleus translocation and physicochemical properties were studied. An increase in hydrophobicity and isoelectric point will promote cellular uptake and nucleus translocation of stabilized helices.

  18. Localization of the N-terminal domain of cauliflower mosaic virus coat protein precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champagne, Julie; Benhamou, Nicole; Leclerc, Denis

    2004-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) open reading frame (ORF) IV encodes a coat protein precursor (pre-CP) harboring an N-terminal extension that is cleaved off by the CaMV-encoded protease. In transfected cells, pre-CP is present in the cytoplasm, while the processed form (p44) of CP is targeted to the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal extension might be involved in keeping the pre-CP in the cytoplasm for viral assembly. This study reports for the first time the intracellular localization of the N-terminal extension during CaMV infection in Brassica rapa. Immunogold-labeling electron microscopy using polyclonal antibodies directed to the N-terminal extension of the pre-CP revealed that this region is closely associated with viral particles present in small aggregates, which we called small bodies, adjacent to the main inclusion bodies typical of CaMV infection. Based on these results, we propose a model for viral assembly of CaMV

  19. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Sheila G. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense 400, C.P. 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Grupo de Biofisica e Fisica Aplicada a Medicina, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Goias, Campus Samambaia, C.P. 131, 74001-970, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Cristina Nonato, M. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia de Proteinas, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. do Cafe S/N, 14040-903, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Costa-Filho, Antonio J., E-mail: ajcosta@ffclrp.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense 400, C.P. 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  20. Nickel Ligation of the N-Terminal Amine of HypA Is Required for Urease Maturation in Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Heidi Q. [Department; Johnson, Ryan C. [Microbiology; Merrell, D. Scott [Microbiology; Maroney, Michael J. [Department

    2017-02-17

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori requires nickel for colonization of the acidic environment of the stomach. HypA, a Ni metallochaperone that is typically associated with hydrogenase maturation, is also required for urease maturation and acid survival of H. pylori. There are two proposed Ni site structures for HypA; one is a paramagnetic six-coordinate site characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in unmodified HypA, while another is a diamagnetic four-coordinate planar site characterized by solution nuclear magnetic resonance in an N-terminally modified HypA construct. To determine the role of the N-terminal amine in Ni binding of HypA, an N-terminal extension variant, L2*-HypA, in which a leucine residue was inserted into the second position of the amino acid sequence in the proposed Ni-binding motif, was characterized in vitro and in vivo. Structural characterization of the Ni site using XAS showed a coordination change from six-coordinate in wild-type HypA (WT-HypA) to five-coordinate pyramidal in L2*-HypA, which was accompanied by the loss of two N/O donor protein ligands and the addition of an exogenous bromide ligand from the buffer. The magnetic properties of the Ni sites in WT-HypA compared to those of the Ni sites in L2*-HypA confirmed that a spin-state change from high to low spin accompanied this change in structure. The L2*-HypA H. pylori strain was shown to be acid sensitive and deficient in urease activity in vivo. In vitro characterization showed that L2*-HypA did not disrupt the HypA–UreE interaction that is essential for urease maturation but was at least 20-fold weaker in Ni binding than WT-HypA. Characterization of the L2*-HypA variant clearly demonstrates that the N-terminal amine of HypA is involved in proper Ni coordination and is necessary for urease activity and acid survival.

  1. Formation of large viroplasms and virulence of Cauliflower mosaic virus in turnip plants depend on the N-terminal EKI sequence of viral protein TAV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Geldreich

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV TAV protein (TransActivator/Viroplasmin plays a pivotal role during the infection cycle since it activates translation reinitiation of viral polycistronic RNAs and suppresses RNA silencing. It is also the major component of cytoplasmic electron-dense inclusion bodies (EDIBs called viroplasms that are particularly evident in cells infected by the virulent CaMV Cabb B-JI isolate. These EDIBs are considered as virion factories, vehicles for CaMV intracellular movement and reservoirs for CaMV transmission by aphids. In this study, focused on different TAV mutants in vivo, we demonstrate that three physically separated domains collectively participate to the formation of large EDIBs: the N-terminal EKI motif, a sequence of the MAV domain involved in translation reinitiation and a C-terminal region encompassing the zinc finger. Surprisingly, EKI mutant TAVm3, corresponding to a substitution of the EKI motif at amino acids 11-13 by three alanines (AAA, which completely abolished the formation of large viroplasms, was not lethal for CaMV but highly reduced its virulence without affecting the rate of systemic infection. Expression of TAVm3 in a viral context led to formation of small irregularly shaped inclusion bodies, mild symptoms and low levels of viral DNA and particles accumulation, despite the production of significant amounts of mature capsid proteins. Unexpectedly, for CaMV-TAVm3 the formation of viral P2-containing electron-light inclusion body (ELIB, which is essential for CaMV aphid transmission, was also altered, thus suggesting an indirect role of the EKI tripeptide in CaMV plant-to-plant propagation. This important functional contribution of the EKI motif in CaMV biology can explain the strict conservation of this motif in the TAV sequences of all CaMV isolates.

  2. Thermodynamic characterization of binding Oxytricha nova single strand telomere DNA with the alpha protein N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczek, Pawel; Horvath, Martin P

    2006-06-23

    The Oxytricha nova telemere binding protein alpha subunit binds single strand DNA and participates in a nucleoprotein complex that protects the very ends of chromosomes. To understand how the N-terminal, DNA binding domain of alpha interacts with DNA we measured the stoichiometry, enthalpy (DeltaH), entropy (DeltaS), and dissociation constant (K(D-DNA)) for binding telomere DNA fragments at different temperatures and salt concentrations using native gel electrophoresis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). About 85% of the total free energy of binding corresponded with non-electrostatic interactions for all DNAs. Telomere DNA fragments d(T(2)G(4)), d(T(4)G(4)), d(G(3)T(4)G(4)), and d(G(4)T(4)G(4)) each formed monovalent protein complexes. In the case of d(T(4)G(4)T(4)G(4)), which has two tandemly repeated d(TTTTTGGGG) telomere motifs, two binding sites were observed. The high-affinity "A site" has a dissociation constant, K(D-DNA(A)) = 13(+/-4) nM, while the low-affinity "B site" is characterized by K(D-DNA(B)) = 5600(+/-600) nM at 25 degrees C. Nucleotide substitution variants verified that the A site corresponds principally with the 3'-terminal portion of d(T(4)G(4)T(4)G(4)). The relative contributions of entropy (DeltaS) and enthalpy (DeltaH) for binding reactions were DNA length-dependent as was heat capacity (DeltaCp). These trends with respect to DNA length likely reflect structural transitions in the DNA molecule that are coupled with DNA-protein association. Results presented here are important for understanding early intermediates and subsequent stages in the assembly of the full telomere nucleoprotein complex and how binding events can prepare the telomere DNA for extension by telomerase, a critical event in telomere biology.

  3. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Öberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, ΔN-hH1.4, were compared. ► Both histones bind to chromatin, however, ΔN-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. ► Interaction of ΔN-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. ► N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain (ΔN-hH1.4). The ΔN-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that ΔN-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  4. N-terminal pro-C-type natriuretic peptide in serum associated with bone destruction in patients with multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylin, Anne K; Goetze, Jens P; Heickendorff, Lene

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether N-terminal proCNP concentrations in serum is associated with bone destruction in patients with multiple myeloma. MATERIALS & METHODS: N-terminal proCNP and biochemical bone markers were measured in 153 patients. Radiographic bone disease and skeletal-related events were...

  5. Regulation of presynaptic Ca2+, synaptic plasticity and contextual fear conditioning by a N-terminal β-amyloid fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, James L M; Tong, Mei; Alfulaij, Naghum; Sherrin, Tessi; Contarino, Mark; White, Michael M; Bellinger, Frederick P; Todorovic, Cedomir; Nichols, Robert A

    2014-10-22

    Soluble β-amyloid has been shown to regulate presynaptic Ca(2+) and synaptic plasticity. In particular, picomolar β-amyloid was found to have an agonist-like action on presynaptic nicotinic receptors and to augment long-term potentiation (LTP) in a manner dependent upon nicotinic receptors. Here, we report that a functional N-terminal domain exists within β-amyloid for its agonist-like activity. This sequence corresponds to a N-terminal fragment generated by the combined action of α- and β-secretases, and resident carboxypeptidase. The N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is present in the brains and CSF of healthy adults as well as in Alzheimer's patients. Unlike full-length β-amyloid, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is monomeric and nontoxic. In Ca(2+) imaging studies using a model reconstituted rodent neuroblastoma cell line and isolated mouse nerve terminals, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment proved to be highly potent and more effective than full-length β-amyloid in its agonist-like action on nicotinic receptors. In addition, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment augmented theta burst-induced post-tetanic potentiation and LTP in mouse hippocampal slices. The N-terminal fragment also rescued LTP inhibited by elevated levels of full-length β-amyloid. Contextual fear conditioning was also strongly augmented following bilateral injection of N-terminal β-amyloid fragment into the dorsal hippocampi of intact mice. The fragment-induced augmentation of fear conditioning was attenuated by coadministration of nicotinic antagonist. The activity of the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment appears to reside largely in a sequence surrounding a putative metal binding site, YEVHHQ. These findings suggest that the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment may serve as a potent and effective endogenous neuromodulator. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414210-09$15.00/0.

  6. Site-specific Isopeptide Bridge Tethering of Chimeric gp41 N-terminal Heptad Repeat Helical Trimers for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xue; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Huixin; Lai, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Ye, Ling; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2016-01-01

    Peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of HIV-1 gp41 can be potent inhibitors against viral entry when presented in a nonaggregating trimeric coiled-coil conformation via the introduction of exogenous trimerization motifs and intermolecular disulfide bonds. We recently discovered that crosslinking isopeptide bridges within the de novo helical trimers added exceptional resistance to unfolding. Herein, we attempted to optimize (CCIZN17)3, a representative disulfide bond-stabilized chimeric NHR-trimer, by incorporating site-specific interhelical isopeptide bonds as the redox-sensitive disulfide surrogate. In this process, we systematically examined the effect of isopeptide bond position and molecular sizes of auxiliary trimeric coiled-coil motif and NHR fragments on the antiviral potency of these NHR-trimers. Pleasingly, (IZ14N24N)3 possessed promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 infection and markedly increased proteolytic stability relative to its disulfide-tethered counterpart, suggesting good potential for further development as an effective antiviral agent for treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27562370

  7. The solution structure of the N-terminal zinc finger of GATA-1 reveals a specific binding face for the transcriptional co-factor FOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, K.; Czolij, R.; King, G.F.; Crossley, M.; Mackay, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Zinc fingers (ZnFs) are generally regarded as DNA-binding motifs. However, a number of recent reports have implicated particular ZnFs in the mediation of protein-protein interactions. The N-terminal ZnF of GATA-1 (NF) is one such finger, having been shown to interact with a number of other proteins, including the recently discovered transcriptional co-factor FOG. Here we solve the three-dimensional structure of the NF in solution using multidimensional 1H/15N NMR spectroscopy, and we use 1H/15N spin relaxation measurements to investigate its backbone dynamics. The structure consists of two distorted β-hairpins and a single α-helix, and is similar to that of the C-terminal ZnF of chicken GATA-1. Comparisons of the NF structure with those of other C4-type zinc binding motifs, including hormone receptor and LIM domains, also reveal substantial structural homology. Finally, we use the structure to map the spatial locations of NF residues shown by mutagenesis to be essential for FOG binding, and demonstrate that these residues all lie on a single face of the NF. Notably, this face is well removed from the putative DNA- binding face of the NF, an observation which is suggestive of simultaneous roles for the NF; that is, stabilisation of GATA-1 DNA complexes and recruitment of FOG to GATA-1-controlled promoter regions

  8. N-terminally truncated forms of human cathepsin F accumulate in aggresome-like inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerič, Barbara; Dolenc, Iztok; Mihelič, Marko; Klarić, Martina; Zavašnik-Bergant, Tina; Gunčar, Gregor; Turk, Boris; Turk, Vito; Stoka, Veronika

    2013-10-01

    The contribution of individual cysteine cathepsins as positive mediators of programmed cell death is dependent on several factors, such as the type of stimuli, intensity and duration of the stimulus, and cell type involved. Of the eleven human cysteine cathepsins, cathepsin F is the only cathepsin that exhibits an extended N-terminal proregion, which contains a cystatin-like domain. We predicted that the wild-type human cathepsin F contains three natively disordered regions within the enzyme's propeptide and various amino acid stretches with high fibrillation propensity. Wild-type human cathepsin F and its N-terminally truncated forms, Ala(20)-Asp(484) (Δ(19)CatF), Pro(126)-Asp(484) (Δ(125)CatF), and Met(147)-Asp(484) (Δ(146)CatF) were cloned into the pcDNA3 vector and overexpressed in HEK 293T cells. Wild-type human cathepsin F displayed a clear vesicular labeling and colocalized with the LAMP2 protein, a lysosomal marker. However, all three N-terminally truncated forms of human cathepsin F were recovered as insoluble proteins, suggesting that the deletion of at least the signal peptides (Δ(19)CatF), results in protein aggregation. Noteworthy, they concentrated large perinuclear-juxtanuclear aggregates that accumulated within aggresome-like inclusions. These inclusions showed p62-positive immunoreactivity and were colocalized with the autophagy marker LC3B, but not with the LAMP2 protein. In addition, an approximately 2-3 fold increase in DEVDase activity was not sufficient to induce apoptotic cell death. These results suggested the clearance of the N-terminally truncated forms of human cathepsin F via the autophagy pathway, underlying its protective and prosurvival mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Abl N-terminal Cap stabilization of SH3 domain dynamics†

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shugui; Dumitrescu, Teodora Pene; Smithgall, Thomas E.; Engen, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Crystal structures and other biochemical data indicate that the N-terminal cap (NCap) region of the Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) is important for maintaining the downregulated conformation of the kinase domain. The exact contributions that NCap makes in stabilizing the various intramolecular interactions within c-Abl are less clear. While the NCap appears important for locking the SH3/SH2 domains to the back of the kinase domain, there may be other more subtle elements of regulation. Hydro...

  10. Accessibility of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence dictates N-terminal codon bias in E. coli

    OpenAIRE

    Shakhnovich, Eugene; Zhang, Wenli; Yan, Jin; Adkar, Bharat; Jacobs, William; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Adkar, Bharat

    2018-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts, no physical mechanism has been shown to explain N-terminal codon bias in prokaryotic genomes. Using a systematic study of synonymous substitutions in two endogenous E. coli genes, we show that interactions between the coding region and the upstream Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence modulate the efficiency of translation initiation, affecting both intracellular mRNA and protein levels due to the inherent coupling of transcription and translation in E. coli. We further ...

  11. N-terminal Pro-B-type natriuretic peptide: a measure of significant patent cuctus arteriosus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    OFarombi-Oghuvbu, IO

    2008-01-24

    Background: B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a marker for ventricular dysfunction secreted as a pre-prohormone, Pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (ProBNP), and cleaved into BNP and a biologically inactive fragment, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Little is known about the clinical usefulness of NT-proBNP in preterm infants.\\r\

  12. N-terminally truncated POM121C inhibits HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Saito

    Full Text Available Recent studies have identified host cell factors that regulate early stages of HIV-1 infection including viral cDNA synthesis and orientation of the HIV-1 capsid (CA core toward the nuclear envelope, but it remains unclear how viral DNA is imported through the nuclear pore and guided to the host chromosomal DNA. Here, we demonstrate that N-terminally truncated POM121C, a component of the nuclear pore complex, blocks HIV-1 infection. This truncated protein is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, does not bind to CA, does not affect viral cDNA synthesis, reduces the formation of 2-LTR and diminished the amount of integrated proviral DNA. Studies with an HIV-1-murine leukemia virus (MLV chimeric virus carrying the MLV-derived Gag revealed that Gag is a determinant of this inhibition. Intriguingly, mutational studies have revealed that the blockade by N-terminally-truncated POM121C is closely linked to its binding to importin-β/karyopherin subunit beta 1 (KPNB1. These results indicate that N-terminally-truncated POM121C inhibits HIV-1 infection after completion of reverse transcription and before integration, and suggest an important role for KPNB1 in HIV-1 replication.

  13. Copper(II) Binding Sites in N-Terminally Acetylated α-Synuclein: A Theoretical Rationalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, Rafael; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Vilanova, Bartolomé; Adrover, Miquel; Frau, Juan

    2017-08-03

    The interactions between N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein and Cu(II) at several binding sites have been studied with DFT calculations, specifically with the M06 hybrid functional and the ωB97X-D DFT-D functional. In previous experimental studies, Cu(II) was shown to bind several α-synuclein residues, including Met1-Asp2 and His50, forming square planar coordination complexes. Also, it was determined that a low-affinity binding site exists in the C-terminal domain, centered on Asp121. However, in the N-terminally acetylated protein, present in vivo, the Met1 site is blocked. In this work, we simplify the representation of the protein by modeling each experimentally found binding site as a complex between an N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein dipeptide (or several independent residues) and a Cu(II) cation, and compare the results with a number of additional, structurally analogous sites not experimentally found. This way of representing the binding sites, although extremely simple, allows us to reproduce experimental results and to provide a theoretical rationale to explain the preference of Cu(II) for certain sites, as well as explicit geometrical structures for the complexes formed. These results are important to understand the interactions between α-synuclein and Cu(II), one of the factors inducing structural changes in the protein and leading to aggregated forms of it which may play a role in neurodegeneration.

  14. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T., E-mail: d.huang@beatson.gla.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  15. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T.

    2016-01-01

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding

  16. MHC motif viewer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas Philippe Jean-Pierre; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . Algorithms that predict which peptides MHC molecules bind have recently been developed and cover many different alleles, but the utility of these algorithms is hampered by the lack of tools for browsing and comparing the specificity of these molecules. We have, therefore, developed a web server, MHC motif....... A special viewing feature, MHC fight, allows for display of the specificity of two different MHC molecules side by side. We show how the web server can be used to discover and display surprising similarities as well as differences between MHC molecules within and between different species. The MHC motif...

  17. Differential isotope dansylation labeling combined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for quantification of intact and N-terminal truncated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yanan; Li, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LC–MS was developed for quantifying protein mixtures containing both intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. • 12 C 2 -Dansylation of the N-terminal amino acid of proteins was done first, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. •The released 12 C 2 -dansyl labeled N-terminal amino acid was quantified using 13 C 2 -dansyl labeled amino acid standards. •The method provided accurate and precise results for quantifying intact and N-terminal truncated proteins within 8 h. -- Abstract: The N-terminal amino acids of proteins are important structure units for maintaining the biological function, localization, and interaction networks of proteins. Under different biological conditions, one or several N-terminal amino acids could be cleaved from an intact protein due to processes, such as proteolysis, resulting in the change of protein properties. Thus, the ability to quantify the N-terminal truncated forms of proteins is of great importance, particularly in the area of development and production of protein-based drugs where the relative quantity of the intact protein and its truncated form needs to be monitored. In this work, we describe a rapid method for absolute quantification of protein mixtures containing intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. This method is based on dansylation labeling of the N-terminal amino acids of proteins, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of the proteins into amino acids. It is shown that dansyl labeled amino acids are stable in acidic conditions and can be quantified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) with the use of isotope analog standards

  18. Differential isotope dansylation labeling combined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for quantification of intact and N-terminal truncated proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yanan; Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca

    2013-08-20

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LC–MS was developed for quantifying protein mixtures containing both intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. •{sup 12}C{sub 2}-Dansylation of the N-terminal amino acid of proteins was done first, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. •The released {sup 12}C{sub 2}-dansyl labeled N-terminal amino acid was quantified using {sup 13}C{sub 2}-dansyl labeled amino acid standards. •The method provided accurate and precise results for quantifying intact and N-terminal truncated proteins within 8 h. -- Abstract: The N-terminal amino acids of proteins are important structure units for maintaining the biological function, localization, and interaction networks of proteins. Under different biological conditions, one or several N-terminal amino acids could be cleaved from an intact protein due to processes, such as proteolysis, resulting in the change of protein properties. Thus, the ability to quantify the N-terminal truncated forms of proteins is of great importance, particularly in the area of development and production of protein-based drugs where the relative quantity of the intact protein and its truncated form needs to be monitored. In this work, we describe a rapid method for absolute quantification of protein mixtures containing intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. This method is based on dansylation labeling of the N-terminal amino acids of proteins, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of the proteins into amino acids. It is shown that dansyl labeled amino acids are stable in acidic conditions and can be quantified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) with the use of isotope analog standards.

  19. [Personal motif in art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerevich, József

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic questions of the art psychology is whether a personal motif is to be found behind works of art and if so, how openly or indirectly it appears in the work itself. Analysis of examples and documents from the fine arts and literature allow us to conclude that the personal motif that can be identified by the viewer through symbols, at times easily at others with more difficulty, gives an emotional plus to the artistic product. The personal motif may be found in traumatic experiences, in communication to the model or with other emotionally important persons (mourning, disappointment, revenge, hatred, rivalry, revolt etc.), in self-searching, or self-analysis. The emotions are expressed in artistic activity either directly or indirectly. The intention nourished by the artist's identity (Kunstwollen) may stand in the way of spontaneous self-expression, channelling it into hidden paths. Under the influence of certain circumstances, the artist may arouse in the viewer, consciously or unconsciously, an illusionary, misleading image of himself. An examination of the personal motif is one of the important research areas of art therapy.

  20. Oxidative Unfolding of the Rubredoxin Domain and the Natively Disordered N-terminal Region Regulate the Catalytic Activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Kinase G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Matthias; Luo, Qi; Kaila, Ville R I; Dames, Sonja A

    2016-12-30

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis escapes killing in human macrophages by secreting protein kinase G (PknG). PknG intercepts host signaling to prevent fusion of the phagosome engulfing the mycobacteria with the lysosome and, thus, their degradation. The N-terminal NORS (no regulatory secondary structure) region of PknG (approximately residues 1-75) has been shown to play a role in PknG regulation by (auto)phosphorylation, whereas the following rubredoxin-like metal-binding motif (RD, residues ∼74-147) has been shown to interact tightly with the subsequent catalytic domain (approximately residues 148-420) to mediate its redox regulation. Deletions or mutations in NORS or the redox-sensitive RD significantly decrease PknG survival function. Based on combined NMR spectroscopy, in vitro kinase assay, and molecular dynamics simulation data, we provide novel insights into the regulatory roles of the N-terminal regions. The NORS region is indeed natively disordered and rather dynamic. Consistent with most earlier data, autophosphorylation occurs in our assays only when the NORS region is present and, thus, in the NORS region. Phosphorylation of it results only in local conformational changes and does not induce interactions with the subsequent RD. Although the reduced, metal-bound RD makes tight interactions with the following catalytic domain in the published crystal structures, it can also fold in its absence. Our data further suggest that oxidation-induced unfolding of the RD regulates substrate access to the catalytic domain and, thereby, PknG function under different redox conditions, e.g. when exposed to increased levels of reactive oxidative species in host macrophages. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Crystal structure of ryanodine receptor N-terminal domain from Plutella xylostella reveals two potential species-specific insecticide-targeting sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lianyun; Liu, Chen; Qin, Juan; Wang, Jie; Dong, Shengjie; Chen, Wei; He, Weiyi; Gao, Qingzhi; You, Minsheng; Yuchi, Zhiguang

    2018-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are large calcium-release channels located in sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. They play a central role in excitation-contraction coupling of muscle cells. Three commercialized insecticides targeting pest RyRs generate worldwide sales over 2 billion U.S. dollars annually, but the structure of insect RyRs remains elusive, hindering our understanding of the mode of action of RyR-targeting insecticides and the development of insecticide resistance in pests. Here we present the crystal structure of RyR N-terminal domain (NTD) (residue 1-205) at 2.84 Å resolution from the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, a destructive pest devouring cruciferous crops all over the world. Similar to its mammalian homolog, DBM RyR NTD consists of a beta-trefoil folding motif and a flanking alpha helix. Interestingly, two regions in NTD interacting with neighboring domains showed distinguished conformations in DBM relative to mammalian RyRs. Using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation, we created a structural model of the N-terminal three domains, showing two unique binding pockets that could be targeted by potential species-specific insecticides. Thermal melt experiment showed that the stability of DBM RyR NTD was higher than mammalian RyRs, probably due to a stable intra-domain disulfide bond observed in the crystal structure. Previously DBM NTD was shown to be one of the two critical regions to interact with insecticide flubendiamide, but isothermal titration calorimetry experiments negated DBM NTD alone as a major binding site for flubendiamide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. N-terminal prolactin-derived fragments, vasoinhibins, are proapoptoptic and antiproliferative in the anterior pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Jimena; Radl, Daniela Betiana; Zárate, Sandra; Jaita, Gabriela; Eijo, Guadalupe; Zaldivar, Verónica; Clapp, Carmen; Seilicovich, Adriana; Pisera, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The anterior pituitary is under a constant cell turnover modulated by gonadal steroids. In the rat, an increase in the rate of apoptosis occurs at proestrus whereas a peak of proliferation takes place at estrus. At proestrus, concomitant with the maximum rate of apoptosis, a peak in circulating levels of prolactin is observed. Prolactin can be cleaved to different N-terminal fragments, vasoinhibins, which are proapoptotic and antiproliferative factors for endothelial cells. It was reported that a 16 kDa vasoinhibin is produced in the rat anterior pituitary by cathepsin D. In the present study we investigated the anterior pituitary production of N-terminal prolactin-derived fragments along the estrous cycle and the involvement of estrogens in this process. In addition, we studied the effects of a recombinant vasoinhibin, 16 kDa prolactin, on anterior pituitary apoptosis and proliferation. We observed by Western Blot that N-terminal prolactin-derived fragments production in the anterior pituitary was higher at proestrus with respect to diestrus and that the content and release of these prolactin forms from anterior pituitary cells in culture were increased by estradiol. A recombinant preparation of 16 kDa prolactin induced apoptosis (determined by TUNEL assay and flow cytometry) of cultured anterior pituitary cells and lactotropes from ovariectomized rats only in the presence of estradiol, as previously reported for other proapoptotic factors in the anterior pituitary. In addition, 16 kDa prolactin decreased forskolin-induced proliferation (evaluated by BrdU incorporation) of rat total anterior pituitary cells and lactotropes in culture and decreased the proportion of cells in S-phase of the cell cycle (determined by flow cytometry). In conclusion, our study indicates that the anterior pituitary production of 16 kDa prolactin is variable along the estrous cycle and increased by estrogens. The antiproliferative and estradiol-dependent proapoptotic actions of this

  3. N-terminal prolactin-derived fragments, vasoinhibins, are proapoptoptic and antiproliferative in the anterior pituitary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Ferraris

    Full Text Available The anterior pituitary is under a constant cell turnover modulated by gonadal steroids. In the rat, an increase in the rate of apoptosis occurs at proestrus whereas a peak of proliferation takes place at estrus. At proestrus, concomitant with the maximum rate of apoptosis, a peak in circulating levels of prolactin is observed. Prolactin can be cleaved to different N-terminal fragments, vasoinhibins, which are proapoptotic and antiproliferative factors for endothelial cells. It was reported that a 16 kDa vasoinhibin is produced in the rat anterior pituitary by cathepsin D. In the present study we investigated the anterior pituitary production of N-terminal prolactin-derived fragments along the estrous cycle and the involvement of estrogens in this process. In addition, we studied the effects of a recombinant vasoinhibin, 16 kDa prolactin, on anterior pituitary apoptosis and proliferation. We observed by Western Blot that N-terminal prolactin-derived fragments production in the anterior pituitary was higher at proestrus with respect to diestrus and that the content and release of these prolactin forms from anterior pituitary cells in culture were increased by estradiol. A recombinant preparation of 16 kDa prolactin induced apoptosis (determined by TUNEL assay and flow cytometry of cultured anterior pituitary cells and lactotropes from ovariectomized rats only in the presence of estradiol, as previously reported for other proapoptotic factors in the anterior pituitary. In addition, 16 kDa prolactin decreased forskolin-induced proliferation (evaluated by BrdU incorporation of rat total anterior pituitary cells and lactotropes in culture and decreased the proportion of cells in S-phase of the cell cycle (determined by flow cytometry. In conclusion, our study indicates that the anterior pituitary production of 16 kDa prolactin is variable along the estrous cycle and increased by estrogens. The antiproliferative and estradiol-dependent proapoptotic

  4. Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase 1 Is Regulated by Its N-Terminal Domain in Response to Allosteric Effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldo, Kristian Mark P; Acedo, Jeella Z; Panigrahi, Rashmi; Vederas, John C; Weselake, Randall J; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2017-10-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is an integral membrane enzyme catalyzing the final and committed step in the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG). The biochemical regulation of TAG assembly remains one of the least understood areas of primary metabolism to date. Here, we report that the hydrophilic N-terminal domain of Brassica napus DGAT1 (BnaDGAT1 1-113 ) regulates activity based on acyl-CoA/CoA levels. The N-terminal domain is not necessary for acyltransferase activity and is composed of an intrinsically disordered region and a folded segment. We show that the disordered region has an autoinhibitory function and a dimerization interface, which appears to mediate positive cooperativity, whereas the folded segment of the cytosolic region was found to have an allosteric site for acyl-CoA/CoA. Under increasing acyl-CoA levels, the binding of acyl-CoA with this noncatalytic site facilitates homotropic allosteric activation. Enzyme activation, on the other hand, is prevented under limiting acyl-CoA conditions (low acyl-CoA-to-CoA ratio), whereby CoA acts as a noncompetitive feedback inhibitor through interaction with the same folded segment. The three-dimensional NMR solution structure of the allosteric site revealed an α-helix with a loop connecting a coil fragment. The conserved amino acid residues in the loop interacting with CoA were identified, revealing details of this important regulatory element for allosteric regulation. Based on these results, a model is proposed illustrating the role of the N-terminal domain of BnaDGAT1 as a positive and negative modulator of TAG biosynthesis. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. KV4.3 N-terminal deletion mutant Δ2–39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovind, Laura J; Skerritt, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Gating transitions in the KV4.3 N-terminal deletion mutant Δ2–39 were characterized in the absence and presence of KChIP2b. We particularly focused on gating characteristics of macroscopic (open state) versus closed state inactivation (CSI) and recovery. In the absence of KChIP2b Δ2–39 did not significantly alter the steady-state activation “a4” relationship or general CSI characteristics, but it did slow the kinetics of deactivation, macroscopic inactivation and macroscopic recovery. Recovery kinetics (for both WT KV4.3 and Δ2–39) were complicated and displayed sigmoidicity, a process which was enhanced by Δ2–39. Deletion of the proximal N-terminal domain therefore appeared to specifically slow mechanisms involved in regulating gating transitions occurring after the channel open state(s) had been reached. In the presence of KChIP2b Δ2–39 recovery kinetics (from both macroscopic and CSI) were accelerated, with an apparent reduction in initial sigmoidicity. Hyperpolarizing shifts in both “a4” and isochronal inactivation “i” were also produced. KChIP2b-mediated remodeling of KV4.3 gating transitions was therefore not obligatorily dependent upon an intact N-terminus. To account for these effects we propose that KChIP2 regulatory domains exist in KV4.3 α subunit regions outside of the proximal N-terminal. In addition to regulating macroscopic inactivation, we also propose that the KV4.3 N-terminus may act as a novel regulator of deactivation-recovery coupling. PMID:21057209

  6. N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide during pharmacological heart rate reduction in hyperthyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, M; Kistorp, C; Corell, P

    2009-01-01

    days. Before treatment, N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide was independently associated with thyroid function (free triiodothyronine-index, r=0.64, p=0.001) and the hemoglobin concentration (r=-0.36, p=0.031). The verapamil treatment induced a decrease in parameters reflecting cardiac function......-index decreased from median 319 to 315 arbitrary units (p=0.039) and free triiodothyronine-index increased from 8.6 to 9.9 arbitrary units (p=0.010). No changes in echocardiographic parameters were observed. A decrease in resting heart rate in untreated hyperthyroidism due to verapamil treatment did not result...

  7. N-terminal domains of human DNA polymerase lambda promote primer realignment during translesion DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, David J.; Dayeh, Daniel M.; Fredrickson, Saul W.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases λ (Polλ) and β (Polβ) possess similar 5′-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphatelyase (dRPase) and polymerase domains. Besides these domains, Polλ also possesses a BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain and a proline-rich domain at its N terminus. However, it is unclear how these non-enzymatic domains contribute to the unique biological functions of Polλ. Here, we used primer extension assays and a newly developed high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay (HT-SOSA) to compare the efficiency of lesion bypass and fidelity of human Polβ, Polλ and two N-terminal deletion constructs of Polλ during the bypass of either an abasic site or a 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesion. We demonstrate that the BRCT domain of Polλ enhances the efficiency of abasic site bypass by approximately 1.6-fold. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal domains of Polλ did not affect the efficiency of 8-oxodG bypass relative to nucleotide incorporations opposite undamaged dG. HT-SOSA analysis demonstrated that Polλ and Polβ preferentially generated −1 or −2 frameshift mutations when bypassing an abasic site and the single or double base deletion frequency was highly sequence dependent. Interestingly, the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ cooperatively promoted the generation of −2 frameshift mutations when the abasic site was situated within a sequence context that was susceptible to homology-driven primer realignment. Furthermore, both N-terminal domains of Polλ increased the generation of −1 frameshift mutations during 8-oxodG bypass and influenced the frequency of substitution mutations produced by Polλ opposite the 8-oxodG lesion. Overall, our data support a model wherein the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ act cooperatively to promote primer/template realignment between DNA strands of limited sequence homology. This function of the N-terminal domains may facilitate the role of Polλ as a gap-filling polymerase

  8. The diagnostic value of plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor levels in children with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Song, Xueqing; Xia, Jiyi; Li, Jing; Jia, Peng; Chen, Pengyuan; Zhao, Jian; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor in children with heart failure. Methods and results Plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor was determined in 61 children, including 41 children with heart failure, 20 children without heart failure, and 30 healthy volunteers. The correlations between plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor levels and clinical parameters were investigated. Moreover, the diagnostic value of N-terminal connective tissue growth factor levels was evaluated. Compared with healthy volunteers and children without heart failure, plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor levels were significantly elevated in those with heart failure (p0.05), but it obviously improved the ability of diagnosing heart failure in children, as demonstrated by the integrated discrimination improvement (6.2%, p=0.013) and net re-classification improvement (13.2%, p=0.017) indices. Plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor is a promising diagnostic biomarker for heart failure in children.

  9. Structural plasticity of the N-terminal capping helix of the TPR domain of kinesin light chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Quyen Nguyen

    Full Text Available Kinesin1 plays a major role in neuronal transport by recruiting many different cargos through its kinesin light chain (KLC. Various structurally unrelated cargos interact with the conserved tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain of KLC. The N-terminal capping helix of the TPR domain exhibits an atypical sequence and structural features that may contribute to the versatility of the TPR domain to bind different cargos. We determined crystal structures of the TPR domain of both KLC1 and KLC2 encompassing the N-terminal capping helix and show that this helix exhibits two distinct and defined orientations relative to the rest of the TPR domain. Such a difference in orientation gives rise, at the N-terminal part of the groove, to the formation of one hydrophobic pocket, as well as to electrostatic variations at the groove surface. We present a comprehensive structural analysis of available KLC1/2-TPR domain structures that highlights that ligand binding into the groove can be specific of one or the other N-terminal capping helix orientations. Further, structural analysis reveals that the N-terminal capping helix is always involved in crystal packing contacts, especially in a TPR1:TPR1' contact which highlights its propensity to be a protein-protein interaction site. Together, these results underline that the structural plasticity of the N-terminal capping helix might represent a structural determinant for TPR domain structural versatility in cargo binding.

  10. Motif enrichment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatti, Charles; Sinha, Saurabh

    2014-07-01

    The Motif Enrichment Tool (MET) provides an online interface that enables users to find major transcriptional regulators of their gene sets of interest. MET searches the appropriate regulatory region around each gene and identifies which transcription factor DNA-binding specificities (motifs) are statistically overrepresented. Motif enrichment analysis is currently available for many metazoan species including human, mouse, fruit fly, planaria and flowering plants. MET also leverages high-throughput experimental data such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq from ENCODE and ModENCODE to identify the regulatory targets of a transcription factor with greater precision. The results from MET are produced in real time and are linked to a genome browser for easy follow-up analysis. Use of the web tool is free and open to all, and there is no login requirement. ADDRESS: http://veda.cs.uiuc.edu/MET/. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Structure of a tropomyosin N-terminal fragment at 0.98 Å resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A.; Krieger, Inna; Kostyukova, Alla S.; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal fragment of the short nonmuscle α-tropomyosin has been determined at a resolution of 0.98 Å. Tropomyosin (TM) is an elongated two-chain protein that binds along actin filaments. Important binding sites are localized in the N-terminus of tropomyosin. The structure of the N-terminus of the long muscle α-TM has been solved by both NMR and X-ray crystallography. Only the NMR structure of the N-terminus of the short nonmuscle α-TM is available. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminus of the short nonmuscle α-TM (αTm1bZip) at a resolution of 0.98 Å is reported, which was solved from crystals belonging to space group P3 1 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 33.00, c = 52.03 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. The first five N-terminal residues are flexible and residues 6–35 form an α-helical coiled coil. The overall fold and the secondary structure of the crystal structure of αTM1bZip are highly similar to the NMR structure and the atomic coordinates of the corresponding C α atoms between the two structures superimpose with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.60 Å. The crystal structure validates the NMR structure, with the positions of the side chains being determined precisely in our structure

  12. Directed evolution of the TALE N-terminal domain for recognition of all 5′ bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Brian M.; Mercer, Andrew C.; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can be designed to bind virtually any DNA sequence. General guidelines for design of TALE DNA-binding domains suggest that the 5′-most base of the DNA sequence bound by the TALE (the N0 base) should be a thymine. We quantified the N0 requirement by analysis of the activities of TALE transcription factors (TALE-TF), TALE recombinases (TALE-R) and TALE nucleases (TALENs) with each DNA base at this position. In the absence of a 5′ T, we observed decreases in TALE activity up to >1000-fold in TALE-TF activity, up to 100-fold in TALE-R activity and up to 10-fold reduction in TALEN activity compared with target sequences containing a 5′ T. To develop TALE architectures that recognize all possible N0 bases, we used structure-guided library design coupled with TALE-R activity selections to evolve novel TALE N-terminal domains to accommodate any N0 base. A G-selective domain and broadly reactive domains were isolated and characterized. The engineered TALE domains selected in the TALE-R format demonstrated modularity and were active in TALE-TF and TALEN architectures. Evolved N-terminal domains provide effective and unconstrained TALE-based targeting of any DNA sequence as TALE binding proteins and designer enzymes. PMID:23980031

  13. Directed evolution of the TALE N-terminal domain for recognition of all 5' bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Brian M; Mercer, Andrew C; Barbas, Carlos F

    2013-11-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can be designed to bind virtually any DNA sequence. General guidelines for design of TALE DNA-binding domains suggest that the 5'-most base of the DNA sequence bound by the TALE (the N0 base) should be a thymine. We quantified the N0 requirement by analysis of the activities of TALE transcription factors (TALE-TF), TALE recombinases (TALE-R) and TALE nucleases (TALENs) with each DNA base at this position. In the absence of a 5' T, we observed decreases in TALE activity up to >1000-fold in TALE-TF activity, up to 100-fold in TALE-R activity and up to 10-fold reduction in TALEN activity compared with target sequences containing a 5' T. To develop TALE architectures that recognize all possible N0 bases, we used structure-guided library design coupled with TALE-R activity selections to evolve novel TALE N-terminal domains to accommodate any N0 base. A G-selective domain and broadly reactive domains were isolated and characterized. The engineered TALE domains selected in the TALE-R format demonstrated modularity and were active in TALE-TF and TALEN architectures. Evolved N-terminal domains provide effective and unconstrained TALE-based targeting of any DNA sequence as TALE binding proteins and designer enzymes.

  14. Isolation and N-terminal sequencing of a novel cadmium-binding protein from Boletus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin-Hansen, C.; Andersen, R. A.; Steinnes, E.

    2003-05-01

    A Cd-binding protein was isolated from the popular edible mushroom Boletus edulis, which is a hyperaccumulator of both Cd and Hg. Wild-growing samples of B. edulis were collected from soils rich in Cd. Cd radiotracer was added to the crude protein preparation obtained from ethanol precipitation of heat-treated cytosol. Proteins were then further separated in two consecutive steps; gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. In both steps the Cd radiotracer profile showed only one distinct peak, which corresponded well with the profiles of endogenous Cd obtained by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Concentrations of the essential elements Cu and Zn were low in the protein fractions high in Cd. N-terminal sequencing performed on the Cd-binding protein fractions revealed a protein with a novel amino acid sequence, which contained aromatic amino acids as well as proline. Both the N-terminal sequencing and spectrofluorimetric analysis with EDTA and ABD-F (4-aminosulfonyl-7-fluoro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazole) failed to detect cysteine in the Cd-binding fractions. These findings conclude that the novel protein does not belong to the metallothionein family. The results suggest a role for the protein in Cd transport and storage, and they are of importance in view of toxicology and food chemistry, but also for environmental protection.

  15. Molecular cloning and biologically active production of IpaD N-terminal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesaraki, Mahdi; Saadati, Mojtaba; Honari, Hossein; Olad, Gholamreza; Heiat, Mohammad; Malaei, Fatemeh; Ranjbar, Reza

    2013-07-01

    Shigella is known as pathogenic intestinal bacteria in high dispersion and pathogenic bacteria due to invasive plasmid antigen (Ipa). So far, a number of Ipa proteins have been studied to introduce a new candidate vaccine. Here, for the first time, we examined whether the N-terminal region of IpaD(72-162) could be a proper candidate for Shigella vaccine. Initially, the DNA sequence coding N-terminal region was isolated by PCR from Shigella dysenteriae type I and cloned into pET-28a expression vector. Then, the heterologous protein was expressed, optimized and purified by affinity Ni-NTA column. Western blot analysis using, His-tag and IpaD(72-162) polyclonal antibodies, confirmed the purity and specificity of the recombinant protein, respectively. Subsequently, the high immunogenicity of the antigen was shown by ELISA. The results of the sereny test in Guinea pigs showed that IpaD(72-162) provides a protective system against Shigella flexneri 5a and S. dysenteriae type I. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Novel Insights into Structure-Activity Relationships of N-Terminally Modified PACE4 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Couture, Frédéric; Levesque, Christine; Ly, Kévin; Beauchemin, Sophie; Desjardins, Roxane; Neugebauer, Witold; Dory, Yves L; Day, Robert

    2016-02-04

    PACE4 plays important roles in prostate cancer cell proliferation. The inhibition of this enzyme has been shown to slow prostate cancer progression and is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. In previous work, we developed a highly potent and selective PACE4 inhibitor, the multi-Leu (ML) peptide, an octapeptide with the sequence Ac-LLLLRVKR-NH2 . Here, with the objective of developing a useful compound for in vivo administration, we investigate the effect of N-terminal modifications. The inhibitory activity, toxicity, stability, and cell penetration properties of the resulting analogues were studied and compared to the unmodified inhibitor. Our results show that the incorporation of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety leads to a loss of antiproliferative activity, whereas the attachment of a lipid chain preserves or improves it. However, the lipidated peptides are significantly more toxic when compared with their unmodified counterparts. Therefore, the best results were achieved not by the N-terminal extension but by the protection of both ends with the d-Leu residue and 4-amidinobenzylamide, which yielded the most stable inhibitor, with an excellent activity and toxicity profile. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effect of N-Terminal Acylation on the Activity of Myostatin Inhibitory Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kentaro; Nakamura, Akari; Rentier, Cédric; Mino, Yusaku; Asari, Tomo; Saga, Yusuke; Taguchi, Akihiro; Yakushiji, Fumika; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2016-04-19

    Inhibition of myostatin, which negatively regulates skeletal muscle growth, is a promising strategy for the treatment of muscle atrophic disorders, such as muscular dystrophy, cachexia and sarcopenia. Recently, we identified peptide A (H-WRQNTRYSRIEAIKIQILSKLRL-NH2 ), the 23-amino-acid minimum myostatin inhibitory peptide derived from mouse myostatin prodomain, and highlighted the importance of its N-terminal tryptophan residue for the effective inhibition. In this study, we synthesized a series of acylated peptide derivatives focused on the tryptophan residue to develop potent myostatin inhibitors. As a result of the investigation, a more potent derivative of peptide A was successfully identified in which the N-terminal tryptophan residue is replaced with a 2-naphthyloxyacetyl moiety to give an inhibitory peptide three times (1.19±0.11 μm) more potent than parent peptide A (3.53±0.25 μm). This peptide could prove useful as a new starting point for the development of improved inhibitory peptides. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Specificity of N-terminal methionyl peptidase: analysis by site-directed mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, T.J.; Boissel, J.P.; Bunn, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    The start site of eukaryotic translation is normally an AUG codon. The corresponding N-terminal methionine is most often removed when the nascent chain reaches about 30 residues. Data from a survey of 1764 eukaryotic protein sequences suggest that the residue adjacent to the initiator Met determines Met cleavage. In order to investigate the mechanism of this reaction, the authors have prepared oligonucleotide-directed mutants of human β-globin from gapped heteroduplexes of a T3/T7 plasmid containing a globin cDNA clone. To date, the authors have produced mutants encoding for 15 of 19 possible amino acid replacements at position 1 in the β-globin chain. These mutants have been confirmed by dideoxy sequencing, transcribed in vitro, and translated in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate in the presence of 35 S-methionine. Labeled translation products were then isolated by cation exchange HPLC, and tryptic peptides were analyzed by RP-HPLC. Thus far, this structural analysis has shown that for β-1 Val, Ala, and Ser, the initiator Met is cleaved, whereas for β-1 Lys, Met, Glu, Trp, Asn, Tyr, and Glu, initiator Met is retained. For β-1 Leu initiator Met is cleaved with a frequency of about 50%. These results are consistent with the data obtained from the previous survey. The expression of site-directed mutants in a cell-free system can also be used to investigate other N-terminal processing events, such as acetylation and myristylation

  19. N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide measurement in plasma suggests covalent modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ingrid; Alehagen, Urban; Dahlström, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    different proANP assays on clinical outcome. METHODS: We examined 474 elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure presenting in a primary healthcare setting. Samples were analyzed with an automated immunoluminometric midregion proANP (MR-proANP) assay and a new processing-independent assay (PIA.......74 (95% CI, 0.66–0.81); P = 0.32]. The prognostic ability to report cardiovascular mortality during a 10-year follow-up revealed AUC values of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.60–0.71) for the proANP PIA and 0.69 (95% CI, 0.63–0.74) for the MR-proANP assay (P = 0.08, for comparing the 2 assays). CONCLUSIONS: Our data......BACKGROUND: The N-terminal fragment of cardiac-derived pro–B-type natriuretic peptide is a glycosylated polypeptide. It is unknown whether N-terminal pro–atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) fragments are also covalently modified. We therefore evaluated the clinical performance of 2 distinctly...

  20. UV laser-induced histone-DNA crosslinking proceeds via the N-terminal tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovski, V.; Dimitrov, S.; Angelov, D.; Keskinova, E.; Pashev, I.

    1990-01-01

    The covalent crosslinking of histones to DNA by UV laser irradiation is accomplished solely via the N-terminal part of the molecule. Irradiated isolated calfthymus nuclei are treated with clostripain. The crosslinked protein-DNA complexes are isolated and the presence of each core histone analyzed by dot-immunoassay using antibodies, specific to the central globular domain of the respective histone. The reaction is negative for all core histones i.e. the globular domain is absent. It means that this domain has not been crosslinked to DNA and, once cleaved by clostripain, it has been stripped from DNA during the centrigugation in CsCl. This peculiar property of the crosslinked procedure makes it particularly useful in addressing some yet unanswered questions concerning histone-DNA interactions, such as the interaction of the N-terminal tails with linker DNA, the effect of the transient postsynthetic histone acetylation on its interaction with DNA, etc. These questions are now under study. 1 fig., 6 refs

  1. Preparation and Analysis of N-Terminal Chemokine Receptor Sulfopeptides Using Tyrosylprotein Sulfotransferase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Christoph; Sanfiz, Anthony; Sakmar, Thomas P; Veldkamp, Christopher T

    2016-01-01

    In most chemokine receptors, one or multiple tyrosine residues have been identified within the receptor N-terminal domain that are, at least partially, modified by posttranslational tyrosine sulfation. For example, tyrosine sulfation has been demonstrated for Tyr-3, -10, -14, and -15 of CCR5, for Tyr-3, -14, and -15 of CCR8, and for Tyr-7, -12, and -21 of CXCR4. While there is evidence for several chemokine receptors that tyrosine sulfation is required for optimal interaction with the chemokine ligands, the precise role of tyrosine sulfation for chemokine receptor function remains unclear. Furthermore, the function of the chemokine receptor N-terminal domain in chemokine binding and receptor activation is also not well understood. Sulfotyrosine peptides corresponding to the chemokine receptor N-termini are valuable tools to address these important questions both in structural and functional studies. However, due to the lability of the sulfotyrosine modification, these peptides are difficult to obtain using standard peptide chemistry methods. In this chapter, we provide methods to prepare sulfotyrosine peptides by enzymatic in vitro sulfation of peptides using purified recombinant tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST) enzymes. In addition, we also discuss alternative approaches for the generation of sulfotyrosine peptides and methods for sulfopeptide analysis. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolutionary analysis of a novel zinc ribbon in the N-terminal region of threonine synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2017-10-18

    Threonine synthase (TS) catalyzes the terminal reaction in the biosynthetic pathway of threonine and requires pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor. TSs share a common catalytic domain with other fold type II PALP dependent enzymes. TSs are broadly grouped into two classes based on their sequence, quaternary structure, and enzyme regulation. We report the presence of a novel zinc ribbon domain in the N-terminal region preceding the catalytic core in TS. The zinc ribbon domain is present in TSs belonging to both classes. Our sequence analysis reveals that archaeal TSs possess all zinc chelating residues to bind a metal ion that are lacking in the structurally characterized homologs. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that TSs with an N-terminal zinc ribbon likely represents the ancestral state of the enzyme while TSs without a zinc ribbon must have diverged later in specific lineages. The zinc ribbon and its N- and C-terminal extensions are important for enzyme stability, activity and regulation. It is likely that the zinc ribbon domain is involved in higher order oligomerization or mediating interactions with other biomolecules leading to formation of larger metabolic complexes.

  3. The unique N-terminal zinc finger of synaptotagmin-like protein 4 reveals FYVE structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Nakatani, Arisa; Saito, Kazuki

    2017-12-01

    Synaptotagmin-like protein 4 (Slp4), expressed in human platelets, is associated with dense granule release. Slp4 is comprised of the N-terminal zinc finger, Slp homology domain, and C2 domains. We synthesized a compact construct (the Slp4N peptide) corresponding to the Slp4 N-terminal zinc finger. Herein, we have determined the solution structure of the Slp4N peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Furthermore, experimental, chemical modification of Cys residues revealed that the Slp4N peptide binds two zinc atoms to mediate proper folding. NMR data showed that eight Cys residues coordinate zinc atoms in a cross-brace fashion. The Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool database predicted the structure of Slp4N as a RING finger. However, the actual structure of the Slp4N peptide adopts a unique C 4 C 4 -type FYVE fold and is distinct from a RING fold. To create an artificial RING finger (ARF) with specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability, cross-brace structures with eight zinc-ligating residues are needed as the scaffold. The cross-brace structure of the Slp4N peptide could be utilized as the scaffold for the design of ARFs. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  4. Human TRPA1 is intrinsically cold- and chemosensitive with and without its N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moparthi, Lavanya; Survery, Sabeen; Kreir, Mohamed; Simonsen, Charlotte; Kjellbom, Per; Högestätt, Edward D; Johanson, Urban; Zygmunt, Peter M

    2014-11-25

    We have purified and reconstituted human transient receptor potential (TRP) subtype A1 (hTRPA1) into lipid bilayers and recorded single-channel currents to understand its inherent thermo- and chemosensory properties as well as the role of the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of the N terminus in channel behavior. We report that hTRPA1 with and without its N-terminal ARD (Δ1-688 hTRPA1) is intrinsically cold-sensitive, and thus, cold-sensing properties of hTRPA1 reside outside the N-terminal ARD. We show activation of hTRPA1 by the thiol oxidant 2-((biotinoyl)amino)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSEA-biotin) and that electrophilic compounds activate hTRPA1 in the presence and absence of the N-terminal ARD. The nonelectrophilic compounds menthol and the cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabiorcol (C16) directly activate hTRPA1 at different sites independent of the N-terminal ARD. The TRPA1 antagonist HC030031 inhibited cold and chemical activation of hTRPA1 and Δ1-688 hTRPA1, supporting a direct interaction with hTRPA1 outside the N-terminal ARD. These findings show that hTRPA1 is an intrinsically cold- and chemosensitive ion channel. Thus, second messengers, including Ca(2+), or accessory proteins are not needed for hTRPA1 responses to cold or chemical activators. We suggest that conformational changes outside the N-terminal ARD by cold, electrophiles, and nonelectrophiles are important in hTRPA1 channel gating and that targeting chemical interaction sites outside the N-terminal ARD provides possibilities to fine tune TRPA1-based drug therapies (e.g., for treatment of pain associated with cold hypersensitivity and cardiovascular disease).

  5. Identification of succinimide sites in proteins by N-terminal sequence analysis after alkaline hydroxylamine cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, M. Y.; Harris, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Under favorable conditions, Asp or Asn residues can undergo rearrangement to a succinimide (cyclic imide), which may also serve as an intermediate for deamidation and/or isoaspartate formation. Direct identification of such succinimides by peptide mapping is hampered by their lability at neutral and alkaline pH. We determined that incubation in 2 M hydroxylamine, 0.2 M Tris buffer, pH 9, for 2 h at 45 degrees C will specifically cleave on the C-terminal side of succinimides without cleavage at Asn-Gly bonds; yields are typically approximately 50%. N-terminal sequence analysis can then be used to identify an internal sequence generated by cleavage of the succinimide, hence identifying the succinimide site. PMID:8142891

  6. Efficient sortase-mediated N-terminal labeling of TEV protease cleaved recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpong, Kwabena; Bose, Ron

    2017-03-15

    A major challenge in attaching fluorophores or other handles to proteins is the availability of a site-specific labeling strategy that provides stoichiometric modification without compromising protein integrity. We developed a simple approach that combines TEV protease cleavage, sortase modification and affinity purification to N-terminally label proteins. To achieve stoichiometrically-labeled protein, we included a short affinity tag in the fluorophore-containing peptide for post-labeling purification of the modified protein. This strategy can be easily applied to any recombinant protein with a TEV site and we demonstrate this on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Membrane Scaffold Protein (MSP) constructs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamic enzyme docking to the ribosome coordinates N-terminal processing with polypeptide folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandikci, Arzu; Gloge, Felix; Martinez, Michael; Mayer, Matthias P; Wade, Rebecca; Bukau, Bernd; Kramer, Günter

    2013-07-01

    Newly synthesized polypeptides undergo various cotranslational maturation steps, including N-terminal enzymatic processing, chaperone-assisted folding and membrane targeting, but the spatial and temporal coordination of these steps is unclear. We show that Escherichia coli methionine aminopeptidase (MAP) associates with ribosomes through a charged loop that is crucial for nascent-chain processing and cell viability. MAP competes with peptide deformylase (PDF), the first enzyme to act on nascent chains, for binding sites at the ribosomal tunnel exit. PDF has extremely fast association and dissociation kinetics, which allows it to frequently sample ribosomes and ensure the processing of nascent chains after their emergence. Premature recruitment of the chaperone trigger factor, or polypeptide folding, negatively affect processing efficiency. Thus, the fast ribosome association kinetics of PDF and MAP are crucial for the temporal separation of nascent-chain processing from later maturation events, including chaperone recruitment and folding.

  8. Crystallization of Galectin-8 Linker Reveals Intricate Relationship between the N-terminal Tail and the Linker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Si

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Galectin-8 (Gal-8 plays a significant role in normal immunological function as well as in cancer. This lectin contains two carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD connected by a peptide linker. The N-terminal CRD determines ligand binding specificity, whereas the linker has been proposed to regulate overall Gal-8 function, including multimerization and biological activity. Here, we crystallized the Gal-8 N-terminal CRD with the peptide linker using a crystallization condition that contains Ni2+. The Ni2+ ion was found to be complexed between two CRDs via crystal packing contacts. The coordination between Ni2+ and Asp25 plays an indirect role in determining the structure of β-strand F0 and in influencing the linker conformation which could not be defined due to its dynamic nature. The linker was also shortened in situ and crystallized under a different condition, leading to a higher resolution structure refined to 1.08 Å. This crystal structure allowed definition of a short portion of the linker interacting with the Gal-8 N-terminal tail via ionic interactions and hydrogen bonds. Observation of two Gal-8 N-terminal CRD structures implies that the N-terminal tail and the linker may influence each other’s conformation. In addition, under specific crystallization conditions, glycerol could replace lactose and was observed at the carbohydrate binding site. However, glycerol did not show inhibition activity in hemagglutination assay.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of human prion protein is mediated by its N-terminal region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Pasupuleti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular prion-related protein (PrP(c is a cell-surface protein that is ubiquitously expressed in the human body. The multifunctionality of PrP(c, and presence of an exposed cationic and heparin-binding N-terminus, a feature characterizing many antimicrobial peptides, made us hypothesize that PrP(c could exert antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intact recombinant PrP exerted antibacterial and antifungal effects at normal and low pH. Studies employing recombinant PrP and N- and C-terminally truncated variants, as well as overlapping peptide 20mers, demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity is mediated by the unstructured N-terminal part of the protein. Synthetic peptides of the N-terminus of PrP killed the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungus Candida parapsilosis. Fluorescence studies of peptide-treated bacteria, paired with analysis of peptide effects on liposomes, showed that the peptides exerted membrane-breaking effects similar to those seen after treatment with the "classical" human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. In contrast to LL-37, however, no marked helix induction was detected for the PrP-derived peptides in presence of negatively charged (bacteria-mimicking liposomes. PrP furthermore showed an inducible expression during wounding of human skin ex vivo and in vivo, as well as stimulation of keratinocytes with TGF-alpha in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: The demonstration of an antimicrobial activity of PrP, localisation of its activity to the N-terminal and heparin-binding region, combined with results showing an increased expression of PrP during wounding, indicate that PrPs could have a previously undisclosed role in host defense.

  10. Unusual chemical properties of N-terminal histidine residues of glucagon and vasoactive intestinal peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefford, M.A.; Evans, R.M.; Oda, G.; Kaplan, H.

