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Sample records for n-15 nmr relaxation

  1. Characterization of mu s-ms dynamics of proteins using a combined analysis of N-15 NMR relaxation and chemical shift: Conformational exchange in plastocyanin induced by histidine protonations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2004-01-01

    An approach is presented that allows a detailed, quantitative characterization of conformational exchange processes in proteins on the mus-ms time scale. The approach relies on a combined analysis of NMR relaxation rates and chemical shift changes and requires that the chemical shift...... of the exchanging species can be determined independently of the relaxation rates. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated by a detailed analysis of the conformational exchange processes previously observed in the reduced form of the blue copper protein, plastocyanin from the cyanobacteria Anabaena...... quantitatively by the correlation between the R-ex terms and the corresponding chemical shift differences of the exchanging species. By this approach, the R-ex terms of N-15 nuclei belonging to contiguous regions in the protein could be assigned to the same exchange process. Furthermore, the analysis...

  2. Spectral Estimation of NMR Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugler, David G.; Cushley, Robert J.

    2000-08-01

    In this paper, spectral estimation of NMR relaxation is constructed as an extension of Fourier Transform (FT) theory as it is practiced in NMR or MRI, where multidimensional FT theory is used. nD NMR strives to separate overlapping resonances, so the treatment given here deals primarily with monoexponential decay. In the domain of real error, it is shown how optimal estimation based on prior knowledge can be derived. Assuming small Gaussian error, the estimation variance and bias are derived. Minimum bias and minimum variance are shown to be contradictory experimental design objectives. The analytical continuation of spectral estimation is constructed in an optimal manner. An important property of spectral estimation is that it is phase invariant. Hence, hypercomplex data storage is unnecessary. It is shown that, under reasonable assumptions, spectral estimation is unbiased in the context of complex error and its variance is reduced because the modulus of the whole signal is used. Because of phase invariance, the labor of phasing and any error due to imperfect phase can be avoided. A comparison of spectral estimation with nonlinear least squares (NLS) estimation is made analytically and with numerical examples. Compared to conventional sampling for NLS estimation, spectral estimation would typically provide estimation values of comparable precision in one-quarter to one-tenth of the spectrometer time when S/N is high. When S/N is low, the time saved can be used for signal averaging at the sampled points to give better precision. NLS typically provides one estimate at a time, whereas spectral estimation is inherently parallel. The frequency dimensions of conventional nD FT NMR may be denoted D1, D2, etc. As an extension of nD FT NMR, one can view spectral estimation of NMR relaxation as an extension into the zeroth dimension. In nD NMR, the information content of a spectrum can be extracted as a set of n-tuples (ω1, … ωn), corresponding to the peak maxima

  3. Relaxation time estimation in surface NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, Elliot D.; Walsh, David O.

    2017-03-21

    NMR relaxation time estimation methods and corresponding apparatus generate two or more alternating current transmit pulses with arbitrary amplitudes, time delays, and relative phases; apply a surface NMR acquisition scheme in which initial preparatory pulses, the properties of which may be fixed across a set of multiple acquisition sequence, are transmitted at the start of each acquisition sequence and are followed by one or more depth sensitive pulses, the pulse moments of which are varied across the set of multiple acquisition sequences; and apply processing techniques in which recorded NMR response data are used to estimate NMR properties and the relaxation times T.sub.1 and T.sub.2* as a function of position as well as one-dimensional and two-dimension distributions of T.sub.1 versus T.sub.2* as a function of subsurface position.

  4. Relaxation time estimation in surface NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, Elliot D.; Walsh, David O.

    2017-03-21

    NMR relaxation time estimation methods and corresponding apparatus generate two or more alternating current transmit pulses with arbitrary amplitudes, time delays, and relative phases; apply a surface NMR acquisition scheme in which initial preparatory pulses, the properties of which may be fixed across a set of multiple acquisition sequence, are transmitted at the start of each acquisition sequence and are followed by one or more depth sensitive pulses, the pulse moments of which are varied across the set of multiple acquisition sequences; and apply processing techniques in which recorded NMR response data are used to estimate NMR properties and the relaxation times T.sub.1 and T.sub.2* as a function of position as well as one-dimensional and two-dimension distributions of T.sub.1 versus T.sub.2* as a function of subsurface position.

  5. Dispersion Properties of NMR Relaxation for Crude Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Ranhong; Xiao Lizhi

    2007-01-01

    Special requirements for design of tools used for wireline NMR logging and NMR logging while drilling and for interpretation model are demanded due to the dispersion properties of NMR relaxation for crude oil.NMR longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2) of the dead oil samples with different viscosities were measured by NMR spectrometers with a Larmor frequency of 2 MHz and 23 MHz at five different temperatures respectively.The results showed that T1 was obviously dependent on the Larmor frequency of NMR spectrometer.The degree of T1 dispersion became stronger with the increasing crude oil viscosity,Larmor frequency and the viscosity/temperature ratio.T2 was independent of NMR spectrometer measuring frequency.It is suggested that the resonance frequency should be selected lower than 2 MHz when measuring T1 in logging while-drilling and that T1 dispersion should be corrected when Larmor frequency is higher than 2 MHz.

  6. Relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy for the study of protein allostery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Patrick J; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2015-06-01

    Allosteric transmission of information between distant sites in biological macromolecules often involves collective transitions between active and inactive conformations. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can yield detailed information on these dynamics. In particular, relaxation dispersion techniques provide structural, dynamic, and mechanistic information on conformational transitions occurring on the millisecond to microsecond timescales. In this review, we provide an overview of the theory and analysis of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion NMR experiments and briefly describe their application to the study of allosteric dynamics in the homeodomain from the PBX transcription factor (PBX-HD). CPMG NMR data show that local folding (helix/coil) transitions in one part of PBX-HD help to communicate information between two distant binding sites. Furthermore, the combination of CPMG and other spin relaxation data show that this region can also undergo local misfolding, reminiscent of conformational ensemble models of allostery.

  7. Non-uniform sampling of NMR relaxation data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz-Linnet, Troels; Teilum, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    The use of non-uniform sampling of NMR spectra may give significant reductions in the data acquisition time. For quantitative experiments such as the measurement of spin relaxation rates, non-uniform sampling is however not widely used as inaccuracies in peak intensities may lead to errors...

  8. Distribution of NMR relaxations in a random Heisenberg chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroka, T; Casola, F; Glazkov, V; Zheludev, A; Prša, K; Ott, H-R; Mesot, J

    2011-04-01

    NMR measurements of the (29)Si spin-lattice relaxation time T(1) were used to probe the spin-1/2 random Heisenberg chain compound BaCu(2)(Si(1-x)Ge(x))(2)O(7). Remarkable differences between the pure (x=0) and the fully random (x=0.5) cases are observed, indicating that randomness generates a distribution of local magnetic relaxations. This distribution, which is reflected in a stretched exponential NMR relaxation, exhibits a progressive broadening with decreasing temperature, caused by a growing inequivalence of magnetic sites. Compelling independent evidence for the influence of randomness is also obtained from magnetization data and Monte Carlo calculations. These results suggest the formation of random-singlet states in this class of materials, as previously predicted by theory.

  9. Extracting protein dynamics information from overlapped NMR signals using relaxation dispersion difference NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konuma, Tsuyoshi [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Structural and Chemical Biology (United States); Harada, Erisa [Suntory Foundation for Life Sciences, Bioorganic Research Institute (Japan); Sugase, Kenji, E-mail: sugase@sunbor.or.jp, E-mail: sugase@moleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Molecular Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Protein dynamics plays important roles in many biological events, such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. NMR is mostly used for investigating such protein dynamics in a site-specific manner. Recently, NMR has been actively applied to large proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are attractive research targets. However, signal overlap, which is often observed for such proteins, hampers accurate analysis of NMR data. In this study, we have developed a new methodology called relaxation dispersion difference that can extract conformational exchange parameters from overlapped NMR signals measured using relaxation dispersion spectroscopy. In relaxation dispersion measurements, the signal intensities of fluctuating residues vary according to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboon-Gill pulsing interval, whereas those of non-fluctuating residues are constant. Therefore, subtraction of each relaxation dispersion spectrum from that with the highest signal intensities, measured at the shortest pulsing interval, leaves only the signals of the fluctuating residues. This is the principle of the relaxation dispersion difference method. This new method enabled us to extract exchange parameters from overlapped signals of heme oxygenase-1, which is a relatively large protein. The results indicate that the structural flexibility of a kink in the heme-binding site is important for efficient heme binding. Relaxation dispersion difference requires neither selectively labeled samples nor modification of pulse programs; thus it will have wide applications in protein dynamics analysis.

  10. Effective rotational correlation times of proteins from NMR relaxation interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghan; Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effective rotational correlation times, τc, for the modulation of anisotropic spin-spin interactions in macromolecules subject to Brownian motion in solution is of key interest for the practice of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. The value of τc enables an estimate of the NMR spin relaxation rates, and indicates possible aggregation of the macromolecular species. This paper reports a novel NMR pulse scheme, [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT, which is based on transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy and permits to determine τc for 15N- 1H bonds without interference from dipole-dipole coupling of the amide proton with remote protons. [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT is highly efficient since only a series of one-dimensional NMR spectra need to be recorded. Its use is suggested for a quick estimate of the rotational correlation time, to monitor sample quality and to determine optimal parameters for complex multidimensional NMR experiments. Practical applications are illustrated with the 110 kDa 7,8-dihydroneopterin aldolase from Staphylococcus aureus, the uniformly 15N-labeled Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) in 60 kDa mixed OmpX/DHPC micelles with approximately 90 molecules of unlabeled 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), and the 16 kDa pheromone-binding protein from Bombyx mori, which cover a wide range of correlation times.

  11. Microscale simulations of NMR relaxation in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    In petrophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the measured relaxation signals originate from the fluid filled pore space. Hence, in rocks or sediments the water content directly corresponds to the initial amplitude of the recorded NMR relaxation signals. The relaxation rate (longitudinal/transversal decay time T1, T2) is sensitive to pore sizes and physiochemical properties of rock-fluid interfaces (surface relaxivity), as well as the concentration of paramagnetic ions in the fluid phases (bulk relaxivity). In the subproject A2 of the TR32 we aim at improving the basic understanding of these processes at the pore scale and thereby advancing the interpretation of NMR data by reducing the application of restrictive approximated interpretation schemes, e.g. for deriving pore size distributions, connectivity or permeability. In this respect we numerically simulate NMR relaxation data at the micro sale to study the impact of physical and hydrological parameters such as internal field gradients or pore connectivities on NMR signals. Joint numerical simulations of the NMR relaxation behavior (Bloch equations) in the presence of internal gradients (Ampere's law) and fluid flow (Navier-Stokes) on a pore scale dimension have been implemented in a finite element (FE) model using Comsol Multiphysics. Processes governing the time and spatial behavior of the nuclear magnetization density in a porous medium are diffusion and surface interactions at the rock-fluid interface. Based on Fick's law of diffusive motion Brownstein and Tarr (1979) introduced differential equations that describe the relaxation behavior of the Spin magnetization in single isolated pores and derived analytical solutions for simple geometries, i.e. spherical, cylindrical and planar. However, by numerically solving these equations in a general way using a FE algorithm this approach can be applied to study and simulate coupled complex pore systems, e.g. derived from computer tomography (CT

  12. NMR relaxation rate and the libron energy of solid hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, K.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    By taking the rotational relaxation of orthohydrogen (o-H2) in solid hydrogen into account, the authors have theoretically investigated the longitudinal NMR spin lattice relaxation rate of o-H2. The rate is characterized by an anomalous maximum, as a function of temperature, at temperatures close to the mean libron energy of o-H2. Application of the theory for o-H2 concentrations between 42% and 75% reveals a nearly concentration-independent mean libron energy equivalent to about 1 K. This qualitatively and quantitatively contradicts the conclusions of other theories, but agrees with recent experiments.

  13. Analysis of 2D NMR relaxation data using Chisholm approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, S.; Haase, A.; Gleich, B.

    2017-08-01

    To analyze 2D NMR relaxation data based on a discrete delta-like relaxation map we extended the Padé-Laplace method to two dimensions. We approximate the forward Laplace image of the time domain signal by a Chisholm approximation, i.e. a rational polynomial in two dimensions. The poles and residues of this approximation correspond to the relaxation rates and weighting factors of the underlying relaxation map. In this work we explain the principle ideas of our algorithm and demonstrate its applicability. Therefore we compare the inversion results of the Chisholm approximation and Tikhonov regularization method as a function of SNR when the investigated signal is based on a given discrete relaxation map. Our algorithm proved to be reliable for SNRs larger than 50 and is able to compete with the Tikhonov regularization method. Furthermore we show that our method is also able to detect the simulated relaxation compartments of narrow Gaussian distributions with widths less or equal than 0.05 s-1. Finally we investigate the resolution limit with experimental data. For a SNR of 750 the Chisholm approximation method was able to resolve two relaxation compartments in 8 of 10 cases when both compartments differ by a factor of 1.7.

  14. Tacrine derivatives-acetylcholinesterase interaction: 1H NMR relaxation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfini, Maurizio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Piccioni, Fabiana; Porcelli, Fernando; Borioni, Anna; Rodomonte, Andrea; Del Giudice, Maria Rosaria

    2007-06-01

    Two acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors structurally related to Tacrine, 6-methoxytacrine (1a) and 9-heptylamino-6-methoxytacrine (1b), and their interaction with Electrophorus Electricus AChE were investigated. The complete assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 1a and 1b was performed by mono-dimensional and homo- and hetero-correlated two-dimensional NMR experiments. This study was undertaken to elucidate the interaction modes between AChE and 1a and 1b in solution, using NMR. The interaction between the two inhibitors and AChE was studied by the analysis of the motional parameters non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation times, thereby allowing the motional state of 1a and 1b, both free and bound with AChE, to be defined. The relaxation data pointed out the ligands molecular moiety most involved in the binding with AChE. The relevant ligand/enzyme interaction constants were also evaluated for both compounds and resulted to be 859 and 5412M(-1) for 1a and1b, respectively.

  15. 13C NMR relaxation studies on cartilage and cartilage components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, L; Kaufmann, J; Huster, D; Schiller, J; Arnold, K

    2000-08-07

    We have investigated the molecular motions of polysaccharides of bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage by measuring the 13C NMR relaxation times (T1 and T2). Both types of cartilage differ significantly towards their collagen/glycosaminoglycan ratio, leading to different NMR spectra. As chondroitin sulfate is the main constituent of cartilage, aqueous solutions of related poly- and monosaccharides (N-acetylglucosamine and glucuronic acid) were also investigated. Although there are only slight differences in T1 relaxation of the mono- and the polysaccharides, T2 decreases about one order of magnitude, when glucuronic acid or N-acetylglucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are compared. It is concluded that the ring carbons are motion-restricted primarily by the embedment in the rigid pyranose structure and, thus, additional limitations of mobility do not more show a major effect. Significant differences were observed between bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage, resulting in a considerable line-broadening and a lower signal to noise ratio in the spectra of pig articular cartilage. This is most likely caused by the higher collagen content of articular cartilage in comparison to the polysaccharide-rich bovine nasal cartilage.

  16. A new method for multi-exponential inversion of NMR relaxation measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Zhongdong; XIAO; Lizhi; LIU; Tangyan

    2004-01-01

    A new method for multi-exponential inversion to NMR T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions is suggested and tested. Inversion results are compared with MAP-II which is based on SVD algorithm and widely accepted in the industry. Inversed NMR relaxation spectra that have different pre-assigned relaxation times from echo trains with different SNR confirm that the new method with 16 to 64 equally spaced time constants in logarithm scale will ensure the relaxation distribution. Testing results show that the new inversion algorithm is a valuable tool for rock core NMR experimental analysis and NMR logging data process and interpretation.

  17. Characterizing RNA Excited States using NMR Relaxation Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yi; Kellogg, Dawn; Kimsey, Isaac J; Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Stein, Zachary W; McBrairty, Mitchell; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in RNA secondary structure play fundamental roles in the cellular functions of a growing number of non-coding RNAs. This chapter describes NMR-based approaches for characterizing microsecond-to-millisecond changes in RNA secondary structure that are directed toward short-lived and low-populated species often referred to as “excited states”. Compared to larger-scale changes in RNA secondary structure, transitions towards excited states do not require assistance from chaperones, are often orders of magnitude faster, and are localized to a small number of nearby base pairs in and around non-canonical motifs. Here we describe a procedure for characterizing RNA excited states using off-resonance R1ρ NMR relaxation dispersion utilizing low-to-high spin-lock fields (25–3000 Hz). R1ρ NMR relaxation dispersion experiments are used to measure carbon and nitrogen chemical shifts in base and sugar moieties of the excited state. The chemical shift data is then interpreted with the aid of secondary structure prediction to infer potential excited states that feature alternative secondary structures. Candidate structures are then tested by using mutations, single-atom substitutions, or by changing physiochemical conditions, such as pH and temperature, to either stabilize or destabilize the candidate excited state. The resulting chemical shifts of the mutants or under different physiochemical conditions are then compared to those of the ground and excited state. Application is illustrated with a focus on the transactivation response element (TAR) from the human immune deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), which exists in dynamic equilibrium with at least two distinct excited states. PMID:26068737

  18. Non-uniform sampling of NMR relaxation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linnet, Troels E.; Teilum, Kaare, E-mail: kaare.teilum@bio.ku.dk [University of Copenhagen, SBiNLab and the Linderstrøm-Lang Centre for Protein Science, Department of Biology (Denmark)

    2016-02-15

    The use of non-uniform sampling of NMR spectra may give significant reductions in the data acquisition time. For quantitative experiments such as the measurement of spin relaxation rates, non-uniform sampling is however not widely used as inaccuracies in peak intensities may lead to errors in the extracted dynamic parameters. By systematic reducing the coverage of the Nyquist grid of {sup 15}N Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion datasets for four different proteins and performing a full data analysis of the resulting non-uniform sampled datasets, we have compared the performance of the multi-dimensional decomposition and iterative re-weighted least-squares algorithms in reconstructing spectra with accurate peak intensities. As long as a single fully sampled spectrum is included in a series of otherwise non-uniform sampled two-dimensional spectra, multi-dimensional decomposition reconstructs the non-uniform sampled spectra with high accuracy. For two of the four analyzed datasets, a coverage of only 20 % results in essentially the same results as the fully sampled data. As exemplified by other data, such a low coverage is in general not enough to produce reliable results. We find that a coverage level not compromising the final results can be estimated by recording a single full two-dimensional spectrum and reducing the spectrum quality in silico.

  19. Parameterization of NMR relaxation curves in terms of logarithmic moments of the relaxation time distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Oleg V.; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-06-01

    This work addresses the problem of a compact and easily comparable representation of multi-exponential relaxation data. It is often convenient to describe such data in a few parameters, all being of physical significance and easy to interpret, and in such a way that enables a model-free comparison between different groups of samples. Logarithmic moments (LMs) of the relaxation time constitute a set of parameters which are related to the characteristic relaxation time on the log-scale, the width and the asymmetry of an underlying distribution of exponentials. On the other hand, the calculation of LMs does not require knowing the actual distribution function and is reduced to a numerical integration of original data. The performance of this method has been tested on both synthetic and experimental NMR relaxation data which differ in a signal-to-noise ratio, the sampling range and the sampling rate. The calculation of two lower-order LMs, the log-mean time and the log-variance, has proved robust against deficiencies of the experiment such as scattered data point and incomplete sampling. One may consider using them as such to monitor formation of a heterogeneous structure, e.g., in phase separation, vitrification, polymerization, hydration, aging, contrast agent propagation processes. It may also assist in interpreting frequency and temperature dependences of relaxation, revealing a crossover from slow to fast exchange between populations. The third LM was found to be a less reliable quantity due to its susceptibility to the noise and must be used with caution.

  20. N-15 NMR study of the immobilization of 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene in aerobic compost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, K.A.; Pennington, J.C.; Kennedy, K.R.; Cox, L.G.; Hayes, C.A.; Porter, B.E.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale aerobic windrow composting has been used to bioremediate washout lagoon soils contaminated with the explosives TNT (2,4,6- trinitrotoluene) and RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) at several sites within the United States. We previously used 15N NMR to investigate the reduction and binding of T15NT in aerobic bench -scale reactors simulating the conditions of windrow composting. These studies have been extended to 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4DNT) and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6DNT), which, as impurities in TNT, are usually present wherever soils have been contaminated with TNT. Liquid-state 15N NMR analyses of laboratory reactions between 4-methyl-3-nitroaniline-15N, the major monoamine reduction product of 2,4DNT, and the Elliot soil humic acid, both in the presence and absence of horseradish peroxidase, indicated that the amine underwent covalent binding with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and non-heterocyclic condensation products. Liquid-state 15N NMR analyses of the methanol extracts of 20 day aerobic bench-scale composts of 2,4-di-15N-nitrotoluene and 2,6-di-15N-nitrotoluene revealed the presence of nitrite and monoamine, but not diamine, reduction products, indicating the occurrence of both dioxygenase enzyme and reductive degradation pathways. Solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR analyses of the whole composts, however, suggested that reduction to monoamines followed by covalent binding of the amines to organic matter was the predominant pathway. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of NMR relaxation and diffusion of bulk hydrocarbons and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Philip M.; Asthagiri, Dilip; Chapman, Walter G.; Hirasaki, George J.

    2017-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and diffusion of bulk n-C5H12 to n-C17H36 hydrocarbons and bulk water. The MD simulations of the 1H NMR relaxation times T1,2 in the fast motion regime where T1 =T2 agree with measured (de-oxygenated) T2 data at ambient conditions, without any adjustable parameters in the interpretation of the simulation data. Likewise, the translational diffusion DT coefficients calculated using simulation configurations agree with measured diffusion data at ambient conditions. The agreement between the predicted and experimentally measured NMR relaxation times and diffusion coefficient also validate the forcefields used in the simulation. The molecular simulations naturally separate intramolecular from intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions helping bring new insight into the two NMR relaxation mechanisms as a function of molecular chain-length (i.e. carbon number). Comparison of the MD simulation results of the two relaxation mechanisms with traditional hard-sphere models used in interpreting NMR data reveals important limitations in the latter. With increasing chain length, there is substantial deviation in the molecular size inferred on the basis of the radius of gyration from simulation and the fitted hard-sphere radii required to rationalize the relaxation times. This deviation is characteristic of the local nature of the NMR measurement, one that is well-captured by molecular simulations.

  2. NMR cross-correlated relaxation rates reveal ion coordination sites in DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiala, R.; Spackova, N.; Foldynová-Trantírková, S.; Sponer, J.; Sklenár, V.; Trantirek, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a novel NMR method for the identification of preferential coordination sites between physiologically relevant counterions and nucleic acid bases is demonstrated. In this approach, the NMR cross-correlated relaxation rates between the aromatic carbon chemical shift anisotropy and the pr

  3. Observation of the relaxivity and thickness of surface phase in porous rock with the combination of PFG NMR and relaxation measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖立志; 杜有如; 叶朝辉

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation of fluids in porous media is affected by the solid-liquid interface. Quantitative determination of the surface relaxivity is significantly important for both investigation and application of relaxation mechanisms in porous media. A method to estimate the surface relaxivity with the combination of relaxation and diffusion measurements is proposed. According to this method, a criterion for testing the current diffusion and relaxation theory for porous media is available.

  4. The eigenmode perspective of NMR spin relaxation in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Yury E., E-mail: shapiro@nmrsgi4.ls.biu.ac.il, E-mail: eva.meirovitch@biu.ac.il; Meirovitch, Eva, E-mail: shapiro@nmrsgi4.ls.biu.ac.il, E-mail: eva.meirovitch@biu.ac.il [The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900-02 (Israel)

    2013-12-14

    We developed in recent years the two-body (protein and probe) coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for elucidating protein dynamics from NMR spin relaxation. So far we used as descriptors the set of physical parameters that enter the SRLS model. They include the global (protein-related) diffusion tensor, D{sub 1}, the local (probe-related) diffusion tensor, D{sub 2}, and the local coupling/ordering potential, u. As common in analyzes based on mesoscopic dynamic models, these parameters have been determined with data-fitting techniques. In this study, we describe structural dynamics in terms of the eigenmodes comprising the SRLS time correlation functions (TCFs) generated by using the best-fit parameters as input to the Smoluchowski equation. An eigenmode is a weighted exponential with decay constant given by an eigenvalue of the Smoluchowski operator, and weighting factor determined by the corresponding eigenvector. Obviously, both quantities depend on the SRLS parameters as determined by the SRLS model. Unlike the set of best-fit parameters, the eigenmodes represent patterns of motion of the probe-protein system. The following new information is obtained for the typical probe, the {sup 15}N−{sup 1}H bond. Two eigenmodes, associated with the protein and the probe, dominate when the time scale separation is large (i.e., D{sub 2} ≫ D{sub 1}), the tensorial properties are simple, and the local potential is either very strong or very weak. When the potential exceeds these limits while the remaining conditions are preserved, new eigenmodes arise. The multi-exponentiality of the TCFs is associated in this case with the restricted nature of the local motion. When the time scale separation is no longer large, the rotational degrees of freedom of the protein and the probe become statistically dependent (coupled dynamically). The multi-exponentiality of the TCFs is associated in this case with the restricted nature of both the local and the

  5. New approach for understanding experimental NMR relaxivity properties of magnetic nanoparticles: focus on cobalt ferrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollet, Anne-Laure; Neveu, Sophie; Porion, Patrice; Dupuis, Vincent; Cherrak, Nadine; Levitz, Pierre

    2016-12-07

    Relaxivities r1 and r2 of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated in the aim of improving the models of NMR relaxation induced by magnetic nanoparticles. On one hand a large set of relaxivity data has been collected for cobalt ferrite MNP dispersions. On the other hand the relaxivity has been calculated for dispersions of cobalt ferrite MNPs with size ranging from 5 to 13 nm, without using any fitting procedure. The model is based on the magnetic dipolar interaction between the magnetic moments of the MNPs and the (1)H nuclei. It takes into account both the longitudinal and transversal contributions of the magnetic moments of MNPs leading to three contributions in the relaxation equations. The comparison of the experimental and theoretical data shows a good agreement of the NMR profiles as well as the temperature dependence.

  6. Distinguishing magnetic vs. quadrupolar relaxation in b-NMR using 8Li and 9Li

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzichristos, A.; McFadden, R. M. L.; Karner, V. L.; Cortie, D. L.; Fang, A.; Levy, C. D. P.; Macfarlane, W. A.; Morris, G. D.; Pearson, M. R.; Salman, Z.; Kiefl, R. F.

    2016-09-01

    Beta-detected NMR is a powerful technique in condensed matter physics. It uses the parity violation of beta decay to detect the NMR signal from a beam of highly polarized radionuclides implanted in a sample material. Spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) is studied by monitoring the rate with which the asymmetry between the beta counts in two opposing detectors is lost. Unlike classical NMR, b-NMR can study thin films and near-surface effects. The most common b-NMR isotope at TRIUMF is 8Li, which has a quadrupole moment, thus it is sensitive to both magnetic fields and electric field gradients. A challenge with 8Li b-NMR is identifying the predominant mechanism of SLR in a given sample. It is possible to distinguish between SLR mechanisms by varying the probe isotope. For two isotopes with different nuclear moments, the ratio of SLR rates should be different in the limits of either pure magnetic or quadrupolar relaxation. This method has been used in classical NMR and we report its first application to b-NMR. We measured the SLR rates for 8Li and 8Li in Pt foil and SrTiO3. Pt is a test case for pure magnetic relaxation. SrTiO3 is a non-magnetic insulator, but the source of its relaxation is not well understood. Here we show that its relaxation is mainly quadrupolar. We thank TRIUMF's CMMS for their technical support. This work was supported by: NSERC Discovery Grants to R.F.K. and W.A.M.; and IsoSiM fellowships to A.C. and R.M.L.M.

  7. Relaxation of coherent states in a two-qubit NMR quadrupole system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarthour, R.S.; Guimaraes, A.P.; Oliveira, I.S. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Azevedo, E.R. de; Bonk, F.A.; Vidoto, E.L.G.; Bonagamba, T.J. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Freitas, J.C.C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2003-07-01

    Full text: Pulse Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most serious candidates as an experimental technique for implementing quantum algorithms. To the present date, this technique is in fact the only one where full demonstrations of quantum algorithms implementations have been carried out, in spite of various technical difficulties. On NMR quantum computers, gates and subroutines are encoded as radiofrequency pulse sequences, which must act over coherent states. These sequences usually take tens of milliseconds to be implemented, and during this time the system relax towards equilibrium. Therefore, studies of relaxation times are very important to the realization of quantum algorithms via NMR. In this work we studied the longitudinal relaxation of various coherent states on the NMR quantum computing two-qubit quadrupole system, {sup 23}Na in C{sub 10}H{sub 21}NaO{sub 4}S liquid crystal at room temperature. Relaxation of pseudo-pure states |00>, |01>, |10>, |11>, pseudo-Bell states |01> + |10> and |00> + |11> and Hadamard states |00> + |01> and |10> + |11> were investigated. Experimental curves follow a multi exponential model of relaxation which takes into account mixed, dipolar magnetic and quadrupolar electric interactions. (author)

  8. Theoretical tools for the design of NMR relaxation dispersion pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Recent decades have witnessed tremendous progress in the development of new experimental methods for studying biomolecules, particularly in the field of NMR relaxation dispersion. Here we review the theoretical frameworks that provided the insights necessary for such progress. The effect of radio-frequency manipulations on spin systems is discussed using Average Hamiltonian Theory (AHT), Average Liouvillian Theory (ALT), and Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield (BWR) relaxation theory. We illustrate these concepts using the case of Heteronuclear Double Resonance (HDR) methods.

  9. Challenging lanthanide relaxation theory: erbium and thulium complexes that show NMR relaxation rates faster than dysprosium and terbium analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Alexander M; Harvey, Peter; Finney, Katie-Louise N A; Fox, Mark A; Kenwright, Alan M; Rogers, Nicola J; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Parker, David

    2015-07-07

    Measurements of the proton NMR paramagnetic relaxation rates for several series of isostructural lanthanide(III) complexes have been performed in aqueous solution over the field range 1.0 to 16.5 Tesla. The field dependence has been modeled using Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory, allowing values for the electronic relaxation time, Tle and the magnetic susceptibility, μeff, to be estimated. Anomalous relaxation rate profiles were obtained, notably for erbium and thulium complexes of low symmetry 8-coordinate aza-phosphinate complexes. Such behaviour challenges accepted theory and can be interpreted in terms of changes in Tle values that are a function of the transient ligand field induced by solvent collision and vary considerably between Ln(3+) ions, along with magnetic susceptibilities that deviate significantly from free-ion values.

  10. Ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements using an optical magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganssle, Paul J; Shin, Hyun D; Seltzer, Scott J; Bajaj, Vikram S; Ledbetter, Micah P; Budker, Dmitry; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Pines, Alexander

    2014-09-08

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and diffusometry are important tools for the characterization of heterogeneous materials and porous media, with applications including medical imaging, food characterization and oil-well logging. These methods can be extremely effective in applications where high-resolution NMR is either unnecessary, impractical, or both, as is the case in the emerging field of portable chemical characterization. Here, we present a proof-of-concept experiment demonstrating the use of high-sensitivity optical magnetometers as detectors for ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements.

  11. NMR relaxation and micro-imaging study of polystyrene in concentrated cyclohexane solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛诗珍; 丁广良; 袁汉珍; 冯汉桥; 杜有如

    1997-01-01

    13C-NMR relaxation times of polystyrene (PS) in its 8 solvent, cyclohexane, are measured at different temperatures. A two-step model for the dissolution is proposed. Swelling of the polymer below the 8 temperature is eventually the dispersion of the side group phenyl rings only. While above the 6 temperature, complete dissolution is the dispersion of the main chain at a molecular level. The results of T1(C) are confirmed by 1H-NMR imaging. NMR and its imaging are powerful tools to study the dynamic behavior of dissolution process of polymers in their 6 solvents.

  12. Solid-state NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement immersion depth studies in phospholipid bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Shidong

    2010-11-01

    A new approach for determining the membrane immersion depth of a spin-labeled probe has been developed using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. A DOXYL spin label was placed at different sites of 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PSPC) phospholipid bilayers as paramagnetic moieties and the resulting enhancements of the longitudinal relaxation (T1) times of 31P nuclei on the surface of the bilayers were measured by a standard inversion recovery pulse sequence. The 31P NMR spin-lattice relaxation times decrease steadily as the DOXYL spin label moves closer to the surface as well as the concentration of the spin-labeled lipids increase. The enhanced relaxation vs. the position and concentration of spin-labels indicate that PRE induced by the DOXYL spin label are significant to determine longer distances over the whole range of the membrane depths. When these data were combined with estimated correlation times τc, the r-6-weighted, time-averaged distances between the spin-labels and the 31P nuclei on the membrane surface were estimated. The application of using this solid-state NMR PRE approach coupled with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) may be a powerful method for measuring membrane protein immersion depth. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of interfacial area from NMR time dependent diffusion and relaxation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, M

    2017-09-07

    The interfacial area between two immiscible phases in porous media is an important parameter for describing and predicting 2 phase flow. Although present in several models, experimental investigations are sparse due to the lack of appropriate measurement techniques. We propose two NMR techniques for the measurement of oil-water interfacial area: (i) a time dependent NMR diffusion technique applicable in static conditions, similar to those used for the measurement of the solid specific surface of a porous media, and (ii) a fast relaxation technique applicable in dynamic conditions while flowing, based on an interfacial relaxation mechanism induced by the inclusion of paramagnetic salts in the water phase. For dodecane relaxing on doped water, we found an oil interfacial relaxivity of 1.8μm/s, large enough to permit the measurement of specific interfacial surface as small as 1000cm(2)/cm(3). We demonstrate both NMR techniques in drainage followed by imbibition, in a model porous media with a narrow pore size distribution. While flowing, we observe that the interfacial area is larger in imbibition than in drainage, implying a different organization of the oil phase. In a carbonate sample with a wide pore size distribution, we evidence the gradual invasion of the smallest pores as the oil-water pressure difference is increased. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Molecular motions in thermotropic liquid crystals studied by NMR spin-lattice relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamar, R.C.; Gonzalez, C.E.; Mensio, O. [Cordoba Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments with field cycling techniques proved to be a valuable tool for studying molecular motions in liquid crystals, allowing a very broad Larmor frequency variation, sufficient to separate the cooperative motions from the liquid like molecular diffusion. In new experiments combining NMR field cycling with the Jeener-Broekaert order-transfer pulse sequence, it is possible to measure the dipolar order relaxation time (T{sub 1D}), in addition to the conventional Zeeman relaxation time (T{sub 1Z}) in a frequency range of several decades. When applying this technique to nematic thermotropic liquid crystals, T{sub 1D} showed to depend almost exclusively on the order fluctuation of the director mechanism in the whole frequency range. This unique characteristic of T{sub 1D} makes dipolar order relaxation experiments specially useful for studying the frequency and temperature dependence of the spectral properties of the collective motions. (author)

  15. NMR relaxation times of trabecular bone-reproducibility, relationships to tissue structure and effects of sample freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prantner, Viktoria; Isaksson, Hanna; Nissi, Mikko J; Jurvelin, Jukka S [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Naervaeinen, Johanna; Groehn, Olli H J [Department of Neurobiology, A I Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Lammentausta, Eveliina [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, PO Box 50, 90029 OYS, Oulu (Finland); Avela, Janne, E-mail: hanna.isaksson@uef.f [Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2010-12-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a potential tool for non-invasive evaluation of the trabecular bone structure. The objective of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the NMR relaxation parameters (T{sub 2}, Carr-Purcel-T{sub 2}, T{sub 1}{rho}) for fat and water and relate those to the structural parameters obtained by micro-computed tomography ({mu}CT). Especially, we aimed to evaluate the effect of freezing on the relaxation parameters. For storing bone samples, freezing is the standard procedure during which the biochemical and cellular organization of the bone marrow may be affected. Bovine trabecular bone samples were stored at -20 {sup 0}C for 7 days and measured by NMR spectroscopy before and after freezing. The reproducibility of NMR relaxation parameters, as expressed by the coefficient of variation, ranged from 3.1% to 27.9%. In fresh samples, some correlations between NMR and structural parameters (Tb.N, Tb.Sp) were significant (e.g. the relaxation rate for T{sub 2} of fat versus Tb.Sp: r = -0.716, p < 0.01). Freezing did not significantly change the NMR relaxation times but the correlations between relaxation parameters and the {mu}CT structural parameters were not statistically significant after freezing, suggesting some nonsystematic alterations of the marrow structure. Therefore, the use of frozen bone samples for NMR relaxation studies may provide inferior information about the trabecular bone structure.

  16. Motions and entropies in proteins as seen in NMR relaxation experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allnér, Olof; Foloppe, Nicolas; Nilsson, Lennart

    2015-01-22

    Molecular dynamics simulations of E. coli glutaredoxin1 in water have been performed to relate the dynamical parameters and entropy obtained in NMR relaxation experiments, with results extracted from simulated trajectory data. NMR relaxation is the most widely used experimental method to obtain data on dynamics of proteins, but it is limited to relatively short timescales and to motions of backbone amides or in some cases (13)C-H vectors. By relating the experimental data to the all-atom picture obtained in molecular dynamics simulations, valuable insights on the interpretation of the experiment can be gained. We have estimated the internal dynamics and their timescales by calculating the generalized order parameters (O) for different time windows. We then calculate the quasiharmonic entropy (S) and compare it to the entropy calculated from the NMR-derived generalized order parameter of the amide vectors. Special emphasis is put on characterizing dynamics that are not expressed through the motions of the amide group. The NMR and MD methods suffer from complementary limitations, with NMR being restricted to local vectors and dynamics on a timescale determined by the rotational diffusion of the solute, while in simulations, it may be difficult to obtain sufficient sampling to ensure convergence of the results. We also evaluate the amount of sampling obtained with molecular dynamics simulations and how it is affected by the length of individual simulations, by clustering of the sampled conformations. We find that two structural turns act as hinges, allowing the α helix between them to undergo large, long timescale motions that cannot be detected in the time window of the NMR dipolar relaxation experiments. We also show that the entropy obtained from the amide vector does not account for correlated motions of adjacent residues. Finally, we show that the sampling in a total of 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation can be increased by around 50%, by dividing the

  17. Resonances in field-cycling NMR on molecular crystals. (reversible) Spin dynamics or (irreversible) relaxation?; Resonanzen in Field-Cycling-NMR an Molekuelkristallen. (reversible) Spindynamik oder (irreversible) Relaxation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Multi spin systems with spin 1/2 nuclei and dipolar coupled quadrupolar nuclei can show so called ''quadrupolar dips''. There are two main reasons for this behavior: polarization transfer and relaxation. They look quite alike and without additional research cannot be differentiated easily in most cases. These two phenomena have quite different physical and theoretical backgrounds. For no or very slow dynamics, polarization transfer will take place, which is energy conserving inside the spin system. This effect can entirely be described using quantum mechanics on the spin system. Detailed knowledge about the crystallography is needed, because this affects the relevant hamiltonians directly. For systems with fast enough dynamics, relaxation takes over, and the energy flows from the spin system to the lattice; thus a more complex theoretical description is needed. This description has to include a dynamic model, usually in the form of a spectral density function. Both models should include detailed modelling of the complete spin system. A software library was developed to be able to model complex spin systems. It allows to simulate polarization transfer or relaxation effects. NMR measurements were performed on the protonic conductor K{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}. A single crystal shows sharp quadrupolar dips at room temperature. Dynamics could be excluded using relaxation measurements and literature values. Thus, a polarization transfer analysis was used to describe those dips with good agreement. As a second system, imidazolium based molecular crystals were analyzed. The quadrupolar dips were expected to be caused by polarization transfer; this was carefully analyzed and found not to be true. A relaxation based analysis shows good agreement with the measured data in the high temperature area. It leverages a two step spectral density function, which indicates two distinct dynamic processes happening in this system.

  18. The generalized Phillips-Twomey method for NMR relaxation time inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Xiao, Lizhi; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Qingming

    2016-10-01

    The inversion of NMR relaxation time involves the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Due to its ill-posedness, numerical solutions to this type of equations are often found much less accurate and bear little resemblance to the true solution. There has been a strong interest in finding a well-posed method for this ill-posed problem since 1950s. In this paper, we prove the existence, the uniqueness, the stability and the convergence of the generalized Phillips-Twomey regularization method for solving this type of equations. Numerical simulations and core analyses arising from NMR transverse relaxation time inversion are conducted to show the effectiveness of the generalized Phillips-Twomey method. Both the simulation results and the core analyses agree well with the model and the realities.

  19. Application of chemometrics to low-field H-1 NMR relaxation data of intact fish flesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Signe Munk; Pedersen, H.T.; Engelsen, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    and subsequently analysed for oil or water content by standard chemical methods. In a second experiment, 58 differently thawed cod (Gadus morhua) samples were measured by NMR and subsequently analysed for water-holding capacity. Correlations between chemical data and NMR data were evaluated using partial least...... squares (PLS) regression on complete relaxation curves and compared with conventional regression models on exponential fitting parameters. Predictions on an independent test set were superior for the PLS regression models, with optimal prediction errors of 12 g kg(-1), 6 g kg(-1) and 3.9% for oil...... and water content in fresh salmon flesh and water-holding capacity in thawed cod flesh respectively. Thus rapid, non-invasive low- field NMR can be used to simultaneously determine both oil and water content of fish flesh. Furthermore, it can predict water- holding capacity of cod flesh, with an R-2 of 0...

  20. Mobility and relaxation determinations of lithium in lithium aluminate ceramics using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, F.F.; Peterson, E.S. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stebbins, J.F. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-01

    Lithium aluminate is one of the materials being considered for fusion reactor blankets. When preparing the ceramic, it is important to be able to monitor the microstructures since it is a controlling factor in the rate of tritium release from the blanket. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has been shown to be a useful tool for the nondestructive analysis of ceramics. Studies detailed in this paper include spectral acquisition, assignment, spin-lattice relaxation time measurements, temperature effects, their correlation to structure, and material purity. The ceramic of interest was lithium aluminate, LiAl{sub 5}O{sub 8}. This material was studied by observation of the NMR active nuclei {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 27}Al. For these nuclei, spin-lattice relaxation times (T{sub 1}) were measured and were found to vary considerably, correlating to the presence of paramagnetic impurities within the crystalline lattice. Previous research has shown that the coordination about the aluminum nucleus can be determined using {sup 27}Al NMR spectroscopy. Aluminum-27 NMR spectroscopy was successfully applied, and it provided valuable insight into composition of the ceramic. 20 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Ultrafast NMR T1 relaxation measurements: probing molecular properties in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pieter E S; Donovan, Kevin J; Szekely, Or; Baias, Maria; Frydman, Lucio

    2013-09-16

    The longitudinal relaxation properties of NMR active nuclei carry useful information about the site-specific chemical environments and about the mobility of molecular fragments. Molecular mobility is in turn a key parameter reporting both on stable properties, such as size, as well as on dynamic ones, such as transient interactions and irreversible aggregation. In order to fully investigate the latter, a fast sampling of the relaxation parameters of transiently formed molecular species may be needed. Nevertheless, the acquisition of longitudinal relaxation data is typically slow, being limited by the requirement that the time for which the nucleus relaxes be varied incrementally until a complete build-up curve is generated. Recently, a number of single-shot-inversion-recovery methods have been developed capable of alleviating this need; still, these may be challenged by either spectral resolution restrictions or when coping with very fast relaxing nuclei. Here, we present a new experiment to measure the T1s of multiple nuclear spins that experience fast longitudinal relaxation, while retaining full high-resolution chemical shift information. Good agreement is observed between T1s measured with conventional means and T1s measured using the new technique. The method is applied to the real-time investigation of the reaction between D-xylose and sodium borate, which is in turn elucidated with the aid of ancillary ultrafast and conventional 2D TOCSY measurements. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Determination of protein rotational correlation time from NMR relaxation data at various solvent viscosities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korchuganov, Denis S.; Gagnidze, Ivan E.; Tkach, Elena N.; Schulga, Alexey A.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Arseniev, Alexander S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation)], E-mail: aars@nmr.ru

    2004-12-15

    An accurate determination of the overall rotation of a protein plays a crucial role in the investigation of its internal motions by NMR. In the present work, an innovative approach to the determination of the protein rotational correlation time {tau}{sub R} from the heteronuclear relaxation data is proposed. The approach is based on a joint fit of relaxation data acquired at several viscosities of a protein solution. The method has been tested on computer simulated relaxation data as compared to the traditional {tau}{sub R} determination method from T{sub 1}/T{sub 2} ratio. The approach has been applied to ribonuclease barnase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens dissolved in an aqueous solution and deuterated glycerol as a viscous component. The resulting rotational correlation time of 5.56 {+-} 0.01 ns and other rotational diffusion tensor parameters are in good agreement with those determined from T{sub 1}/T{sub 2} ratio.

  3. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF TRANSVERSE RELAXATION TIME OF INTERMOLECULAR MULTIPLE QUANTUM COHERENCES IN NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG SHAO-KUAN; CHEN ZHONG; CHEN ZHI-WEI; ZHONG JIAN-HUI

    2001-01-01

    A one-dimensional NMR method is presented for measuring the transverse relaxation time, T2,n, of intermolecular multiple quantum coherences (IMQCs) of coherence order n in highly polarized spin systems. The pulse sequence proposed in this paper effectively suppresses the effects of radiation damping, molecular diffusion, inhomogeneity of magnetic field, and variations of dipolar correlation distance, all of which may affect quantitation of T2,n. This pulse sequence can be used to measure not only IMQC transverse relaxation time T2,n(n > 1) quickly and directly, but also the conventional transverse relaxation time. Experimental results demonstrate that the quantitative relationship between T2,n(n≥1) and T2 is T2,n≈T2/n. These results will be helpful for understanding the fundamental properties and mechanisms of IMQCs.

  4. {sup 75}As NMR relaxation in glassy Ge-As-Se

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammadov, Eldar; Mehdiyeva, Salima [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences, H. Javid Avenue 33, Baku, AZ 1143 (Azerbaijan); Taylor, P.C. [Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, 1523 Illinois Street, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Reyes, Arneil; Kuhns, Phillip [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 1800 East Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    We have used high magnetic fields to perform {sup 75}As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements in Ge-As-Se glasses. The spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1} has been studied as a function of average coordination number, left angle r right angle and temperature, T. We show that the relaxation time constant, T{sub 1}, in this system can be a useful tool to probe rigidity of the glassy matrix. In the two extreme cases, zero-field nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and high-field NMR, T{sub 1} exhibits a similar dependence on the average coordination number. Namely, there is a region in this dependence at low left angle r right angle values, where the spin-lattice relaxation time does not change remarkably, followed by an increase in T{sub 1} in glasses with left angle r right angle more than 2.54. This transition can be correlated with the onset of rigidity percolation in the glassy matrix. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate is found in the form T{sub 1}{sup -1} {proportional_to} T{sup 2}. This behavior is typical for As and other nuclei in glasses at temperatures below 300 K and is indicative of Raman-like relaxation mechanism involving low-frequency modes. Spin-echo intensity for Ge{sub 2}As{sub 2}Se{sub 5} as a function of pulse separation exhibits exponential decay whose slope is the same as one of the average of the decay found from {sup 75}As NQR measurements. This result indicates to the presence of indirect dipolar coupling of arsenic atoms in this composition. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Solid-state NMR (31)P paramagnetic relaxation enhancement membrane protein immersion depth measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Sergey; Hudson, Stephen M; Sahu, Indra D; Liu, Lishan; Lorigan, Gary A

    2014-04-24

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a widely used approach for measuring long-range distance constraints in biomolecular solution NMR spectroscopy. In this paper, we show that (31)P PRE solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be utilized to determine the immersion depth of spin-labeled membrane peptides and proteins. Changes in the (31)P NMR PRE times coupled with modeling studies can be used to describe the spin-label position/amino acid within the lipid bilayer and the corresponding helical tilt. This method provides valuable insight on protein-lipid interactions and membrane protein structural topology. Solid-state (31)P NMR data on the 23 amino acid α-helical nicotinic acetylcholine receptor nAChR M2δ transmembrane domain model peptide followed predicted behavior of (31)P PRE rates of the phospholipid headgroup as the spin-label moves from the membrane surface toward the center of the membrane. Residue 11 showed the smallest changes in (31)P PRE (center of the membrane), while residue 22 shows the largest (31)P PRE change (near the membrane surface), when compared to the diamagnetic control M2δ sample. This PRE SS-NMR technique can be used as a molecular ruler to measure membrane immersion depth.

  6. Theory of nonrigid rotational motion applied to NMR relaxation in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emani, Prashant S; Olsen, Gregory L; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P

    2011-11-10

    Solution NMR spectroscopy can elucidate many features of the structure and dynamics of macromolecules, yet relaxation measurements, the most common source of experimental information on dynamics, can sample only certain ranges of dynamic rates. A complete characterization of motion of a macromolecule thus requires the introduction of complementary experimental approaches. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy successfully probes the time scale of nanoseconds to microseconds, a dynamic window where solution NMR results have been deficient, and probes conditions where the averaging effects of rotational diffusion of the molecule are absent. Combining the results of the two distinct techniques within a single framework provides greater insight into dynamics, but this task requires the common interpretation of results recorded under very different experimental conditions. Herein, we provide a unified description of dynamics that is robust to the presence of large-scale conformational exchange, where the diffusion tensor of the molecule varies on a time scale comparable to rotational diffusion in solution. We apply this methodology to the HIV-1 TAR RNA molecule, where conformational rearrangements are both substantial and functionally important. The formalism described herein is of greater generality than earlier combined solid-state/solution NMR interpretations, if detailed molecular structures are available, and can offer a more complete description of RNA dynamics than either solution or solid-state NMR spectroscopy alone.

  7. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  8. Interaction of ferulic acid derivatives with human erythrocytes monitored by pulse field gradient NMR diffusion and NMR relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Bernardi, Francesca; Centini, Marisanna; Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Valensin, Daniela; Valensin, Gianni

    2005-04-01

    Ferulic acid (Fer), a natural anti-oxidant and chemo-protector, is able to suppress experimental carcinogenesis in the forestomach, lungs, skin, tongue and colon. Several Fer derivatives have been suggested as promising candidates for cancer prevention, being the biological activity related also to the capacity of partitioning between aqueous and lipid phases. In the present work, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion measurement and NMR relaxation rates have been adopted for investigating the interaction of three Fer derivatives (Fer-C11, Fer-C12 and Fer-C13) with human erythrocytes. Binding to the erythrocyte membrane has been shown for all derivatives, which displayed a similar interaction mode such that the aromatic moiety and the terminal part of the alkyl chain were the most affected. Quantitative analysis of the diffusion coefficients was used to show that Fer-C12 and Fer-C13 display higher affinity for the cell membrane when compared with Fer-C11. These findings agree with the higher anti-oxidant activity of the two derivatives.

  9. Microscopic insights into the NMR relaxation-based protein conformational entropy meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinath, Vignesh; Sharp, Kim A; Wand, A Joshua

    2013-10-09

    Conformational entropy is a potentially important thermodynamic parameter contributing to protein function. Quantitative measures of conformational entropy are necessary for an understanding of its role but have been difficult to obtain. An empirical method that utilizes changes in conformational dynamics as a proxy for changes in conformational entropy has recently been introduced. Here we probe the microscopic origins of the link between conformational dynamics and conformational entropy using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation of seven proteins gave an excellent correlation with measures of side-chain motion derived from NMR relaxation. The simulations show that the motion of methyl-bearing side chains are sufficiently coupled to that of other side chains to serve as excellent reporters of the overall side-chain conformational entropy. These results tend to validate the use of experimentally accessible measures of methyl motion--the NMR-derived generalized order parameters--as a proxy from which to derive changes in protein conformational entropy.

  10. Requirements on paramagnetic relaxation enhancement data for membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottstein, Daniel; Reckel, Sina; Dötsch, Volker; Güntert, Peter

    2012-06-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure calculations of the α-helical integral membrane proteins DsbB, GlpG, and halorhodopsin show that distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) can provide sufficient structural information to determine their structure with an accuracy of about 1.5 Å in the absence of other long-range conformational restraints. Our systematic study with simulated NMR data shows that about one spin label per transmembrane helix is necessary for obtaining enough PRE distance restraints to exclude wrong topologies, such as pseudo mirror images, if only limited other NMR restraints are available. Consequently, an experimentally realistic amount of PRE data enables α-helical membrane protein structure determinations that would not be feasible with the very limited amount of conventional NOESY data normally available for these systems. These findings are in line with our recent first de novo NMR structure determination of a heptahelical integral membrane protein, proteorhodopsin, that relied extensively on PRE data.

  11. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by C-13 CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Yilmaz, A.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2009-01-01

    The use of C-13 NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically C-13 labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from...... Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for C-13(epsilon 1) nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from...... or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the C-13(epsilon 1) dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains...

  12. A subzero 1H NMR relaxation investigation of water dynamics in tomato pericarp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucat, Loïc; Lahaye, Marc

    2014-09-01

    (1)H NMR relaxation times (T1 and T2) were measured at low field (0.47 T) in pericarp tissues of three tomato genotypes (Ferum, LA0147 and Levovil) at subzero temperature (-20 °C) and two ripening stages (mature green and red). The unfrozen water dynamics was characterised by two T1 and three T2 components. The relaxation time values and their associated relative populations allowed differentiating the ripening stage of only LA0147 and Levovil lines. But the three genotypes were unequivocally discriminated at the red ripe stage. The unfrozen water distribution was discussed in terms of specific interactions, especially with sugars, in relation with their osmoprotectant effects.

  13. On the reliability of NMR relaxation data analyses: a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abergel, Daniel; Volpato, Andrea; Coutant, Eloi P; Polimeno, Antonino

    2014-09-01

    The analysis of NMR relaxation data is revisited along the lines of a Bayesian approach. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo strategy of data fitting, we investigate conditions under which relaxation data can be effectively interpreted in terms of internal dynamics. The limitations to the extraction of kinetic parameters that characterize internal dynamics are analyzed, and we show that extracting characteristic time scales shorter than a few tens of ps is very unlikely. However, using MCMC methods, reliable estimates of the marginal probability distributions and estimators (average, standard deviations, etc.) can still be obtained for subsets of the model parameters. Thus, unlike more conventional strategies of data analysis, the method avoids a model selection process. In addition, it indicates what information may be extracted from the data, but also what cannot.

  14. Probing the carbonyl functionality of a petroleum resin and asphaltene through oximation and schiff base formation in conjunction with N-15 NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in spectroscopic techniques, there is uncertainty regarding the nature of the carbonyl groups in the asphaltene and resin fractions of crude oil, information necessary for an understanding of the physical properties and environmental fate of these materials. Carbonyl and hydroxyl group functionalities are not observed in natural abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of asphaltenes and resins and therefore require spin labeling techniques for detection. In this study, the carbonyl functionalities of the resin and asphaltene fractions from a light aliphatic crude oil that is the source of groundwater contamination at the long term USGS study site near Bemidji, Minnesota, have been examined through reaction with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and aniline in conjunction with analysis by solid and liquid state 15N NMR. Ketone groups were revealed through 15N NMR detection of their oxime and Schiff base derivatives, and esters through their hydroxamic acid derivatives. Anilinohydroquinone adducts provided evidence for quinones. Some possible configurations of the ketone groups in the resin and asphaltene fractions can be inferred from a consideration of the likely reactions that lead to heterocyclic condensation products with aniline and to the Beckmann reaction products from the initially formed oximes. These include aromatic ketones and ketones adjacent to quaternary carbon centers, β-hydroxyketones, β-diketones, and β-ketoesters. In a solid state cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 15N NMR spectrum recorded on the underivatized asphaltene as a control, carbazole and pyrrole-like nitrogens were the major naturally abundant nitrogens detected.

  15. Probing the Carbonyl Functionality of a Petroleum Resin and Asphaltene through Oximation and Schiff Base Formation in Conjunction with N-15 NMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Thorn

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in spectroscopic techniques, there is uncertainty regarding the nature of the carbonyl groups in the asphaltene and resin fractions of crude oil, information necessary for an understanding of the physical properties and environmental fate of these materials. Carbonyl and hydroxyl group functionalities are not observed in natural abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectra of asphaltenes and resins and therefore require spin labeling techniques for detection. In this study, the carbonyl functionalities of the resin and asphaltene fractions from a light aliphatic crude oil that is the source of groundwater contamination at the long term USGS study site near Bemidji, Minnesota, have been examined through reaction with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and aniline in conjunction with analysis by solid and liquid state 15N NMR. Ketone groups were revealed through 15N NMR detection of their oxime and Schiff base derivatives, and esters through their hydroxamic acid derivatives. Anilinohydroquinone adducts provided evidence for quinones. Some possible configurations of the ketone groups in the resin and asphaltene fractions can be inferred from a consideration of the likely reactions that lead to heterocyclic condensation products with aniline and to the Beckmann reaction products from the initially formed oximes. These include aromatic ketones and ketones adjacent to quaternary carbon centers, β-hydroxyketones, β-diketones, and β-ketoesters. In a solid state cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS 15N NMR spectrum recorded on the underivatized asphaltene as a control, carbazole and pyrrole-like nitrogens were the major naturally abundant nitrogens detected.