    1985-01-01

    An N-terminal histidine residue of a protein or peptide has two functional groups, viz., an alpha-amino group and an imidazole group. A new procedure, based on the competitive labeling approach described by Duggleby and Kaplan has been developed by which the chemical reactivity of each functional group in such a residue can be determined as a function of pH. Only very small amounts of material are required, which makes it possible to determine the chemical properties in dilute solution or in proteins and polypeptides that can be obtained in only minute quantities. With this approach, the reactivity of the alpha-amino group of histidylglycine toward 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene gave an apparent pK /sub a/ value of 7.64 +/- 0.07 at 37 degrees C, in good agreement with a value of 7.69 +/- 0.02 obtained by acid-base titration. However, the reactivity of the imidazole function gave an apparent pK /sub a/ value of 7.16 +/- 0.07 as compared to the pK /sub a/ value of 5.85 +/- 0.01 obtained by acid-base titration. Similarly, in glucagon and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), apparent pKa values of 7.60 +/- 0.04 and 7.88 +/- 0.18, respectively, were obtained for the alpha-amino of their N-terminal histidine, and pKa values of 7.43 +/- 0.09 and 7.59 +/- 0.18 were obtained for the imidazole function

  11. Structure of a tropomyosin N-terminal fragment at 0.98 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A. [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Okinawa (Japan); Krieger, Inna [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Kostyukova, Alla S. [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey (United States); Samatey, Fadel A., E-mail: f.a.samatey@oist.jp [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Okinawa (Japan)

    2011-09-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal fragment of the short nonmuscle α-tropomyosin has been determined at a resolution of 0.98 Å. Tropomyosin (TM) is an elongated two-chain protein that binds along actin filaments. Important binding sites are localized in the N-terminus of tropomyosin. The structure of the N-terminus of the long muscle α-TM has been solved by both NMR and X-ray crystallography. Only the NMR structure of the N-terminus of the short nonmuscle α-TM is available. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminus of the short nonmuscle α-TM (αTm1bZip) at a resolution of 0.98 Å is reported, which was solved from crystals belonging to space group P3{sub 1} with unit-cell parameters a = b = 33.00, c = 52.03 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. The first five N-terminal residues are flexible and residues 6–35 form an α-helical coiled coil. The overall fold and the secondary structure of the crystal structure of αTM1bZip are highly similar to the NMR structure and the atomic coordinates of the corresponding C{sup α} atoms between the two structures superimpose with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.60 Å. The crystal structure validates the NMR structure, with the positions of the side chains being determined precisely in our structure.

  12. C-Jun N-terminal kinase signalling pathway in response to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dong; An, GuangYu; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2016-11-01

    Cisplatin (cis diamminedichloroplatinum II, cDDP) is one of the most effective cancer chemotherapeutic agents and is used in the treatment of many types of human malignancies. However, inherent tumour resistance is a major barrier to effective cisplatin therapy. So far, the mechanism of cDDP resistance has not been well defined. In general, cisplatin is considered to be a cytotoxic drug, for damaging DNA and inhibiting DNA synthesis, resulting in apoptosis via the mitochondrial death pathway or plasma membrane disruption. cDDP-induced DNA damage triggers signalling pathways that will eventually decide between cell life and death. As a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinases family, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is a signalling pathway in response to extracellular stimuli, especially drug treatment, to modify the activity of numerous proteins locating in the mitochondria or the nucleus. Recent studies suggest that JNK signalling pathway plays a major role in deciding the fate of the cell and inducing resistance to cDDP-induced apoptosis in human tumours. c-Jun N-terminal kinase regulates several important cellular functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival and apoptosis while activating and inhibiting substrates for phosphorylation transcription factors (c-Jun, ATF2: Activating transcription factor 2, p53 and so on), which subsequently induce pro-apoptosis and pro-survival factors expression. Therefore, it is suggested that JNK signal pathway is a double-edged sword in cDDP treatment, simultaneously being a significant pro-apoptosis factor but also being associated with increased resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This review focuses on current knowledge concerning the role of JNK in cell response to cDDP, as well as their role in cisplatin resistance. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  13. N-terminal region of gelsolin induces apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells by a caspase-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhaditya Mazumdar

    Full Text Available Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs are the major source for alteration of extracellular matrix in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Conditioned medium (CM collected from immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH have earlier been shown to be responsible for apoptosis of HSCs. In this study, we have shown that antibodies raised against a peptide derived from a linear B-cell epitope in the N-terminal region of gelsolin identified a gelsolin fragment in IHH CM. Analysis of activated stellate cell death by CM collected from Huh7 cells transfected with plasmids encoding gelsolin deletion mutants suggested that the N-terminal half of gelsolin contained sequences which were responsible for stellate cell death. Further analysis determined that this activity was restricted to a region encompassing amino acids 1-70 in the gelsolin sequence; antibody directed to an epitope within this region was able to neutralize stellate cell death. Gelsolin modulation of cell death using this fragment involved upregulation of TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2, and involved caspase 3 activation by extrinsic pathway. The apoptotic activity of N-terminal gelsolin fragments was restricted to activated but not quiescent stellate cells indicating its potential application in therapeutic use as an anti-fibrotic agent. Gelsolin fragments encompassing N-terminal regions in polypeptides of different molecular sizes were detected by N-terminal peptide specific antiserum in IHH CM immunoprecipitated with chronically HCV infected patient sera, suggesting the presence of autoantibodies generated against N-terminal gelsolin fragments in patients with chronic liver disease.

  14. Synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB is essential for high-affinity binding, DNA supercoiling and inhibition of RecA-promoted strand exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharadamma, N; Khan, Krishnendu; Kumar, Sandeep; Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Hasnain, Seyed E; Muniyappa, K

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of DNA architectural proteins containing two functional domains derived from two different architectural proteins is an interesting emerging research theme in the field of nucleoid structure and function. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB, unlike Escherichia coli HU, is a two-domain protein that, in the N-terminal region, shows broad sequence homology with bacterial HU. The long C-terminal extension, on the other hand, contains seven PAKK/KAAK motifs, which are characteristic of the histone H1/H5 family of proteins. In this article, we describe several aspects of HupB function, in comparison with its truncated derivatives lacking either the C-terminus or N-terminus. We found that HupB binds a variety of DNA repair and replication intermediates with K(d) values in the nanomolar range. By contrast, the N-terminal fragment of M. tuberculosis HupB (HupB(MtbN)) showed diminished DNA-binding activity, with K(d) values in the micromolar range, and the C-terminal domain was completely devoid of DNA-binding activity. Unlike HupB(MtbN) , HupB was able to constrain DNA in negative supercoils and introduce negative superhelical turns into relaxed DNA. Similarly, HupB exerted a robust inhibitory effect on DNA strand exchange promoted by cognate and noncognate RecA proteins, whereas HupB(MtbN), even at a 50-fold molar excess, had no inhibitory effect. Considered together, these results suggest that synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of HupB is essential for its DNA-binding ability, and to modulate the topological features of DNA, which has implications for processes such as DNA compaction, gene regulation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  15. The N-Terminal GYPSY Motif Is Required for Pilin-Specific Sortase SrtC1 Functionality in Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain GG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douillard, François P.; Rasinkangas, Pia; Bhattacharjee, Arnab; Palva, Airi; Vos, De Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    Predominantly identified in pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili are also found in commensal species, such as the probiotic-marketed strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG. Pili are typically associated with host colonization, immune signalling and biofilm formation.

  16. N-terminal amphipathic helix as a trigger of hemolytic activity in antimicrobial peptides: a case study in latarcins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyansky, Anton A; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Volynsky, Pavel E; Vorontsova, Olga V; Samsonova, Olga V; Egorova, Natalya S; Krylov, Nicolay A; Feofanov, Alexei V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Grishin, Eugene V; Efremov, Roman G

    2009-07-21

    In silico structural analyses of sets of alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are performed. Differences between hemolytic and non-hemolytic AMPs are revealed in organization of their N-terminal region. A parameter related to hydrophobicity of the N-terminal part is proposed as a measure of the peptide propensity to exhibit hemolytic and other unwanted cytotoxic activities. Based on the information acquired, a rational approach for selective removal of these properties in AMPs is suggested. A proof of concept is gained through engineering specific mutations that resulted in elimination of the hemolytic activity of AMPs (latarcins) while leaving the beneficial antimicrobial effect intact.

  17. Characterization of an extensin-modifying metalloprotease: N-terminal processing and substrate cleavage pattern of Pectobacterium carotovorum Prt1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Tao; Nyffenegger, Christian; Højrup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Compared to other plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, proteases are less well understood. In this study, the extracellular metalloprotease Prt1 from Pectobacterium carotovorum (formerly Erwinia carotovora) was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized with respect to N-terminal processing...

  18. Interaction of N-terminal peptide analogues of the Na+,K+-ATPase with membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Khoa; Garcia, Alvaro; Sani, Marc Antoine

    2018-01-01

    phosphatidylserine) in the surrounding membrane. Furthermore, to isolate which segments of the N-terminus could be involved in membrane binding, we chemically synthesized N-terminal fragments of various lengths. Based on a combination of results from RH421 UV/visible absorbance measurements and solid-state 31P and 2...

  19. The N-terminal tail of hERG contains an amphipathic α-helix that regulates channel deactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of the human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG K+ channel is critical for the slow deactivation kinetics of the channel. However, the mechanism(s by which the N-terminal domain regulates deactivation remains to be determined. Here we show that the solution NMR structure of the N-terminal 135 residues of hERG contains a previously described Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS domain (residues 26-135 as well as an amphipathic α-helix (residues 13-23 and an initial unstructured segment (residues 2-9. Deletion of residues 2-25, only the unstructured segment (residues 2-9 or replacement of the α-helix with a flexible linker all result in enhanced rates of deactivation. Thus, both the initial flexible segment and the α-helix are required but neither is sufficient to confer slow deactivation kinetics. Alanine scanning mutagenesis identified R5 and G6 in the initial flexible segment as critical for slow deactivation. Alanine mutants in the helical region had less dramatic phenotypes. We propose that the PAS domain is bound close to the central core of the channel and that the N-terminal α-helix ensures that the flexible tail is correctly orientated for interaction with the activation gating machinery to stabilize the open state of the channel.

  20. N-terminal amino acid sequence of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase: comparison with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus subtilis Enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, H; Fietzek, P P; Lampen, J O

    1982-01-01

    The thermostable, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis was immunologically cross-reactive with the thermolabile, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Their N-terminal amino acid sequences showed extensive homology with each other, but not with the saccharifying alpha-amylases of Bacillus subtilis.

  1. Cutting edge: HLA-B27 acquires many N-terminal dibasic peptides: coupling cytosolic peptide stability to antigen presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herberts, Carla A.; Neijssen, Joost J.; de Haan, Jolanda; Janssen, Lennert; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Reits, Eric A.; Neefjes, Jacques J.

    2006-01-01

    Ag presentation by MHC class I is a highly inefficient process because cytosolic peptidases destroy most peptides after proteasomal generation. Various mechanisms shape the MHC class I peptidome. We define a new one: intracellular peptide stability. Peptides with two N-terminal basic amino acids are

  2. FUNCTIONAL-ANALYSIS OF THE N-TERMINAL PREPEPTIDES OF WATERMELON MITOCHONDRIAL AND GLYOXYSOMAL MALATE-DEHYDROGENASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LEHNERER, M; KEIZERGUNNIK, [No Value; VEENHUIS, M; GIETL, C

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial and glyoxysomal malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; gMDH; L-malate : NAD(+) oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.37) of watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) cotyledons are synthesized with N-terminal cleavable presequences which are shown to specify sorting of the two proteins. The two presequences differ in

  3. Mutational analysis of the N-terminal topogenic signal of watermelon glyoxysomal malate dehydrogenase using the heterologous host Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietl, Christine; Faber, Klaas Nico; Klei, Ida J. van der; Veenhuis, Marten

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the significance of the N-terminal presequence of watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) glyoxysomal malate dehydrogenase [gMDH; (S)-malate:NAD+ oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.37] in microbody targeting. The yeast Hansenula polymorpha was used as heterologous host for the in vivo expression of

  4. The N-Terminal of Aquareovirus NS80 Is Required for Interacting with Viral Proteins and Viral Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Reovirus replication and assembly occurs within viral inclusion bodies that formed in specific intracellular compartments of cytoplasm in infected cells. Previous study indicated that aquareovirus NS80 is able to form inclusion bodies, and also can retain viral proteins within its inclusions. To better understand how NS80 performed in viral replication and assembly, the functional regions of NS80 associated with other viral proteins in aquareovirus replication were investigated in this study. Deletion mutational analysis and rotavirus NSP5-based protein association platform were used to detect association regions. Immunofluorescence images indicated that different N-terminal regions of NS80 could associate with viral proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 and NS38. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the interaction between VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 with different regions covering the N-terminal amino acid (aa, 1-471 of NS80, respectively. Moreover, removal of NS80 N-terminal sequences required for interaction with proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 not only prevented the capacity of NS80 to support viral replication in NS80 shRNA-based replication complementation assays, but also inhibited the expression of aquareovirus proteins, suggesting that N-terminal regions of NS80 are necessary for viral replication. These results provided a foundational basis for further understanding the role of NS80 in viral replication and assembly during aquareovirus infection.

  5. Regulation of amyloid precursor protein processing by its KFERQ motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Seon; Kim, Dong-Hou; Yoon, Seung-Yong

    2016-06-01

    Understanding of trafficking, processing, and degradation mechanisms of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is important because APP can be processed to produce β-amyloid (Aβ), a key pathogenic molecule in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we found that APP contains KFERQ motif at its C-terminus, a consensus sequence for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) or microautophagy which are another types of autophagy for degradation of pathogenic molecules in neurodegenerative diseases. Deletion of KFERQ in APP increased C-terminal fragments (CTFs) and secreted N-terminal fragments of APP and kept it away from lysosomes. KFERQ deletion did not abolish the interaction of APP or its cleaved products with heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70), a protein necessary for CMA or microautophagy. These findings suggest that KFERQ motif is important for normal processing and degradation of APP to preclude the accumulation of APP-CTFs although it may not be important for CMA or microautophagy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 337-342].

  6. The outermost N-terminal region of tapasin facilitates folding of major histocompatibility complex class I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Gustav Andreas; Geironson, Linda; Darabi, Anna

    2009-01-01

    ). Using a biochemical peptide-MHC-I-binding assay, recombinant Tpn(1-87) was found to specifically facilitate peptide-dependent folding of HLA-A*0201. Furthermore, we used Tpn(1-87) to generate a monoclonal antibody, alphaTpn(1-87)/80, specific for natural human Tpn and capable of cellular staining of ER......Tapasin (Tpn) is an ER chaperone that is uniquely dedicated to MHC-I biosynthesis. It binds MHC-I molecules, integrates them into peptide-loading complexes, and exerts quality control of the bound peptides; only when an "optimal peptide" is bound will the MHC-I be released and exported to the cell...... surface for presentation to T cells. The exact mechanisms of Tpn quality control and the criteria for being an optimal peptide are still unknown. Here, we have generated a recombinant fragment of human Tpn, Tpn(1-87) (representing the 87 N-terminal and ER-luminal amino acids of the mature Tpn protein...

  7. PrP N-terminal domain triggers PrPSc-like aggregation of Dpl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlich, Paul; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Lemaire-Vieille, Catherine; Curt, Aurelie; Andrieu, Jean-Pierre; Schoehn, Guy; Jamin, Marc; Gagnon, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative disorders thought to be transmitted by self-perpetuating conformational conversion of a neuronal membrane glycoprotein (PrP C , for 'cellular prion protein') into an abnormal state (PrP Sc , for 'scrapie prion protein'). Doppel (Dpl) is a protein that shares significant biochemical and structural homology with PrP C . In contrast to its homologue PrP C , Dpl is unable to participate in prion disease progression or to achieve an abnormal PrP Sc -like state. We have constructed a chimeric mouse protein, composed of the N-terminal domain of PrP C (residues 23-125) and the C-terminal part of Dpl (residues 58-157). This chimeric protein displays PrP-like biochemical and structural features; when incubated in presence of NaCl, the α-helical monomer forms soluble β-sheet-rich oligomers which acquire partial resistance to pepsin proteolysis in vitro, as do PrP oligomers. Moreover, the presence of aggregates akin to protofibrils is observed in soluble oligomeric species by electron microscopy

  8. The N-terminal 33 amino acid domain of Siva-1 is sufficient for nuclear localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.Y.; Yang, L.X.; Huang, Z.F.

    2013-01-01

    Siva-1 induces apoptosis in multiple pathological processes and plays an important role in the suppression of tumor metastasis, protein degradation, and other functions. Although many studies have demonstrated that Siva-1 functions in the cytoplasm, a few have found that Siva-1 can relocate to the nucleus. In this study, we found that the first 33 amino acid residues of Siva-1 are required for its nuclear localization. Further study demonstrated that the green fluorescent protein can be imported into the nucleus after fusion with these 33 amino acid residues. Other Siva-1 regions and domains showed less effect on Siva-1 nuclear localization. By site-mutagenesis of all of these 33 amino acid residues, we found that mutants of the first 1-18 amino acids affected Siva-1 nuclear compartmentalization but could not complete this localization independently. In summary, we demonstrated that the N-terminal 33 amino acid residues were sufficient for Siva-1 nuclear localization, but the mechanism of this translocation needs additional investigation

  9. The N-terminal 33 amino acid domain of Siva-1 is sufficient for nuclear localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.Y.; Yang, L.X. [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Huang, Z.F. [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Biochemistry, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Diseases Control, Sun Yat-sen University, Ministry of Education in China, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-12-02

    Siva-1 induces apoptosis in multiple pathological processes and plays an important role in the suppression of tumor metastasis, protein degradation, and other functions. Although many studies have demonstrated that Siva-1 functions in the cytoplasm, a few have found that Siva-1 can relocate to the nucleus. In this study, we found that the first 33 amino acid residues of Siva-1 are required for its nuclear localization. Further study demonstrated that the green fluorescent protein can be imported into the nucleus after fusion with these 33 amino acid residues. Other Siva-1 regions and domains showed less effect on Siva-1 nuclear localization. By site-mutagenesis of all of these 33 amino acid residues, we found that mutants of the first 1-18 amino acids affected Siva-1 nuclear compartmentalization but could not complete this localization independently. In summary, we demonstrated that the N-terminal 33 amino acid residues were sufficient for Siva-1 nuclear localization, but the mechanism of this translocation needs additional investigation.

  10. N-terminal peptides from unprocessed prion proteins enter cells by macropinocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magzoub, Mazin; Sandgren, Staffan; Lundberg, Pontus; Oglecka, Kamila; Lilja, Johanna; Wittrup, Anders; Goeran Eriksson, L.E.; Langel, Ulo; Belting, Mattias; Graeslund, Astrid

    2006-01-01

    A peptide derived from the N-terminus of the unprocessed bovine prion protein (bPrPp), incorporating the hydrophobic signal sequence (residues 1-24) and a basic domain (KKRPKP, residues 25-30), internalizes into mammalian cells, even when coupled to a sizeable cargo, and therefore functions as a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). Confocal microscopy and co-localization studies indicate that the internalization of bPrPp is mainly through macropinocytosis, a fluid-phase endocytosis process, initiated by binding to cell-surface proteoglycans. Electron microscopy studies show internalized bPrPp-DNA-gold complexes residing in endosomal vesicles. bPrPp induces expression of a complexed luciferase-encoding DNA plasmid, demonstrating the peptide's ability to transport the cargo across the endosomal membrane and into the cytosol and nucleus. The novel CPP activity of the unprocessed N-terminal domain of PrP could be important for the retrotranslocation of partly processed PrP and for PrP trafficking inside or between cells, with implications for the infectivity associated with prion diseases

  11. [Diagnostic values of serum type III procollagen N-terminal peptide in type IV gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, S; Fujiki, T; Kanda, Y; Kumai, R; Yoshida, S

    1985-04-01

    Since increased synthesis of collagen has been demonstrated in tissue of type IV gastric cancer, we attempted to distinguish type IV gastric cancer from other cancers by measuring serum levels of type III procollagen N-terminal peptide (type III-N-peptide). Mean serum levels in type IV gastric cancer patients without metastasis were found to be elevated above normal values and developed a tendency to be higher than those in types I, II and III gastric cancer patients without metastasis. Highly positive ratios were found in patients with liver diseases including hepatoma and colon cancer, biliary tract cancer, and esophageal cancer patients with liver, lung or bone metastasis, but only 2 out of 14 of these cancer patients without such metastasis showed positive serum levels of type III-N-peptide. Positive cases in patients with type IV gastric cancer were obtained not only in the group with clinical stage IV but also in the groups with clinical stages II and III. In addition, high serum levels of type III-N-peptide in patients with type IV gastric cancer were seen not only in the cases with liver, lung or bone metastasis but also in cases with disseminated peritoneal metastasis alone. These results suggest that if the serum level of type III-N-peptide is elevated above normal values, type IV gastric cancer should be suspected after ruling out liver diseases, myelofibrosis and liver, lung or bone metastasis.

  12. N-terminal processing of affinity-tagged recombinant proteins purified by IMAC procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Jane T; Fredericks, Dale P; Christensen, Thorkild; Bruun Schiødt, Christine; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-07-01

    The ability of a new class of metal binding tags to facilitate the purification of recombinant proteins, exemplified by the tagged glutathione S-transferase and human growth hormone, from Escherichia coli fermentation broths and lysates has been further investigated. These histidine-containing tags exhibit high affinity for borderline metal ions chelated to the immobilised ligand, 1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tacn). The use of this tag-tacn immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) system engenders high selectivity with regard to host cell protein removal and permits facile tag removal from the E. coli-expressed recombinant protein. In particular, these tags were specifically designed to enable their efficient removal by the dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 (DAP-1), thus capturing the advantages of high substrate specificity and rates of cleavage. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the cleaved products from the DAP-1 digestion of the recombinant N-terminally tagged proteins confirmed the complete removal of the tag within 4-12 h under mild experimental conditions. Overall, this study demonstrates that the use of tags specifically designed to target tacn-based IMAC resins offers a comprehensive and flexible approach for the purification of E. coli-expressed recombinant proteins, where complete removal of the tag is an essential prerequisite for subsequent application of the purified native proteins in studies aimed at delineating the molecular and cellular basis of specific biological processes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The N-terminal, polybasic region is critical for prion protein neuroprotective activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie A Turnbaugh

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence suggest that the normal form of the prion protein, PrP(C, exerts a neuroprotective activity against cellular stress or toxicity. One of the clearest examples of such activity is the ability of wild-type PrP(C to suppress the spontaneous neurodegenerative phenotype of transgenic mice expressing a deleted form of PrP (Δ32-134, called F35. To define domains of PrP involved in its neuroprotective activity, we have analyzed the ability of several deletion mutants of PrP (Δ23-31, Δ23-111, and Δ23-134 to rescue the phenotype of Tg(F35 mice. Surprisingly, all of these mutants displayed greatly diminished rescue activity, although Δ23-31 PrP partially suppressed neuronal loss when expressed at very high levels. Our results pinpoint the N-terminal, polybasic domain as a critical determinant of PrP(C neuroprotective activity, and suggest that identification of molecules interacting with this region will provide important clues regarding the normal function of the protein. Small molecule ligands targeting this region may also represent useful therapeutic agents for treatment of prion diseases.

  14. Identification of evolutionarily conserved non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in human coding sequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P

    2011-05-01

    In eukaryotes, it is generally assumed that translation initiation occurs at the AUG codon closest to the messenger RNA 5\\' cap. However, in certain cases, initiation can occur at codons differing from AUG by a single nucleotide, especially the codons CUG, UUG, GUG, ACG, AUA and AUU. While non-AUG initiation has been experimentally verified for a handful of human genes, the full extent to which this phenomenon is utilized--both for increased coding capacity and potentially also for novel regulatory mechanisms--remains unclear. To address this issue, and hence to improve the quality of existing coding sequence annotations, we developed a methodology based on phylogenetic analysis of predicted 5\\' untranslated regions from orthologous genes. We use evolutionary signatures of protein-coding sequences as an indicator of translation initiation upstream of annotated coding sequences. Our search identified novel conserved potential non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in 42 human genes including VANGL2, FGFR1, KCNN4, TRPV6, HDGF, CITED2, EIF4G3 and NTF3, and also affirmed the conservation of known non-AUG-initiated extensions in 17 other genes. In several instances, we have been able to obtain independent experimental evidence of the expression of non-AUG-initiated products from the previously published literature and ribosome profiling data.

  15. Structure of the N-terminal region of Haemophilus Influenzae HI0017: Implications for function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Liping; Mack, Jamey; Hajduk, Phil; Fesik, Stephen W. [Abbott Laboratories, Pharmaceutical Discovery Division, D46Y, AP10/LL (United States)

    2001-06-15

    Haemophilus influenzae is a gram-negative pathogen that causes infections ranging from asymptomatic colonization of the human upper respiratory tract to serious invasive diseases such as meningitis. Although the genome of Haemophilus influenzae has been completely sequenced, the structure and function of many of these proteins are unknown. HI0017 is one of these uncharacterized proteins. Here we describe the three-dimensional solution structure of the N-terminal portion of HI0017 as determined by NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and two short {alpha}-helices. It is similar to the C-terminal domain of Diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR). The C-terminal portion of HI0017 has an amino acid sequence that closely resembles pyruvate formate-lyase - an enzyme that converts pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and formate by a radical mechanism. Based on structural and sequence comparisons, we propose that the C-terminus of HI0017 functions as an enzyme with a glycyl radical mechanism, while the N-terminus participates in protein/protein interactions involving an activase (iron-sulfur protein) and/or the substrate.

  16. Structure of the N-terminal region of Haemophilus Influenzae HI0017: Implications for function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Liping; Mack, Jamey; Hajduk, Phil; Fesik, Stephen W.

    2001-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a gram-negative pathogen that causes infections ranging from asymptomatic colonization of the human upper respiratory tract to serious invasive diseases such as meningitis. Although the genome of Haemophilus influenzae has been completely sequenced, the structure and function of many of these proteins are unknown. HI0017 is one of these uncharacterized proteins. Here we describe the three-dimensional solution structure of the N-terminal portion of HI0017 as determined by NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of a five-stranded antiparallel β-sheet and two short α-helices. It is similar to the C-terminal domain of Diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR). The C-terminal portion of HI0017 has an amino acid sequence that closely resembles pyruvate formate-lyase - an enzyme that converts pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and formate by a radical mechanism. Based on structural and sequence comparisons, we propose that the C-terminus of HI0017 functions as an enzyme with a glycyl radical mechanism, while the N-terminus participates in protein/protein interactions involving an activase (iron-sulfur protein) and/or the substrate

  17. Biologic variability of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in adult healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Autumn N; Estrada, Amara H; Gallagher, Alexander E; Winter, Brandy; Lamb, Kenneth E; Bohannon, Mary; Hanscom, Jancy; Mainville, Celine A

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The biologic variability of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and its impact on diagnostic utility is unknown in healthy cats and those with cardiac disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the biologic variation of NT-proBNP within-day and week-to-week in healthy adult cats. Methods Adult cats were prospectively evaluated by complete blood count (CBC), biochemistry, total thyroxine, echocardiography, electrocardiography and blood pressure, to exclude underlying systemic or cardiac disease. Adult healthy cats were enrolled and blood samples were obtained at 11 time points over a 6 week period (0, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, 10 h and at weeks 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6). The intra-individual (coefficient of variation [CV I ]) biologic variation along with index of individuality and reference change values (RCVs) were calculated. Univariate models were analyzed and included comparison of the six different time points for both daily and weekly samples. This was followed by a Tukey's post-hoc adjustment, with a P value of cats. Further research is warranted to evaluate NT-proBNP variability, particularly how serial measurements of NT-proBNP may be used in the diagnosis and management of cats with cardiac disease.

  18. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  19. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease Npro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer; Ruggli, Nicolas; Choi, Kyung H.

    2014-01-01

    Pestivirus N pro is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N pro blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N pro' s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N pro -GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N pro proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N pro' s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N pro does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N pro' s autoproteolysis is studied using N pro -GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N pro prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position

  20. Tor forms a dimer through an N-terminal helical solenoid with a complex topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretić, Domagoj; Berndt, Alex; Ohashi, Yohei; Johnson, Christopher M.; Williams, Roger L.

    2016-04-01

    The target of rapamycin (Tor) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates a range of anabolic and catabolic processes. Tor is present in two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, in which the Tor-Lst8 heterodimer forms a common sub-complex. We have determined the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of Tor bound to Lst8. Two Tor-Lst8 heterodimers assemble further into a dyad-symmetry dimer mediated by Tor-Tor interactions. The first 1,300 residues of Tor form a HEAT repeat-containing α-solenoid with four distinct segments: a highly curved 800-residue N-terminal 'spiral', followed by a 400-residue low-curvature 'bridge' and an extended `railing' running along the bridge leading to the 'cap' that links to FAT region. This complex topology was verified by domain insertions and offers a new interpretation of the mTORC1 structure. The spiral of one TOR interacts with the bridge of another, which together form a joint platform for the Regulatory Associated Protein of TOR (RAPTOR) regulatory subunit.

  1. Procollagen III N-terminal Propeptide and Desmosine are Released by Matrix Destruction in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Jo; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Walker, Naomi F.; Yuen, Ho Ming; Sunpath, Henry; Tezera, Liku; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Bishai, William R.; Friedland, Jon S.; Elkington, Paul T.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is transmitted by patients with pulmonary disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) drive lung destruction in tuberculosis but the resulting matrix degradation products (MDPs) have not been studied. We investigate the hypothesis that MMP activity generates matrix turnover products as correlates of lung pathology. Methods. Induced sputum and plasma were collected prospectively from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive and negative patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and controls. Concentrations of MDPs and MMPs were analyzed by ELISA and Luminex array in 2 patient cohorts. Results. Procollagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP) was 3.8-fold higher in induced sputum of HIV-uninfected tuberculosis patients compared to controls and desmosine, released during elastin degradation, was 2.4-fold higher. PIIINP was elevated in plasma of tuberculosis patients. Plasma PIIINP correlated with induced sputum MMP-1 concentrations and radiological scores, demonstrating that circulating MDPs reflect lung destruction. In a second patient cohort of mixed HIV seroprevalence, plasma PIIINP concentration was increased 3.0-fold above controls (P tuberculosis patients (P = .001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis utilizing these 2 variables demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.832 (P pulmonary tuberculosis, MMP-driven immunopathology generates matrix degradation products. PMID:23922364

  2. N-Terminal Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-1, a Potential Subunit for Malaria Vivax Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda G. Versiani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human malaria is widely distributed in the Middle East, Asia, the western Pacific, and Central and South America. Plasmodium vivax started to have the attention of many researchers since it is causing diseases to millions of people and several reports of severe malaria cases have been noticed in the last few years. The lack of in vitro cultures for P. vivax represents a major delay in developing a functional malaria vaccine. One of the major candidates to antimalarial vaccine is the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1, which is expressed abundantly on the merozoite surface and capable of activating the host protective immunity. Studies have shown that MSP-1 possesses highly immunogenic fragments, capable of generating immune response and protection in natural infection in endemic regions. This paper shows humoral immune response to different proteins of PvMSP1 and the statement of N-terminal to be added to the list of potential candidates for malaria vivax vaccine.

  3. The position of the Gly-xxx-Gly motif in transmembrane segments modulates dimer affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M

    2006-12-01

    Although the intrinsic low solubility of membrane proteins presents challenges to their high-resolution structure determination, insight into the amino acid sequence features and forces that stabilize their folds has been provided through study of sequence-dependent helix-helix interactions between single transmembrane (TM) helices. While the stability of helix-helix partnerships mediated by the Gly-xxx-Gly (GG4) motif is known to be generally modulated by distal interfacial residues, it has not been established whether the position of this motif, with respect to the ends of a given TM segment, affects dimer affinity. Here we examine the relationship between motif position and affinity in the homodimers of 2 single-spanning membrane protein TM sequences: glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 coat protein (MCP). Using the TOXCAT assay for dimer affinity on a series of GpA and MCP TM segments that have been modified with either 4 Leu residues at each end or with 8 Leu residues at the N-terminal end, we show that in each protein, centrally located GG4 motifs are capable of stronger helix-helix interactions than those proximal to TM helix ends, even when surrounding interfacial residues are maintained. The relative importance of GG4 motifs in stabilizing helix-helix interactions therefore must be considered not only in its specific residue context but also in terms of the location of the interactive surface relative to the N and C termini of alpha-helical TM segments.

  4. Identification of helix capping and {beta}-turn motifs from NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2012-03-15

    We present an empirical method for identification of distinct structural motifs in proteins on the basis of experimentally determined backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts. Elements identified include the N-terminal and C-terminal helix capping motifs and five types of {beta}-turns: I, II, I Prime , II Prime and VIII. Using a database of proteins of known structure, the NMR chemical shifts, together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of the helix capping and {beta}-turn motifs are used as input data for training an artificial neural network algorithm, which outputs the statistical probability of finding each motif at any given position in the protein. The trained neural networks, contained in the MICS (motif identification from chemical shifts) program, also provide a confidence level for each of their predictions, and values ranging from ca 0.7-0.9 for the Matthews correlation coefficient of its predictions far exceed those attainable by sequence analysis. MICS is anticipated to be useful both in the conventional NMR structure determination process and for enhancing on-going efforts to determine protein structures solely on the basis of chemical shift information, where it can aid in identifying protein database fragments suitable for use in building such structures.

  5. Identification of helix capping and β-turn motifs from NMR chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad

    2012-01-01

    We present an empirical method for identification of distinct structural motifs in proteins on the basis of experimentally determined backbone and 13 C β chemical shifts. Elements identified include the N-terminal and C-terminal helix capping motifs and five types of β-turns: I, II, I′, II′ and VIII. Using a database of proteins of known structure, the NMR chemical shifts, together with the PDB-extracted amino acid preference of the helix capping and β-turn motifs are used as input data for training an artificial neural network algorithm, which outputs the statistical probability of finding each motif at any given position in the protein. The trained neural networks, contained in the MICS (motif identification from chemical shifts) program, also provide a confidence level for each of their predictions, and values ranging from ca 0.7–0.9 for the Matthews correlation coefficient of its predictions far exceed those attainable by sequence analysis. MICS is anticipated to be useful both in the conventional NMR structure determination process and for enhancing on-going efforts to determine protein structures solely on the basis of chemical shift information, where it can aid in identifying protein database fragments suitable for use in building such structures.

  6. Dimeric structure of the N-terminal domain of PriB protein from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis solved ab initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebschner, Dorothee [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Brzezinski, Krzysztof [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Bialystok, 15-399 Bialystok (Poland); Dauter, Miroslawa [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew, E-mail: dauter@anl.gov [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Nowak, Marta; Kur, Józef; Olszewski, Marcin, E-mail: dauter@anl.gov [Gdansk University of Technology, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium T. tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure has been solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. PriB is one of the components of the bacterial primosome, which catalyzes the reactivation of stalled replication forks at sites of DNA damage. The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure was solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. The protein chain, which encompasses the first 104 residues of the full 220-residue protein, adopts the characteristic oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) structure consisting of a five-stranded β-barrel filled with hydrophobic residues and equipped with four loops extending from the barrel. In the crystal two protomers dimerize, forming a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. The structure of the N-terminal OB domain of T. tengcongensis shows significant differences compared with mesophile PriBs. While in all other known structures of PriB a dimer is formed by two identical OB domains in separate chains, TtePriB contains two consecutive OB domains in one chain. However, sequence comparison of both the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of TtePriB suggests that they have analogous structures and that the natural protein possesses a structure similar to a dimer of two N-terminal domains.

  7. Hydroxyl Radical-Mediated Novel Modification of Peptides: N-Terminal Cyclization through the Formation of α-Ketoamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Kyung, Hyunsook; Yokota, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-20

    The hydroxyl radical-mediated oxidation of peptides and proteins constitutes a large group of post-translational modifications that can result in structural and functional changes. These oxidations can lead to hydroxylation, sulfoxidation, or carbonylation of certain amino acid residues and cleavage of peptide bonds. In addition, hydroxyl radicals can convert the N-terminus of peptides to an α-ketoamide via abstraction of the N-terminal α-hydrogen and hydrolysis of the ketimine intermediate. In the present study, we identified N-terminal cyclization as a novel modification mediated by a hydroxyl radical. The reaction of angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Cu(II)/ascorbic acid (AA) system or UV/hydrogen peroxide system produced N-terminal cyclized-Ang II (Ang C) and pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P, CH3COCONH-RVYIHPF). The structure of Ang C was confirmed by mass spectrometry and comparison to an authentic standard. The subsequent incubation of isolated Ang P in the presence of Cu(II)/AA revealed that Ang P was the direct precursor of Ang C. The proposed mechanism involves the formation of a nitrogen-centered (aminyl) radical, which cyclizes to form a five-membered ring containing the alkoxy radical. The subsequent β-scission reaction of the alkoxyl radical results in the cleavage of the terminal CH3CO group. The initial aminyl radical can be stabilized by chelation to the Cu(II) ions. The affinity of Ang C toward the Ang II type 1 receptor was significantly lower than that of Ang II or Ang P. Ang C was not further metabolized by aminopeptidase A, which converts Ang II to Ang III. Hydroxyl radical-mediated N-terminal cyclization was also observed in other Ang peptides containing N-terminal alanine, arginine, valine, and amyloid β 1-11 (DAEFRHDSGYE).

  8. A non-catalytic N-terminal domain negatively influences the nucleotide exchange activity of translation elongation factor 1Bα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosiuk, Tetiana V; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bα (eEF1Bα) is a functional homolog of the bacterial factor EF-Ts, and is a component of the macromolecular eEF1B complex. eEF1Bα functions as a catalyst of guanine nucleotide exchange on translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A). The C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα is necessary and sufficient for its catalytic activity, whereas the N-terminal domain interacts with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bγ (eEF1Bγ) to form a tight complex. However, eEF1Bγ has been shown to enhance the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα attributed to the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα. This suggests that the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may in some way influence the guanine nucleotide exchange process. We have shown that full-length recombinant eEF1Bα and its truncated forms are non-globular proteins with elongated shapes. Truncation of the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα, which is dispensable for catalytic activity, resulted in acceleration of the rate of guanine nucleotide exchange on eEF1A compared to full-length eEF1Bα. A similar effect on the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα was observed after its interaction with eEF1Bγ. We suggest that the non-catalytic N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may interfere with eEF1A binding to the C-terminal catalytic domain, resulting in a decrease in the overall rate of the guanine nucleotide exchange reaction. Formation of a tight complex between the eEF1Bγ and eEF1Bα N-terminal domains abolishes this inhibitory effect. © 2015 FEBS.

  9. MotifMark: Finding regulatory motifs in DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Hamid Reza; Kolhe, Pushkar; Isbell, Charles L; Wang, May D

    2017-07-01

    The interaction between proteins and DNA is a key driving force in a significant number of biological processes such as transcriptional regulation, repair, recombination, splicing, and DNA modification. The identification of DNA-binding sites and the specificity of target proteins in binding to these regions are two important steps in understanding the mechanisms of these biological activities. A number of high-throughput technologies have recently emerged that try to quantify the affinity between proteins and DNA motifs. Despite their success, these technologies have their own limitations and fall short in precise characterization of motifs, and as a result, require further downstream analysis to extract useful and interpretable information from a haystack of noisy and inaccurate data. Here we propose MotifMark, a new algorithm based on graph theory and machine learning, that can find binding sites on candidate probes and rank their specificity in regard to the underlying transcription factor. We developed a pipeline to analyze experimental data derived from compact universal protein binding microarrays and benchmarked it against two of the most accurate motif search methods. Our results indicate that MotifMark can be a viable alternative technique for prediction of motif from protein binding microarrays and possibly other related high-throughput techniques.

  10. Amphipathic motifs in BAR domains are essential for membrane curvature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatia, Vikram K; Madsen, Kenneth L; Bolinger, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-01

    BAR (Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs) domains and amphipathic alpha-helices (AHs) are believed to be sensors of membrane curvature thus facilitating the assembly of protein complexes on curved membranes. Here, we used quantitative fluorescence microscopy to compare the binding of both motifs on single...... nanosized liposomes of different diameters and therefore membrane curvature. Characterization of members of the three BAR domain families showed surprisingly that the crescent-shaped BAR dimer with its positively charged concave face is not able to sense membrane curvature. Mutagenesis on BAR domains showed...... that membrane curvature sensing critically depends on the N-terminal AH and furthermore that BAR domains sense membrane curvature through hydrophobic insertion in lipid packing defects and not through electrostatics. Consequently, amphipathic motifs, such as AHs, that are often associated with BAR domains...

  11. Requirement for asparagine in the aquaporin NPA sequence signature motifs for cation exclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wree, Dorothea; Wu, Binghua; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Two highly conserved NPA motifs are a hallmark of the aquaporin (AQP) family. The NPA triplets form N-terminal helix capping structures with the Asn side chains located in the centre of the water or solute-conducting channel, and are considered to play an important role in AQP selectivity. Although...... interchangeable at both NPA sites without affecting protein expression or water, glycerol and methylamine permeability. However, other mutations in the NPA region led to reduced permeability (S186C and S186D), to nonfunctional channels (N64D), or even to lack of protein expression (S186A and S186T). Using...... electrophysiology, we found that an analogous mammalian AQP1 N76S mutant excluded protons and potassium ions, but leaked sodium ions, providing an argument for the overwhelming prevalence of Asn over other amino acids. We conclude that, at the first position in the NPA motifs, only Asn provides efficient helix cap...

  12. A novel N-terminal domain may dictate the glucose response of Mondo proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa G McFerrin

    Full Text Available Glucose is a fundamental energy source for both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The balance between glucose utilization and storage is integral for proper energy homeostasis, and defects are associated with several diseases, e.g. type II diabetes. In vertebrates, the transcription factor ChREBP is a major component in glucose metabolism, while its ortholog MondoA is involved in glucose uptake. Both MondoA and ChREBP contain five Mondo conserved regions (MCRI-V that affect their cellular localization and transactivation ability. While phosphorylation has been shown to affect ChREBP function, the mechanisms controlling glucose response of both ChREBP and MondoA remain elusive. By incorporating sequence analysis techniques, structure predictions, and functional annotations, we synthesized data surrounding Mondo family proteins into a cohesive, accurate, and general model involving the MCRs and two additional domains that determine ChREBP and MondoA glucose response. Paramount, we identified a conserved motif within the transactivation region of Mondo family proteins and propose that this motif interacts with the phosphorylated form of glucose. In addition, we discovered a putative nuclear receptor box in non-vertebrate Mondo and vertebrate ChREBP sequences that reveals a potentially novel interaction with nuclear receptors. These interactions are likely involved in altering ChREBP and MondoA conformation to form an active complex and induce transcription of genes involved in glucose metabolism and lipogenesis.

  13. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States); Ruggli, Nicolas [Institute of Virology and Immunology, CH-3147 Mittelhäusern (Switzerland); Choi, Kyung H., E-mail: kychoi@utmb.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  14. Suppression of cell death by the secretory form of N-terminal ERC/mesothelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tegexibaiyin; Kajino, Kazunori; Abe, Masaaki; Tan, Ke; Maruo, Masumi; Sun, Guodong; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Masahiro; Hino, Okio

    2010-08-01

    ERC/mesothelin is highly expressed in malignant mesothelioma, pancreatic cancer, and ovarian cancer. It is cleaved to a 30 kDa N-terminal secretory form (N-ERC) and a 40 kDa C-terminal membranous form (C-ERC). Several functions have been reported for full-length ERC (full-ERC) and C-ERC/mesothelin, such as in cell adhesion and invasion, stimulation of cell proliferation, and the suppression of cell death. However, there have been no studies to date on the function of secretory N-ERC, despite the fact that it is abundantly secreted into the sera of mesothelioma patients. In this study, we investigated whether N-ERC could function as a secretory factor to stimulate tumor progression. Full-, N, or C-ERC was overexpressed in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Huh7 that lacks endogenous expression of ERC/mesothelin. Changes in the rates of cell proliferation and cell death were determined, and the state of signal transducers was examined using various endpoints: total cell counts, trypan blue exclusion rate, BrdU incorporation rate, TUNEL assay, and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Stat3. In cells overexpressing N-ERC, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was enhanced and the rate of cell death decreased, leading to the increase of cell number. The culture medium containing the secretory N-ERC also had the activity to increase the number of cells. Our data suggested that one of the full-ERC functions reported previously was mediated by the secretory N-ERC.

  15. Abl N-terminal cap stabilization of SH3 domain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shugui; Dumitrescu, Teodora Pene; Smithgall, Thomas E; Engen, John R

    2008-05-27

    Crystal structures and other biochemical data indicate that the N-terminal cap (NCap) region of the Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) is important for maintaining the downregulated conformation of the kinase domain. The exact contributions that the NCap makes in stabilizing the various intramolecular interactions within c-Abl are less clear. While the NCap appears to be important for locking the SH3 and SH2 domains to the back of the kinase domain, there may be other more subtle elements of regulation. Hydrogen exchange (HX) and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to determine if the NCap contributes to intramolecular interactions involving the Abl SH3 domain. Under physiological conditions, the Abl SH3 domain underwent partial unfolding and its unfolding half-life was slowed during binding to the SH2 kinase linker, providing a unique assay for testing NCap-induced stabilization of the SH3 domain in various constructs. The results showed that the NCap stabilizes the dynamics of the SH3 domain in certain constructs but does not increase the relative affinity of the SH3 domain for the native SH2 kinase linker. The stabilization effect was absent in constructs of just the NCap and SH3 but was obvious when the SH2 domain and the SH2 kinase linker were present. These results suggest that interactions between the NCap and the SH3 domain can contribute to c-Abl stabilization in constructs that contain at least the SH2 domain, an effect that may partially compensate for the absence of the negative regulatory C-terminal tail found in the related Src family of kinases.

  16. Systemic N-terminal fragments of adrenocorticotropin reduce inflammation- and stress-induced anhedonia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Dmitrii D; Yatsenko, Ksenia A; Inozemtseva, Lyudmila S; Grivennikov, Igor A; Myasoedov, Nikolai F; Dolotov, Oleg V

    2017-08-01

    Emerging evidence implicates impaired self-regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and inflammation as important and closely related components of the pathophysiology of major depression. Antidepressants show anti-inflammatory effects and are suggested to enhance glucocorticoid feedback inhibition of the HPA axis. HPA axis activity is also negatively self-regulated by the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), a potent anti-inflammatory peptide activating five subtypes of melanocortin receptors (MCRs). There are indications that ACTH-mediated feedback can be activated by noncorticotropic N-terminal ACTH fragments such as a potent anti-inflammatory MC1/3/4/5R agonist α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), corresponding to ACTH(1-13), and a MC3/5R agonist ACTH(4-10). We investigated whether intraperitoneal administration of rats with these peptides affects anhedonia, which is a core symptom of depression. Inflammation-related anhedonia was induced by a single intraperitoneal administration of a low dose (0.025mg/kg) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Stress-related anhedonia was induced by the chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) procedure. The sucrose preference test was used to detect anhedonia. We found that ACTH(4-10) pretreatment decreased LPS-induced increase in serum corticosterone and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and a MC3/4R antagonist SHU9119 blocked this effect. Both α-MSH and ACTH(4-10) alleviated LPS-induced anhedonia. In the CUS model, these peptides reduced anhedonia and normalized body weight gain. The data indicate that systemic α-MSH and ACTH(4-10) produce an antidepressant-like effect on anhedonia induced by stress or inflammation, the stimuli that trigger the release of ACTH and α-MSH into the bloodstream. The results suggest a counterbalancing role of circulating melanocortins in depression and point to a new approach for antidepressant treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of niphatenones that inhibit androgen receptor N-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A Banuelos

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy causes a temporary reduction in tumor burden in patients with advanced prostate cancer. Unfortunately the malignancy will return to form lethal castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CRPC. The androgen receptor (AR remains transcriptionally active in CRPC in spite of castrate levels of androgens in the blood. AR transcriptional activity resides in its N-terminal domain (NTD. Possible mechanisms of continued AR transcriptional activity may include, at least in part, expression of constitutively active splice variants of AR that lack the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD. Current therapies that target the AR LBD, would not be effective against these AR variants. Currently no drugs are clinically available that target the AR NTD which should be effective against these AR variants as well as full-length AR. Niphatenones were originally isolated and identified in active extracts from Niphates digitalis marine sponge. Here we begin to characterize the mechanism of niphatenones in blocking AR transcriptional activity. Both enantiomers had similar IC50 values of 6 µM for inhibiting the full-length AR in a functional transcriptional assay. However, (S-niphatenone had significantly better activity against the AR NTD compared to (R-niphatenone. Consistent with niphatenones binding to and inhibiting transactivation of AR NTD, niphatenones inhibited AR splice variant. Niphatenone did not affect the transcriptional activity of the related progesterone receptor, but slightly decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR activity and covalently bound to GR activation function-1 (AF-1 region. Niphatenone blocked N/C interactions of AR without altering either AR protein levels or its intracellular localization in response to androgen. Alkylation with glutathione suggests that niphatenones are not a feasible scaffold for further drug development.

  18. Investigating the DNA-binding ability of GATA-1-N-terminal zinc finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, R.; Newton, A.; Crossley, M.; Mackay, J.

    2001-01-01

    Erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 interacts with both DNA and other proteins through its zinc finger domains (ZnFs). While it has been known for me time that the C-terminal ZnF binds DNA at GATA sites, only recently has it been observed that the N-terminal finger (NF) is capable of interacting with GATC sites. Further, a number of naturally occurring mutations in NF (V205M, G208S, R216Q, D218G) that lead to anaemia and thrombocytopenia have been identified. We are interested in characterising the NF-DNA interaction and determining the effects of mutation upon this interaction. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have observed an interaction between recombinant NF and a 16-mer DNA duplex containing a core GATC sequence. This result forms the basis from which residues in NF involved in DNA binding can be identified, and work is being carried out to improve the quality of the NMR data with the aim of determining the solution structure of the NF-DNA complex. The DNA-binding affinity of both wild-type and mutant NFs mentioned above is also being investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry. These data suggest that the strength of the interaction between NF and the 16-mer DNA duplex is in the sub-micromolar range, and comparisons between the DNA-binding affinities of the NF mutants are being made. Together, these studies will help us to understand how GATA-1 acts as a transcriptional regulator and how mutations in NF domain of GATA-1 may lead to blood disorders

  19. Plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations in dogs with pulmonic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Keiya; Hori, Yasutomo; Chimura, Syuuichi

    2014-06-01

    The detailed information between plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and dogs with pulmonic stenosis (PS) is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical utility of measuring plasma NT-proBNP concentrations in dogs with PS and to determine whether plasma NT-proBNP concentration could be used to assess disease severity. This retrospective study enrolled 30 client-owned, untreated dogs with PS (asymptomatic [n=23] and symptomatic [n=7]) and 11 healthy laboratory beagles. Results of physical examination, thoracic radiography and echocardiography were recorded. Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were measured using commercial laboratories. Compared to the healthy control dogs, cardiothoracic ratio was significantly increased in dogs with both asymptomatic and symptomatic PS. Similarly, the ratio of the main pulmonary artery to aorta was significantly decreased in dogs with both asymptomatic and symptomatic PS. The pulmonic pressure gradient in the symptomatic PS dogs was significantly higher than that in the asymptomatic PS dogs. Plasma NT-proBNP concentration was significantly elevated in the symptomatic PS dogs compared to the healthy control dogs and the asymptomatic PS dogs. Furthermore, the Doppler-derived pulmonic pressure gradient was significantly correlated with the plasma NT-proBNP concentration (r=0.78, r(2)=0.61, P764 pmol/l to identify severe PS had a sensitivity of 76.2% and specificity of 81.8%. The plasma NT-proBNP concentration increased by spontaneous PS, i.e. right-sided pressure overload and can be used as an additional method to assess the severity of PS in dogs.

  20. Structural modeling of the N-terminal signal–receiving domain of IκBα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira eYazdi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB exerts essential roles in many biological processes including cell growth, apoptosis and innate and adaptive immunity. The NF-kB inhibitor (IκBα retains NF-κB in the cytoplasm and thus inhibits nuclear localization of NF-κB and its association with DNA. Recent protein crystal structures of the C-terminal part of IκBα in complex with NF-κB provided insights into the protein-protein interactions but could not reveal structural details about the N-terminal signal receiving domain (SRD. The SRD of IκBα contains a degron, formed following phosphorylation by IκB kinases (IKK. In current protein X-ray structures, however, the SRD is not resolved and assumed to be disordered. Here, we combined secondary structure annotation and domain threading followed by long molecular dynamics (MD simulations and showed that the SRD possesses well-defined secondary structure elements. We show that the SRD contains 3 additional stable α-helices supplementing the six ARDs present in crystallized IκBα. The IκBα/NF-κB protein-protein complex remained intact and stable during the entire simulations. Also in solution, free IκBα retains its structural integrity. Differences in structural topology and dynamics were observed by comparing the structures of NF-κB free and NF-κB bound IκBα-complex. This study paves the way for investigating the signaling properties of the SRD in the IκBα degron. A detailed atomic scale understanding of molecular mechanism of NF-κB activation, regulation and the protein-protein interactions may assist to design and develop novel chronic inflammation modulators.

  1. N-terminal segments modulate the α-helical propensities of the intrinsically disordered basic regions of bZIP proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rahul K; Crick, Scott L; Pappu, Rohit V

    2012-02-17

    Basic region leucine zippers (bZIPs) are modular transcription factors that play key roles in eukaryotic gene regulation. The basic regions of bZIPs (bZIP-bRs) are necessary and sufficient for DNA binding and specificity. Bioinformatic predictions and spectroscopic studies suggest that unbound monomeric bZIP-bRs are uniformly disordered as isolated domains. Here, we test this assumption through a comparative characterization of conformational ensembles for 15 different bZIP-bRs using a combination of atomistic simulations and circular dichroism measurements. We find that bZIP-bRs have quantifiable preferences for α-helical conformations in their unbound monomeric forms. This helicity varies from one bZIP-bR to another despite a significant sequence similarity of the DNA binding motifs (DBMs). Our analysis reveals that intramolecular interactions between DBMs and eight-residue segments directly N-terminal to DBMs are the primary modulators of bZIP-bR helicities. We test the accuracy of this inference by designing chimeras of bZIP-bRs to have either increased or decreased overall helicities. Our results yield quantitative insights regarding the relationship between sequence and the degree of intrinsic disorder within bZIP-bRs, and might have general implications for other intrinsically disordered proteins. Understanding how natural sequence variations lead to modulation of disorder is likely to be important for understanding the evolution of specificity in molecular recognition through intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein indicates the importance of the N-terminal domain for avirulence and RNA silencing suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ronde, Dryas; Pasquier, Adrien; Ying, Su; Butterbach, Patrick; Lohuis, Dick; Kormelink, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Recently, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) nonstructural protein NSs has been identified unambiguously as an avirulence (Avr) determinant for Tomato spotted wilt (Tsw)-based resistance. The observation that NSs from two natural resistance-breaking isolates had lost RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity and Avr suggested a link between the two functions. To test this, a large set of NSs mutants was generated by alanine substitutions in NSs from resistance-inducing wild-type strains (NSs(RI) ), amino acid reversions in NSs from resistance-breaking strains (NSs(RB)), domain deletions and swapping. Testing these mutants for their ability to suppress green fluorescent protein (GFP) silencing and to trigger a Tsw-mediated hypersensitive response (HR) revealed that the two functions can be separated. Changes in the N-terminal domain were found to be detrimental for both activities and indicated the importance of this domain, additionally supported by domain swapping between NSs(RI) and NSs(RB). Swapping domains between the closely related Tospovirus Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) NSs and TSWV NSs(RI) showed that Avr functionality could not simply be transferred between species. Although deletion of the C-terminal domain rendered NSs completely dysfunctional, only a few single-amino-acid mutations in the C-terminus affected both functions. Mutation of a GW/WG motif (position 17/18) rendered NSs completely dysfunctional for RSS and Avr activity, and indicated a putative interaction between NSs and Argonaute 1 (AGO1), and its importance in TSWV virulence and viral counter defence against RNA interference. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  3. N-terminal arginines modulate plasma-membrane localization of Kv7.1/KCNE1 channel complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenawit Girmatsion

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks is important for cardiac action potential termination. The underlying channel is composed of Kv7.1 α-subunits and KCNE1 β-subunits. While most evidence suggests a role of KCNE1 transmembrane domain and C-terminus for the interaction, the N-terminal KCNE1 polymorphism 38G is associated with reduced I(Ks and atrial fibrillation (a human arrhythmia. Structure-function relationship of the KCNE1 N-terminus for I(Ks modulation is poorly understood and was subject of this study. METHODS: We studied N-terminal KCNE1 constructs disrupting structurally important positively charged amino-acids (arginines at positions 32, 33, 36 as well as KCNE1 constructs that modify position 38 including an N-terminal truncation mutation. Experimental procedures included molecular cloning, patch-clamp recording, protein biochemistry, real-time-PCR and confocal microscopy. RESULTS: All KCNE1 constructs physically interacted with Kv7.1. I(Ks resulting from co-expression of Kv7.1 with non-atrial fibrillation '38S' was greater than with any other construct. Ionic currents resulting from co-transfection of a KCNE1 mutant with arginine substitutions ('38G-3xA' were comparable to currents evoked from cells transfected with an N-terminally truncated KCNE1-construct ('Δ1-38'. Western-blots from plasma-membrane preparations and confocal images consistently showed a greater amount of Kv7.1 protein at the plasma-membrane in cells co-transfected with the non-atrial fibrillation KCNE1-38S than with any other construct. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study indicate that N-terminal arginines in positions 32, 33, 36 of KCNE1 are important for reconstitution of I(Ks. Furthermore, our results hint towards a role of these N-terminal amino-acids in membrane representation of the delayed rectifier channel complex.

  4. The N-terminal region of the dopamine D2 receptor, a rhodopsin-like GPCR, regulates correct integration into the plasma membrane and endocytic routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, DI; Min, C; Jung, KS; Cheong, SY; Zheng, M; Cheong, SJ; Oak, MH; Cheong, JH; Lee, BK; Kim, KM

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Functional roles of the N-terminal region of rhodopsin-like GPCR family remain unclear. Using dopamine D2 and D3 receptors as a model system, we probed the roles of the N-terminal region in the signalling, intracellular trafficking of receptor proteins, and explored the critical factors that determine the functionality of the N-terminal region. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The N-terminal region of the D2 receptor was gradually shortened or switched with that of the D3 receptor or a non-specific sequence (FLAG), or potential N-terminal glycosylation sites were mutated. Effects of these manipulations on surface expression, internalization, post-endocytic behaviours and signalling were determined. KEY RESULTS Shortening the N-terminal region of the D2 receptor enhanced receptor internalization and impaired surface expression and signalling; ligand binding, desensitization and down-regulation were not affected but their association with a particular microdomain, caveolae, was disrupted. Replacement of critical residues within the N-terminal region with the FLAG epitope failed to restore surface expression but partially restored the altered internalization and signalling. When the N-terminal regions were switched between D2 and D3 receptors, cell surface expression pattern of each receptor was switched. Mutations of potential N-terminal glycosylation sites inhibited surface expression but enhanced internalization of D2 receptors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Shortening of N-terminus or mutation of glycosylation sites located within the N-terminus enhanced receptor internalization but impaired the surface expression of D2 receptors. The N-terminal region of the D2 receptor, in a sequence-specific manner, controls the receptor's conformation and integration into the plasma membrane, which determine its subcellular localization, intracellular trafficking and signalling properties. PMID:22117524

  5. Solution structure of the N-terminal domain of a replication restart primosome factor, PriC, in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, Takahiko; Abe, Yoshito; Katayama, Tsutomu; Ueda, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    In eubacterial organisms, the oriC-independent primosome plays an essential role in replication restart after the dissociation of the replication DNA-protein complex by DNA damage. PriC is a key protein component in the replication restart primosome. Our recent study suggested that PriC is divided into two domains: an N-terminal and a C-terminal domain. In the present study, we determined the solution structure of the N-terminal domain, whose structure and function have remained unknown until now. The revealed structure was composed of three helices and one extended loop. We also observed chemical shift changes in the heteronuclear NMR spectrum and oligomerization in the presence of ssDNA. These abilities may contribute to the PriC-ssDNA complex, which is important for the replication restart primosome. PMID:23868391

  6. Structure of a double hexamer of the Pyrococcus furiosus minichromosome maintenance protein N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Martin; Enemark, Eric J.

    2016-06-22

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of thePyrococcus furiosusminichromosome maintenance (MCM) protein as a double hexamer is described. The MCM complex is a ring-shaped helicase that unwinds DNA at the replication fork of eukaryotes and archaea. Prior to replication initiation, the MCM complex assembles as an inactive double hexamer at specific sites of DNA. The presented structure is highly consistent with previous MCM double-hexamer structures and shows two MCM hexamers with a head-to-head interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain. Minor differences include a diminished head-to-head interaction and a slightly reduced inter-hexamer rotation.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein 3C binds to the N-terminal (NTD) and beta trefoil domains (BTD) of RBP/CSL; Only the NTD interaction is essential for lymphoblastoid cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderwood, Michael A.; Lee, Sungwook; Holthaus, Amy M.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Kieff, Elliott; Johannsen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Association of EBV nuclear proteins EBNA2, EBNA3A and EBNA3C with RBP/CSL, is essential for lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) proliferation. Conserved residues in the EBNA3 homology domain, required for RBP/CSL interaction, lack the WΦP motif that mediates EBNA2 and Notch binding to the RBP/CSL beta-trefoil domain (BTD). We map RBP/CSL interacting residues within EBNA3A(aa128-204) and EBNA3C(aa211-233). The EBNA3A results are consistent with an earlier report (aa125-222), but the EBNA3C domain is unexpectedly small and includes a 'WTP' sequence. This EBNA3C WTP motif confers RBP/CSL binding in vitro, in yeast, and in mammalian cells. Further, an EBNA3C WTP → STP(W227S) mutation impaired BTD binding whereas EBNA3 homology domain mutations disrupted RBP/CSL N-terminal domain (NTD) binding. WTP was not essential for EBNA3C repression of EBNA2 in reporter assays or for maintenance of LCL growth. Our results indicate that EBNA3 proteins interact with multiple RBP/CSL domains, but only NTD interactions are required for LCL growth.

  8. Fine tuning of the catalytic activity of colicin E7 nuclease domain by systematic N-terminal mutations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Németh, E.; Körtvélyesi, T.; Thulstrup, P. W.; Christensen, H. E. M.; Kožíšek, Milan; Nagata, K.; Czene, A.; Gyurcsik, B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 8 (2014), s. 1113-1122 ISSN 0961-8368 Grant - others:Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union(XE) FP7-312284; OPPC(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA cleavage * flow linear dichroism * isothermal calorimetry * positively charged N-terminal residues * Zn2+ binding Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.854, year: 2014

  9. Autoantibodies to N-terminally truncated GAD improve clinical phenotyping of individuals with adult-onset diabetes: Action LADA 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Peter; Hawa, Mohammed I; Krause, Stephanie; Lampasona, Vito; Jerram, Samuel T; Williams, Alistair J K; Bonifacio, Ezio; Ziegler, Anette G; Leslie, R David

    2018-04-04

    Adult-onset type 1 diabetes, in which the 65 kDa isoform of GAD (GAD65) is a major autoantigen, has a broad clinical phenotype encompassing variable need for insulin therapy. This study aimed to evaluate whether autoantibodies against N-terminally truncated GAD65 more closely defined a type 1 diabetes phenotype associated with insulin therapy. Of 1114 participants with adult-onset diabetes from the Action LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) study with sufficient sera, we selected those designated type 1 (n = 511) or type 2 diabetes (n = 603) and retested the samples in radiobinding assays for human full-length GAD65 autoantibodies (f-GADA) and N-terminally truncated (amino acids 96-585) GAD65 autoantibodies (t-GADA). Individuals' clinical phenotypes were analysed according to antibody binding patterns. Overall, 478 individuals were f-GADA-positive, 431 were t-GADA-positive and 628 were negative in both assays. Risk of insulin treatment was augmented in t-GADA-positive individuals (OR 4.69 [95% CI 3.57, 6.17]) compared with f-GADA-positive individuals (OR 3.86 [95% CI 2.95, 5.06]), irrespective of diabetes duration. Of 55 individuals who were f-GADA-positive but t-GADA-negative, i.e. with antibody binding restricted to the N-terminus of GAD65, the phenotype was similar to type 2 diabetes with low risk of progression to insulin treatment. Compared with these individuals with N-terminal GAD65-restricted GADA, t-GADA-positive individuals were younger at diagnosis (p = 0.005), leaner (p N-terminally truncated GAD65 autoantibodies is associated with the clinical phenotype of autoimmune type 1 diabetes and predicts insulin therapy.

  10. Plasmatic levels of N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in preeclamptic patients and healthy normotensive pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna-Villasmil, Eduardo; Mejia-Montilla, Jorly; Reyna-Villasmil, Nadia; Mayner-Tresol, Gabriel; Herrera-Moya, Pedro; Fernández-Ramírez, Andreina; Rondón-Tapía, Marta

    2018-05-11

    To compare plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations in preeclamptic patients and healthy normotensive pregnant women. A cases-controls study was done with 180 patients at Hospital Central Dr. Urquinaona, Maracaibo, Venezuela, that included 90 preeclamptic patients (group A; cases) and 90 healthy normotensive pregnant women selected with the same age and body mass index similar to group A (group B; controls). Blood samples were collected one hour after admission and prior to administration of any medication in group A to determine plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and other laboratory parameters. Plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations in group A (mean 1.01 [0.26] pg/mL) showed a significant difference when compared with patients in group B (mean 0.55 [0.07] pg/mL; P<.001]. There was no significant correlation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure values in preeclamptic patients (P=ns). A cut-off value of 0.66ng/mL had an area under the curve of 0.93, sensitivity of 87.8%, specificity of 83.3%, a positive predictive value of 84.0% and a negative predictive value of 87.2%, with a diagnostic accuracy of 85.6%. Preeclamptic patients have significantly higher concentrations of plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide compared with healthy normotensive pregnant women, with high predictive values for diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Studies on Aculeines: Synthetic Strategy to the Fully Protected Protoaculeine B, the N-Terminal Amino Acid of Aculeine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Hiroki; Miyahara, Masayoshi; Otsuka, Kazunori; Miyako, Kei; Honda, Akito; Takasaki, Yuichi; Takamizawa, Satoshi; Tukada, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Sakai, Ryuichi; Oikawa, Masato

    2018-05-23

    A synthetic strategy for accessing protoaculeine B (1), the N-terminal amino acid of the highly modified peptide toxin aculeine, was developed via the synthesis of the fully protected natural homologue of 1 with a 12-mer poly(propanediamine). The synthesis of mono(propanediamine) analog 2, as well as core amino acid 3, was demonstrated by this strategy. New amino acid 3 induced convulsions in mice; however, compound 2 showed no such activity.

  12. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  13. The metalloid arsenite induces nuclear export of Id3 possibly via binding to the N-terminal cysteine residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Sugai, Manabu; Mori, Kentaro; Yokota, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Sodium arsenite induces cytoplasmic accumulation of Id3. •Arsenite binds to closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3. •N-terminal cysteines are essential for arsenite-induced nuclear export of Id3. •Nuclear export of Id3 counteracts its transcriptional repression activity. -- Abstract: Ids are versatile transcriptional repressors that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation, and appropriate subcellular localization of the Id proteins is important for their functions. We previously identified distinct functional nuclear export signals (NESs) in Id1 and Id2, but no active NES has been reported in Id3. In this study, we found that treatment with the stress-inducing metalloid arsenite led to the accumulation of GFP-tagged Id3 in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic accumulation was impaired by a mutation in the Id3 NES-like sequence resembling the Id1 NES, located at the end of the HLH domain. It was also blocked by co-treatment with the CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB), but not with the inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Importantly, we showed that the closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3 interacted with the arsenic derivative phenylarsine oxide (PAO) and were essential for the arsenite-induced cytoplasmic accumulation, suggesting that arsenite induces the CRM1-dependent nuclear export of Id3 via binding to the N-terminal cysteines. Finally, we demonstrated that Id3 significantly repressed arsenite-stimulated transcription of the immediate-early gene Egr-1 and that this repression activity was inversely correlated with the arsenite-induced nuclear export. Our results imply that Id3 may be involved in the biological action of arsenite

  14. N-Terminal Pro–B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Variability in Stable Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayen, Andrew; Horvath, Andrea R.; Dimeski, Goce; Coburn, Amanda; Johnson, David W.; Hawley, Carmel M.; Campbell, Scott B.; Craig, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Monitoring N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) may be useful for assessing cardiovascular risk in dialysis patients. However, its biologic variation is unknown, hindering the accurate interpretation of serial concentrations. The aims of this prospective cohort study were to estimate the within- and between-person coefficients of variation of NT-proBNP in stable dialysis patients, and derive the critical difference between measurements needed to exclude biologic and analytic variation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Fifty-five prevalent hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients attending two hospitals were assessed weekly for 5 weeks and then monthly for 4 months between October 2010 and April 2012. Assessments were conducted at the same time in the dialysis cycle and entailed NT-proBNP testing, clinical review, electrocardiography, and bioimpedance spectroscopy. Patients were excluded if they became unstable. Results This study analyzed 136 weekly and 113 monthly NT-proBNP measurements from 40 and 41 stable patients, respectively. Results showed that 22% had ischemic heart disease; 9% and 87% had left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction, respectively. Respective between- and within-person coefficients of variation were 153% and 27% for weekly measurements, and 148% and 35% for monthly measurements. Within-person variation was unaffected by dialysis modality, hydration status, inflammation, or cardiac comorbidity. NT-proBNP concentrations measured at weekly intervals needed to increase by at least 46% or decrease by 84% to exclude change due to biologic and analytic variation alone with 90% certainty, whereas monthly measurements needed to increase by at least 119% or decrease by 54%. Conclusions The between-person variation of NT-proBNP was large and markedly greater than within-person variation, indicating that NT-proBNP testing might better be applied in the dialysis population using a

  15. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide variability in stable dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, Magid A; Hayen, Andrew; Horvath, Andrea R; Dimeski, Goce; Coburn, Amanda; Johnson, David W; Hawley, Carmel M; Campbell, Scott B; Craig, Jonathan C

    2015-04-07

    Monitoring N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) may be useful for assessing cardiovascular risk in dialysis patients. However, its biologic variation is unknown, hindering the accurate interpretation of serial concentrations. The aims of this prospective cohort study were to estimate the within- and between-person coefficients of variation of NT-proBNP in stable dialysis patients, and derive the critical difference between measurements needed to exclude biologic and analytic variation. Fifty-five prevalent hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients attending two hospitals were assessed weekly for 5 weeks and then monthly for 4 months between October 2010 and April 2012. Assessments were conducted at the same time in the dialysis cycle and entailed NT-proBNP testing, clinical review, electrocardiography, and bioimpedance spectroscopy. Patients were excluded if they became unstable. This study analyzed 136 weekly and 113 monthly NT-proBNP measurements from 40 and 41 stable patients, respectively. Results showed that 22% had ischemic heart disease; 9% and 87% had left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction, respectively. Respective between- and within-person coefficients of variation were 153% and 27% for weekly measurements, and 148% and 35% for monthly measurements. Within-person variation was unaffected by dialysis modality, hydration status, inflammation, or cardiac comorbidity. NT-proBNP concentrations measured at weekly intervals needed to increase by at least 46% or decrease by 84% to exclude change due to biologic and analytic variation alone with 90% certainty, whereas monthly measurements needed to increase by at least 119% or decrease by 54%. The between-person variation of NT-proBNP was large and markedly greater than within-person variation, indicating that NT-proBNP testing might better be applied in the dialysis population using a relative-change strategy. Serial NT-proBNP concentrations need to double or halve to confidently

  16. The N-terminal region of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A signals to nuclear localization of the protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T.; Gomes, Marcelo D.; Oliveira, Eduardo B.; Costa-Neto, Claudio M.

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a ubiquitous protein of eukaryotic and archaeal organisms which undergoes hypusination, a unique post-translational modification. We have generated a polyclonal antibody against murine eIF5A, which in immunocytochemical assays in B16-F10 cells revealed that the endogenous protein is preferentially localized to the nuclear region. We therefore analyzed possible structural features present in eIF5A proteins that could be responsible for that characteristic. Multiple sequence alignment analysis of eIF5A proteins from different eukaryotic and archaeal organisms showed that the former sequences have an extended N-terminal segment. We have then performed in silico prediction analyses and constructed different truncated forms of murine eIF5A to verify any possible role that the N-terminal extension might have in determining the subcellular localization of the eIF5A in eukaryotic organisms. Our results indicate that the N-terminal extension of the eukaryotic eIF5A contributes in signaling this protein to nuclear localization, despite of bearing no structural similarity with classical nuclear localization signals

  17. The first N-terminal unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide: H-Gly-Aib-Gly-Aib-OtBu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2015-12-01

    Glycine (Gly) is incorporated in roughly half of all known peptaibiotic (nonribosomally biosynthesized antibiotic peptides of fungal origin) sequences and is the residue with the greatest conformational flexibility. The conformational space of Aib (α-aminoisobutyric acid) is severely restricted by the second methyl group attached to the Cα atom. Most of the crystal structures containing Aib are N-terminal protected. Deprotection of the N- or C-terminus of peptides may alter the hydrogen-bonding scheme and/or the structure and may facilitate crystallization. The structure reported here for glycyl-α-aminoisobutyrylglycyl-α-aminoisobutyric acid tert-butyl ester, C16H30N4O5, describes the first N-terminal-unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide. The achiral peptide could form an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the C=O group of Gly1 and the N-H group of Aib4. This hydrogen bond is found in all tetrapeptides and N-terminal-protected tripeptides containing Aib, apart from one exception. In the present work, this hydrogen bond is not observed (N...O = 5.88 Å). Instead, every molecule is hydrogen bonded to six other symmetry-related molecules with a total of eight hydrogen bonds per molecule. The backbone conformation starts in the right-handed helical region (and the left-handed helical region for the inverted molecule) and reverses the screw sense in the last two residues.

  18. N-terminal truncation enables crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of the FedF bacterial adhesin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Kerpel, Maia; Van Molle, Inge [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Brys, Lea [Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Wyns, Lode; De Greve, Henri; Bouckaert, Julie, E-mail: bouckaej@vub.ac.be [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-12-01

    The N-terminal receptor-binding domain of the FedF adhesin from enterotoxigenic E. coli has been crystallized. This required the deletion of its first 14 residues, which are also cleaved off naturally. FedF is the two-domain tip adhesin of F18 fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Bacterial adherence, mediated by the N-terminal receptor-binding domain of FedF to carbohydrate receptors on intestinal microvilli, causes diarrhoea and oedema disease in newly weaned piglets and induces the secretion of Shiga toxins. A truncate containing only the receptor-binding domain of FedF was found to be further cleaved at its N-terminus. Reconstruction of this N-terminal truncate rendered FedF amenable to crystallization, resulting in crystals with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and unit-cell parameters a = 36.20, b = 74.64, c = 99.03 Å that diffracted to beyond 2 Å resolution. The binding specificity of FedF was screened for on a glycan array, exposing 264 glycoconjugates, to identify specific receptors for cocrystallization with FedF.

  19. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E.; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P.; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization. PMID:26442018

  20. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzell Euridice Hernández-Sánchez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization.

  1. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Adam; Liu, Xiang; Zaid, Ali; Goh, Lucas Y H; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Hall, Roy A; Merits, Andres; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2017-02-21

    Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS) in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS) attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT)-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design. IMPORTANCE CHIKV is a mosquito-borne pathogen capable of causing explosive epidemics of incapacitating joint pain

  2. Motif signatures of transcribed enhancers

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios

    2017-09-14

    In mammalian cells, transcribed enhancers (TrEn) play important roles in the initiation of gene expression and maintenance of gene expression levels in spatiotemporal manner. One of the most challenging questions in biology today is how the genomic characteristics of enhancers relate to enhancer activities. This is particularly critical, as several recent studies have linked enhancer sequence motifs to specific functional roles. To date, only a limited number of enhancer sequence characteristics have been investigated, leaving space for exploring the enhancers genomic code in a more systematic way. To address this problem, we developed a novel computational method, TELS, aimed at identifying predictive cell type/tissue specific motif signatures. We used TELS to compile a comprehensive catalog of motif signatures for all known TrEn identified by the FANTOM5 consortium across 112 human primary cells and tissues. Our results confirm that distinct cell type/tissue specific motif signatures characterize TrEn. These signatures allow discriminating successfully a) TrEn from random controls, proxy of non-enhancer activity, and b) cell type/tissue specific TrEn from enhancers expressed and transcribed in different cell types/tissues. TELS codes and datasets are publicly available at http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/TELS.

  3. Restricted N-terminal truncation of cardiac troponin T: a novel mechanism for functional adaptation to energetic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Yu, Zhi-Bin; Hossain, M Moazzem; Jin, J-P

    2008-07-15

    The N-terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T (TnT) is a regulatory structure that can be selectively removed during myocardial ischaemia reperfusion by mu-calpain proteolysis. Here we investigated the pathophysiological significance of this post-translational modification that removes amino acids 1-71 of cardiac TnT. Working heart preparations were employed to study rat acute myocardial infarction and transgenic mouse hearts over-expressing the N-terminal truncated cardiac TnT (cTnT-ND). Ex vivo myocardial infarction by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery induced heart failure and produced cTnT-ND not only in the infarct but also in remote zones, including the right ventricular free wall, indicating a whole organ response in the absence of systemic neurohumoral mechanisms. Left ventricular pressure overload in mouse working hearts produced increased cTnT-ND in both ventricles, suggesting a role of haemodynamic stress in triggering an acute whole organ proteolytic regulation. Transgenic mouse hearts in which the endogenous intact cardiac TnT was partially replaced by cTnT-ND showed lowered contractile velocity. When afterload increased from 55 mmHg to 90 mmHg, stroke volume decreased in the wild type but not in the transgenic mouse hearts. Correspondingly, the left ventricular rapid-ejection time of the transgenic mouse hearts was significantly longer than that of wild type hearts, especially at high afterload. The restricted deletion of the N-terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T demonstrates a novel mechanism by which the thin filament regulation adapts to sustain cardiac function under stress conditions.

  4. The EBNA-2 N-Terminal Transactivation Domain Folds into a Dimeric Structure Required for Target Gene Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Friberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a γ-herpesvirus that may cause infectious mononucleosis in young adults. In addition, epidemiological and molecular evidence links EBV to the pathogenesis of lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. EBV has the unique ability to transform resting B cells into permanently proliferating, latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2 is a key regulator of viral and cellular gene expression for this transformation process. The N-terminal region of EBNA-2 comprising residues 1-58 appears to mediate multiple molecular functions including self-association and transactivation. However, it remains to be determined if the N-terminus of EBNA-2 directly provides these functions or if these activities merely depend on the dimerization involving the N-terminal domain. To address this issue, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the EBNA-2 N-terminal dimerization (END domain by heteronuclear NMR-spectroscopy. The END domain monomer comprises a small fold of four β-strands and an α-helix which form a parallel dimer by interaction of two β-strands from each protomer. A structure-guided mutational analysis showed that hydrophobic residues in the dimer interface are required for self-association in vitro. Importantly, these interface mutants also displayed severely impaired self-association and transactivation in vivo. Moreover, mutations of solvent-exposed residues or deletion of the α-helix do not impair dimerization but strongly affect the functional activity, suggesting that the EBNA-2 dimer presents a surface that mediates functionally important intra- and/or intermolecular interactions. Our study shows that the END domain is a novel dimerization fold that is essential for functional activity. Since this specific fold is a unique feature of EBNA-2 it might provide a novel target for anti-viral therapeutics.

  5. The relationship between N-terminal prosomatostatin, all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (ZODIAC-35)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Peter R; Landman, Gijs W D; van Essen, Larissa; Struck, Joachim; Groenier, Klaas H; Bilo, Henk J G; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kleefstra, Nanne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hormone somatostatin inhibits growth hormone release from the pituitary gland and is theoretically linked to diabetes and diabetes related complications. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between levels of the stable somatostatin precursor, N-terminal prosomatostatin

  6. The relationship between N-terminal prosomatostatin, all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (ZODIAC-35)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Peter R; Landman, Gijs W D; van Essen, Larissa; Struck, Joachim; Groenier, Klaas H; Bilo, Henk J G; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kleefstra, Nanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: The hormone somatostatin inhibits growth hormone release from the pituitary gland and is theoretically linked to diabetes and diabetes related complications. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between levels of the stable somatostatin precursor, N-terminal prosomatostatin

  7. Troponin T and N-terminal pro B-Type natriuretic peptide and presence of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Mette R; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Carlsen, Christian M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the effects of exercise intensity, sampling intervals, degree of coronary artery stenosis, and demographic factors on circulating N-terminal pro B-Type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and cardiac Troponin T (cTnT) in subjects suspected of coronary artery disease (CAD). MATE...... = 0.4067 p = 0.046). CONCLUSIONS: Baseline cTnT and ΔcTnT were found to be independently associated with CAD and also with exercise intensity in stable chest pain subjects. These properties were not identified for NT-pro-BNP....

  8. Identification of a Major Dimorphic Region in the Functionally Critical N-Terminal ID1 Domain of VAR2CSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doritchamou, Justin; Sabbagh, Audrey; Jespersen, Jakob S

    2015-01-01

    The VAR2CSA protein of Plasmodium falciparum is transported to and expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface where it plays a key role in placental malaria (PM). It is the current leading candidate for a vaccine to prevent PM. However, the antigenic polymorphism integral to VAR2CSA poses...... a challenge for vaccine development. Based on detailed analysis of polymorphisms in the sequence of its ligand-binding N-terminal region, currently the main focus for vaccine development, we assessed var2csa from parasite isolates infecting pregnant women. The results reveal for the first time the presence...

  9. Mutational analysis of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu in search of a role for the N-terminal region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansilla, Francisco; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Laurberg, M

    1998-01-01

    We have mutated lysine 2 and arginine 7 in elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli separately either to alanine or glutamic acid. The aim of the work was to reveal the possible interactions between the conserved N-terminal part of the molecule, which is rich in basic residues and aminoacyl...... this activity. Furthermore, arginine 7 seems to play a role in regulating the binding of GTP. The three-dimensional structure of the ternary complex, EF-Tu:GTP:Phe-tRNAPhe, involving Thermus aquaticus EF-Tu and yeast Phe-tRNA(Phe), shows that Arg7 is in a position which permits salt bridge formation with Asp284...

  10. Locus-specific detection of HLA-DQ and -DR antigens by antibodies against synthetic N-terminal octapeptides of the beta chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deufel, T; Grove, A; Kofod, Hans

    1985-01-01

    Antibodies against synthetic peptides representing the class-II antigen HLA-DR and -DQ beta chain N-terminal sequences were prepared in rabbits. The two octapeptides only share two amino acids and enzyme-linked immuno-assays showed the antisera only to bind to its own antigen. Both peptide antisera...... chains of HLA-DR and -DQ have been prepared by the preparation by the production of antibodies against the N-terminal sequences of each polypeptide....

  11. Protection against β-amyloid neurotoxicity by a non-toxic endogenous N-terminal β-amyloid fragment and its active hexapeptide core sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Kelly H; Alfulaij, Naghum; Arora, Komal; Taketa, Ruth; Sherrin, Tessi; Todorovic, Cedomir; Lawrence, James L M; Yoshikawa, Gene T; Ng, Ho-Leung; Hruby, Victor J; Nichols, Robert A

    2018-01-01

    High levels (μM) of beta amyloid (Aβ) oligomers are known to trigger neurotoxic effects, leading to synaptic impairment, behavioral deficits, and apoptotic cell death. The hydrophobic C-terminal domain of Aβ, together with sequences critical for oligomer formation, is essential for this neurotoxicity. However, Aβ at low levels (pM-nM) has been shown to function as a positive neuromodulator and this activity resides in the hydrophilic N-terminal domain of Aβ. An N-terminal Aβ fragment (1-15/16), found in cerebrospinal fluid, was also shown to be a highly active neuromodulator and to reverse Aβ-induced impairments of long-term potentiation. Here, we show the impact of this N-terminal Aβ fragment and a shorter hexapeptide core sequence in the Aβ fragment (Aβcore: 10-15) to protect or reverse Aβ-induced neuronal toxicity, fear memory deficits and apoptotic death. The neuroprotective effects of the N-terminal Aβ fragment and Aβcore on Aβ-induced changes in mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, and apoptotic neuronal death were demonstrated via mitochondrial membrane potential, live reactive oxygen species, DNA fragmentation and cell survival assays using a model neuroblastoma cell line (differentiated NG108-15) and mouse hippocampal neuron cultures. The protective action of the N-terminal Aβ fragment and Aβcore against spatial memory processing deficits in amyloid precursor protein/PSEN1 (5XFAD) mice was demonstrated in contextual fear conditioning. Stabilized derivatives of the N-terminal Aβcore were also shown to be fully protective against Aβ-triggered oxidative stress. Together, these findings indicate an endogenous neuroprotective role for the N-terminal Aβ fragment, while active stabilized N-terminal Aβcore derivatives offer the potential for therapeutic application. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Nucleophosmin integrates within the nucleolus via multi-modal interactions with proteins displaying R-rich linear motifs and rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrea, Diana M; Cika, Jaclyn A; Guy, Clifford S; Ban, David; Banerjee, Priya R; Stanley, Christopher B; Nourse, Amanda; Deniz, Ashok A; Kriwacki, Richard W

    2016-02-02

    The nucleolus is a membrane-less organelle formed through liquid-liquid phase separation of its components from the surrounding nucleoplasm. Here, we show that nucleophosmin (NPM1) integrates within the nucleolus via a multi-modal mechanism involving multivalent interactions with proteins containing arginine-rich linear motifs (R-motifs) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Importantly, these R-motifs are found in canonical nucleolar localization signals. Based on a novel combination of biophysical approaches, we propose a model for the molecular organization within liquid-like droplets formed by the N-terminal domain of NPM1 and R-motif peptides, thus providing insights into the structural organization of the nucleolus. We identify multivalency of acidic tracts and folded nucleic acid binding domains, mediated by N-terminal domain oligomerization, as structural features required for phase separation of NPM1 with other nucleolar components in vitro and for localization within mammalian nucleoli. We propose that one mechanism of nucleolar localization involves phase separation of proteins within the nucleolus.

  13. N-Terminal Domains in Two-Domain Proteins Are Biased to Be Shorter and Predicted to Fold Faster Than Their C-Terminal Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etai Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational analysis of proteomes in all kingdoms of life reveals a strong tendency for N-terminal domains in two-domain proteins to have shorter sequences than their neighboring C-terminal domains. Given that folding rates are affected by chain length, we asked whether the tendency for N-terminal domains to be shorter than their neighboring C-terminal domains reflects selection for faster-folding N-terminal domains. Calculations of absolute contact order, another predictor of folding rate, provide additional evidence that N-terminal domains tend to fold faster than their neighboring C-terminal domains. A possible explanation for this bias, which is more pronounced in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, is that faster folding of N-terminal domains reduces the risk for protein aggregation during folding by preventing formation of nonnative interdomain interactions. This explanation is supported by our finding that two-domain proteins with a shorter N-terminal domain are much more abundant than those with a shorter C-terminal domain.

  14. Depletion of the human N-terminal acetyltransferase hNaa30 disrupts Golgi integrity and ARFRP1 localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starheim, Kristian K; Kalvik, Thomas V; Bjørkøy, Geir; Arnesen, Thomas

    2017-04-30

    The organization of the Golgi apparatus (GA) is tightly regulated. Golgi stack scattering is observed in cellular processes such as apoptosis and mitosis, and has also been associated with disruption of cellular lipid metabolism and neurodegenerative diseases. Our studies show that depletion of the human N-α-acetyltransferase 30 (hNaa30) induces fragmentation of the Golgi stack in HeLa and CAL-62 cell lines. The GA associated GTPase ADP ribosylation factor related protein 1 (ARFRP1) was previously shown to require N-terminal acetylation for membrane association and based on its N-terminal sequence, it is likely to be a substrate of hNaa30. ARFRP1 is involved in endosome-to- trans -Golgi network (TGN) traffic. We observed that ARFRP1 shifted from a predominantly cis -Golgi and TGN localization to localizing both Golgi and non-Golgi vesicular structures in hNaa30-depleted cells. However, we did not observe loss of membrane association of ARFRP1. We conclude that hNaa30 depletion induces Golgi scattering and induces aberrant ARFRP1 Golgi localization. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Neurospora tryptophan synthase: N-terminal analysis and the sequence of the pyridoxal phosphate active site peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, M.L.; Hsu, P.Y.; DeMoss, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Tryptophan synthase (TS), which catalyzes the final step of tryptophan biosynthesis, is a multifunctional protein requiring pyridoxal phosphate (B6P) for two of its three distinct enzyme activities. TS from Neurospora has a blocked N-terminal, is a homodimer of 150 KDa and binds one mole of B6P per mole of subunit. The authors shown the N-terminal residue to be acyl-serine. The B6P-active site of holoenzyme was labelled by reduction of the B6P-Schiff base with [ 3 H]-NaBH 4 , and resulted in a proportionate loss of activity in the two B6P-requiring reactions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CNBr-generated peptides showed the labelled, active site peptide to be 6 KDa. The sequence of this peptide, purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of C-18 reversed phase and TSK gel filtration HPLC is: gly-arg-pro-gly-gln-leu-his-lys-ala-glu-arg-leu-thr-glu-tyr-ala-gly-gly-ala-gln-ile-xxx-leu-lys-arg-glu-asp-leu-asn-his-xxx-gly-xxx-his-/sub ***/-ile-asn-asn-ala-leu. Although four residues (xxx, /sub ***/) are unidentified, this peptide is minimally 78% homologous with the corresponding peptide from yeast TS, in which residue (/sub ***/) is the lysine that binds B6P

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the N-terminal domain of human thioredoxin-interacting protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polekhina, Galina; Ascher, David Benjamin; Kok, Shie Foong; Waltham, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of thioredoxin-interacting protein has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to a monoclinic space group and diffracted to 3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) is a negative regulator of thioredoxin and its roles in the pathologies of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases have marked it out as a potential drug target. Expression of TXNIP is robustly induced under various stress conditions such as high glucose, heat shock, UV, H 2 O 2 and mechanical stress amongst others. Elevated levels of TXNIP result in the sequestration and inactivation of thioredoxin, leading to cellular oxidative stress. For some time, this was the only known function of TXNIP; however, more recently the protein has been shown to play a role in regulation of glucose uptake and activation of the inflammasome. Based on the primary sequence, TXNIP is remotely related to β-arrestins, which include the visual arrestins. TXNIP has thus been classified as a member of the α-arrestin family, which to date includes five other members. None of the other α-arrestins are known to interact with thioredoxin, although curiously one has been implicated in glucose uptake. In order to gain insight into the structure–function relationships of the α-arrestin protein family, and particularly that of TXNIP, the N-terminal domain of TXNIP has been crystallized. The crystals belonged to a monoclinic space group and diffracted to 3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation

  17. The N-terminal domain of human DNA helicase Rtel1 contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Aaron P; Ding, Huangen

    2014-01-01

    Human telomere length regulator Rtel1 is a superfamily II DNA helicase and is essential for maintaining proper length of telomeres in chromosomes. Here we report that the N-terminal domain of human Rtel1 (RtelN) expressed in Escherichia coli cells produces a protein that contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster with the redox midpoint potential of -248 ± 10 mV (pH 8.0). The iron-sulfur cluster in RtelN is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, indicating that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species may modulate the DNA helicase activity of Rtel1 via modification of its iron-sulfur cluster. Purified RtelN retains a weak binding affinity for the single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) DNA in vitro. However, modification of the iron-sulfur cluster by hydrogen peroxide or nitric oxide does not significantly affect the DNA binding activity of RtelN, suggesting that the iron-sulfur cluster is not directly involved in the DNA interaction in the N-terminal domain of Rtel1.

  18. The N-Terminal Domain of Human DNA Helicase Rtel1 Contains a Redox Active Iron-Sulfur Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron P. Landry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human telomere length regulator Rtel1 is a superfamily II DNA helicase and is essential for maintaining proper length of telomeres in chromosomes. Here we report that the N-terminal domain of human Rtel1 (RtelN expressed in Escherichia coli cells produces a protein that contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster with the redox midpoint potential of −248 ± 10 mV (pH 8.0. The iron-sulfur cluster in RtelN is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, indicating that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species may modulate the DNA helicase activity of Rtel1 via modification of its iron-sulfur cluster. Purified RtelN retains a weak binding affinity for the single-stranded (ss and double-stranded (ds DNA in vitro. However, modification of the iron-sulfur cluster by hydrogen peroxide or nitric oxide does not significantly affect the DNA binding activity of RtelN, suggesting that the iron-sulfur cluster is not directly involved in the DNA interaction in the N-terminal domain of Rtel1.

  19. Rtt107/Esc4 binds silent chromatin and DNA repair proteins using different BRCT motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jockusch Rebecca A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By screening a plasmid library for proteins that could cause silencing when targeted to the HMR locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we previously reported the identification of Rtt107/Esc4 based on its ability to establish silent chromatin. In this study we aimed to determine the mechanism of Rtt107/Esc4 targeted silencing and also learn more about its biological functions. Results Targeted silencing by Rtt107/Esc4 was dependent on the SIR genes, which encode obligatory structural and enzymatic components of yeast silent chromatin. Based on its sequence, Rtt107/Esc4 was predicted to contain six BRCT motifs. This motif, originally identified in the human breast tumor suppressor gene BRCA1, is a protein interaction domain. The targeted silencing activity of Rtt107/Esc4 resided within the C-terminal two BRCT motifs, and this region of the protein bound to Sir3 in two-hybrid tests. Deletion of RTT107/ESC4 caused sensitivity to the DNA damaging agent MMS as well as to hydroxyurea. A two-hybrid screen showed that the N-terminal BRCT motifs of Rtt107/Esc4 bound to Slx4, a protein previously shown to be involved in DNA repair and required for viability in a strain lacking the DNA helicase Sgs1. Like SLX genes, RTT107ESC4 interacted genetically with SGS1; esc4Δ sgs1Δ mutants were viable, but exhibited a slow-growth phenotype and also a synergistic DNA repair defect. Conclusion Rtt107/Esc4 binds to the silencing protein Sir3 and the DNA repair protein Slx4 via different BRCT motifs, thus providing a bridge linking silent chromatin to DNA repair enzymes.

  20. Kopi dan Kakao dalam Kreasi Motif Batik Khas Jember

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfa'ina Rohana Salma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Batik Jember selama ini identik dengan motif daun tembakau. Visualisasi daun tembakau dalam motif Batik Jember cukup lemah, yaitu kurang berkarakter karena motif yang muncul adalah seperti gambar daun pada umumnya. Oleh karena itu perlu diciptakan desain motif batik khas Jember yang sumber inspirasinya digali dari kekayaan alam lainnya dari Jember yang mempunyai bentuk spesifik dan karakteristik sehingga identitas motif bisa didapatkan dengan lebih kuat. Hasil alam khas Jember tersebut adalah kopi dan kakao. Tujuan penciptaan seni ini adalah untuk menghasilkan motif batik  baru yang mempunyai ciri khas Jember. Metode yang digunakan yaitu pengumpulan data, pengamatan mendalam terhadap objek penciptaan, pengkajian sumber inspirasi, pembuatan desain motif, dan perwujudan menjadi batik. Dari penciptaan seni ini berhasil dikreasikan 6 (enam motif batik yaitu: (1 Motif Uwoh Kopi; (2 Motif Godong Kopi;  (3 Motif Ceplok Kakao; (4 Motif Kakao Raja; (5 Motif Kakao Biru; dan (6 Motif Wiji Mukti. Berdasarkan hasil penilaian “Selera Estetika” diketahui bahwa motif yang paling banyak disukai adalah Motif Uwoh Kopi dan Motif Kakao Raja. Kata kunci: Motif Woh Kopi, Motif Godong Kopi, Motif Ceplok Kakao, Motif Kakao Raja, Motif Kakao Biru, Motif Wiji Mukti ABSTRACTBatik Jember is synonymous with tobacco leaf motif. Tobacco leaf shape is quite weak in the visual appearance characterized as that motif emerges like a picture of leaves in general. Therefore, it is necessary to create a distinctive design motif extracted from other natural resources of Jember that have specific shapes and characteristics that can be obtained as the stronger motif identity. The typical natural resources from Jember are coffee and cocoa. The purpose of the creation of this art is to produce the unique, creative and innovative batik and have specific characteristics of Jember. The method used are data collection, observation of the object, reviewing inspiration sources

  1. Structure and assembly properties of the N-terminal domain of the prion Ure2p in isolation and in its natural context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Bousset

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aggregation of the baker's yeast prion Ure2p is at the origin of the [URE3] trait. The Q- and N-rich N-terminal part of the protein is believed to drive Ure2p assembly into fibrils of amyloid nature and the fibrillar forms of full-length Ure2p and its N-terminal part generated in vitro have been shown to induce [URE3] occurrence when introduced into yeast cells. This has led to the view that the fibrillar form of the N-terminal part of the protein is sufficient for the recruitment of constitutive Ure2p and that it imprints its amyloid structure to full-length Ure2p. RESULTS: Here we generate a set of Ure2p N-terminal fragments, document their assembly and structural properties and compare them to that of full-length Ure2p. We identify the minimal region critical for the assembly of Ure2p N-terminal part into amyloids and show that such fibrils are unable to seed the assembly of full length Ure2p unlike fibrils made of intact Ure2p. CONCLUSION: Our results clearly indicate that fibrillar Ure2p shares no structural similarities with the amyloid fibrils made of Ure2p N-terminal part. Our results further suggest that the induction of [URE3] by fibrils made of full-length Ure2p is likely the consequence of fibrils growth by depletion of cytosolic Ure2p while it is the consequence of de novo formation of prion particles following, for example, titration within the cells of a specific set of molecular chaperones when fibrils made of Ure2p N-terminal domain are introduced within the cytoplasm.

  2. Crystal Structure of the N-Terminal Half of the Traffic Controller UL37 from Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigsberg, Andrea L.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.

    2017-08-02

    Inner tegument protein UL37 is conserved among all three subfamilies of herpesviruses. Studies of UL37 homologs from two alphaherpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), have suggested that UL37 plays an essential albeit poorly defined role in intracellular capsid trafficking. At the same time, HSV and PRV homologs cannot be swapped, which suggests that in addition to a conserved function, UL37 homologs also have divergent virus-specific functions. Accurate dissection of UL37 functions requires detailed maps in the form of atomic-resolution structures. Previously, we reported the crystal structure of the N-terminal half of UL37 (UL37N) from PRV. Here, we report the crystal structure of HSV-1 UL37N. Comparison of the two structures reveals that UL37 homologs differ in their overall shapes, distributions of surface charges, and locations of projecting loops. In contrast, the previously identified R2 surface region is structurally conserved. We propose that within the N-terminal half of UL37, functional conservation is centered within the R2 surface region, whereas divergent structural elements pinpoint regions mediating virus-specific functions and may engage different binding partners. Together, the two structures can now serve as templates for a structure-guided exploration of both conserved and virus-specific functions of UL37.

    IMPORTANCEThe ability to move efficiently within host cell cytoplasm is essential for replication in all viruses. It is especially important in the neuroinvasive alphaherpesviruses, such as human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, and veterinarian pseudorabies virus (PRV), that infect the peripheral nervous system and have to travel long distances along axons. Capsid movement in these viruses is controlled by capsid-associated tegument proteins, yet their specific roles have not yet been defined. Systematic exploration of the roles of tegument proteins in capsid trafficking requires

  3. Implication of the oligomeric state of the N-terminal PTX3 domain in cumulus matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ievoli, Elena; Lindstedt, Ragnar; Inforzato, Antonio; Camaioni, Antonella; Palone, Francesca; Day, Anthony J; Mantovani, Alberto; Salvatori, Giovanni; Salustri, Antonietta

    2011-06-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) plays a key role in the formation of the hyaluronan-rich matrix of the cumulus oophorus surrounding ovulated eggs that is required for successful fertilization and female fertility. PTX3 is a multimeric protein consisting of eight identical protomers held together by a combination of non-covalent interactions and disulfide bonds. Recent findings suggest that the oligomeric status of PTX3 is important for stabilizing the cumulus matrix. Because the role of PTX3 in the cumulus resides in the unique N-terminal sequence of the protomer, we investigated further this issue by testing the ability of distinct Cys/Ser mutants of recombinant N-terminal region of PTX3 (N(_)PTX3) with different oligomeric arrangement to promote in vitro normal expansion in cumuli from Ptx3-null mice. Here we report that the dimer of the N(_)PTX3 is unable to rescue cumulus matrix organization, and that the tetrameric assembly of the protein is the minimal oligomeric state required for accomplishing this function. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 binds to HCs of IαI and TSG-6, which are essential for cumulus matrix formation and able to interact with hyaluronan. Interestingly, here we show by solid-phase binding experiments that the dimer of the N(_)PTX3 retains the ability to bind to both IαI and TSG-6, suggesting that the octameric structure of PTX3 provides multiple binding sites for each of these ligands. These findings support the hypothesis that PTX3 contributes to cumulus matrix organization by cross-linking HA polymers through interactions with multiple HCs of IαI and/or TSG-6. The N-terminal PTX3 tetrameric oligomerization was recently reported to be also required for recognition and inhibition of FGF2. Given that this growth factor has been detected in the mammalian preovulatory follicle, we wondered whether FGF2 negatively influences cumulus expansion and PTX3 may also serve in vivo to antagonize its activity. We found that a molar excess of FGF2, above

  4. Substituting Both the N-Terminal and "Cord" Regions of a Xylanase from Aspergillus oryzae to Improve Its Temperature Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuang; Li, Jianfang; Wang, Rui; Li, Xueqing; Li, Jinping; Deng, Chao; Wu, Minchen

    2018-02-06

    To improve the temperature characteristics of AoXyn11A, a mesophilic glycoside hydrolase family (GHF) 11 xylanase from Aspergillus oryzae CICC40186, its N-terminal and "cord" regions were selected to be substituted by means of the computer-aided analysis and calculation. In brief, one mutant, named ATX11A 41 , possessing the lowest root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) value was designed based on the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation by substituting the N-terminal 41 amino acids of AoXyn11A with the corresponding 42 ones of pXYL11, a thermophilic GHF11 xylanase from Thermobifida fusca. On the basis of the primary structure alignment of pXYL11 with ATX11A 41 (or AoXyn11A), another mutant, named ATX11A 41/cord , was designed by substituting the cord region ( 93 GTYNPGSGG 101 ) of ATX11A 41 with the corresponding one ( 93 GTYRPTG 99 ) of pXYL11. Both mutant-encoding genes, ATx11A 41 and ATx11A 41/cord , were constructed as designed theoretically by a megaprimer PCR technique and were expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. The specific activities of recombinant (re) AoXyn11A, ATX11A 41 , and ATX11A 41/cord were 2916.7, 2667.6, and 2457.0 U/mg, respectively. The analysis of temperature characteristics displayed that the temperature optimum (T opt ) of reATX11A 41 or reATX11A 41/cord was 65 °C, which was 15 °C higher than that of reAoXyn11A. The thermal inactivation half-life (t 1/2 ) values of reATX11A 41 and reATX11A 41/cord at 60 °C were 55 and 83 min, respectively, whereas that of reAoXyn11A was only 18 min at 50 °C. The melting temperature (T m ) values of reAoXyn11A, reATX11A 41 , and reATX11A 41/cord were 54.2, 66.7, and 71.9 °C, respectively. In conclusion, the above findings indicated that the substitution of both the N-terminal and cord regions of a mesophilic AoXyn11A greatly contributed to its improved temperature characteristics.

  5. Yeast eIF4B binds to the head of the 40S ribosomal subunit and promotes mRNA recruitment through its N-terminal and internal repeat domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sarah E; Zhou, Fujun; Mitchell, Sarah F; Larson, Victoria S; Valasek, Leos; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Lorsch, Jon R

    2013-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)4B stimulates recruitment of mRNA to the 43S ribosomal pre-initiation complex (PIC). Yeast eIF4B (yeIF4B), shown previously to bind single-stranded (ss) RNA, consists of an N-terminal domain (NTD), predicted to be unstructured in solution; an RNA-recognition motif (RRM); an unusual domain comprised of seven imperfect repeats of 26 amino acids; and a C-terminal domain. Although the mechanism of yeIF4B action has remained obscure, most models have suggested central roles for its RRM and ssRNA-binding activity. We have dissected the functions of yeIF4B's domains and show that the RRM and its ssRNA-binding activity are dispensable in vitro and in vivo. Instead, our data indicate that the 7-repeats and NTD are the most critical domains, which mediate binding of yeIF4B to the head of the 40S ribosomal subunit via interaction with Rps20. This interaction induces structural changes in the ribosome's mRNA entry channel that could facilitate mRNA loading. We also show that yeIF4B strongly promotes productive interaction of eIF4A with the 43S•mRNA PIC in a manner required for efficient mRNA recruitment.

  6. N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide response to acute exercise in depressed patients and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Ströhle, Andreas; Westrin, Asa

    2011-01-01

    that patients with depression would have an attenuated N-terminal proANP (NT-proANP) response to acute exercise compared to healthy controls. Secondly, we aimed to assess the effect of antidepressants on NT-proANP response to acute exercise. METHODS: We examined 132 outpatients with mild to moderate depression......BACKGROUND: The dysfunction of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in major depression includes hyperactivity and reduced feedback inhibition. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is able to reduce the HPA-axis response to stress and has an anxiolytic effect in rodents and humans. We hypothesized...... (ICD-10) and 44 healthy controls, group matched for age, sex, and BMI. We used an incremental bicycle ergometer test as a physical stressor. Blood samples were drawn at rest, at exhaustion, and 15, 30, and 60min post-exercise. RESULTS: The NT-proANP response to physical exercise differed between...

  7. N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide response to acute exercise in depressed patients and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Ströhle, Andreas; Westrin, Asa

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dysfunction of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in major depression includes hyperactivity and reduced feedback inhibition. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is able to reduce the HPA-axis response to stress and has an anxiolytic effect in rodents and humans. We hypothesized...... that patients with depression would have an attenuated N-terminal proANP (NT-proANP) response to acute exercise compared to healthy controls. Secondly, we aimed to assess the effect of antidepressants on NT-proANP response to acute exercise. METHODS: We examined 132 outpatients with mild to moderate depression...... (ICD-10) and 44 healthy controls, group matched for age, sex, and BMI. We used an incremental bicycle ergometer test as a physical stressor. Blood samples were drawn at rest, at exhaustion, and 15, 30, and 60min post-exercise. RESULTS: The NT-proANP response to physical exercise differed between...

  8. The mechanism of vault opening from the high resolution structure of the N-terminal repeats of MVP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol-Audí, Jordi; Casañas, Arnau; Usón, Isabel; Luque, Daniel; Castón, José R; Fita, Ignasi; Verdaguer, Nuria

    2009-11-04

    Vaults are ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in a diversity of cellular processes, including multidrug resistance, transport mechanisms and signal transmission. The vault particle shows a barrel-shaped structure organized in two identical moieties, each consisting of 39 copies of the major vault protein MVP. Earlier data indicated that vault halves can dissociate at acidic pH. The crystal structure of the vault particle solved at 8 A resolution, together with the 2.1-A structure of the seven N-terminal domains (R1-R7) of MVP, reveal the interactions governing vault association and provide an explanation for a reversible dissociation induced by low pH. The structural comparison with the recently published 3.5 A model shows major discrepancies, both in the main chain tracing and in the side chain assignment of the two terminal domains R1 and R2.

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum Export, Subcellular Distribution, and Fibril Formation by Pmel17 Require an Intact N-terminal Domain Junction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Vigneron, Nathalie; Rahner, Christoph; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Cresswell, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte/melanoma-specific protein that subcellularly localizes to melanosomes, where it forms a fibrillar matrix that serves for the sequestration of potentially toxic reaction intermediates of melanin synthesis and deposition of the pigment. As a key factor in melanosomal biogenesis, understanding intracellular trafficking and processing of Pmel17 is of central importance to comprehend how these organelles are formed, how they mature, and how they function in the cell. Using a series of deletion and missense mutants of Pmel17, we are able to show that the integrity of the junction between the N-terminal region and the polycystic kidney disease-like domain is highly crucial for endoplasmic reticulum export, subcellular targeting, and fibril formation by Pmel17 and thus for establishing functional melanosomes. PMID:20231267

  10. Structure of the mouse galectin-4 N-terminal carbohydrate-recognition domain reveals the mechanism of oligosaccharide recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krejciríková, Veronika; Pachl, Petr; Fábry, Milan; Malý, Petr; Rezácová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jirí (Czech Academy)

    2011-11-18

    Galectin-4, a member of the tandem-repeat subfamily of galectins, participates in cell-membrane interactions and plays an important role in cell adhesion and modulation of immunity and malignity. The oligosaccharide specificity of the mouse galectin-4 carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) has been reported previously. In this work, the structure and binding properties of the N-terminal domain CRD1 were further investigated and the crystal structure of CRD1 in complex with lactose was determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. The lactose-binding affinity was characterized by fluorescence measurements and two lactose-binding sites were identified: a high-affinity site with a K{sub d} value in the micromolar range (K{sub d1} = 600 {+-} 70 {mu}M) and a low-affinity site with K{sub d2} = 28 {+-} 10 mM.

  11. The Drosophila Microtubule-Associated Protein Mars Stabilizes Mitotic Spindles by Crosslinking Microtubules through Its N-Terminal Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Beati, Hamze; Nilsson, Jakob; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs) are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs. PMID:23593258

  12. The Drosophila microtubule-associated protein mars stabilizes mitotic spindles by crosslinking microtubules through its N-terminal region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs.

  13. Structural communication between the chromophore-binding pocket and the N-terminal extension in plant phytochrome phyB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez Escobar, Francisco; Buhrke, David; Fernandez Lopez, Maria; Shenkutie, Sintayehu Manaye; von Horsten, Silke; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Hughes, Jon; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2017-05-01

    The N-terminal extension (NTE) of plant phytochromes has been suggested to play a functional role in signaling photoinduced structural changes. Here, we use resonance Raman spectroscopy to study the effect of the NTE on the chromophore structure of B-type phytochromes from two evolutionarily distant plants. NTE deletion seems to have no effect on the chromophore in the inactive Pr state, but alters the torsion of the C-D ring methine bridge and the surrounding hydrogen bonding network in the physiologically active Pfr state. These changes are accompanied by a shift of the conformational equilibrium between two Pfr substates, which might affect the thermal isomerization rate of the C-D double bond and, thus, account for the effect of the NTE on the dark reversion kinetics. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. The Drosophila microtubule-associated protein mars stabilizes mitotic spindles by crosslinking microtubules through its N-terminal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Beati, Hamze; Nilsson, Jakob; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs) are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs.

  15. Conformational changes of the N-terminal part of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus p12 protein during multimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knejzlik, Zdenek; Ulbrich, Pavel; Strohalm, Martin; Lastuvkova, Hana; Kodicek, Milan; Sakalian, Michael; Ruml, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    The Mason-Pfizer monkey virus is a prototype Betaretrovirus with the defining characteristic that it assembles spherical immature particles from Gag-related polyprotein precursors within the cytoplasm of the infected cell. It was shown previously that the N-terminal part of the Gag p12 domain (wt-Np12) is required for efficient assembly. However, the precise role for p12 in mediating Gag-Gag interaction is still poorly understood. In this study we employed detailed circular dichroism spectroscopy, electron microscopy and ultracentrifugation analyses of recombinant wt-Np12 prepared by in vitro transcription and translation. The wt-Np12 domain fragment forms fibrillar structures in a concentration-dependent manner. Assembly into fibers is linked to a conformational transition from unfolded or another non-periodical state to α-helix during multimerization.

  16. Statistical tests to compare motif count exceptionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandewalle Vincent

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Finding over- or under-represented motifs in biological sequences is now a common task in genomics. Thanks to p-value calculation for motif counts, exceptional motifs are identified and represent candidate functional motifs. The present work addresses the related question of comparing the exceptionality of one motif in two different sequences. Just comparing the motif count p-values in each sequence is indeed not sufficient to decide if this motif is significantly more exceptional in one sequence compared to the other one. A statistical test is required. Results We develop and analyze two statistical tests, an exact binomial one and an asymptotic likelihood ratio test, to decide whether the exceptionality of a given motif is equivalent or significantly different in two sequences of interest. For that purpose, motif occurrences are modeled by Poisson processes, with a special care for overlapping motifs. Both tests can take the sequence compositions into account. As an illustration, we compare the octamer exceptionalities in the Escherichia coli K-12 backbone versus variable strain-specific loops. Conclusion The exact binomial test is particularly adapted for small counts. For large counts, we advise to use the likelihood ratio test which is asymptotic but strongly correlated with the exact binomial test and very simple to use.

  17. Investigation of the N-terminal coding region of MUC7 alterations in dentistry students with and without caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koç Öztürk L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human low-molecular weight salivary mucin (MUC7 is a small, secreted glycoprotein coded by MUC7. In the oral cavity, they inhibit the colonization of oral bacteria, including cariogenic ones, by masking their surface adhesions, thus helping saliva to avoid dental caries. The N-terminal domain is important for low-molecular weight (MG2 mucins to contact with oral microorganisms. In this study, we aimed to identify the N-terminal coding region of the MUC7 gene between individuals with and without caries. Forty-four healthy dental students were enrolled in this study; 24 of them were classified to have caries [decayed, missing, filled-teeth (DMFT = 5.6] according to the World Health Organization (WHO criteria, and 20 of them were caries-free (DMFT = 0. Simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S and gingival index (GI were used to determine the oral hygiene and gingival conditions. Total protein levels and salivary total protein levels and salivary buffer capacity (SBC were determined by Lowry and Ericsson methods. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood cells of all the participants and genotyping was carried out by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR-sequencing method. No statistical differences were found between two groups in the terms of salivary parameters, oral hygiene and gingival conditions. We detected one common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP that leads to a change of asparagine to lysine at codon 80. This substitution was found in 29.0 and 40.0%, respectively, of the groups with and without caries. No other sequence variations were detected. The SNP found in this study may be a specific polymorphism affecting the Turkish population. Further studies with extended numbers are necessary in order to clarify this finding.

  18. Immunological and protective effects of Bordetella bronchiseptica subunit vaccines based on the recombinant N-terminal domain of dermonecrotic toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanwen; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Zhen; Yan, Zhengui; Yu, Cuilian; Shao, Mingxu; Jiang, Xiaodong; Chi, Shanshan; Wei, Kai; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2015-10-01

    Dermonecrotic toxin (DNT) produced by Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. bronchiseptica) can cause clinical turbinate atrophy in swine and induce dermonecrotic lesions in model mice. We know that the N-terminal of DNT molecule contains the receptor-binding domain, which facilitates binding to the target cells. However, we do not know whether this domain has sufficient immunogenicity to resist B. bronchiseptica damage and thereby to develop a subunit vaccine for the swine industry. In this study, we prokaryotically expressed the recombinant N-terminal of DNT from B. bronchiseptica (named DNT-N) and prepared it for the subunit vaccine to evaluate its immunogenicity. Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), a known immunomodulator, was used as the adjuvant to examine its immune-conditioning effects. At 49 d after inoculation, 10 mice from each group were challenged with B. bronchiseptica, and another 10 mice were intradermally challenged with native DNT, to examine the protection imparted by the vaccines. The immune parameters (T-lymphocyte counts, cytokine secretions, serum antibody titers, and survival rates) and skin lesions were determined. The results showed that pure DNT-N vaccine significantly induced immune responses and had limited ability to resist the B. bronchiseptica and DNT challenge, whereas the mice administered with TPPPS or Freund's incomplete adjuvant vaccine could induce higher levels of the above immune parameters. Remarkably, the DNT-N vaccine combined with TPPPS adjuvant protected the mice effectively to prevent B. bronchiseptica infection. Our findings indicated that DNT-N has potential for development as an effective subunit vaccine to counteract the damage of B. bronchiseptica infection, especially when used conjointly with TPPPS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. PKC phosphorylates residues in the N-terminal of the DA transporter to regulate amphetamine-induced DA efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Bubula, Nancy; Brown, Jason; Wang, Yunliang; Kondev, Veronika; Vezina, Paul

    2016-05-27

    The DA transporter (DAT), a phosphoprotein, controls extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the central nervous system through transport or reverse transport (efflux). Multiple lines of evidence support the claim that PKC significantly contributes to amphetamine-induced DA efflux. Other signaling pathways, involving CaMKII and ERK, have also been shown to regulate DAT mediated efflux. Here we assessed the contribution of putative PKC residues (S4, S7, S13) in the N-terminal of the DAT to amphetamine-induced DA efflux by transfecting DATs containing different serine to alanine (S-A) point mutations into DA pre-loaded HEK-293 cells and incubating these cells in amphetamine (2μM). The effects of a S-A mutation at the non-PKC residue S12 and a threonine to alanine (T-A) mutation at the ERK T53 residue were also assessed for comparison. WT-DATs were used as controls. In an initial experiment, we confirmed that inhibiting PKC with Go6976 (130nM) significantly reduced amphetamine-induced DA efflux. In subsequent experiments, cells transfected with the S4A, S12A, S13A, T53A and S4,7,13A mutants showed a reduction in amphetamine-induced DA efflux similar to that observed with Go6976. Interestingly, cells transfected with the S7A mutant, identified by some as a PKC-PKA residue, showed unperturbed WT-DAT levels of amphetamine-induced DA efflux. These results indicate that phosphorylation by PKC of select residues in the DAT N-terminal can regulate amphetamine-induced efflux. PKC can act either independently or in concert with other kinases such as ERK to produce this effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of an extensin-modifying metalloprotease: N-terminal processing and substrate cleavage pattern of Pectobacterium carotovorum Prt1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Nyffenegger, Christian; Højrup, Peter; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Yan, Kok-Phen; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Meyer, Anne S; Kirpekar, Finn; Willats, William G; Mikkelsen, Jørn D

    2014-12-01

    Compared to other plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, proteases are less well understood. In this study, the extracellular metalloprotease Prt1 from Pectobacterium carotovorum (formerly Erwinia carotovora) was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized with respect to N-terminal processing, thermal stability, substrate targets, and cleavage patterns. Prt1 is an autoprocessing protease with an N-terminal signal pre-peptide and a pro-peptide which has to be removed in order to activate the protease. The sequential cleavage of the N-terminus was confirmed by mass spectrometry (MS) fingerprinting and N-terminus analysis. The optimal reaction conditions for the activity of Prt1 on azocasein were at pH 6.0, 50 °C. At these reaction conditions, K M was 1.81 mg/mL and k cat was 1.82 × 10(7) U M(-1). The enzyme was relatively stable at 50 °C with a half-life of 20 min. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment abolished activity; Zn(2+) addition caused regain of the activity, but Zn(2+)addition decreased the thermal stability of the Prt1 enzyme presumably as a result of increased proteolytic autolysis. In addition to casein, the enzyme catalyzed degradation of collagen, potato lectin, and plant extensin. Analysis of the cleavage pattern of different substrates after treatment with Prt1 indicated that the protease had a substrate cleavage preference for proline in substrate residue position P1 followed by a hydrophobic residue in residue position P1' at the cleavage point. The activity of Prt1 against plant cell wall structural proteins suggests that this enzyme might become an important new addition to the toolbox of cell-wall-degrading enzymes for biomass processing.