  16. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L., E-mail: ivanov@tomo.nsc.ru [International Tomography Center, Institutskaya 3a, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Vieth, Hans-Martin [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  17. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmyreva, Anna A; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V

    2016-06-14

    Orders of magnitude decrease of (207)Pb and (199)Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  18. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, K.A.; Cox, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS 15N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by 15N NMR. Liquid state 15N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (1H-15N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  19. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹⁵N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹⁵N NMR. Liquid state ¹⁵N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹⁵N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  20. A proton NMR relaxation study of water dynamics in bovine serum albumin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotti, Monica; Martinelli, Andrea; Gianferri, Raffaella; Brosio, Elvino

    2010-01-14

    Water dynamics and compartmentation in glutaraldehyde cross-linked bovine serum albumin nanoparticles have been investigated by an integrated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) protocol based on water relaxation times and self-diffusion coefficients measurements. Multi-exponentially of water relaxation curves has been accounted for according to a diffusive and chemical exchange model (see B. P. Hills, S. F. Takacs and P. S. Belton, Mol. Phys., 1989, 67(4), 903, and Mol. Phys., 1989, 67(4), 913; E. Brosio, M. Belotti and R. Gianferri, in Food Science and Technology: New Research, ed. L. V. Greco and M. N. Bruno, Nova Science Publishers, Hauppauge (NY), 2008) that made it possible to single out water molecules in the molecular spaces in the interior of albumin nanoparticles, in the meso-cavities formed by packed nanoparticles and in the meniscus on top of the nanoparticles suspension. A quantitative rationalization of T(2) values of water different components allowed morphological information to be acquired as for the size of water filled compartments, while self-diffusion coefficient measurements of water excess or fluxed packed nanoparticles suspensions are describers of transport properties of soft biomaterials. The paper reports an NMR approach that can be seen as a general and relevant method to characterize excess-water-swollen soft biomaterials.

  1. Active site dynamics in NADH oxidase from Thermus thermophilus studied by NMR spin relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletti, Teresa; Farber, Patrick J; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2011-09-01

    We have characterized the backbone dynamics of NADH oxidase from Thermus thermophilus (NOX) using a recently-developed suite of NMR experiments designed to isolate exchange broadening, together with (15)N R (1), R (1ρ ), and {(1)H}-(15)N steady-state NOE relaxation measurements performed at 11.7 and 18.8 T. NOX is a 54 kDa homodimeric enzyme that belongs to a family of structurally homologous flavin reductases and nitroreductases with many potential biotechnology applications. Prior studies have suggested that flexibility is involved in the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. The active site residue W47 was previously identified as being particularly important, as its level of solvent exposure correlates with enzyme activity, and it was observed to undergo "gating" motions in computer simulations. The NMR data are consistent with these findings. Signals from W47 are dynamically broadened beyond detection and several other residues in the active site have significant R ( ex ) contributions to transverse relaxation rates. In addition, the backbone of S193, whose side chain hydroxyl proton hydrogen bonds directly with the FMN cofactor, exhibits extensive mobility on the ns-ps timescale. We hypothesize that these motions may facilitate structural rearrangements of the active site that allow NOX to accept both FMN and FAD as cofactors.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of spin-lattice NMR relaxation in poly-L-lysine dendrimers: manifestation of the semiflexibility effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markelov, Denis A; Falkovich, Stanislav G; Neelov, Igor M; Ilyash, Maxim Yu; Matveev, Vladimir V; Lähderanta, Erkki; Ingman, Petri; Darinskii, Anatolii A

    2015-02-07

    NMR relaxation experiments are widely used to investigate the local orientation mobility in dendrimers. In particular, the NMR method allows one to measure the spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, which is connected with the orientational autocorrelation function (ACF) of NMR active groups. We calculate the temperature (Θ) and frequency (ω) dependences of the spin-lattice NMR relaxation rates for segments and NMR active CH2 groups in poly-L-lysine (PLL) dendrimers in water, on the basis of full-atomic molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that the position of the maximum of 1/T1(ω) depends on the location of the segments inside the dendrimer. This dependence of the maximum is explained by the restricted flexibility of the dendrimer. Such behavior has been predicted recently by the analytical theory based on the semiflexible viscoelastic model. The simulated temperature dependences of 1/T1 for terminal and inner groups in PLL dendrimers of n = 2 and n = 4 generations dissolved in water are in good agreement with the NMR experimental data, which have been obtained for these systems previously by us. It is shown that in the case of PLL dendrimers, the traditional procedure of the interpretation of NMR experimental data - when smaller values of 1/T1 correspond to higher orientation mobility - is applicable to the whole accessible frequency interval only for the terminal groups. For the inner groups, this procedure is valid only at low frequencies.

  3. Translational diffusion of macromolecular assemblies measured using transverse-relaxation-optimized pulsed field gradient NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Reto; Horwich, Arthur L; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2011-10-19

    In structural biology, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy for the characterization of size and hydrodynamic parameters of macromolecular solutes has the advantage over other techniques that the measurements can be recorded with identical solution conditions as used for NMR structure determination or for crystallization trials. This paper describes two transverse-relaxation-optimized (TRO) (15)N-filtered PFG stimulated-echo (STE) experiments for studies of macromolecular translational diffusion in solution, (1)H-TRO-STE and (15)N-TRO-STE, which include CRINEPT and TROSY elements. Measurements with mixed micelles of the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and the detergent Fos-10 were used for a systematic comparison of (1)H-TRO-STE and (15)N-TRO-STE with conventional (15)N-filtered STE experimental schemes. The results provide an extended platform for evaluating the NMR experiments available for diffusion measurements in structural biology projects involving molecular particles with different size ranges. An initial application of the (15)N-TRO-STE experiment with very long diffusion delays showed that the tedradecamer structure of the 800 kDa Thermus thermophilus chaperonin GroEL is preserved in aqueous solution over the temperature range 25-60 °C.

  4. Translational diffusion of macromolecular assemblies measured using transverse relaxation-optimized PFG-NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Reto; Horwich, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    In structural biology, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR for characterization of size and hydrodynamic parameters of macromolecular solutes has the advantage over other techniques that the measurements can be recorded with identical solution conditions as used for NMR structure determination or for crystallization trials. This paper describes two transverse relaxation-optimized (TRO) 15N-filtered PFG stimulated-echo (STE) experiments for studies of macromolecular translational diffusion in solution, 1H-TRO-STE and 15N-TRO-STE, which include CRINEPT and TROSY elements. Measurements with mixed micelles of the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and the detergent Fos-10 were used for a systematic comparison of 1H-TRO-STE and 15N-TRO-STE with conventional 15N-filtered STE experimental schemes. The results provide an extended platform for evaluating the NMR experiments available for diffusion measurements in structural biology projects with molecular particles of different size ranges. An initial application of the 15N-TRO-STE experiment with very long diffusion delays showed that the tedradecamer structure of the 800 kDa Thermus thermophilus chaperonin GroEL is preserved in aqueous solution over the temperature range 25–60°C. PMID:21919531

  5. Solvent dynamical behavior in an organogel phase as studied by NMR relaxation and diffusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemloul, Mehdi; Steiner, Emilie; Robert, Anthony; Bouguet-Bonnet, Sabine; Allix, Florent; Jamart-Grégoire, Brigitte; Canet, Daniel

    2011-03-24

    An organogelation process depends on the gelator-solvent pair. This study deals with the solvent dynamics once the gelation process is completed. The first approach used is relaxometry, i.e., the measurement of toluene proton longitudinal relaxation time T(1) as a function of the proton NMR resonance frequency (here in the 5 kHz to 400 MHz range). Pure toluene exhibits an unexpected T(1) variation, which has been identified as paramagnetic relaxation resulting from an interaction of toluene with dissolved oxygen. In the gel phase, this contribution is retrieved with, in addition, a strong decay at low frequencies assigned to toluene molecules within the gel fibers. Comparison of dispersion curves of pure toluene and toluene in the gel phase leads to an estimate of the proportion of toluene embedded within the organogel (found around 40%). The second approach is based on carbon-13 T(1) and nuclear Overhauser effect measurements, the combination of these two parameters providing direct information about the reorientation of C-H bonds. It appears clearly that reorientation of toluene is the same in pure liquid and in the gel phase. The only noticeable changes in carbon-13 longitudinal relaxation times are due to the so-called chemical shift anisotropy (csa) mechanism and reflect slight modifications of the toluene electronic distribution in the gel phase. NMR diffusion measurements by the pulse gradient spin-echo (PGSE) method allow us to determine the diffusion coefficient of toluene inside the organogel. It is roughly two-thirds of the one in pure toluene, thus indicating that self-diffusion is the only dynamical parameter to be slightly affected when the solvent is inside the gel structure. The whole set of experimental observations leads to the conclusion that, once the gel is formed, the solvent becomes essentially passive, although an important fraction is located within the gel structure.

  6. Contribution of proton NMR relaxation to the investigation of molecular dynamics in columnar mesophases of discotic and polycatenar molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A C Ribeiro; P J Sebastiao; C Cruz

    2003-08-01

    We present in this work a review concerning wide frequency range 1 proton NMR relaxation studies performed in compounds exhibiting columnar mesophases, namely the Colho mesophase in the case of a liquid crystal of discotic molecules and the h mesophase in the case of a liquid crystal of biforked molecules. These NMR relaxation studies were performed combining conventional and fast field cycling NMR techniques in a frequency range between 100 Hz and 300 MHz. The possibility of probing such a large frequency range has provided a way to effectively distinguish the influence, on the 1 relaxation profiles, of the different molecular movements observed in this type of mesophases. In addition, we present a comparison between the molecular dynamics in columnar (h) and lamellar (SmC) mesophases exhibited by the same biforked compound.

  7. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by {sup 13}C CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hass, Mathias A. S. [Leiden University, Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Yilmaz, Ali [University of Copenhagen, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Denmark); Christensen, Hans E. M. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Chemistry (Denmark); Led, Jens J. [University of Copenhagen, Department of Chemistry (Denmark)], E-mail: led@kiku.dk

    2009-08-15

    The use of {sup 13}C NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically {sup 13}C labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from {sup 15}N backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains are discussed.

  8. Dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation - prospects for real time NMR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    The dynamics of a spin system is usually calculated using the density matrix. However, the usual formulation in terms of the density matrix predicts that the signal will decay to zero, and does not address the stochastic dynamics of individual spins. Spin fluctuations are to be viewed as an intrinsic quantum mechanical property of such systems immersed in random magnetic environments, and are observed as ``spin noise'' in the absence of any radio frequency (RF) excitation. Using stochastic calculus we develop a dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation whose origins lie in the component spin fluctuations. This entails consideration of random pure states for individual protons, and how these pure states are correctly combined when the density matrix is formulated. Both the lattice and the spins are treated quantum mechanically. Such treatment incorporates both the processes of spin-spin and (finite temperature) spin-lattice relaxation. Our results reveal the intimate connections between spin noise and conventional spin relaxation, in terms of a modified spin density (MSD), distinct from the density matrix, which is necessary to describe non-ensemble averaged properties of spin systems. With the prospect of ultra-fast digitization, the role of spin noise in real time parameter extraction for (NMR) spin systems, and the advantage over standard techniques, is of essential importance, especially for systems containing a small number of spins. In this presentation we outline prospects for harnessing the recent dynamical theory in terms of spin noise measurement, with attention to real time properties.

  9. Solution conformation and dynamics of a tetrasaccharide related to the Lewis{sup X} antigen deduced by NMR relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poveda, Ana [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion (Spain); Asensio, Juan Luis; Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Instituto de Quimica Organica, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain)

    1997-07-15

    {sup 1}H-NMR cross-relaxation rates and nonselective longitudinal relaxation times have been obtained at two magnetic fields (7.0 and 11.8 T) and at a variety of temperatures for the branched tetrasaccharide methyl 3-O-{alpha}-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-(1{sup {yields}}4)[3-O-{alpha}-fucosyl] -glucopyranoside (1), an inhibitor of astrocyte growth. In addition, {sup 13}C-NMR relaxation data have also been recorded at both fields. The {sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data have been interpreted using different motional models to obtain proton-proton correlation times. The results indicate that the GalNAc and Fuc rings display more extensive local motion than the two inner Glc and Gal moieties, since those present significantly shorter local correlation times. The{sup 13}C-NMR relaxation parameters have been interpreted in terms of the Lipari-Szabo model-free approach. Thus, order parameters and internal motion correlation times have been deduced. As obtained for the{sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data, the two outer residues possess smaller order parameters than the two inner rings. Internal correlation times are in the order of 100 ps. The hydroxymethyl groups have also different behaviour,with the exocyclic carbon on the glucopyranoside unit showing the highestS{sup 2}. Molecular dynamics simulations using a solvated system have also been performed and internal motion correlation functions have been deduced from these calculations. Order parameters and interproton distances have been compared to those inferred from the NMR measurements. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Estimating the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size from NMR T2 distributions and micro-tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Francisco; Leiderman, Ricardo; Souza, Andre; Carneiro, Giovanna; Bagueira, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, we formulate and solve an inverse problem to recover the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size. The input data for our technique are the T2 distribution measurement and the micro-tomographic image of the rock sample under investigation. We simulate the NMR relaxation signal for a given surface relaxivity function using the random walk method and rank different surface relaxivity functions according to the correlation of the resulting simulated T2 distributions with the measured T2 distribution. The optimization is performed using genetic algorithms and determines the surface relaxivity function whose corresponding simulated T2 distribution best matches the measured T2 distribution. In the proposed methodology, pore size is associated with a number of collisions in the random walk simulations. We illustrate the application of the proposed method by performing inversions from synthetic and laboratory input data and compare the obtained results with those obtained using the uniform relaxivity assumption.

  11. Determining pore length scales and pore surface relaxivity of rock cores by internal magnetic fields modulation at 2MHz NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huabing; Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Obruchkov, Sergei; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-09-01

    Pore length scales and pore surface relaxivities of rock cores with different lithologies were studied on a 2MHz Rock Core Analyzer. To determine the pore length scales of the rock cores, the high eigenmodes of spin bearing molecules satisfying the diffusion equation were detected with optimized encoding periods in the presence of internal magnetic fields Bin. The results were confirmed using a 64MHz NMR system, which supports the feasibility of high eigenmode detection at fields as low as 2MHz. Furthermore, this methodology was combined with relaxometry measurements to a two-dimensional experiment, which provides correlation between pore length and relaxation time. This techniques also yields information on the surface relaxivity of the rock cores. The estimated surface relaxivities were then compared to the results using an independent NMR method.

  12. Changes in Porcine Muscle Water Characteristics during Growth—An in Vitro Low-Field NMR Relaxation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Rasmussen, Marianne; Busk, Hans; Oksbjerg, Niels; Karlsson, Anders Hans; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen

    2002-08-01

    This study investigates the effects of developmental stage and muscle type on the mobility and distribution of water within skeletal muscles, using low-field 1H-NMR transverse relaxation measurements in vitro on four different porcine muscles ( M. longissimus dorsi, M. semitendinosus, M. biceps femoris, M. vastus intermedius) from a total of 48 pigs slaughtered at various weight classes between 25 kg and 150 kg. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed effects of both slaughter weight and muscle type on the transverse relaxation decay. Independent of developmental stage and muscle type, distributed exponential analysis of the NMR T 2 relaxation data imparted the existence of three distinct water populations, T 2b, T 21, and T 22, with relaxation times of approximately 1-10, 45-120, and 200-500 ms, respectively. The most profound change during muscle growth was a shift toward faster relaxation in the intermediate time constant, T 21. It decreased by approx. 24% in all four muscle types during the period from 25 to 150 kg live weight. Determination of dry matter, fat, and protein content in the muscles showed that the changes in relaxation time of the intermediate time constant, T 21, during growth should be ascribed mainly to a change in protein content, as the protein content explained 77% of the variation in the T 21 time constant. Partial least squares (PLS) regression revealed validated correlations in the region of 0.58 to 0.77 between NMR transverse relaxation data and muscle development for all the four muscle types, which indicates that NMR relaxation measurements may be used in the prediction of muscle developmental stage.

  13. Using relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy to determine structures of excited, invisible protein states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2008-07-15

    Currently the main focus of structural biology is the determination of static three-dimensional representations of biomolecules that for the most part correspond to low energy (ground state) conformations. However, it is becoming increasingly well recognized that higher energy structures often play important roles in function as well. Because these conformers are populated to only low levels and are often only transiently formed their study is not amenable to many of the tools of structural biology. In this perspective we discuss the role of CPMG-based relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy in characterizing these low populated, invisible states. It is shown that robust methods for measuring both backbone chemical shifts and residual anisotropic interactions in the excited state are in place and that these data provide valuable restraints for structural studies of invisible conformers.

  14. Microphase structures and 13C NMR relaxation parameters in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱清仁; 洪昆仑; 鲁非; 戚嵘嵘; 庞文民; 周贵恩; 宋名实

    1995-01-01

    The phase transformations in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene(UHMWPE)gel-filmsupon superdrawing have been studied by X-ray diffraction and high resolution solid state 13C NMR.Themorphological change and molecular motions in the crystalline phase,amorphous phase and interphase are dis-cussed according to the 13C nuclear relaxation time(T1c,T2cresults.A brief interpretation to the three orfour T1cvalues in the crystalline phase is presented.It is found that the component with the highest T1c(T1cα)plays a key role in the forming of ’Shish-Kebab’ microfibril which determines the sample strength andmodulus,namely,the greater the T1cα,the higher the modulus and strength of the drawn UHMWPEgel-film.These results support the ’Shish-Kebabs’ model in crystalline polymers.

  15. NMR relaxation and water self-diffusion studies in whey protein solutions and gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colsenet, Roxane; Mariette, François; Cambert, Mireille

    2005-08-24

    The changes in water proton transverse relaxation behavior induced by aggregation of whey proteins are explained in terms of the simple molecular processes of diffusion and chemical exchange. The water self-diffusion coefficient was measured in whey protein solutions and gels by the pulsed field gradient NMR method. As expected, water self-diffusion was reduced with increased protein concentrations. Whatever the concentration, the water molecules were free to diffuse over distances varying from 15 to 47 mum. Water diffusion was constant over these distances, demonstrating that no restrictions were found to explain the water hindrance. The modification in protein structure by gelation induced a decrease in water diffusion. The effects of protein concentration on water diffusion are discussed and modeled. Two approaches were compared, the obstruction effect induced by a spherical particle and the cell model, which considered two water compartments with specific self-diffusion coefficients.

  16. Relationships between 1H NMR Relaxation Data and Some Technological Parameters of Meat: A Chemometric Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert J. S.; Capozzi, Francesco; Cavani, Claudio; Cremonini, Mauro A.; Petracci, Massimiliano; Placucci, Giuseppe

    2000-11-01

    In this paper chemometrics (ANOVA and PCR) is used to measure unbiased correlations between NMR spin-echo decays of pork M. Longissimus dorsi obtained through Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiments at low frequency (20 MHz) and the values of 14 technological parameters commonly used to assess pork meat quality. On the basis of the ANOVA results, it is also found that the CPMG decays of meat cannot be best interpreted with a "discrete" model (i.e., by expanding the decays in a series of a discrete number of exponential components, each with a different transverse relaxation time), but rather with a "continuous" model, by which a continuous distribution of T2's is allowed. The latter model also agrees with literature histological results.

  17. Relationships between (1)H NMR relaxation data and some technological parameters of meat: a chemometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R J; Capozzi, F; Cavani, C; Cremonini, M A; Petracci, M; Placucci, G

    2000-11-01

    In this paper chemometrics (ANOVA and PCR) is used to measure unbiased correlations between NMR spin-echo decays of pork M. Longissimus dorsi obtained through Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiments at low frequency (20 MHz) and the values of 14 technological parameters commonly used to assess pork meat quality. On the basis of the ANOVA results, it is also found that the CPMG decays of meat cannot be best interpreted with a "discrete" model (i.e., by expanding the decays in a series of a discrete number of exponential components, each with a different transverse relaxation time), but rather with a "continuous" model, by which a continuous distribution of T(2)'s is allowed. The latter model also agrees with literature histological results. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  18. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Yu, Lu [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Zhang, Longhua [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  19. Interdomain orientation of cardiac troponin C characterized by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR reveals a compact state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordina, Nicole M; Liew, Chu Kong; Gell, David A; Fajer, Piotr G; Mackay, Joel P; Brown, Louise J

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is the calcium binding subunit of the troponin complex that triggers the thin filament response to calcium influx into the sarcomere. cTnC consists of two globular EF-hand domains (termed the N- and C-domains) connected by a flexible linker. While the conformation of each domain of cTnC has been thoroughly characterized through NMR studies involving either the isolated N-domain (N-cTnC) or C-domain (C-cTnC), little attention has been paid to the range of interdomain orientations possible in full-length cTnC that arises as a consequence of the flexibility of the domain linker. Flexibility in the domain linker of cTnC is essential for effective regulatory function of troponin. We have therefore utilized paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) NMR to assess the interdomain orientation of cTnC. Ensemble fitting of our interdomain PRE measurements reveals that isolated cTnC has considerable interdomain flexibility and preferentially adopts a bent conformation in solution, with a defined range of relative domain orientations.

  20. Functional dynamics of human FKBP12 revealed by methyl C-13 rotating frame relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brath, U; Akke, M; Yang, DW; Kay, LE; Mulder, FAA

    2006-01-01

    Transverse relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy can provide atom-specific information about time scales, populations, and the extent of structural reorganization in proteins under equilibrium conditions. A method is described that uses side-chain methyl groups as local reporters for conformational

  1. Functional dynamics of human FKBP12 revealed by methyl C-13 rotating frame relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brath, U; Akke, M; Yang, DW; Kay, LE; Mulder, FAA

    2006-01-01

    Transverse relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy can provide atom-specific information about time scales, populations, and the extent of structural reorganization in proteins under equilibrium conditions. A method is described that uses side-chain methyl groups as local reporters for conformational

  2. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff , that scales like T2,cutoff ∝g - 2 / 3D - 1 / 3 . For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1 /T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1 , for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ2g2 DT23 >102), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1 /T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2 . In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids.

  3. Wide-ranging molecular mobilities of water in active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) hydrates as determined by NMR relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Sumie; Aso, Yukio; Osako, Tsutomu; Kawanishi, Toru

    2008-10-01

    In order to examine the possibility of determining the molecular mobility of hydration water in active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) hydrates by NMR relaxation measurement, spin-spin relaxation and spin-lattice relaxation were measured for the 11 API hydrates listed in the Japanese Pharmacopeia using pulsed (1)H-NMR. For hydration water that has relatively high mobility and shows Lorentzian decay, molecular mobility as determined by spin-spin relaxation time (T(2)) was correlated with ease of evaporation under both nonisothermal and isothermal conditions, as determined by DSC and water vapor sorption isotherm analysis, respectively. Thus, T(2) may be considered a useful parameter which indicates the molecular mobility of hydration water. In contrast, for hydration water that has low mobility and shows Gaussian decay, T(2) was found not to correlate with ease of evaporation under nonisothermal conditions, which suggests that in this case, the molecular mobility of hydration water was too low to be determined by T(2). A wide range of water mobilities was found among API hydrates, from low mobility that could not be evaluated by NMR relaxation time, such as that of the water molecules in pipemidic acid hydrate, to high mobility that could be evaluated by this method, such as that of the water molecules in ceftazidime hydrate. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  4. Study of cross - relaxation and molecular dynamics in the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid by solid state NMR off - resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics of the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid containing proton (1)H and fluorine (19)F nuclei was explored by the solid-state NMR off - resonance technique. Contrary to the previous experiments the proton nuclei system I relaxed in the off - resonance effective field B→e while fluorine nuclei system S was saturated for short time in comparison to the relaxation time T1I. New cross - relaxation solid - state NMR off - resonance experiments were conducted on a homebuilt pulse spectrometer operating at the on-resonance frequency of 30.2MHz, at the off - resonance frequency varied between 30.2 and 30.6MHz for protons and at the frequency of 28.411MHz for fluorines, respectively. Based on the experimental data the dispersions of the proton off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(I), the fluorine off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(S) and the cross - relaxation rate σρ in the rotating frame were determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Relationship between the crystallization rates of amorphous nifedipine, phenobarbital, and flopropione, and their molecular mobility as measured by their enthalpy relaxation and (1)H NMR relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Y; Yoshioka, S; Kojima, S

    2000-03-01

    Isothermal crystallization of amorphous nifedipine, phenobarbital, and flopropione was studied at temperatures above and below their glass transition temperatures (T(g)). A sharp decrease in the crystallization rate with decreasing temperature was observed for phenobarbital and flopropione, such that no crystallization was observed at temperatures 20-30 degrees C lower than their T(g) within ordinary experimental time periods. In contrast, the crystallization rate of nifedipine decreased moderately with decreasing temperature, and considerable crystallization was observed at 40 degrees C below its T(g) within 4 months. The molecular mobility of these amorphous drugs was assessed by enthalpy relaxation and (1)H-NMR relaxation measurements. The enthalpy relaxation time of nifedipine was smaller than that of phenobarbital or flopropinone at the same T - T(g) values, suggesting higher molecular mobility of nifedipine. The spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T(1rho)) decreased markedly at temperature above T(g). The slope of the Arrhenius type plot of the T(1rho) for nifedipine protons changed at about 10 degrees C below the T(g), whereas the slope for phenobarbital protons became discontinuous at about 10 degrees C above the T(g). Even at temperatures below its T(g), the spin-spin relaxation process of nifedipine could be described by the sum of its Gaussian relaxation, which is characteristic of solid protons, and its Lorentzian relaxation, which is characteristic of protons with higher mobility. In contrast, no Lorentzian relaxation was observed for phenobarbital or flopropione at temperatures below their T(g). These results also suggest that nifedipine has higher molecular mobility than phenobarbital and flopropione at temperatures below T(g). The faster crystallization of nifedipine than that of phenobarbital or flopropione observed at temperatures below its T(g) may be partly ascribed to its higher molecular mobility at these temperatures.

  6. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Sammy H. S.; Waudby, Christopher A.; Cassaignau, Anaïs M. E.; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John, E-mail: j.christodoulou@ucl.ac.uk [University College London and Birkbeck College, Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of {sup 15}N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of {sup 1}H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on N{sub z} during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ∼1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies.Graphical Abstract.