  1. The N-terminal tropomyosin- and actin-binding sites are important for leiomodin 2's function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Thu; Moroz, Natalia; Pappas, Christopher T; Novak, Stefanie M; Tolkatchev, Dmitri; Wooldridge, Dayton; Mayfield, Rachel M; Helms, Gregory; Gregorio, Carol C; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2016-08-15

    Leiomodin is a potent actin nucleator related to tropomodulin, a capping protein localized at the pointed end of the thin filaments. Mutations in leiomodin-3 are associated with lethal nemaline myopathy in humans, and leiomodin-2-knockout mice present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The arrangement of the N-terminal actin- and tropomyosin-binding sites in leiomodin is contradictory and functionally not well understood. Using one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and the pointed-end actin polymerization assay, we find that leiomodin-2, a major cardiac isoform, has an N-terminal actin-binding site located within residues 43-90. Moreover, for the first time, we obtain evidence that there are additional interactions with actin within residues 124-201. Here we establish that leiomodin interacts with only one tropomyosin molecule, and this is the only site of interaction between leiomodin and tropomyosin. Introduction of mutations in both actin- and tropomyosin-binding sites of leiomodin affected its localization at the pointed ends of the thin filaments in cardiomyocytes. On the basis of our new findings, we propose a model in which leiomodin regulates actin poly-merization dynamics in myocytes by acting as a leaky cap at thin filament pointed ends. © 2016 Ly, Moroz, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Fitness for synchronization of network motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vega, Y.M.; Vázquez-Prada, M.; Pacheco, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    We study the synchronization of Kuramoto's oscillators in small parts of networks known as motifs. We first report on the system dynamics for the case of a scale-free network and show the existence of a non-trivial critical point. We compute the probability that network motifs synchronize, and fi...... that the fitness for synchronization correlates well with motifs interconnectedness and structural complexity. Possible implications for present debates about network evolution in biological and other systems are discussed....

  3. Novel and deviant Walker A ATP-binding motifs in bacteriophage large terminase-DNA packaging proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteriophage terminases constitute a very interesting class of viral-coded multifunctional ATPase 'motors' that apparently drive directional translocation of DNA into an empty viral capsid. A common Walker A motif and other conserved signatures of a critical ATPase catalytic center are identified in the N-terminal half of numerous large terminase proteins. However, several terminases, including the well-characterized λ and SPP1 terminases, seem to lack the classic Walker A in the N-terminus. Using sequence alignment approaches, we discovered the presence of deviant Walker A motifs in these and many other phage terminases. One deviation, the presence of a lysine at the beginning of P-loop, may represent a 3D equivalent of the universally conserved lysine in the Walker A GKT/S signature. This and other novel putative Walker A motifs that first came to light through this study help define the ATPase centers of phage and viral terminases as well as elicit important insights into the molecular functioning of this fundamental motif in biological systems

  4. Solution structure of a DNA mimicking motif of an RNA aptamer against transcription factor AML1 Runt domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Fukunaga, Jun-ichi; Fujiwara, Kazuya; Chiba, Manabu; Iibuchi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Kozu, Tomoko; Sakamoto, Taiichi

    2013-12-01

    AML1/RUNX1 is an essential transcription factor involved in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. AML1 binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. In a previous study, we obtained RNA aptamers against the AML1 Runt domain by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment and revealed that RNA aptamers exhibit higher affinity for the Runt domain than that for RDE and possess the 5'-GCGMGNN-3' and 5'-N'N'CCAC-3' conserved motif (M: A or C; N and N' form Watson-Crick base pairs) that is important for Runt domain binding. In this study, to understand the structural basis of recognition of the Runt domain by the aptamer motif, the solution structure of a 22-mer RNA was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance. The motif contains the AH(+)-C mismatch and base triple and adopts an unusual backbone structure. Structural analysis of the aptamer motif indicated that the aptamer binds to the Runt domain by mimicking the RDE sequence and structure. Our data should enhance the understanding of the structural basis of DNA mimicry by RNA molecules.

  5. Crystal structure of the G3BP2 NTF2-like domain in complex with a canonical FGDF motif peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Ole

    2015-11-06

    The crystal structure of the NTF2-like domain of the human Ras GTPase SH3 Binding Protein (G3BP), isoform 2, was determined at a resolution of 2.75 Å in complex with a peptide containing a FGDF sequence motif. The overall structure of the protein is highly similar to the homodimeric N-terminal domains of the G3BP1 and Rasputin proteins. Recently, a subset of G3BP interacting proteins was recognized to share a common sequence motif, FGDF. The most studied binding partners, USP10 and viral nsP3, interfere with essential G3BP functions related to assembly of cellular stress granules. Reported molecular modeling suggested that FGDF-motif containing peptides bind in an extended conformation into a hydrophobic groove on the surface of the G3BP NTF2-like domain in a manner similar to the known binding of FxFG nucleoporin repeats. The results in this paper provide evidence for a different binding mode. The FGDF peptide binds and changes conformation of the protruding N-terminal residues by providing hydrophobic interactions to a symmetry related molecule that facilitated crystallization of the G3BP2 isoform. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins are convenient translation enhancers in a human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Tominari; Machida, Kodai; Masutani, Mamiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Imataka, Hiroaki

    2010-07-01

    Human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis systems are useful for the production of recombinant proteins. Productivity can be increased by supplementation with GADD34, a protein that is difficult to express in and purify from E. coli. Deletion of the N-terminal 120 or 240 amino acids of GADD34 improves recovery of this protein from E. coli without compromising its ability to boost protein synthesis in an in vitro protein synthesis system. The use of N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins in place of full-length GADD34 should improve the utility of human cell-based cell-free protein synthesis systems.

  7. The N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant lipopeptide SP-C has intrinsic propensity to interact with and perturb phospholipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, Inés; Rivas, Luis; Keough, Kevin M W

    2004-01-01

    aggregation, and leakage of the aqueous content of the vesicles. The lipid-peptide interaction includes a significant hydrophobic component for both zwitterionic and anionic membranes, although the interaction with phosphatidylglycerol bilayers is also electrostatic in nature. The effects of the SP-C N......-terminal peptides on the membrane structure are mediated by significant perturbations of the packing order and mobility of phospholipid acyl chain segments deep in the bilayer, as detected by differential scanning calorimetry and spin-label ESR. These results suggest that the N-terminal region of SP-C, even...

  8. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2014-02-20

    ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data.

  9. MSDmotif: exploring protein sites and motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrick Kim

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structures have conserved features – motifs, which have a sufficient influence on the protein function. These motifs can be found in sequence as well as in 3D space. Understanding of these fragments is essential for 3D structure prediction, modelling and drug-design. The Protein Data Bank (PDB is the source of this information however present search tools have limited 3D options to integrate protein sequence with its 3D structure. Results We describe here a web application for querying the PDB for ligands, binding sites, small 3D structural and sequence motifs and the underlying database. Novel algorithms for chemical fragments, 3D motifs, ϕ/ψ sequences, super-secondary structure motifs and for small 3D structural motif associations searches are incorporated. The interface provides functionality for visualization, search criteria creation, sequence and 3D multiple alignment options. MSDmotif is an integrated system where a results page is also a search form. A set of motif statistics is available for analysis. This set includes molecule and motif binding statistics, distribution of motif sequences, occurrence of an amino-acid within a motif, correlation of amino-acids side-chain charges within a motif and Ramachandran plots for each residue. The binding statistics are presented in association with properties that include a ligand fragment library. Access is also provided through the distributed Annotation System (DAS protocol. An additional entry point facilitates XML requests with XML responses. Conclusion MSDmotif is unique by combining chemical, sequence and 3D data in a single search engine with a range of search and visualisation options. It provides multiple views of data found in the PDB archive for exploring protein structures.

  10. The thyroxine-binding site of human apolipoprotein-A-I: Location in the N-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenga, S.; Cahnmann, H.J.; Robbins, J.

    1991-01-01

    We tested the ability of nine monoclonal antibodies (MAb) against human apolipoprotein-A-I (apoA-I), the 28.3-kDa major apoprotein of high density lipoproteins (HDL), to inhibit its photoaffinity labeling with [125I]T4. Two forms were evaluated: isolated lipid-free apoA-I (Sigma or Calbiochem) and lipid-complexed apoA-I [HDL2, (density, 1.063-1.125 g/ml) and HDL3 (density, 1.125-1.210 g/ml)]. After labeling with 0.5 nM [125I]T4 in the presence of MAb or normal mouse IgG, the products were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent densitometric quantitation of radioactivity associated with the 28.3-kDa band. Group I MAbs, namely those having epitopes in the N-terminal portion of apoA-I, include MAb 16 (epitopes at residues 1-16), 4 and 14 (residues 1-86), and 18 (residues 98-105); group II includes MAbs 7,10, 15, and 17 (epitopes at residues 87-148); group III includes MAb 9 (residues 149-243). All group I MAbs inhibited [125I]T4 binding to isolated apoA-I with this order of potency: MAb 16 greater than MAb 14 greater than MAb 4 greater than MAb 18. In the case of lipid-associated apoA-I, the pattern of hierarchy was variable, presumably related to the known markedly polydisperse nature of HDL, but a constant feature, in contrast to the case of isolated apoA-I, was that MAb 4 was more potent than MAb 14. Group II MAbs gave less than 3% inhibition in both isolated and lipid-complexed apoA-I. Group III MAb 9 either failed to inhibit or gave 18-27% inhibition (one preparation each of HDL2 and HDL3). We conclude that the T4 site of apoA-I is in the N-terminal domain of apoA-I, closer to the epitope for MAb 16 than to that for MAb 18, and that conformational changes occurring when apoA-I is associated with lipids in the HDL particle alter the spatial relationship between some epitopes and the T4 site

  11. The scavenger receptor SSc5D physically interacts with bacteria through the SRCR-containing N-terminal domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Bessa-Pereira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR family comprises a group of membrane-attached or secreted proteins that contain one or more modules/domains structurally similar to the membrane distal domain of type I macrophage scavenger receptor. Although no all-inclusive biological function has been ascribed to the SRCR family, some of these receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP of bacteria, fungi or other microbes. SSc5D is a recently described soluble SRCR receptor produced by monocytes/macrophages and T lymphocytes, consisting of an N-terminal portion which contains five SRCR modules, and a large C-terminal mucin-like domain. Towards establishing a global common role for SRCR domains, we interrogated whether the set of five SRCR domains of SSc5D displayed pattern recognition receptor (PRR properties. For that purpose, we have expressed in a mammalian expression system the N-terminal SRCR-containing moiety of SSC5D (N-SSc5D, thus excluding the mucin-like domain likely by nature to bind microorganisms, and tested the capacity of the SRCR functional groups to physically interact with bacteria. Using conventional protein-bacteria binding assays, we showed that N-SSc5D had a superior capacity to bind to E. coli strains RS218 and IHE3034 compared with that of the extracellular domains of the SRCR proteins CD5 and CD6 (sCD5 and sCD6, respectively, and similar E. coli-binding properties as Spα, a proven PRR of the SRCR family. We have further designed a more sensitive, real-time and label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR-based assay, and examined the capacity of N-SSc5D, Spα, sCD5 and sCD6 to bind to different bacteria. We demonstrated that the N-SSc5D compares with Spα in the capacity to bind to E. coli and L. monocytogenes, and further that it can distinguish between pathogenic E. coli RS218 and IHE3034 strains and the non-pathogenic laboratory E. coli strain BL21(DE3. Our work thus advocates the

  12. A Proline-Rich N-Terminal Region of the Dengue Virus NS3 Is Crucial for Infectious Particle Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, Leopoldo G; Iglesias, Néstor G; Byk, Laura A; Filomatori, Claudia V; De Maio, Federico A; Gamarnik, Andrea V

    2016-06-01

    Dengue virus is currently the most important insect-borne viral human pathogen. Viral nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is a key component of the viral replication machinery that performs multiple functions during viral replication and participates in antiviral evasion. Using dengue virus infectious clones and reporter systems to dissect each step of the viral life cycle, we examined the requirements of different domains of NS3 on viral particle assembly. A thorough site-directed mutagenesis study based on solvent-accessible surface areas of NS3 revealed that, in addition to being essential for RNA replication, different domains of dengue virus NS3 are critically required for production of infectious viral particles. Unexpectedly, point mutations in the protease, interdomain linker, or helicase domain were sufficient to abolish infectious particle formation without affecting translation, polyprotein processing, or RNA replication. In particular, we identified a novel proline-rich N-terminal unstructured region of NS3 that contains several amino acid residues involved in infectious particle formation. We also showed a new role for the interdomain linker of NS3 in virion assembly. In conclusion, we present a comprehensive genetic map of novel NS3 determinants for viral particle assembly. Importantly, our results provide evidence of a central role of NS3 in the coordination of both dengue virus RNA replication and particle formation. Dengue virus is an important human pathogen, and its prominence is expanding globally; however, basic aspects of its biology are still unclear, hindering the development of effective therapeutic and prophylactic treatments. Little is known about the initial steps of dengue and other flavivirus particle assembly. This process involves a complex interplay between viral and cellular components, making it an attractive antiviral target. Unpredictably, we identified spatially separated regions of the large NS3 viral protein as determinants for

  13. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Grauffel

    Full Text Available Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs. In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p. To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG, hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE. Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic, hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic, hNaa30p (basic and hNaa50p (hydrophobic. We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide

  14. Host factors that interact with the pestivirus N-terminal protease, Npro, are components of the ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Matthew; Donaszi-Ivanov, Andras; Pollen, Sean; Dalmay, Tamas; Saalbach, Gerhard; Powell, Penny P

    2014-09-01

    The viral N-terminal protease N(pro) of pestiviruses counteracts cellular antiviral defenses through inhibition of IRF3. Here we used mass spectrometry to identify a new role for N(pro) through its interaction with over 55 associated proteins, mainly ribosomal proteins and ribonucleoproteins, including RNA helicase A (DHX9), Y-box binding protein (YBX1), DDX3, DDX5, eIF3, IGF2BP1, multiple myeloma tumor protein 2, interleukin enhancer binding factor 3 (IEBP3), guanine nucleotide binding protein 3, and polyadenylate-binding protein 1 (PABP-1). These are components of the translation machinery, ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs), and stress granules. Significantly, we found that stress granule formation was inhibited in MDBK cells infected with a noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain, Kyle. However, ribonucleoproteins binding to N(pro) did not inhibit these proteins from aggregating into stress granules. N(pro) interacted with YBX1 though its TRASH domain, since the mutant C112R protein with an inactive TRASH domain no longer redistributed to stress granules. Interestingly, RNA helicase A and La autoantigen relocated from a nuclear location to form cytoplasmic granules with N(pro). To address a proviral role for N(pro) in RNP granules, we investigated whether N(pro) affected RNA interference (RNAi), since interacting proteins are involved in RISC function during RNA silencing. Using glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) silencing with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) followed by Northern blotting of GAPDH, expression of N(pro) had no effect on RNAi silencing activity, contrasting with other viral suppressors of interferon. We propose that N(pro) is involved with virus RNA translation in the cytoplasm for virus particle production, and when translation is inhibited following stress, it redistributes to the replication complex. Although the pestivirus N-terminal protease, N(pro), has been shown to have an important role in degrading IRF3 to

  15. Temporal motifs in time-dependent networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovanen, Lauri; Karsai, Márton; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2011-01-01

    Temporal networks are commonly used to represent systems where connections between elements are active only for restricted periods of time, such as telecommunication, neural signal processing, biochemical reaction and human social interaction networks. We introduce the framework of temporal motifs to study the mesoscale topological–temporal structure of temporal networks in which the events of nodes do not overlap in time. Temporal motifs are classes of similar event sequences, where the similarity refers not only to topology but also to the temporal order of the events. We provide a mapping from event sequences to coloured directed graphs that enables an efficient algorithm for identifying temporal motifs. We discuss some aspects of temporal motifs, including causality and null models, and present basic statistics of temporal motifs in a large mobile call network

  16. Motif discovery in ranked lists of sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Tataru, Paula; Madsen, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Motif analysis has long been an important method to characterize biological functionality and the current growth of sequencing-based genomics experiments further extends its potential. These diverse experiments often generate sequence lists ranked by some functional property. There is therefore...... advantage of the regular expression feature, including enrichments for combinations of different microRNA seed sites. The method is implemented and made publicly available as an R package and supports high parallelization on multi-core machinery....... a growing need for motif analysis methods that can exploit this coupled data structure and be tailored for specific biological questions. Here, we present an exploratory motif analysis tool, Regmex (REGular expression Motif EXplorer), which offers several methods to evaluate the correlation of motifs...

  17. Calcium has a permissive role in interleukin-1beta-induced c-jun N-terminal kinase activation in insulin-secreting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Kapelioukh, Iouri L

    2005-01-01

    The c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway mediates IL-1beta-induced apoptosis in insulin-secreting cells, a mechanism relevant to the destruction of pancreatic beta-cells in type 1 and 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms that contribute to IL-1beta activation of JNK in beta-cells are la...

  18. The N-Terminal Flanking Region of the Invariant Chain Peptide Augments the Immunogenicity of a Cryptic “Self” Epitope from a Tumor-Associated Antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hess, A.D.; Thoburn, C.; Chen, W.; Miura, Y.; Wall, E. van der

    2001-01-01

    The N-terminal flanking region of the invariant chain peptide termed CLIP appears to have superagonistic properties interacting with the T cell receptor and the MHC class II molecule at or near the binding site for the bacterial superantigen Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). The present studies

  19. Troponin T, N-terminal pro natriuretic peptide and a patent ductus arteriosus scoring system predict death before discharge or neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    El-Khuffash, Afif F

    2011-03-01

    There is little consensus regarding the use of echocardiography in patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) treatment in preterm infants. The use of troponin T (cTnT) and N-terminal Pro-BNP (NTpBNP) in combination with echocardiography assessment may facilitate the development of a superior predictive model.

  20. Unbiased Selective Isolation of Protein N-Terminal Peptides from Complex Proteome Samples Using Phospho Tagging PTAG) and TiO2-based Depletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommen, G.P.M.; Waterbeemd, van de B.; Meiring, H.D.; Kersten, G.; Heck, A.J.R.; Jong, de A.P.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    A positional proteomics strategy for global N-proteome analysis is presented based on phospho tagging (PTAG) of internal peptides followed by depletion by titanium dioxide (TiO2) affinity chromatography. Therefore, N-terminal and lysine amino groups are initially completely dimethylated with

  1. Site-specific quantification of lysine acetylation in the N-terminal tail of histone H4 using a double-labelling, targeted UHPLC MS/MS approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Urzo, Annalisa; Boichenko, Alexander P.; van den Bosch, Thea; Hermans, Jos; Dekker, Frank; Andrisano, Vincenza; Bischoff, Rainer

    We developed a targeted liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the site-specific quantification of lysine acetylation in the N-terminal region of histone H4 by combining chemical derivatization at the protein and peptide levels with digestion using chymotrypsin and

  2. Cardiovascular risk prediction by N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide and high sensitivity C-reactive protein is affected by age and sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M.H.; Hansen, T.W.; Christensen, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP) predict cardiovascular events in a general population aged 41, 51, 61 or 71 years. This study investigated...

  3. Usefulness of Serial N-terminal Pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide Measurements to Predict Cardiac Death in Acute and Chronic Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, S.L. den; Rizopoulos, D.; Sarvaas, G.J.; Backx, A.P.; Harkel, A.D. Ten; Iperen, G.G. van; Rammeloo, L.A.; Tanke, R.B.; Boersma, E.; Helbing, W.A.; Dalinghaus, M.

    2016-01-01

    N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is an important predictor of outcome in adults with heart failure. In children with heart failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) markers that reliably predict disease progression and outcome during follow-up are scarce. We investigated

  4. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Phonocardiography in Differentiating Innocent Cardiac Murmurs from Congenital Cardiac Anomalies in Asymptomatic Puppies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinus, S M; Engelen, H.G.H.; Szatmári, V.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Differentiating innocent cardiac murmurs from murmurs caused by congenital cardiac anomalies can be challenging with auscultation alone in asymptomatic puppies. Hypothesis: Plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and phonocardiograms recorded by an

  5. Investigation of functional aspects of the N-terminal region of elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli using a protein engineering approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, M; Mansilla, Francisco; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1998-01-01

    The function of the N-terminal region of elongation factor Tu is still unexplained. Until recently, it has not been visible in electron density maps from x-ray crystallography studies, but the presence of several well conserved basic residues suggest that this part of the molecule is of structural...

  6. Mortality and preoperative cardiac function in vascular amputees : an N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemersma, Marcel; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk Jan; Muskiet, Frits A. J.; van den Dungen, Jan A. M. M.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.

    Objective: To determine preoperative ventricular function in vascular amputees by measuring N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and to analyse the relationship between NT-proBNP levels and 30-day postoperative mortality. Design: Prospective pilot study. Subjects and methods: In 19

  7. Involvement of the N-terminal unique domain of Chk tyrosine kinase in Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Yuji; Kawana, Akiko; Igarashi, Asae; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2006-01-01

    Chk tyrosine kinase phosphorylates Src-family kinases and suppresses their kinase activity. We recently showed that Chk localizes to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm and inhibits cell proliferation. In this study, we explored the role of the N-terminal unique domain of Chk in nuclear localization and Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus. In situ binding experiments showed that the N-terminal domain of Chk was associated with the nucleus and the nuclear matrix. The presence of the N-terminal domain of Chk led to a fourfold increase in cell population exhibiting Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus. Expression of Chk but not kinase-deficient Chk induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a variety of proteins ranging from 23 kDa to ∼200 kDa, especially in Triton X-100-insoluble fraction that included chromatin and the nuclear matrix. Intriguingly, in situ subnuclear fractionations revealed that Chk induced tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins that were associated with the nuclear matrix. These results suggest that various unidentified substrates of Chk, besides Src-family kinases, may be present in the nucleus. Thus, our findings indicate that the importance of the N-terminal domain to Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus, implicating that these nuclear tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins may contribute to inhibition of cell proliferation

  8. Importance of the content and localization of tyrosine residues for thyroxine formation within the N-terminal part of human thyroglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, M. T.; Sijmons, C. C.; Bakker, O.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; de Vijlder, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Thyroxine (T4) is formed by coupling of iodinated tyrosine residues within thyroglobulin (TG). In mature TG, some iodinated tyrosine residues are involved preferentially in T4 formation. In order to investigate the specific role of various tyrosine residues in T4 formation, N-terminal TG fragments

  9. The role of n terminal - probrain natriuretic peptide in the diagnosis of hemodynamic persistent asrteriosus ductus in premature neonates patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasraf, D.; Djer, M. M.; Advani, N.

    2017-08-01

    Persistent ductus arteriosus is one of the most frequent congenital heart diseases found in infants, mainly in preterms. Echocardiography is the gold standard for the diagnosis of hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (hs-PDA) in preterm neonates. A few studies have suggested that the use of a simple blood assay to detect N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) may be useful in determining the diagnosis and management of hs-PDA. No such studies have been conducted in Indonesia, although the assay kit and characteristics of the patient (gestational age and chronological age) influence the accuracy of NT-proBNP levels in determining hs-PDA. The aim of this study was to determine the association between the NT-proBNP level and the prevalence of hs-PDA in an Indonesian patient population. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. PDA was determined using echocardiography in 49 preterm neonates (gestational age groups: non-PDA, non-hsPDA, and hs-PDA. The blood NT-proBNP level was then determined in the non-hsPDA and hs-PDA groups, and between-group differences were compared. Among the 49 neonates, 33 patients had PDA, and 16 of these had hs-PDA. The results revealed a significant association between the NT-proBNP level and hs-PDA (p < 0.001).

  10. Loss of Nat4 and its associated histone H4 N-terminal acetylation mediates calorie restriction-induced longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Serrano, Diego; Schiza, Vassia; Demosthenous, Christis; Stavrou, Emmanouil; Oppelt, Jan; Kyriakou, Dimitris; Liu, Wei; Zisser, Gertrude; Bergler, Helmut; Dang, Weiwei; Kirmizis, Antonis

    2016-12-01

    Changes in histone modifications are an attractive model through which environmental signals, such as diet, could be integrated in the cell for regulating its lifespan. However, evidence linking dietary interventions with specific alterations in histone modifications that subsequently affect lifespan remains elusive. We show here that deletion of histone N-alpha-terminal acetyltransferase Nat4 and loss of its associated H4 N-terminal acetylation (N-acH4) extend yeast replicative lifespan. Notably, nat4Δ-induced longevity is epistatic to the effects of calorie restriction (CR). Consistent with this, (i) Nat4 expression is downregulated and the levels of N-acH4 within chromatin are reduced upon CR, (ii) constitutive expression of Nat4 and maintenance of N-acH4 levels reduces the extension of lifespan mediated by CR, and (iii) transcriptome analysis indicates that nat4Δ largely mimics the effects of CR, especially in the induction of stress-response genes. We further show that nicotinamidase Pnc1, which is typically upregulated under CR, is required for nat4Δ-mediated longevity. Collectively, these findings establish histone N-acH4 as a regulator of cellular lifespan that links CR to increased stress resistance and longevity. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  11. Blood N-terminal Pro-brain Natriuretic Peptide and Interleukin-17 for Distinguishing Incomplete Kawasaki Disease from Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Chen, Yuanling; Zhong, Shiling; Li, Yunyan; Dai, Xiahua; Di, Yazhen

    2015-06-01

    To explore the diagnostic value of blood N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and interleukin-17(IL-17) for incomplete Kawasaki disease. Patients with Kawasaki disease, Incomplete Kawasaki disease and unclear infectious fever were included in this retrospective study. Their clinical features, and laboratory test results of blood NT-proBNP and IL-17 were collected and compared. 766 patients with complete clinical information were recruited, consisting of 291 cases of Kawasaki disease, 74 cases of incomplete Kawasaki disease, and 401 cases of unclear infectious diseases. When the consistency with indicator 2 and 3 in Kawasaki disease diagnosis criteria was assessed with blood IL-17 ?11.55 pg/mL and blood NT-proBNP ? 225.5 pg/dL as the criteria, the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing incomplete Kawasaki disease and infectious diseases reached 86.5% and 94.8%, respectively. When we chose the consistency with indicator 1 and 2 in Kawasaki disease diagnosis criteria, the appearance of decrustation and/or the BCG erythema, blood IL-17 ?11.55 pg/mL and blood NT-Pro BNP ?225.5 pg/dL as the criteria, the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing incomplete Kawasaki disease and infectious diseases was 43.2% and 100%, respectively. Blood NT-proBNP and IL-17 are useful laboratory indicators for distinguishing incomplete Kawasaki disease and infectious diseases at the early stage.

  12. Improving the secretion of a methyl parathion hydrolase in Pichia pastoris by modifying its N-terminal sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    Full Text Available Pichia pastoris is commonly used to express and secrete target proteins, although not all recombinant proteins can be successfully produced. In this study, we used methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH from Ochrobactrum sp. M231 as a model to study the importance of the N-terminus of the protein for its secretion. While MPH can be efficiently expressed intracellularly in P. pastoris, it is not secreted into the extracellular environment. Three MPH mutants (N66-MPH, D10-MPH, and N9-MPH were constructed through modification of its N-terminus, and the secretion of each by P. pastoris was improved when compared to wild-type MPH. The level of secreted D10-MPH was increased to 0.21 U/mL, while that of N9-MPH was enhanced to 0.16 U/mL. Although N66-MPH was not enzymatically active, it was secreted efficiently, and was identified by SDS-PAGE. These results demonstrate that the secretion of heterologous proteins in P. pastoris may be improved by modifying their N-terminal structures.

  13. Highly potent antimicrobial peptides from N-terminal membrane-binding region of E. coli MreB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Karabi; Sravani, Yalavarthi Durga; Ramakrishnan, Vibin; Chaudhary, Nitin

    2017-02-23

    Microbial pathogenesis is a serious health concern. The threat escalates as the existing conventional antimicrobials are losing their efficacy against the evolving pathogens. Peptides hold promise to be developed into next-generation antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides adopt amphipathic structures that could selectively bind to and disrupt the microbial membranes. Interaction of proteins with membranes is central to all living systems and we reasoned that the membrane-binding domains in microbial proteins could be developed into efficient antimicrobials. This is an interesting approach as self-like sequences could elude the microbial strategies of degrading the antimicrobial peptides, one of the mechanisms of showing resistance to antimicrobials. We selected the 9-residue-long membrane-binding region of E. coli MreB protein. The 9-residue peptide (C-terminal amide) and its N-terminal acetylated analog displayed broad-spectrum activity, killing Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi. Extension with a tryptophan residue at the N-terminus drastically improved the activity of the peptides with lethal concentrations ≤10 μM against all the organisms tested. The tryptophan-extended peptides caused complete killing of C. albicans as well as gentamicin and methicillin resistant S. aureus at 5 μM concentration. Lipid-binding studies and electron microscopic analyses of the peptide-treated microbes suggest membrane disruption as the mechanism of killing.

  14. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and abnormal brain aging: The AGES-Reykjavik Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabayan, Behnam; van Buchem, Mark A; de Craen, Anton J M; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Zhang, Qian; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Arai, Andrew E; Launer, Lenore J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the independent association of serum N-terminal fragment of the prohormone natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) with structural and functional features of abnormal brain aging in older individuals. In this cross-sectional study based on the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, we included 4,029 older community-dwelling individuals (born 1907 to 1935) with a measured serum level of NT-proBNP. Outcomes included parenchymal brain volumes estimated from brain MRI, cognitive function measured by tests of memory, processing speed, and executive functioning, and presence of depressive symptoms measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale. In a substudy, cardiac output of 857 participants was assessed using cardiac MRI. In multivariate analyses, adjusted for sociodemographic and cardiovascular factors, higher levels of NT-proBNP were independently associated with lower total (p brain volumes. Likewise, in multivariate analyses, higher levels of NT-proBNP were associated with worse scores in memory (p = 0.005), processing speed (p = 0.001), executive functioning (p brain parenchymal volumes, impaired executive function and processing speed, and higher depressive symptoms were independent of the level of cardiac output. Higher serum levels of NT-proBNP, independent of cardiovascular risk factors and a measure of cardiac function, are linked with alterations in brain structure and function. Roles of natriuretic peptides in the process of brain aging need to be further elucidated. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Analysis of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels in patients with chronic heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xiao; Zhang Xingping; Zhou Kejian

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the changes and its clinical significance of serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels in patients with chronic heart failure(CHF), 128 patients with decompensated CHF and 20 patients without structural heart disease were selected as CHF and control group. All subjects were evaluated heart function by New York Heart Association (NYHA) class. The serum NT-proBNP levels were assayed by electrochemiluminescence double antibody sandwich immunoassay. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was detected by color Doppler ultrasound. The results showed that the NT-proBNP levels in CHF group were significantly higher than that of in the control group (P<0.05). Further, the NT-proBNP levels showed an increased tendency accompanied by the severity of heart failure (P<0.05) and lowering of LVEF (r=-0.595, P<0.05). The serum NT-proBNP levels can reflect the state of cardiac function in patients with decompensated DHF, and useful in the diagnosis and severity assessment of CHF. (authors)

  16. Release kinetics of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in a clinical model of acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebetrau, Christoph; Gaede, Luise; Dörr, Oliver; Troidl, Christian; Voss, Sandra; Hoffmann, Jedrzej; Paszko, Agata; Weber, Michael; Rolf, Andreas; Hamm, Christian; Nef, Holger; Möllmann, Helge

    2014-02-15

    N-terminal segment of B-type natriuretic peptide prohormone (NT-proBNP) is elevated in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) thus providing both diagnostic information and prognostic information. The aim of the present study was to determine the time course of NT-proBNP release in patients undergoing transcoronary ablation of septal hypertrophy (TASH) a procedure mimicking AMI. We analyzed the release kinetics of NT-proBNP in 18 consecutive patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy undergoing TASH. Serum samples were collected prior to and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, and 105 min, and 2, 4, 8, and 24h after TASH. NT-proBNP concentrations showed a continuous increase during the first 75 min with a significant percent change compared to baseline value already 15 min after TASH (105.6% [IQR 102.2-112.7]; Pvalue until the 8th h after initiation of myocardial infarction. NT-proBNP concentration increases immediately after induction of myocardial infarction proving early evidence of myocardial injury despite the decrease of the left ventricular wall stress due to the TASH related reduction of the left ventricular outflow gradient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide predicts mortality in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Santiago; Akbar, Muhammad S; Ali, Syed S; Kamdar, Forum; Tsai, Michael Y; Duprez, Daniel A

    2010-09-03

    Left ventricular hypertrophy adversely affects outcomes in patients with hypertension. Whether N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) adds incremental prognostic information in patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is not well established. We aimed to study the prognostic value of NT-proBNP in hypertensive patients with LVH. Echocardiography was performed in 232 patients (mean age 61±15, 102 males, 130 females) for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy. Left ventricular mass was measured according to The American Society of Echocardiography guidelines. A blood sample was taken for NT-proBNP determination. NT-proBNP levels were analyzed in quartiles after log transformation. Long term survival was established by review of electronic medical records. Arterial hypertension was present in 130 patients (56%) and left ventricular hypertrophy was present in 105 patients (45%). In patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, NT-proBNP levels predicted long term survival (Chi-square=10, p=0.01). After adjusting by age, presence of coronary artery disease, ejection fraction, diabetes status, and hypertension; patients in highest NT pro-BNP quartile were twice as likely to die when compared to patients in the lowest NT-ptoBNP quartile (OR=2.2, 95% CI=1.0-4.6, p=0.03). NT-proBNP is an independent predictor of survival in patients with hypertension and increased left ventricular mass. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Usefulness of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as a biomarker of the presence of carcinoid heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Toumpanakis, Christos; Caplin, Martyn Evan; Davar, Joseph

    2008-10-01

    We sought to investigate whether N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) can be used as a biomarker for the detection of carcinoid heart disease (CHD); 200 patients with carcinoid syndrome were screened for CHD using transthoracic echocardiography. A carcinoid score was formulated to quantify severity of CHD. NT-pro-BNP was measured in all patients before echocardiography. Patients were categorised into New York Heart Association class. CHD was present in 39 patients (19.5%). NT-pro-BNP was significantly higher in those with CHD (median 1,149 pg/ml) than in those without CHD (median 101 pg/ml, p pro-BNP at a cut-off level of 260 pg/ml for detection of CHD were 0.92 and 0.91, respectively. NT-pro-BNP positively correlated both with carcinoid score (r = 0.81, p pro-BNP seems to be an excellent biomarker of CHD. A high negative predictive value may allow it to provide a screening test for CHD.

  19. Structure of N-Terminal Domain of NPC1 Reveals Distinct Subdomains for Binding and Transfer of Cholesterol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Wang, Michael L.; Deisenhofer, Johann; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Infante, Rodney E.; (UTSMC)

    2010-09-21

    LDL delivers cholesterol to lysosomes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Exit of cholesterol from lysosomes requires two proteins, membrane-bound Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) and soluble NPC2. NPC2 binds cholesterol with its isooctyl side chain buried and its 3{beta}-hydroxyl exposed. Here, we describe high-resolution structures of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NPC1 and complexes with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. NPC1(NTD) binds cholesterol in an orientation opposite to NPC2: 3{beta}-hydroxyl buried and isooctyl side chain exposed. Cholesterol transfer from NPC2 to NPC1(NTD) requires reorientation of a helical subdomain in NPC1(NTD), enlarging the opening for cholesterol entry. NPC1 with point mutations in this subdomain (distinct from the binding subdomain) cannot accept cholesterol from NPC2 and cannot restore cholesterol exit from lysosomes in NPC1-deficient cells. We propose a working model wherein after lysosomal hydrolysis of LDL-cholesteryl esters, cholesterol binds NPC2, which transfers it to NPC1(NTD), reversing its orientation and allowing insertion of its isooctyl side chain into the outer lysosomal membranes.

  20. Barley polyamine oxidase: Characterisation and analysis of the cofactor and the N-terminal amino acid sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radova, A.; Sebela, M.; Galuszka, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the first purification method developed for the isolation of an homogeneous polyamine oxidase (PAO) from etiolated barley seedlings. The crude enzyme preparation was obtained after initial precipitation of the extract with protamine sulphate and ammonium sulphate. The enzyme...... was further confirmed by measuring the fluorescence spectra, Barley PAO is an acidic protein (pI 5.4) containing 3% of neutral sugars: its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE was 56 kDa, whilst gel permeation chromatography revealed the higher value of 76 kDa. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of barley...... PAO shows a high degree of similarity to that of maize PAO and to several other flavoprotein oxidases. The polyamines spermine and spermidine were the only two substrates of the enzyme with K-m values 4 x 10(-5) and 3 x 10(-5) M and pH optima of 5.0 and 6.0, respectively. Barley polyamine oxidase...

  1. c-Jun N-terminal kinase mediates AML1-ETO protein-induced connexin-43 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fenghou; Wang Qiong; Wu Yingli; Li Xi; Zhao Kewen; Chen Guoqiang

    2007-01-01

    AML1-ETO fusion protein, a product of leukemia-related chromosomal translocation t(8;21), was reported to upregulate expression of connexin-43 (Cx43), a member of gap junction-constituted connexin family. However, its mechanism(s) remains unclear. By bioinformatic analysis, here we showed that there are two putative AML1-binding consensus sequences followed by two activated protein (AP)1 sites in the 5'-flanking region upstream to Cx43 gene. AML1-ETO could directly bind to these two AML1-binding sites in electrophoretic mobility shift assay, but luciferase reporter assay revealed that the AML1 binding sites were not indispensable for Cx43 induction by AML1-ETO protein. Conversely, AP1 sites exerted an important role in this event. In agreement, AML1-ETO overexpression in leukemic U937 cells activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), while its specific inhibitor SP600125 effectively abrogated AML1-ETO-induced Cx43 expression, indicating that JNK signaling pathway contributes to AML1-ETO induced Cx43 expression. These results would shed new insights for understanding mechanisms of AML1-ETO-associated leukemogenesis

  2. MotifNet: a web-server for network motif analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoly, Ilan Y; Lerman, Eugene; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2017-06-15

    Network motifs are small topological patterns that recur in a network significantly more often than expected by chance. Their identification emerged as a powerful approach for uncovering the design principles underlying complex networks. However, available tools for network motif analysis typically require download and execution of computationally intensive software on a local computer. We present MotifNet, the first open-access web-server for network motif analysis. MotifNet allows researchers to analyze integrated networks, where nodes and edges may be labeled, and to search for motifs of up to eight nodes. The output motifs are presented graphically and the user can interactively filter them by their significance, number of instances, node and edge labels, and node identities, and view their instances. MotifNet also allows the user to distinguish between motifs that are centered on specific nodes and motifs that recur in distinct parts of the network. MotifNet is freely available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/motifnet . The website was implemented using ReactJs and supports all major browsers. The server interface was implemented in Python with data stored on a MySQL database. estiyl@bgu.ac.il or michaluz@cs.bgu.ac.il. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Diagnosis of invasive candidiasis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the N-terminal fragment of Candida albicans hyphal wall protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontón José

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis of invasive candidiasis is difficult because there are no specific clinical manifestations of the disease and colonization and infection are difficult to distinguish. In the last decade, much effort has been made to develop reliable tests for rapid diagnosis of invasive candidiasis, but none of them have found widespread clinical use. Results Antibodies against a recombinant N-terminal fragment of the Candida albicans germ tube-specific antigen hyphal wall protein 1 (Hwp1 generated in Escherichia coli were detected by both immunoblotting and ELISA tests in a group of 36 hematological or Intensive Care Unit patients with invasive candidiasis and in a group of 45 control patients at high risk for the mycosis who did not have clinical or microbiological data to document invasive candidiasis. Results were compared with an immunofluorescence test to detect antibodies to C. albicans germ tubes (CAGT. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of a diagnostic test based on the detection of antibodies against the N-terminal fragment of Hwp1 by immunoblotting were 27.8 %, 95.6 %, 83.3 % and 62.3 %, respectively. Detection of antibodies to the N-terminal fragment of Hwp1 by ELISA increased the sensitivity (88.9 % and the negative predictive value (90.2 % but slightly decreased the specificity (82.6 % and positive predictive values (80 %. The kinetics of antibody response to the N-terminal fragment of Hwp1 by ELISA was very similar to that observed by detecting antibodies to CAGT. Conclusion An ELISA test to detect antibodies against a recombinant N-terminal fragment of the C. albicans germ tube cell wall antigen Hwp1 allows the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis with similar results to those obtained by detecting antibodies to CAGT but without the need of treating the sera to adsorb the antibodies against the cell wall surface of the blastospore.

  4. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  5. Calcium Occupancy of N-terminal Sites within Calmodulin Induces Inhibition of the Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2007-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates calcium release from intracellular stores in skeletal muscle through its association with the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) calcium release channel, where CaM association enhances channel opening at resting calcium levels and its closing at micromolar calcium levels associated with muscle contraction. A high-affinity CaM-binding sequence (RyRp) has been identified in RyR1, which corresponds to a 30-residue sequence (i.e., K3614 – N3643) located within the central portion of the primary sequence. However, it is currently unclear whether the identified CaM-binding sequence a) senses calcium over the physiological range of calcium-concentrations associated with RyR1 regulation or b) plays a structural role unrelated to the calcium-dependent modulation of RyR1 function. Therefore, we have measured the calcium-dependent activation of the individual domains of CaM in association with RyRp and their relationship to the CaM-dependent regulation of RyR1. These measurements utilize an engineered CaM, permitting the site-specific incorporation of N-(1-pyrene) maleimide at either T34C (PyN-CaM) or T110C (PyC-CaM) in the N- and C-domains, respectively. Consistent with prior measurements, we observe a high-affinity association between both apo- and calcium-activated CaM and RyRp. Upon association with RyRp, fluorescence changes in PyN-CaM or PyC-CaM permit the measurement of the calcium-activation of these individual domains. Fluorescence changes upon calcium-activation of PyC-CaM in association with RyRp are indicative of high-affinity calcium-dependent activation of the C-terminal domain of CaM bound to RyRp at resting calcium levels and the activation of the N-terminal domain at levels of calcium associated cellular activation. In comparison, occupancy of calcium-binding sites in the N-domain of CaM mirrors the calcium-dependence of RyR1 inhibition observed at activating calcium levels, where [Ca]1/2 = 4.3 0.4 μM, suggesting a direct regulation of Ry

  6. The Informative Value of N-Terminal Pro-type B Natriuretic Peptide in Cardiac Surgical Patients with Hypercreatininemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Burzhunova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the informative value of a dramatic increase in the preoperative blood level of the inactive moiety of the precursor of N-terminal pro-type B natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP in cardiac surgical patients with hypercreatininemia. Subjects and materials. Twenty-one patients with a preoperative NT-proBNP level of 1000 pg/ml or more, who underwent myocardial revascularization under extracorporeal circulation (ECC, were examined. The patients were divided into groups with normal (up to 120 ^mol/l (Group 1; n=11 and elevated (Group 2; n=10 creatinine concentrations. The values of circulation were processed after skin incision and at the end of surgery. The clinical features of a perioperative period were analyzed. Results. Creatininemia was 103±3.3 and 183±12.9 ^mol/l in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (p<0.05; NT-proBNP was 1397±139 and 1908±170 pg/ml (p<0.05. EuroSCORE-predicted mortality ran to 9.8±1.6 and 9.1±1.7% (p>0.05. There were no intergroup differences in intraoperative circulatory parameters. The intensity of sympatomimetic therapy after ECC was equal in the identified patient groups and there were either no differences (p>0.05 in the frequency of intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation (18.2 and 10.0%, the length of mechanical ventilation (15±1.5 and 18.7±2.3 hours and intensive care unit stay (1.8±0.5 and 2.0±0.7 days in survivors, and inpatient mortality (23.7 and 20.0% that proved to be substantially higher than the EuroSCORE-predicted one. Regression analysis showed that in the entire group of operated patients, the level of NT-proBNP turned out to be a more significant predictor of inpatient mortality (p=0.012 than EuroSCORE-predicted one (p = 0.04. The similar regularity was characteristic for patients with hypercreatininemia. In the patients with hypercholesterolemia, the EuroSCORE-predicted mortality completely lost its significance (p=0.61 in predicting actual mortality rates. In this group, NT

  7. Association of N-terminal domain polymorphisms of the porcine glucocorticoid receptor with carcass composition and meat quality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyer, Henry; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Wimmers, Klaus; Murani, Eduard

    2014-02-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ubiquitously acting transcription factor that is responsible for mediating the physiological response to stress and adaptation to environmental conditions. Genetic variation of a GR gene (NR3C1) may therefore contribute to multiple phenotypic alterations and influence relevant traits of animal production. Here, we examined effects of two non-synonymous mutations of the porcine NR3C1, leading to amino acid exchanges p.Glu13Asp (c.39A>C) and p.Val19Leu (c.55G>C) in the N-terminal domain of the GR, on meat quality and carcass composition. In addition, we explored their influence on transcriptional activity of GR in vitro. A commercial crossbreed Pietrain × (German Large White × German Landrace) herd (n = 545) in which genotypes and relevant traits had been collected was used to perform the association analysis. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.55G>C was significantly associated with conductivity and meat color scores. These effects were highly consistent considering the physiological relationship between these traits. Association analysis of SNP c.39A>C also revealed significant effects on closely connected meat quality traits. In addition, SNP c.55G>C showed association with carcass traits, mainly those related to muscle deposition. The molecular mechanism of action of both amino acid substitutions remains obscure because neither showed significant influence on transcriptional activity of GR. Our study emphasizes NR3C1 as an important candidate gene for muscle-related traits in pigs, but further work is necessary to clarify the molecular background of the identified associations. © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  8. Exercise dependence of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachtrup, Sabine; Brügel, Mathias; Pankau, Hans; Halank, Michael; Wirtz, Hubert; Seyfarth, Hans-Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is secreted by cardiac ventricular myocytes upon pressure and volume overload and is a prognostic marker to monitor the severity of precapillary pulmonary hypertension and the extent of right heart failure. The impact of physical exercise on NT-proBNP levels in patients with left heart disease was demonstrated previously. No data regarding patients with isolated right heart failure and the influence of acute exercise on NT-proBNP serum levels exist. Twenty patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension were examined. Hemodynamic parameters were measured during right heart catheterization. Serum NT-proBNP of patients was measured at rest, after a 6-min walking test, during ergospirometry and during recovery, all within 7 h. Significant differences in sequential NT-proBNP values, relative changes compared to values at rest and the correlation between NT-proBNP and obtained parameters were assessed. At rest, the mean serum level of NT-proBNP was 1,278 ± 998 pg/ml. The mean level of NT-proBNP at maximal exercise was increased (1,592 ± 1,219 pg/ml), whereas serum levels decreased slightly during recovery (1,518 ± 1,170 pg/ml). The relative increase of serum NT-proBNP during exercise correlated with pulmonary vascular resistance (r = 0.45; p = 0.026) and cardiac output (r = -0.5; p = 0.015). In this study, we demonstrated acute changes in NT-proBNP levels due to physical exercise in a small group of patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension. Our results also confirm the predominant usefulness of NT-proBNP as an intraindividual parameter of right heart load. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Cocoa flavanols reduce N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Rodney; Sotto, Imelda; Wood, Elizabeth G; Khan, Noorafza Q; Butler, Jane; Johnston, Atholl; Rothman, Martin T; Corder, Roger

    2016-06-01

    Poor prognosis in chronic heart failure (HF) is linked to endothelial dysfunction for which there is no specific treatment currently available. Previous studies have shown reproducible improvements in endothelial function with cocoa flavanols, but the clinical benefit of this effect in chronic HF has yet to be determined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the potential therapeutic value of a high dose of cocoa flavanols in patients with chronic HF, by using reductions in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) as an index of improved cardiac function. Thirty-two patients with chronic HF, stable on guideline-directed medical therapy, were randomized to consume 50 g/day of high-flavanol dark chocolate (HFDC; 1064 mg of flavanols/day) or low-flavanol dark chocolate (LFDC; 88 mg of flavanols/day) for 4 weeks and then crossed over to consume the alternative dark chocolate for a further 4 weeks. Twenty-four patients completed the study. After 4 weeks of HFDC, NT-proBNP (mean decrease % ± standard deviation) was significantly reduced compared with baseline (-44 ± 69%), LFDC (-33 ± 72%), and follow-up (-41 ± 77%) values. HFDC also reduced diastolic blood pressure compared with values after LFDC (-6.7 ± 10.1 mmHg). Reductions in blood pressure and NT-proBNP after HFDC indicate decreased vascular resistance resulting in reduced left ventricular afterload. These effects warrant further investigation in patients with chronic HF.

  10. Molecular characterization of the 30-AA N-terminal mineral interaction domain of the biomineralization protein AP7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il Won; Morse, Daniel E; Evans, John Spencer

    2004-12-21

    The AP7 protein is one of several mollusk shell proteins which are responsible for aragonite polymorph formation and stabilization within the nacre layer of the Pacific red abalone, H. rufescens. Previously, we demonstrated that the 30-AA N-terminal domain of AP7, denoted as AP7-1, exists as an unfolded sequence and possesses the capability of inhibiting calcium carbonate crystal growth in vitro via growth step frustration or interruption. However, very little is known with regard to the interactive capabilities of this sequence with Ca(II) and with calcium carbonates. Using multidisciplinary techniques, we determine that the AP7-1 polypeptide interacts with Ca(II) ions at the -DD- sequence clusters, yet retains its unfolded, conformationally labile structure in the presence of Ca(II) ions. Further, NMR experiments reveal that the extended structured sequence blocks, -GNGM-, -SVRTQG-, and -ISYL, exhibit motional, chemical exchange, and/or backbone geometry perturbations in response to Ca(II) interactions with AP7-1. Solid-state NMR magic angle spinning studies verify that during the course of in vitro calcium carbonate crystal growth, AP7-1 becomes bound to calcite fragments and cannot be entirely displaced from the mineral fragments using competitive Ca(II) washing. Finally, using a scrambled sequence version of the AP7-1 polypeptide, we observe that sequence scrambling does not adversely affect the crystal growth inhibitory activity of AP7-1, suggesting that the amino acid composition of AP7-1 may be more critical to growth step inhibition than the linear ordering of amino acids.

  11. Substitutions of PrP N-terminal histidine residues modulate scrapie disease pathogenesis and incubation time in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenbrod, Sabina; Frick, Petra; Bertsch, Uwe; Mitteregger-Kretzschmar, Gerda; Mielke, Janina; Maringer, Marko; Piening, Niklas; Hepp, Alexander; Daude, Nathalie; Windl, Otto; Levin, Johannes; Giese, Armin; Sakthivelu, Vignesh; Tatzelt, Jörg; Kretzschmar, Hans; Westaway, David

    2017-01-01

    Prion diseases have been linked to impaired copper homeostasis and copper induced-oxidative damage to the brain. Divalent metal ions, such as Cu2+ and Zn2+, bind to cellular prion protein (PrPC) at octapeptide repeat (OR) and non-OR sites within the N-terminal half of the protein but information on the impact of such binding on conversion to the misfolded isoform often derives from studies using either OR and non-OR peptides or bacterially-expressed recombinant PrP. Here we created new transgenic mouse lines expressing PrP with disrupted copper binding sites within all four histidine-containing OR's (sites 1-4, H60G, H68G, H76G, H84G, "TetraH>G" allele) or at site 5 (composed of residues His-95 and His-110; "H95G" allele) and monitored the formation of misfolded PrP in vivo. Novel transgenic mice expressing PrP(TetraH>G) at levels comparable to wild-type (wt) controls were susceptible to mouse-adapted scrapie strain RML but showed significantly prolonged incubation times. In contrast, amino acid replacement at residue 95 accelerated disease progression in corresponding PrP(H95G) mice. Neuropathological lesions in terminally ill transgenic mice were similar to scrapie-infected wt controls, but less severe. The pattern of PrPSc deposition, however, was not synaptic as seen in wt animals, but instead dense globular plaque-like accumulations of PrPSc in TgPrP(TetraH>G) mice and diffuse PrPSc deposition in (TgPrP(H95G) mice), were observed throughout all brain sections. We conclude that OR and site 5 histidine substitutions have divergent phenotypic impacts and that cis interactions between the OR region and the site 5 region modulate pathogenic outcomes by affecting the PrP globular domain.

  12. Serum N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide level and its clinical implications in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Mei; Yang, Jiefu; Li, Yingying

    2009-12-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is increasingly being used for screening and monitoring of congestive heart failure. However, the role of BNP in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and normal left ventricular function has not been determined. This study investigates serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level and its clinical implications in patients with AF. Serum NT-proBNP levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and transthoracic echocardiography was performed in 136 subjects (90 cases with AF and 46 cases with sinus rhythm [SR]). Subjects were excluded if they had a history of myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy, rheumatic heart disease, or hyperthyroidism that preceded the onset of AF. Controls (n = 30) were from a healthy outpatient primary care population. Potential determinants of serum NT-proBNP levels were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Individuals with AF had higher serum NT-proBNP levels (689.56 +/- 251.87 fmol/ml) than those with SR (456.11 +/- 148.14 fmol/ml, P NT-proBNP levels (P > 0.05). The regression model of serum NT-proBNP levels and clinical predictors showed that presence of AF, older age, and larger right atrial diameter were independently predictive of higher serum NT-proBNP values. Patients with AF were associated with increased serum NT-proBNP levels. Examining the change of serum NT-proBNP levels is helpful to evaluate the cardiac function in patients with AF. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. N-Terminal Pro-B Type Natriuretic Peptide is Associated with Mild Cognitive Impairment in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Kaffer; Mahabadi, Amir Abbas; Weimar, Christian; Winkler, Angela; Neumann, Till; Kälsch, Hagen; Dragano, Nico; Moebus, Susanne; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Jokisch, Martha

    2017-01-01

    N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a marker of cardiac stress and is linked with silent cardiac diseases. While associations of cognitive impairment with manifest cardiovascular diseases are established, data on whether subclinical elevation of NT-proBNP levels below clinically established threshold of heart failure is related with cognitive functioning, especially mild cognitive impairment (MCI), is rare. Aim of the present study was to investigate the cross-sectional association of NT-proBNP levels and MCI in a population-based study sample without heart failure. We used data from the second examination of the population based Heinz-Nixdorf-Recall-Study. Subjects with overt coronary heart disease and subjects with NT-proBNP levels indicating potential heart failure (NT-proBNP≥300 pg/ml) were excluded from this analysis. Participants performed a validated brief cognitive assessment and were classified either as MCI [subtypes: amnestic-MCI (aMCI), non-amnestic-MCI (naMCI)], or cognitively-normal. We included 419 participants with MCI (63.1±7.4 y; 47% men; aMCI n = 209; naMCI n = 210) and 1,206 cognitively normal participants (62.42±7.1 y; 48% men). NT-proBNP-levels≥125 pg/ml compared to heart failure, higher NT-proBNPlevels are associated with MCI and both MCI subtypes independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and sociodemographic parameters.

  14. The N-terminal neurotensin fragment, NT1-11, inhibits cortisol secretion by human adrenocortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Flavie; Contesse, Vincent; Lefebvre, Hervé; Ait-Ali, Djida; Gras, Marjorie; Cartier, Dorthe; Decker, Annick; Chartrel, Nicolas; Anouar, Youssef; Vaudry, Hubert; Delarue, Catherine

    2006-08-01

    Neurotensin (NT) modulates corticosteroid secretion from the mammalian adrenal gland. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible involvement of NT in the control of cortisol secretion in the human adrenal gland. In vitro studies were conducted on cultured human adrenocortical cells. This study was conducted in a university research laboratory. Adrenal explants from patients undergoing expanded nephrectomy for kidney cancer were studied. Cortisol secretion from cultured adrenocortical cells was measured. NT1-11, the N-terminal fragment of NT, dose-dependently inhibited basal and ACTH-stimulated cortisol production by human adrenocortical cells in primary culture. In contrast, NT had no influence on cortisol output at concentrations up to 10(-6) m. HPLC and RT-PCR analyses failed to detect any significant amounts of NT and NT mRNA, respectively, in adrenal extracts. Molecular and pharmacological studies were performed to determine the type of NT receptor involved in the corticostatic effect of NT1-11. RT-PCR analysis revealed the expression of NT receptor type (NTR) 3 mRNA but not NTR1 and NTR2 mRNAs in the human adrenal tissue. However, the pharmacological profile of the adrenal NT1-11 receptor was different from that of NTR3, indicating that this receptor type is not involved in the action of NT1-11 on corticosteroidogenesis. Our results indicate that NT1-11 may act as an endocrine factor to inhibit cortisol secretion through activation of a receptor distinct from the classical NTR1, NTR2, and NTR3.

  15. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karaca

    Full Text Available Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  16. Type I Collagen Synthesis Marker Procollagen I N-Terminal Peptide (PINP) in Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Intermittent Androgen Suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard.hamilton@toc.lbg.ac.at; Olszewski-Hamilton, Ulrike [Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster of Translational of Oncology, Nussdorfer Strasse 64, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Theyer, Gerhard [Hospital Kittsee, Kittsee A-2421, Burgenland (Austria)

    2011-09-15

    Intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) therapy for prostate cancer patients attempts to maintain the hormone dependence of the tumor cells by cycles alternating between androgen suppression (AS) and treatment cessation till a certain prostate-specific antigen (PSA) threshold is reached. Side effects are expected to be reduced, compared to standard continuous androgen suppression (CAS) therapy. The present study examined the effect of IAS on bone metabolism by determinations of serum procollagen I N-terminal peptide (PINP), a biochemical marker of collagen synthesis. A total of 105 treatment cycles of 58 patients with prostate cancer stages ≥pT2 was studied assessing testosterone, PSA and PINP levels at monthly intervals. During phases of AS lasting for up to nine months PSA levels were reversibly reduced, indicating apoptotic regression of the prostatic tumors. Within the first cycle PINP increased at the end of the AS period and peaked in the treatment cessation phase. During the following two cycles a similar pattern was observed for PINP, except a break in collagen synthesis as indicated by low PINP levels in the first months off treatment. Therefore, measurements of the serum PINP concentration indicated increased bone matrix synthesis in response to >6 months of AS, which uninterruptedly continued into the first treatment cessation phase, with a break into each of the following two pauses. In summary, synthesis of bone matrix collagen increases while degradation decreases during off-treatment phases in patients undergoing IAS. Although a direct relationship between bone matrix turnover and risk of fractures is difficult to establish, IAS for treatment of biochemical progression of prostate tumors is expected to reduce osteoporosis in elderly men often at high risk for bone fractures representing a highly suitable patient population for this kind of therapy.

  17. Microtubule association of EML proteins and the EML4-ALK variant 3 oncoprotein require an N-terminal trimerization domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark W; O'Regan, Laura; Roth, Daniel; Montgomery, Jessica M; Straube, Anne; Fry, Andrew M; Bayliss, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Proteins of the echinoderm microtubule (MT)-associated protein (EMAP)-like (EML) family contribute to formation of the mitotic spindle and interphase MT network. EML1-4 consist of Trp-Asp 40 (WD40) repeats and an N-terminal region containing a putative coiled-coil. Recurrent gene rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) fuse EML4 to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) causing expression of several oncogenic fusion variants. The fusions have constitutive ALK activity due to self-association through the EML4 coiled-coil. We have determined crystal structures of the coiled-coils from EML2 and EML4, which describe the structural basis of both EML self-association and oncogenic EML4-ALK activation. The structures reveal a trimeric oligomerization state directed by a conserved pattern of hydrophobic residues and salt bridges. We show that the trimerization domain (TD) of EML1 is necessary and sufficient for self-association. The TD is also essential for MT binding; however, this property requires an adjacent basic region. These observations prompted us to investigate MT association of EML4-ALK and EML1-ABL1 (Abelson 1) fusions in which variable portions of the EML component are present. Uniquely, EML4-ALK variant 3, which includes the TD and basic region of EML4 but none of the WD40 repeats, was localized to MTs, both when expressed recombinantly and when expressed in a patient-derived NSCLC cell line (H2228). This raises the question of whether the mislocalization of ALK activity to MTs might influence downstream signalling and malignant properties of cells. Furthermore, the structure of EML4 TD may enable the development of protein-protein interaction inhibitors targeting the trimerization interface, providing a possible avenue towards therapeutic intervention in EML4-ALK NSCLC.

  18. Predictive value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in severe sepsis and septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varpula, Marjut; Pulkki, Kari; Karlsson, Sari; Ruokonen, Esko; Pettilä, Ville

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) on mortality in a large, unselected patient population with severe sepsis and septic shock. Prospective observational cohort study about incidence and prognosis of sepsis in 24 intensive care units in Finland (the FINNSEPSIS study). A total of 254 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. After informed consent, the blood tests for NT-proBNP analyses were drawn on the day of admission and 72 hrs thereafter. Patients' demographic data were collected, and intensive care unit and hospital mortality and basic hemodynamic and laboratory data were recorded daily. NT-proBNP levels at admission were significantly higher in hospital nonsurvivors (median, 7908 pg/mL) compared with survivors (median, 3479 pg/mL; p = .002), and the difference remained after 72 hrs (p = .002). The receiver operating characteristic curves of admission and 72-hr NT-proBNP levels for hospital mortality resulted in area under the curve values of 0.631 (95% confidence interval, 0.549-0.712; p = .002) and 0.648 (95% confidence interval, 0.554-0.741; p = .002), respectively. In logistic regression analyses, NT-proBNP values at 72 hrs after inclusion and Simplified Acute Physiology Score for the first 24 hrs were independent predictors of hospital mortality. Pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (p < .001), plasma creatinine clearance (p = .001), platelet count (p = .03), and positive blood culture (p = .04) had an independent effect on first-day NT-proBNP values, whereas after 72 hrs, only plasma creatinine clearance (p < .001) was significant in linear regression analysis. NT-proBNP values are frequently increased in severe sepsis and septic shock. Values are significantly higher in nonsurvivors than survivors. NT-proBNP on day 3 in the intensive care unit is an independent prognostic marker of mortality in severe sepsis.

  19. Association of menopause age and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebong, Imo A; Watson, Karol E; Goff, David C; Bluemke, David A; Srikanthan, Preethi; Horwich, Tamara; Bertoni, Alain G

    2015-05-01

    Menopause age can affect the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations of early menopause (menopause occurring before age 45 y) and menopause age with N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), a potential risk marker of CVD and heart failure. Our cross-sectional study included 2,275 postmenopausal women, aged 45 to 85 years and without clinical CVD (2000-2002), from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Participants were classified as having or not having early menopause. NT-proBNP was log-transformed. Multivariable linear regression was used for analysis. Five hundred sixty-one women had early menopause. The median (25th-75th percentiles) NT-proBNP value was 79.0 (41.1-151.6) pg/mL for all participants, 83.4 (41.4-164.9) pg/mL for women with early menopause, and 78.0 (40.8-148.3) pg/mL for women without early menopause. The mean (SD) age was 65 (10.1) and 65 (8.9) years for women with and without early menopause, respectively. No significant interactions between menopause age and ethnicity were observed. In multivariable analysis, early menopause was associated with a 10.7% increase in NT-proBNP levels, whereas each 1-year increase in menopause age was associated with a 0.7% decrease in NT-proBNP levels. Early menopause is associated with greater NT-proBNP levels, whereas each 1-year increase in menopause age is associated with lower NT-proBNP levels, in postmenopausal women.

  20. The Tobacco Smoke Component, Acrolein, Suppresses Innate Macrophage Responses by Direct Alkylation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, Milena; Spiess, Page C.; Kasahara, David I.; Randall, Matthew J.; Deng, Bin

    2012-01-01

    The respiratory innate immune system is often compromised by tobacco smoke exposure, and previous studies have indicated that acrolein, a reactive electrophile in tobacco smoke, may contribute to the immunosuppressive effects of smoking. Exposure of mice to acrolein at concentrations similar to those in cigarette smoke (5 ppm, 4 h) significantly suppressed alveolar macrophage responses to bacterial LPS, indicated by reduced induction of nitric oxide synthase 2, TNF-α, and IL-12p40. Mechanistic studies with bone marrow–derived macrophages or MH-S macrophages demonstrated that acrolein (1–30 μM) attenuated these LPS-mediated innate responses in association with depletion of cellular glutathione, although glutathione depletion itself was not fully responsible for these immunosuppressive effects. Inhibitory actions of acrolein were most prominent after acute exposure (acrolein with critical signaling pathways. Among the key signaling pathways involved in innate macrophage responses, acrolein marginally affected LPS-mediated activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and significantly suppressed phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and activation of c-Jun. Using biotin hydrazide labeling, NF-κB RelA and p50, as well as JNK2, a critical mediator of innate macrophage responses, were revealed as direct targets for alkylation by acrolein. Mass spectrometry analysis of acrolein-modified recombinant JNK2 indicated adduction to Cys41 and Cys177, putative important sites involved in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) binding and JNK2 phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that direct alkylation of JNK2 by electrophiles, such as acrolein, may be a prominent and hitherto unrecognized mechanism in their immunosuppressive effects, and may be a major factor in smoking-induced effects on the immune system. PMID:21778411

  1. Beneficial effects of a N-terminally modified GIP agonist on tissue-level bone material properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabilleau, Guillaume; Mieczkowska, Aleksandra; Irwin, Nigel; Simon, Yannick; Audran, Maurice; Flatt, Peter R; Chappard, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Bone remodeling is under complex regulation from nervous, hormonal and local signals, including gut hormones. Among the gut hormones, a role for the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) has been suggested. However, the rapid degradation of GIP in the bloodstream by the ubiquitous enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) precludes therapeutic use. To circumvent this problem, a series of N-terminally modified GIP agonists have been developed, with N-AcGIP being the most promising. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of N-AcGIP on bone at the micro-level using trabecular and cortical microstructural morphology, and at the tissue-level in rats. Copenhagen rats were randomly assigned into control or N-AcGIP-treated groups and received daily injection for 4 weeks. Bone microstructural morphology was assessed by microCT and dynamic histomorphometry and tissue-level properties by nanoindentation, qBEI and infra-red microscopy. Four week treatment with N-AcGIP did not alter trabecular or cortical microstructural morphology. In addition, no significant modifications of mechanical response and properties at the tissue-level were observed in trabecular bone. However, significant augmentations in maximum load (12%), hardness (14%), indentation modulus (13%) and dissipated energy (16%) were demonstrated in cortical bone. These beneficial modifications of mechanical properties at the tissue-level were associated with increased mineralization (22%) and collagen maturity (13%) of the bone matrix. Taken together, the results support a beneficial role of GIP, and particularly stable analogs such as N-AcGIP, on tissue material properties of bone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ribonucleocapsid Formation of SARS-COV Through Molecular Action of the N-Terminal Domain of N Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikatendu, K.S.; Joseph, J.S.; Subramanian, V.; Neuman, B.W.; Buchmeier, M.J.; Stevens, R.C.; Kuhn, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-12

    Conserved amongst all coronaviruses are four structural proteins, the matrix (M), small envelope (E) and spike (S) that are embedded in the viral membrane and the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (N), which exists in a ribonucleoprotein complex in their lumen. The N terminal domain of coronaviral N proteins (N-NTD) provides a scaffold for RNA binding while the C-terminal domain (N-CTD) mainly acts as oligomerization modules during assembly. The C-terminus of N protein anchors it to the viral membrane by associating with M protein. We characterized the structures of N-NTD from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in two crystal forms, at 1.17A (monoclinic) and 1.85 A (cubic) respectively, solved by molecular replacement using the homologous avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) structure. Flexible loops in the solution structure of SARS-CoV N-NTD are now shown to be well ordered around the beta-sheet core. The functionally important positively charged beta-hairpin protrudes out of the core and is oriented similar to that in the IBV N-NTD and is involved in crystal packing in the monoclinic form. In the cubic form, the monomers form trimeric units that stack in a helical array. Comparison of crystal packing of SARS-CoV and IBV N-NTDs suggest a common mode of RNA recognition, but probably associate differently in vivo during the formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex. Electrostatic potential distribution on the surface of homology models of related coronaviral N-NTDs hints that they employ different modes of both RNA recognition as well as oligomeric assembly, perhaps explaining why their nucleocapsids have different morphologies.

  3. C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 2 Promotes Liver Injury via the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition after Hemorrhage and Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Czerny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic shock leads to hepatic hypoperfusion and activation of mitogen-activated stress kinases (MAPK like c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK 1 and 2. Our aim was to determine whether mitochondrial dysfunction leading to hepatic necrosis and apoptosis after hemorrhage/resuscitation (H/R was dependent on JNK2. Under pentobarbital anesthesia, wildtype (WT and JNK2 deficient (KO mice were hemorrhaged to 30 mm Hg for 3 h and then resuscitated with shed blood plus half the volume of lactated Ringer’s solution. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT, necrosis, apoptosis and oxidative stress were assessed 6 h after resuscitation. Mitochondrial polarization was assessed by intravital microscopy. After H/R, ALT in WT-mice increased from 130 U/L to 4800 U/L. In KO-mice, ALT after H/R was blunted to 1800 U/l (P<0.05. Necrosis, caspase-3 activity and ROS were all substantially decreased in KO compared to WT mice after H/R. After sham operation, intravital microscopy revealed punctate mitochondrial staining by rhodamine 123 (Rh123, indicating normal mitochondrial polarization. At 4 h after H/R, Rh123 staining became dim and diffuse in 58% of hepatocytes, indicating depolarization and onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT. By contrast, KO mice displayed less depolarization after H/R (23%, P<0.05. In conclusion, JNK2 contributes to MPT-mediated liver injury after H/R.

  4. Hunting Motifs in Situla Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Preložnik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Situla art developed as an echo of the toreutic style which had spread from the Near East through the Phoenicians, Greeks and Etruscans as far as the Veneti, Raeti, Histri, and their eastern neighbours in the region of Dolenjska (Lower Carniola. An Early Iron Age phenomenon (c. 600—300 BC, it rep- resents the major and most arresting form of the contemporary visual arts in an area stretching from the foot of the Apennines in the south to the Drava and Sava rivers in the east. Indeed, individual pieces have found their way across the Alpine passes and all the way north to the Danube. In the world and art of the situlae, a prominent role is accorded to ani- mals. They are displayed in numerous representations of human activities on artefacts crafted in the classic situla style – that is, between the late 6th  and early 5th centuries BC – as passive participants (e.g. in pageants or in harness or as an active element of the situla narrative. The most typical example of the latter is the hunting scene. Today we know at least four objects decorat- ed exclusively with hunting themes, and a number of situlae and other larger vessels where hunting scenes are embedded in composite narratives. All this suggests a popularity unparallelled by any other genre. Clearly recognisable are various hunting techniques and weapons, each associated with a particu- lar type of game (Fig. 1. The chase of a stag with javelin, horse and hound is depicted on the long- familiar and repeatedly published fibula of Zagorje (Fig. 2. It displays a hound mauling the stag’s back and a hunter on horseback pursuing a hind, her neck already pierced by the javelin. To judge by the (so far unnoticed shaft end un- der the stag’s muzzle, the hunter would have been brandishing a second jave- lin as well, like the warrior of the Vače fibula or the rider of the Nesactium situla, presumably himself a hunter. Many parallels to his motif are known from Greece, Etruria, and

  5. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Funk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary

  6. Parallel motif extraction from very long sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Sahli, Majed; Mansour, Essam; Kalnis, Panos

    2013-01-01

    Motifs are frequent patterns used to identify biological functionality in genomic sequences, periodicity in time series, or user trends in web logs. In contrast to a lot of existing work that focuses on collections of many short sequences, modern

  7. Deciphering functional glycosaminoglycan motifs in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Robert A; Bülow, Hannes E

    2018-03-23

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as heparan sulfate, chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, and keratan sulfate are linear glycans, which when attached to protein backbones form proteoglycans. GAGs are essential components of the extracellular space in metazoans. Extensive modifications of the glycans such as sulfation, deacetylation and epimerization create structural GAG motifs. These motifs regulate protein-protein interactions and are thereby repsonsible for many of the essential functions of GAGs. This review focusses on recent genetic approaches to characterize GAG motifs and their function in defined signaling pathways during development. We discuss a coding approach for GAGs that would enable computational analyses of GAG sequences such as alignments and the computation of position weight matrices to describe GAG motifs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bayesian centroid estimation for motif discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Biological sequences may contain patterns that signal important biomolecular functions; a classical example is regulation of gene expression by transcription factors that bind to specific patterns in genomic promoter regions. In motif discovery we are given a set of sequences that share a common motif and aim to identify not only the motif composition, but also the binding sites in each sequence of the set. We propose a new centroid estimator that arises from a refined and meaningful loss function for binding site inference. We discuss the main advantages of centroid estimation for motif discovery, including computational convenience, and how its principled derivation offers further insights about the posterior distribution of binding site configurations. We also illustrate, using simulated and real datasets, that the centroid estimator can differ from the traditional maximum a posteriori or maximum likelihood estimators.

  9. Bayesian centroid estimation for motif discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carvalho

    Full Text Available Biological sequences may contain patterns that signal important biomolecular functions; a classical example is regulation of gene expression by transcription factors that bind to specific patterns in genomic promoter regions. In motif discovery we are given a set of sequences that share a common motif and aim to identify not only the motif composition, but also the binding sites in each sequence of the set. We propose a new centroid estimator that arises from a refined and meaningful loss function for binding site inference. We discuss the main advantages of centroid estimation for motif discovery, including computational convenience, and how its principled derivation offers further insights about the posterior distribution of binding site configurations. We also illustrate, using simulated and real datasets, that the centroid estimator can differ from the traditional maximum a posteriori or maximum likelihood estimators.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a 40 kDa N-terminal fragment of the yeast prion-remodeling factor Hsp104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sukyeong; Tsai, Francis T. F., E-mail: ftsai@bcm.tmc.edu [Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2007-09-01

    An N-terminal fragment of S. cerevisiae Hsp104 has been crystallized. This is the first report of the crystallization of a eukaryotic member of the Hsp100 family of molecular chaperones. A 40 kDa N-terminal fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp104 was crystallized in two different crystal forms. Native 1 diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, b = 75.8, c = 235.7 Å. Native 2 diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 179.1, b = 179.1, c = 69.7 Å. This is the first report of the crystallization of a eukaryotic member of the Hsp100 family of molecular chaperones.

  11. Features of the Env leader protein and the N-terminal Gag domain of feline foamy virus important for virus morphogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiselhart, Verena; Schwantes, Astrid; Bastone, Patrizia; Frech, Matthias; Loechelt, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that foamy virus (FV) particle budding, especially the involvement of the viral Env glycoprotein, is different from that of other (ortho) retroviruses: the N-terminal Env leader protein Elp is a constituent of released FV particles. A defined sequence in Elp required for particle budding binds to the MA domain of Gag. To extend these findings, we show that feline FV Elp is a membrane-anchored protein with the N-terminus located inside the particle. Thus, the internal/cytoplasmic domain of Elp has the correct topology for interacting with Gag during budding. In addition to Elp, an Elp-related protein of about 9 kDa was shown to be virion associated and is probably generated by cellular signal peptidases. Besides the function of Elp binding, the N-terminal domain of Gag was shown to be required for proper localization of feline FV Gag to the cytoplasm and the perinuclear/nuclear region

  12. The N-terminal domain of Slack determines the formation and trafficking of Slick/Slack heteromeric sodium-activated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haijun; Kronengold, Jack; Yan, Yangyang; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Brown, Maile R; Ma, Liqun; Ferreira, Gonzalo; Yang, Youshan; Bhattacharjee, Arin; Sigworth, Fred J; Salkoff, Larry; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2009-04-29

    Potassium channels activated by intracellular Na(+) ions (K(Na)) play several distinct roles in regulating the firing patterns of neurons, and, at the single channel level, their properties are quite diverse. Two known genes, Slick and Slack, encode K(Na) channels. We have now found that Slick and Slack subunits coassemble to form heteromeric channels that differ from the homomers in their unitary conductance, kinetic behavior, subcellular localization, and response to activation of protein kinase C. Heteromer formation requires the N-terminal domain of Slack-B, one of the alternative splice variants of the Slack channel. This cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of Slack-B also facilitates the localization of heteromeric K(Na) channels to the plasma membrane. Immunocytochemical studies indicate that Slick and Slack-B subunits are coexpressed in many central neurons. Our findings provide a molecular explanation for some of the diversity in reported properties of neuronal K(Na) channels.

  13. Phosphorylation of purified mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 modifies channel voltage-dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Gupta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC phosphorylated by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 (JNK3 was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single-channel electrophysiological properties of the native and the phosphorylated VDAC were compared. The open probability versus voltage curve of the native VDAC displayed symmetry around the voltage axis, whereas that of the phosphorylated VDAC showed asymmetry. This result indicates that phosphorylation by JNK3 modifies voltage-dependence of VDAC.

  14. An N-terminal peptide extension results in efficient expression, but not secretion, of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase gene in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Mihaly; Burbridge, Emma; Brock, Ian W; Heggie, Laura; Dix, Philip J; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2004-03-01

    Native horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase, HRP (EC 1.11.1.7), isoenzyme C is synthesized with N-terminal and C-terminal peptide extensions, believed to be associated with protein targeting. This study aimed to explore the specific functions of these extensions, and to generate transgenic plants with expression patterns suitable for exploring the role of peroxidase in plant development and defence. Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants expressing different versions of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase, HRP, isoenzyme C gene were constructed. The gene was engineered to include additional sequences coding for either the natural N-terminal or the C-terminal extension or both. These constructs were placed under the control of a constitutive promoter (CaMV-35S) or the tobacco RUBISCO-SSU light inducible promoter (SSU) and introduced into tobacco using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. To study the effects of the N- and C-terminal extensions, the localization of recombinant peroxidase was determined using biochemical and molecular techniques. Transgenic tobacco plants can exhibit a ten-fold increase in peroxidase activity compared with wild-type tobacco levels, and the majority of this activity is located in the symplast. The N-terminal extension is essential for the production of high levels of recombinant protein, while the C-terminal extension has little effect. Differences in levels of enzyme activity and recombinant protein are reflected in transcript levels. There is no evidence to support either preferential secretion or vacuolar targeting of recombinant peroxidase in this heterologous expression system. This leads us to question the postulated targeting roles of these peptide extensions. The N-terminal extension is essential for high level expression and appears to influence transcript stability or translational efficiency. Plants have been generated with greatly elevated cytosolic peroxidase activity, and smaller increases in apoplastic

  15. The Use of N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide to Evaluate Vascular Disease in Elderly Patients with Mental Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Karin; Gustafson, Lars; Hultberg, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Background: Serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is regarded as a sensitive marker of cardiovascular disease. Vascular disease plays an important role in cognitive impairment. Method: In 447 elderly patients with mental illness, serum NT-proBNP level and the presence or absence of vascular disease according to the medical record were used to categorize patients in different subgroups of vascular disease. Results and Conclusion: Patients with vascular disease and elevated...

  16. Peptides derived from human galectin-3 N-terminal tail interact with its carbohydrate recognition domain in a phosphorylation-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berbís, M. Álvaro [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); André, Sabine [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany); Cañada, F. Javier [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pipkorn, Rüdiger [Central Peptide Synthesis Unit, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ippel, Hans [Department of Biochemistry, CARIM, University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Mayo, Kevin H. [Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kübler, Dieter [Biomolecular Interactions, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gabius, Hans-Joachim [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany); Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús, E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Galectin-3 is composed of a carbohydrate recognition domain and an N-terminal tail. •Synthetic peptides derived from the tail are shown to interact with the CRD. •This interaction is modulated by Ser- and Tyr-phosphorylation of the peptides. -- Abstract: Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a multi-functional effector protein that functions in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, as well as extracellularly following non-classical secretion. Structurally, Gal-3 is unique among galectins with its carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) attached to a rather long N-terminal tail composed mostly of collagen-like repeats (nine in the human protein) and terminating in a short non-collagenous terminal peptide sequence unique in this lectin family and not yet fully explored. Although several Ser and Tyr sites within the N-terminal tail can be phosphorylated, the physiological significance of this post-translational modification remains unclear. Here, we used a series of synthetic (phospho)peptides derived from the tail to assess phosphorylation-mediated interactions with {sup 15}N-labeled Gal-3 CRD. HSQC-derived chemical shift perturbations revealed selective interactions at the backface of the CRD that were attenuated by phosphorylation of Tyr 107 and Tyr 118, while phosphorylation of Ser 6 and Ser 12 was essential. Controls with sequence scrambling underscored inherent specificity. Our studies shed light on how phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail may impact on Gal-3 function and prompt further studies using phosphorylated full-length protein.

  17. Peptides derived from human galectin-3 N-terminal tail interact with its carbohydrate recognition domain in a phosphorylation-dependent manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berbís, M. Álvaro; André, Sabine; Cañada, F. Javier; Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Ippel, Hans; Mayo, Kevin H.; Kübler, Dieter; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Galectin-3 is composed of a carbohydrate recognition domain and an N-terminal tail. •Synthetic peptides derived from the tail are shown to interact with the CRD. •This interaction is modulated by Ser- and Tyr-phosphorylation of the peptides. -- Abstract: Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a multi-functional effector protein that functions in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, as well as extracellularly following non-classical secretion. Structurally, Gal-3 is unique among galectins with its carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) attached to a rather long N-terminal tail composed mostly of collagen-like repeats (nine in the human protein) and terminating in a short non-collagenous terminal peptide sequence unique in this lectin family and not yet fully explored. Although several Ser and Tyr sites within the N-terminal tail can be phosphorylated, the physiological significance of this post-translational modification remains unclear. Here, we used a series of synthetic (phospho)peptides derived from the tail to assess phosphorylation-mediated interactions with 15 N-labeled Gal-3 CRD. HSQC-derived chemical shift perturbations revealed selective interactions at the backface of the CRD that were attenuated by phosphorylation of Tyr 107 and Tyr 118, while phosphorylation of Ser 6 and Ser 12 was essential. Controls with sequence scrambling underscored inherent specificity. Our studies shed light on how phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail may impact on Gal-3 function and prompt further studies using phosphorylated full-length protein

  18. Characterization, cell-surface expression and ligand-binding properties of different truncated N-terminal extracellular domains of the ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlhinney, R A; Molnár, E

    1996-04-01

    To identify the location of the first transmembrane segment of the GluR1 glutamate receptor subunit artificial stop codons have been introduced into the N-terminal domain at amino acid positions 442, 510, and 563, namely just before and spanning the proposed first two transmembrane regions. The resultant truncated N-terminal fragments of GluR1, termed NT1, NT2, and NT3 respectively were expressed in Cos-7 cells and their cellular distribution and cell-surface expression analysed using an N-terminal antibody to GluR1. All of the fragments were fully glycosylated and were found to be associated with cell membranes but none was secreted. Differential extraction of the cell membranes indicated that both NT1 and NT2 behave as peripheral membrane proteins. In contrast NT3, like the full subunit, has integral membrane protein properties. Furthermore only NT3 is expressed at the cell surface as determined by immunofluorescence and cell-surface biotinylation. Protease protection assays indicated that only NT3 had a cytoplasmic tail. Binding studies using the selective ligand [(3)H]alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate ([(3)H]AMPA) demonstrated that NT3 does not bind ligand. Together these results indicate that the first transmembrane domain of the GluR1 subunit lies between residues 509 and 562, that the N-terminal domain alone cannot form a functional ligand-binding site and that this domain can be targeted to the cell surface provided that it has a transmembrane-spanning region.

  19. Mortality and preoperative cardiac function in vascular amputees: an N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Riemersma, Marcel; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk Jan; Muskiet, Frits A. J.; van den Dungen, Jan A. M. M.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine preoperative ventricular function in vascular amputees by measuring N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and to analyse the relationship between NT-proBNP levels and 30-day postoperative mortality. Design: Prospective pilot study. Subjects and methods: In 19 patients planned for a lower limb amputation for nonreconstructable peripheral arterial disease NT-proBNP was measured the day before amputation. Results: Four amputees died within 30 days after the...

  20. Prognostic value of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing left main percutaneous coronary intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Jaberg, L; Toggweiler, S; Puck, M; Frank, M; Rufibach, K; Lüscher, T F; Corti, R

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing acute left main (LM) coronary artery revascularization have a high mortality and natriuretic peptides such as N-terminal pro-B-type (NT-proBNP) have been shown to have prognostic value in patients with acute coronary syndromes. The present study looked at the prognostic value of NT-proBNP in these patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied all consecutive patients undergoing acute LM coronary artery percutaneous coronary intervention between January 2005 and Dec...

  1. Analysis of the Varicella-Zoster Virus IE62 N-Terminal Acidic Transactivating Domain and Its Interaction with the Human Mediator Complex▿

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Shinobu; Eletsky, Alexander; Szyperski, Thomas; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T.

    2009-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus major transactivator, IE62, contains a potent N-terminal acidic transcriptional activation domain (TAD). Our experiments revealed that the minimal IE62 TAD encompasses amino acids (aa) 19 to 67. We showed that the minimal TAD interacts with the human Mediator complex. Site-specific mutations revealed residues throughout the minimal TAD that are important for both activation and Mediator interaction. The TAD interacts directly with aa 402 to 590 of the MED25 subunit,...

  2. Passive immunization targeting the N-terminal projection domain of tau decreases tau pathology and improves cognition in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease and tauopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chun-ling; Chen, Xia; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain is a histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and a family of related neurodegenerative disorders collectively called tauopathies. At present there is no effective treatment available for these progressive neurodegenerative diseases which are clinically characterized by dementia in mid to old-age. Here we report the treatment of 14-17-months-old 3xTg-AD mice with tau antibodies 43D (tau 6-18) and 77E9 (tau 184-195) to the N-terminal projection domain of tau or mouse IgG as a control by intraperitoneal injection once a week for 4 weeks, and the effects of the passive immunization on reduction of hyperphosphorylated tau, Aβ accumulation and cognitive performance in these animals. We found that treatment with tau antibodies 43D and 77E9 reduced total tau level, decreased tau hyperphosphorylated at Ser199, Ser202/Thr205 (AT8), Thr205, Ser262/356 (12E8), and Ser396/404 (PHF-1) sites, and a trend to reduce Aβ pathology. Most importantly, targeting N-terminal tau especially by 43D (tau 6-18) improved reference memory in the Morris water maze task in 3xTg-AD mice. We did not observe any abnormality in general physical characteristics of the treated animals with either of the two antibodies during the course of this study. Taken together, our studies demonstrate for the first time (1) that passive immunization targeting normal tau can effectively clear the hyperphosphorylated protein and possibly reduce Aβ pathology from the brain and (2) that targeting N-terminal projection domain of tau containing amino acid 6-18 is especially beneficial. Thus, targeting selective epitopes of N-terminal domain of tau may present a novel effective therapeutic opportunity for Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies.

  3. Phosphorylation of purified mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 modifies channel voltage-dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajeev; Ghosh, Subhendu

    2017-06-01

    Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC) phosphorylated by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 (JNK3) was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single-channel electrophysiological properties of the native and the phosphorylated VDAC were compared. The open probability versus voltage curve of the native VDAC displayed symmetry around the voltage axis, whereas that of the phosphorylated VDAC showed asymmetry. This result indicates that phosphorylation by JNK3 modifies voltage-dependence of VDAC.

  4. Identification of the Raptor-binding motif on Arabidopsis S6 kinase and its use as a TOR signaling suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Cheon, Choong-Ill, E-mail: ccheon@sookmyung.ac.kr

    2016-03-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signaling plays central role as a regulator of growth and proliferation in all eukaryotic cells and its key signaling components and effectors are also conserved in plants. Unlike the mammalian and yeast counterparts, however, we found through yeast two-hybrid analysis that multiple regions of the Arabidopsis Raptor (regulatory associated protein of TOR) are required for binding to its substrate. We also identified that a 44-amino acid region at the N-terminal end of Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) specifically interacted with AtRaptor1, indicating that this region may contain a functional equivalent of the TOS (TOR-Signaling) motif present in the mammalian TOR substrates. Transient over-expression of this 44-amino acid fragment in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in significant decrease in rDNA transcription, demonstrating a feasibility of developing a new plant-specific TOR signaling inhibitor based upon perturbation of the Raptor-substrate interaction. - Highlights: • Multiple regions on the Arabidopsis Raptor protein were found to be involved in substrate binding. • N-terminal end of the Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) was responsible for interacting with AtRaptor1. • The Raptor-interacting fragment of AtS6K1 could be utilized as an effective inhibitor of plant TOR signaling.

  5. Identification of the Raptor-binding motif on Arabidopsis S6 kinase and its use as a TOR signaling suppressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2016-01-01

    TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signaling plays central role as a regulator of growth and proliferation in all eukaryotic cells and its key signaling components and effectors are also conserved in plants. Unlike the mammalian and yeast counterparts, however, we found through yeast two-hybrid analysis that multiple regions of the Arabidopsis Raptor (regulatory associated protein of TOR) are required for binding to its substrate. We also identified that a 44-amino acid region at the N-terminal end of Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) specifically interacted with AtRaptor1, indicating that this region may contain a functional equivalent of the TOS (TOR-Signaling) motif present in the mammalian TOR substrates. Transient over-expression of this 44-amino acid fragment in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in significant decrease in rDNA transcription, demonstrating a feasibility of developing a new plant-specific TOR signaling inhibitor based upon perturbation of the Raptor-substrate interaction. - Highlights: • Multiple regions on the Arabidopsis Raptor protein were found to be involved in substrate binding. • N-terminal end of the Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) was responsible for interacting with AtRaptor1. • The Raptor-interacting fragment of AtS6K1 could be utilized as an effective inhibitor of plant TOR signaling.

  6. Annexin A1 N-terminal derived peptide Ac2-26 stimulates fibroblast migration in high glucose conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Bizzarro

    Full Text Available Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we have evaluated whether Annexin A1 derived peptide Ac2-26 stimulates fibroblast migration in high glucose conditions. Using normal human skin fibroblasts WS1 in low glucose (LG or high glucose (HG we observed the enrichment of Annexin A1 protein at cell movement structures like lamellipodial extrusions and interestingly, a significant decrease in levels of the protein in HG conditions. The analysis of the translocation of Annexin A1 to cell membrane showed lower levels of Annexin A1 in both membrane pool and supernatants of WS1 cells treated with HG. Wound-healing assays using cell line transfected with Annexin A1 siRNAs indicated a slowing down in migration speed of cells suggesting that Annexin A1 has a role in the migration of WS1 cells. In order to analyze the role of extracellular Annexin A1 in cell migration, we have performed wound-healing assays using Ac2-26 showing that peptide was able to increase fibroblast cell migration in HG conditions. Experiments on the mobilization of intracellular calcium and analysis of p-ERK expression confirmed the activity of the FPR1 following stimulation with the peptide Ac2-26. A wound-healing assay on WS1 cells in the presence of the FPR agonist fMLP, of the FPR antagonist CsH and in the presence of Ac2-26 indicated that Annexin A1 influences fibroblast cell migration under HG conditions acting through FPR receptors whose expression was slightly increased in HG. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that (i Annexin A1 is involved in migration of WS1 cells, through interaction with FPRs; (ii N- terminal peptide of Annexin A1 Ac2-26 is able to stimulate direct migration of WS1 cells in high glucose treatment possibly due to the increased receptor expression observed in hyperglycemia conditions.

  7. Association between N-terminal proB-type Natriuretic Peptide and Depressive Symptoms in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ren; Jiao Jia; Jian Sa; Li-Xia Qiu; Yue-Hua Cui; Yue-An Zhang; Hong Yang

    2017-01-01

    Background:While depression and certain cardiac biomarkers are associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI),the relationship between them remains largely unexplored.We examined the association between depressive symptoms and biomarkers in patients with AMI.Methods:We performed a cross-sectional study using data from 103 patients with AMI between March 2013 and September 2014.The levels of depression,N-terminal proB-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP),and troponin I (TnI) were measured at baseline.The patients were divided into two groups:those with depressive symptoms and those without depressive symptoms according to Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) score.Baseline comparisons between two groups were made using Student's t-test for continuous variables,Chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables,and Wilcoxon test for variables in skewed distribution.Binomial logistic regression and multivariate linear regression were performed to assess the association between depressive symptoms and biomarkers while adjusting for demographic and clinical variables.Results:Patients with depressive symptoms had significantly higher NT-proBNP levels as compared to patients without depressive symptoms (1135.0 [131.5,2474.0] vs.384.0 [133.0,990.0],Z =-2.470,P =0.013).Depressive symptoms were associated with higher NT-proBNP levels (odds ratio [OR] =2.348,95% CI:1.344 to 4.103,P =0.003) and higher body mass index (OR =1.169,95% confidence interval [CI]:1.016 to 1.345,P =0.029).The total SDS score was associated with the NT-proBNP level (β =0.327,95% CI:1.674 to 6.119,P =0.001) after multivariable adjustment.In particular,NT-proBNP was associated with three of the depressive dimensions,including core depression (β =0.299,95% CI:0.551 to 2.428,P =0.002),cognitive depression (β =0.320,95% CI:0.476 to 1.811,P=0.001),and somatic depression (β =0.333,95% CI:0.240 to 0.847,P =0.001).Neither the overall depressive symptomatology nor the individual

  8. Critical structural and functional roles for the N-terminal insertion sequence in surfactant protein B analogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans J Walther

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein B (SP-B; 79 residues belongs to the saposin protein superfamily, and plays functional roles in lung surfactant. The disulfide cross-linked, N- and C-terminal domains of SP-B have been theoretically predicted to fold as charged, amphipathic helices, suggesting their participation in surfactant activities. Earlier structural studies with Mini-B, a disulfide-linked construct based on the N- and C-terminal regions of SP-B (i.e., approximately residues 8-25 and 63-78, confirmed that these neighboring domains are helical; moreover, Mini-B retains critical in vitro and in vivo surfactant functions of the native protein. Here, we perform similar analyses on a Super Mini-B construct that has native SP-B residues (1-7 attached to the N-terminus of Mini-B, to test whether the N-terminal sequence is also involved in surfactant activity.FTIR spectra of Mini-B and Super Mini-B in either lipids or lipid-mimics indicated that these peptides share similar conformations, with primary alpha-helix and secondary beta-sheet and loop-turns. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated that Super Mini-B was dimeric in SDS detergent-polyacrylamide, while Mini-B was monomeric. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR, predictive aggregation algorithms, and molecular dynamics (MD and docking simulations further suggested a preliminary model for dimeric Super Mini-B, in which monomers self-associate to form a dimer peptide with a "saposin-like" fold. Similar to native SP-B, both Mini-B and Super Mini-B exhibit in vitro activity with spread films showing near-zero minimum surface tension during cycling using captive bubble surfactometry. In vivo, Super Mini-B demonstrates oxygenation and dynamic compliance that are greater than Mini-B and compare favorably to full-length SP-B.Super Mini-B shows enhanced surfactant activity, probably due to the self-assembly of monomer peptide into dimer Super Mini-B that mimics the functions and putative structure of native SP-B.

  9. Prognostic value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ki Young; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Tae Yun; Lee, Christopher C; Jo, Si On; Rhee, Joong Eui; Jo, You Hwan; Suh, Gil Joon; Singer, Adam J

    2011-02-01

    The prognostic role of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has not been evaluated. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether NT-proBNP level could predict mortality in hospitalised CAP patients. We performed a structured medical record review of all hospitalised CAP patients from May 2003 to October 2006, and classified patients into the 30-day survival and non-survival group. Data included demographic and clinical characteristics, and laboratory findings including NT-proBNP levels. The APACHE II scores, PSI (pneumonia severity index) and CURB65 (confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure and aged 65 or more) scores were calculated. Comparisons between survivors and non-survivors were made with χ(2), non-parametric tests and logistic regression and ROC analysis were used to compare the ability of NT-proBNP (adjusted for age, heart failure and creatinine), APACHE II, PSI and CURB65 to predict mortality. Of 502 patients, 61 (12.2%) died within 30 days. NT-proBNP levels were measured in 167 patients and were significantly higher in non-survivors compared to survivors (median 841.7 (IQR 267.1-3137.3) pg/ml vs 3658.0 (1863.0-7025.0) pg/ml, p=0.019). NT-proBNP was an independent predictor of mortality (adjusted OR 1.53; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.02, p=0.002). The AUC for NT-proBNP was 0.712 (95% CI, 0.613 to 0.812), which was comparable to those of PSI (0.749, p=0.531) and CURB65 (0.698, p=0.693), but inferior to that of APACHE II (0.831, p=0.037). Adding NT-proBNP to APACHE II, PSI and CURB65 did not significantly increase the AUCs, respectively. NT-proBNP level is an independent predictor of mortality in hospitalised CAP patients. The performance of NT-proBNP level is comparable to those of PSI and CURB65 in predicting mortality.

  10. A role for galanin N-terminal fragment (1-15) in anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millón, Carmelo; Flores-Burgess, Antonio; Narváez, Manuel; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Santín, Luis; Parrado, Concepción; Narváez, José Angel; Fuxe, Kjell; Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida

    2014-10-31

    Galanin (GAL) plays a role in mood regulation. In this study we analyzed the action of the active N-terminal fragment [GAL(1-15)] in anxiety- and depression-related behavioral tests in rats. The effect of GAL(1-15) was analyzed in the forced swimming test, tail suspension test, open field test, and light/dark test. The proximity of GAL1 and GAL2 receptors was examined with the proximity ligation assay (PLA). We tested the GAL receptors involved in GAL(1-15) effects with the GAL2 receptor antagonist M871 and with an in vivo model of siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown or siRNA GAL1 receptor knockdown rats. The effects of GAL(1-15) were also studied in the cell line RN33B. GAL(1-15) induced strong depression-like and anxiogenic-like effects in all the tests. These effects were stronger than the ones induced by GAL. The involvement of the GAL2 receptor was demonstrated with M871 and with the siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown rats. The PLA indicated the possible existence of GAL1 and GAL2 heteroreceptor complexes in the dorsal hippocampus and especially in the dorsal raphe nucleus. In the siRNA GAL1 receptor knockdown rats the behavioral actions of GAL(1-15) disappeared, and in the siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown rats the reductions of the behavioral actions of GAL(1-15) was linked to a disappearance of PLA. In the cell line RN33B, GAL(1-15) decreased 5-HT immunoreactivity more strongly than GAL. Our results indicate that GAL(1-15) exerts strong depression-related and anxiogenic-like effects and may give the basis for the development of drugs targeting GAL1 and GAL2 heteroreceptor complexes in the raphe-limbic system for the treatment of depression and anxiety. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  11. A Role for Galanin N-Terminal Fragment (1–15) in Anxiety- and Depression-Related Behaviors in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millón, Carmelo; Flores-Burgess, Antonio; Narváez, Manuel; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Santín, Luis; Parrado, Concepción; Narváez, José Angel; Fuxe, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    Background: Galanin (GAL) plays a role in mood regulation. In this study we analyzed the action of the active N-terminal fragment [GAL(1–15)] in anxiety- and depression-related behavioral tests in rats. Methods: The effect of GAL(1–15) was analyzed in the forced swimming test, tail suspension test, open field test, and light/dark test. The proximity of GAL1 and GAL2 receptors was examined with the proximity ligation assay (PLA). We tested the GAL receptors involved in GAL(1–15) effects with the GAL2 receptor antagonist M871 and with an in vivo model of siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown or siRNA GAL1 receptor knockdown rats. The effects of GAL(1–15) were also studied in the cell line RN33B. Results: GAL(1–15) induced strong depression-like and anxiogenic-like effects in all the tests. These effects were stronger than the ones induced by GAL. The involvement of the GAL2 receptor was demonstrated with M871 and with the siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown rats. The PLA indicated the possible existence of GAL1 and GAL2 heteroreceptor complexes in the dorsal hippocampus and especially in the dorsal raphe nucleus. In the siRNA GAL1 receptor knockdown rats the behavioral actions of GAL(1–15) disappeared, and in the siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown rats the reductions of the behavioral actions of GAL(1–15) was linked to a disappearance of PLA. In the cell line RN33B, GAL(1–15) decreased 5-HT immunoreactivity more strongly than GAL. Conclusions: Our results indicate that GAL(1–15) exerts strong depression-related and anxiogenic-like effects and may give the basis for the development of drugs targeting GAL1 and GAL2 heteroreceptor complexes in the raphe-limbic system for the treatment of depression and anxiety. PMID:25522404

  12. N-termini of fungal CSL transcription factors are disordered, enriched in regulatory motifs and inhibit DNA binding in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Převorovský

    Full Text Available CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1 transcription factors are the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway, which is critical for metazoan development. The metazoan CSL proteins (class M can also function in a Notch-independent manner. Recently, two novel classes of CSL proteins, designated F1 and F2, have been identified in fungi. The role of the fungal CSL proteins is unclear, because the Notch pathway is not present in fungi. In fission yeast, the Cbf11 and Cbf12 CSL paralogs play antagonistic roles in cell adhesion and the coordination of cell and nuclear division. Unusually long N-terminal extensions are typical for fungal and invertebrate CSL family members. In this study, we investigate the functional significance of these extended N-termini of CSL proteins.We identify 15 novel CSL family members from 7 fungal species and conduct bioinformatic analyses of a combined dataset containing 34 fungal and 11 metazoan CSL protein sequences. We show that the long, non-conserved N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins are likely disordered and enriched in phosphorylation sites and PEST motifs. In a case study of Cbf12 (class F2, we provide experimental evidence that the protein is proteolytically processed and that the N-terminus inhibits the Cbf12-dependent DNA binding activity in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay.This study provides insight into the characteristics of the long N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins that may be crucial for controlling DNA-binding and CSL function. We propose that the regulation of DNA binding by Cbf12 via its N-terminal region represents an important means by which fission yeast strikes a balance between the class F1 and class F2 paralog activities. This mode of regulation might be shared with other CSL-positive fungi, some of which are relevant to human disease and biotechnology.

  13. The N-terminal domains of Vps3 and Vps8 are critical for localization and function of the CORVET tethering complex on endosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Epp

    Full Text Available Endosomal biogenesis depends on multiple fusion and fission events. For fusion, the heterohexameric CORVET complex as an effector of the endosomal Rab5/Vps21 GTPase has a central function in the initial tethering event. Here, we show that the CORVET-specific Vps3 and Vps8 subunits, which interact with Rab5/Vps21, require their N-terminal domains for localization and function. Surprisingly, CORVET may lack either one of the two N-terminal domains, but not both, to promote protein sorting via the endosome. The dually truncated complex mislocalizes to the cytosol and is impaired in endocytic protein sorting, but not in assembly. Furthermore, the endosomal localization can be rescued by overexpression of Vps21 or one of the truncated CORVET subunits, even though CORVET assembly is not impaired by loss of the N-terminal domains or in strains lacking all endosomal Rab5s and Ypt7. We thus conclude that CORVET requires only its C-terminal domains for assembly and has beyond its putative β-propeller domains additional binding sites for endosomes, which could be important to bind Vps21 and other endosome-specific factors for efficient endosome tethering.

  14. Characterization of the N-terminal segment used by the barley yellow dwarf virus movement protein to promote interaction with the nuclear membrane of host plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Sarah Rachel; Harris, Frederick; Brandenburg, Klaus; Phoenix, David Andrew

    2007-11-01

    The barley yellow dwarf virus movement protein (BYDV-MP) requires its N-terminal sequence to promote the transport of viral RNA into the nuclear compartment of host plant cells. Here, graphical analysis predicts that this sequence would form a membrane interactive amphiphilic alpha-helix. Confirming this prediction, NT1, a peptide homologue of the BYDV-MP N-terminal sequence, was found to be alpha-helical (65%) in the presence of vesicles mimics of the nuclear membrane. The peptide increased the fluidity of these nuclear membrane mimics (rise in wavenumber of circa 0.5-1.0 cm(-1)) and induced surface pressure changes of 2 mN m(-1) in lipid monolayers with corresponding compositions. Taken with isotherm analysis these results suggest that BYDV-MP forms an N-terminal amphiphilic alpha-helix, which partitions into the nuclear membrane primarily through thermodynamically stable associations with the membrane lipid headgroup region. We speculate that these associations may play a role in targeting of the nuclear membrane by BYDM-MP.

  15. The DnaA N-terminal domain interacts with Hda to facilitate replicase clamp-mediated inactivation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su'etsugu, Masayuki; Harada, Yuji; Keyamura, Kenji; Matsunaga, Chika; Kasho, Kazutoshi; Abe, Yoshito; Ueda, Tadashi; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2013-12-01

    DnaA activity for replication initiation of the Escherichia coli chromosome is negatively regulated by feedback from the DNA-loaded form of the replicase clamp. In this process, called RIDA (regulatory inactivation of DnaA), ATP-bound DnaA transiently assembles into a complex consisting of Hda and the DNA-clamp, which promotes inter-AAA+ domain association between Hda and DnaA and stimulates hydrolysis of DnaA-bound ATP, producing inactive ADP-DnaA. Using a truncated DnaA mutant, we previously demonstrated that the DnaA N-terminal domain is involved in RIDA. However, the precise role of the N-terminal domain in RIDA has remained largely unclear. Here, we used an in vitro reconstituted system to demonstrate that the Asn-44 residue in the N-terminal domain of DnaA is crucial for RIDA but not for replication initiation. Moreover, an assay termed PDAX (pull-down after cross-linking) revealed an unstable interaction between a DnaA-N44A mutant and Hda. In vivo, this mutant exhibited an increase in the cellular level of ATP-bound DnaA. These results establish a model in which interaction between DnaA Asn-44 and Hda stabilizes the association between the AAA+ domains of DnaA and Hda to facilitate DnaA-ATP hydrolysis during RIDA. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Intrafamiliar clinical variability of circumferential skin creases Kunze type caused by a novel heterozygous mutation of N-terminal TUBB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentici, M L; Terracciano, A; Bellacchio, E; Capolino, R; Novelli, A; Digilio, M C; Dallapiccola, B

    2018-02-10

    Circumferential skin creases Kunze type (CSC-KT; OMIM 156610, 616734) is a rare disorder characterized by folding of excess skin, which leads to ringed creases, known as Michelin Tire Baby Syndrome (MTBS). CSC-KT patients also exhibit facial dysmorphism, growth retardation, intellectual disability (ID) and multiple congenital malformations. Recently, 2 heterozygous mutations in TUBB gene and 4 mutations (both homozygous and heterozygous) in MAPRE2 gene were identified in 3 and 4 CSC-KT patients, respectively. In the 3 TUBB gene-related CSC-KT patients, all mutations fall in the N-terminal gene domain and were de novo. Mutations in the C-terminal of TUBB gene have been associated to microcephaly and structural brain malformation, in the absence of CSC-KT features. We report a 9-year-old boy with a diagnosis of CSC-KT based on MTBS, facial dysmorphism, microcephaly, severe ID, cortical atrophy and corpus callosum hypoplasia. Sanger sequencing identified a novel heterozygous c.218T>C (p.Met73Thr) mutation in the N-terminal of TUBB gene, that was inherited from the mother affected by isolated MTBS. This is the first report of inherited TUBB gene-related CSC-KT resulting from a novel heterozygous mutation in the N-terminal domain. Present data support the role of TUBB mutations in CSC-KT and definitely includes CSC-KT syndrome within the tubulinopathies. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Space-related pharma-motifs for fast search of protein binding motifs and polypharmacological targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Chih-Ta; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Chang, Li-Zen; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2012-01-01

    To discover a compound inhibiting multiple proteins (i.e. polypharmacological targets) is a new paradigm for the complex diseases (e.g. cancers and diabetes). In general, the polypharmacological proteins often share similar local binding environments and motifs. As the exponential growth of the number of protein structures, to find the similar structural binding motifs (pharma-motifs) is an emergency task for drug discovery (e.g. side effects and new uses for old drugs) and protein functions. We have developed a Space-Related Pharmamotifs (called SRPmotif) method to recognize the binding motifs by searching against protein structure database. SRPmotif is able to recognize conserved binding environments containing spatially discontinuous pharma-motifs which are often short conserved peptides with specific physico-chemical properties for protein functions. Among 356 pharma-motifs, 56.5% interacting residues are highly conserved. Experimental results indicate that 81.1% and 92.7% polypharmacological targets of each protein-ligand complex are annotated with same biological process (BP) and molecular function (MF) terms, respectively, based on Gene Ontology (GO). Our experimental results show that the identified pharma-motifs often consist of key residues in functional (active) sites and play the key roles for protein functions. The SRPmotif is available at http://gemdock.life.nctu.edu.tw/SRP/. SRPmotif is able to identify similar pharma-interfaces and pharma-motifs sharing similar binding environments for polypharmacological targets by rapidly searching against the protein structure database. Pharma-motifs describe the conservations of binding environments for drug discovery and protein functions. Additionally, these pharma-motifs provide the clues for discovering new sequence-based motifs to predict protein functions from protein sequence databases. We believe that SRPmotif is useful for elucidating protein functions and drug discovery.

  18. The MHC motif viewer: a visualization tool for MHC binding motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    is hampered by the lack of tools for browsing and comparing specificity of these molecules. We have developed a Web server, MHC Motif Viewer, which allows the display of the binding motif for MHC class I proteins for human, chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and swine, as well as HLA-DR protein sequences...

  19. Analisis Unsur Matematika pada Motif Sulam Usus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredi Ganda Putra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on interviews with researchers sources said that the beginning of the intestine embroidery is an art of genuine crafts. Called the intestine embroidery because this technique is a technique of combining a strand of cloth resembling the intestine formed according to the pattern by means of embroidered using a thread. Intestinal embroidery techniques were originally used to create a cover of the women's customary wardrobe of Lampung or often referred to as bebe. But not many people in Lampung, especially people who live in Lampung are still many who do not know and recognize the intestine embroidery because most only know tapis only characteristic of Lampung, besides that there are other cultural results that is embroidered intestine. There are still many who do not know that the intestine motif there is a knowledge of mathematics. The researcher's problem formulation is whether there are mathematical elements contained in the intestine embroidery motif based on the concept of geometry. The purpose of this study is to determine whether there are elements of mathematics contained in the intestine motif based on the concept of geometry. Subjects in this study consisted of 4 people obtained by purposive sampling technique. From the results of data analysis conducted by using descriptive analysis and discussion as follows: (1 Intestinal embroidery motif contains the meaning of mathematics and culture or often called Etnomatematika. On the meaning of culture there is a link between the embroidery intestine with a culture that has been there before as the existence of cultural linkage between Hindu belief Buddhism and there are similarities of motifs and decorative patterns contained in the motif embroidery intestine with ornamental variety in Indonesia. (2 The relationship between the intestine with mathematical motifs there are elements of mathematics such as geometry elements in the form of geometry of dimension one and dimension two, and the

  20. Armadillo motifs involved in vesicular transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Striegl

    Full Text Available Armadillo (ARM repeat proteins function in various cellular processes including vesicular transport and membrane tethering. They contain an imperfect repeating sequence motif that forms a conserved three-dimensional structure. Recently, structural and functional insight into tethering mediated by the ARM-repeat protein p115 has been provided. Here we describe the p115 ARM-motifs for reasons of clarity and nomenclature and show that both sequence and structure are highly conserved among ARM-repeat proteins. We argue that there is no need to invoke repeat types other than ARM repeats for a proper description of the structure of the p115 globular head region. Additionally, we propose to define a new subfamily of ARM-like proteins and show lack of evidence that the ARM motifs found in p115 are present in other long coiled-coil tethering factors of the golgin family.

  1. Direct AUC optimization of regulatory motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Huang, De-Shuang

    2017-07-15

    The discovery of transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs is essential for untangling the complex mechanism of genetic variation under different developmental and environmental conditions. Among the huge amount of computational approaches for de novo identification of TFBS motifs, discriminative motif learning (DML) methods have been proven to be promising for harnessing the discovery power of accumulated huge amount of high-throughput binding data. However, they have to sacrifice accuracy for speed and could fail to fully utilize the information of the input sequences. We propose a novel algorithm called CDAUC for optimizing DML-learned motifs based on the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) criterion, which has been widely used in the literature to evaluate the significance of extracted motifs. We show that when the considered AUC loss function is optimized in a coordinate-wise manner, the cost function of each resultant sub-problem is a piece-wise constant function, whose optimal value can be found exactly and efficiently. Further, a key step of each iteration of CDAUC can be efficiently solved as a computational geometry problem. Experimental results on real world high-throughput datasets illustrate that CDAUC outperforms competing methods for refining DML motifs, while being one order of magnitude faster. Meanwhile, preliminary results also show that CDAUC may also be useful for improving the interpretability of convolutional kernels generated by the emerging deep learning approaches for predicting TF sequences specificities. CDAUC is available at: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BxOW5MtIZbJjNFpCeHlBVWJHeW8 . dshuang@tongji.edu.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Heterologous Gene Expression of N-Terminally Truncated Variants of LipPks1 Suggests a Functionally Critical Structural Motif in the N-terminus of Modular Polyketide Synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuzawa, Satoshi; Bailey, Constance B.; Fujii, Tatsu A.

    2017-01-01

    Streptomyces-derived, Well-characterized modular, polyketide synthase (PKS). Using this enzyme as a model, we experimentally investigated the effects of alternative TSSs using a heterologous host, Streptomyces venezuelae. One of the TSSs employed boosted the protein level by 59-fold and the product yield by 23...

  3. Myosin-1A Targets to Microvilli Using Multiple Membrane Binding Motifs in the Tail Homology 1 (TH1) Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerik, Jessica N.; Tyska, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most abundant components of the enterocyte brush border is the actin-based monomeric motor, myosin-1a (Myo1a). Within brush border microvilli, Myo1a carries out a number of critical functions at the interface between membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Proper physiological function of Myo1a depends on its ability to bind to microvillar membrane, an interaction mediated by a C-terminal tail homology 1 (TH1) domain. However, little is known about the mechanistic details of the Myo1a-TH1/membrane interaction. Structure-function analysis of Myo1a-TH1 targeting in epithelial cells revealed that an N-terminal motif conserved among class I myosins and a C-terminal motif unique to Myo1a-TH1 are both required for steady state microvillar enrichment. Purified Myo1a bound to liposomes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, with moderate affinity in a charge-dependent manner. Additionally, peptides of the N- and C-terminal regions required for targeting were able to compete with Myo1a for binding to highly charged liposomes in vitro. Single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that these motifs are also necessary for slowing the membrane detachment rate in cells. Finally, Myo1a-TH1 co-localized with both lactadherin-C2 (a phosphatidylserine-binding protein) and PLCδ1-PH (a phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding protein) in microvilli, but only lactaderin-C2 expression reduced brush border targeting of Myo1a-TH1. Together, our results suggest that Myo1a targeting to microvilli is driven by membrane binding potential that is distributed throughout TH1 rather than localized to a single motif. These data highlight the diversity of mechanisms that enable different class I myosins to target membranes in distinct biological contexts. PMID:22367206

  4. The Runt domain of AML1 (RUNX1) binds a sequence-conserved RNA motif that mimics a DNA element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Junichi; Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Amano, Ryo; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Kozu, Tomoko

    2013-07-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) is a key transcription factor for hematopoiesis that binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. Aberrations in the AML1 gene are frequently found in human leukemia. To better understand AML1 and its potential utility for diagnosis and therapy, we obtained RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the AML1 Runt domain. Enzymatic probing and NMR analyses revealed that Apt1-S, which is a truncated variant of one of the aptamers, has a CACG tetraloop and two stem regions separated by an internal loop. All the isolated aptamers were found to contain the conserved sequence motif 5'-NNCCAC-3' and 5'-GCGMGN'N'-3' (M:A or C; N and N' form Watson-Crick base pairs). The motif contains one AC mismatch and one base bulged out. Mutational analysis of Apt1-S showed that three guanines of the motif are important for Runt binding as are the three guanines of RDE, which are directly recognized by three arginine residues of the Runt domain. Mutational analyses of the Runt domain revealed that the amino acid residues used for Apt1-S binding were similar to those used for RDE binding. Furthermore, the aptamer competed with RDE for binding to the Runt domain in vitro. These results demonstrated that the Runt domain of the AML1 protein binds to the motif of the aptamer that mimics DNA. Our findings should provide new insights into RNA function and utility in both basic and applied sciences.

  5. Highly scalable Ab initio genomic motif identification

    KAUST Repository

    Marchand, Benoit; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Kaushik, Dinesh

    2011-01-01

    We present results of scaling an ab initio motif family identification system, Dragon Motif Finder (DMF), to 65,536 processor cores of IBM Blue Gene/P. DMF seeks groups of mutually similar polynucleotide patterns within a set of genomic sequences and builds various motif families from them. Such information is of relevance to many problems in life sciences. Prior attempts to scale such ab initio motif-finding algorithms achieved limited success. We solve the scalability issues using a combination of mixed-mode MPI-OpenMP parallel programming, master-slave work assignment, multi-level workload distribution, multi-level MPI collectives, and serial optimizations. While the scalability of our algorithm was excellent (94% parallel efficiency on 65,536 cores relative to 256 cores on a modest-size problem), the final speedup with respect to the original serial code exceeded 250,000 when serial optimizations are included. This enabled us to carry out many large-scale ab initio motiffinding simulations in a few hours while the original serial code would have needed decades of execution time. Copyright 2011 ACM.

  6. Molecular determinants of interactions between the N-terminal domain and the transmembrane core that modulate hERG K+ channel gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernández-Trillo

    Full Text Available A conserved eag domain in the cytoplasmic amino terminus of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG potassium channel is critical for its slow deactivation gating. Introduction of gene fragments encoding the eag domain are able to restore normal deactivation properties of channels from which most of the amino terminus has been deleted, and also those lacking exclusively the eag domain or carrying a single point mutation in the initial residues of the N-terminus. Deactivation slowing in the presence of the recombinant domain is not observed with channels carrying a specific Y542C point mutation in the S4-S5 linker. On the other hand, mutations in some initial positions of the recombinant fragment also impair its ability to restore normal deactivation. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET analysis of fluorophore-tagged proteins under total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF conditions revealed a substantial level of FRET between the introduced N-terminal eag fragments and the eag domain-deleted channels expressed at the membrane, but not between the recombinant eag domain and full-length channels with an intact amino terminus. The FRET signals were also minimized when the recombinant eag fragments carried single point mutations in the initial portion of their amino end, and when Y542C mutated channels were used. These data suggest that the restoration of normal deactivation gating by the N-terminal recombinant eag fragment is an intrinsic effect of this domain directed by the interaction of its N-terminal segment with the gating machinery, likely at the level of the S4-S5 linker.