  7. Non-polymeric asymmetric binary glass-formers. II. Secondary relaxation studied by dielectric, (2)H NMR, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötzschner, B; Mohamed, F; Bächer, C; Wagner, E; Lichtinger, A; Bock, D; Kreger, K; Schmidt, H-W; Rössler, E A

    2017-04-28

    We investigate the secondary (β-) relaxations of an asymmetric binary glass former consisting of a spirobichroman derivative (SBC; Tg = 356 K) as the high-Tg component and the low-Tg component tripropyl phosphate (TPP; Tg = 134 K). The main relaxations are studied in Paper I [B. Pötzschner et al., J. Chem. Phys. 146, 164503 (2017)]. A high Tg contrast of ΔTg = 222 K is put into effect in a non-polymeric system. Component-selective studies are carried out by combining results from dielectric spectroscopy (DS) for mass concentrations cTPP ≥ 60% and those from different methods of (2)H and (31)P NMR spectroscopy. In the case of NMR, the full concentration range (10% ≤ cTPP ≤ 100%) is covered. The neat components exhibit a β-relaxation (β1 (SBC) and β2 (TPP)). The latter is rediscovered by DS in the mixtures for all concentrations with unchanged time constants. NMR spectroscopy identifies the β-relaxations as being alike to those in neat glasses. A spatially highly restricted motion with angular displacement below ±10° encompassing all molecules is involved. In the low temperature range, where TPP shows the typical (31)P NMR echo spectra of the β2-process, very similar spectral features are observed for the (deuterated) SBC component by (2)H NMR, in addition to its "own" β1-process observed at high temperatures. Apparently, the small TPP molecules enslave the large SBC molecules to perform a common hindered reorientation. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time of both components is the same and reveals an angular displacement of the SBC molecules somewhat smaller than that of TPP, though the time constants τβ2 are the same. Furthermore, T1(T) of TPP in the temperature region of the β2-process is absolutely the same as in the mixture TPP/polystyrene investigated previously. It appears that the manifestations of the β-process introduced by one component are essentially independent of the second component. Finally, at cTPP

  8. Non-polymeric asymmetric binary glass-formers. II. Secondary relaxation studied by dielectric, 2H NMR, and 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötzschner, B.; Mohamed, F.; Bächer, C.; Wagner, E.; Lichtinger, A.; Bock, D.; Kreger, K.; Schmidt, H.-W.; Rössler, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the secondary (β-) relaxations of an asymmetric binary glass former consisting of a spirobichroman derivative (SBC; Tg = 356 K) as the high-Tg component and the low-Tg component tripropyl phosphate (TPP; Tg = 134 K). The main relaxations are studied in Paper I [B. Pötzschner et al., J. Chem. Phys. 146, 164503 (2017)]. A high Tg contrast of ΔTg = 222 K is put into effect in a non-polymeric system. Component-selective studies are carried out by combining results from dielectric spectroscopy (DS) for mass concentrations cTPP ≥ 60% and those from different methods of 2H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. In the case of NMR, the full concentration range (10% ≤ cTPP ≤ 100%) is covered. The neat components exhibit a β-relaxation (β1 (SBC) and β2 (TPP)). The latter is rediscovered by DS in the mixtures for all concentrations with unchanged time constants. NMR spectroscopy identifies the β-relaxations as being alike to those in neat glasses. A spatially highly restricted motion with angular displacement below ±10° encompassing all molecules is involved. In the low temperature range, where TPP shows the typical 31P NMR echo spectra of the β2-process, very similar spectral features are observed for the (deuterated) SBC component by 2H NMR, in addition to its "own" β1-process observed at high temperatures. Apparently, the small TPP molecules enslave the large SBC molecules to perform a common hindered reorientation. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time of both components is the same and reveals an angular displacement of the SBC molecules somewhat smaller than that of TPP, though the time constants τβ2 are the same. Furthermore, T1(T) of TPP in the temperature region of the β2-process is absolutely the same as in the mixture TPP/polystyrene investigated previously. It appears that the manifestations of the β-process introduced by one component are essentially independent of the second component. Finally, at cTPP ≤ 20% one

  9. NMR spin relaxation in proteins: The patterns of motion that dissipate power to the bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Yury E., E-mail: eva.meirovitch@biu.ac.il, E-mail: yuryeshapiro@gmail.com; Meirovitch, Eva, E-mail: eva.meirovitch@biu.ac.il, E-mail: yuryeshapiro@gmail.com [The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900-02 (Israel)

    2014-04-21

    We developed in recent years the two-body coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for the analysis of NMR relaxation in proteins. The two bodies/rotators are the protein (diffusion tensor D{sub 1}) and the spin-bearing probe, e.g., the {sup 15}N−{sup 1}H bond (diffusion tensor, D{sub 2}), coupled by a local potential (u). A Smoluchowski equation is solved to yield the generic time correlation functions (TCFs), which are sums of weighted exponentials (eigenmodes). By Fourier transformation one obtains the generic spectral density functions (SDFs) which underlie the experimental relaxation parameters. The typical paradigm is to characterize structural dynamics in terms of the best-fit values of D{sub 1}, D{sub 2}, and u. Additional approaches we pursued employ the SRLS TCFs, SDFs, or eigenmodes as descriptors. In this study we develop yet another perspective. We consider the SDF as function of the angular velocity associated with the fluctuating fields underlying NMR relaxation. A parameter called j-fraction, which represents the relative contribution of eigenmode, i, to a given value of the SDF function at a specific frequency, ω, is defined. j-fraction profiles of the dominant eigenmodes are derived for 0 ≤ ω ≤ 10{sup 12} rad/s. They reveal which patterns of motion actuate power dissipation at given ω-values, what are their rates, and what is their relative contribution. Simulations are carried out to determine the effect of timescale separation, D{sub 1}/D{sub 2}, axial potential strength, and local diffusion axiality. For D{sub 1}/D{sub 2} ≤ 0.01 and strong local potential of 15 k{sub B}T, power is dissipated by global diffusion, renormalized (by the strong potential) local diffusion, and probe diffusion on the surface of a cone (to be called cone diffusion). For D{sub 1}/D{sub 2} = 0.1, power is dissipated by mixed eigenmodes largely of a global-diffusion-type or cone-diffusion-type, and a nearly bare renormalized

  10. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  11. Reorientational eigenmode dynamics: a combined MD/NMR relaxation analysis method for flexible parts in globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prompers, J J; Brüschweiler, R

    2001-08-01

    An approach is presented for the interpretation of heteronuclear NMR spin relaxation data in mobile protein parts in terms of reorientational eigenmode dynamics. The method is based on the covariance matrix of the spatial functions of the nuclear spin interactions that cause relaxation expressed as spherical harmonics of rank 2. The approach was applied to characterize the dynamics of a loop region of ubiquitin. The covariance matrix was determined from a conformational ensemble generated by a 5 ns molecular dynamics simulation. It was found that the time correlation functions of the dominant eigenmodes decay in good approximation with a single correlation time. From the reorientational eigenmodes, their eigenvalues, and correlation times, NMR relaxation data were calculated in accordance with Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield relaxation theory and directly compared with experimental (15)N relaxation parameters. Using a fitting procedure, agreement between calculated and experimental data was improved significantly by adjusting eigenvalues and correlation times of the dominant modes. The presented procedure provides detailed information on correlated reorientational dynamics of flexible parts in globular proteins. The covariance matrix was linked to the covariance matrix of backbone dihedral angle fluctuations, allowing one to study the motional behavior of these degrees of freedom on nano- and subnanosecond time scales.

  12. Manganese-55 NMR and relaxation in single crystals of manganese(12)-Ac and analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Andrew

    This dissertation presents the first single crystal 55Mn NMR characterization of three compounds related to Mn12-acetate [Mn12O12(O2CCH3)16(H 2O)4]·2CH3COOH·4H2O (henceforth Mn12-Ac) that have come to be known as Single-Molecule Magnets (SMMs). This study was undertaken because they exhibit novel phenomena such as quantum mechanical tunneling of their magnetization (QTM), the origin of which is still not fully understood, and also because they have the potential to form elements of magnetic memory storage at the molecular dimensions. The investigations herein involve studies related to both the bonding as well as spin-dynamics in these compounds to much higher precision than in earlier work. These experiments were made possible by the design of a high frequency goniometer probe and a 3He temperature facility. The first single crystal NMR of any Mn12-based molecule was conducted on [Mn12O12(O2CCH2Br) 16(H2O)4]·4CH2Cl2 (Mn12-BrAc). Its 55Mn NMR spectrum, field dependence, angular dependence, and spin-lattice relaxation time (T 1) measurements were conducted. Most importantly, data are presented that (a) confirm the alteration of the magnetic core of these molecules when the samples are crushed into powder (a practice used in earlier studies), (b) show the presence of transverse hyperfine fields at the nuclear site, and (c) do not yield any evidence of temperature independent relaxation below 1 K, suggesting that QTM is not the dominant relaxation mechanism at these temperatures, in contrast to earlier studies. Data from single crystals of Mn12-Ac, the most studied SMM, concur with previous x-ray findings in that isomers are present. Such detailed information was not obtainable with powder samples. T 1-1 measurements over 400 mK--1 K indicate the existence of an energy barrier, in this case ˜1.65 K, which does not fit the current understanding of the electronic energy diagram. This value supports an earlier, yet unexplained observation of such a level by inelastic

  13. NMR Relaxation and Diffusion in Polymerized Microemulsions of HEMA and MMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Meerwall, E.; Chandran, S.; Slivka, J.; Lopina, S.; Cheung, M.

    2002-10-01

    In an effort to develop a class of materials for use in controlled drug delivery via implantation, we have used proton NMR T2 relaxation and pulsed-field-gradient diffusion (D) measurements to study bicontinuous microemulsions formed with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), polymerized and crosslinked with 4 wt. percent ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in the presence of water containing ten percent surfactant, either the inert sodium alkyl sulfate or the polymerizable TREM-LF-40. Measurements were made at 50 deg. C over the full two-phase range (e. g., 30 to 96 percent aqueous, depending on HEMA/MMA ratio). We identify a trimodal T2 spectrum with components attributable to the semi-glassy network, adsorbed surfactant and ingested water, and the interstitial aqueous phase. In the latter, two distinct D rates are due to free water and dissolved surfactant; specimens are permeable to both. Component intensity ratios are non-monotonic in aqueous content. Results suggest a wide range of pore sizes and complex interactions between the mobile molecules and the network surfaces, pores, and swellable bulk. Surfactant reactivity seems to play a minor role. Results of other characterizations complement and support these findings.

  14. Model-independent interpretation of NMR relaxation data for unfolded proteins: the acid-denatured state of ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modig, Kristofer; Poulsen, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the acid-unfolded state of acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) using (15)N laboratory frame nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation experiments at three magnetic field strengths. The data have been analyzed using standard model-free fitting and models involving....... The analysis also shows that the relaxation data are consistent with and complementary to information obtained from other parameters, especially secondary chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings, and strengthens the conclusions of previous observations that three out of the four regions that form...

  15. Optimized co-solute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement for the rapid NMR analysis of a highly fibrillogenic peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oktaviani, Nur Alia [University of Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (Netherlands); Risør, Michael W. [University of Aarhus, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Chemistry (Denmark); Lee, Young-Ho [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Megens, Rik P. [University of Groningen, Stratingh Institute for Chemistry (Netherlands); Jong, Djurre H. de; Otten, Renee; Scheek, Ruud M. [University of Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (Netherlands); Enghild, Jan J. [University of Aarhus, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (Denmark); Nielsen, Niels Chr. [University of Aarhus, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Chemistry (Denmark); Ikegami, Takahisa [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Medical Life Science (Japan); Mulder, Frans A. A., E-mail: fmulder@chem.au.dk [University of Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Co-solute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is an attractive way to speed up data acquisition in NMR spectroscopy by shortening the T{sub 1} relaxation time of the nucleus of interest and thus the necessary recycle delay. Here, we present the rationale to utilize high-spin iron(III) as the optimal transition metal for this purpose and characterize the properties of its neutral chelate form Fe(DO3A) as a suitable PRE agent. Fe(DO3A) effectively reduces the T{sub 1} values across the entire sequence of the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein with negligible impact on line width. The agent is better suited than currently used alternatives, shows no specific interaction with the polypeptide chain and, due to its high relaxivity, is effective at low concentrations and in ‘proton-less’ NMR experiments. By using Fe(DO3A) we were able to complete the backbone resonance assignment of a highly fibrillogenic peptide from α{sub 1}-antitrypsin by acquiring the necessary suite of multidimensional NMR datasets in 3 h.

  16. A suite of Mathematica notebooks for the analysis of protein main chain 15N NMR relaxation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2006-12-01

    A suite of Mathematica notebooks has been designed to ease the analysis of protein main chain 15N NMR relaxation data collected at a single magnetic field strength. Individual notebooks were developed to perform the following tasks: nonlinear fitting of 15N-T1 and -T2 relaxation decays to a two parameter exponential decay, calculation of the principal components of the inertia tensor from protein structural coordinates, nonlinear optimization of the principal components and orientation of the axially symmetric rotational diffusion tensor, model-free analysis of 15N-T1, -T2, and {1H}-15N NOE data, and reduced spectral density analysis of the relaxation data. The principle features of the notebooks include use of a minimal number of input files, integrated notebook data management, ease of use, cross-platform compatibility, automatic visualization of results and generation of high-quality graphics, and output of analyses in text format.

  17. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  18. The inverted chevron plot measured by NMR relaxation reveals a native-like unfolding intermediate in acyl-CoA binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Poulsen, F. M.; Akke, M.

    2006-01-01

    those from stopped-flow kinetics and define an "inverted chevron" plot. The combination of NMR relaxation and stopped-flow kinetic measurements allowed determination of k f and k u in the range from 0.48 M GuHCl to 1.28 M GuHCl. Individually, the stopped-flow and NMR data fit two-state models...

  19. The inverted chevron plot measured by NMR relaxation reveals a native-like unfolding intermediate in acyl-CoA binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Poulsen, F. M.; Akke, M.

    2006-01-01

    those from stopped-flow kinetics and define an "inverted chevron" plot. The combination of NMR relaxation and stopped-flow kinetic measurements allowed determination of k f and k u in the range from 0.48 M GuHCl to 1.28 M GuHCl. Individually, the stopped-flow and NMR data fit two-state models...

  20. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  1. Rapid and simple determination of T1 relaxation times in time-domain NMR by Continuous Wave Free Precession sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Monaretto, Tatiana; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times have been widely used in time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) to determine several physicochemical properties of petroleum, polymers, and food products. The measurement of T2 through the CPMG pulse sequence has been used in most of these applications because it denotes a rapid, robust method. On the other hand, T1 has been occasionally used in TD-NMR due to the long measurement time required to collect multiple points along the T1 relaxation curve. Recently, several rapid methods to measure T1 have been proposed. Those methods based upon single shot, known as Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) pulse sequences, have been employed in the simultaneous measurement of T1 and T2 in a rapid fashion. However, these sequences can be used exclusively in instrument featuring short dead time because the magnitude of the signal at thermal equilibrium is required. In this paper, we demonstrate that a special CWFP sequence with a low flip angle can be a simple and rapid method to measure T1 regardless of instruments dead time. Experimental results confirmed that the method called CWFP-T1 may be used to measure both single T1 value and T1 distribution in heterogeneous samples. Therefore, CWFP-T1 sequence can be a feasible alternative to CPMG in the determination of physicochemical properties, particularly in processes where fast protocols are requested such as industrial applications.

  2. A nonlinear BOLD model accounting for refractory effect by applying the longitudinal relaxation in NMR to the linear BOLD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwan-Jin

    2009-09-01

    A mathematical model to regress the nonlinear blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal has been developed by incorporating the refractory effect into the linear BOLD model of the biphasic gamma variate function. The refractory effect was modeled as a relaxation of two separate BOLD capacities corresponding to the biphasic components of the BOLD signal in analogy with longitudinal relaxation of magnetization in NMR. When tested with the published fMRI data of finger tapping, the nonlinear BOLD model with the refractory effect reproduced the nonlinear BOLD effects such as reduced poststimulus undershoot and saddle pattern in a prolonged stimulation as well as the reduced BOLD signal for repetitive stimulation.

  3. Interactions of acetylcholinesterase with salvianolic acid B and rosmarinic acid from Salvia miltiorhiza water extract investigated by NMR relaxation rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Wei Yin; Yi Ming Li; Wei Wei; Shan Hao Jiang; Da Yuan Zhu; Wei Hong Du

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand whether the ameliorating effect on old ages memory disorder by the root of Salvia miltiorhiza is related to the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, two main ingredients, salvianolic acid B (1) and rosmarinic acid (2), which were isolated from S. Miltiorhiza water extract, were investigated in vitro by NMR relaxation rate in this work. The results showed that the proton selective relaxation rates and the molecular rotational correlation time of proton pairs for compounds 1 and 2 increased significantly by adding of AChE in mixing solution. The study reveals that the two compounds might bind to the enzyme and have AChE inhibitory effect, which could contribute to the ameliorating effect at some extent on old ages memory disorder.

  4. Nuclear Spin Relaxation Studied by {beta}-NMR of {sup 12}N Implanted in TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihara, M., E-mail: mihara@vg.phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nakashima, Y.; Kumashiro, S.; Fujiwara, H. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Zheng, Y. N. [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Ogura, M. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Sumikama, T. [RIKEN (Japan); Nagatomo, T. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Minamisono, K. [RIKEN (Japan); Fukuda, M.; Matsuta, K. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Minamisono, T. [Fukui University of Technology (Japan)

    2004-12-15

    The {beta}-NMR of short-lived {beta}-emitter {sup 12}N(I{sup {pi}=}1{sup +}, T{sub 1/2}=11ms) in a rutile TiO{sub 2} single crystal has been measured as functions of temperature and external magnetic field. Atomic motion induced spin lattice relaxation was observed for two known sites, O substitutional and interstitial sites. The data were analyzed in terms of the thermal atomic jump, which suggests that the motion of defects around the substitutional {sup 12}N atom for O, and of the interstitial {sup 12}N atom are attributed to the spin lattice relaxation. The electric field gradients have shown temperature dependence for both sites, which is probably due to the thermal expansion of rutile.

  5. NMR Water Self-Diffusion and Relaxation Studies on Sodium Polyacrylate Solutions and Gels in Physiologic Ionic Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruiliang; Basser, Peter J; Briber, Robert M; Horkay, Ferenc

    2014-03-15

    Water self-diffusion coefficients and longitudinal relaxation rates in sodium polyacrylate solutions and gels were measured by NMR, as a function of polymer content and structure in a physiological concentration range of monovalent and divalent cations, Ca(2+) and Na(+). Several physical models describing the self-diffusion of the solvent were applied and compared. A free-volume model was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results over a wide range of polymer concentrations. The longitudinal relaxation rate exhibited linear dependence on polymer concentration below a critical concentration and showed non-linear behavior at higher concentrations. Both the water self-diffusion and relaxation were less influenced by the polymer in the gel state than in the uncrosslinked polymer solutions. The effect of Na(+) on the mobility of water molecules was practically undetectable. By contrast, addition of Ca(2+) strongly increased the longitudinal relaxation rate while its effect on the self-diffusion coefficient was much less pronounced.

  6. Measuring {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible excited states in proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstroem, Patrik [Linkoeping University, Molecular Biotechnology/IFM (Sweden); Lin Hong [Hospital for Sick Children, Molecular Structure and Function (Canada); Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Genetics (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2009-07-15

    A labeling scheme is introduced that facilitates the measurement of accurate {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible, excited states of proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy. The approach makes use of protein over-expression in a strain of E. coli in which the TCA cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase is knocked out, leading to the production of samples with high levels of {sup 13}C enrichment (30-40%) at C{sup {beta}} side-chain carbon positions for 15 of the amino acids with little {sup 13}C label at positions one bond removed ({approx}5%). A pair of samples are produced using [1-{sup 13}C]-glucose/NaH{sup 12}CO{sub 3} or [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose as carbon sources with isolated and enriched (>30%) {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} positions for 11 and 4 residues, respectively. The efficacy of the labeling procedure is established by NMR spectroscopy. The utility of such samples for measurement of {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible, excited states in exchange with visible, ground conformations is confirmed by relaxation dispersion studies of a protein-ligand binding exchange reaction in which the extracted chemical shift differences from dispersion profiles compare favorably with those obtained directly from measurements on ligand free and fully bound protein samples.

  7. Site-resolved 2H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, E. L.; Stilbs, P.; Furó, I.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in 2H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the 2H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two 2H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In 2H-exchanged cellulose containing two 2H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics.

  8. Non-polymeric asymmetric binary glass-formers. I. Main relaxations studied by dielectric, (2)H NMR, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötzschner, B; Mohamed, F; Bächer, C; Wagner, E; Lichtinger, A; Minikejew, R; Kreger, K; Schmidt, H-W; Rössler, E A

    2017-04-28

    In Paper I of this series of two papers we study the main relaxations of a binary glass former made of the low-Tg component tripropyl phosphate (TPP, Tg = 134 K) and of a specially synthesized (deuterated) spirobichroman derivative (SBC, Tg = 356 K) as the non-polymeric high-Tg component for the full concentration range. A large Tg contrast of the neat components is put into effect. Dielectric spectroscopy and different techniques of (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as well as of (31)P NMR spectroscopy allow to selectively probe the dynamics of the components. For all concentrations, two well separated liquid-like processes are identified. The faster α2-process associated with the low-Tg component TPP shows pronounced dynamic heterogeneities reflected by quasi-logarithmic correlation functions at low TPP concentrations. The slower α1-process involves the reorientation of the high-Tg component SBC. Its correlation function is Kohlrausch-like as in neat glass formers. The corresponding time constants and consequently their glass transition temperatures Tg1 and Tg2 differ more the lower the TPP concentration is. Plasticizer and anti-plasticizer effect, respectively, is observed. At low temperatures a situation arises that the TPP molecules isotropically reorient in an arrested SBC matrix (Tg2 < T < Tg1). At T < Tg2 the liquid-like reorientation of TPP gets arrested too. We find indications that a fraction of the TPP molecule takes part in the slower α1-process of the high-Tg component. All the features known from polymer-plasticizer systems are rediscovered in this non-polymeric highly asymmetric binary mixture. In Paper II [B. Pötzschner et al., J. Chem. Phys. 146, 164504 (2017)] we study the secondary (β-) relaxations of the mixtures.

  9. Non-polymeric asymmetric binary glass-formers. I. Main relaxations studied by dielectric, 2H NMR, and 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pötzschner, B.; Mohamed, F.; Bächer, C.; Wagner, E.; Lichtinger, A.; Minikejew, R.; Kreger, K.; Schmidt, H.-W.; Rössler, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    In Paper I of this series of two papers we study the main relaxations of a binary glass former made of the low-Tg component tripropyl phosphate (TPP, Tg = 134 K) and of a specially synthesized (deuterated) spirobichroman derivative (SBC, Tg = 356 K) as the non-polymeric high-Tg component for the full concentration range. A large Tg contrast of the neat components is put into effect. Dielectric spectroscopy and different techniques of 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as well as of 31P NMR spectroscopy allow to selectively probe the dynamics of the components. For all concentrations, two well separated liquid-like processes are identified. The faster α2-process associated with the low-Tg component TPP shows pronounced dynamic heterogeneities reflected by quasi-logarithmic correlation functions at low TPP concentrations. The slower α1-process involves the reorientation of the high-Tg component SBC. Its correlation function is Kohlrausch-like as in neat glass formers. The corresponding time constants and consequently their glass transition temperatures Tg1 and Tg2 differ more the lower the TPP concentration is. Plasticizer and anti-plasticizer effect, respectively, is observed. At low temperatures a situation arises that the TPP molecules isotropically reorient in an arrested SBC matrix (Tg2 < T < Tg1). At T < Tg2 the liquid-like reorientation of TPP gets arrested too. We find indications that a fraction of the TPP molecule takes part in the slower α1-process of the high-Tg component. All the features known from polymer-plasticizer systems are rediscovered in this non-polymeric highly asymmetric binary mixture. In Paper II [B. Pötzschner et al., J. Chem. Phys. 146, 164504 (2017)] we study the secondary (β-) relaxations of the mixtures.

  10. NMR RELAXIVITY AND IMAGING OF NEUTRAL MACROMOLECULAR POLYESTER GADOLINIUM (Ⅲ) COMPLEXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-chao Yu; Hong-bing Hu; Mai-li Liu; Han-zhen Yuan; Chao-hui Ye; Ren-xi Zhuo

    1999-01-01

    Five neutral macromolecular polyester gadolinium (Ⅲ) complexes with pendant hydrophobic alkyl and aromatic functional groups were prepared. The longitudinal relaxation rates of these complexes were measured. One of these Gd (Ⅲ) complexes was chosen for the acute toxicity test and T1-weighted imaging measurement. Preliminary results showed that. compared with Gd-DTPA, the neutral macromolecular gadolinium (Ⅲ) complexes provide higher T1 relaxivity enhancement and longer function duration.

  11. Miscibility of nifedipine and hydrophilic polymers as measured by (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yukio; Yoshioka, Sumie; Miyazaki, Tamaki; Kawanishi, Tohru; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Satoshi; Takakura, Asako; Hayashi, Takashi; Muranushi, Noriyuki

    2007-08-01

    The miscibility of a drug with excipients in solid dispersions is considered to be one of the most important factors for preparation of stable amorphous solid dispersions. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the feasibility of (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements to assess the miscibility of a drug with excipients. Solid dispersions of nifedipine with the hydrophilic polymers poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and alpha,beta-poly(N-5-hydroxypentyl)-L-aspartamide (PHPA) with various weight ratios were prepared by spray drying, and the spin-lattice relaxation decay of the solid dispersions in a laboratory frame (T(1) decay) and in a rotating frame (T(1rho) decay) were measured. T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation, whereas T(1rho) decay of nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersions (3 : 7, 4 : 6 and 5 : 5) was describable with a bi-exponential equation. Because a mono-exponential T(1rho) decay indicates that the domain sizes of nifedipine and polymer in solid dispersion are less than several nm, it is speculated that nifedipine is miscible with PVP but not miscible with PHPA. All the nifedipine-PVP solid dispersions studied showed a single glass transition temperature (T(g)), whereas two glass transitions were observed for the nifedipine-PHPA solid dispersion (3 : 7), thus supporting the above speculation. For nifedipine-HPMC solid dispersions (3 : 7 and 5 : 5), the miscibility of nifedipine and HPMC could not be determined by DSC measurements due to the lack of obviously evident T(g). In contrast, (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements showed that nifedipine and HPMC are miscible, since T(1rho) decay of the solid dispersions (3 : 7, 5 : 5 and 7 : 3) was describable with a mono-exponential equation. These results indicate that (1)H-NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements are useful for assessing the miscibility of a drug and an

  12. The Frequency-Dependence of the NMR Longitudinal Relaxation Rate, T(1)(-1), of Water in Cysts of the Brine Shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Thomas F.

    The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, T(,1)(' -1), of water is independent of the Larmor frequency, (omega)/2(pi), in the normal rf range. However, T(,1)('-1) of intracellular water in biological systems, which accounts for as much as 80% of the cell mass, is frequency-dependent. This indicates that the NMR properties of water in the cellular environment are influenced by long-correlation time processes due to the interaction of water with proteins and other macromolecular constituents of the cell. In this research, the relaxation rate T(,1)(' -1) of water in the Artemia (brine shrimp) cyst is examined as a function of: (1) the proton NMR Larmor frequency for .01 Artemia cysts between 10 and 500 MHz. At lower Larmor frequencies, below 1 MHz, the relaxation rates of water in brine shrimp cysts are influenced by additional relexation mechanisms; translational diffusion of hydration water is one possibility.

  13. Intrinsic unfoldase/foldase activity of the chaperonin GroEL directly demonstrated using multinuclear relaxation-based NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libich, David S.; Tugarinov, Vitali; Clore, G. Marius

    2015-01-01

    The prototypical chaperonin GroEL assists protein folding through an ATP-dependent encapsulation mechanism. The details of how GroEL folds proteins remain elusive, particularly because encapsulation is not an absolute requirement for successful re/folding. Here we make use of a metastable model protein substrate, comprising a triple mutant of Fyn SH3, to directly demonstrate, by simultaneous analysis of three complementary NMR-based relaxation experiments (lifetime line broadening, dark state exchange saturation transfer, and Carr–Purcell–Meinboom–Gill relaxation dispersion), that apo GroEL accelerates the overall interconversion rate between the native state and a well-defined folding intermediate by about 20-fold, under conditions where the “invisible” GroEL-bound states have occupancies below 1%. This is largely achieved through a 500-fold acceleration in the folded-to-intermediate transition of the protein substrate. Catalysis is modulated by a kinetic deuterium isotope effect that reduces the overall interconversion rate between the GroEL-bound species by about 3-fold, indicative of a significant hydrophobic contribution. The location of the GroEL binding site on the folding intermediate, mapped from 15N, 1HN, and 13Cmethyl relaxation dispersion experiments, is composed of a prominent, surface-exposed hydrophobic patch. PMID:26124125

  14. Mineralogical controls on NMR rock surface relaxivity: A case study of the Fontainebleau Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livo, Kurt

    Pore size distribution is derived from nuclear magnetic resonance, but is scaled by surface relaxivity. While nuclear magnetic resonance studies generally focus on the difficulty of determining pore size distribution in unconventional shale reservoirs, there is a lack of discussion concerning pure quartz sandstones. Long surface relaxivity causes complications analyzing nuclear magnetic resonance data for pore size distribution determination. Currently, I am unaware of research that addresses the complicated pore size distribution determination in long relaxing, pure sandstone formations, which is essential to accurate downhole petrophysical modeling. The Fontainebleau sandstone is well known for its homogenous mineralogical makeup and wide range of porosity and permeability. The Hibernia sandstone exhibits a similar mineralogy and is characterized by a similar and porosity-permeability range to the Fontainebleau sandstones, but with a significantly higher portion of clay minerals (1-6%). I present systematic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution from nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation times, permeability, and volumetric magnetic susceptibility to aide in characterization of the Fontainebleau sandstone. Analysis of collected nuclear magnetic resonance data is then compared to other petrophysical studies from literature such as helium porosity and permeability, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity. I find that the lack of impurities on the grain surfaces of pure quartz samples imparts a lower surface relaxivity as compared to clay containing sandstones and makes nuclear magnetic resonance analysis more complex. Thus, inverted nuclear magnetic resonance data from cleaner outcrop samples incorrectly models pore size distribution without accounting for wider surface relaxivity variation and is improperly used when characterizing the Fontainebleau sandstone. This is further supported by evidence from less

  15. (1)H NMR Relaxation Study of a Magnetic Ionic Liquid as a Potential Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Carla I; Vaca Chávez, Fabián; Portugal, Carla A M; Crespo, João G; Sebastião, Pedro J

    2015-09-03

    A proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (1)H NMRD study of the molecular dynamics in mixtures of magnetic ionic liquid [P66614][FeCl4] with [P66614][Cl] ionic liquid and mixtures of [P66614][FeCl4] with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is presented. The proton spin-lattice relaxation rate, R1, was measured in the frequency range of 8 kHz-300 MHz. The viscosity of the binary mixtures was measured as a function of an applied magnetic field, B, in the range of 0-2 T. In the case of DMSO/[P66614][FeCl4] the viscosity was found to be independent from the magnetic field, while in the case of the [P66614][Cl]/[P66614][FeCl4] system viscosity decreased with the increase of the magnetic field strength. The spin-lattice relaxation results were analyzed for all systems taking into account the relaxation mechanisms associated with the molecular motions with correlation times in a range between 10(-11) and 10(-7)s, usually observed by NMRD, and the paramagnetic relaxation contributions associated with the presence of the magnetic ions in the systems. In the case of the DMSO/[P66614][FeCl4] system the R1 dispersion shows the relaxation enhancement due to the presence of the magnetic ions, similar to that reported for contrast agents. For the [P66614][Cl]/[P66614][FeCl4] system, the R1 dispersion presents a much larger paramagnetic relaxation contribution, in comparison with that observed for the DMSO/[P66614][FeCl4] mixtures but different from that reported for other magnetic ionic liquid system. In the [P66614][Cl]/[P66614][FeCl4] system the relaxation enhancement associated with the paramagnetic ions is clearly not proportional to the concentration of magnetic ions, in contrast with what is observed for the DMSO/[P66614][FeCl4] system.