  7. The DAF-16 FOXO transcription factor regulates natc-1 to modulate stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans, linking insulin/IGF-1 signaling to protein N-terminal acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Warnhoff

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway plays a critical role in stress resistance and longevity, but the mechanisms are not fully characterized. To identify genes that mediate stress resistance, we screened for C. elegans mutants that can tolerate high levels of dietary zinc. We identified natc-1, which encodes an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the N-terminal acetyltransferase C (NAT complex. N-terminal acetylation is a widespread modification of eukaryotic proteins; however, relatively little is known about the biological functions of NATs. We demonstrated that loss-of-function mutations in natc-1 cause resistance to a broad-spectrum of physiologic stressors, including multiple metals, heat, and oxidation. The C. elegans FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is a critical target of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway that mediates stress resistance, and DAF-16 is predicted to directly bind the natc-1 promoter. To characterize the regulation of natc-1 by DAF-16 and the function of natc-1 in insulin/IGF-1 signaling, we analyzed molecular and genetic interactions with key components of the insulin/IGF-1 pathway. natc-1 mRNA levels were repressed by DAF-16 activity, indicating natc-1 is a physiological target of DAF-16. Genetic studies suggested that natc-1 functions downstream of daf-16 to mediate stress resistance and dauer formation. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that natc-1 is directly regulated by the DAF-16 transcription factor, and natc-1 is a physiologically significant effector of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway that mediates stress resistance and dauer formation. These studies identify a novel biological function for natc-1 as a modulator of stress resistance and dauer formation and define a functionally significant downstream effector of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. Protein N-terminal acetylation mediated by the NatC complex may play an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating stress resistance.

  8. Mutated but Not Deleted Ovine PrP(C) N-Terminal Polybasic Region Strongly Interferes with Prion Propagation in Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifé, Manal; Reine, Fabienne; Paquet-Fifield, Sophie; Castille, Johan; Herzog, Laetitia; Vilotte, Marthe; Moudjou, Mohammed; Moazami-Goudarzi, Katayoun; Makhzami, Samira; Passet, Bruno; Andréoletti, Olivier; Vilette, Didier; Laude, Hubert; Béringue, Vincent; Vilotte, Jean-Luc

    2016-02-01

    Mammalian prions are proteinaceous infectious agents composed of misfolded assemblies of the host-encoded, cellular prion protein (PrP). Physiologically, the N-terminal polybasic region of residues 23 to 31 of PrP has been shown to be involved in its endocytic trafficking and interactions with glycosaminoglycans or putative ectodomains of membrane-associated proteins. Several recent reports also describe this PrP region as important for the toxicity of mutant prion proteins and the efficiency of prion propagation, both in vitro and in vivo. The question remains as to whether the latter observations made with mouse PrP and mouse prions would be relevant to other PrP species/prion strain combinations given the dramatic impact on prion susceptibility of minimal amino acid substitutions and structural variations in PrP. Here, we report that transgenic mouse lines expressing ovine PrP with a deletion of residues 23 to 26 (KKRP) or mutated in this N-terminal region (KQHPH instead of KKRPK) exhibited a variable, strain-dependent susceptibility to prion infection with regard to the proportion of affected mice and disease tempo relative to findings in their wild-type counterparts. Deletion has no major effect on 127S scrapie prion pathogenesis, whereas mutation increased by almost 3-fold the survival time of the mice. Deletion marginally affected the incubation time of scrapie LA19K and ovine bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions, whereas mutation caused apparent resistance to disease. Recent reports suggested that the N-terminal polybasic region of the prion protein could be a therapeutic target to prevent prion propagation or toxic signaling associated with more common neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Mutating or deleting this region in ovine PrP completes the data previously obtained with the mouse protein by identifying the key amino acid residues involved. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. The N-terminal cleavage of chondromodulin-I in growth-plate cartilage at the hypertrophic and calcified zones during bone development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenori Miura

    Full Text Available Chondromodulin-I (ChM-I is a 20-25 kDa anti-angiogenic glycoprotein in cartilage matrix. In the present study, we identified a novel 14-kDa species of ChM-I by immunoblotting, and purified it by immunoprecipitation with a newly raised monoclonal antibody against ChM-I. The N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicated that it was an N-terminal truncated form of ChM-I generated by the proteolytic cleavage at Asp37-Asp38. This 14-kDa ChM-I was shown by the modified Boyden chamber assay to have very little inhibitory activity on the VEGF-A-induced migration of vascular endothelial cells in contrast to the intact 20-25 kDa form of ChM-I (ID50 = 8 nM. Immunohistochemistry suggested that 20-25 kDa ChM-I was exclusively localized in the avascular zones, i.e. the resting, proliferating, and prehypertrophic zones, of the cartilaginous molds of developing long bone, whereas the 14-kDa form of ChM-I was found in hypertrophic and calcified zones. Immunoblotting demonstrated that mature growth-plate chondrocytes isolated from rat costal cartilage actively secrete ChM-I almost exclusively as the intact 20-25 kDa form into the medium in primary culture. Taken together, our results suggest that intact 20-25 kDa ChM-I is stored as a component of extracellular matrix in the avascular cartilage zones, but it is inactivated by a single N-terminal proteolytic cleavage in the hypertrophic zone of growth-plate cartilage.

  10. The DAF-16 FOXO transcription factor regulates natc-1 to modulate stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans, linking insulin/IGF-1 signaling to protein N-terminal acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnhoff, Kurt; Murphy, John T; Kumar, Sandeep; Schneider, Daniel L; Peterson, Michelle; Hsu, Simon; Guthrie, James; Robertson, J David; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2014-10-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway plays a critical role in stress resistance and longevity, but the mechanisms are not fully characterized. To identify genes that mediate stress resistance, we screened for C. elegans mutants that can tolerate high levels of dietary zinc. We identified natc-1, which encodes an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the N-terminal acetyltransferase C (NAT) complex. N-terminal acetylation is a widespread modification of eukaryotic proteins; however, relatively little is known about the biological functions of NATs. We demonstrated that loss-of-function mutations in natc-1 cause resistance to a broad-spectrum of physiologic stressors, including multiple metals, heat, and oxidation. The C. elegans FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is a critical target of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway that mediates stress resistance, and DAF-16 is predicted to directly bind the natc-1 promoter. To characterize the regulation of natc-1 by DAF-16 and the function of natc-1 in insulin/IGF-1 signaling, we analyzed molecular and genetic interactions with key components of the insulin/IGF-1 pathway. natc-1 mRNA levels were repressed by DAF-16 activity, indicating natc-1 is a physiological target of DAF-16. Genetic studies suggested that natc-1 functions downstream of daf-16 to mediate stress resistance and dauer formation. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that natc-1 is directly regulated by the DAF-16 transcription factor, and natc-1 is a physiologically significant effector of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway that mediates stress resistance and dauer formation. These studies identify a novel biological function for natc-1 as a modulator of stress resistance and dauer formation and define a functionally significant downstream effector of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. Protein N-terminal acetylation mediated by the NatC complex may play an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating stress resistance.

  11. Structural Insight into the Critical Role of the N-Terminal Region in the Catalytic Activity of Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 26.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Won

    Full Text Available Human dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26 is a novel target for anticancer therapy because its dephosphorylation of the p53 tumor suppressor regulates the apoptosis of cancer cells. DUSP26 inhibition results in neuroblastoma cell cytotoxicity through p53-mediated apoptosis. Despite the previous structural studies of DUSP26 catalytic domain (residues 61-211, DUSP26-C, the high-resolution structure of its catalytically active form has not been resolved. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26 (residues 39-211, DUSP26-N with an additional N-terminal region at 2.0 Å resolution. Unlike the C-terminal domain-swapped dimeric structure of DUSP26-C, the DUSP26-N (C152S monomer adopts a fold-back conformation of the C-terminal α8-helix and has an additional α1-helix in the N-terminal region. Consistent with the canonically active conformation of its protein tyrosine phosphate-binding loop (PTP loop observed in the structure, the phosphatase assay results demonstrated that DUSP26-N has significantly higher catalytic activity than DUSP26-C. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser scattering (SEC-MALS measurements showed that DUSP26-N (C152S exists as a monomer in solution. Notably, the crystal structure of DUSP26-N (C152S revealed that the N-terminal region of DUSP26-N (C152S serves a scaffolding role by positioning the surrounding α7-α8 loop for interaction with the PTP-loop through formation of an extensive hydrogen bond network, which seems to be critical in making the PTP-loop conformation competent for phosphatase activity. Our study provides the first high-resolution structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26, which will contribute to the structure-based rational design of novel DUSP26-targeting anticancer therapeutics.

  12. Superficial disposition of the N-terminal region of the surfactant protein SP-C and the absence of specific SP-B-SP-C interactions in phospholipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Cruz, A; Casals, C

    2001-01-01

    . The fluorescence emission spectrum of Dns-SP-C in phospholipid bilayers is similar to the spectrum of dansyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, and indicates that the N-terminal end of the protein is located at the surface of the membranes and is exposed to the aqueous environment. In membranes containing...... phosphatidylglycerol (PG), the fluorescence of Dns-SP-C shows a 3-fold increase with respect to the fluorescence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), suggesting that electrostatic lipid-protein interactions induce important effects on the structure and disposition of the N-terminal segment of the protein in these membranes...... of the N-terminal segment of the protein into less polar environments that originate during protein lateral segregation. This suggests that conformation and interactions of the N-terminal segment of SP-C could be important in regulating the lateral distribution of the protein in surfactant bilayers...

  13. N-terminal diproline and charge group effects on the stabilization of helical conformation in alanine-based short peptides: CD studies with water and methanol as solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Bhupesh; Srivastava, Kinshuk Raj; Durani, Susheel

    2017-06-01

    Protein folding problem remains a formidable challenge as main chain, side chain and solvent interactions remain entangled and have been difficult to resolve. Alanine-based short peptides are promising models to dissect protein folding initiation and propagation structurally as well as energetically. The effect of N-terminal diproline and charged side chains is assessed on the stabilization of helical conformation in alanine-based short peptides using circular dichroism (CD) with water and methanol as solvent. A1 (Ac-Pro-Pro-Ala-Lys-Ala-Lys-Ala-Lys-Ala-NH 2 ) is designed to assess the effect of N-terminal homochiral diproline and lysine side chains to induce helical conformation. A2 (Ac-Pro-Pro-Glu-Glu-Ala-Ala-Lys-Lys-Ala-NH 2 ) and A3 (Ac-dPro-Pro-Glu-Glu-Ala-Ala-Lys-Lys-Ala-NH 2 ) with N-terminal homochiral and heterochiral diproline, respectively, are designed to assess the effect of Glu...Lys (i, i + 4) salt bridge interactions on the stabilization of helical conformation. The CD spectra of A1, A2 and A3 in water manifest different amplitudes of the observed polyproline II (PPII) signals, which indicate different conformational distributions of the polypeptide structure. The strong effect of solvent substitution from water to methanol is observed for the peptides, and CD spectra in methanol evidence A2 and A3 as helical folds. Temperature-dependent CD spectra of A1 and A2 in water depict an isodichroic point reflecting coexistence of two conformations, PPII and β-strand conformation, which is consistent with the previous studies. The results illuminate the effect of N-terminal diproline and charged side chains in dictating the preferences for extended-β, semi-extended PPII and helical conformation in alanine-based short peptides. The results of the present study will enhance our understanding on stabilization of helical conformation in short peptides and hence aid in the design of novel peptides with helical structures. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide

  14. Procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) as an indicator of type I collagen metabolism: ELISA development, reference interval, and hypovitaminosis D induced hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, O; Hansen, M; Jensen, Charlotte Harken

    1996-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantification of the N-terminal propeptide of human procollagen type I (PINP) utilizing purified alpha 1-chain specific rabbit antibodies is described. The ELISA measured the content of the alpha 1-chain of PINP independent of the molecular....../mL, these values being significantly different from the normal range (p ELISA was superior to commercially available assays for PICP and osteocalcin in separation between healthy controls and patients with osteomalaci. Udgivelsesdato: 1996-Aug...

  15. C-terminal motif prediction in eukaryotic proteomes using comparative genomics and statistical over-representation across protein families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cutler Sean R

    2007-06-01

    between species, among kingdoms and across eukaryotes. Motifs of note include a serine-acidic peptide (DSD* as well as several lysine enriched motifs found in nearly all eukaryotic genomes examined. Conclusion We have successfully generated a high confidence representation of eukaryotic motifs anchored at the C-terminus. A high incidence of true-positives in our results suggests that several previously unidentified tripeptide patterns are strong candidates for representing novel peptide motifs of a widely employed nature in the C-terminal biology of eukaryotes. Our application of comparative genomics, statistical over-representation and the adjustment for protein family homology has generated several hypotheses concerning the C-terminal topology as it pertains to sorting and potential protein interaction signals. This approach to background reduction could be expanded for application to protein motif prediction in the protein interior. A parallel N-terminal analysis is presented as supplementary data.

  16. Parallel motif extraction from very long sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Sahli, Majed

    2013-01-01

    Motifs are frequent patterns used to identify biological functionality in genomic sequences, periodicity in time series, or user trends in web logs. In contrast to a lot of existing work that focuses on collections of many short sequences, modern applications require mining of motifs in one very long sequence (i.e., in the order of several gigabytes). For this case, there exist statistical approaches that are fast but inaccurate; or combinatorial methods that are sound and complete. Unfortunately, existing combinatorial methods are serial and very slow. Consequently, they are limited to very short sequences (i.e., a few megabytes), small alphabets (typically 4 symbols for DNA sequences), and restricted types of motifs. This paper presents ACME, a combinatorial method for extracting motifs from a single very long sequence. ACME arranges the search space in contiguous blocks that take advantage of the cache hierarchy in modern architectures, and achieves almost an order of magnitude performance gain in serial execution. It also decomposes the search space in a smart way that allows scalability to thousands of processors with more than 90% speedup. ACME is the only method that: (i) scales to gigabyte-long sequences; (ii) handles large alphabets; (iii) supports interesting types of motifs with minimal additional cost; and (iv) is optimized for a variety of architectures such as multi-core systems, clusters in the cloud, and supercomputers. ACME reduces the extraction time for an exact-length query from 4 hours to 7 minutes on a typical workstation; handles 3 orders of magnitude longer sequences; and scales up to 16, 384 cores on a supercomputer. Copyright is held by the owner/author(s).

  17. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2013-01-01

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k = 8 ?10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/?wkc/kmerHMM. 2013 The Author(s).

  18. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2013-09-01

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k=8∼10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/kmerHMM.

  19. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2013-06-29

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k = 8 ?10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors\\' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/?wkc/kmerHMM. 2013 The Author(s).

  20. CombiMotif: A new algorithm for network motifs discovery in protein-protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiawei; Li, Guanghui; Song, Dan; Liang, Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Discovering motifs in protein-protein interaction networks is becoming a current major challenge in computational biology, since the distribution of the number of network motifs can reveal significant systemic differences among species. However, this task can be computationally expensive because of the involvement of graph isomorphic detection. In this paper, we present a new algorithm (CombiMotif) that incorporates combinatorial techniques to count non-induced occurrences of subgraph topologies in the form of trees. The efficiency of our algorithm is demonstrated by comparing the obtained results with the current state-of-the art subgraph counting algorithms. We also show major differences between unicellular and multicellular organisms. The datasets and source code of CombiMotif are freely available upon request.

  1. Urokinase links plasminogen activation and cell adhesion by cleavage of the RGD motif in vitronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzi, Valentina; Sarra Ferraris, Gian Maria; Madsen, Jeppe B; Lupia, Michela; Andreasen, Peter A; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2016-07-01

    Components of the plasminogen activation system including urokinase (uPA), its inhibitor (PAI-1) and its cell surface receptor (uPAR) have been implicated in a wide variety of biological processes related to tissue homoeostasis. Firstly, the binding of uPA to uPAR favours extracellular proteolysis by enhancing cell surface plasminogen activation. Secondly, it promotes cell adhesion and signalling through binding of the provisional matrix protein vitronectin. We now report that uPA and plasmin induces a potent negative feedback on cell adhesion through specific cleavage of the RGD motif in vitronectin. Cleavage of vitronectin by uPA displays a remarkable receptor dependence and requires concomitant binding of both uPA and vitronectin to uPAR Moreover, we show that PAI-1 counteracts the negative feedback and behaves as a proteolysis-triggered stabilizer of uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to vitronectin. These findings identify a novel and highly specific function for the plasminogen activation system in the regulation of cell adhesion to vitronectin. The cleavage of vitronectin by uPA and plasmin results in the release of N-terminal vitronectin fragments that can be detected in vivo, underscoring the potential physiological relevance of the process. © 2016 The Authors.

  2. DNA methylation requires a DNMT1 ubiquitin interacting motif (UIM) and histone ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weihua; Wolf, Patricia; Liu, Nan; Link, Stephanie; Smets, Martha; La Mastra, Federica; Forné, Ignasi; Pichler, Garwin; Hörl, David; Fellinger, Karin; Spada, Fabio; Bonapace, Ian Marc; Imhof, Axel; Harz, Hartmann; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2015-08-01

    DNMT1 is recruited by PCNA and UHRF1 to maintain DNA methylation after replication. UHRF1 recognizes hemimethylated DNA substrates via the SRA domain, but also repressive H3K9me3 histone marks with its TTD. With systematic mutagenesis and functional assays, we could show that chromatin binding further involved UHRF1 PHD binding to unmodified H3R2. These complementation assays clearly demonstrated that the ubiquitin ligase activity of the UHRF1 RING domain is required for maintenance DNA methylation. Mass spectrometry of UHRF1-deficient cells revealed H3K18 as a novel ubiquitination target of UHRF1 in mammalian cells. With bioinformatics and mutational analyses, we identified a ubiquitin interacting motif (UIM) in the N-terminal regulatory domain of DNMT1 that binds to ubiquitinated H3 tails and is essential for DNA methylation in vivo. H3 ubiquitination and subsequent DNA methylation required UHRF1 PHD binding to H3R2. These results show the manifold regulatory mechanisms controlling DNMT1 activity that require the reading and writing of epigenetic marks by UHRF1 and illustrate the multifaceted interplay between DNA and histone modifications. The identification and functional characterization of the DNMT1 UIM suggests a novel regulatory principle and we speculate that histone H2AK119 ubiquitination might also lead to UIM-dependent recruitment of DNMT1 and DNA methylation beyond classic maintenance.

  3. Enhanced SUMOylation of proteins containing a SUMO-interacting motif by SUMO-Ubc9 fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Tae; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Matunis, Mike J.; Ahn, Jin-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Identifying new targets for SUMO and understanding the function of protein SUMOylation are largely limited by low level of SUMOylation. It was found recently that Ubc9, the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme, is covalently modified by SUMO at a lysine 14 in the N-terminal alpha helix, and that SUMO-modified Ubc9 has enhanced conjugation activity for certain target proteins containing a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM). Here, we show that, compared to intact Ubc9, the SUMO-Ubc9 fusion protein has higher conjugating activity for SIM-containing targets such as Sp100 and human cytomegalovirus IE2. Assays using an IE2 SIM mutant revealed the requirement of SIM for the enhanced IE2 SUMOylation by SUMO-Ubc9. In pull-down assays with cell extracts, the SUMO-Ubc9 fusion protein bound to more diverse cellular proteins and interacted with some SIM-containing proteins with higher affinities than Ubc9. Therefore, the devised SUMO-Ubc9 fusion will be useful for identifying SIM-containing SUMO targets and producing SUMO-modified proteins.

  4. An N-terminal Retention Module Anchors the Giant Adhesin LapA of Pseudomonas fluorescens at the Cell Surface: A Novel Sub-family of Type I Secretion Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T Jarrod; Font, Maria E; Kelly, Carolyn M; Sondermann, Holger; O'Toole, George A

    2018-02-05

    LapA of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 belongs to a diverse family of cell surface associated bacterial adhesins that are secreted via the type-1 secretion system (T1SS). We previously reported that the periplasmic protease LapG cleaves the N-terminus of LapA at a canonical dialanine motif to release the adhesin from the cell surface under conditions unfavorable to biofilm formation, thus decreasing biofilm formation. Here, we characterize LapA as the first type 1 secreted substrate that does not follow the "one-step" rule of T1SS. Rather, a novel N-terminal element, called the retention module (RM), localizes LapA at the cell surface as a secretion intermediate. Our genetic, biochemical, and molecular modeling analysis support a model wherein LapA is tethered to the cell surface through its T1SS outer membrane TolC-like pore, LapE, until LapG cleaves LapA in the periplasm. We further demonstrate this unusual retention strategy is likely conserved among LapA-like proteins, and reveals a new subclass of T1SS ABC transporters involved in transporting this group of surface-associated, LapA-like adhesins. These studies demonstrate a novel cell surface retention strategy used throughout the Proteobacteria and highlight a previously unappreciated flexibility of function for T1SS. Importance. Bacteria have evolved multiple secretion strategies to interact with their environment. For many bacteria, the secretion of cell surface associated adhesins is key for initiating contact with a preferred substratum to facilitate biofilm formation. Our work demonstrates that P. fluorescens uses a previously unrecognized secretion strategy to retain the giant adhesin LapA at its cell surface. Further, we identify likely LapA-like adhesins in various pathogenic and commensal Proteobacteria and provide phylogenetic evidence that these adhesins are secreted by a new subclass of T1SS ABC transporters. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Characterization of cDNA for human tripeptidyl peptidase II: The N-terminal part of the enzyme is similar to subtilisin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkinson, B.; Jonsson, A-K

    1991-01-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II is a high molecular weight serine exopeptidase, which has been purified from rat liver and human erythrocytes. Four clones, representing 4453 bp, or 90% of the mRNA of the human enzyme, have been isolated from two different cDNA libraries. One clone, designated A2, was obtained after screening a human B-lymphocyte cDNA library with a degenerated oligonucleotide mixture. The B-lymphocyte cDNA library, obtained from human fibroblasts, were rescreened with a 147 bp fragment from the 5' part of the A2 clone, whereby three different overlapping cDNA clones could be isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence, 1196 amino acid residues, corresponding to the longest open rading frame of the assembled nucleotide sequence, was compared to sequences of current databases. This revealed a 56% similarity between the bacterial enzyme subtilisin and the N-terminal part of tripeptidyl peptidase II. The enzyme was found to be represented by two different mRNAs of 4.2 and 5.0 kilobases, respectively, which probably result from the utilziation of two different polyadenylation sites. Futhermore, cDNA corresponding to both the N-terminal and C-terminal part of tripeptidyl peptidase II hybridized with genomic DNA from mouse, horse, calf, and hen, even under fairly high stringency conditions, indicating that tripeptidyl peptidase II is highly conserved

  6. The N-terminal domain of APJ, a CNS-based coreceptor for HIV-1, is essential for its receptor function and coreceptor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Naiming; Zhang Xiaoling; Fan Xuejun; Argyris, Elias; Fang Jianhua; Acheampong, Edward; DuBois, Garrett C.; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    2003-01-01

    The human APJ, a G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptor, has been found to be dramatically expressed in the human central nervous system (CNS) and also to serve as a coreceptor for the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Studies with animal models suggested that APJ and its natural ligand, apelin, play an important role in the central control of body fluid homeostasis, and in regulation of blood pressure and cardiac contractility. In this study, we characterize the structural and functional determinants of the N-terminal domain of APJ in interactions with its natural ligand and HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. We demonstrate that the second 10 residues of the N-terminal domain of APJ are critical for association with apelin, while the first 20 amino acids play an important role in supporting cell-cell fusion mediated by HIV-1 gp120. With site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified that the negatively charged amino acid residues Glu20 and Asp23 are involved in receptor and coreceptor functions, but residues Tyr10 and Tyr11 substantially contribute to coreceptor function for both T-tropic (CXCR4) and dual-tropic (CXCR4 and CCR5) HIV-1 isolates. Thus, this study provides potentially important information for further characterizing APJ-apelin functions in vitro and in vivo and designing small molecules for treatment of HIV-1 infection in the CNS

  7. Differential functions of C- and N-terminal hepatitis B x protein in liver cells treated with doxorubicin in normoxic or hypoxic condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Kin-Fan Chau

    Full Text Available Hepatitis viral B x protein (HBx, a hepatocarcinogen, is frequently mutated. Hypoxia influences the growth of HCC and also the sensitivity of tumor cells to treatments. We aimed to test the role of HBx and acute hypoxia in the efficacy of chemotherapy. In this study, we established 4 Chang liver cell lines with the full-length HBx (HBx, the first 50 amino acids of N-terminal HBx (HBx/50, the last 104 amino acids of C-terminal HBx (HBx/51 and empty vector (CL, respectively. MTT and TNUEL assays were used to assess cell viability and apoptosis respectively. Western blot was used to determine the expression of relevant proteins. Results showed that among 4 cell lines, doxorubicin was most effective in decreasing the viability and enhancing apoptosis in HBx/51 cells, while HBx/50 cells were most resistant to the treatment. Cells in hypoxia were more susceptible to doxorubicin than cells in normoxia. Hypoxia facilitated the Bid cleavage especially in HBx/51 cells via phosphorylating p38 MAPK. p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly reduced the tBid level and increased cell viability. In conclusion, N-terminal HBx and C-terminal HBx function differentially in their ability to regulate cell growth, with the former being promotive but the latter being inhibitory. The acute hypoxia may overcome the HBx-induced resistance and facilitate the chemotherapy.

  8. N-terminal aliphatic residues dictate the structure, stability, assembly, and small molecule binding of the coiled-coil region of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekar, Susheel K; Asnani, Mukta; Limbad, Chandani; Haghpanah, Jennifer S; Hom, Wendy; Barra, Hanna; Nanda, Soumya; Lu, Min; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2009-09-15

    The coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMPcc) assembles into a homopentamer that naturally recognizes the small molecule 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (vit D). To identify the residues critical for the structure, stability, oligomerization, and binding to vit D as well as two other small molecules, all-trans-retinol (ATR) and curcumin (CCM), here we perform an alanine scanning mutagenesis study. Ten residues lining the hydrophobic pocket of COMPcc were mutated into alanine; of the mutated residues, the N-terminal aliphatic residues L37, L44, V47, and L51 are responsible for maintaining the structure and function. Furthermore, two polar residues, T40 and Q54, within the N-terminal region when converted into alanine improve the alpha-helical structure, stability, and self-assembly behavior. Helical stability, oligomerization, and binding appear to be linked in a manner in which mutations that abolish helical structure and assembly bind poorly to vit D, ATR, and CCM. These results provide not only insight into COMPcc and its functional role but also useful guidelines for the design of stable, pentameric coiled-coils capable of selectively storing and delivering various small molecules.

  9. The 133-kDa N-terminal domain enables myosin 15 to maintain mechanotransducing stereocilia and is essential for hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qing; Indzhykulian, Artur A; Mustapha, Mirna; Riordan, Gavin P; Dolan, David F; Friedman, Thomas B; Belyantseva, Inna A; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Camper, Sally A; Bird, Jonathan E

    2015-01-01

    The precise assembly of inner ear hair cell stereocilia into rows of increasing height is critical for mechanotransduction and the sense of hearing. Yet, how the lengths of actin-based stereocilia are regulated remains poorly understood. Mutations of the molecular motor myosin 15 stunt stereocilia growth and cause deafness. We found that hair cells express two isoforms of myosin 15 that differ by inclusion of an 133-kDa N-terminal domain, and that these isoforms can selectively traffic to different stereocilia rows. Using an isoform-specific knockout mouse, we show that hair cells expressing only the small isoform remarkably develop normal stereocilia bundles. However, a critical subset of stereocilia with active mechanotransducer channels subsequently retracts. The larger isoform with the 133-kDa N-terminal domain traffics to these specialized stereocilia and prevents disassembly of their actin core. Our results show that myosin 15 isoforms can navigate between functionally distinct classes of stereocilia, and are independently required to assemble and then maintain the intricate hair bundle architecture. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08627.001 PMID:26302205

  10. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the N-terminal domain of nsp2 from avian infectious bronchitis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Anqi; Wei, Lei; Zhao, Weiran; Xu, Yuanyuan; Rao, Zihe

    2009-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of nsp2 from avian infectious bronchitis virus has been purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution. Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a prototype of the group III coronaviruses and encodes 15 nonstructural proteins which make up the transcription/replication machinery. The nsp2 protein from IBV has a unique and novel sequence and has no experimentally confirmed function in replication, whereas it has been proposed to be crucial for early viral infection and may inhibit the early host immune response. The gene that encodes a double-mutant IBV nsp2 N-terminal domain (residues 9–393 of the polyprotein, with mutations Q132L and L270F) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein was subjected to crystallization trials. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6 2 or P6 4 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 114.2, c = 61.0 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Each asymmetric unit contained one molecule

  11. N-Terminal Prodomain of Pfs230 Synthesized Using a Cell-Free System Is Sufficient To Induce Complement-Dependent Malaria Transmission-Blocking Activity▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Mayumi; Wu, Yimin; Iriko, Hideyuki; Muratova, Olga; MacDonald, Nicholas J.; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Takeo, Satoru; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine is to block the development of malaria parasites in the mosquito and thus prevent subsequent infection of the human host. Previous studies have demonstrated that the gametocyte/gamete surface protein Pfs230 can induce transmission-blocking immunity and have evaluated Escherichia coli-produced Pfs230 as a transmission-blocking vaccine candidate. In this study, we used the wheat germ cell-free expression system to produce N-terminal fragments of Pfs230 and evaluated the transmission-blocking activity of antisera raised against the recombinant Pfs230 protein. The rabbit antisera reacted to the surface of cultured gametocytes and gametes of the Plasmodium falciparum NF54 line, recognized the 360-kDa form of parasite-produced Pfs230 by Western blot assay, and reduced the infectivity of NF54 parasites to Anopheles stefensi mosquitoes in the presence of complement in a standard membrane feeding assay. Thus, our data demonstrate that the N-terminal pro domain of Pfs230 is sufficient to induce complement-dependent transmission-blocking activity against P. falciparum. PMID:21715579

  12. N-terminal prodomain of Pfs230 synthesized using a cell-free system is sufficient to induce complement-dependent malaria transmission-blocking activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Mayumi; Wu, Yimin; Iriko, Hideyuki; Muratova, Olga; MacDonald, Nicholas J; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Takeo, Satoru; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2011-08-01

    The aim of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine is to block the development of malaria parasites in the mosquito and thus prevent subsequent infection of the human host. Previous studies have demonstrated that the gametocyte/gamete surface protein Pfs230 can induce transmission-blocking immunity and have evaluated Escherichia coli-produced Pfs230 as a transmission-blocking vaccine candidate. In this study, we used the wheat germ cell-free expression system to produce N-terminal fragments of Pfs230 and evaluated the transmission-blocking activity of antisera raised against the recombinant Pfs230 protein. The rabbit antisera reacted to the surface of cultured gametocytes and gametes of the Plasmodium falciparum NF54 line, recognized the 360-kDa form of parasite-produced Pfs230 by Western blot assay, and reduced the infectivity of NF54 parasites to Anopheles stefensi mosquitoes in the presence of complement in a standard membrane feeding assay. Thus, our data demonstrate that the N-terminal pro domain of Pfs230 is sufficient to induce complement-dependent transmission-blocking activity against P. falciparum.

  13. Voltage-sensing domain mode shift is coupled to the activation gate by the N-terminal tail of hERG channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Peter S; Perry, Matthew D; Ng, Chai Ann; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Hill, Adam P

    2012-09-01

    Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channels exhibit unique gating kinetics characterized by unusually slow activation and deactivation. The N terminus of the channel, which contains an amphipathic helix and an unstructured tail, has been shown to be involved in regulation of this slow deactivation. However, the mechanism of how this occurs and the connection between voltage-sensing domain (VSD) return and closing of the gate are unclear. To examine this relationship, we have used voltage-clamp fluorometry to simultaneously measure VSD motion and gate closure in N-terminally truncated constructs. We report that mode shifting of the hERG VSD results in a corresponding shift in the voltage-dependent equilibrium of channel closing and that at negative potentials, coupling of the mode-shifted VSD to the gate defines the rate of channel closure. Deletion of the first 25 aa from the N terminus of hERG does not alter mode shifting of the VSD but uncouples the shift from closure of the cytoplasmic gate. Based on these observations, we propose the N-terminal tail as an adaptor that couples voltage sensor return to gate closure to define slow deactivation gating in hERG channels. Furthermore, because the mode shift occurs on a time scale relevant to the cardiac action potential, we suggest a physiological role for this phenomenon in maximizing current flow through hERG channels during repolarization.

  14. Glycosylation of the N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites in the human α1,3-fucosyltransferase V and -VI (hFucTV and -VI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Bross, Peter Gerd; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2000-01-01

    Human alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase V and -VI (hFucTV and -VI) each contain four potential N-glycosylation sites (hFucTV: Asn60, Asn105, Asn167 and Asn198 and hFucTVI: Asn46, Asn91, Asn153 and Asn184). Glycosylation of the two N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites (hFucTV: Asn60, Asn105 and h......FucTVI: Asn46 and Asn91) have never been studied in detail. In the present study, we have analysed the glycosylation of these potential N-glycosylation sites. Initially, we compared the molecular mass of hFucTV and -VI expressed in COS-7 cells treated with tunicamycin with the mass of the proteins...... in untreated cells. The difference in molecular mass between the proteins in treated and untreated cells corresponded to the presence of at least three N-linked glycans. We then made a series of mutants, in which the asparagine residues in the N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites were replaced...

  15. Involvement of the N-terminal part of cyclophilin B in the interaction with specific Jurkat T-cell binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariller, C; Haendler, B; Allain, F; Denys, A; Spik, G

    1996-07-15

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB) is secreted in biological fluids such as blood or milk and binds to a specific receptor present on the human lymphoblastic cell line Jurkat and on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. This study was intended to specify the areas of CyPB that are involved in the interaction with the receptor. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the first 24 N-terminal amino acid residues of CyPB was shown to specifically recognize the receptor. Moreover, modification of Arg18 of CyPB by p-hydroxyphenlglyoxal led to a dramatic loss of affinity for the receptor. However, when this residue was replaced by an alanine residue using site-directed mutagenesis, no modification of the binding properties was found, suggesting that Arg18 is not directly involved but is sufficiently close to the interaction site to interfere with the binding when modified. Competitive binding experiments using a chimaeric protein made up of the 24 N-terminal amino acid residues of CyPB fused to the cyclophilin A core sequence confirmed the involvement of this region of CyPB in receptor binding.

  16. Ionic interaction of myosin loop 2 with residues located beyond the N-terminal part of actin probed by chemical cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliszka, Barbara; Martin, Brian M; Karczewska, Emilia

    2008-02-01

    To probe ionic contacts of skeletal muscle myosin with negatively charged residues located beyond the N-terminal part of actin, myosin subfragment 1 (S1) and actin split by ECP32 protease (ECP-actin) were cross-linked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC). We have found that unmodified S1 can be cross-linked not only to the N-terminal part, but also to the C-terminal 36 kDa fragment of ECP-actin. Subsequent experiments performed on S1 cleaved by elastase or trypsin indicate that the cross-linking site in S1 is located within loop 2. This site is composed of Lys-636 and Lys-637 and can interact with negatively charged residues of the 36 kDa actin fragment, most probably with Glu-99 and Glu-100. Cross-links are formed both in the absence and presence of MgATP.P(i) analog, although the addition of nucleotide decreases the efficiency of the cross-linking reaction.

  17. BtcA, A class IA type III chaperone, interacts with the BteA N-terminal domain through a globular/non-globular mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guttman

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of "whooping cough" disease, utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver a 69 kDa cytotoxic effector protein, BteA, directly into the host cells. As with other T3SS effectors, prior to its secretion BteA binds BtcA, a 13.9 kDa protein predicted to act as a T3SS class IA chaperone. While this interaction had been characterized for such effector-chaperone pairs in other pathogens, it has yet to be fully investigated in Bordetella. Here we provide the first biochemical proof that BtcA is indeed a class IA chaperone, responsible for the binding of BteA's N-terminal domain. We bring forth extensive evidence that BtcA binds its substrate effector through a dual-interface binding mechanism comprising of non-globular and bi-globular interactions at a moderate micromolar level binding affinity. We demonstrate that the non-globular interactions involve the first 31 N-terminal residues of BteA287 and their removal leads to destabilization of the effector-chaperone complex and lower binding affinities to BtcA. These findings represent an important first step towards a molecular understanding of BteA secretion and cell entry.

  18. Role of N-terminal 28-amino-acid region of Rhizopus oryzae lipase in directing proteins to secretory pathway of Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Shinji; Tamalampudi, Sriappareddy; Shindo, Naoki; Numata, Takao; Yamaji, Hideki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2008-07-01

    To develop a new approach for improving heterologous protein production in Aspergillus oryzae, we focused on the functional role of the N-terminal region of Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL). Several N-terminal deletion variants of ROL were expressed in A. oryzae. Interestingly, a segment of 28 amino acids from the C-terminal region of the propeptide (N28) was found to be critical for secretion of ROL into the culture medium. To further investigate the role of N28, the ROL secretory process was visualized in vivo using ROL-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins. In cells producing ROL with N28, fluorescence observations showed that the fusion proteins are transported through endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, and cell wall, which is one of the typical secretory processes in a eukaryotic cell. Because the expression of the mature ROL-GFP fusion protein induced fluorescence accumulation without its translocation into the ER, N28 is considered to play a crucial role in protein transport. When N28 was inserted between the secretion signal and GFP, fluorescence observations showed that GFP, which is originally a cytoplasmic protein, was efficiently translocated into the ER of A. oryzae, resulting in an enhanced secretion of mature GFP after proteolytic cleavage of N28. These findings suggest that N28 facilitates protein translocation into ER and can be a promising candidate for improving heterologous protein production in A. oryzae.

  19. Role of N-terminal His6-Tags in binding and efficient translocation of polypeptides into cells using anthrax protective antigen (PA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Beitzinger

    Full Text Available It is of interest to define bacterial toxin biochemical properties to use them as molecular-syringe devices in order to deliver enzymatic activities into host cells. Binary toxins of the AB(7/8-type are among the most potent and specialized bacterial protein toxins. The B subunits oligomerize to form a pore that binds with high affinity host cell receptors and the enzymatic A subunit. This allows the endocytosis of the complex and subsequent injection of the A subunit into the cytosol of the host cells. Here we report that the addition of an N-terminal His(6-tag to different proteins increased their binding affinity to the protective antigen (PA PA(63-channels, irrespective if they are related (C2I or unrelated (gpJ, EDIN to the AB(7/8-family of toxins. His(6-EDIN exhibited voltage-dependent increase of the stability constant for binding by a factor of about 25 when the trans-side corresponding to the cell interior was set to -70 mV. Surprisingly, the C. botulinum toxin C2II-channel did not share this feature of PA(63. Cell-based experiments demonstrated that addition of an N-terminal His(6-tag promoted also intoxication of endothelial cells by C2I or EDIN via PA(63. Our results revealed that addition of His(6-tags to several factors increase their binding properties to PA(63 and enhance the property to intoxicate cells.

  20. Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain A59 and Blocking Antireceptor Monoclonal Antibody Bind to the N-Terminal Domain of Cellular Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dveksler, Gabriela S.; Pensiero, Michael N.; Dieffenbach, Carl W.; Cardellichio, Christine B.; Basile, Alexis A.; Elia, Patrick E.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    1993-03-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) strain A59 uses as cellular receptors members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family in the immunoglobulin superfamily. Recombinant receptor proteins with deletions of whole or partial immunoglobulin domains were used to identify the regions of receptor glycoprotein recognized by virus and by antireceptor monoclonal antibody CC1, which blocks infection of murine cells. Monoclonal antibody CC1 and MHV-A59 virions bound only to recombinant proteins containing the entire first domain of MHV receptor. To determine which of the proteins could serve as functional virus receptors, receptor-negative hamster cells were transfected with recombinant deletion clones and then challenged with MHV-A59 virions. Receptor activity required the entire N-terminal domain with either the second or the fourth domain and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Recombinant proteins lacking the first domain or its C-terminal portion did not serve as viral receptors. Thus, like other virus receptors in the immunoglobulin superfamily, including CD4, poliovirus receptor, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, the N-terminal domain of MHV receptor is recognized by the virus and the blocking monoclonal antibody.

  1. 4-alkyl-L-(Dehydro)proline biosynthesis in actinobacteria involves N-terminal nucleophile-hydrolase activity of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase homolog for C-C bond cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guannan; Zhao, Qunfei; Zhang, Qinglin; Liu, Wen

    2017-07-01

    γ-Glutamyltranspeptidases (γ-GTs), ubiquitous in glutathione metabolism for γ-glutamyl transfer/hydrolysis, are N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn)-hydrolase fold proteins that share an autoproteolytic process for self-activation. γ-GT homologues are widely present in Gram-positive actinobacteria where their Ntn-hydrolase activities, however, are not involved in glutathione metabolism. Herein, we demonstrate that the formation of 4-Alkyl-L-(dehydro)proline (ALDP) residues, the non-proteinogenic α-amino acids that serve as vital components of many bioactive metabolites found in actinobacteria, involves unprecedented Ntn-hydrolase activity of γ-GT homologue for C-C bond cleavage. The related enzymes share a key Thr residue, which acts as an internal nucleophile for protein hydrolysis and then as a newly released N-terminal nucleophile for carboxylate side-chain processing likely through the generation of an oxalyl-Thr enzyme intermediate. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the biosynthesis of various ALDP residues/associated natural products, highlight the versatile functions of Ntn-hydrolase fold proteins, and particularly generate interest in thus far less-appreciated γ-GT homologues in actinobacteria.

  2. Annotating RNA motifs in sequences and alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Paul P; Eldai, Hisham

    2015-01-01

    RNA performs a diverse array of important functions across all cellular life. These functions include important roles in translation, building translational machinery and maturing messenger RNA. More recent discoveries include the miRNAs and bacterial sRNAs that regulate gene expression, the thermosensors, riboswitches and other cis-regulatory elements that help prokaryotes sense their environment and eukaryotic piRNAs that suppress transposition. However, there can be a long period between the initial discovery of a RNA and determining its function. We present a bioinformatic approach to characterize RNA motifs, which are critical components of many RNA structure-function relationships. These motifs can, in some instances, provide researchers with functional hypotheses for uncharacterized RNAs. Moreover, we introduce a new profile-based database of RNA motifs--RMfam--and illustrate some applications for investigating the evolution and functional characterization of RNA. All the data and scripts associated with this work are available from: https://github.com/ppgardne/RMfam. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Dynamic motifs in socio-economic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Shao, Shuai; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2014-12-01

    Socio-economic networks are of central importance in economic life. We develop a method of identifying and studying motifs in socio-economic networks by focusing on “dynamic motifs,” i.e., evolutionary connection patterns that, because of “node acquaintances” in the network, occur much more frequently than random patterns. We examine two evolving bi-partite networks: i) the world-wide commercial ship chartering market and ii) the ship build-to-order market. We find similar dynamic motifs in both bipartite networks, even though they describe different economic activities. We also find that “influence” and “persistence” are strong factors in the interaction behavior of organizations. When two companies are doing business with the same customer, it is highly probable that another customer who currently only has business relationship with one of these two companies, will become customer of the second in the future. This is the effect of influence. Persistence means that companies with close business ties to customers tend to maintain their relationships over a long period of time.

  4. Large-scale discovery of promoter motifs in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Thomas A Down

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A key step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the repertoire of transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs that form the building blocks of promoters and other regulatory elements. Identifying these experimentally is very laborious, and the number of TFBMs discovered remains relatively small, especially when compared with the hundreds of transcription factor genes predicted in metazoan genomes. We have used a recently developed statistical motif discovery approach, NestedMICA, to detect candidate TFBMs from a large set of Drosophila melanogaster promoter regions. Of the 120 motifs inferred in our initial analysis, 25 were statistically significant matches to previously reported motifs, while 87 appeared to be novel. Analysis of sequence conservation and motif positioning suggested that the great majority of these discovered motifs are predictive of functional elements in the genome. Many motifs showed associations with specific patterns of gene expression in the D. melanogaster embryo, and we were able to obtain confident annotation of expression patterns for 25 of our motifs, including eight of the novel motifs. The motifs are available through Tiffin, a new database of DNA sequence motifs. We have discovered many new motifs that are overrepresented in D. melanogaster promoter regions, and offer several independent lines of evidence that these are novel TFBMs. Our motif dictionary provides a solid foundation for further investigation of regulatory elements in Drosophila, and demonstrates techniques that should be applicable in other species. We suggest that further improvements in computational motif discovery should narrow the gap between the set of known motifs and the total number of transcription factors in metazoan genomes.

  5. MUTATION ON WD DIPEPTIDE MOTIFS OF THE p48 SUBUNIT OF CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTOR-1 CAUSING VIABILITY AND GROWTH OF DT40 CHICKEN B CELL LINE

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    Ahyar Ahmad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1, a protein complex consisting of three subunits, p150, p60, and p48, is highly conserved from yeast to humans and facilitated nucleosome assembly of newly replicated DNA. The p48 subunit, CAF-1p48 (p48, with seven WD (Trp-Asp repeat motifs, is a member of the WD protein family. The immunoprecipitation experiment revealed that ß-propeller structure of p48 was less stringent for it's binding to HDAC-1, but more stringent for its binding to both histones H4 and CAF-1p60 but not to ASF-1, indicating that the proper ß-propeller structure of p48 is essential for the binding to these two proteins histone H4 and CAF-1p60. Complementation experiments, involving missense and truncated mutants of FLAG-tagged p48, revealed that mutations of every of seven WD dipeptide motifs, like both the N-terminal and C-terminal truncated mutations, could not rescue for the tet-induced lethality. These results indicate not only that p48 is essential for the viability of vertebrate cells, although the yeast p48 homolog is nonessential, but also that all the seven WD dipeptide motifs are necessary for the maintenance of the proper structure of p48 that is fundamentally important for cell viability.   Keywords: Chromatin assembly factor-1, complementation experiments, viability

  6. CONTEMPORARY USAGE OF TRADITIONAL TURKISH MOTIFS IN PRODUCT DESIGNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulay Gumuser

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the traditional Turkish motifs and its relations among present industrial designs. Traditional Turkish motifs played a very important role in 16th century onwards. The arts of the Ottoman Empire were used because of their symbolic meanings and unique styles. When we examine these motifs we encounter; Tiger Stripe, Three Spot (Çintemani, Rumi, Hatayi, Penç, Cloud, Crescent, Star, Crown, Hyacinth, Tulip and Carnation motifs. Nowadays, Turkish designers have begun to use these traditional Turkish motifs in their designs so as to create differences and awareness in the world design. The examples of these industrial designs, using the Turkish motifs, have survived and have Ottoman heritage and historical value. In this study, the Turkish motifs will be examined along with their focus on contemporary Turkish industrial designs used today.

  7. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Santamaría-Hernando

    Full Text Available Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20, where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+ coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+ binding with a K(D of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821 is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of

  8. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría-Hernando, Saray; Krell, Tino; Ramos-González, María-Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP) superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20), where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+) coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+) binding with a K(D) of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821) is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of life.

  9. Aplikasi Ornamen Khas Maluku untuk Pengembangan Desain Motif Batik

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    Masiswo Masiswo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAKMaluku memiliki banyak ragam hias budaya warisan nilai leluhur berupa ornamen etnis yang merupakan kesenian dan keterampilan kerajinan. Hasil warisan tersebut sampai saat ini masih lestari hidup serta dapat dinikmati sebagai konsumsi rohani yang memuaskan manusia. Berkaitan dengan keberlangsungan nilai-nilai tradisi etnis yang berwujud pada ornamen-ornamen daerah Maluku, maka dikembangkan untuk kebutuhan manusia berupa motif batik pada kain. Pengembangan ornamen ini lebih menekankan pada representasi akan bentuk-bentuk ornamen yang diterapkan pada kerajinan batik berupa motif khas Maluku. Pengembangan alternatif desain motif batik dibuat tiga variasi yang bersumber dari ornamen khas Maluku dibuat prototipe produknya dan diuji ketahanan luntur warnanya. Hasil uji ketahanan luntur warna terhadap gosokan basah dari tiga prototipe produk berpredikat baik sekali terdapat pada “Motif Siwa” dan predikat baik pada motif “Siwa Talang” dan motif “Matahari Siwa Talang”.Kata kunci: desain, Maluku, motif batik, ornamenABSTRACTMaluku has much decorative ancestral cultural heritage value in the form of ornament ethnic arts and crafts skills. The result of the legacy is still sustainable living can be enjoyed as well as satisfying spiritual human consumption.Related to the sustainability of traditional values in the form of ethnic ornaments Maluku, it was developed for human needs in the form of batik cloth . The development of these ornaments will be more emphasis on the representation forms of ornamentation that is applied to a batik motif Maluku. Development of alternative design motif made three variations. The development of three alternative design motifs derived from the Maluku ornaments made and tested a prototype product color fastness. The test results of color fastness to wet rubbing of the three prototypes are excellent products predicated on the "Motif Siwa" and a good rating on the motif "Siwa Talang" and motif "Matahari Siwa

  10. Combined measurement of copeptin, high-sensitivity troponin T, and N-terminal proBNP improves the identification of patients at risk of cardiovascular death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alehagen, Urban; Dahlström, Ulf; Carstensen, John

    2012-01-01

    and all mortality was registered. Cardiovascular mortality was evaluated using Kaplan–Meier plots and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analyses. Results: Copeptin, HS-TnT, and NT-proBNP measurements provided independent prognostic information in a multivariate setting over 5 years (hazard......Objectives: A multimarker strategy for the handling of patients with heart failure has been suggested in the literature. Therefore, the potential prognostic relevance of combined copeptin, high-sensitivity troponin T (HS-TnT), and N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) measurement in plasma from elderly...... patients with symptoms of heart failure was evaluated. Methods: This study included 470 elderly patients (mean age 73 years) from a rural municipality with symptoms of heart failure. Clinical examination, echocardiography, and biomarker measurements were performed. All patients were followed for 13 years...

  11. The heparin-binding site in tetranectin is located in the N-terminal region and binding does not involve the carbohydrate recognition domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentsen, R H; Graversen, J H; Caterer, N R; Thogersen, H C; Etzerodt, M

    2000-04-01

    Tetranectin is a homotrimeric plasma and extracellular-matrix protein that binds plasminogen and complex sulphated polysaccharides including heparin. In terms of primary and tertiary structure, tetranectin is related to the collectin family of Ca(2+)-binding C-type lectins. Tetranectin is encoded in three exons. Exon 3 encodes the carbohydrate recognition domain, which binds to kringle 4 in plasminogen at low levels of Ca(2+). Exon 2 encodes an alpha-helix, which is necessary and sufficient to govern the trimerization of tetranectin by assembling into a triple-helical coiled-coil structural element. Here we show that the heparin-binding site in tetranectin resides not in the carbohydrate recognition domain but within the N-terminal region, comprising the 16 amino acid residues encoded by exon 1. In particular, the lysine residues in the decapeptide segment KPKKIVNAKK (tetranectin residues 6-15) are shown to be of primary importance in heparin binding.

  12. Tumor suppressor BLU inhibits proliferation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by regulation of cell cycle, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and the cyclin D1 promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiangning; Liu, Hui; Li, Binbin; Huang, Peichun; Shao, Jianyong; He, Zhiwei

    2012-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes function to regulate and block tumor cell proliferation. To explore the mechanisms underlying the tumor suppression of BLU/ZMYND10 gene on a frequently lost human chromosomal region, an adenoviral vector with BLU cDNA insert was constructed. BLU was re-expressed in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by transfection or viral infection. Clonogenic growth was assayed; cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry-based DNA content detection; c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and cyclin D1 promoter activities were measured by reporter gene assay, and phosphorylation was measured by immunoblotting. The data for each pair of groups were compared with Student t tests. BLU inhibits clonogenic growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, arrests cell cycle at G1 phase, downregulates JNK and cyclin D1 promoter activities, and inhibits phosphorylation of c-Jun. BLU inhibits growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by regulation of the JNK-cyclin D1 axis to exert tumor suppression

  13. The scorpion toxin Bot IX is a potent member of the α-like family and has a unique N-terminal sequence extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Salvatierra, Juan; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E

    2016-09-01

    We report the detailed chemical, immunological and pharmacological characterization of the α-toxin Bot IX from the Moroccan scorpion Buthus occitanus tunetanus venom. Bot IX, which consists of 70 amino acids, is a highly atypical toxin. It carries a unique N-terminal sequence extension and is highly lethal in mice. Voltage clamp recordings on oocytes expressing rat Nav1.2 or insect BgNav1 reveal that, similar to other α-like toxins, Bot IX inhibits fast inactivation of both variants. Moreover, Bot IX belongs to the same structural/immunological group as the α-like toxin Bot I. Remarkably, radioiodinated Bot IX competes efficiently with the classical α-toxin AaH II from Androctonus australis, and displays one of the highest affinities for Nav channels. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. The Use of N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide to Evaluate Vascular Disease in Elderly Patients with Mental Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Nilsson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP is regarded as a sensitive marker of cardiovascular disease. Vascular disease plays an important role in cognitive impairment. Method: In 447 elderly patients with mental illness, serum NT-proBNP level and the presence or absence of vascular disease according to the medical record were used to categorize patients in different subgroups of vascular disease. Results and Conclusion: Patients with vascular disease and elevated serum NT-proBNP level had a lower cognition level, shorter survival time, lower renal function and a higher percentage of pathological brain imaging than patients with vascular disease and normal NT-proBNP level. Thus, elevated serum NT-proBNP level might be helpful to detect patients who have a more severe cardiovascular disease.

  15. Elevation of serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide after exercise is an index of myocardial damage or a cytoprotective reflection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faviou, E; Zachari, A; Nounopoulos, C; Agrafiotis, E; Vourli, G; Dionyssiou-Asteriou, A

    2008-03-01

    Recent investigations have suggested the occurrence of transient cardiac dysfunction and reversible myocardial injury in healthy individuals after heavy exercise. Our purpose was to examine if the release of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) after intense exercise in obviously healthy participants may have cytoprotective and growth-regulating effects or may result from myocardial dysfunction/damage with changes in cTnT as a marker for myocardial cell necrosis during exercise. In 43 highly-trained male athletes hypertrophy. A normal plasma concentration of NT-proBNP in consecutive routine check-up, before and after exercise, could minimize the possibility of cardiac dysfunction, whereas persistent elevated plasma concentrations warrant further cardiological evaluation.

  16. The 1.8-Å crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of an archaeal MCM as a right-handed filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yang; Slaymaker, Ian M; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Ganggang; Chen, Xiaojiang S

    2014-04-03

    Mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins are the replicative helicase necessary for DNA replication in both eukarya and archaea. Most of archaea only have one MCM gene. Here, we report a 1.8-Å crystal structure of the N-terminal MCM from the archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum (tapMCM). In the structure, the MCM N-terminus forms a right-handed filament that contains six subunits in each turn, with a diameter of 25Å of the central channel opening. The inner surface is highly positively charged, indicating DNA binding. This filament structure with six subunits per turn may also suggests a potential role for an open-ring structure for hexameric MCM and dynamic conformational changes in initiation and elongation stages of DNA replication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnostic Value of N Terminal Pro B Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-pro BNP in Cardiac Involvement in Patients with Beta- Thalassemia

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    Noor Mohammad Noori

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Heart failure is a major cause of death in thalassemia. The study aimed to determine the diagnostic value of N Terminal Pro B Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-pro BNP, to early diagnose the cardiac involvement in beta- thalassemia major patients. Materials and Methods  80 thalassemia patients aged 7 to 18 years old (patients group, and 80 healthy age and gender matched controls were enrolled in the case-control study. Patients were selected from those attending to the clinic of Aliasghar hospital, Zahedan-Iran. They were subjected to echo-Doppler tissue and conventional examination for both right and left heart function. Data were analysis using SPSS 18.0 software. Results  NT-pro BNP increased in patients compared the controls (P

  18. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 expression in the retina of ocular hypertension mice: a possible target to reduce ganglion cell apoptosis

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    Yue He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma, a type of optic neuropathy, is characterized by the loss of retinal ganglion cells. It remains controversial whether c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK participates in the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. This study sought to explore a possible mechanism of action of JNK signaling pathway in glaucoma-induced retinal optic nerve damage. We established a mouse model of chronic ocular hypertension by reducing the aqueous humor followed by photocoagulation using the laser ignition method. Results showed significant pathological changes in the ocular tissues after the injury. Apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells increased with increased intraocular pressure, as did JNK3 mRNA expression in the retina. These data indicated that the increased expression of JNK3 mRNA was strongly associated with the increase in intraocular pressure in the retina, and correlated positively with the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells.

  19. Prognostic Value of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Heart Failure Patients With and Without Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Jhund, Pardeep S; Mogensen, Ulrik M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF) have higher circulating levels of NT-proBNP (N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide) than HF patients without AF. There is uncertainty about the prognostic importance of a given concentration of NT-proBNP in HF patients...... Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure) or the ATMOSPHERE trial (Aliskiren Trial to Minimize Outcomes in Patients With Heart Failure), of whom 3575 (24%) had AF on their baseline ECG. Median (Q1, Q3) levels of NT-proBNP were 1817 pg/mL (1095......-3266 pg/mL) in those with AF and 1271 pg/mL (703-2569 pg/mL) in those without (PHeart Association class (III/IV; 36% versus 24%), and experienced fewer previous HF hospitalizations (52% versus 61%) or myocardial infarction (30...

  20. Quantification of the N-terminal propeptide of human procollagen type I (PINP): comparison of ELISA and RIA with respect to different molecular forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Hansen, M; Brandt, J

    1998-01-01

    This paper compares the results of procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) quantification by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PINP in serum from a patient with uremic hyperparathyroidism was measured in RIA and ELISA to 20 micrograms l-1 and 116...... of PINP when analysed in a direct ELISA. It is concluded that the major difference in the ELISA and RIA results is due to assay efficacy with respect to the low molecular weight form of PINP. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-Jan-12......-PAGE). Analysis of fractions from size separated amniotic fluid, serum and dialysis fluid demonstrated that the RIA failed to measure the low molecular weight form of PINP. However, the anti-PINP supplied with the RIA-kit and the anti-PINP applied in the ELISA reacted equally well with both molecular forms...

  1. Relation between N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and cardiac remodeling and function assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huaibing; Lu, Minjie; Hou, Cuihong; Chen, Xuhua; Wang, Jing; Yin, Gang; Chu, Jianmin; Zhang, Shu; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pu, Jielin; Zhao, Shihua

    2015-02-01

    Although N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a useful screening test of impaired right ventricular (RV) function in conditions affecting the right-sided cardiac muscle, the role of NT-proBNP remains unclear in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). This study was designed to clarify the relation between the plasma NT-proBNP level and the RV function evaluated by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. We selected 56 patients with confirmed ARVC only when their blood specimens for NT-proBNP measurements were collected within 48 hours of a CMR scan. The NT-proBNP level was significantly higher in patients with RV dysfunction than in patients without RV dysfunction (median of 655.3 [interquartile range 556.4 to 870.0] vs 347.0 [interquartile range 308.0 to 456.2] pmol/L, p rights reserved.

  2. Effects of body mass index and age on N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide are associated with glomerular filtration rate in chronic heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Kistorp, Caroline N

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a state characterized by glomerular hyperfiltration and age-related decreases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Body mass index (BMI), age, and GFR are associated with plasma concentrations of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in chronic heart failure...... (CHF) patients. We hypothesized that the effects of BMI and age on plasma concentrations of NT-proBNP are associated with GFR. METHODS: We obtained clinical data and laboratory test results from 345 CHF patients at the baseline visit in our heart failure clinic and examined the hypothesis using...... estimates for BMI (P = 0.3807) and age (P = 0.7238) changed markedly and became insignificant. In another model, after adjustment for GFR estimated by the 4-component Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula (eGFR(MDRD)), the parameter estimates for age (P = 0.0674) changed markedly and became...

  3. Propeptide big-endothelin, N-terminal-pro brain natriuretic peptide and mortality. The Ludwigshafen risk and cardiovascular health (LURIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergei, Ingrid; Krämer, Bernhard K; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; März, Winfried; Mondorf, Ulrich

    The endothelin system (Big-ET-1) is a key regulator in cardiovascular (CV) disease and congestive heart failure (CHF). We have examined the incremental value of Big-ET-1 in predicting total and CV mortality next to the well-established CV risk marker N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP). Big-ET-1 and NT-proBNP were determined in 2829 participants referred for coronary angiography (follow-up 9.9 years). Big-ET-1 is an independent predictor of total, CV mortality and death due to CHF. The conjunct use of Big-ET-1 and NT-proBNP improves the risk stratification of patients with intermediate to high risk of CV death and CHF. Big-ET-1improves risk stratification in patients referred for coronary angiography.

  4. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of RV144 Vaccine AIDSVAX Clade E Envelope Immunogen Is Enhanced by a gp120 N-Terminal Deletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Bonsignori, Mattia; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Haiyan; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Bowman, Cindy; Sutherland, Laura; Jeffries, Thomas L.; Kozink, Daniel M.; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Parks, Robert; Yates, Nicole L.; Overman, R. Glenn; Sinangil, Faruk; Berman, Phillip W.; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Karasavva, Nicos; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Santra, Sampa; Letvin, Norman L.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    An immune correlates analysis of the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial revealed that antibody responses to the gp120 V1/V2 region correlated inversely with infection risk. The RV144 protein immunogens (A244-rp120 and MN-rgp120) were modified by an N-terminal 11-amino-acid deletion (Δ11) and addition of a herpes simplex virus (HSV) gD protein-derived tag (gD). We investigated the effects of these modifications on gp120 expression, antigenicity, and immunogenicity by comparing unmodified A244 gp120 with both Δ11 deletion and gD tag and with Δ11 only. Analysis of A244 gp120, with or without Δ11 or gD, demonstrated that the Δ11 deletion, without the addition of gD, was sufficient for enhanced antigenicity to gp120 C1 region, conformational V2, and V1/V2 gp120 conformational epitopes. RV144 vaccinee serum IgGs bound more avidly to A244 gp120 Δ11 than to the unmodified gp120, and their binding was blocked by C1, V2, and V1/V2 antibodies. Rhesus macaques immunized with the three different forms of A244 gp120 proteins gave similar levels of gp120 antibody titers, although higher antibody titers developed earlier in A244 Δ11 gp120-immunized animals. Conformational V1/V2 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) gave significantly higher levels of blocking of plasma IgG from A244 Δ11 gp120-immunized animals than IgG from animals immunized with unmodified A244 gp120, thus indicating a qualitative difference in the V1/V2 antibodies induced by A244 Δ11 gp120. These results demonstrate that deletion of N-terminal residues in the RV144 A244 gp120 immunogen improves both envelope antigenicity and immunogenicity. PMID:23175357

  5. The catalytic chain of human complement subcomponent C1r. Purification and N-terminal amino acid sequences of the major cyanogen bromide-cleavage fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlaud, G J; Gagnon, J; Porter, R R

    1982-01-01

    1. The a- and b-chains of reduced and alkylated human complement subcomponent C1r were separated by high-pressure gel-permeation chromatography and isolated in good yield and in pure form. 2. CNBr cleavage of C1r b-chain yielded eight major peptides, which were purified by gel filtration and high-pressure reversed-phase chromatography. As determined from the sum of their amino acid compositions, these peptides accounted for a minimum molecular weight of 28 000, close to the value 29 100 calculated from the whole b-chain. 3. N-Terminal sequence determinations of C1r b-chain and its CNBr-cleavage peptides allowed the identification of about two-thirds of the amino acids of C1r b-chain. From our results, and on the basis of homology with other serine proteinases, an alignment of the eight CNBr-cleavage peptides from C1r b-chain is proposed. 4. The residues forming the 'charge-relay' system of the active site of serine proteinases (His-57, Asp-102 and Ser-195 in the chymotrypsinogen numbering) are found in the corresponding regions of C1r b-chain, and the amino acid sequence around these residues has been determined. 5. The N-terminal sequence of C1r b-chain has been extended to residue 60 and reveals that C1r b-chain lacks the 'histidine loop', a disulphide bond that is present in all other known serine proteinases.

  6. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the protein Expansion: an ‘Expansion’ to the Smad MH2 fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beich-Frandsen, Mads; Aragón, Eric [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Llimargas, Marta [Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, IBMB–CSIC, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Benach, Jordi [ALBA Synchrotron, BP 1413, km 3.3, Cerdanyola del Vallès (Spain); Riera, Antoni [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pous, Joan [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Platform of Crystallography IBMB–CSIC, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Macias, Maria J., E-mail: maria.macias@irbbarcelona.org [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-04-01

    Expansion is a modular protein that is conserved in protostomes. The first structure of the N-terminal domain of Expansion has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution and the new Nα-MH2 domain was found to belong to the Smad/FHA superfamily of structures. Gene-expression changes observed in Drosophila embryos after inducing the transcription factor Tramtrack led to the identification of the protein Expansion. Expansion contains an N-terminal domain similar in sequence to the MH2 domain characteristic of Smad proteins, which are the central mediators of the effects of the TGF-β signalling pathway. Apart from Smads and Expansion, no other type of protein belonging to the known kingdoms of life contains MH2 domains. To compare the Expansion and Smad MH2 domains, the crystal structure of the Expansion domain was determined at 1.6 Å resolution, the first structure of a non-Smad MH2 domain to be characterized to date. The structure displays the main features of the canonical MH2 fold with two main differences: the addition of an α-helical region and the remodelling of a protein-interaction site that is conserved in the MH2 domain of Smads. Owing to these differences, to the new domain was referred to as Nα-MH2. Despite the presence of the Nα-MH2 domain, Expansion does not participate in TGF-β signalling; instead, it is required for other activities specific to the protostome phyla. Based on the structural similarities to the MH2 fold, it is proposed that the Nα-MH2 domain should be classified as a new member of the Smad/FHA superfamily.

  7. The conserved residue Arg46 in the N-terminal heptad repeat domain of HIV-1 gp41 is critical for viral fusion and entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Wang

    Full Text Available During the process of HIV-1 fusion with the target cell, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR of gp41 interacts with the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR to form fusogenic six-helix bundle (6-HB core. We previously identified a crucial residue for 6-HB formation and virus entry--Lys63 (K63 in the C-terminal region of NHR (aa 54-70, which forms a hydrophobic cavity. It can form an important salt bridge with Asp121 (D121 in gp41 CHR. Here, we found another important conserved residue for virus fusion and entry, Arg46 (R46, in the N-terminal region of NHR (aa 35-53, which forms a hydrogen bond with a polar residue, Asn43 (N43, in NHR, as a part of the hydrogen-bond network. R46 can also form a salt bridge with a negatively charged residue, Glu137 (E137, in gp41 CHR. Substitution of R46 with the hydrophobic residue Ala (R46A or the negatively charged residue Glu (R46E resulted in disruption of the hydrogen bond network, breakage of the salt bridge and reduction of 6-HB's stability, leading to impairment of viral fusion and decreased inhibition of N36, an NHR peptide. Similarly, CHR peptide C34 with substitution of E137 for Ala (E137A or Arg (E137R also exhibited reduced inhibitory activity against HIV-1 infection and HIV-1-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. These results suggest that the positively charged residue R46 and its hydrogen bond network, together with the salt bridge between R46 and E137, are important for viral fusion and entry and may therefore serve as a target for designing novel HIV fusion/entry inhibitors.

  8. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the protein Expansion: an ‘Expansion’ to the Smad MH2 fold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beich-Frandsen, Mads; Aragón, Eric; Llimargas, Marta; Benach, Jordi; Riera, Antoni; Pous, Joan; Macias, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion is a modular protein that is conserved in protostomes. The first structure of the N-terminal domain of Expansion has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution and the new Nα-MH2 domain was found to belong to the Smad/FHA superfamily of structures. Gene-expression changes observed in Drosophila embryos after inducing the transcription factor Tramtrack led to the identification of the protein Expansion. Expansion contains an N-terminal domain similar in sequence to the MH2 domain characteristic of Smad proteins, which are the central mediators of the effects of the TGF-β signalling pathway. Apart from Smads and Expansion, no other type of protein belonging to the known kingdoms of life contains MH2 domains. To compare the Expansion and Smad MH2 domains, the crystal structure of the Expansion domain was determined at 1.6 Å resolution, the first structure of a non-Smad MH2 domain to be characterized to date. The structure displays the main features of the canonical MH2 fold with two main differences: the addition of an α-helical region and the remodelling of a protein-interaction site that is conserved in the MH2 domain of Smads. Owing to these differences, to the new domain was referred to as Nα-MH2. Despite the presence of the Nα-MH2 domain, Expansion does not participate in TGF-β signalling; instead, it is required for other activities specific to the protostome phyla. Based on the structural similarities to the MH2 fold, it is proposed that the Nα-MH2 domain should be classified as a new member of the Smad/FHA superfamily

  9. Feline tetherin is characterized by a short N-terminal region and is counteracted by the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestino, Michele; Calistri, Arianna; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Salata, Cristiano; Chiuppesi, Flavia; Pistello, Mauro; Borsetti, Alessandra; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina

    2012-06-01

    Tetherin (BST2) is the host cell factor that blocks the particle release of some enveloped viruses. Two putative feline tetherin proteins differing at the level of the N-terminal coding region have recently been described and tested for their antiviral activity. By cloning and comparing the two reported feline tetherins (called here cBST2(504) and cBST2*) and generating specific derivative mutants, this study provides evidence that feline tetherin has a shorter intracytoplasmic domain than those of other known homologues. The minimal tetherin promoter was identified and assayed for its ability to drive tetherin expression in an alpha interferon-inducible manner. We also demonstrated that cBST2(504) is able to dimerize, is localized at the cellular membrane, and impairs human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particle release, regardless of the presence of the Vpu antagonist accessory protein. While cBST2(504) failed to restrict wild-type feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) egress, FIV mutants, bearing a frameshift at the level of the envelope-encoding region, were potently blocked. The transient expression of the FIV envelope glycoprotein was able to rescue mutant particle release from feline tetherin-positive cells but did not antagonize human BST2 activity. Moreover, cBST2(504) was capable of specifically immunoprecipitating the FIV envelope glycoprotein. Finally, cBST2(504) also exerted its function on HIV-2 ROD10 and on the simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239. Taken together, these results show that feline tetherin does indeed have a short N-terminal region and that the FIV envelope glycoprotein is the predominant factor counteracting tetherin restriction.

  10. Structure of the USP15 N-terminal domains: a β-hairpin mediates close association between the DUSP and UBL domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Stephen; Besong, Tabot M D; Emsley, Jonas; Scott, David J; Dreveny, Ingrid

    2011-09-20

    Ubiquitin specific protease 15 (USP15) functions in COP9 signalosome mediated regulation of protein degradation and cellular signaling through catalyzing the ubiquitin deconjugation reaction of a discrete number of substrates. It influences the stability of adenomatous polyposis coli, IκBα, caspase-3, and the human papillomavirus type 16 E6. USP15 forms a subfamily with USP4 and USP11 related through a shared presence of N-terminal "domain present in ubiquitin specific proteases" (DUSP) and "ubiquitin-like" (UBL) domains (DU subfamily). Here we report the 1.5 Å resolution crystal structure of the human USP15 N-terminal domains revealing a 80 Å elongated arrangement with the DU domains aligned in tandem. This architecture is generated through formation of a defined interface that is dominated by an intervening β-hairpin structure (DU finger) that engages in an intricate hydrogen-bonding network between the domains. The UBL domain is closely related to ubiquitin among β-grasp folds but is characterized by the presence of longer loop regions and different surface characteristics, indicating that this domain is unlikely to act as ubiquitin mimic. Comparison with the related murine USP4 DUSP-UBL crystal structure reveals that the main DU interdomain contacts are conserved. Analytical ultracentrifugation, small-angle X-ray scattering, and gel filtration experiments revealed that USP15 DU is monomeric in solution. Our data provide a framework to advance study of the structure and function of the DU subfamily. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Analysis of proteolytic processes and enzymatic activities in the generation of huntingtin n-terminal fragments in an HEK293 cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T N Tebbenkamp

    Full Text Available N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin (htt that terminate between residues 90-115, termed cleavage product A or 1 (cp-A/1, form intracellular and intranuclear inclusion bodies in the brains of patients with Huntington's disease (HD. These fragments appear to be proteolytic products of the full-length protein. Here, we use an HEK293 cell culture model to investigate huntingtin proteolytic processing; previous studies of these cells have demonstrated cleavage of htt to cp-A/1 like htt fragments.Recombinant N-terminal htt fragments, terminating at residue 171 (also referred to as cp-B/2 like, were efficiently cleaved to produce cp-A/1 whereas fragments representing endogenous caspase, calpain, and metalloproteinase cleavage products, terminating between residues 400-600, were inefficiently cleaved. Using cysteine-labeling techniques and antibody binding mapping, we localized the C-terminus of the cp-A/1 fragments produced by HEK293 cells to sequences minimally limited by cysteine 105 and an antibody epitope composed of residues 115-124. A combination of genetic and pharmacologic approaches to inhibit potential proteases, including γ-secretase and calpain, proved ineffective in preventing production of cp-A/1.Our findings indicate that HEK293 cells express a protease that is capable of efficiently cleaving cp-B/2 like fragments of htt with normal or expanded glutamine repeats. For reasons that remain unclear, this protease cleaves longer htt fragments, with normal or expanded glutamine expansions, much less efficiently. The protease in HEK293 cells that is capable of generating a cp-A/1 like htt fragment may be a novel protease with a high preference for a cp-B/2-like htt fragment as substrate.

  12. Crystal Structure of Marburg Virus VP40 Reveals a Broad, Basic Patch for Matrix Assembly and a Requirement of the N-Terminal Domain for Immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Shun-Ichiro; Noda, Takeshi; Wijesinghe, Kaveesha J; Halfmann, Peter; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Abelson, Dafna M; Armbrust, Tammy; Stahelin, Robert V; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2016-02-15

    Marburg virus (MARV), a member of the filovirus family, causes severe hemorrhagic fever with up to 90% lethality. MARV matrix protein VP40 is essential for assembly and release of newly copied viruses and also suppresses immune signaling in the infected cell. Here we report the crystal structure of MARV VP40. We found that MARV VP40 forms a dimer in solution, mediated by N-terminal domains, and that formation of this dimer is essential for budding of virus-like particles. We also found the N-terminal domain to be necessary and sufficient for immune antagonism. The C-terminal domains of MARV VP40 are dispensable for immunosuppression but are required for virus assembly. The C-terminal domains are only 16% identical to those of Ebola virus, differ in structure from those of Ebola virus, and form a distinct broad and flat cationic surface that likely interacts with the cell membrane during virus assembly. Marburg virus, a cousin of Ebola virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever, with up to 90% lethality seen in recent outbreaks. Molecular structures and visual images of the proteins of Marburg virus are essential for the development of antiviral drugs. One key protein in the Marburg virus life cycle is VP40, which both assembles the virus and suppresses the immune system. Here we provide the molecular structure of Marburg virus VP40, illustrate differences from VP40 of Ebola virus, and reveal surfaces by which Marburg VP40 assembles progeny and suppresses immune function. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Association between resting heart rate and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in a community-based population study in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ruihua Cao, Yongyi Bai, Ruyi Xu, Ping Ye Department of Geriatric Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP is associated with an increased risk of cardiac insufficiency, which possibly leads to heart failure. However, the relationship between resting heart rate and NT-proBNP is unclear.Objective: This study focuses on this relativity between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP levels in a surveyed community-based population.Methods: We evaluated the relativity between resting heart rate and plasma levels of NT-proBNP in 1,567 participants (mean age 61.0 years, range 21–96 years from a community-based population in Beijing, People’s Republic of China.Results: In patients with high resting heart rate (≥75 beats/min, NT-proBNP was higher than in those having low resting heart rate (<75 beats/min. In multiple linear stepwise regression analysis, plasma NT-proBNP was associated with resting heart rate (partial correlation coefficient, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.18–1.51; P=0.011. A subsequent subgroup analysis revealed that the association between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP was strengthened in subjects over 60 years old (partial correlation coefficient 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.49–2.36; P=0.031; while the relativity between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP was not emerged in the younger subgroup (<60 years old.Conclusions: Resting heart rate was associated with plasma NT-proBNP in the elderly, which indicated a relationship between resting heart rate and cardiac function damage. Keywords: resting heart rate, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, epidemiology, cardiac function, relationship

  14. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Varela Chavez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1–93 domain recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases.

  15. Three-dimensional structure of N-terminal domain of DnaB helicase and helicase-primase interactions in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Kashav

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Replication initiation is a crucial step in genome duplication and homohexameric DnaB helicase plays a central role in the replication initiation process by unwinding the duplex DNA and interacting with several other proteins during the process of replication. N-terminal domain of DnaB is critical for helicase activity and for DnaG primase interactions. We present here the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD of H. pylori DnaB (HpDnaB helicase at 2.2 A resolution and compare the structural differences among helicases and correlate with the functional differences. The structural details of NTD suggest that the linker region between NTD and C-terminal helicase domain plays a vital role in accurate assembly of NTD dimers. The sequence analysis of the linker regions from several helicases reveals that they should form four helix bundles. We also report the characterization of H. pylori DnaG primase and study the helicase-primase interactions, where HpDnaG primase stimulates DNA unwinding activity of HpDnaB suggesting presence of helicase-primase cohort at the replication fork. The protein-protein interaction study of C-terminal domain of primase and different deletion constructs of helicase suggests that linker is essential for proper conformation of NTD to interact strongly with HpDnaG. The surface charge distribution on the primase binding surface of NTDs of various helicases suggests that DnaB-DnaG interaction and stability of the complex is most probably charge dependent. Structure of the linker and helicase-primase interactions indicate that HpDnaB differs greatly from E.coli DnaB despite both belong to gram negative bacteria.

  16. UKIRAN KERAWANG ACEH GAYO SEBAGAI INSPIRASI PENCIPTAAN MOTIF BATIK KHAS GAYO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfa ina Rohana Salma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Industri batik mulai berkembang di Gayo, tetapi belum memiliki motif batik khas daerah. Oleh karena itu perlu diciptakan motif batik khas Gayo, dengan mengambil inspirasi dari ukiran yang terdapat pada rumah tradisional yang biasa disebut ukiran kerawang Gayo. Tujuan penciptaan seni ini adalah untuk menciptakan motif batik yang memiliki ciri khas Gayo. Metode yang digunakan yaitu eksplorasi ide, perancangan, dan perwujudan menjadi motif batik. Dalam kegiatan ini telah diciptakan enam motif batik khas Gayo yaitu: (1 Motif Ceplok Gayo; (2 Motif Gayo Tegak; (3 Motif Gayo Lurus; (4 Motif Parang Gayo; (5 Motif Gayo Lembut; dan (6 Motif Geometris Gayo. Hasil uji kesukaan terhadap motif kepada lima puluh responden menunjukkan bahwa Motif Ceplok Gayo paling banyak dipilih oleh responden yaitu sebesar 19%, sedangkan Motif Parang Gayo 18%, Motif Gayo Lembut 17%, Motif Geometris Gayo 17%, Motif Gayo Lurus 15% dan Motif Gayo Tegak 14%. Rata-rata motif yang dihasilkan mendapatkan apresiasi yang baik dari responden, sehingga semua motif layak diproduksi sebagai batik khas Gayo.Kata kunci: batik Gayo, Motif Ceplok Gayo, Motif Parang Gayo.ABSTRACTBatik industry began to develop in Gayo, but have not had a typical batik motif itself. Therefore, it is necessary to create batik motifs of Gayo, by taking inspiration from the carvings found in traditional houses commonly called kerawang Gayo. The purpose of this art is to create motifs those have a Gayo characteristic. The method used are the idea exploration, design, and motifs embodiment. In this activity has created six Gayo batik motifs, namely: (1 Motif Ceplok Gayo; (2 Motif Gayo Tegak; (3 Motif GayoLurus; (4 Motif Parang Gayo; (5 Motif Gayo Lembut; dan (6 Motif Geometris Gayo. The test results fondness of the motives to fifty respondents indicated that the Motif Ceplok Gayo most preferred by respondents ie 19%, while Motif Parang Gayo 18%, Motif Gayo Lembut 17%, Motif Geometris Gayo 17%, Motif Gayo

  17. Expression, refolding and crystallizations of the Grb2-like (GADS) C-terminal SH3 domain complexed with a SLP-76 motif peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faravelli, Alessandro; Dimasi, Nazzareno

    2005-01-01

    Several crystals of the Grb2-like C-terminal SH3 domain in complex with a motif peptide from the SLP-76 protein were obtained and characterized. The Grb2-like adaptor protein GADS is composed of an N-terminal SH3 domain, an SH2 domain, a proline-rich region and a C-terminal SH3 domain. GADS interacts through its C-terminal SH3 domain with the adaptor protein SLP-76, thus recruiting this protein and other associated molecules to the linker for activation of T-cell (LAT) protein. The DNA encoding the C-terminal SH3 domain of GADS (GADS-cSH3) was assembled synthetically using a recursive PCR technique and the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, refolded and purified. Several crystals of this domain in complex with the SLP-76 peptide were obtained and characterized

  18. Getting from A to B-exploring the activation motifs of the class B adhesion G protein-coupled receptor subfamily G member 4/GPR112

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelia Peeters, Miriam; Mos, Iris; Lenselink, Eelke B

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs/class B2 G protein-coupled receptors) constitute an ancient family of G protein-coupled receptors that have recently been demonstrated to play important roles in cellular and developmental processes. Here, we describe a first insight...... into the structure-function relationship of ADGRs using the family member ADGR subfamily G member 4 (ADGRG4)/GPR112 as a model receptor. In a bioinformatics approach, we compared conserved, functional elements of the well-characterized class A and class B1 secretin-like G protein-coupled receptors with the ADGRs. We...... identified several potential equivalent motifs and subjected those to mutational analysis. The importance of the mutated residues was evaluated by examining their effect on the high constitutive activity of the N-terminally truncated ADGRG4/GPR112 in a 1-receptor-1-G protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  19. RMOD: a tool for regulatory motif detection in signaling network.

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    Jinki Kim

    Full Text Available Regulatory motifs are patterns of activation and inhibition that appear repeatedly in various signaling networks and that show specific regulatory properties. However, the network structures of regulatory motifs are highly diverse and complex, rendering their identification difficult. Here, we present a RMOD, a web-based system for the identification of regulatory motifs and their properties in signaling networks. RMOD finds various network structures of regulatory motifs by compressing the signaling network and detecting the compressed forms of regulatory motifs. To apply it into a large-scale signaling network, it adopts a new subgraph search algorithm using a novel data structure called path-tree, which is a tree structure composed of isomorphic graphs of query regulatory motifs. This algorithm was evaluated using various sizes of signaling networks generated from the integration of various human signaling pathways and it showed that the speed and scalability of this algorithm outperforms those of other algorithms. RMOD includes interactive analysis and auxiliary tools that make it possible to manipulate the whole processes from building signaling network and query regulatory motifs to analyzing regulatory motifs with graphical illustration and summarized descriptions. As a result, RMOD provides an integrated view of the regulatory motifs and mechanism underlying their regulatory motif activities within the signaling network. RMOD is freely accessible online at the following URL: http://pks.kaist.ac.kr/rmod.

  20. Structural motifs of pre-nucleation clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Türkmen, I R; Wassermann, B; Erko, A; Rühl, E

    2013-10-07

    Structural motifs of pre-nucleation clusters prepared in single, optically levitated supersaturated aqueous aerosol microparticles containing CaBr2 as a model system are reported. Cluster formation is identified by means of X-ray absorption in the Br K-edge regime. The salt concentration beyond the saturation point is varied by controlling the humidity in the ambient atmosphere surrounding the 15-30 μm microdroplets. This leads to the formation of metastable supersaturated liquid particles. Distinct spectral shifts in near-edge spectra as a function of salt concentration are observed, in which the energy position of the Br K-edge is red-shifted by up to 7.1 ± 0.4 eV if the dilute solution is compared to the solid. The K-edge positions of supersaturated solutions are found between these limits. The changes in electronic structure are rationalized in terms of the formation of pre-nucleation clusters. This assumption is verified by spectral simulations using first-principle density functional theory and molecular dynamics calculations, in which structural motifs are considered, explaining the experimental results. These consist of solvated CaBr2 moieties, rather than building blocks forming calcium bromide hexahydrates, the crystal system that is formed by drying aqueous CaBr2 solutions.

  1. POWRS: position-sensitive motif discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian W Davis

    Full Text Available Transcription factors and the short, often degenerate DNA sequences they recognize are central regulators of gene expression, but their regulatory code is challenging to dissect experimentally. Thus, computational approaches have long been used to identify putative regulatory elements from the patterns in promoter sequences. Here we present a new algorithm "POWRS" (POsition-sensitive WoRd Set for identifying regulatory sequence motifs, specifically developed to address two common shortcomings of existing algorithms. First, POWRS uses the position-specific enrichment of regulatory elements near transcription start sites to significantly increase sensitivity, while providing new information about the preferred localization of those elements. Second, POWRS forgoes position weight matrices for a discrete motif representation that appears more resistant to over-generalization. We apply this algorithm to discover sequences related to constitutive, high-level gene expression in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and then experimentally validate the importance of those elements by systematically mutating two endogenous promoters and measuring the effect on gene expression levels. This provides a foundation for future efforts to rationally engineer gene expression in plants, a problem of great importance in developing biotech crop varieties.BSD-licensed Python code at http://grassrootsbio.com/papers/powrs/.

  2. Promoter Motifs in NCLDVs: An Evolutionary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Graziele Pereira; Andrade, Ana Cláudia dos Santos Pereira; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Araújo Lima; Arantes, Thalita Souza; Boratto, Paulo Victor Miranda; Silva, Ludmila Karen dos Santos; Dornas, Fábio Pio; Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Drumond, Betânia Paiva; La Scola, Bernard; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos

    2017-01-01

    For many years, gene expression in the three cellular domains has been studied in an attempt to discover sequences associated with the regulation of the transcription process. Some specific transcriptional features were described in viruses, although few studies have been devoted to understanding the evolutionary aspects related to the spread of promoter motifs through related viral families. The discovery of giant viruses and the proposition of the new viral order Megavirales that comprise a monophyletic group, named nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV), raised new questions in the field. Some putative promoter sequences have already been described for some NCLDV members, bringing new insights into the evolutionary history of these complex microorganisms. In this review, we summarize the main aspects of the transcription regulation process in the three domains of life, followed by a systematic description of what is currently known about promoter regions in several NCLDVs. We also discuss how the analysis of the promoter sequences could bring new ideas about the giant viruses’ evolution. Finally, considering a possible common ancestor for the NCLDV group, we discussed possible promoters’ evolutionary scenarios and propose the term “MEGA-box” to designate an ancestor promoter motif (‘TATATAAAATTGA’) that could be evolved gradually by nucleotides’ gain and loss and point mutations. PMID:28117683

  3. Promoter Motifs in NCLDVs: An Evolutionary Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziele Pereira Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, gene expression in the three cellular domains has been studied in an attempt to discover sequences associated with the regulation of the transcription process. Some specific transcriptional features were described in viruses, although few studies have been devoted to understanding the evolutionary aspects related to the spread of promoter motifs through related viral families. The discovery of giant viruses and the proposition of the new viral order Megavirales that comprise a monophyletic group, named nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV, raised new questions in the field. Some putative promoter sequences have already been described for some NCLDV members, bringing new insights into the evolutionary history of these complex microorganisms. In this review, we summarize the main aspects of the transcription regulation process in the three domains of life, followed by a systematic description of what is currently known about promoter regions in several NCLDVs. We also discuss how the analysis of the promoter sequences could bring new ideas about the giant viruses’ evolution. Finally, considering a possible common ancestor for the NCLDV group, we discussed possible promoters’ evolutionary scenarios and propose the term “MEGA-box” to designate an ancestor promoter motif (‘TATATAAAATTGA’ that could be evolved gradually by nucleotides’ gain and loss and point mutations.

  4. Parole, Sintagmatik, dan Paradigmatik Motif Batik Mega Mendung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi - Nababan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   Discussing traditional batik is related a lot to the organization system of fine arts element ac- companying it, either the pattern of the motif or the technique of the making. In this case, the motif of Mega Mendung Cirebon certainly has patterns and rules which are traditionally different from the other motifs in other areas. Through  semiotics analysis especially with Saussure and Pierce concept, it can be traced that batik with Cirebon motif, in this case Mega Mendung motif, has parole and langue system, as unique fine arts language in batik, and structure of visual syntagmatic and paradigmatic. In the context of batik motif as fine arts language, it is surely related to sign system as symbol and icon.       Keywords: visual semiotic, Cirebon’s batik.

  5. Hexa-histidin tag position influences disulfide structure but not binding behavior of in vitro folded N-terminal domain of rat corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2a

    OpenAIRE

    Klose, Jana; Wendt, Norbert; Kubald, Sybille; Krause, Eberhard; Fechner, Klaus; Beyermann, Michael; Bienert, Michael; Rudolph, Rainer; Rothemund, Sven

    2004-01-01

    The oxidative folding, particularly the arrangement of disulfide bonds of recombinant extracellular N-terminal domains of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2a bearing five cysteines (C2 to C6), was investigated. Depending on the position of a His-tag, two types of disulfide patterns were found. In the case of an N-terminal His-tag, the disulfide bonds C2–C3 and C4–C6 were found, leaving C5 free, whereas the C-terminal position of the His-tag led to the disulfide pattern C2–C5 a...

  6. Age-dependent values of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide are superior to a single cut-point for ruling out suspected systolic dysfunction in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Per; Collinson, Paul O; Doughty, Robert N

    2010-01-01

    The study evaluated the use of age-related decision limits for N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), for ruling out suspected systolic dysfunction in symptomatic patients in primary care, compared with the present standards.......The study evaluated the use of age-related decision limits for N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), for ruling out suspected systolic dysfunction in symptomatic patients in primary care, compared with the present standards....

  7. Three-dimensional structure of a glycosylated cell surface antigen from D. discoideum: a primordial adhesion motif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabbutt, B.C.; Swarbrick, J.; Cubeddu, L.; Hill, A.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: We have determined the solution structure of pre-spore specific antigen (PsA), a predominant cell surface glycoprotein from the slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum. The structure and function of this protein suggests that it serves as a molecular signal for multicellular organisation, and that it may also be an adhesion motif mediating direct cell-cell contact. PsA consists of a 90-residue N-terminal globular domain tethered to the cell membrane via a heavily O-glycosylated stalk and a GPI anchor. No homologous sequences have been identified for the N-terminal domain. At Macquarie University, the D. discoideum organism has been well developed as a eukaryotic expression host for glycosylated proteins. For NMR, we have engineered a soluble form of PsA (residues 1-122) containing the globular 'head' and the glycopeptide linker. 15 N- and 15 N/ 13 C-labelled PsA was generated in this organism via a protocol that is readily adaptable for the cost-effective production of milligram quantities of other isotopically labelled recombinant proteins. Using 3D heteronuclear NMR, we have solved the three-dimensional structure of the PsA glycoprotein. It defines an eight stranded β-sandwich of five-on-three topology in a unique arrangement. A long loop is constrained by a cis proline residue and a disulphide bond to form an opening across one end of the sandwich, exposing portions of the hydrophobic interior. We postulate that this distortion of the sandwich fold structures a binding site. Structural and dynamics information was also obtained concerning the intact glycopeptide linker of the protein, which comprises a repeating P-T-V-T motif. In our recombinant form, each Thr residue is modified by a single GlcNAc sugar. This simple structure yields interpretable NMR spectra, which show the glycosylated linker to be in extended conformation, and undergoing distinctly different mobility from the globular domain. These same sugar residues provide an ideal attachment

  8. Motif-role-fingerprints: the building-blocks of motifs, clustering-coefficients and transitivities in directed networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D McDonnell

    Full Text Available Complex networks are frequently characterized by metrics for which particular subgraphs are counted. One statistic from this category, which we refer to as motif-role fingerprints, differs from global subgraph counts in that the number of subgraphs in which each node participates is counted. As with global subgraph counts, it can be important to distinguish between motif-role fingerprints that are 'structural' (induced subgraphs and 'functional' (partial subgraphs. Here we show mathematically that a vector of all functional motif-role fingerprints can readily be obtained from an arbitrary directed adjacency matrix, and then converted to structural motif-role fingerprints by multiplying that vector by a specific invertible conversion matrix. This result demonstrates that a unique structural motif-role fingerprint exists for any given functional motif-role fingerprint. We demonstrate a similar result for the cases of functional and structural motif-fingerprints without node roles, and global subgraph counts that form the basis of standard motif analysis. We also explicitly highlight that motif-role fingerprints are elemental to several popular metrics for quantifying the subgraph structure of directed complex networks, including motif distributions, directed clustering coefficient, and transitivity. The relationships between each of these metrics and motif-role fingerprints also suggest new subtypes of directed clustering coefficients and transitivities. Our results have potential utility in analyzing directed synaptic networks constructed from neuronal connectome data, such as in terms of centrality. Other potential applications include anomaly detection in networks, identification of similar networks and identification of similar nodes within networks. Matlab code for calculating all stated metrics following calculation of functional motif-role fingerprints is provided as S1 Matlab File.

  9. Identification of an N-terminal 27 kDa fragment of Mycoplasma pneumoniae P116 protein as specific immunogen in M. pneumoniae infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chourasia Bishwanath

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important cause of respiratory tract infection and is increasingly being associated with other diseases such as asthma and extra-pulmonary complications. Considerable cross-reactivity is known to exist between the whole cell antigens used in the commercial serological testing assays. Identification of specific antigens is important to eliminate the risk of cross-reactions among different related organisms. Adherence of M. pneumoniae to human epithelial cells is mediated through a well defined apical organelle to which a number of proteins such as P1, P30, P116 and HMW1-3 have been localized, and are being investigated for adhesion, gliding and immunodiagnostic purposes. Methods A 609 bp fragment P116(N-27, corresponding to the N-terminal region of M. pneumoniae P116 gene was cloned and expressed. A C-terminal fragment P1(C-40, of P1 protein of M. pneumoniae was also expressed. Three IgM ELISA assays based on P116(N-27, P1(C-40 and (P116 (N-27 + P1(C-40 proteins were optimized and a detailed analysis comparing the reactivity of these proteins with a commercial kit was carried out. Comparative statistical analysis of these assays was performed with the SPSS version 15.0. Results The expressed P116(N-27 protein was well recognized by the patient sera and was immunogenic in rabbit. P1(C-40 of M. pneumoniae was also immunogenic in rabbit. In comparison to the reference kit, which is reported to be 100% sensitive and 75% specific, ELISA assay based on purified P116(N-27, P1(C-40 and (P116(N-27 + P1(C-40 proteins showed 90.3%, 87.1% and 96.8% sensitivity and 87.0%, 87.1% and 90.3% specificity respectively. The p value for all the three assays was found to be Conclusion This study shows that an N-terminal fragment of P116 protein holds a promise for serodiagnosis of M. pneumoniae infection. The IgM ELISA assays based on the recombinant proteins seem to be suitable for the use in serodiagnosis of acute M

  10. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in relation to inflammation, myocardial necrosis, and the effect of an invasive strategy in unstable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernberg, Tomas; Lindahl, Bertil; Siegbahn, Agneta; Andren, Bertil; Frostfeldt, Gunnar; Lagerqvist, Bo; Stridsberg, Mats; Venge, Per; Wallentin, Lars

    2003-12-03

    We sought to examine whether measurements of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), in addition to cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), improve the ability to identify high-risk patients who benefit from an early invasive strategy. Biochemical indicators of cardiac performance (e.g., NT-proBNP), inflammation (e.g., IL-6), and myocardial damage (e.g., cTnT) predict mortality in unstable coronary artery disease (UCAD) (i.e., unstable angina or non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction [MI]). In these patients, an early invasive treatment strategy improves the outcome. Levels of NT-proBNP, cTnT, and IL-6 were measured in 2,019 patients with UCAD randomized to an invasive or non-invasive strategy in the FRagmin and fast revascularization during InStability in Coronary artery disease (FRISC-II) trial. Patients were followed up for two years to determine death and MI. Patients in the third NT-proBNP tertile had a 4.1-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4 to 7.2) and 3.5-fold (95% CI 1.8 to 6.8) increased mortality in the non-invasive and invasive groups, respectively. An increased NT-proBNP level was independently associated with mortality. In patients with increased levels of both NT-proBNP and IL-6, an early invasive strategy reduced mortality by 7.3% (risk ratio 0.46, 95% CI 0.21 to 1.00). In patients with lower NT-proBNP or IL-6 levels, the mortality was not reduced. Only elevated cTnT was independently associated with future MI and a reduction of MI by means of an invasive strategy. N-terminal proBNP is independently associated with mortality. The combination of NT-proBNP and IL-6 seems to be a useful tool in the identification of patients with a definite survival benefit from an early invasive strategy. Only cTnT is independently associated with future MI and a reduction of MI by an invasive strategy.

  11. Cordyceps militaris Fraction induces apoptosis and G2/M Arrest via c-Jun N-Terminal kinase signaling pathway in oral squamous carcinoma KB Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wangshi; Zhang, Zhang; Song, Liyan; Huang, Chunhua; Guo, Zhongyi; Hu, Xianjing; Bi, Sixue; Yu, Rongmin

    2018-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris fraction (CMF) has been shown to possess in vitro antitumor activity against human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells in our previous research. The in vitro inhibitory activities of CMF on the growth of KB cells were evaluated by viability assay. The apoptotic and cell cycle influences of CMF were detected by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and flow cytometry assay. The expression of different apoptosis-associated proteins and cell cycle regulatory proteins was examined by Western blot assay. The nuclear localization of c-Jun was observed by fluorescence staining. The objective of this study was to investigate the antiproliferative effect of CMF as well as the mechanism underlying the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest it induces in KB cells. CMF suppressed KB cells' proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that CMF induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Western blot analysis revealed that CMF induced caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP cleavages, and increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. CMF also led to increased expression of p21, decreased expression of cyclin B1, mitotic phosphatase cdc25c, and mitotic kinase cdc2, as well as unchanged expression of p53. In addition, CMF stimulated c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) protein phosphorylations, resulting in upregulated expression of c-Jun and nuclear localization of c-Jun. Pretreatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125 suppressed CMF-induced apoptosis and G2/M arrest. CMF is capable of modulating c-Jun caspase and Bcl-2 family proteins through JNK-dependent apoptosis, which results in G2/M phase arrest in KB cells. CMF could be developed as a promising candidate for the new antitumor agents. CMF exhibited strong anticancer activity against oral squamous carcinoma KB cellsCMF inhibited KB cells' proliferation via induction of apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrestCMF activated JNK signaling pathway and promoted the nuclear localization of c-JunCMF regulated the

  12. Rekayasa Pengembangan Desain Motif Batik Khas Melayu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eustasia Sri Murwati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAKPengembangan desain batik melalui rancang bangun perekayasaan desain menurut ragam hias Melayu meliputi pengembangan motif dan proses, termasuk pemilihan komposisi warna. Proses yang sering dilakukan yaitu proses celup, penghilangan lilin dan celup warna tumpangan atau proses colet, celup, penghilangan lilin atau celup kemudian penghilangan lilin yang disebut Batik Kelengan. Setiap pulau di Indonesia mempunyai ciri khas budaya dan kesenian yang dikenal dengan corak/ragam hias khas daerah, juga ornamen yang diminati oleh masyarakat dari daerah tersebut atau dari daerah lain. Kondisi demikian mendorong pertumbuhan industri kerajinan yang memanfaatkan unsur–unsur seni. Adapun motif yang diperoleh adalah: Ayam Berlaga, Bungo Matahari, Kuntum Bersanding, Lancang Kuning, Encong Kerinci, Durian Pecah, Bungo Bintang, Bungo Pauh Kecil, Riang-riang, Bungo Nagaro. Pengembangan desain tersebut dipilih 3 produk terbaik yang dinilai oleh 5 penilai yang ahli di bidang desain batik, yaitu motif Durian Pecah, Ayam Berlaga, dan Bungo Matahari. Rancang bangun diversifikasi desain dengan memanfaatkan unsur–unsur seni dan ketrampilan etnis Melayu yaitu pemilihan ragam hias dan motif batik Melayu untuk diterapkan ke bahan sandang dengan komposisi warna yang menarik, sehingga produk memenuhi selera konsumen. Memperbaiki keberagaman batik dengan meningkatkan desain produk antara lain menuangkan ragam hias Melayu ke dalam proses batik yang menggunakan berbagai macam warna sehingga komposisi warna memadai. Diperoleh hasil produk batik dengan ragam hias Melayu yang berkualitas dan komposisi warna yang sesuai dengan karakter ragam hias Melayu. Rancang bangun desain produk untuk mendapatkan formulasi desain serta kelayakan prosesnya dengan penekanan pada teknologi akrab lingkungan dilaksanakan dengan alternatif pendekatan yaitu penciptaan desain bentuk baru.Kata kunci: desain, batik, rancang bangun, ragam hias, MelayuABSTRACTDevelopment of batik design through

  13. Transnationalism as a motif in family stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Elizabeth; Gomez, Erica; Hotzoglou, Despina; Lipnitsky, Jane Y

    2005-12-01

    Family stories have long been recognized as a vehicle for assessing components of a family's emotional and social life, including the degree to which an immigrant family has been willing to assimilate. Transnationalism, defined as living in one or more cultures and maintaining connections to both, is now increasingly common. A qualitative study of family stories in the family of those who appear completely "American" suggests that an affiliation with one's home country is nevertheless detectable in the stories via motifs such as (1) positively connotated home remedies, (2) continuing denigration of home country "enemies," (3) extensive knowledge of the home country history and politics, (4) praise of endogamy and negative assessment of exogamy, (5) superiority of home country to America, and (6) beauty of home country. Furthermore, an awareness of which model--assimilationist or transnational--governs a family's experience may help clarify a clinician's understanding of a family's strengths, vulnerabilities, and mode of framing their cultural experiences.

  14. The limits of de novo DNA motif discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Simcha

    Full Text Available A major challenge in molecular biology is reverse-engineering the cis-regulatory logic that plays a major role in the control of gene expression. This program includes searching through DNA sequences to identify "motifs" that serve as the binding sites for transcription factors or, more generally, are predictive of gene expression across cellular conditions. Several approaches have been proposed for de novo motif discovery-searching sequences without prior knowledge of binding sites or nucleotide patterns. However, unbiased validation is not straightforward. We consider two approaches to unbiased validation of discovered motifs: testing the statistical significance of a motif using a DNA "background" sequence model to represent the null hypothesis and measuring performance in predicting membership in gene clusters. We demonstrate that the background models typically used are "too null," resulting in overly optimistic assessments of significance, and argue that performance in predicting TF binding or expression patterns from DNA motifs should be assessed by held-out data, as in predictive learning. Applying this criterion to common motif discovery methods resulted in universally poor performance, although there is a marked improvement when motifs are statistically significant against real background sequences. Moreover, on synthetic data where "ground truth" is known, discriminative performance of all algorithms is far below the theoretical upper bound, with pronounced "over-fitting" in training. A key conclusion from this work is that the failure of de novo discovery approaches to accurately identify motifs is basically due to statistical intractability resulting from the fixed size of co-regulated gene clusters, and thus such failures do not necessarily provide evidence that unfound motifs are not active biologically. Consequently, the use of prior knowledge to enhance motif discovery is not just advantageous but necessary. An implementation of

  15. DNA motif alignment by evolving a population of Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Chengpeng

    2009-01-30

    Deciphering cis-regulatory elements or de novo motif-finding in genomes still remains elusive although much algorithmic effort has been expended. The Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method such as Gibbs motif samplers has been widely employed to solve the de novo motif-finding problem through sequence local alignment. Nonetheless, the MCMC-based motif samplers still suffer from local maxima like EM. Therefore, as a prerequisite for finding good local alignments, these motif algorithms are often independently run a multitude of times, but without information exchange between different chains. Hence it would be worth a new algorithm design enabling such information exchange. This paper presents a novel motif-finding algorithm by evolving a population of Markov chains with information exchange (PMC), each of which is initialized as a random alignment and run by the Metropolis-Hastings sampler (MHS). It is progressively updated through a series of local alignments stochastically sampled. Explicitly, the PMC motif algorithm performs stochastic sampling as specified by a population-based proposal distribution rather than individual ones, and adaptively evolves the population as a whole towards a global maximum. The alignment information exchange is accomplished by taking advantage of the pooled motif site distributions. A distinct method for running multiple independent Markov chains (IMC) without information exchange, or dubbed as the IMC motif algorithm, is also devised to compare with its PMC counterpart. Experimental studies demonstrate that the performance could be improved if pooled information were used to run a population of motif samplers. The new PMC algorithm was able to improve the convergence and outperformed other popular algorithms tested using simulated and biological motif sequences.

  16. Assessing local structure motifs using order parameters for motif recognition, interstitial identification, and diffusion path characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Nils E. R.; Horton, Matthew K.; Jain, Anubhav; Haranczyk, Maciej

    2017-11-01

    Structure-property relationships form the basis of many design rules in materials science, including synthesizability and long-term stability of catalysts, control of electrical and optoelectronic behavior in semiconductors as well as the capacity of and transport properties in cathode materials for rechargeable batteries. The immediate atomic environments (i.e., the first coordination shells) of a few atomic sites are often a key factor in achieving a desired property. Some of the most frequently encountered coordination patterns are tetrahedra, octahedra, body and face-centered cubic as well as hexagonal closed packed-like environments. Here, we showcase the usefulness of local order parameters to identify these basic structural motifs in inorganic solid materials by developing classification criteria. We introduce a systematic testing framework, the Einstein crystal test rig, that probes the response of order parameters to distortions in perfect motifs to validate our approach. Subsequently, we highlight three important application cases. First, we map basic crystal structure information of a large materials database in an intuitive manner by screening the Materials Project (MP) database (61,422 compounds) for element-specific motif distributions. Second, we use the structure-motif recognition capabilities to automatically find interstitials in metals, semiconductor, and insulator materials. Our Interstitialcy Finding Tool (InFiT) facilitates high-throughput screenings of defect properties. Third, the order parameters are reliable and compact quantitative structure descriptors for characterizing diffusion hops of intercalants as our example of magnesium in MnO2-spinel indicates. Finally, the tools developed in our work are readily and freely available as software implementations in the pymatgen library, and we expect them to be further applied to machine-learning approaches for emerging applications in materials science.

  17. Assessing Local Structure Motifs Using Order Parameters for Motif Recognition, Interstitial Identification, and Diffusion Path Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils E. R. Zimmermann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Structure–property relationships form the basis of many design rules in materials science, including synthesizability and long-term stability of catalysts, control of electrical and optoelectronic behavior in semiconductors, as well as the capacity of and transport properties in cathode materials for rechargeable batteries. The immediate atomic environments (i.e., the first coordination shells of a few atomic sites are often a key factor in achieving a desired property. Some of the most frequently encountered coordination patterns are tetrahedra, octahedra, body and face-centered cubic as well as hexagonal close packed-like environments. Here, we showcase the usefulness of local order parameters to identify these basic structural motifs in inorganic solid materials by developing classification criteria. We introduce a systematic testing framework, the Einstein crystal test rig, that probes the response of order parameters to distortions in perfect motifs to validate our approach. Subsequently, we highlight three important application cases. First, we map basic crystal structure information of a large materials database in an intuitive manner by screening the Materials Project (MP database (61,422 compounds for element-specific motif distributions. Second, we use the structure-motif recognition capabilities to automatically find interstitials in metals, semiconductor, and insulator materials. Our Interstitialcy Finding Tool (InFiT facilitates high-throughput screenings of defect properties. Third, the order parameters are reliable and compact quantitative structure descriptors for characterizing diffusion hops of intercalants as our example of magnesium in MnO2-spinel indicates. Finally, the tools developed in our work are readily and freely available as software implementations in the pymatgen library, and we expect them to be further applied to machine-learning approaches for emerging applications in materials science.

  18. Growth arrest- and DNA-damage-inducible 45beta gene inhibits c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and decreases IL-1beta-induced apoptosis in insulin-producing INS-1E cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus Morten; Døssing, M G; Papa, S

    2006-01-01

    IL-1beta is a candidate mediator of apoptotic beta cell destruction, a process that leads to type 1 diabetes and progression of type 2 diabetes. IL-1beta activates beta cell c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, all of which are members of the mitogen...

  19. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide for additional risk stratification in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome and an elevated troponin T: an Invasive versus Conservative Treatment in Unstable coronary Syndromes (ICTUS) substudy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windhausen, Fons; Hirsch, Alexander; Sanders, Gerard T.; Cornel, Jan Hein; Fischer, Johan; van Straalen, Jan P.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Verheugt, Freek W. A.; de Winter, Robbert J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New evidence has emerged that the assessment of multiple biomarkers such as cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (nSTE-ACS) provides unique prognostic information. The purpose of this

  20. Frequency of and Prognostic Significance of Cardiac Involvement at Presentation in Hereditary Transthyretin-Derived Amyloidosis and the Value of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Sebastiaan H C; Tromp, Jasper; Nienhuis, Hans L A; van der Meer, Peter; van den Berg, Maarten P; Blokzijl, Hans; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hazenberg, Bouke P C

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of cardiac involvement in hereditary transthyretin-derived (ATTRm) amyloidosis at the time of diagnosis and to determine the diagnostic and clinical value of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). The University Medical Center

  1. Embryoid body attachment to reconstituted basement membrane induces a genetic program of epithelial differentiation via jun N-terminal kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hoang-Yen; Moffat, Ryan C; Patel, Rupal V; Awah, Franklin N; Baloue, Kaitrin; Crowe, David L

    2010-09-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from early stage mammalian embryos and have broad developmental potential. These cells can be manipulated experimentally to generate cells of multiple tissue types which could be important in treating human diseases. The ability to produce relevant amounts of these differentiated cell populations creates the basis for clinical interventions in tissue regeneration and repair. Understanding how embryonic stem cells differentiate also can reveal important insights into cell biology. A previously reported mouse embryonic stem cell model demonstrated that differentiated epithelial cells migrated out of embryoid bodies attached to reconstituted basement membrane. We used genomic technology to profile ES cell populations in order to understand the molecular mechanisms leading to epithelial differentiation. Cells with characteristics of cultured epithelium migrated from embryoid bodies attached to reconstituted basement membrane. However, cells that comprised embryoid bodies also rapidly lost ES cell-specific gene expression and expressed proteins characteristic of stratified epithelia within hours of attachment to basement membrane. Gene expression profiling of sorted cell populations revealed upregulation of the BMP/TGFbeta signaling pathway, which was not sufficient for epithelial differentiation in the absence of basement membrane attachment. Activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and increased expression of Jun family transcription factors was observed during epithelial differentiation of ES cells. Inhibition of JNK signaling completely blocked epithelial differentiation in this model, revealing a key mechanism by which ES cells adopt epithelial characteristics via basement membrane attachment. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. DISCO interacting protein 2 determines direction of axon projection under the regulation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in the Drosophila mushroom body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Yohei; Sugie, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Precisely controlled axon guidance for complex neuronal wiring is essential for appropriate neuronal function. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was found to play a role in axon guidance recently as well as in cell proliferation, protection and apoptosis. In spite of many genetic and molecular studies on these biological processes regulated by JNK, how JNK regulates axon guidance accurately has not been fully explained thus far. To address this question, we use the Drosophila mushroom body (MB) as a model since the α/β axons project in two distinct directions. Here we show that DISCO interacting protein 2 (DIP2) is required for the accurate direction of axonal guidance. DIP2 expression is under the regulation of Basket (Bsk), the Drosophila homologue of JNK. We additionally found that the Bsk/DIP2 pathway is independent from the AP-1 transcriptional factor complex pathway, which is directly activated by Bsk. In conclusion, our findings revealed DIP2 as a novel effector downstream of Bsk modulating the direction of axon projection. - Highlights: • DIP2 is required for accurate direction of axon guidance in Drosophila mushroom body. • DIP2 is a downstream of JNK in the axon guidance of Drosophila mushroom body neuron. • JNK/DIP2 pathway is independent from JNK/AP-1 transcriptional factor complex pathway.

  3. NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR EVALUATION OF SEVERITY AND PROGNOSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE BASED ON N-TERMINAL PRO-BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE PLASMA LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Galjavich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study an importance of plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (N-proBNP in evaluation of severity and prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic genesis.Material and methods. 77 patients (60 men and 17 women; 59,4±10,7 y.o. with CHF of ischemic genesis were included in the study. All patients had sinus rhythm and history of Q wave myocardial infarction. Standard examination was performed to all patients. Besides N-proBNP plasma level and patients yearly survival were evaluated.Results. N-proBNP plasma level had direct correlation with clinical indices (exercise tolerance, blood pressure, heart rate and echocardiographic heart sizes. N-proBNP plasma level had relationship with prognosis of CHF patients. Baseline N-proBNP level was more than 2 times higher in died patients in comparison with survived patients. The yearly survival rate of CHF patients was 51,3% if N-proBNP level had been more than 400 fmol/ml (>15% of normal value. The clinico-laboratory index (based on N-proBNP plasma level of severity and prognosis in CHF patients was developed.Conclusion. The clinico-laboratory index based on N-proBNP plasma level is easy to use and can improve medical practice.

  4. Crystal structures of the F and pSLT plasmid TraJ N-terminal regions reveal similar homodimeric PAS folds with functional interchangeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Ruiying; Adkins, Joshua N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Glover, Mark

    2014-09-16

    In the F-family of conjugative plasmids, TraJ is an essential transcriptional activator of the tra operon that encodes most of the proteins required for conjugation. Here we report for the first time the X-ray crystal structures of the TraJ N-terminal regions from the prototypic F plasmid (TraJF11-130) and from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT (TraJpSLT 1-128). Both proteins form similar homodimeric Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) fold structures. Mutational analysis reveals that the observed dimeric interface is critical for TraJF transcriptional activation, indicating that dimerization of TraJ is required for its in vivo function. An artificial ligand (oxidized dithiothreitol) occupies a cavity in the TraJF dimer interface, while a smaller cavity in corresponding region of the TraJpSLT structure lacks a ligand. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-electron ionization analysis of dithiothreitol-free TraJF suggests indole may be the natural TraJ ligand; however, disruption of the indole biosynthetic pathway does not affect TraJF function. Heterologous PAS domains from pSLT and R100 TraJ can functionally replace the TraJF PAS domain, suggesting that TraJ allelic specificity is mediated by the region C-terminal to the PAS domain.

  5. Influence of Dimerization of Lipopeptide Laur-Orn-Orn-Cys-NH2 and an N-terminal Peptide of Human Lactoferricin on Biological Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamysz, Elżbieta; Sikorska, Emilia; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Tyszkowski, Rafał; Kamysz, Wojciech

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide that is cleaved by pepsin to lactoferricin (LFcin). LFcin has an enhanced antimicrobial activity as compared to that of LF. Recently several hetero- and homodimeric antimicrobial peptides stabilized by a single disulfide bond linking linear polypeptide chains have been discovered. We have demonstrated that the S-S bond heterodimerization of lipopeptide Laur-Orn-Orn-Cys-NH 2 (peptide III) and the synthetic N -terminal peptide of human lactoferricin (peptide I) yields a dimer (peptide V), which is almost as microbiologically active as the more active monomer and at the same time it is much less toxic. Furthermore, it has been found that the S-S bond homodimerization of both peptide I and peptide III did not affect antimicrobial and haemolytic activity of the compounds. The homo- and heterodimerization of peptides I and III resulted in either reduction or loss of antifungal activity. This work suggests that heterodimerization of antimicrobial lipopeptides via intermolecular disulfide bond might be a powerful modification deserving consideration in the design of antimicrobial peptides.

  6. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure determination of the N terminal domain of Fhb, a factor H binding protein from Streptococcus suis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chunmao [State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijng Institute of Microbiology and Infectious Disease, No. 20 Dongda Street, Fengtai District, Beijing 100071 (China); Yu, You [Key Laboratory for Protein Sciences of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, 100084, Beijing (China); Yang, Maojun, E-mail: maojunyang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Protein Sciences of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, 100084, Beijing (China); Jiang, Yongqiang, E-mail: jiangyq@bmi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijng Institute of Microbiology and Infectious Disease, No. 20 Dongda Street, Fengtai District, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2015-10-23

    Fhb is a surface virulence protein from Streptococcus suis, which could aid bacterial evasion of host innate immune defense by recruiting complement regulator factor H to inactivate C3b deposited on bacterial surface in blood. Here we successfully expressed and purified the N terminal domain of Fhb (N-Fhb) and obtained crystals of the N-Fhb by sitting-drop vapor diffusion method with a resolution of 1.50 Å. The crystals belong to space group C2 with unit cell parameters a = 127.1 Å, b = 77.3 Å, c = 131.6 Å, α = 90°, β = 115.9°, γ = 90°. The structure of N-Fhb was determined by SAD method and the core structure of N-Fhb is a β sandwich. We speculated that binding of Fhb to human factor H may be mainly mediated by surface amino acids with negative charges. - Highlights: • We expressed N-Fhb as the soluble protein in Escherichia coli. • Crystals of N-Fhb were grown by sitting drop vapor diffusion method. • Crystals of N-Fhb could diffracted to 1.5 Å. • The core structure of N-Fhb was a β sandwich. • A part of the surface of N-Fhb was rich with negative charges.