  16. Molecular motions and phase transitions. NMR relaxation times studies of several lecithins.

    OpenAIRE

    Bar-Adon, R; Gilboa, H

    1981-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, and the dipolar energy relaxation time, TD, were measured as a function of temperature. The materials studied were samples of anhydrous L-dipalmitoyl lecithin, DL-dipalmitoyl lecithin, L-dimyristoyl lecithin, DL-dimyristoyl lecithin and their monohydrates, and of anhydrous egg yolk lecithin. It is shown that TD is a much more sensitive parameter than T1 for the determination of the Chapman phase transition. Comparison between T1 and TD provides informatio...

  17. Very short NMR relaxation times of anions in ionic liquids: new pulse sequence to eliminate the acoustic ringing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimavicius, Vytautas; Gdaniec, Zofia; Balevicius, Vytautas

    2014-11-11

    NMR relaxation processes of anions were studied in two neat imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) 1-decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide- and chloride. The spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxations of 81Br and 35Cl nuclei were found to be extremely fast due to very strong quadrupolar interactions. The determined relaxation rates are comparable with those observed in the solids or in some critical organic solute/water/salt systems. In order to eliminate the acoustic ringing of the probe-head during relaxation times measurements the novel pulse sequence has been devised. It is based on the conventional inversion recovery pulse sequence, however, instead of the last 90° pulse the subsequence of three 90° pulses applied along axes to fulfill the phase cycling condition is used. Using this pulse sequence it was possible to measure T1 for both studied nuclei. The viscosity measurements have been carried out and the rotational correlation times were calculated. The effective 35Cl quadrupolar coupling constant was found to be almost one order lower than that for 81Br, i.e. 1.8 MHz and 16.0 MHz, respectively. Taking into account the facts that the ratio of (Q(35Cl)/Q(81Br))2≈0.1 and EFG tensors on the anions are quite similar, analogous structural organizations are expected for both RTILs. The observed T1/T2 (1.27-1.44) ratios were found to be not sufficiently high to confirm the presence of long-living (on the time scale of ≥10(-8) s) mesoscopic structures or heterogeneities in the studied neat ionic liquids.

  18. Paraffin molecule mobility in channel clathrates of urea on spectroscopic NMR relaxation data

    CERN Document Server

    Kriger, Y G; Chekhova, G N

    2001-01-01

    The temperature dependences of the protons spin-lattice relaxation time (T sub I) in the channel clathrates of urea with paraffins are measured. The data on the T sub I are interpreted within the frames of the model of the paraffins molecules and their fragments orientation in the clathrate channels. The dynamics peculiarities are connected with the disproportion effects of these compounds

  19. Determination of Leu Side-Chain Conformations in Excited Protein States by NMR Relaxation Dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Neudecker, Philipp; Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Mulder, Frans A. A.; Kay, Lewis E.

    2010-01-01

    Fits of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion profiles allow extraction of the kinetics and thermodynamics of exchange reactions that interconvert highly populated, ground state and low Populated, excited state conformers. Structural information is also available in the form of chem

  20. Measurement of relaxation times by NMR-CT of electric superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Koji; Yoshitoshi, Motosada (Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto (Japan)); Narise, Shoji; Hirakawa, Kogi

    1984-08-01

    Relaxation curves of T/sub 1/ in various tissues of the brain in patients with cerebral tumor and in healthy controls were obtained by saturation-recovery and inversion-recovery methods, whereby T/sub 1/ values were calculated. The results obtained were in good agreement with in vitro measurement results of excised brain tissues. Prolongation of T/sub 1/ values was evidently observed with increasing the strength of static magnetic field.

  1. On the suppression of background signals originating from NMR hardware components. Application to zero echo time imaging and relaxation time analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Wolfgang; Bardenhagen, Ingo; Huang, Li; Bäumer, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Modern NMR imaging systems used for biomedical research are equipped with B0 gradient systems with strong maximum gradient strength and short switching time enabling (1)H NMR measurements of samples with very short transverse relaxation times. However, background signal originating from non-optimized RF coils may hamper experiments with ultrashort delays between RF excitation and signal reception. We demonstrate that two simple means, outer volume suppression and the use of shaped B0 fields produced by higher-order shim coils, allow a considerable suppression of disturbing background signals. Thus, the quality of NMR images acquired at ultrashort or zero echo time is improved and systematic errors in quantitative data evaluation are avoided. Fields of application comprise MRI with ultrashort echo time or relaxation time analysis, for both biomedical research and characterizing porous media filled with liquids or gases.

  2. Temperature dependence of the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate for spin-1/2 chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coira, E.; Barmettler, P.; Giamarchi, T.; Kollath, C.

    2016-10-01

    We use recent developments in the framework of a time-dependent matrix product state method to compute the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rate 1 /T1 for spin-1/2 chains under magnetic field and for different Hamiltonians (XXX, XXZ, isotropically dimerized). We compute numerically the temperature dependence of the 1 /T1 . We consider both gapped and gapless phases, and also the proximity of quantum critical points. At temperatures much lower than the typical exchange energy scale, our results are in excellent agreement with analytical results, such as the ones derived from the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) theory and bosonization, which are valid in this regime. We also cover the regime for which the temperature T is comparable to the exchange coupling. In this case analytical theories are not appropriate, but this regime is relevant for various new compounds with exchange couplings in the range of tens of Kelvin. For the gapped phases, either the fully polarized phase for spin chains or the low-magnetic-field phase for the dimerized systems, we find an exponential decrease in Δ /(kBT ) of the relaxation time and can compute the gap Δ . Close to the quantum critical point our results are in good agreement with the scaling behavior based on the existence of free excitations.

  3. CF3 Rotation in 3-(Trifluoromethyl)phenanthrene: Solid State 19F and 1H NMR relaxation and Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Peter A; Rosenberg, Jessie; Nordstrom, Kerstin; Mallory, Clelia W; Mallory, Frank B

    2006-03-23

    We have observed and modeled the 1H and 19F solid-state nuclear spin relaxation process in polycrystalline 3-(trifluoromethyl)phenanthrene. The relaxation rates for the two spin species were observed from 85 to 300 K at the low NMR frequencies of omega/2pi = 22.5 and 53.0 MHz where CF3 rotation, characterized by a mean time tau between hops, is the only motion on the NMR time scale. All motional time scales (omegatau 1) are observed. The 1H spins are immobile on the NMR time scale but are coupled to the 19F spins via the unlike-spin dipole-dipole interaction. The temperature dependence of the observed relaxation rates (the relaxation is biexponential) shows considerable structure and a thorough analysis of Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory for this coupled spin system is provided. The activation energy for CF3 rotation is 11.5 +/- 0.7 kJ/mol, in excellent agreement with the calculation in a 13-molecule cluster provided in the companion paper where the crystal structure is reported and detailed ab initio electronic structure calculations are performed [Wang, X.; Mallory F. B.; Mallory, C. W; Beckmann, P. A.; Rheingold, A. L.; Francl, M. M J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 3954].

  4. Probing the hydration of composite cement pastes containing fly ash and silica fume by proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation (T1) was used as a prober for observing the hydration process of composite cement pastes blending fly ash and silica fume during the early age.The distribution at initial time,evolution curves and signals intensity of T1 were shown in this paper.Results demonstrate that the T1 distribution curves at initial time exhibit two peaks,which are regarded as two different water phases in the pastes.The evolution curves of T1 are in good agreement with the hydration process of composite pastes and could be roughly divided into four stages:initial period,dormant period,acceleration period and steady period.The hydration mechanism for each stage was discussed.The hydration of the composite cement pastes was retarded by the addition of fly ash and silica fume when compared to that of pure cement.However,the hydration degree of the cement in the blends was promoted.

  5. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-04

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach.

  6. Backbone dynamics of a biologically active human FGF-1 monomer, complexed to a hexasaccharide heparin-analogue, by {sup 15}N NMR relaxation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Fayos, Rosa [Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Departamento de Estructura y Funcion de Proteinas (Spain); Angulo, Jesus; Ojeda, Rafael [Instituto de Investigaciones Quimicas, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain); Martin-Pastor, Manuel [Unidad de RM y Unidad de RMN de Biomoleculas Asociada al CSIC, Laboratorio de Estructura e Estructura de Biomoleculas Jose Carracido (Spain); Nieto, Pedro M.; Martin-Lomas, Manuel [Instituto de Investigaciones Quimicas, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain); Lozano, Rosa; Gimenez-Gallego, Guillermo; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Departamento de Estructura y Funcion de Proteinas (Spain)], E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es

    2006-08-15

    The binding site and backbone dynamics of a bioactive complex formed by the acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) and a specifically designed heparin hexasaccharide has been investigated by HSQC and relaxation NMR methods. The comparison of the relaxation data for the free and bound states has allowed showing that the complex is monomeric, and still induces mutagenesis, and that the protein backbone presents reduced motion in different timescale in its bound state, except in certain points that are involved in the interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)

  7. Water mobility and microstructure evolution in the germinating Medicago truncatula seed studied by NMR relaxometry. A revisited interpretation of multicomponent relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaye, Marc; Falourd, Xavier; Limami, Anis M; Foucat, Loïc

    2015-02-18

    The water status of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. seed was followed by low-field NMR relaxometry during germination with and without oryzalin or fusicoccin used as growth modulators. T1 and T2 relaxation times and proportions P1 and P2 were determined on fresh, frozen, and freeze-thawed samples to characterize changes in water dynamics and compartmentation and in the nonfreezing water fraction. The results demonstrate that low-field NMR relaxometry allowed differentiating germination phases and events occurring during them as well as perturbations related to the presence of growth modulators. The results provide clear evidence that the classical multicomponent relaxation interpretation cannot directly relate T2 components and morphological compartments in biological tissue.

  8. The mechanism of paramagnetic NMR relaxation produced by Mn(II): role of orthorhombic and fourth-order zero field splitting terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Robert

    2008-10-14

    Mn(II) is a spin-5/2 paramagnetic ion that mediates a characteristically large NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (NMR-PRE) of nuclear spins in solution. In the range of high magnetic field strengths (above about 0.3 T), where the electronic Zeeman interaction provides the largest term of the electron spin Hamiltonian, NMR relaxation mechanism is well understood. In the lower field range, the physical picture is more complex because of the presence in the spin Hamiltonian of zero field splitting (ZFS) terms that are comparable to or greater than the Zeeman term. This work describes a systematic study of the relaxation mechanism in the low field range, particularly aspects involving the dependence of NMR-PRE on the orthorhombic (E) and fourth-order (a(q)(4), q=0,2,4) ZFS tensor components. It is shown that the fourfold (a(4)(4)) and twofold (a(2)(4)) fourth-order components exert large orientation-dependent influences on the NMR-PRE. Thus, fourth-order terms with magnitudes equal to only a few percent of the quadratic ZFS terms (D,E) produce large changes in the shape of the magnetic field profile of the PRE. Effects arising from the orthorhombic quadratic ZFS term (E) are much smaller than those of the fourth-order terms and can in most cases be neglected. However, effects due to a(4)(4) and a(2)(4) need to be included in simulations of low field data.

  9. Effect of gel firmness at cutting time, pH, and temperature on rennet coagulation and syneresis: an in situ 1H NMR relaxation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christian Lyndgaard; Rinnan, Asmund; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Janhøj, Thomas; Micklander, Elisabeth; Andersen, Ulf; van den Berg, Frans

    2010-01-13

    The objective of this study was to monitor rennet-induced milk gel formation and mechanically induced gel syneresis in situ by low-field NMR. pH, temperature, and gel firmness at cutting time were varied in a factorial design. The new curve-fitting method Doubleslicing revealed that during coagulation two proton populations with distinct transverse relaxation times (T2,1=181, T2,2=465 ms) were present in fractions (f1=98.9%, f2=1.1%). Mechanical cutting of the gel in the NMR tube induced macrosyneresis, which led to the appearance of an additional proton population (T2,3=1500-2200 ms) identified as whey. On the basis of NMR quantification of whey water the syneresis rate was calculated and found to be significantly dependent on pH and temperature.

  10. Effect of spatial spin modulation on relaxation and NMR frequencies of sup 5 sup 7 Fe nuclei in ferroelectric antiferromagnetic BiFeO sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Zalessky, A V; Zvezdin, A K; Gippius, A A; Morozova, E N; Khozeev, D F; Bush, A S; Pokatilov, V S

    2002-01-01

    The NMR spectra on the iron nuclei in the BiFeO sub 3 antiferromagnetic sample enriched by the sup 5 sup 7 Fe (95.43%) with the spatially-modulated magnetic structure are studied. It is established that the cycloid-type spin modulation in the BiFeO sub 3 produces spatial modulation of the nuclear spin-spin relaxation velocity and leads to the spectral nonuniform widening of the NMR local line. It is determined also that the local magnetic moments of the iron ions on various cycloid sections differently depend on temperature which testifies to different character of the spin waves excitation. The analogy of the experimental results with the NMR regularities in the Bloch wall is discussed

  11. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations Part II: CP kinetics and relaxation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Excipients used in the solid drug formulations differ in their NMR relaxation and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) kinetics parameters. Therefore, experimental parameters like contact time of cross-polarization and repetition time have a major impact on the registered solid state NMR spectra and in consequence on the results of the NMR analysis. In this work the CP kinetics and relaxation of the most common pharmaceutical excipients: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. The studied excipients differ significantly in their optimum repetition time (from 5 s to 1200 s) and T(1ρ)(I) parameters (from 2 ms to 73 ms). The practical use of those differences in the excipients composition analysis was demonstrated on the example of commercially available tablets containing indapamide as an API. The information presented in this article will help to choose the correct acquisition parameters and also will save the time and effort needed for their optimization in the NMR analysis of the solid drug formulations.

  12. Flexible and rigid structures in HIV-1 p17 matrix protein monitored by relaxation and amide proton exchange with NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohori, Yuka; Okazaki, Honoka; Watanabe, Satoru; Tochio, Naoya; Arai, Munehito; Kigawa, Takanori; Nishimura, Chiaki

    2014-03-01

    The HIV-1 p17 matrix protein is a multifunctional protein that interacts with other molecules including proteins and membranes. The dynamic structure between its folded and partially unfolded states can be critical for the recognition of interacting molecules. One of the most important roles of the p17 matrix protein is its localization to the plasma membrane with the Gag polyprotein. The myristyl group attached to the N-terminus on the p17 matrix protein functions as an anchor for binding to the plasma membrane. Biochemical studies revealed that two regions are important for its function: D14-L31 and V84-V88. Here, the dynamic structures of the p17 matrix protein were studied using NMR for relaxation and amide proton exchange experiments at the physiological pH of 7.0. The results revealed that the α12-loop, which includes the 14-31 region, was relatively flexible, and that helix 4, including the 84-88 region, was the most protected helix in this protein. However, the residues in the α34-loop near helix 4 had a low order parameter and high exchange rate of amide protons, indicating high flexibility. This region is probably flexible because this loop functions as a hinge for optimizing the interactions between helices 3 and 4. The C-terminal long region of K113-Y132 adopted a disordered structure. Furthermore, the C-terminal helix 5 appeared to be slightly destabilized due to the flexible C-terminal tail based on the order parameters. Thus, the dynamic structure of the p17 matrix protein may be related to its multiple functions.

  13. Redox-controlled backbone dynamics of human cytochrome c revealed by {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Koichi [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kamiya, Masakatsu [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Uchida, Takeshi [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kawano, Keiichi [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Ishimori, Koichiro, E-mail: koichiro@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} The dynamic parameters for the backbone dynamics in Cyt c were determined. {yields} The backbone mobility of Cyt c is highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme. {yields} The backbone mobility of Cyt c is more restricted upon the oxidation of the heme. {yields} The redox-dependent dynamics are shown in the backbone of Cyt c. {yields} The backbone dynamics of Cyt c would regulate the electron transfer from Cyt c. -- Abstract: Redox-controlled backbone dynamics in cytochrome c (Cyt c) were revealed by 2D {sup 15}N NMR relaxation experiments. {sup 15}N T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} values and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N NOEs of uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled reduced and oxidized Cyt c were measured, and the generalized order parameters (S{sup 2}), the effective correlation time for internal motion ({tau}{sub e}), the {sup 15}N exchange broadening contributions (R{sub ex}) for each residue, and the overall correlation time ({tau}{sub m}) were estimated by model-free dynamics formalism. These dynamic parameters clearly showed that the backbone dynamics of Cyt c are highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme that functions as the stable hydrophobic core. Upon oxidation of the heme iron in Cyt c, the average S{sup 2} value was increased from 0.88 {+-} 0.01 to 0.92 {+-} 0.01, demonstrating that the mobility of the backbone is further restricted in the oxidized form. Such increases in the S{sup 2} values were more prominent in the loop regions, including amino acid residues near the thioether bonds to the heme moiety and positively charged region around Lys87. Both of the regions are supposed to form the interaction site for cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) and the electron pathway from Cyt c to CcO. The redox-dependent mobility of the backbone in the interaction site for the electron transfer to CcO suggests an electron transfer mechanism regulated by the backbone dynamics in the Cyt c-CcO system.

  14. Another challenge to paramagnetic relaxation theory: a study of paramagnetic proton NMR relaxation in closely related series of pyridine-derivatised dysprosium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Nicola J; Finney, Katie-Louise N A; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Parker, David

    2016-02-14

    Measurements of the relaxation rate behaviour of two series of dysprosium complexes have been performed in solution, over the field range 1.0 to 16.5 Tesla. The field dependence has been modelled using Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory, allowing estimates of the electronic relaxation time, T1e, and the size of the magnetic susceptibility, μeff, to be made. Changes in relaxation rate of the order of 50% at higher fields were measured, following variation of the para-substituent in the single pyridine donor. The magnetic susceptibilities deviated unexpectedly from the free-ion values for certain derivatives in each series examined, in a manner that was independent of the electron-releasing/withdrawing ability of the pyridine substituent, suggesting that the polarisability of just one pyridine donor in octadenate ligands can play a significant role in defining the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy.

  15. Is the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers sensitive to excluded volume interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavykin, Oleg V; Neelov, Igor M; Darinskii, Anatolii A

    2016-09-21

    The effect of excluded volume (EV) interactions on the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers has been studied by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The study was motivated by the theory developed by Markelov et al., [J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 140, 244904] for a Gaussian dendrimer model without EV interactions. The theory connects the experimentally observed dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(1)H on the location of NMR active groups with the restricted flexibility (semiflexibility) of dendrimers. Semiflexibility was introduced through the correlations between the orientations of different segments. However, these correlations exist even in flexible dendrimer models with EV interactions. We have simulated coarse-grained flexible and semiflexible dendrimer models with and without EV interactions. Every dendrimer segment consisted of two rigid bonds. Semiflexibility was introduced through a potential which restricts the fluctuations of angles between neighboring bonds but does not change orientational correlations in the EV model as compared to the flexible case. The frequency dependence of the reduced 1/T(1)H(ωH) for segments and bonds belonging to different dendrimer shells was calculated. It was shown that the main effect of EV interactions consists of a much stronger contribution of the overall dendrimer rotation to the dynamics of dendrimer segments as compared to phantom models. After the exclusion of this contribution the manifestation of internal dynamics in spin-lattice NMR relaxation appears to be practically insensitive to EV interactions. For the flexible models, the position ωmax of the peak of the modified 1/T(1)H(ωH) does not depend on the shell number. For semiflexible models, the maximum of 1/T(1)H(ωH) for internal segments or bonds shifts to lower frequencies as compared to outer ones. The dependence of ωmax on the number of dendrimer shells appears to be universal for segments and

  16. $^{11}$B and $^{27}$Al NMR spin-lattice relaxation and Knight shift study of Mg$_{1-x}$Al$_x$B$_2$. Evidence for anisotropic Fermi surface

    OpenAIRE

    Papavassiliou, G.; Pissas, M.; Karayanni, M.; Fardis, M.; Koutandos, S.; Prassides, K.

    2002-01-01

    We report a detailed study of $^{11}$B and $^{27}$Al NMR spin-lattice relaxation rates ($1/T_1$), as well as of $^{27}$Al Knight shift (K) of Mg$_{1-x}$Al$_x$B$_2$, $0\\leq x\\leq 1$. The obtained ($1/T_1T$) and K vs. x plots are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. This asserts experimentally the prediction that the Fermi surface is highly anisotropic, consisting mainly of hole-type 2-D cylindrical sheets from bonding $2p_{x,y}$ boron orbitals. It is also shown that the density ...

  17. Feasibility of high-resolution one-dimensional relaxation imaging at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner applied to articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2015-02-01

    Low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance increases the contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate in many biological tissues; one prominent example is hyaline articular cartilage. In order to take advantage of this increased contrast and to profile the depth-dependent variations, high resolution parameter measurements are carried out which can be of critical importance in an early diagnosis of cartilage diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the maximum achievable spatial resolution of parameter profiles is limited by factors such as sensor geometry, sample curvature, and diffusion limitation. In this work, we report on high-resolution single-sided NMR scanner measurements with a commercial device, and quantify these limitations. The highest achievable spatial resolution on the used profiler, and the lateral dimension of the sensitive volume were determined. Since articular cartilage samples are usually bent, we also focus on averaging effects inside the horizontally aligned sensitive volume and their impact on the relaxation profiles. Taking these critical parameters into consideration, depth-dependent relaxation time profiles with the maximum achievable vertical resolution of 20 μm are discussed, and are correlated with diffusion coefficient profiles in hyaline articular cartilage in order to reconstruct T2 maps from the diffusion-weighted CPMG decays of apparent relaxation rates.

  18. Measurement of carbonyl chemical shifts of excited protein states by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy: comparison between uniformly and selectively {sup 13}C labeled samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstroem, Patrik; Hansen, D. Flemming; Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Genetics (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2008-09-15

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful method for quantifying chemical shifts of excited protein states. For many applications of the technique that involve the measurement of relaxation rates of carbon magnetization it is necessary to prepare samples with isolated {sup 13}C spins so that experiments do not suffer from magnetization transfer between coupled carbon spins that would otherwise occur during the CPMG pulse train. In the case of {sup 13}CO experiments however the large separation between {sup 13}CO and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts offers hope that robust {sup 13}CO dispersion profiles can be recorded on uniformly {sup 13}C labeled samples, leading to the extraction of accurate {sup 13}CO chemical shifts of the invisible, excited state. Here we compare such chemical shifts recorded on samples that are selectively labeled, prepared using [1-{sup 13}C]-pyruvate and NaH{sup 13}CO{sub 3,} or uniformly labeled, generated from {sup 13}C-glucose. Very similar {sup 13}CO chemical shifts are obtained from analysis of CPMG experiments recorded on both samples, and comparison with chemical shifts measured using a second approach establishes that the shifts measured from relaxation dispersion are very accurate.

  19. Cross-validation of the structure of a transiently formed and low populated FF domain folding intermediate determined by relaxation dispersion NMR and CS-Rosetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barette, Julia; Velyvis, Algirdas; Religa, Tomasz L; Korzhnev, Dmitry M; Kay, Lewis E

    2012-06-14

    We have recently reported the atomic resolution structure of a low populated and transiently formed on-pathway folding intermediate of the FF domain from human HYPA/FBP11 [Korzhnev, D. M.; Religa, T. L.; Banachewicz, W.; Fersht, A. R.; Kay, L.E. Science 2011, 329, 1312-1316]. The structure was determined on the basis of backbone chemical shift and bond vector orientation restraints of the invisible intermediate state measured using relaxation dispersion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that were subsequently input into the database structure determination program, CS-Rosetta. As a cross-validation of the structure so produced, we present here the solution structure of a mimic of the folding intermediate that is highly populated in solution, obtained from the wild-type domain by mutagenesis that destabilizes the native state. The relaxation dispersion/CS-Rosetta structures of the intermediate are within 2 Å of those of the mimic, with the nonnative interactions in the intermediate also observed in the mimic. This strongly confirms the structure of the FF domain folding intermediate, in particular, and validates the use of relaxation dispersion derived restraints in structural studies of invisible excited states, in general.

  20. Sodium-23 NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate studies of mono- and bis-intercalation in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, H.; Dinesen, J.; Jacobsen, J.P. (Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1989-04-18

    Sodium-23 spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements have been used to study the intercalation of a series of 9-aminoacridine derivatives in DNA. The {sup 23}Na relaxation rate is strongly dependent upon the amount of intercalator added to a sodium DNA solution. The results are analyzed by a combined use of the ion condensation theory and the quadrupolar relaxation theory of polyelectrolyte solutions. This interpretation shows that the major effect in lowering the relaxation rate by intercalation is not due to the release of sodium ions but is caused by a substantial decrease in the relaxation rate R{sub b} for the remaining bound sodium ions. Likewise, titration of NaDNA solutions with MgCl{sub 2} shows that condensation of Mg{sup 2+} on the DNA double helix reduces R{sub b}. A good agreement between experiment and theory is found if the average lengthening following intercalation of a 9-aminoacridine moiety is assumed to be approximately 2.7 {angstrom}. The distinction between mono- and bis-intercalation is clearly indicated by the results. The two bis-intercalating drugs examined are found to bis-intercalate only up to r {le} 0.02. For r > 0.02 the drugs apparently mono-intercalate.

  1. Relaxation time: a proton NMR-based approach as a metric to measure reactivity of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruthi, Archini; Misra, Superb K.

    2017-08-01

    The toxicological impact of engineered nanoparticles in environmental or biological milieu is very difficult to predict and control because of the complexity of interactions of nanoparticles with the varied constituents in the suspended media. Nanoparticles are different from their bulk counterparts due to their high surface area-to-volume ratio per unit mass, which plays a vital role in bioavailability of these nanoparticles to its surroundings. This study explores how changes in the spin-spin nuclear relaxation time can be used to gauge the availability of surface area and suspension stability of selected nanoparticles (CuO, ZnO, and SiO2), in a range of simulated media. Spin-spin nuclear relaxation time can be mathematically correlated to wetted surface area, which is well backed up by the data of hydrodynamic size measurements and suspension stability. We monitored the change in spin-spin relaxation time for all the nanoparticles, over a range of concentrations (2.5 -100 ppm) in deionized water and artificial seawater. Selective concentrations of nanoparticle suspensions were subjected for temporal studies over a period of 48 hrs to understand the concept of spin-spin nuclear relaxation time-based reactivity of nanoparticle suspension. The nanoparticles showed high degree of agglomeration, when suspended in artificial seawater. This was captured by a decrease in spin-spin nuclear relaxation time and also an increment in the hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles.

  2. NMR paramagnetic relaxation due to the S=5/2 complex, Fe(III)-(tetra-p-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin: central role of the tetragonal fourth-order zero-field splitting interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefle, Nathaniel; Sharp, Robert

    2005-05-08

    The metalloporphyrins, Me-TSPP [Me=Cr(III), Mn(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), and TSPP=meso-(tetra-p-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin], which possess electron spins S=3/2, 2, 5/2, and 5/2, respectively, comprise an important series of model systems for mechanistic studies of NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (NMR-PRE). For these S>1/2 spin systems, the NMR-PRE depends critically on the detailed form of the zero-field splitting (zfs) tensor. We report the results of experimental and theoretical studies of the NMR relaxation mechanism associated with Fe(III)-TSPP, a spin 5/2 complex for which the overall zfs is relatively large (D approximately = 10 cm(-1)). A comparison of experimental data with spin dynamics simulations shows that the primary determinant of the shape of the magnetic relaxation dispersion profile of the water proton R1 is the tetragonal fourth-order component of the zfs tensor. The relaxation mechanism, which has not previously been described, is a consequence of zfs-induced mixing of the spin eigenfunctions of adjacent Kramers doublets. We have also investigated the magnetic-field dependence of electron-spin relaxation for S=5/2 in the presence of a large zfs, such as occurs in Fe(III)-TSPP. Calculations show that field dependence of this kind is suppressed in the vicinity of the zfs limit, in agreement with observation.

  3. Computer Code for Interpreting 13C NMR Relaxation Measurements with Specific Models of Molecular Motion: The Rigid Isotropic and Symmetric Top Rotor Models and the Flexible Symmetric Top Rotor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    resonance (NMR) Spectral density functions Spin - spin relaxation Molecular dynamics Nuclear Overhauser effect Symmetric top rotor Spin -lattice relaxation...SYMMETRIC TOP ROTOR MODELS AND THE FLEXIBLE SYMMETRIC TOP ROTOR MODEL ECBC-TR-1428 Terry J. Henderson RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE...Symmetric Top Rotor Models and the Flexible Symmetric Top Rotor Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  4. Solid State NMR Study of Polystyrene Nanolatex Particles(I) 13C Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    13C spin-lattice relaxtion times for polystyrene nanolatex particles have been investigated. It was found that the dramatic increase at 80℃ annealing temperature is well below the Tg temperature of bulk polystyrene, the increase of relaxation time of aromatic carbons is larger than that of for aliphatic carbons at transition annealing temperature.

  5. Relaxation-compensated difference spin diffusion NMR for detecting {sup 13}C–{sup 13}C long-range correlations in proteins and polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tuo; Williams, Jonathan K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Hong, Mei, E-mail: meihong@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The measurement of long-range distances remains a challenge in solid-state NMR structure determination of biological macromolecules. In 2D and 3D correlation spectra of uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled biomolecules, inter-residue, inter-segmental, and intermolecular {sup 13}C–{sup 13}C cross peaks that provide important long-range distance constraints for three-dimensional structures often overlap with short-range cross peaks that only reflect the covalent structure of the molecule. It is therefore desirable to develop new approaches to obtain spectra containing only long-range cross peaks. Here we show that a relaxation-compensated modification of the commonly used 2D {sup 1}H-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiment allows the clean detection of such long-range cross peaks. By adding a z-filter to keep the total z-period of the experiment constant, we compensate for {sup 13}C T{sub 1} relaxation. As a result, the difference spectrum between a long- and a scaled short-mixing time spectrum show only long-range correlation signals. We show that one- and two-bond cross peaks equalize within a few tens of milliseconds. Within ∼200 ms, the intensity equilibrates within an amino acid residue and a monosaccharide to a value that reflects the number of spins in the local network. With T{sub 1} relaxation compensation, at longer mixing times, inter-residue and inter-segmental cross peaks increase in intensity whereas intra-segmental cross-peak intensities remain unchanged relative to each other and can all be subtracted out. Without relaxation compensation, the difference 2D spectra exhibit both negative and positive intensities due to heterogeneous T{sub 1} relaxation in most biomolecules, which can cause peak cancellation. We demonstrate this relaxation-compensated difference PDSD approach on amino acids, monosaccharides, a crystalline model peptide, a membrane-bound peptide and a plant cell wall sample. The resulting difference spectra yield clean multi-bond, inter

  6. An inversion method of 2D NMR relaxation spectra in low fields based on LSQR and L-curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guanqun; Zhou, Xiaolong; Wang, Lijia; Wang, Yuanjun; Nie, Shengdong

    2016-04-01

    The low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) inversion method based on traditional least-squares QR decomposition (LSQR) always produces some oscillating spectra. Moreover, the solution obtained by traditional LSQR algorithm often cannot reflect the true distribution of all the components. Hence, a good solution requires some manual intervention, for especially low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data. An approach based on the LSQR algorithm and L-curve is presented to solve this problem. The L-curve method is applied to obtain an improved initial optimal solution by balancing the residual and the complexity of the solutions instead of manually adjusting the smoothing parameters. First, the traditional LSQR algorithm is used on 2D NMR T1-T2 data to obtain its resultant spectra and corresponding residuals, whose norms are utilized to plot the L-curve. Second, the corner of the L-curve as the initial optimal solution for the non-negative constraint is located. Finally, a 2D map is corrected and calculated iteratively based on the initial optimal solution. The proposed approach is tested on both simulated and measured data. The results show that this algorithm is robust, accurate and promising for the NMR analysis.

  7. 11B and 27Al NMR spin-lattice relaxation and Knight shift of Mg1-xAlxB2: Evidence for an anisotropic Fermi surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavassiliou, G.; Pissas, M.; Karayanni, M.; Fardis, M.; Koutandos, S.; Prassides, K.

    2002-10-01

    We report a detailed study of the 11B and 27Al NMR spin-lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the 27Al Knight shift (K) in Mg1-xAlxB2, 0<=x<=1. The evolution of (1/T1T) and K with x is in excellent agreement with the prediction of ab initio calculations of a highly anisotropic Fermi surface, consisting mainly of hole-type two-dimensional (2D) cylindrical sheets from bonding 2px,y boron orbitals. The density of states at the Fermi level also decreases sharply on Al doping and the 2D sheets collapse at x~0.55, where the superconducting phase disappears.

  8. Utilization of paramagnetic relaxation enhancements for high-resolution NMR structure determination of a soluble loop-rich protein with sparse NOE distance restraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuita, Kyoko; Kataoka, Saori; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Hattori, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Shiozaki, Kazuhiro [Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate School of Biological Sciences (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro, E-mail: kojima@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    NMR structure determination of soluble proteins depends in large part on distance restraints derived from NOE. In this study, we examined the impact of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE)-derived distance restraints on protein structure determination. A high-resolution structure of the loop-rich soluble protein Sin1 could not be determined by conventional NOE-based procedures due to an insufficient number of NOE restraints. By using the 867 PRE-derived distance restraints obtained from the NOE-based structure determination procedure, a high-resolution structure of Sin1 could be successfully determined. The convergence and accuracy of the determined structure were improved by increasing the number of PRE-derived distance restraints. This study demonstrates that PRE-derived distance restraints are useful in the determination of a high-resolution structure of a soluble protein when the number of NOE constraints is insufficient.

  9. Fast Li ion dynamics in the solid electrolyte Li7 P3 S11 as probed by (6,7) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlmuth, Dominik; Epp, Viktor; Wilkening, Martin

    2015-08-24

    The development of safe and long-lasting all-solid-state batteries with high energy density requires a thorough characterization of ion dynamics in solid electrolytes. Commonly, conductivity spectroscopy is used to study ion transport; much less frequently, however, atomic-scale methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are employed. Here, we studied long-range as well as short-range Li ion dynamics in the glass-ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . Li(+) diffusivity was probed by using a combination of different NMR techniques; the results are compared with those obtained from electrical conductivity measurements. Our NMR relaxometry data clearly reveal a very high Li(+) diffusivity, which is reflected in a so-called diffusion-induced (6) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation peak showing up at temperatures as low as 313 K. At this temperature, the mean residence time between two successful Li jumps is in the order of 3×10(8) s(-1) , which corresponds to a Li(+) ion conductivity in the order of 10(-4) to 10(-3) S cm(-1) . Such a value is in perfect agreement with expectations for the crystalline but metastable glass ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . In contrast to conductivity measurements, NMR analysis reveals a range of activation energies with values ranging from 0.17 to 0.26 eV, characterizing Li diffusivity in the bulk. In our case, through-going Li ion transport, when probed by using macroscopic conductivity spectroscopy, however, seems to be influenced by blocking grain boundaries including, for example, amorphous regions surrounding the Li7 P3 S11 crystallites. As a result of this, long-range ion transport as seen by impedance spectroscopy is governed by an activation energy of approximately 0.38 eV. The findings emphasize how surface and grain boundary effects can drastically affect long-range ionic conduction. If we are to succeed in solid-state battery technology, such effects have to be brought under control by, for example, sophisticated densification or through the preparation

  10. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and 1H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Maria R.; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15-20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications.

  11. Interaction between reduced glutathione and PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers in aqueous solutions: studied by 1H NMR and spin-lattice relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lianwei; Guo, Chen; Yang, Liangrong; Xiang, Junfeng; Tang, Yalin; Liu, Huizhou

    2011-03-17

    In order to investigate the effect of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers on the glutathione (GSH)/glutathione-S-transferase (GST) detoxification system, interaction between the copolymers and GSH is studied by NMR measurements. Selective rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect (ROE) experiment confirms that glutamyl (Glu) α-H of GSH has spatial contact with EO methylene protons. Spin-lattice relaxation times of GSH Glu α-H show a decrease when PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers are added, and the decrease is greater with copolymers possessing more EO units. Other protons of GSH show little change in the presence of the copolymers. The addition of GSH promotes the dehydration of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers. This results from the breaking of hydrogen bonds between water and the polymers and the forming of hydrogen bonds between Glu α-carboxylate protons and oxygen atoms of EO units. The dissociation constant between GSH and P85 copolymer is determined by spin-lattice relaxation measurements, which shows the binding is of low affinity and the two molecules are in fast dissociation kinetics. This study suggests that GSH transporting or utilizing systems may be affected by treatment of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers.

  12. Probing Microsecond Time Scale Dynamics in Proteins by Methyl H-1 Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill Relaxation Dispersion NMR Measurements. Application to Activation of the Signaling Protein NtrC(r)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Renee; Villali, Janice; Kern, Dorothee; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2010-01-01

    To study microsecond processes by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy, low power deposition and short pulses are crucial and encourage the development of experiments that employ H-1 Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse trains. Herein, a method is described for the comprehensive study of microse

  13. Probing Microsecond Time Scale Dynamics in Proteins by Methyl H-1 Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill Relaxation Dispersion NMR Measurements. Application to Activation of the Signaling Protein NtrC(r)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Renee; Villali, Janice; Kern, Dorothee; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2010-01-01

    To study microsecond processes by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy, low power deposition and short pulses are crucial and encourage the development of experiments that employ H-1 Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse trains. Herein, a method is described for the comprehensive study of microse

  14. Relaxation-optimised Hartmann-Hahn transfer using a specifically Tailored MOCCA-XY16 mixing sequence for carbonyl-carbonyl correlation spectroscopy in {sup 13}C direct detection NMR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felli, Isabella C.; Pierattelli, Roberta [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Glaser, Steffen J.; Luy, Burkhard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Chemistry (Germany)], E-mail: Burkhard.Luy@ch.tum.de

    2009-03-15

    Isotropic mixing sequences are one of the key methods to achieve efficient coherence transfer. Among them, the MOCCA-XY16, which keeps the magnetization longitudinal for a significant amount of time, is characterised by favourable relaxation properties. We show here that its adapted version is particularly suited for carbonyl-carbonyl correlations in {sup 13}C direct detection NMR experiments.

  15. Probing Microsecond Time Scale Dynamics in Proteins by Methyl H-1 Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill Relaxation Dispersion NMR Measurements. Application to Activation of the Signaling Protein NtrC(r)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Renee; Villali, Janice; Kern, Dorothee; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2010-01-01

    To study microsecond processes by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy, low power deposition and short pulses are crucial and encourage the development of experiments that employ H-1 Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse trains. Herein, a method is described for the comprehensive study of

  16. Quantifying millisecond time-scale exchange in proteins by CPMG relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy of side-chain carbonyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Alexandar L.; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    A new pulse sequence is presented for the measurement of relaxation dispersion profiles quantifying millisecond time-scale exchange dynamics of side-chain carbonyl groups in uniformly {sup 13}C labeled proteins. The methodology has been tested using the 87-residue colicin E7 immunity protein, Im7, which is known to fold via a partially structured low populated intermediate that interconverts with the folded, ground state on the millisecond time-scale. Comparison of exchange parameters extracted for this folding 'reaction' using the present methodology with those obtained from more 'traditional' {sup 15}N and backbone carbonyl probes establishes the utility of the approach. The extracted excited state side-chain carbonyl chemical shifts indicate that the Asx/Glx side-chains are predominantly unstructured in the Im7 folding intermediate. However, several crucial salt-bridges that exist in the native structure appear to be already formed in the excited state, either in part or in full. This information, in concert with that obtained from existing backbone and side-chain methyl relaxation dispersion experiments, will ultimately facilitate a detailed description of the structure of the Im7 folding intermediate.

  17. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-02-22

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation.

  18. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation. PMID:28223697

  19. Refined solution structure and backbone dynamics of 15N-labeled C12A-p8MTCP studied by NMR relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthe, Philippe; Chiche, Laurent; Declerck, Nathalie; Delsuc, Marc-Andre [Universite de Montpellier I, Faculte de Pharmacie, Centre de Biochimie Structurale, CNRS-UMR 9955, INSERM-U414 (France); Lefevre, Jean-Francois [Universite Louis Pasteur, CNRS UPR-9003, ESBS (France); Malliavin, Therese [Universite de Montpellier I, Faculte de Pharmacie, Centre de Biochimie Structurale, CNRS-UMR 9955, INSERM-U414 (France); Mispelter, Joel [Centre Universitaire Bat 112, INSERM-U350, Institut Curie, Biologie (France); Stern, Marc-Henri [Hopital Saint-Louis, Unite INSERM-U462 (France); Lhoste, Jean-Marc; Roumestand, Christian [Universite de Montpellier I, Faculte de Pharmacie, Centre de Biochimie Structurale, CNRS-UMR 9955, INSERM-U414 (France)

    1999-12-15

    MTCP1 (for Mature-T-Cell Proliferation) was the first gene unequivocally identified in the group of uncommon leukemias with a mature phenotype. The three-dimensional solution structure of the human p8{sup MTCP} protein encoded by the MTCP1 oncogene has been previously determined by homonuclear proton two-dimensional NMR methods at 600 MHz: it consists of an original scaffold comprising three {alpha}-helices, associated with a new cysteine motif. Two of the helices are covalently paired by two disulfide bridges, forming an {alpha}-hairpin which resembles an antiparallel coiled-coil. The third helix is orientated roughly parallel to the plane defined by the {alpha}-antiparallel motif and appears less well defined. In order to gain more insight into the details of this new scaffold, we uniformly labeled with nitrogen-15 a mutant of this protein (C12A-p8{sup MTCP1}) in which the unbound cysteine at position 12 has been replaced by an alanine residue, thus allowing reproducibly high yields of recombinant protein. The refined structure benefits from 211 additional NOEs, extracted from {sup 15}N-edited 3D experiments, and from a nearly complete set of {phi} angular restraints allowing the estimation of the helical content of the structured part of the protein. Moreover, measurements of {sup 15} N spin relaxation times and heteronuclear {sup 15} N{sup 1}HNOEs provided additional insights into the dynamics of the protein backbone. The analysis of the linear correlation between J(0) and J({omega}) was used to interpret relaxation parameters. It appears that the apparent relative disorder seen in helix III is not simply due to a lack of experimental constraints, but associated with substantial contributions of sub-nanosecond motions in this segment.

  20. Measuring {sup 1}H{sup N} temperature coefficients in invisible protein states by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvignies, Guillaume; Vallurupalli, Pramodh [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada); Cordes, Matthew H. J. [The University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Hansen, D. Flemming [University College London, Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology (United Kingdom); Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    A method based on the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiment is presented for measuring the temperature coefficients of amide proton chemical shifts of low populated 'invisible' protein states that exchange with a 'visible' ground state on the millisecond time-scale. The utility of the approach is demonstrated with an application to an I58D mutant of the Pfl6 Cro protein that undergoes exchange between the native, folded state and a cold denatured, unfolded conformational ensemble that is populated at a level of 6% at 2.5 Degree-Sign C. A wide distribution of amide temperature coefficients is measured for the unfolded state. The distribution is centered about -5.6 ppb/K, consistent with an absence of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds, on average. However, the large range of values (standard deviation of 2.1 ppb/K) strongly supports the notion that the unfolded state of the protein is not a true random coil polypeptide chain.

  1. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, M.; Woźniak-Braszak, A.; Jurga, K.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz and 28.411 MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins 1H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins 19F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal.

  2. Hydrogen-1 NMR relaxation time studies in membrane: anesthetic systems; Variacao dos tempos de relaxacao longitudinal de protons em sistemas membranares contendo anestesicos locais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, L.M.A.; Fraceto, L.; Paula, E. de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica; Franzoni, L.; Spisni, A. [Universita degli Studi di Parma, Parma (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Biologica

    1997-12-31

    The study of local anesthetics`(LA) interaction with model phospholipid membranes is justified by the direct correlation between anesthetic`s hydrophobicity and its potency/toxicity. By the same reason, uncharged LA species seems to play a crucial role in anesthesia. Most clinically used LA are small amphiphilics with a protonated amine group (pKa around 8). Although both charged (protonated) and uncharged forms can coexist at physiological pH, it has been shown (Lee, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 514:95, 1978; Screier et al. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 769:231, 1984) that the real anesthetic pka can be down-shifted, due to differential partition into membranes, increasing the ratio of uncharged species at pH 7.4. We have measured {sup 1}H-NMR longitudinal relaxation times (T{sub 1}) for phospholipid and three local anesthetics (tetracaine, lidocaine, benzocaine), in sonicated vesicles at a 3:1 molar ratio. All the LA protons have shown smaller T{sub 1} in this system than in isotropic phases, reflecting LA immobilization caused by insertion in the membrane. T{sub 1} values for the lipid protons in the presence of LA were analyzed, in an attempt to identify specific LA:lipid contact regions. (author) 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs.

  3. High-resolution NMR field-cycling device for full-range relaxation and structural studies of biopolymers on a shared commercial instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redfield, Alfred G., E-mail: redfield@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Improvements are described in a shuttling field-cycling device (Redfield in Magn Reson Chem 41:753-768, 2003), designed to allow widespread access to this useful technique by configuring it as a removable module to a commercial 500 MHz NMR instrument. The main improvements described here, leading to greater versatility, high reliability and simple construction, include: shuttling provided by a linear motor driven by an integrated-control servomotor; provision of automated bucking magnets to allow fast two-stage cycling to nearly zero field; and overall control by a microprocessor. A brief review of history and publications that have used the system is followed by a discussion of topics related to such a device including discussion of some future applications. A description of new aspects of the shuttling device follows. The minimum round trip time to 1T and above is less than 0.25 s and to 0.002 T is 0.36 s. Commercial probes are used and sensitivity is that of the host spectrometer reduced only by relaxation during travel. A key element is development of a linkage that prevents vibration of the linear motor from reaching the probe.

  4. High-resolution NMR field-cycling device for full-range relaxation and structural studies of biopolymers on a shared commercial instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Alfred G

    2012-02-01

    Improvements are described in a shuttling field-cycling device (Redfield in Magn Reson Chem 41:753-768, 2003), designed to allow widespread access to this useful technique by configuring it as a removable module to a commercial 500 MHz NMR instrument. The main improvements described here, leading to greater versatility, high reliability and simple construction, include: shuttling provided by a linear motor driven by an integrated-control servomotor; provision of automated bucking magnets to allow fast two-stage cycling to nearly zero field; and overall control by a microprocessor. A brief review of history and publications that have used the system is followed by a discussion of topics related to such a device including discussion of some future applications. A description of new aspects of the shuttling device follows. The minimum round trip time to 1T and above is less than 0.25 s and to 0.002 T is 0.36 s. Commercial probes are used and sensitivity is that of the host spectrometer reduced only by relaxation during travel. A key element is development of a linkage that prevents vibration of the linear motor from reaching the probe.

  5. Applications de la résonance magnétique nucléaire (RMN en milieu poreux Lissage des courbes de relaxation RMN du domaine du temps par une méthode discrète et continue Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (Nmr Applications in Porous Media Time-Dependent Nmr Relaxation Curve Smoothing Using a Discrete Continuous Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Botlan D.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Dans un champ magnétique hétérogène, le signal RMN de précession libre (FID suit une évolution gaussienne. Le traitement du signal par une méthode discrète peut donner des composantes qui ne correspondent pas à un état physique réel. Par contre l'utilisation d'une méthode de déconvolution continue nous a donné des résultats quantitatifs tout à fait satisfaisants permettant de déterminer les distributions de temps de relaxation correspondant à des états intermédiaires entre les phases solides et liquides. La RMN du domaine du temps peut ainsi être considérée comme une méthode analytique complémentaire des techniques habituellement utilisées pour l'étude de composés complexes hétérogènes ATD, ACD, isothermes de sorption, etc. In a heterogeneous magnetic field, the freely precessing NMR signal (FID describes a Gaussian curve. Processing the signal using a discrete method can give rise to components that do not correspond to a real physical state. However, with a continuous deconvolution method, which gives quite satisfactory quantitative results, it is possible to determine the distributions of relaxation times that correspond to intermediate states between solid and liquid phases. Time-dependent NMR can thus be used to supplement the usual analytical methods, such as DTA, DCA and sorption isotherms, for studying complex heterogeneous compounds.

  6. Probing microsecond time scale dynamics in proteins by methyl (1)H Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion NMR measurements. Application to activation of the signaling protein NtrC(r).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Renee; Villali, Janice; Kern, Dorothee; Mulder, Frans A A

    2010-12-01

    To study microsecond processes by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy, low power deposition and short pulses are crucial and encourage the development of experiments that employ (1)H Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse trains. Herein, a method is described for the comprehensive study of microsecond to millisecond time scale dynamics of methyl groups in proteins, exploiting their high abundance and favorable relaxation properties. In our approach, protein samples are produced using [(1)H, (13)C]-d-glucose in ∼100% D(2)O, which yields CHD(2) methyl groups for alanine, valine, threonine, isoleucine, leucine, and methionine residues with high abundance, in an otherwise largely deuterated background. Methyl groups in such samples can be sequence-specifically assigned to near completion, using (13)C TOCSY NMR spectroscopy, as was recently demonstrated (Otten, R.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 2952-2960). In this Article, NMR pulse schemes are presented to measure (1)H CPMG relaxation dispersion profiles for CHD(2) methyl groups, in a vein similar to that of backbone relaxation experiments. Because of the high deuteration level of methyl-bearing side chains, artifacts arising from proton scalar coupling during the CPMG pulse train are negligible, with the exception of Ile-δ1 and Thr-γ2 methyl groups, and a pulse scheme is described to remove the artifacts for those residues. Strong (13)C scalar coupling effects, observed for several leucine residues, are removed by alternative biochemical and NMR approaches. The methodology is applied to the transcriptional activator NtrC(r), for which an inactive/active state transition was previously measured and the motions in the microsecond time range were estimated through a combination of backbone (15)N CPMG dispersion NMR spectroscopy and a collection of experiments to determine the exchange-free component to the transverse relaxation rate. Exchange contributions to the (1)H line width were detected for 21 methyl

  7. Cooperative binding of midazolam with testosterone and alpha-naphthoflavone within the CYP3A4 active site: a NMR T1 paramagnetic relaxation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Michael D; Wen, Bo; Allen, Kyle E; Roberts, Arthur G; Schuman, Jason T; Campbell, A Patricia; Kunze, Kent L; Nelson, Sidney D

    2005-11-01

    Recent studies have indicated that CYP3A4 exhibits non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics for numerous substrates. Both homo- and heterotropic activation have been reported, and kinetic models have suggested multiple substrates within the active site. We provide some of the first physicochemical data supporting the hypothesis of allosteric substrate binding within the CYP3A4 active site. Midazolam (MDZ) is metabolized by CYP3A4 to two hydroxylated metabolites, 1'- and 4-hydroxymidazolam. Incubations using purified CYP3A4 and MDZ showed that both alpha-naphthoflavone (alpha-NF) and testosterone affect the ratio of formation rates of 1'- and 4-hydroxymidazolam. Similar to previous reports, alpha-NF was found to promote formation of 1'-hydroxymidazolam, while testosterone stimulated formation of 4-hydroxymidazolam. NMR was used to measure the closest approach of individual MDZ protons to the paramagnetic heme iron of CYP3A4 using paramagnetic T(1) relaxation measurements. Solutions of 0.2 microM CYP3A4 with 500 microM MDZ resulted in calculated distances between 7.4 and 8.3 A for all monitored MDZ protons. The distances were statistically equivalent for all protons except C3-H and were consistent with the rotation within the active site or sliding parallel to the heme plane. When 50 microM alpha-NF was added, proton-heme iron distances ranged from 7.3 to 10.0 A. Consistent with kinetics of activation, the 1' position was situated closest to the heme, while the fluorophenyl 5-H proton was the furthest. Proton-heme iron distances for MDZ with CYP3A4 and 50 microM testosterone ranged from 7.7 to 9.0 A, with the flourophenyl 5-H proton furthest from the heme iron and the C4-H closest to the heme, also consistent with kinetic observations. When titrated with CYP3A4 in the presence of MDZ, testosterone and alpha-NF resonances themselves exhibited significant broadening and enhanced relaxation rates, indicating that these effector molecules were also bound within the CYP3A4 active

  8. Site-specific protonation kinetics of acidic side chains in proteins determined by pH-dependent carboxyl (13)C NMR relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, Johan; Weininger, Ulrich; Khan, M Ashhar I; Linse, Sara; Akke, Mikael

    2015-03-04

    Proton-transfer dynamics plays a critical role in many biochemical processes, such as proton pumping across membranes and enzyme catalysis. The large majority of enzymes utilize acid-base catalysis and proton-transfer mechanisms, where the rates of proton transfer can be rate limiting for the overall reaction. However, measurement of proton-exchange kinetics for individual side-chain carboxyl groups in proteins has been achieved in only a handful of cases, which typically have involved comparative analysis of mutant proteins in the context of reaction network modeling. Here we describe an approach to determine site-specific protonation and deprotonation rate constants (kon and koff, respectively) of carboxyl side chains, based on (13)C NMR relaxation measurements as a function of pH. We validated the method using an extensively studied model system, the B1 domain of protein G, for which we measured rate constants koff in the range (0.1-3) × 10(6) s(-1) and kon in the range (0.6-300) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), which correspond to acid-base equilibrium dissociation constants (Ka) in excellent agreement with previous results determined by chemical shift titrations. Our results further reveal a linear free-energy relationship between log kon and pKa, which provides information on the free-energy landscape of the protonation reaction, showing that the variability among residues in these parameters arises primarily from the extent of charge stabilization of the deprotonated state by the protein environment. We find that side-chain carboxyls with extreme values of koff or kon are involved in hydrogen bonding, thus providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed stabilization of the protonated or deprotonated state.

  9. Structural plasticity and Mg2+ binding properties of RNase P P4 from combined analysis of NMR residual dipolar couplings and motionally decoupled spin relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Melissa M; Andrews, Andy J; Fierke, Carol A; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2007-02-01

    The P4 helix is an essential element of ribonuclease P (RNase P) that is believed to bind catalytically important metals. Here, we applied a combination of NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and a recently introduced domain-elongation strategy for measuring "motionally decoupled" relaxation data to characterize the structural dynamics of the P4 helix from Bacillus subtilis RNase P. In the absence of divalent ions, the two P4 helical domains undergo small amplitude (approximately 13 degrees) collective motions about an average interhelical angle of 10 degrees. The highly conserved U7 bulge and helical residue C8, which are proposed to be important for substrate recognition and metal binding, are locally mobile at pico- to nanosecond timescales and together form the pivot point for the collective domain motions. Chemical shift mapping reveals significant association of Mg2+ ions at the P4 major groove near the flexible pivot point at residues (A5, G22, G23) previously identified to bind catalytically important metals. The Mg2+ ions do not, however, significantly alter the structure or dynamics of P4. Analysis of results in the context of available X-ray structures of the RNA component of RNase P and structural models that include the pre-tRNA substrate suggest that the internal motions observed in P4 likely facilitate adaptive changes in conformation that take place during folding and substrate recognition, possibly aided by interactions with Mg2+ ions. Our results add to a growing view supporting the existence of functionally important internal motions in RNA occurring at nanosecond timescales.