  7. The identification of prothymosin α-like material in vertebrate lymphoid organs by a radioimmunoassay for the N-terminal decapeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yialouris, P.P.; Tsitsiloni, O.E.; Haritos, A.A.; Evangelatos, G.P.; Soteriadis-Vlahos, C.; Heimer, E.P.; Felix, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) is described for the detection and quantitation of prothymosin α (ProT α), and its N-terminal fragments containing as a minimum the first ten amino acid residues. This range of peptides includes thymosins α 1 (T α 1 ) and α 11 (T α 11 ). Antibodies against T α 1 and the tracer T α 1 (1-10)Tyr 11 ( 125 I), an analogue of the major epitope, were utilized in this RIA. 50% displacement of the ligand was observed with 1.3 pmol of T α 1 and 6.4 pmol of ProT α. The partially homologous parathymosin α (ParaT α) showed less than 2% cross-reactivity with ProT α. Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration separation of the peptides of calf thymus, chicken spleen and trout spleen extracts prepared by a method eliminating proteolysis, combined with the above RIA, showed the presence of a major immunoreactive peak. Its elution volume corresponded to that of rat ProT α (apparent mol. weight 36,000) for both calf (37,000) and chicken (35,000) tissues. In trout it corresponded to a significantly higher molecular weight (62,000). The levels of ProT α-like peptides in calf thymus, chicken spleen and trout spleen were found to be 246, 8.6 and 7.7 μg respectively, of rat ProT α equivalents per gram of fresh tissue. 43 refs.; 5 figs

  8. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway is critical for cell transformation by the latent membrane protein 1 of Epstein-Barr virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutz, Helmut; Reisbach, Gilbert; Schultheiss, Ute; Kieser, Arnd

    2008-01-01

    The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transforms cells activating signal transduction pathways such as NF-κB, PI3-kinase, or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Here, we investigated the functional role of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway in cell transformation. Expression of a novel dominant-negative JNK1 allele caused a block of proliferation in LMP1-transformed Rat1 fibroblasts. The JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125 reproduced this effect in Rat1-LMP1 cells and efficiently interfered with proliferation of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). Inhibition of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway in LCLs caused the downregulation of c-Jun and Cdc2, the essential G2/M cell cycle kinase, which was accompanied by a cell cycle arrest of LCLs at G2/M phase transition. Moreover, SP600125 retarded tumor growth of LCLs in a xenograft model in SCID mice. Our data support a critical role of the LMP1-induced JNK pathway for proliferation of LMP1-transformed cells and characterize JNK as a potential target for intervention against EBV-induced malignancies

  9. Phosphorylation of rat brain purified mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-3 modifies open-channel noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajeev

    2017-09-02

    The drift kinetic energy of ionic flow through single ion channels cause vibrations of the pore walls which are observed as open-state current fluctuations (open-channel noise) during single-channel recordings. Vibration of the pore wall leads to transitions among different conformational sub-states of the channel protein in the open-state. Open-channel noise analysis can provide important information about the different conformational sub-state transitions and how biochemical modifications of ion channels would affect their transport properties. It has been shown that c-Jun N-terminal kinase-3 (JNK3) becomes activated by phosphorylation in various neurodegenerative diseases and phosphorylates outer mitochondrion associated proteins leading to neuronal apoptosis. In our earlier work, JNK3 has been reported to phosphorylate purified rat brain mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) in vitro and modify its conductance and opening probability. In this article we have compared the open-state noise profile of the native and the JNK3 phosphorylated VDAC using Power Spectral Density vs frequency plots. Power spectral density analysis of open-state noise indicated power law with average slope value α ≈1 for native VDAC at both positive and negative voltage whereas average α value open-state noise arises due to coupling of ionic transport and conformational sub-states transitions in open-state and this coupling is perturbed as a result of channel phosphorylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. C-reactive protein and N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide as biomarkers in acute exacerbations of COPD leading to hospitalizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Roy Chen

    Full Text Available There are currently no accepted and validated blood tests available for diagnosing acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD. In this study, we sought to determine the discriminatory power of blood C-reactive protein (CRP and N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP in the diagnosis of AECOPD requiring hospitalizations. The study cohort consisted of 468 patients recruited in the COPD Rapid Transition Program who were hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of AECOPD, and 110 stable COPD patients who served as controls. Logistic regression was used to build a classification model to separate AECOPD from convalescent or stable COPD patients. Performance was assessed using an independent validation set of patients who were not included in the discovery set. Serum CRP and whole blood NT-proBNP concentrations were highest at the time of hospitalization and progressively decreased over time. Of the 3 classification models, the one with both CRP and NT-proBNP had the highest AUC in discriminating AECOPD (cross-validated AUC of 0.80. These data were replicated in a validation cohort with an AUC of 0.88. A combination of CRP and NT-proBNP can reasonably discriminate AECOPD requiring hospitalization versus clinical stability and can be used to rapidly diagnose patients requiring hospitalization for AECOPD.

  11. Induction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 by tenascin-X deficiency is mediated through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase and protein tyrosine kinase phosphorylation pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Minamitani, Takeharu; Orba, Yasuko; Sato, Mami; Sawa, Hirofumi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2004-01-01

    The results of our previous study showed that tumor invasion and metastasis are promoted in extracellular matrix (ECM) tenascin-X-deficient (TNX-/-) mice via increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). However, little is known about the relationship between TNX deficiency and activation of MMP genes. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which TNX deficiency activates the MMP-2 gene. We examined the intracellular signaling pathways that regulate gene expression of the proteinase in isolated fibroblasts. Results of gelatin zymography showed that MMP-2 was induced to a greater extent in TNX-/- fibroblasts embedded in type I collagen than in wild-type fibroblasts. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the increased level of MMP-2 expression was caused at the transcription level. Conversely, stable overexpression of TNX in a fibroblast cell line reduced MMP-2 expression and suppressed MMP-2 promoter activity. In addition, treatment of TNX-/- fibroblasts with SP600125, a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, and genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, suppressed the increased level of proMMP-2 and increased MMP-2 promoter activity in TNX-/- fibroblasts. Furthermore, increased activation of JNK and tyrosine phosphorylation of certain proteins were observed in TNX-/- fibroblasts. These findings suggest that induction of MMP-2 by TNX deficiency is mediated, at least in part, through the JNK and protein tyrosine kinase phosphorylation pathway

  12. Functional role of the N-terminal domain of ΔFosB in response to stress and drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Y N; Ohnishi, Y H; Vialou, V; Mouzon, E; LaPlant, Q; Nishi, A; Nestler, E J

    2015-01-22

    Previous work has implicated the transcription factor, ΔFosB, acting in the nucleus accumbens, in mediating the pro-rewarding effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine as well as in mediating resilience to chronic social stress. However, the transgenic and viral gene transfer models used to establish these ΔFosB phenotypes express, in addition to ΔFosB, an alternative translation product of ΔFosB mRNA, termed Δ2ΔFosB, which lacks the N-terminal 78 aa present in ΔFosB. To study the possible contribution of Δ2ΔFosB to these drug and stress phenotypes, we prepared a viral vector that overexpresses a point mutant form of ΔFosB mRNA which cannot undergo alternative translation as well as a vector that overexpresses Δ2ΔFosB alone. Our results show that the mutant form of ΔFosB, when overexpressed in the nucleus accumbens, reproduces the enhancement of reward and of resilience seen with our earlier models, with no effects seen for Δ2ΔFosB. Overexpression of full length FosB, the other major product of the FosB gene, also has no effect. These findings confirm the unique role of ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens in controlling responses to drugs of abuse and stress. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of milrinone on the cardiac function and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels in patients with senile refractory heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao-Na Wei1

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of milrinone on the cardiac function and N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP levels in patients with senile refractory heart failure. Methods: 90 patients with senile refractory heart failure who were treated in our hospital between August 2013 and August 2016 were collected and divided into control group (n=45 and observation group (n=45 according to the random number table. The control group received regular clinical treatment, and the observation group received regular + milrinone treatment. The cardiac function and serum NT-proBN contents were compared between two groups of patients before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, the differences in ultrasound and serum cardiac function indexes and serum NT-proBN levels were not statistically significant between two groups of patients. After treatment, ultrasound serum cardiac function parameter LVEDD level in observation group was lower than that in control group while CI and SV levels were higher than those in control group; serum cardiac function indexes Cys-C, GDF-15, sST2 and H-FABP contents were lower than those in control group; serum NT-proBNP content was lower than that in control group. Conclusion: Milrinone therapy can optimize the cardiac function and reduce the serum NT-proBN levels in patients with senile refractory heart failure.

  14. Reference intervals for N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in amniotic fluid between 10 and 34 weeks of gestation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waltraut M Merz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In adult and pediatric cardiology, n-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (nt-proBNP serves as biomarker in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular dysfunction. Elevated levels of circulating nt-proBNP are present in fetal conditions associated with myocardial pressure or volume load. Compared to fetal blood sampling, amniocentesis is technically easier and can be performed from early pregnancy onwards. We aimed to investigate amniotic fluid (AF nt-proBNP concentrations in normal pregnancies between 10 and 34 weeks of gestation. METHODS: Nt-proBNP and total protein (TP was measured in AF by chemiluminescence assay (photometry, respectively. To adjust for a potential dilutional effect, the AF-nt-proBNP/AF-TP ratio was analyzed. Reference intervals were constructed by regression modeling across gestational age. RESULTS: 132 samples were analyzed. A negative correlation between AF-nt-proBNP/AF-TP ratio and gestational age was observed. Curves for the mean and the 5% and 95% reference interval between 10 and 34 weeks of gestation were established. CONCLUSION: In normal pregnancy, nt-proBNP is present in AF and decreases during gestation. Our data provide the basis for research on AF-nt-proBNP as biomarker in fetal medicine.

  15. EGCG-targeted p57/KIP2 reduces tumorigenicity of oral carcinoma cells: Role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Digumarthi, Hari; Aranbayeva, Zina; Wataha, John; Lewis, Jill; Messer, Regina; Qin, Haiyan; Dickinson, Douglas; Osaki, Tokio; Schuster, George S.; Hsu, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) regulates gene expression differentially in tumor and normal cells. In normal human primary epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), one of the key mediators of EGCG action is p57/KIP2, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor. EGCG potently induces p57 in NHEK, but not in epithelial cancer cells. In humans, reduced expression of p57 often is associated with advanced tumors, and tumor cells with inactivated p57 undergo apoptosis when exposed to EGCG. The mechanism of p57 induction by EGCG is not well understood. Here, we show that in NHEK, EGCG-induces p57 via the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In p57-negative tumor cells, JNK signaling mediates EGCG-induced apoptosis, and exogenous expression of p57 suppresses EGCG-induced apoptosis via inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). We also found that restoration of p57 expression in tumor cells significantly reduced tumorigenicity in athymic mice. These results suggest that p57 expression may be an useful indicator for the clinical course of cancers, and could be potentially useful as a target for cancer therapies

  16. N-terminal pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide in three different mechanisms of dysnatremia onset after a child's craniopharyngioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatenkova, Vera; Hradil, Jan; Suchomel, Petr

    2017-10-01

    Craniopharyngioma, due to its sellar location, can be perioperatively complicated by different types of dysnatremia. We present a rare postoperative onset of a combination of three different mechanisms of dysnatremia with N-terminal pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP) and renal function parameters in a boy with a good outcome after craniopharyngioma surgery: 1/ Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) onset immediately after the operation, hypernatremia with peak serum sodium (SNa) 158 mmol/l) caused by free water polyuria (electrolyte-free water clearance, EWC 0.104 ml/s), NT-proBNP 350 pg/ml; 2/ cerebral salt wasting (CSW) onset on day 7, hyponatremia (SNa 128 mmol/l) with hypoosmolality (measured serum osmolality, SOsm 265 mmol/kg) caused by natriuresis (sodium - daily output 605 mmol/day, fractional excretion 0.035), NT-proBNP 191 pg/ml; 3/ Polydypsia onset on day 11 caused hyponatremia (SNa 132 mmol/l), EWC 0.015, NT-proBNP 68 pg/ml.

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure determination of the N terminal domain of Fhb, a factor H binding protein from Streptococcus suis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chunmao; Yu, You; Yang, Maojun; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Fhb is a surface virulence protein from Streptococcus suis, which could aid bacterial evasion of host innate immune defense by recruiting complement regulator factor H to inactivate C3b deposited on bacterial surface in blood. Here we successfully expressed and purified the N terminal domain of Fhb (N-Fhb) and obtained crystals of the N-Fhb by sitting-drop vapor diffusion method with a resolution of 1.50 Å. The crystals belong to space group C2 with unit cell parameters a = 127.1 Å, b = 77.3 Å, c = 131.6 Å, α = 90°, β = 115.9°, γ = 90°. The structure of N-Fhb was determined by SAD method and the core structure of N-Fhb is a β sandwich. We speculated that binding of Fhb to human factor H may be mainly mediated by surface amino acids with negative charges. - Highlights: • We expressed N-Fhb as the soluble protein in Escherichia coli. • Crystals of N-Fhb were grown by sitting drop vapor diffusion method. • Crystals of N-Fhb could diffracted to 1.5 Å. • The core structure of N-Fhb was a β sandwich. • A part of the surface of N-Fhb was rich with negative charges.

  18. Effects of new sports tennis type exercise on aerobic capacity, follicle stimulating hormone and N-terminal telopeptide in the postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Jae; Lee, Ha-Yan; Cho, Hye-Young; Park, Yun-Jin; Moon, Hyung-Hoon; Lee, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Sung-Ki; Kim, Myung-Ki

    2014-04-01

    Menopause is characterized by rapid decreases in bone mineral density, aerobic fitness, muscle strength, and balance. In the present study, we investigated the effects of new sports tennis type exercise on aerobic capacity, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and N-terminal telopeptide (NTX) in the postmenopausal women. Subjects were consisted of 20 postmenopausal women, who had not menstruated for at least 1 yr and had follicle-stimulating hormone levels > 35 mIU/L, estradiol levelssports tennis type exercise group (n= 10). New sports tennis type exercise was consisted of warm up (10 min), new sports tennis type exercise (40 min), cool down (10 min) 3 days a per week for 12 weeks. The aerobic capacities were increased by 12 weeks new sports tennis type exercise. New sports tennis type exercise significantly increased FSH and NTx levels, indicating biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption. These findings indicate that 12 weeks of new sports tennis type exercise can be effective in prevention of bone loss and enhancement of aerobic capacity in postmenopausal women.

  19. Aminoacylation of the N-terminal cysteine is essential for Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes but does not depend on lipoprotein sorting signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ayumu; Matsuyama, Shin-Ichi; Hara, Takashi; Nakayama, Jiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-11-08

    Lipoproteins are present in a wide variety of bacteria and are anchored to membranes through lipids attached to the N-terminal cysteine. The Lol system of Escherichia coli mediates the membrane-specific localization of lipoproteins. Aspartate at position 2 functions as a Lol avoidance signal and causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane, whereas lipoproteins having residues other than aspartate at position 2 are released from the inner membrane and localized to the outer membrane by the Lol system. Phospholipid:apolipoprotein transacylase, Lnt, catalyzes the last step of lipoprotein modification, converting apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein. To reveal the importance of this aminoacylation for the Lol-dependent membrane localization, apolipoproteins were prepared by inhibiting lipoprotein maturation. Lnt was also purified and used to convert apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein in vitro. The release of these lipoproteins was examined in proteoliposomes. We show here that the aminoacylation is essential for the Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes. Furthermore, lipoproteins with aspartate at position 2 were found to be aminoacylated both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that the lipoprotein-sorting signal does not affect lipid modification.

  20. NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR EVALUATION OF SEVERITY AND PROGNOSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE BASED ON N-TERMINAL PRO-BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE PLASMA LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Galjavich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study an importance of plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (N-proBNP in evaluation of severity and prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic genesis.Material and methods. 77 patients (60 men and 17 women; 59,4±10,7 y.o. with CHF of ischemic genesis were included in the study. All patients had sinus rhythm and history of Q wave myocardial infarction. Standard examination was performed to all patients. Besides N-proBNP plasma level and patients yearly survival were evaluated.Results. N-proBNP plasma level had direct correlation with clinical indices (exercise tolerance, blood pressure, heart rate and echocardiographic heart sizes. N-proBNP plasma level had relationship with prognosis of CHF patients. Baseline N-proBNP level was more than 2 times higher in died patients in comparison with survived patients. The yearly survival rate of CHF patients was 51,3% if N-proBNP level had been more than 400 fmol/ml (>15% of normal value. The clinico-laboratory index (based on N-proBNP plasma level of severity and prognosis in CHF patients was developed.Conclusion. The clinico-laboratory index based on N-proBNP plasma level is easy to use and can improve medical practice.

  1. Structure-activity relationships of the antimicrobial peptide arasin 1 - and mode of action studies of the N-terminal, proline-rich region.

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    Victoria S Paulsen

    Full Text Available Arasin 1 is a 37 amino acid long proline-rich antimicrobial peptide isolated from the spider crab, Hyas araneus. In this work the active region of arasin 1 was identified through structure-activity studies using different peptide fragments derived from the arasin 1 sequence. The pharmacophore was found to be located in the proline/arginine-rich NH(2 terminus of the peptide and the fragment arasin 1(1-23 was almost equally active to the full length peptide. Arasin 1 and its active fragment arasin 1(1-23 were shown to be non-toxic to human red blood cells and arasin 1(1-23 was able to bind chitin, a component of fungal cell walls and the crustacean shell. The mode of action of the fully active N-terminal arasin 1(1-23 was explored through killing kinetic and membrane permeabilization studies. At the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC, arasin 1(1-23 was not bactericidal and had no membrane disruptive effect. In contrast, at concentrations of 5×MIC and above it was bactericidal and interfered with membrane integrity. We conclude that arasin 1(1-23 has a different mode of action than lytic peptides, like cecropin P1. Thus, we suggest a dual mode of action for arasin 1(1-23 involving membrane disruption at peptide concentrations above MIC, and an alternative mechanism of action, possibly involving intracellular targets, at MIC.

  2. A Loop Region in the N-Terminal Domain of Ebola Virus VP40 Is Important in Viral Assembly, Budding, and Egress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Adu-Gyamfi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and can have clinical fatality rates of ~60%. The EBOV genome consists of negative sense RNA that encodes seven proteins including viral protein 40 (VP40. VP40 is the major Ebola virus matrix protein and regulates assembly and egress of infectious Ebola virus particles. It is well established that VP40 assembles on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane of human cells to regulate viral budding where VP40 can produce virus like particles (VLPs without other Ebola virus proteins present. The mechanistic details, however, of VP40 lipid-interactions and protein-protein interactions that are important for viral release remain to be elucidated. Here, we mutated a loop region in the N-terminal domain of VP40 (Lys127, Thr129, and Asn130 and find that mutations (K127A, T129A, and N130A in this loop region reduce plasma membrane localization of VP40. Additionally, using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and number and brightness analysis we demonstrate these mutations greatly reduce VP40 oligomerization. Lastly, VLP assays demonstrate these mutations significantly reduce VLP release from cells. Taken together, these studies identify an important loop region in VP40 that may be essential to viral egress.

  3. Functional role of the extracellular N-terminal domain of neuropeptide Y subfamily receptors in membrane integration and agonist-stimulated internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Diana; Walther, Cornelia; Tennemann, Anja; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2009-01-01

    The N terminus is the most variable element in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), ranging from seven residues up to approximately 5900 residues. For family B and C GPCRs it is described that at least part of the ligand binding site is located within the N terminus. Here we investigated the role of the N terminus in the neuropeptide Y receptor family, which belongs to the class A of GPCRs. We cloned differentially truncated Y receptor mutants, in which the N terminus was partially or completely deleted. We found, that eight amino acids are sufficient for full ligand binding and signal transduction activity. Interestingly, we could show that no specific amino acids but rather the extension of the first transmembrane helix by any residues is sufficient for receptor activity but also for membrane integration in case of the hY(1) and the hY(4) receptors. In contrast, the complete deletion of the N terminus in the hY(2) receptors resulted in a mutant that is fully integrated in the membrane but does not bind the ligand very well and internalizes much slower compared to the wild type receptor. Interestingly, also these effects could be reverted by any N-terminal extension. Accordingly, the most important function of the N termini seems to be the stabilization of the first transmembrane helix to ensure the correct receptor structure, which obviously is essential for ligand binding, integration into the cell membrane and receptor internalization.

  4. Low humidity environmental challenge causes barrier disruption and cornification of the mouse corneal epithelium via a c-jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrino, F S A; Pflugfelder, S C; De Paiva, C S

    2012-01-01

    Patients with tear dysfunction often experience increased irritation symptoms when subjected to drafty and/or low humidity environmental conditions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low humidity stress (LHS) on corneal barrier function and expression of cornified envelope (CE) precursor proteins in the epithelium of C57BL/6 and c-jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) knockout (KO) mice. LHS was induced in both strains by exposure to an air draft for 15 (LHS15D) or 30 days (LHS30D) at a relative humidity LHS15D showed corneal barrier dysfunction, decreased apical corneal epithelial cell area, higher MMP-9 expression and gelatinase activity and increased involucrin and SPRR-2 immunoreactivity in the corneal epithelium compared to NS mice. JNK2KO mice were resistant to LHS-induced corneal barrier disruption. MMP-3,-9,-13, IL-1α, IL-1β, involucrin and SPRR-2a RNA transcripts were significantly increased in C57BL/6 mice at LHS15D, while no change was noted in JNK2KO mice. LHS is capable of altering corneal barrier function, promoting pathologic alteration of the TJ complex and stimulating production of CE proteins by the corneal epithelium. Activation of the JNK2 signaling pathway contributes to corneal epithelial barrier disruption in LHS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 1-Oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol stimulates 5-lipoxygenase activity via a putative (phospho)lipid binding site within the N-terminal C2-like domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnig, Christina; Albert, Dana; Fischer, Lutz; Hörnig, Michael; Rådmark, Olof; Steinhilber, Dieter; Werz, Oliver

    2005-07-22

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalysis is positively regulated by Ca2+ ions and phospholipids that both act via the N-terminal C2-like domain of 5-LO. Previously, we have shown that 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (OAG) functions as an agonist for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in stimulating 5-LO product formation. Here we have demonstrated that OAG directly stimulates 5-LO catalysis in vitro. In the absence of Ca2+ (chelated using EDTA), OAG strongly and concentration-dependently stimulated crude 5-LO in 100,000 x g supernatants as well as purified 5-LO enzyme from PMNL. Also, the monoglyceride 1-O-oleyl-rac-glycerol and 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol were effective, whereas various phospholipids did not stimulate 5-LO. However, in the presence of Ca2+, OAG caused no stimulation of 5-LO. Also, phospholipids or cellular membranes abolished the effects of OAG. As found previously for Ca2+, OAG renders 5-LO activity resistant against inhibition by glutathione peroxidase activity, and this effect of OAG is reversed by phospholipids. Intriguingly, a 5-LO mutant lacking tryptophan residues (Trp-13, -75, and -102) important for the binding of the 5-LO C2-like domain to phospholipids was not stimulated by OAG. We conclude that OAG directly stimulates 5-LO by acting at a phospholipid binding site located within the C2-like domain.

  6. Fatty acids bind tightly to the N-terminal domain of angiopoietin-like protein 4 and modulate its interaction with lipoprotein lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robal, Terje; Larsson, Mikael; Martin, Miina; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Lookene, Aivar

    2012-08-24

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4), a potent regulator of plasma triglyceride metabolism, binds to lipoprotein lipase (LPL) through its N-terminal coiled-coil domain (ccd-Angptl4) inducing dissociation of the dimeric enzyme to inactive monomers. In this study, we demonstrate that fatty acids reduce the inactivation of LPL by Angptl4. This was the case both with ccd-Angptl4 and full-length Angptl4, and the effect was seen in human plasma or in the presence of albumin. The effect decreased in the sequence oleic acid > palmitic acid > myristic acid > linoleic acid > linolenic acid. Surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence, and chromatography measurements revealed that fatty acids bind with high affinity to ccd-Angptl4. The interactions were characterized by fast association and slow dissociation rates, indicating formation of stable complexes. The highest affinity for ccd-Angptl4 was detected for oleic acid with a subnanomolar equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)). The K(d) values for palmitic and myristic acid were in the nanomolar range. Linoleic and linolenic acid bound with much lower affinity. On binding of fatty acids, ccd-Angptl4 underwent conformational changes resulting in a decreased helical content, weakened structural stability, dissociation of oligomers, and altered fluorescence properties of the Trp-38 residue that is located close to the putative LPL-binding region. Based on these results, we propose that fatty acids play an important role in modulating the effects of Angptl4.

  7. Characterizing interaction forces between actin and proteins of the tropomodulin family reveals the presence of the N-terminal actin-binding site in leiomodin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Baran; Colpan, Mert; Gray, Kevin T; Abu-Lail, Nehal I; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2018-01-15

    Tropomodulin family of proteins includes several isoforms of tropomodulins (Tmod) and leiomodins (Lmod). These proteins can sequester actin monomers or nucleate actin polymerization. Although it is known that their actin-binding properties are isoform-dependent, knowledge on how they vary in strengths of interactions with G-actin is missing. While it is confirmed in many studies that Tmods have two actin-binding sites, information on number and location of actin-binding sites in Lmod2 is controversial. We used atomic force microscopy to study interactions between G-actin and proteins of the tropomodulin family. Unbinding forces between G-actin and Tmod1, Tmod2, Tmod3, or Lmod2 were quantified. Our results indicated that Tmod1 and Tmod3 had unimodal force distributions, Tmod2 had a bimodal distribution and Lmod2 had a trimodal distribution. The number of force distributions correlates with the proteins' abilities to sequester actin or to nucleate actin polymerization. We assigned specific unbinding forces to the individual actin-binding sites of Tmod2 and Lmod2 using mutations that destroy actin-binding sites of Tmod2 and truncated Lmod2. Our results confirm the existence of the N-terminal actin-binding site in Lmod2. Altogether, our data demonstrate how the differences between the number and the strength of actin-binding sites of Tmod or Lmod translate to their functional abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Disposition of radiolabelled insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-II and their N-terminal truncated variants in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yuzuru; Murphy, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    Serum half life, tissue uptake and urinary excretion of N-terminal truncated IGF variants and their intact precursors were compared to see whether the variants regulate the bioavailability of those growth factors. IGF-I, des(1-3) IGF-I, IGF-II and des(1-6) IGF-II were labeled with 125 I and intravenously administered to SD rats. Blood from femoral artery and urine from implanted bladder catheter were collected at appropriate intervals until sacrifice of animals at 2 hr after administration. Tissues were dissected out and all of these samples were measured for their radioactivity with a gamma counter. The half lives of des(1-3) IGF-I, IGF-I, des(1-6) IGF-II and IGF-II were 20.5, 228.3, 21.3 and 181.7 min, respectively. Maximal accumulation of all peptides was found in the kidney. 125 I-IGF-I and -II showed the following distribution pattern; levels were higher in the kidney>pancreas>small intestine>liver>duodenum>stomach>lung>spleen>heart>large intestine>testis>brain>skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle, kidney and testis showed a preferential uptake of the variants. Urinary excretion of the variants were much greater. Thus the variants were more rapidly cleared from circulation. The physiological significance of tissue distribution of 4 peptides remains to be further investigated. (K.H.)

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of mouse galectin-4 N-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain in complex with lactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejčiříková, Veronika; Fábry, Milan; Marková, Vladimíra; Malý, Petr; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Mouse galectin-4 carbohydrate binding domain was overexpressed in E. coli and crystallized in the presence of lactose. The crystals belong to tetragonal space group P42 1 2 and diffraction data were collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Galectin-4 is thought to play a role in the process of tumour conversion of cells of the alimentary tract and the breast tissue; however, its exact function remains unknown. With the aim of elucidating the structural basis of mouse galectin-4 (mGal-4) binding specificity, we have undertaken X-ray analysis of the N-terminal domain, CRD1, of mGal-4 in complex with lactose (the basic building block of known galectin-4 carbohydrate ligands). Crystals of CRD1 in complex with lactose were obtained using vapour-diffusion techniques. The crystals belong to tetragonal space group P42 1 2 with unit-cell parameters a = 91.1, b = 91.16, c = 57.10 Å and preliminary X-ray diffraction data were collected to 3.2 Å resolution. An optimized crystallization procedure and cryocooling protocol allowed us to extend resolution to 2.1 Å. Structure refinement is currently under way; the initial electron-density maps clearly show non-protein electron density in the vicinity of the carbohydrate binding site, indicating the presence of one lactose molecule. The structure will help to improve understanding of the binding specificity and function of the potential colon cancer marker galectin-4

  10. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and associated factors in the general working population: a baseline survey of the Uranosaki cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Yoshida, Hisako; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Oyama, Jun-Ichi; Kotooka, Norihiko; Toyoda, Shigeru; Inoue, Teruo; Natsuaki, Masafumi; Node, Koichi

    2017-07-19

    Few data on clinical characteristics associated with N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) or the clinical value of measuring NT-proBNP in the working population are available. The aim of the present study was to investigate the levels of NT-proBNP and their association with clinical variables in the Japanese general working population by using baseline data from the Uranosaki cohort study. In the study, the plasma concentration of NT-proBNP and some biomarkers were measured in addition to the standard health checkups at the workplace. Questionnaires regarding health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) were also completed. A total of 2140 participants were enrolled in the study. Plasma levels of NT-proBNP were positively associated with age, female sex, systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, prevalent hypertension, smoking habit, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and prevalent proteinuria, and negatively associated with body mass index, lipid profiles except HDL-C, uric acid, renal function, and hemoglobin. Both the plasma concentration of high-molecular weight adiponectin and that of high-sensitivity troponin T were positively and independently associated with NT-proBNP. In addition, the HR-QOL score regarding sleep disorder was independently associated with NT-proBNP. Thus, we have obtained evidence that the plasma NT-proBNP is affected by several clinical variables in the general working population.

  11. Limitations of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in the Diagnosis of Heart Disease among Cancer Patients Who Present with Cardiac or Pulmonary Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieshammer, Siegfried; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Müller, Dirk; Momm, Felix; Jakob, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing heart disease is relevant to oncologists because cancer patients are at an increased risk of cardiac mortality due to shared risk factors and the adverse effects of cancer therapy. This study assessed the extent to which the measurement of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) aids in the diagnosis of heart disease in addition to a history of coronary artery disease and the presence of atrial fibrillation (composite test). The NT- proBNP cutoff value was 100 pg/ml. A series of 583 consecutive cancer patients (68.4 ± 11.0 years) who were referred because of cardiac or pulmonary symptoms prospectively underwent a diagnostic work-up. Heart disease was diagnosed if at least one of the following conditions was present: (a) history of coronary artery disease, (b) atrial fibrillation, (c) impaired left ventricular systolic function, (d) significant valvular disease, (e) pulmonary hypertension, or (f) left ventricular hypertrophy. Except for (a), all 6 conditions were associated with NT-proBNP >100 pg/ml. The sensitivity/specificity values of the composite test were 0.92/0.50 for any heart disease. Several extracardiac covariates were associated with NT-proBNP >100 pg/ml, which contributed to the low test specificity. The low specificity of NT-proBNP limits its value for the diagnosis of heart disease in cancer patients. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Prognostic value of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing left main percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberg, Laurenz; Toggweiler, Stefan; Puck, Marietta; Frank, Michelle; Rufibach, Kaspar; Lüscher, Thomas F; Corti, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Patients undergoing acute left main (LM) coronary artery revascularization have a high mortality and natriuretic peptides such as N-terminal pro-B-type (NT-proBNP) have been shown to have prognostic value in patients with acute coronary syndromes. The present study looked at the prognostic value of NT-proBNP in these patients. We studied all consecutive patients undergoing acute LM coronary artery percutaneous coronary intervention between January 2005 and December 2008 in whom NT-proBNP was measured (n=71). We analyzed the clinical characteristics and the short- and long-term outcomes in relation to NT-proBNP level at admission. Median NT-proBNP was 1,364 ng/L, ranging from 46 to 70,000 ng/L. NT-proBNP was elevated in 63 (89%) patients and was ≥1,000ng/L in 42 (59%). Log NT-proBNP (hazard ratio [HR] 3.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.55-7.97, P=0.003) and left ventricular ejection fraction (HR 0.95, 95%CI 0.91-0.99, P=0.007) were predictors for all-cause mortality. Log NT-proBNP was the only independent significant predictor of cardiovascular mortality. In-hospital mortality was 0% for patients with NT-proBNP value for NT-proBNP in patients undergoing acute LM coronary artery intervention.

  13. Diagnostic value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide for pleural effusion due to heart failure: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Ye, Z J; Su, Y; Zhang, J C; Shi, H Z

    2010-08-01

    N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a biomarker useful in diagnosis of pleural effusion due to heart failure. Thus far, its overall diagnostic accuracy has not been systematically reviewed. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to establish the overall diagnostic accuracy of the measurement of pleural NT-proBNP for identifying pleural effusion due to heart failure. After a systematic review of English-language studies, sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy of NT-proBNP concentrations in pleural fluid in the diagnosis of pleural effusion resulting from heart failure were pooled using fixed-effects models. Summary receiver operating characteristic curves were used to summarise overall test performance. Eight publications met the inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for pleural NT-proBNP in the diagnosis of pleural effusion attributable to heart failure were: sensitivity 0.95 (95% CI 0.92 to 0.97), specificity 0.94 (0.92 to 0.96), positive likelihood ratio 14.12 (10.23 to 19.51), negative likelihood ratio 0.06 (0.04 to 0.09) and diagnostic OR 213.87 (122.50 to 373.40). NT-proBNP levels in pleural fluid showed a high diagnostic accuracy and may help accurately differentiate cardiac from non-cardiac conditions in patients presenting with pleural effusion.

  14. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity troponin T exhibit additive prognostic value for the outcome of critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Max; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Goliasch, Georg; Distelmaier, Klaus; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Speidl, Walter S

    2018-04-01

    Patients treated at medical intensive care units suffer from various pathologies and often present with elevated troponin T (TnT) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels. Both markers may reflect different forms of cardiac involvement in critical illness. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the synergistic prognostic potential of NT-proBNP and high-sensitivity TnT (hs)TnT in unselected critically ill patients. We included all consecutive patients admitted to our intensive care unit within one year, excluding those suffering from acute myocardial infarction or undergoing cardiac surgery and measured NT-proBNP and TnT plasma levels on the day of admission and 72 hours thereafter. Of the included 148 patients, 52% were male, mean age was of 64.2 ± 16.8 years and 30-day mortality was 33.2%. Non-survivors showed significantly higher NT-proBNP and TnT plasma levels as compared with survivors ( pvalue. This might be attributed to a difference in underlying pathomechanisms and an assessment of synergistic risk factors.

  15. Estimated glomerular filtration rate is associated with both arterial stiffness and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in newly diagnosed hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gür, Mustafa; Uçar, Hakan; Kuloğlu, Osman; Kıvrak, Ali; Şeker, Taner; Türkoğlu, Caner; Özaltun, Betül; Kaypaklı, Onur; Şahin, Durmuş Yıldıray; Elbasan, Zafer; Tanboğa, Halil İbrahim; Çaylı, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Even a slight decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Arterial stiffness, left ventricular hypertrophy and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease, which are particularly common in end-stage renal disease. We aimed to evaluate the association between GFR with arterial stiffness, left ventricle mass (LVM) and NT-proBNP in hypertensive subjects with normal to mildly impaired renal function. The study population consisted of 285 newly diagnosed hypertensive patients (mean age; 49.9 ± 11.8 years). GFR was estimated (eGFR) by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), which reflects arterial stiffness, were calculated using the single-point method via the Mobil-O-Graph® ARCsolver algorithm. LVM was obtained by echocardiography. Plasma NT-proBNP was measured by electrochemiluminescence. The patients were divided into two groups according to the median eGFR value (eGFRlow group values were higher in eGFRlow group compared with eGFRhigh group (pvalues were higher in eGFRlow group compared with eGFRhigh group (pPresent study showed that eGFR was independently associated with PWV and NT-proBNP values. Importantly, these findings may explain, in part, the increase in cardiovascular risk in with slightly impaired renal function.

  16. Designer Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofiber Scaffolds Containing Link Protein N-Terminal Peptide Induce Chondrogenesis of Rabbit Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baichuan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Designer self-assembling peptide nanofiber hydrogel scaffolds have been considered as promising biomaterials for tissue engineering because of their excellent biocompatibility and biofunctionality. Our previous studies have shown that a novel designer functionalized self-assembling peptide nanofiber hydrogel scaffold (RLN/RADA16, LN-NS containing N-terminal peptide sequence of link protein (link N can promote nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs adhesion and three-dimensional (3D migration and stimulate biosynthesis of type II collagen and aggrecan by NPCs in vitro. The present study has extended these investigations to determine the effects of this functionalized LN-NS on bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs, a potential cell source for NP regeneration. Although the functionalized LN-NS cannot promote BMSCs proliferation, it significantly promotes BMSCs adhesion compared with that of the pure RADA16 hydrogel scaffold. Moreover, the functionalized LN-NS remarkably stimulates biosynthesis and deposition of type II collagen and aggrecan. These data demonstrate that the functionalized peptide nanofiber hydrogel scaffold containing link N peptide as a potential matrix substrate will be very useful in the NP tissue regeneration.

  17. Uncaria rhynchophylla and Rhynchophylline inhibit c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation and nuclear factor-kappaB activity in kainic acid-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Ho, Tin-Yun; Su, Shan-Yu; Lo, Wan-Yu; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Tang, Nou-Ying

    2009-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) can reduce epileptic seizures. We hypothesized that UR and its major component rhynchophylline (RH), reduce epileptic seizures in rats treated with kainic acid (KA) by inhibiting nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activator-protein-1 (AP-1) activity, and by eliminating superoxide anions. Therefore, the level of superoxide anions and the DNA binding activities of NF-kappaB and AP-1 were measured. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were pre-treated with UR (1.0 g/kg, i.p.), RH (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.), or valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg, i.p.) for 3 days and then KA was administered intra-peritoneal (i.p.). The results indicated that UR, RH, and VA can reduce epileptic seizures and the level of superoxide anions in the blood. Furthermore, KA was demonstrated to induce the DNA binding activities of NF-kappaB and AP-1. However, these inductions were inhibited by pre-treatment with UR, RH, or VA for 3 days. Moreover, UR and RH were shown to be involved in the suppression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. This study suggested that UR and RH have antiepileptic effects in KA-induced seizures and are associated with the regulation of the innate immune system via a reduction in the level of superoxide anions, JNK phosphorylation, and NF-kappaB activation.

  18. Prognostic value of N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide for in-hospital and long-term outcomes in patients with infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xue-Biao; Liu, Yuan-Hui; He, Peng-Cheng; Yu, Dan-Qing; Zhou, Ying-Ling; Tan, Ning; Chen, Ji-Yan

    2017-05-01

    Background Limited research studies with a large sample size were performed to evaluate the prognostic value of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) for in-hospital or long-term poor outcomes in patients with infective endocarditis. Methods A total of 703 patients with infective endocarditis were enrolled and divided into four groups according to admission NT-pro-BNP (pg/mL) quartiles: Q1 (3522). Multivariate regression was used to determine independent risk of NT-proBNP for in-hospital and one-year death. Results In-hospital death occurred in 9.0% of patients. The in-hospital mortality was increased from the lowest to the highest NT-proBNP quartiles (1.1%, 3.4%, 9.1% and 22.3%, P  2260 pg/mL had 76.2% sensitivity and 69.1% specificity for predicting in-hospital death. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with NT-proBNP > 2260 pg/ml had a worse prognosis than those without (log-rank test 18.84, P endocarditis.

  19. Neurofibrillary tangles and the deposition of a beta amyloid peptide with a novel N-terminal epitope in the brains of wild Tsushima leopard cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K Chambers

    Full Text Available Beta amyloid (Aβ deposits are seen in aged individuals in many of the mammalian species that possess the same Aβ amino acid sequence as humans. Conversely, neurofibrillary tangles (NFT, the other hallmark lesion of Alzheimer's disease (AD, are extremely rare in these animals. We detected Aβ deposits in the brains of Tsushima leopard cats (Prionailurus bengalensis euptilurus that live exclusively on Tsushima Island, Japan. Aβ42 was deposited in a granular pattern in the neuropil of the pyramidal cell layer, but did not form argyrophilic senile plaques. These Aβ deposits were not immunolabeled with antibodies to the N-terminal of human Aβ. Sequence analysis of the amyloid precursor protein revealed an amino acid substitution at the 7th residue of the Aβ peptide. In a comparison with other mammalian animals that do develop argyrophilic senile plaques, we concluded that the alternative Aβ amino acid sequence displayed by leopard cats is likely to be related to its distinctive deposition pattern. Interestingly, most of the animals with these Aβ deposits also developed NFTs. The distributions of hyperphosphorylated tau-positive cells and the two major isoforms of aggregated tau proteins were quite similar to those seen in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the unphosphorylated form of GSK-3β colocalized with hyperphosphorylated tau within the affected neurons. In conclusion, this animal species develops AD-type NFTs without argyrophilic senile plaques.

  20. The role of p38 MAP kinase and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase signaling in the differentiation and apoptosis of immortalized neural stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Se-Ran; Cho, Sung-Dae; Ahn, Nam-Shik; Jung, Ji-Won; Park, Joon-Suk; Jo, Eun-Hye; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Bong-Hee; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Lee, Yong-Soon

    2005-01-01

    The two distinct members of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 MAP kinase, play an important role in central nervous system (CNS) development and differentiation. However, their role and functions are not completely understood in CNS. To facilitate in vitro study, we have established an immortal stem cell line using SV40 from fetal rat embryonic day 17. In these cells, MAP kinase inhibitors (SP600125, SB202190, and PD98059) were treated for 1, 24, 48, and 72 h to examine the roles of protein kinases. Early inhibition of JNK did not alter phenotypic or morphological changes of immortalized cells, however overexpression of Bax and decrease of phosphorylated AKT was observed. The prolonged inhibition of JNK induced polyploidization of immortalized cells, and resulted in differentiation and inhibition of cell proliferation. Moreover, JNK and p38 MAP kinase but not ERK1/2 was activated, and p21, p53, and Bax were overexpressed by prolonged inhibition of JNK. These results indicate that JNK and p38 MAP kinase could play dual roles on cell survival and apoptosis. Furthermore, this established cell line could facilitate study of the role of JNK and p38 MAP kinase on CNS development or differentiation/apoptosis

  1. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-02-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable 'UU172 element' from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Ureaplasma antigenic variation beyond MBA phase variation: DNA inversions generating chimeric structures and switching in expression of the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Carl-Ulrich R; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Phase variation of the major ureaplasma surface membrane protein, the multiple-banded antigen (MBA), with its counterpart, the UU376 protein, was recently discussed as a result of DNA inversion occurring at specific inverted repeats. Two similar inverted repeats to the ones within the mba locus were found in the genome of Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3; one within the MBA N-terminal paralogue UU172 and another in the adjacent intergenic spacer region. In this report, we demonstrate on both genomic and protein level that DNA inversion at these inverted repeats leads to alternating expression between UU172 and the neighbouring conserved hypothetical ORF UU171. Sequence analysis of this phase-variable ‘UU172 element’ from both U. parvum and U. urealyticum strains revealed that it is highly conserved among both species and that it also includes the orthologue of UU144. A third inverted repeat region in UU144 is proposed to serve as an additional potential inversion site from which chimeric genes can evolve. Our results indicate that site-specific recombination events in the genome of U. parvum serovar 3 are dynamic and frequent, leading to a broad spectrum of antigenic variation by which the organism may evade host immune responses. PMID:21255110

  3. Probing structural changes of self assembled i-motif DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Iljoon; Patil, Sachin; Fhayli, Karim; Alsaiari, Shahad K.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2015-01-01

    We report an i-motif structural probing system based on Thioflavin T (ThT) as a fluorescent sensor. This probe can discriminate the structural changes of RET and Rb i-motif sequences according to pH change. This journal is

  4. The identification of functional motifs in temporal gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Surette

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of transcription factor binding sites is essential to the understanding of the regulation of gene expression and the reconstruction of genetic regulatory networks. The in silico identification of cis-regulatory motifs is challenging due to sequence variability and lack of sufficient data to generate consensus motifs that are of quantitative or even qualitative predictive value. To determine functional motifs in gene expression, we propose a strategy to adopt false discovery rate (FDR and estimate motif effects to evaluate combinatorial analysis of motif candidates and temporal gene expression data. The method decreases the number of predicted motifs, which can then be confirmed by genetic analysis. To assess the method we used simulated motif/expression data to evaluate parameters. We applied this approach to experimental data for a group of iron responsive genes in Salmonella typhimurium 14028S. The method identified known and potentially new ferric-uptake regulator (Fur binding sites. In addition, we identified uncharacterized functional motif candidates that correlated with specific patterns of expression. A SAS code for the simulation and analysis gene expression data is available from the first author upon request.

  5. RNA recognition motif (RRM)-containing proteins in Bombyx mori

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... Recognition Motif (RRM), sometimes referred to as. RNP1, is one of the first identified domains for RNA interaction. RRM is very common ..... Apart from the RRM motif, eIF3-S9 has a Trp-Asp. (WD) repeat domain, Poly (A) ...

  6. BlockLogo: Visualization of peptide and sequence motif conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Kudahl, Ulrich Johan; Simon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    BlockLogo is a web-server application for the visualization of protein and nucleotide fragments, continuous protein sequence motifs, and discontinuous sequence motifs using calculation of block entropy from multiple sequence alignments. The user input consists of a multiple sequence alignment, se...

  7. Fingerprint motifs of phytases | Fan | African Journal of Biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among the total of potential 173 phytases gained in 11 plant genomes through MAST, PAPhys are the major phytases, and HAPhys are the minor, and other phytase groups are not found in planta. Keywords: Phytase, fingerprint motif, multiple EM for motif elicitation (MEME), MAST African Journal of Biotechnology Vol.

  8. Identification of sequence motifs significantly associated with antisense activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peek Andrew S

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting the suppression activity of antisense oligonucleotide sequences is the main goal of the rational design of nucleic acids. To create an effective predictive model, it is important to know what properties of an oligonucleotide sequence associate significantly with antisense activity. Also, for the model to be efficient we must know what properties do not associate significantly and can be omitted from the model. This paper will discuss the results of a randomization procedure to find motifs that associate significantly with either high or low antisense suppression activity, analysis of their properties, as well as the results of support vector machine modelling using these significant motifs as features. Results We discovered 155 motifs that associate significantly with high antisense suppression activity and 202 motifs that associate significantly with low suppression activity. The motifs range in length from 2 to 5 bases, contain several motifs that have been previously discovered as associating highly with antisense activity, and have thermodynamic properties consistent with previous work associating thermodynamic properties of sequences with their antisense activity. Statistical analysis revealed no correlation between a motif's position within an antisense sequence and that sequences antisense activity. Also, many significant motifs existed as subwords of other significant motifs. Support vector regression experiments indicated that the feature set of significant motifs increased correlation compared to all possible motifs as well as several subsets of the significant motifs. Conclusion The thermodynamic properties of the significantly associated motifs support existing data correlating the thermodynamic properties of the antisense oligonucleotide with antisense efficiency, reinforcing our hypothesis that antisense suppression is strongly associated with probe/target thermodynamics, as there are no enzymatic

  9. Automatic annotation of protein motif function with Gene Ontology terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishnan Vanathi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conserved protein sequence motifs are short stretches of amino acid sequence patterns that potentially encode the function of proteins. Several sequence pattern searching algorithms and programs exist foridentifying candidate protein motifs at the whole genome level. However, amuch needed and importanttask is to determine the functions of the newly identified protein motifs. The Gene Ontology (GO project is an endeavor to annotate the function of genes or protein sequences with terms from a dynamic, controlled vocabulary and these annotations serve well as a knowledge base. Results This paperpresents methods to mine the GO knowledge base and use the association between the GO terms assigned to a sequence and the motifs matched by the same sequence as evidence for predicting the functions of novel protein motifs automatically. The task of assigning GO terms to protein motifsis viewed as both a binary classification and information retrieval problem, where PROSITE motifs are used as samples for mode training and functional prediction. The mutual information of a motif and aGO term association isfound to be a very useful feature. We take advantageof the known motifs to train a logistic regression classifier, which allows us to combine mutual information with other frequency-based features and obtain a probability of correctassociation. The trained logistic regression model has intuitively meaningful and logically plausible parameter values, and performs very well empirically according to our evaluation criteria. Conclusions In this research, different methods for automatic annotation of protein motifs have been investigated. Empirical result demonstrated that the methods have a great potential for detecting and augmenting information about thefunctions of newly discovered candidate protein motifs.

  10. Identification of the Raptor-binding motif on Arabidopsis S6 kinase and its use as a TOR signaling suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2016-03-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signaling plays central role as a regulator of growth and proliferation in all eukaryotic cells and its key signaling components and effectors are also conserved in plants. Unlike the mammalian and yeast counterparts, however, we found through yeast two-hybrid analysis that multiple regions of the Arabidopsis Raptor (regulatory associated protein of TOR) are required for binding to its substrate. We also identified that a 44-amino acid region at the N-terminal end of Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) specifically interacted with AtRaptor1, indicating that this region may contain a functional equivalent of the TOS (TOR-Signaling) motif present in the mammalian TOR substrates. Transient over-expression of this 44-amino acid fragment in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in significant decrease in rDNA transcription, demonstrating a feasibility of developing a new plant-specific TOR signaling inhibitor based upon perturbation of the Raptor-substrate interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The group B streptococcal alpha C protein binds alpha1beta1-integrin through a novel KTD motif that promotes internalization of GBS within human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Gilles R; Madoff, Lawrence C

    2007-12-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis among neonates and a cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. GBS epithelial cell invasion is associated with expression of alpha C protein (ACP). Loss of ACP expression results in a decrease in GBS internalization and translocation across human cervical epithelial cells (ME180). Soluble ACP and its 170 amino acid N-terminal region (NtACP), but not the repeat protein RR', bind to ME180 cells and reduce internalization of wild-type GBS to levels obtained with an ACP-deficient isogenic mutant. In the current study, ACP colocalized with alpha(1)beta(1)-integrin, resulting in integrin clustering as determined by laser scanning confocal microscopy. NtACP contains two structural domains, D1 and D2. D1 is structurally similar to fibronectin's integrin-binding region (FnIII10). D1's (KT)D146 motif is structurally similar to the FnIII10 (RG)D1495 integrin-binding motif, suggesting that ACP binds alpha(1)beta(1)-integrin via the D1 domain. The (KT)D146A mutation within soluble NtACP reduced its ability to bind alpha(1)beta(1)-integrin and inhibit GBS internalization within ME180 cells. Thus ACP binding to human epithelial cell integrins appears to contribute to GBS internalization within epithelial cells.

  12. An unusual helix-turn-helix protease inhibitory motif in a novel trypsin inhibitor from seeds of Veronica (Veronica hederifolia L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Rebecca; Konarev, Alexander V; Forsyth, Jane; Lovegrove, Alison; Marsh, Justin; Joseph-Horne, Timothy; Shewry, Peter; Brady, R Leo

    2007-09-21

    The storage tissues of many plants contain protease inhibitors that are believed to play an important role in defending the plant from invasion by pests and pathogens. These proteinaceous inhibitor molecules belong to a number of structurally distinct families. We describe here the isolation, purification, initial inhibitory properties, and three-dimensional structure of a novel trypsin inhibitor from seeds of Veronica hederifolia (VhTI). The VhTI peptide inhibits trypsin with a submicromolar apparent K(i) and is expected to be specific for trypsin-like serine proteases. VhTI differs dramatically in structure from all previously described families of trypsin inhibitors, consisting of a helix-turn-helix motif, with the two alpha helices tightly associated by two disulfide bonds. Unusually, the crystallized complex is in the form of a stabilized acyl-enzyme intermediate with the scissile bond of the VhTI inhibitor cleaved and the resulting N-terminal portion of the inhibitor remaining attached to the trypsin catalytic serine 195 by an ester bond. A synthetic, truncated version of the VhTI peptide has also been produced and co-crystallized with trypsin but, surprisingly, is seen to be uncleaved and consequently forms a noncovalent complex with trypsin. The VhTI peptide shows that effective enzyme inhibitors can be constructed from simple helical motifs and provides a new scaffold on which to base the design of novel serine protease inhibitors.

  13. Deletion of a 197-Amino-Acid Region in the N-Terminal Domain of Spike Protein Attenuates Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus in Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yixuan; Lin, Chun-Ming; Yokoyama, Masaru; Yount, Boyd L; Marthaler, Douglas; Douglas, Arianna L; Ghimire, Shristi; Qin, Yibin; Baric, Ralph S; Saif, Linda J; Wang, Qiuhong

    2017-07-15

    We previously isolated a porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) strain, PC177, by blind serial passaging of the intestinal contents of a diarrheic piglet in Vero cell culture. Compared with the highly virulent U.S. PEDV strain PC21A, the tissue culture-adapted PC177 (TC-PC177) contains a 197-amino-acid (aa) deletion in the N-terminal domain of the spike (S) protein. We orally inoculated neonatal, conventional suckling piglets with TC-PC177 or PC21A to compare their pathogenicities. Within 7 days postinoculation, TC-PC177 caused mild diarrhea and lower fecal viral RNA shedding, with no mortality, whereas PC21A caused severe clinical signs and 55% mortality. To investigate whether infection with TC-PC177 can induce cross-protection against challenge with a highly virulent PEDV strain, all the surviving piglets were challenged with PC21A at 3 weeks postinoculation. Compared with 100% protection in piglets initially inoculated with PC21A, 88% and 100% TC-PC177- and mock-inoculated piglets had diarrhea following challenge, respectively, indicating incomplete cross-protection. To investigate whether this 197-aa deletion was the determinant for the attenuation of TC-PC177, we generated a mutant (icPC22A-S1Δ197) bearing the 197-aa deletion from an infectious cDNA clone of the highly virulent PEDV PC22A strain (infectious clone PC22A, icPC22A). In neonatal gnotobiotic pigs, the icPC22A-S1Δ197 virus caused mild to moderate diarrhea, lower titers of viral shedding, and no mortality, whereas the icPC22A virus caused severe diarrhea and 100% mortality. Our data indicate that deletion of this 197-aa fragment in the spike protein can attenuate a highly virulent PEDV, but the virus may lose important epitopes for inducing robust protective immunity. IMPORTANCE The emerging, highly virulent PEDV strains have caused substantial economic losses worldwide. However, the virulence determinants are not established. In this study, we found that a 197-aa deletion in the N-terminal region

  14. Motif statistics and spike correlations in neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yu; Shea-Brown, Eric; Trousdale, James; Josić, Krešimir

    2013-01-01

    Motifs are patterns of subgraphs of complex networks. We studied the impact of such patterns of connectivity on the level of correlated, or synchronized, spiking activity among pairs of cells in a recurrent network of integrate and fire neurons. For a range of network architectures, we find that the pairwise correlation coefficients, averaged across the network, can be closely approximated using only three statistics of network connectivity. These are the overall network connection probability and the frequencies of two second order motifs: diverging motifs, in which one cell provides input to two others, and chain motifs, in which two cells are connected via a third intermediary cell. Specifically, the prevalence of diverging and chain motifs tends to increase correlation. Our method is based on linear response theory, which enables us to express spiking statistics using linear algebra, and a resumming technique, which extrapolates from second order motifs to predict the overall effect of coupling on network correlation. Our motif-based results seek to isolate the effect of network architecture perturbatively from a known network state. (paper)

  15. Computational analyses of synergism in small molecular network motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular functions and responses to stimuli are controlled by complex regulatory networks that comprise a large diversity of molecular components and their interactions. However, achieving an intuitive understanding of the dynamical properties and responses to stimuli of these networks is hampered by their large scale and complexity. To address this issue, analyses of regulatory networks often focus on reduced models that depict distinct, reoccurring connectivity patterns referred to as motifs. Previous modeling studies have begun to characterize the dynamics of small motifs, and to describe ways in which variations in parameters affect their responses to stimuli. The present study investigates how variations in pairs of parameters affect responses in a series of ten common network motifs, identifying concurrent variations that act synergistically (or antagonistically to alter the responses of the motifs to stimuli. Synergism (or antagonism was quantified using degrees of nonlinear blending and additive synergism. Simulations identified concurrent variations that maximized synergism, and examined the ways in which it was affected by stimulus protocols and the architecture of a motif. Only a subset of architectures exhibited synergism following paired changes in parameters. The approach was then applied to a model describing interlocked feedback loops governing the synthesis of the CREB1 and CREB2 transcription factors. The effects of motifs on synergism for this biologically realistic model were consistent with those for the abstract models of single motifs. These results have implications for the rational design of combination drug therapies with the potential for synergistic interactions.

  16. Triadic motifs in the dependence networks of virtual societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen-Jie; Li, Ming-Xia; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2014-06-01

    In friendship networks, individuals have different numbers of friends, and the closeness or intimacy between an individual and her friends is heterogeneous. Using a statistical filtering method to identify relationships about who depends on whom, we construct dependence networks (which are directed) from weighted friendship networks of avatars in more than two hundred virtual societies of a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG). We investigate the evolution of triadic motifs in dependence networks. Several metrics show that the virtual societies evolved through a transient stage in the first two to three weeks and reached a relatively stable stage. We find that the unidirectional loop motif (M9) is underrepresented and does not appear, open motifs are also underrepresented, while other close motifs are overrepresented. We also find that, for most motifs, the overall level difference of the three avatars in the same motif is significantly lower than average, whereas the sum of ranks is only slightly larger than average. Our findings show that avatars' social status plays an important role in the formation of triadic motifs.

  17. RNA motif search with data-driven element ordering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampášek, Ladislav; Jimenez, Randi M; Lupták, Andrej; Vinař, Tomáš; Brejová, Broňa

    2016-05-18

    In this paper, we study the problem of RNA motif search in long genomic sequences. This approach uses a combination of sequence and structure constraints to uncover new distant homologs of known functional RNAs. The problem is NP-hard and is traditionally solved by backtracking algorithms. We have designed a new algorithm for RNA motif search and implemented a new motif search tool RNArobo. The tool enhances the RNAbob descriptor language, allowing insertions in helices, which enables better characterization of ribozymes and aptamers. A typical RNA motif consists of multiple elements and the running time of the algorithm is highly dependent on their ordering. By approaching the element ordering problem in a principled way, we demonstrate more than 100-fold speedup of the search for complex motifs compared to previously published tools. We have developed a new method for RNA motif search that allows for a significant speedup of the search of complex motifs that include pseudoknots. Such speed improvements are crucial at a time when the rate of DNA sequencing outpaces growth in computing. RNArobo is available at http://compbio.fmph.uniba.sk/rnarobo .

  18. Triadic motifs in the dependence networks of virtual societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen-Jie; Li, Ming-Xia; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2014-06-10

    In friendship networks, individuals have different numbers of friends, and the closeness or intimacy between an individual and her friends is heterogeneous. Using a statistical filtering method to identify relationships about who depends on whom, we construct dependence networks (which are directed) from weighted friendship networks of avatars in more than two hundred virtual societies of a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG). We investigate the evolution of triadic motifs in dependence networks. Several metrics show that the virtual societies evolved through a transient stage in the first two to three weeks and reached a relatively stable stage. We find that the unidirectional loop motif (M9) is underrepresented and does not appear, open motifs are also underrepresented, while other close motifs are overrepresented. We also find that, for most motifs, the overall level difference of the three avatars in the same motif is significantly lower than average, whereas the sum of ranks is only slightly larger than average. Our findings show that avatars' social status plays an important role in the formation of triadic motifs.

  19. Inhibition of spinal astrocytic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activation correlates with the analgesic effects of ketamine in neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that inhibition of astrocytic activation contributes to the analgesic effects of intrathecal ketamine on spinal nerve ligation (SNL-induced neuropathic pain. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, a member of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK family, has been reported to be critical for spinal astrocytic activation and neuropathic pain development after SNL. Ketamine can decrease lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced phosphorylated JNK (pJNK expression and could thus exert its anti-inflammatory effect. We hypothesized that inhibition of astrocytic JNK activation might be involved in the suppressive effect of ketamine on SNL-induced spinal astrocytic activation. Methods Immunofluorescence histochemical staining was used to detect SNL-induced spinal pJNK expression and localization. The effects of ketamine on SNL-induced mechanical allodynia were confirmed by behavioral testing. Immunofluorescence histochemistry and Western blot were used to quantify the SNL-induced spinal pJNK expression after ketamine administration. Results The present study showed that SNL induced ipsilateral pJNK up-regulation in astrocytes but not microglia or neurons within the spinal dorsal horn. Intrathecal ketamine relieved SNL-induced mechanical allodynia without interfering with motor performance. Additionally, intrathecal administration of ketamine attenuated SNL-induced spinal astrocytic JNK activation in a dose-dependent manner, but not JNK protein expression. Conclusions The present results suggest that inhibition of JNK activation may be involved in the suppressive effects of ketamine on SNL-induced spinal astrocyte activation. Therefore, inhibition of spinal JNK activation may be involved in the analgesic effects of ketamine on SNL-induced neuropathic pain.

  20. Inhibition of spinal astrocytic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation correlates with the analgesic effects of ketamine in neuropathic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-0