  10. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  11. Site-specific protein backbone and side-chain NMR chemical shift and relaxation analysis of human vinexin SH3 domain using a genetically encoded {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-labeled unnatural amino acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Pan [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Xi, Zhaoyong; Wang, Hu [School of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Shi, Chaowei [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical synthesis of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine. {yields} Site-specific incorporation of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine to SH3. {yields} Site-specific backbone and side chain chemical shift and relaxation analysis. {yields} Different internal motions at different sites of SH3 domain upon ligand binding. -- Abstract: SH3 is a ubiquitous domain mediating protein-protein interactions. Recent solution NMR structural studies have shown that a proline-rich peptide is capable of binding to the human vinexin SH3 domain. Here, an orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair for {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine ({sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-tfmF) has been applied to achieve site-specific labeling of SH3 at three different sites. One-dimensional solution NMR spectra of backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F were obtained for SH3 with three different site-specific labels. Site-specific backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F chemical shift and relaxation analysis of SH3 in the absence or presence of a peptide ligand demonstrated different internal motions upon ligand binding at the three different sites. This site-specific NMR analysis might be very useful for studying large-sized proteins or protein complexes.

  12. Integrated computational approach to the analysis of NMR relaxation in proteins: application to ps-ns main chain 15N-1H and global dynamics of the Rho GTPase binding domain of plexin-B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbetto, Mirco; Buck, Matthias; Meirovitch, Eva; Polimeno, Antonino

    2011-01-20

    An integrated computational methodology for interpreting NMR spin relaxation in proteins has been developed. It combines a two-body coupled-rotator stochastic model with a hydrodynamics-based approach for protein diffusion, together with molecular dynamics based calculations for the evaluation of the coupling potential of mean force. The method is applied to ¹⁵N relaxation of N-H bonds in the Rho GTPase binding (RBD) domain of plexin-B1, which exhibits intricate internal mobility. Bond vector dynamics are characterized by a rhombic local ordering tensor, S, with principal values S₀² and S₂², and an axial local diffusion tensor, D₂, with principal values D(2,||) and D(2,⊥). For α-helices and β-sheets we find that S₀² ~ -0.5 (strong local ordering), -1.2 computational approach for treating NMR relaxation in proteins by combining stochastic modeling and molecular dynamics. The approach developed provides new insights by its application to a protein that experiences complex dynamics.

  13. Study of relaxation times of nanocomposites of starch/montmorillonite employing low field NMR; Estudo dos tempos de relaxacao de nanocompositos de amido e argila montmorilonita por RMN de baixo campo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Luciana M.; Tavares, Maria Ines B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Due to its various applications and features, especially in therapies for controlled release of pharmaceuticals, polymers are among the most widely used excipients in pharmaceutical technology. One of the most promising nanocomposites is formed from organic polymer and inorganic clay minerals. Nanocomposites of starch/montmorillonite were prepared employing solution intercalation and characterized by proton spin-lattice relaxation time, through NMR relaxometry. The characterization of nanocomposites was done by X-ray diffraction and by nuclear magnetic resonance. The results showed that nanostructured films were obtained by intercalation from solution. Furthermore, the use of low field NMR, T1H, provided more precise information about the movement of materials, being complementary to the results obtained by X-ray diffraction. (author)

  14. NMR and dynamics of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, L.Y.; Barsukov, I.L. [Leicester Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Several basic experimental analytical NMR techniques that are frequently used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of dynamic and exchange processes, focusing on proteins systems, are described: chemical exchange (slow exchange, fast exchange, intermediate exchange), heteronuclear relaxation measurements (relaxation parameters, strategy of relaxation data analysis, experimental results and examples, motional model interpretation of relaxation data, homonuclear relaxation); slow large-scale exchange and hydrogen-deuterium exchange are also studied: mechanisms of hydrogen exchange in a native protein, methods for measuring amide exchange rates by NMR, interpretation of amide exchange rates. 9 fig., 3 tab., 56 ref.

  15. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation.

  16. CPMG relaxation dispersion NMR experiments measuring glycine {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts in the 'invisible' excited states of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Hansen, D. Flemming; Lundstroem, Patrik; Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2009-09-15

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion NMR experiments are extremely powerful for characterizing millisecond time-scale conformational exchange processes in biomolecules. A large number of such CPMG experiments have now emerged for measuring protein backbone chemical shifts of sparsely populated (>0.5%), excited state conformers that cannot be directly detected in NMR spectra and that are invisible to most other biophysical methods as well. A notable deficiency is, however, the absence of CPMG experiments for measurement of {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts of glycine residues in the excited state that reflects the fact that in this case the {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} spins form a three-spin system that is more complex than the AX {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}-{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} spin systems in the other amino acids. Here pulse sequences for recording {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} CPMG relaxation dispersion profiles derived from glycine residues are presented that provide information from which {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts can be obtained. The utility of these experiments is demonstrated by an application to a mutant of T4 lysozyme that undergoes a millisecond time-scale exchange process facilitating the binding of hydrophobic ligands to an internal cavity in the protein.

  17. Structure determination of uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeled protein using qualitative distance restraints from MAS solid-state {sup 13}C-NMR observed paramagnetic relaxation enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, Hajime [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Life Science (Japan); Egawa, Ayako [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Kido, Kouki [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Life Science (Japan); Kameda, Tomoshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Biotechnology Research Institute for Drug Discovery (Japan); Kamiya, Masakatsu; Kikukawa, Takashi; Aizawa, Tomoyasu [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshimichi [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Demura, Makoto, E-mail: demura@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful method for structure determination of insoluble biomolecules. However, structure determination by MAS solid-state NMR remains challenging because it is difficult to obtain a sufficient amount of distance restraints owing to spectral complexity. Collection of distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a promising approach to alleviate this barrier. However, the precision of distance restraints provided by PRE is limited in solid-state NMR because of incomplete averaged interactions and intermolecular PREs. In this report, the backbone structure of the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) has been successfully determined by combining the CS-Rosetta protocol and qualitative PRE restraints. The derived structure has a Cα RMSD of 1.49 Å relative to the X-ray structure. It is noteworthy that our protocol can determine the correct structure from only three cysteine-EDTA-Mn{sup 2+} mutants because this number of PRE sites is insufficient when using a conventional structure calculation method based on restrained molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. This study shows that qualitative PRE restraints can be employed effectively for protein structure determination from a limited conformational sampling space using a protein fragment library.

  18. 3-DIMENSIONAL N-15-H-1-H-1 AND N-15-C-13-H-1 NUCLEAR-MAGNETIC-RESONANCE STUDIES OF HPR, A CENTRAL COMPONENT OF THE PHOSPHOENOLPYRUVATE-DEPENDENT PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE SYSTEM FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI - ASSIGNMENT OF BACKBONE RESONANCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANNULAND, NAJ; VANDIJK, AA; DIJKSTRA, K; VANHOESEL, FHJ; SCHEEK, RM; ROBILLARD, GT

    1992-01-01

    We have performed three-dimensional NMR studies on a central component of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli, denoted as HPr. The protein was uniformly enriched with N-15 and C-13 to overcome spectral overlap. Complete assignments were obtained for the ba

  19. NMR T1 relaxation time measurements and calculations with translational and rotational components for liquid electrolytes containing LiBF4 and propylene carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, P. M.; Voice, A. M.; Ward, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    Longitudinal relaxation (T1) measurements of 19F, 7Li, and 1H in propylene carbonate/LiBF4 liquid electrolytes are reported. Comparison of T1 values with those for the transverse relaxation time (T2) confirm that the measurements are in the high temperature (low correlation time) limit of the T1 minimum. Using data from pulsed field gradient measurements of self-diffusion coefficients and measurements of solution viscosity measured elsewhere, it is concluded that although in general there are contributions to T1 from both translational and rotational motions. For the lithium ions, this is mainly translational, and for the fluorine ions mainly rotational.

  20. A carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation study of the molecular conformation of the nootropic drug 2-oxopyrrolidin-1-ylacetamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, M.; Grassi, A.; Guidoni, L.; Nicolini, M.; Pappalardo, G. C.; Viti, V.

    The spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) of carbon-13 resonances of the drug 2-oxopyrrolidin- 1-ylacetamide ( 2OPYAC) were determined in CDCl 3 + DMSO and H 2O solutions to investigate the internal conformational flexibility. The measured T1s for the hydrogen-bearing carbon atoms of the 2-pyrrolidone ring fragment were diagnostic of a rigid conformation with respect to the acetamide linked moiety. The model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body was used to analyse the measured relaxation data in terms of a single conformation. Owing to the small number of T1 data available the fitting procedure for each of the possible conformations failed. The structure corresponding to the rigid conformation was therefore considered to be the one that is strongly stabilized by internal hydrogen bonding as predicted on the basis of theoretical MO ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

  1. Characterization of Maytenus ilicifolia samples by {sup 1}H NMR relaxation in the solid state; Caracterizacao dos constituintes polimericos da Maytenus ilicifolia por relaxacao nuclear de {sup 1}H por RMN no estado solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preto, Monica S. de M.; Tavares, Maria I.B., E-mail: mibt@ima.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano. Lab de Ressonancia Magnetica Nuclear; Sebastiao, Pedro J.O. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-07-01

    The Maytenus ilicifolia (espinheira-santa) is a popular medicinal plant with different uses. It is native of South America and can be found in Brazil. In the Brazilian market it is possible found products labeled as M. ilicifolia. So far, the studies published in the literature involve the modification of the natural materials and do not concern the comparison between commercial the raw natural materials. Different non-destructive NMR techniques can be used to study natural materials. In this work it is presented a characterization study by Fast Field Cycling of the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) NMR, in the frequency range 100 khz-10 MHz. The results obtained in two commercial M. ilicifolia samples and one control sample collected in natura are compared. It was intended to study the possibility to elaborate a characterization method using FFCNMR suitable for the verification of authenticity and/or evaluation of tampering on products. The differences detected by FFCNMR relaxometry were confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy. (author)

  2. Quantifying two-bond 1HN-13CO and one-bond 1H(alpha)-13C(alpha) dipolar couplings of invisible protein states by spin-state selective relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D Flemming; Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Kay, Lewis E

    2008-07-02

    Relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy has become a valuable probe of millisecond dynamic processes in biomolecules that exchange between a ground (observable) state and one or more excited (invisible) conformers, in part because chemical shifts of the excited state(s) can be obtained that provide insight into the conformations that are sampled. Here we present a pair of experiments that provide additional structural information in the form of residual dipolar couplings of the excited state. The new experiments record (1)H spin-state selective (13)CO and (13)C(alpha) dispersion profiles under conditions of partial alignment in a magnetic field from which two-bond (1)HN-(13)CO and one-bond (1)H(alpha)-(13)C(alpha) residual dipolar couplings of the invisible conformer can be extracted. These new dipolar couplings complement orientational restraints that are provided through measurement of (1)HN-(15)N residual dipolar couplings and changes in (13)CO chemical shifts upon alignment that have been measured previously for the excited-state since the interactions probed here are not collinear with those previously investigated. An application to a protein-ligand binding reaction is presented, and the accuracies of the extracted excited-state dipolar couplings are established. A combination of residual dipolar couplings and chemical shifts as measured by relaxation dispersion will facilitate a quantitative description of excited protein states.

  3. Mapping of the spectral density function of a C alpha-H alpha bond vector from NMR relaxation rates of a 13C-labelled alpha-carbon in motilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, P; Jarvet, J; Ehrenberg, A; Gräslund, A

    1995-02-01

    The peptide hormone motilin was synthesised with a 13C-enriched alpha-carbon in the leucine at position 10. In aqueous solution, six different relaxation rates were measured for the 13C alpha-H alpha fragment as a function of temperature and with and without the addition of 30% (v/v) of the cosolvent d2-1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFP). The relaxation rates were analysed employing the spectral density mapping technique introduced by Peng and Wagner [(1992) J. Magn. Reson., 98, 308-332] and using the model-free approach by Lipari and Szabo [(1982) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 104, 4546-4570]. The fit to various models of dynamics was also considered. Different procedures to evaluate the overall rotational correlation time were compared. A single exponential time correlation function was found to give a good fit to the measured spectral densities only for motilin in 30% (v/v) HFP at low temperatures, whereas at high temperatures in this solvent, and in D2O at all temperatures, none of the considered models gave an acceptable fit. A new empirical spectral density function was tested and found to accurately fit the experimental spectral density mapping points. The application of spectral density mapping based on NMR relaxation data for a specific 13C-1H vector is shown to be a highly useful method to study biomolecular dynamics. Advantages are high sensitivity, high precision and uniform sampling of the spectral density function over the frequency range.

  4. Novel DNA packaging recognition in the unusual bacteriophage N15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiss, Michael [Department of Microbiology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Geyer, Henriette, E-mail: henriettegeyer@gmail.com [Division of Viral Infections, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin (Germany); Division of Viral Infections, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin (Germany); Klingberg, Franco, E-mail: franco.klingberg@thermofisher.com [Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Moreno, Norma, E-mail: nmoreno@islander.tamucc.edu [Texas A& M University – Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi, TX 78412, United States. (United States); Texas A& M University – Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi, TX 78412, United States. (United States); Forystek, Amanda, E-mail: eamanda-forystek@uiowa.edu [Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Room # 2911 JPP, Dept. of Psychiatry, The University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa, 52242 (United States); Maluf, Nasib Karl, E-mail: fKarl.Maluf@ap-lab.com [Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Alliance Protein Laboratories, Inc. 6042 Cornerstone Court West, Suite ASan Diego, CA 92121, USA. (United States); Sippy, Jean [Department of Microbiology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Phage lambda's cosB packaging recognition site is tripartite, consisting of 3 TerS binding sites, called R sequences. TerS binding to the critical R3 site positions the TerL endonuclease for nicking cosN to generate cohesive ends. The N15 cos (cos{sup N15}) is closely related to cos{sup λ}, but whereas the cosB{sup N15} subsite has R3, it lacks the R2 and R1 sites and the IHF binding site of cosB{sup λ}. A bioinformatic study of N15-like phages indicates that cosB{sup N15} also has an accessory, remote rR2 site, which is proposed to increase packaging efficiency, like R2 and R1 of lambda. N15 plus five prophages all have the rR2 sequence, which is located in the TerS-encoding 1 gene, approximately 200 bp distal to R3. An additional set of four highly related prophages, exemplified by Monarch, has R3 sequence, but also has R2 and R1 sequences characteristic of cosB–λ. The DNA binding domain of TerS-N15 is a dimer. - Highlights: • There are two classes of DNA packaging signals in N15-related phages. • Phage N15's TerS binding site: a critical site and a possible remote accessory site. • Viral DNA recognition signals by the λ-like bacteriophages: the odd case of N15.

  5. NMR spin-lattice relaxation study of 7Li and 93Nb nuclei in Ti- or Fe-doped LiNbO3:Mg single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Ho Yeom

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, to understand the effects of paramagnetic impurities, we investigated the temperature dependent of the spin-lattice relaxation times of pure LiNbO3, LiNbO3:Mg, LiNbO3:Mg/Ti, LiNbO3:Mg/Fe, and LiNbO3:Mg/Fe (thermally treated at 500°C single crystals. The results for the LiNbO3:Mg single crystals doped with Fe3+ or Ti3+ are discussed with respect to the site distribution and atomic mobility of Li and Nb. In addition, the effects of a thermal treatment on LiNbO3:Mg/Fe single crystals were examined based on the T1 analysis of 7Li and 93Nb. It was found that the presence of impurities in the crystals induced systematic changes of activation energies concerning atomic mobility.

  6. Novel DNA packaging recognition in the unusual bacteriophage N15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiss, Michael; Geyer, Henriette; Klingberg, Franco; Moreno, Norma; Forystek, Amanda; Maluf, Nasib Karl; Sippy, Jean

    2015-08-01

    Phage lambda's cosB packaging recognition site is tripartite, consisting of 3 TerS binding sites, called R sequences. TerS binding to the critical R3 site positions the TerL endonuclease for nicking cosN to generate cohesive ends. The N15 cos (cos(N15)) is closely related to cos(λ), but whereas the cosB(N15) subsite has R3, it lacks the R2 and R1 sites and the IHF binding site of cosB(λ). A bioinformatic study of N15-like phages indicates that cosB(N15) also has an accessory, remote rR2 site, which is proposed to increase packaging efficiency, like R2 and R1 of lambda. N15 plus five prophages all have the rR2 sequence, which is located in the TerS-encoding 1 gene, approximately 200 bp distal to R3. An additional set of four highly related prophages, exemplified by Monarch, has R3 sequence, but also has R2 and R1 sequences characteristic of cosB-λ. The DNA binding domain of TerS-N15 is a dimer.

  7. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations

  8. Schostakowitsch: Sinfonie N15, Op. 141 / Hanspeter Krellmann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Krellmann, Hanspeter

    1990-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Schostakowitsch: Sinfonie N15, Op. 141, Oktober, Op. 131, Ouvertüre über russische und kirgisische Volksthemen, Op. 115. Göteborger Sinfonie-Orchester, Neeme Järvi". DG CD 427 616-2

  9. The therapeutically anti-prion active antibody-fragment scFv-W226: paramagnetic relaxation-enhanced NMR spectroscopy aided structure elucidation of the paratope-epitope interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, Christian; Kellner, Ruth; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Weiglmeier, Philipp R; Rosch, Paul; Gmeiner, Peter; Schwarzinger, Stephan

    2010-08-01

    Antibodies have become indispensable reagents with numerous applications in biological and biotechnical analysis, in diagnostics as well as in therapy. In all cases, selective interaction with an epitope is crucial and depends on the conformation of the paratope. While epitopes are routinely mapped at high throughput, methods revealing structural insights on a rather short timescale are rare. We here demonstrate paramagnetic relaxation-enhanced (PRE) NMR spectroscopy to be a powerful tool unraveling structural information about epitope-orientation in a groove spanned by the complementary determining regions. In particular, we utilize the spin label TOAC, which is fused to the peptidic epitope using standard solid-phase chemistry and which is characterized by a reduced mobility compared to, e.g., spin labels attached to the side-chain functionalities of cysteine or lysine residues. We apply the method to determine the orientation of helix 1 of the prion protein, which is the epitope for the therapeutically anti-prion active scF(v) fragment W226.

  10. Studies of DNA-binding properties of lafutidine as adjuvant anticancer agent to calf thymus DNA using multi-spectroscopic approaches, NMR relaxation data, molecular docking and dynamical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongqin; Tang, Peixiao; Tang, Bin; Huang, Yanmei; He, Jiawei; Li, Shanshan; Li, Hui

    2017-06-01

    The interactions between lafutidine (LAF) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. UV-vis absorption studies confirmed that LAF binds to ctDNA through non-covalent interactions. Fluorescence quenching and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy studies showed that the binding of LAF with ctDNA occurred through static quenching mechanism, resulting in the formation of a LAF-ctDNA complex. The binding constants (K) of the complex were found to be around 10(3)M(-1) via NMR relaxation rates and fluorescence data, and the calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played major roles in the binding of LAF to ctDNA. The changes in CD spectra indicated that LAF induced a slight perturbation on the base stacking and helicity of B-DNA. A comparative study of the LAF-ctDNA complex with respect to potassium iodide quenching experiments and competition displacement assays with ethidium bromide, acridine orange, and Hoechst 33258 probes suggested that LAF interacted with ctDNA by minor groove mode. Molecular docking analysis further supported the minor groove binding. Molecular dynamics simulation indicated that LAF depart from the C-G region of DNA, but it can steadily bind with the middle part of DNA composed by A-T base pairs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Edwin D

    1969-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications focuses on the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as chemical shifts, lattices, and couplings. The book first offers information on the theory of NMR, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, spin lattice relaxation, line widths, saturation, quantum mechanical description of NMR, and ringing. The text then ponders on instrumentation and techniques and chemical shifts. Discussions focus on the origin of chemical shifts, reference compounds, empirical correlations of chemical shifts, modulation and phase detection,

  12. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 samples (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010). Third, relaxometric information forms the basis of understanding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. The general difficulty of imaging in soils are the inherent fast T2 relaxation times due to i) the small pore sizes, ii) presence of paramagnetic ions in the solid matrix, and iii) diffusion in internal gradients. The last point is important, since echo times can not set shorter than about 1ms for imaging purposes. The way out is either the usage of low fields for imaging in soils or special ultra-short pulse sequences, which do not create echoes. In this presentation we will give examples on conventional imaging of macropore fluxes in soil cores (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010), and the combination with relaxometric imaging, as well as the advantages and drawbacks of low-field and ultra-fast pulse imaging. Also first results on the imaging of soil columns measured by SIP in Project A3 are given. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Waterflow Monitored by Tracer Transport in Natural Porous Media Using MRI." Vadose Zone J.: submitted. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Relaxation in a

  13. Studies on irradiation stability of polystyrene by NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xin; SUN Wan-Fu; XIE Cheng-Xi

    2004-01-01

    The irradiation stability of polystyrene (PS) was studied by 13C and 1H NMR spectra, Nuclear Overhauser Relaxation (NOE) and 13C NMR spin-lattice relaxation time (T1). The results indicate that 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts, NOE and T1 were almost invariant with the increase of irradiation dose. This shows that polystyrene is particularly stable within 2.5 kGy doses and the mechanism of its stability is discussed.

  14. Nuclear spin relaxation in liquids theory, experiments, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalewski, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used across many fields because of the rich data it produces, and some of the most valuable data come from the study of nuclear spin relaxation in solution. While described to varying degrees in all major NMR books, spin relaxation is often perceived as a difficult, if not obscure, topic, and an accessible, cohesive treatment has been nearly impossible to find.Collecting relaxation theory, experimental techniques, and illustrative applications into a single volume, this book clarifies the nature of the phenomenon, shows how to study it, and explains why such studies are worthwhile. Coverage ranges from basic to rigorous theory and from simple to sophisticated experimental methods, and the level of detail is somewhat greater than most other NMR texts. Topics include cross-relaxation, multispin phenomena, relaxation studies of molecular dynamics and structure, and special topics such as relaxation in systems with quadrupolar nuclei and paramagnetic systems.Avoiding ove...

  15. Spin-Exchange Pumped NMR Gyros

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Thad G

    2016-01-01

    We present the basic theory governing spin-exchange pumped NMR gyros. We review the basic physics of spin-exchange collisions and relaxation as they pertain to precision NMR. We present a simple model of operation as an NMR oscillator and use it to analyze the dynamic response and noise properties of the oscillator. We discuss the primary systematic errors (differential alkali fields, quadrupole shifts, and offset drifts) that limit the bias stability, and discuss methods to minimize them. We give with a brief overview of a practical implementation and performance of an NMR gyro built by Northrop-Grumman Corporation, and conclude with some comments about future prospects.

  16. Bioagent detection using miniaturized NMR and nanoparticle amplification : final LDRD report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clewett, C. F. M.; Adams, David Price; Fan, Hongyou; Williams, John D.; Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alam, Todd Michael; Aldophi, Natalie L. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM); McDowell, Andrew F. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-11-01

    This LDRD program was directed towards the development of a portable micro-nuclear magnetic resonance ({micro}-NMR) spectrometer for the detection of bioagents via induced amplification of solvent relaxation based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The first component of this research was the fabrication and testing of two different micro-coil ({micro}-coil) platforms: namely a planar spiral NMR {micro}-coil and a cylindrical solenoid NMR {micro}-coil. These fabrication techniques are described along with the testing of the NMR performance for the individual coils. The NMR relaxivity for a series of water soluble FeMn oxide nanoparticles was also determined to explore the influence of the nanoparticle size on the observed NMR relaxation properties. In addition, The use of commercially produced superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for amplification via NMR based relaxation mechanisms was also demonstrated, with the lower detection limit in number of SPIONs per nanoliter (nL) being determined.

  17. Correlated fluorine diffusion and ionic conduction in the nanocrystalline F(-) solid electrolyte Ba(0.6)La(0.4)F(2.4)-(19)F T1(ρ) NMR relaxation vs. conductivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preishuber-Pflügl, F; Bottke, P; Pregartner, V; Bitschnau, B; Wilkening, M

    2014-05-28

    Chemical reactions induced by mechanical treatment may give access to new compounds whose properties are governed by chemical metastability, defects introduced and the size effects present. Their interplay may lead to nanocrystalline ceramics with enhanced transport properties being useful to act as solid electrolytes. Here, the introduction of large amounts of La into the cubic structure of BaF2 served as such an example. The ion transport properties in terms of dc-conductivity values of the F(-) anion conductor Ba1-xLaxF2+x (here with x = 0.4) considerably exceed those of pure, nanocrystalline BaF2. So far, there is only little knowledge about activation energies and jump rates of the elementary hopping processes. Here, we took advantage of both impedance spectroscopy and (19)F NMR relaxometry to get to the bottom of ion jump diffusion proceeding on short-range and long-range length scales in Ba0.6La0.4F2.4. While macroscopic transport is governed by an activation energy of 0.55 to 0.59 eV, the elementary steps of hopping seen by NMR are characterised by much smaller activation energies. Fortunately, we were able to deduce an F(-) self-diffusion coefficient by the application of spin-locking NMR relaxometry.

  18. {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement as a sensitive probe of dynamical properties of solids—[C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 3}Bi{sub 2}I{sub 9} as an example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florek-Wojciechowska, M. [Department of Physics and Biophysics, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Oczapowskiego 4, 10719 Olsztyn (Poland); Wojciechowski, M.; Brym, Sz.; Kruk, D., E-mail: danuta.kruk@matman.uwm.edu.pl [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Słoneczna 54, 10710 Olsztyn (Poland); Jakubas, R. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, Joliot Curie 14, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-02-07

    {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been applied to reveal information on dynamics and structure of Gu{sub 3}Bi{sub 2}I{sub 9} ([Gu = C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}] denotes guanidinium cation). The data have been analyzed in terms of a theory of quadrupole relaxation enhancement, which has been extended here by including effects associated with quadrupole ({sup 14}N) spin relaxation caused by a fast fluctuating component of the electric field gradient tensor. Two motional processes have been identified: a slow one occurring on a timescale of about 8 × 10{sup −6} s which has turned out to be (almost) temperature independent, and a fast process in the range of 10{sup −9} s. From the {sup 1}H-{sup 14}N relaxation contribution (that shows “quadrupole peaks”) the quadrupole parameters, which are a fingerprint of the arrangement of the anionic network, have been determined. It has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the quadrupole coupling considerably changes with temperature and the changes are not caused by phase transitions. At the same time, it has been shown that there is no evidence of abrupt changes in the cationic dynamics and the anionic substructure upon the phase transitions.

  19. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  20. Natural relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  1. Applied NMR spectroscopy for chemists and life scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Zerbe, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    From complex structure elucidation to biomolecular interactions - this applicationoriented textbook covers both theory and practice of modern NMR applications. Part one sets the stage with a general description of NMR introducing important parameters such as the chemical shift and scalar or dipolar couplings. Part two describes the theory behind NMR, providing a profound understanding of the involved spin physics, deliberately kept shorter than in other NMR textbooks, and without a rigorous mathematical treatment of all the physico-chemical computations. Part three discusses technical and practical aspects of how to use NMR. Important phenomena such as relaxation, exchange, or the nuclear Overhauser effects and the methods of modern NMR spectroscopy including multidimensional experiments, solid state NMR, and the measurement of molecular interactions are the subject of part four. The final part explains the use of NMR for the structure determination of selected classes of complex biomolecules, from steroids t...

  2. NMR GHZ

    CERN Document Server

    Laflamme, R; Zurek, W H; Catasti, P; Mariappan, S V S

    1998-01-01

    We describe the creation of a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state of the form |000>+|111> (three maximally entangled quantum bits) using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We have successfully carried out the experiment using the proton and carbon spins of trichloroethylene, and confirmed the result using state tomography. We have thus extended the space of entangled quantum states explored systematically to three quantum bits, an essential step for quantum computation.

  3. Multi-exponential inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王为民; 叶朝辉; 李培

    2001-01-01

    Beginning from the first kind of integral equation, two kinds of methods, i. e. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and transform that are fit for the inversion calculation of NMR multi-relaxation data from rock, have been derived. The mathematical processing was discussed in detail. The advantage and disadvantage of the two methods have been compared in theory and application. From the view of the degree of freedom of the inversion solution, we discussed the resolution of the solution of NMR relaxation inversion and the selection of optimal inversion modeling. Results showed that SVD method is fit for the inversion of NMR relaxation data with a higher signal to noise ratio and transform inversion method is more flexible and can be used in NMR data with a lower signal to noise ratio. It is advisable that transform inversion method be selected for the multi-relaxation inversion of rock NMR data. SVD method can be used when the signal to noise ratio is better than 80. In order to ensure the accuracy, the number of T2 points should be varied from 30 to 50. The results of the research are useful for NMR core analysis and the interpretation of NMR logging data.

  4. Ionic-liquid-like local structure in $LiNO_3-Ca(NO_3)_2-H_2O$ as studied by ion and solvent nuclei NMR relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Matveev, Vladimir V; Lähderanta, Erkki

    2010-01-01

    Relaxation rates in the $13mLiNO_3-6,5mCa(NO_3)_2-H_2O$ ternary system have been measured for nuclei of water ($^1H$ and $^{17}O$), anion ($^{14}N$), and both cations ($^7Li$, $^{43}Ca$). The data analysis reveals the system structure as consisting of two main charged units: [Li(H$_2$O)$_4$]$^+$ and [Ca(NO$_3$)$_4$]$^{2-}$. Thus the system presents inorganic ionic liquid like structure.

  5. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  6. Relaxation response in femoral angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandle, C L; Domar, A D; Harrington, D P; Leserman, J; Bozadjian, E M; Friedman, R; Benson, H

    1990-03-01

    Immediately before they underwent femoral angiography, 45 patients were given one of three types of audiotapes: a relaxation response tape recorded for this study, a tape of contemporary instrumental music, or a blank tape. All patients were instructed to listen to their audiotape during the entire angiographic procedure. Each audiotape was played through earphones. Radiologists were not told the group assignment or tape contents. The patients given the audiotape with instructions to elicit the relaxation response (n = 15) experienced significantly less anxiety (P less than .05) and pain (P less than .001) during the procedure, were observed by radiology nurses to exhibit significantly less pain (P less than .001) and anxiety (P less than .001), and requested significantly less fentanyl citrate (P less than .01) and diazepam (P less than .01) than patients given either the music (n = 14) or the blank (n = 16) control audiotapes. Elicitation of the relaxation response is a simple, inexpensive, efficacious, and practical method to reduce pain, anxiety, and medication during femoral angiography and may be useful in other invasive procedures.

  7. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented.

  8. NMR Study of Water Distribution inside Tomato Cells: Effects of Water Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Musse, M.; Cambert, M.; Mariette, F.

    2010-01-01

    Tomato pericarp tissue was studied by low-field nuclear magnetic res-onance (NMR) relaxometry. Two kinds of experiments were performed to inves-tigate the correlation between multi-exponential NMR relaxation and the subcellular compartments. The longitudinal (T 1 ) versus transverse (T 2 ) relaxation times were first measured on fresh samples and then the transverse relaxation time was measured on samples exposed to water stress. Four signal components were found in all experiments. The resul...

  9. Partition of the Linear Plasmid N15: Interactions of N15 Partition Functions with the sop Locus of the F Plasmid

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    A locus close to one end of the linear N15 prophage closely resembles the sop operon which governs partition of the F plasmid; the promoter region contains similar operator sites, and the two putative gene products have extensive amino acid identity with the SopA and -B proteins of F. Our aim was to ascertain whether the N15 sop homologue functions in partition, to identify the centromere site, and to examine possible interchangeability of function with the F Sop system. When expressed at a m...

  10. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites – An NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich, E-mail: scheler@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., Hohe Str. 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-03-09

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. {sup 1}H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T{sub 2} is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T{sub 2} measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  11. Micellar kinetics of a fluorosurfactant through stopped-flow NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István; Stilbs, Peter

    2006-02-28

    19F NMR chemical shifts and transverse relaxation times T2 were measured as a function of time after quick stopped-flow dilution of aqueous solutions of sodium perfluorooctanoate (NaPFO) with water. Different initial concentrations of micellar solution and different proportions of mixing were tested. Previous stopped-flow studies by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (TR-SAXS) detection indicated a slow (approximately 10 s) micellar relaxation kinetics in NaPFO solutions. In contrast, no evidence of any comparable slow (>100 ms) relaxation process was found in our NMR studies. Possible artifacts of stopped-flow experiments are discussed as well as differences between NMR and SAXS detection methods. Upper bounds on the relative weight of a slow relaxation process are given within existing kinetic theories of micellar dissolution.

  12. Solid-state NMR basic principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Apperley, David C; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has proved to be a uniquely powerful and versatile tool for analyzing and characterizing chemicals and materials of all kinds. This book focuses on the latest developments and applications for "solid-state" NMR, which has found new uses from archaeology to crystallography to biomaterials and pharmaceutical science research. The book will provide materials engineers, analytical chemists, and physicists, in and out of lab, a survey of the techniques and the essential tools of solid-state NMR, together with a practical guide on applications. In this concise introduction to the growing field of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy The reader will find: * Basic NMR concepts for solids, including guidance on the spin-1/2 nuclei concept * Coverage of the quantum mechanics aspects of solid state NMR and an introduction to the concept of quadrupolar nuclei * An understanding relaxation, exchange and quantitation in NMR * An analysis and interpretation of NMR data, with e...

  13. Solid-state NMR basic principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Apperley, David C; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has proved to be a uniquely powerful and versatile tool for analyzing and characterizing chemicals and materials of all kinds. This book focuses on the latest developments and applications for "solid-state" NMR, which has found new uses from archaeology to crystallography to biomaterials and pharmaceutical science research. The book will provide materials engineers, analytical chemists, and physicists, in and out of lab, a survey of the techniques and the essential tools of solid-state NMR, together with a practical guide on applications. In this concise introduction to the growing field of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy The reader will find: * Basic NMR concepts for solids, including guidance on the spin-1/2 nuclei concept * Coverage of the quantum mechanics aspects of solid state NMR and an introduction to the concept of quadrupolar nuclei * An understanding relaxation, exchange and quantitation in NMR * An analysis and interpretation of NMR data, with e...

  14. Enzyme dynamics from NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Arthur G

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond-nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond-millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a

  15. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  16. Metabolism of nonessential N-15-labeled amino acids and the measurement of human whole-body protein synthesis rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Melnick, G.; Dempsey, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15-labeled nonessential amino acids plus (N-15)H4Cl were administered over a 10-h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted.

  17. Metabolism of nonessential N-15-labeled amino acids and the measurement of human whole-body protein synthesis rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Melnick, G.; Dempsey, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15-labeled nonessential amino acids plus (N-15)H4Cl were administered over a 10-h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted.

  18. Introduction to NMR Quantum Information Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Laflamme, R; Cory, D G; Fortunato, E M; Havel, T F; Miquel, C; Martínez, R; Negrevergne, C; Ortiz, G; Pravia, M A; Sharf, Y; Sinha, S; Somma, R D; Viola, L

    2002-01-01

    After a general introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we give the basics of implementing quantum algorithms. We describe how qubits are realized and controlled with RF pulses, their internal interactions, and gradient fields. A peculiarity of NMR is that the internal interactions (given by the internal Hamiltonian) are always on. We discuss how they can be effectively turned off with the help of a standard NMR method called ``refocusing''. Liquid state NMR experiments are done at room temperature, leading to an extremely mixed (that is, nearly random) initial state. Despite this high degree of randomness, it is possible to investigate QIP because the relaxation time (the time scale over which useful signal from a computation is lost) is sufficiently long. We explain how this feature leads to the crucial ability of simulating a pure (non-random) state by using ``pseudopure'' states. We discuss how the ``answer'' provided by a computation is obtained by measurement and how this measurement differs f...

  19. 葵花籽油贮藏过程理化性质与LF-NMR弛豫特性的相关性%Relationship between Analytical Indicators of Sunflower Oil and the LF-NMR Relaxation Characteristics During Storage Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢海燕; 王欣; 赵婷婷; 刘宝林

    2014-01-01

    该文主要对葵花籽油分别在25、65℃避光贮藏过程的理化性质及其低场核磁共振(LF-NMR)弛豫特性的变化规律进行了研究,建立并验证了理化指标与LF-NMR检测结果的相关性模型.结果表明:65℃贮藏时,油样的过氧化值(PV)、共轭二烯值(K232)、共轭三烯值(K270)、p-茴香胺值(p-AV)、总极性化合物(TPC)含量及峰面积比例(S21、S22)随时间延长呈指数关系增加(r2 >0.93),而S23峰及单组分弛豫时间(T2W)则随时间延长呈指数减小趋势(r2 >0.98),通过多元回归分析可建立理化指标与弛豫特性间的相关性模型(r2> 0.94).25℃贮藏过程中理化性质及其LF-NMR弛豫特性的变化程度均相对较小,但PV、K232及TPC含量仍与贮藏时间呈良好的线性增大关系(r2 >0.95),其余理化指标及LF-NMR弛豫特性则无明显的规律性变化,相关性模型亦较差.

  20. Clathrate formation and dissociation in vapor/water/ice/hydrate systems in SBA-15, sol-gel and CPG porous media, as probed by NMR relaxation, novel protocol NMR cryoporometry, neutron scattering and ab initio quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, J Beau W; Anderson, Ross; Strange, John H; Tohidi, Bahman

    2007-05-01

    The Gibbs-Thomson effect modifies the pressure and temperature at which clathrates occur, hence altering the depth at which they occur in the seabed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements as a function of temperature are being conducted for water/ice/hydrate systems in a range of pore geometries, including templated SBA-15 silicas, controlled pore glasses and sol-gel silicas. Rotator-phase plastic ice is shown to be present in confined geometry, and bulk tetrahydrofuran hydrate is also shown to probably have a rotator phase. A novel NMR cryoporometry protocol, which probes both melting and freezing events while avoiding the usual problem of supercooling for the freezing event, has been developed. This enables a detailed probing of the system for a given pore size and geometry and the exploration of differences between hydrate formation and dissociation processes inside pores. These process differences have an important effect on the environment, as they impact on the ability of a marine hydrate system to re-form once warmed above a critical temperature. Ab initio quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics calculations are also being employed to probe the dynamics of liquids in pores at nanometric dimensions.

  1. NMR Characterizations of Properties of Heterogeneous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uh, Jinsoo; Phan, Jack; Xue, Dong; Watson, A. Ted

    2003-01-28

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reliable methods for resolving macroscopic properties important for describing the flow of one or more fluid phases in reservoirs from formation measurements. During this reporting period, the determination of surface relaxivity from NMR data was investigated. A new method for determining the surface relaxivity from measured data was developed and tested with data obtained from an Exxon sample. The new method avoids the use of a certain mathematical short-time approximation in the data analysis, which has been shown to be unsuitable.

  2. Petrophysical properties of greensand as predicted from NMR measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Zakir; Grattoni, Carlos A.; Solymar, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a useful tool in reservoir evaluation. The objective of this study is to predict petrophysical properties from NMR T2 distributions. A series of laboratory experiments including core analysis, capillary pressure measurements, NMR T2 measurements...... and image analysis were carried out on sixteen greensand samples from two formations in the Nini field of the North Sea. Hermod Formation is weakly cemented, whereas Ty Formation is characterized by microcrystalline quartz cement. The surface area measured by the BET method and the NMR derived surface...... with macro-pores. Permeability may be predicted from NMR by using Kozeny's equation when surface relaxivity is known. Capillary pressure drainage curves may be predicted from NMR T2 distribution when pore size distribution within a sample is homogeneous....

  3. Relaxation Techniques for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Relaxation Techniques for Health Share: On This Page What’s the ... Bottom Line? How much do we know about relaxation techniques? A substantial amount of research has been done ...

  4. Application of Multi-Exponential Inversion Method to NMR Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaoLizhi; WangZhongdong; LiuTangyan

    2004-01-01

    A new multi-exponential inversion method for NMR relaxation signals is presented and tested, which is based on a solid iteration rebuild technique (SIRT). The T2 spectra inversed by the new method are compared with MAP-Ⅱ results. The T1 and T2 inversion results with different pre-assigned relaxation times and different SNR show that 16 to 64 logarithm equal spaced time constants is better obviously than MAP-Ⅱ. And in particular, it can ensure the relaxation time distribution when the SNR of the measured signal is very low. The new algorithm has been applied in rock core NMR analysis and NMR logging data process and interpretation.

  5. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  6. Macroalgae delta N-15 values in well-mixed estuaries: Indicator of anthropogenic nitrogen input or macroalgae metabolism?

    OpenAIRE

    Raimonet, Melanie; Guillou, Gael; Mornet, Francoise; Richard, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Although nitrogen stable isotope ratio (delta N-15) in macroalgae is widely used as a bioindicator of anthropogenic nitrogen inputs to the coastal zone, recent studies suggest the possible role of macroalgae metabolism in delta N-15 variability. Simultaneous determinations of delta N-15 of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) along the land sea continuum, inter-species variability of delta N-15 and its sensitivity to environmental factors are necessary to confirm the efficiency of macroalgae de...

  7. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  8. Solid-state NMR of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirau, P

    2001-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as one of the most important methods for the solid-state characterisation of polymers. The popularity of NMR is due to the fact that many molecular level features can be measured from the NMR spectra, including the polymer chain conformation, the morphology and the dynamics. The spectral features and relaxation times are affected by local interactions, so they provide information about the structure of polymers on a length scale (2-200 A) that is difficult to measure by other methods. In favourable cases, the NMR experiments provide a molecular-level explanation for the transitions observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and other methods, and the NMR properties can often be related to the bulk properties. Solid-state NMR has long been of interest in polymer science, and the first solid-state NMR studies of polymers were reported approximately a year after the discovery of nuclear resonance in bulk matter. It was reported in this initial study that the proton line width for natural rubber at room temperature is more like that of a mobile liquid than of a solid, but that the resonance broadens near the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). This was recognised as being related to a change in chain dynamics above and below the T{sub g}. NMR methods developed rapidly after these initial observations, first for polymers in solution and, more recently, for polymers in the solid-state. Solid-state NMR studies of polymers were developed more slowly than their solution-state counterparts because solid-state NMR requires more specialised equipment. Solid-state NMR is now such an important tool that most modern spectrometers are capable of performing these studies. The interest in the NMR of solid polymers is due in part to the fact that most polymers are used in the solid state, and in many cases the NMR properties can be directly related to the macroscopic properties. Polymers have restricted mobility

  9. 葵花籽油热氧化过程的1H-NMR指纹图谱与LF-NMR弛豫特性研究%1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Fingerprints and Low-Field-NMR Relaxation Properties of Sunflower Oil during Thermal Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢海燕; 王欣; 赵婷婷; 刘宝林

    2014-01-01

    论文应用1H-NMR研究了葵花籽油65℃贮藏过程中氧化产物(共轭烯、醛类、氧化物、芳香烃、游离酸相对含量)的变化规律,并与低场核磁共振(LF-NMR)弛豫特性中的S21的变化进行了相关性分析.1H-NMR结果表明,在65℃贮藏过程中,油样的初级氧化产物随贮藏时间的延长呈先增加后减小的趋势,与氢过氧化物相比,氢过氧化物-共轭二烯优先降解;次级氧化产物及水解产物如醛、环氧化物、游离脂肪酸等随贮藏时间呈良好指数关系(R2>0.96),芳香烃则随贮藏时间呈先增加后减小的趋势.而LF-NMR检测所得到的油样的S21随贮藏时间延长呈良好的指数增加趋势(R2=0.99).相关性分析表明,氧化物、游离脂肪酸与S21的相关性最高,模型验证合理可靠.该结果可为研究S21特征峰的表征物质、提高LF-NMR油脂品质判别率提供研究参考及有益思路.

  10. Analyzing protein-ligand interactions by dynamic NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittermaier, Anthony; Meneses, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide detailed information on protein-ligand interactions that is inaccessible using other biophysical techniques. This chapter focuses on NMR-based approaches for extracting affinity and rate constants for weakly binding transient protein complexes with lifetimes of less than about a second. Several pulse sequences and analytical techniques are discussed, including line-shape simulations, spin-echo relaxation dispersion methods (CPMG), and magnetization exchange (EXSY) experiments.

  11. NMR probe of metallic states in nanoscale topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Chasapis, Thomas C; Taylor, Robert E; Lake, Michael P; King, Danny; Jarenwattananon, Nanette N; Fiete, Gregory A; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2013-01-11

    A 125Te NMR study of bismuth telluride nanoparticles as a function of particle size revealed that the spin-lattice relaxation is enhanced below 33 nm, accompanied by a transition of NMR spectra from the single to the bimodal regime. The satellite peak features a negative Knight shift and higher relaxivity, consistent with core polarization from p-band carriers. Whereas nanocrystals follow a Korringa law in the range 140-420 K, micrometer particles do so only below 200 K. The results reveal increased metallicity of these nanoscale topological insulators in the limit of higher surface-to-volume ratios.

  12. Some specific features of the NMR study of fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Some specific features of studying fluid flows with a NMR spectrometer are considered. The consideration of these features in the NMR spectrometer design makes it possible to determine the relative concentrations of paramagnetic ions and measure the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times ( T 1 and T 2, respectively) in fluid flows with an error no larger than 0.5%. This approach allows one to completely avoid errors in determining the state of a fluid from measured relaxation constants T 1 and T 2, which is especially urgent when working with medical suspensions and biological solutions. The results of an experimental study of fluid flows are presented.

  13. NMR detection with an atomic magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Savukov, I M

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate detection of NMR signals using a non-cryogenic atomic magnetometer and describe several novel applications of this technique. A water free induction decay (FID) signal in a 0.5 $\\mu$T field is detected using a spin-exchange-relaxation-free K magnetometer and the possibility of using a multi-channel magnetometer for 3-D MRI requiring only a single FID signal is described. We also demonstrate detection of less than $10^{13}$ $^{129}$Xe atoms whose NMR signal is enhanced by a factor of 540 due to Fermi-contact interaction with K atoms. This technique allows detection of less than $10^{9}$ $^{129}$Xe spins in a flowing system suitable for remote NMR applications.

  14. NMR with Hyperpolarised Protons in Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbertz, A., E-mail: engelbert@iskp.uni-bonn.de; Anbalagan, P.; Bommas, C.; Eversheim, P.-D.; Hartman, D. T.; Maier, K. [University of Bonn, Helmholtz- Institut fuer Strahlen und Kernphysik (Germany)

    2004-12-15

    Proton pulse NMR, established as a versatile method in Solid State Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Medical Science, requires on the order of 10{sup 18} nuclei to detect an electromagnetic signal in a free induction decay (FID). The main cause for this small sensitivity is the low polarisation in the order of a few ppm due to the Boltzmann distribution in the magnetic field. Thus, NMR experiments on hydrogen are limited to metals with extremely high hydrogen solubility like Pd near room temperature. Using a polarised proton beam, a NMR signal is possible with as few as 10{sup 13} implanted nuclei. For the first time spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times were measured in Au and W with this technique at the Bonn cyclotron.

  15. NMR Studies of Lithium Iodide Based Solid Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupree, R.; Howells, R. J.; Hooper, A.

    1983-01-01

    In mixture of LiI with γAl2O3 the ionic conductivity is found to increase by up to three orders of magnitude over pure LiI. NMR measurements of7Li relaxation times were performed on both anhydrous LiI and a mixture of LiI with 30m/o γAl2O3. The relaxation is found to be purely dipolar in origin f...

  16. H-1, C-13, and N-15 resonance assignment of photoactive yellow protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Trijntje J.; Oktaviani, Nur Alia; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is involved in the negative phototactic response towards blue light of the bacterium Halorhodospira halophila. Here, we report nearly complete backbone and side chain H-1, C-13 and N-15 resonance assignments at pH 5.8 and 20 A degrees C of PYP in its electronic

  17. NMR of lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Larry L. Landucci

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will consider the basic aspects and findings of several forms of NMR spectroscopy, including separate discussions of proton, carbon, heteronuclear, and multidimensional NMR. Enhanced focus will be on 13C NMR, because of its qualitative and quantitative importance, followed by NMR’s contributions to our understanding of lignin...

  18. Evaluation of sandstone surface relaxivity using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E; Sandor, Magdalena; Cheng, Yuesheng

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a common technique used to assess the pore size of fluid-filled porous materials in a wide variety of fields. However, the NMR signal itself only provides a relative distribution of pore size. To calculate an absolute pore size distribution from the NMR data, the material's surface relaxivity needs to be known. Here, a method is presented using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to evaluate surface relaxivity in sandstones. NMR transverse and longitudinal relaxation was measured on a set of sandstone samples and the surface relaxivity was calculated from the pore size distribution determined with MICP measurements. Using multivariate analysis, it was determined that the LIBS data can predict with good accuracy the longitudinal (R(2)∼0.84) and transverse (R(2)∼0.79) surface relaxivity. Analysis of the regression coefficients shows significant influence from several elements. Some of these are elements previously established to have an effect on surface relaxivity, such as iron and manganese, while others are not commonly associated with surface relaxivity, such as cobalt and titanium. Furthermore, LIBS provides advantages compared to current methods to calibrate surface relaxivity in terms of speed, portability, and sample size requirements. While this paper focuses on geological samples, the method could potentially be expanded to other types of porous materials.

  19. Integration of screening and identifying ligand(s) from medicinal plant extracts based on target recognition by using NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Yalin Tang, Qian Shang, Junfeng Xiang, Qianfan Yang, Qiuju Zhou, Lin Li, Hong Zhang, Qian Li, Hongxia Sun, Aijiao Guan, Wei Jiang & Wei Gai ### Abstract This protocol presents the screening of ligand(s) from medicinal plant extracts based on target recognition by using NMR spectroscopy. A detailed description of sample preparation and analysis process is provided. NMR spectroscopies described here are 1H NMR, diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), relaxation-edited NMR, ...

  20. Radiation damping in microcoil NMR probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, V V

    2006-04-01

    Radiation damping arises from the field induced in the receiver coil by large bulk magnetization and tends to selectively drive this magnetization back to equilibrium much faster than relaxation processes. The demand for increased sensitivity in mass-limited samples has led to the development of microcoil NMR probes that are capable of obtaining high quality NMR spectra with small sample volumes (nL-microL). Microcoil probes are optimized to increase sensitivity by increasing either the sample-to-coil ratio (filling factor) of the probe or quality factor of the detection coil. Though radiation damping effects have been studied in standard NMR probes, these effects have not been measured in the microcoil probes. Here a systematic evaluation of radiation damping effects in a microcoil NMR probe is presented and the results are compared with similar measurements in conventional large volume samples. These results show that radiation-damping effects in microcoil probe is much more pronounced than in 5 mm probes, and that it is critically important to optimize NMR experiments to minimize these effects. As microcoil probes provide better control of the bulk magnetization, with good RF and B0 inhomogeneity, in addition to negligible dipolar field effects due to nearly spherical sample volumes, these probes can be used exclusively to study the complex behavior of radiation damping.

  1. T2-Filtered T2 - T2 Exchange NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Eurydice, Marcel Nogueira; Montrazi, Elton Tadeu; Fortulan, Carlos Alberto; Bonagamba, Tito José

    2016-05-01

    This work introduces an alternative way to perform the T2 - T2 Exchange NMR experiment. Rather than varying the number of π pulses in the first CPMG cycle of the T2 - T2 Exchange NMR pulse sequence, as used to obtain the 2D correlation maps, it is fixed and small enough to act as a short T2-filter. By varying the storage time, a set of 1D measurements of T2 distributions can be obtained to reveal the effects of the migration dynamics combined with relaxation effects. This significantly reduces the required time to perform the experiment, allowing a more in-depth study of exchange dynamics and relaxation processes with improved signal-to-noise ratio. These aspects stand as basis of this novel experiment, T2-Filtered T2 - T2 Exchange NMR or simply T2 F-TREx.

  2. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  3. NMR at 900 MHz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ An important factor in the development of solutionstate NMR has always been th e ability to produce stable and homogeneous magnetic fields. As higher and higher field strengths are reached the pressure is growing on manufacturers to produce NMR systems with greatly improved spectral resolution and signal to noise ratio. The introduction of the Varian 900 MHz INOVA system in August 2000 featuring Oxford Instruments 21.1 T magnet represents the latest pioneering development in NMR technology.

  4. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-08-21

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  5. NMR studies of the GTP/GDP binding domain of translation initiation factor IF2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tishchenko, Evgeny Vladimirovich

    2005-01-01

    Translation Initiation Factor 2 (IF2) plays an important role in the initiation stage of bacterial protein biosynthesis. This protein binds both fMet-tRNA and 30S ribosomal subunit in the presence of GTP, and it stimulates the formation of the 70S initiation complex. The NMR samples of the 15N-, 15N

  6. Metabolism of Nonessential N15-Labeled Amino Acids and the Measurement of Human Whole-Body Protein Synthesis Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Dempsey, D. T.; Melnick, G.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15 labeled nonessential amino acids plus (15)NH4Cl were administered over a 10 h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted (Kendall coefficient of concordance W = 0.83, P is less than 0.01). Protein synthesis rates were calculated from the urinary ammonia plateau enrichment and the cumulative excretion of N-15. Glycine was one of the few amino acids that gave similar values by both methods.

  7. Indentation load relaxation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannula, S.P.; Stone, D.; Li, C.Y. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    Most of the models that are used to describe the nonelastic behavior of materials utilize stress-strain rate relations which can be obtained by a load relaxation test. The conventional load relaxation test, however, cannot be performed if the volume of the material to be tested is very small. For such applications the indentation type of test offers an attractive means of obtaining data necessary for materials characterization. In this work the feasibility of the indentation load relaxation test is studied. Experimental techniques are described together with results on Al, Cu and 316 SS. These results are compared to those of conventional uniaxial load relaxation tests, and the conversion of the load-indentation rate data into the stress-strain rate data is discussed.

  8. Relaxation techniques for stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems such as high blood pressure, stomachaches, headaches, anxiety, and depression. Using relaxation techniques can help you feel calm. These exercises can also help you manage stress and ease the effects of stress on your body.

  9. Extended Function of Plasmid Partition Genes: the Sop System of Linear Phage-Plasmid N15 Facilitates Late Gene Expression▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Nikolai V.; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David

    2008-01-01

    The mitotic stability of the linear plasmid-prophage N15 of Escherichia coli depends on a partition system closely related to that of the F plasmid SopABC. The two Sop systems are distinguished mainly by the arrangement of their centromeric SopB-binding sites, clustered in F (sopC) and dispersed in N15 (IR1 to IR4). Because two of the N15 inverted repeat (IR) sites are located close to elements presumed (by analogy with phage λ) to regulate late gene expression during the lytic growth of N15, we asked whether Sop partition functions play a role in this process. In N15, a putative Q antiterminator gene is located 6 kb upstream of the probable major late promoter and two intrinsic terminator-like sequences, in contrast to λ, where the Q gene is adjacent to the late promoter. Northern hybridization and lacZ reporter activity confirmed the identity of the N15 late promoter (p52), demonstrated antiterminator activity of the Q analogue, and located terminator sequences between p52 and the first open reading frame. Following prophage induction, N15 mutated in IR2 (downstream from gene Q) or IR3 (upstream of p52) showed a pronounced delay in lysis relative to that for wild-type N15. Expression of ir3−-p52::lacZ during N15 wild-type lytic growth was strongly reduced relative to the equivalent ir3+ fusion. The provision of Q protein and the IR2 and SopAB proteins in trans to ir3+-p52::lacZ increased expression beyond that seen in the absence of any one of these factors. These results indicate that the N15 Sop system has a dual role: partition and regulation of late gene transcription during lytic growth. PMID:18359814

  10. Extended function of plasmid partition genes: the Sop system of linear phage-plasmid N15 facilitates late gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Nikolai V; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David

    2008-05-01

    The mitotic stability of the linear plasmid-prophage N15 of Escherichia coli depends on a partition system closely related to that of the F plasmid SopABC. The two Sop systems are distinguished mainly by the arrangement of their centromeric SopB-binding sites, clustered in F (sopC) and dispersed in N15 (IR1 to IR4). Because two of the N15 inverted repeat (IR) sites are located close to elements presumed (by analogy with phage lambda) to regulate late gene expression during the lytic growth of N15, we asked whether Sop partition functions play a role in this process. In N15, a putative Q antiterminator gene is located 6 kb upstream of the probable major late promoter and two intrinsic terminator-like sequences, in contrast to lambda, where the Q gene is adjacent to the late promoter. Northern hybridization and lacZ reporter activity confirmed the identity of the N15 late promoter (p52), demonstrated antiterminator activity of the Q analogue, and located terminator sequences between p52 and the first open reading frame. Following prophage induction, N15 mutated in IR2 (downstream from gene Q) or IR3 (upstream of p52) showed a pronounced delay in lysis relative to that for wild-type N15. Expression of ir3(-)-p52::lacZ during N15 wild-type lytic growth was strongly reduced relative to the equivalent ir3(+) fusion. The provision of Q protein and the IR2 and SopAB proteins in trans to ir3(+)-p52::lacZ increased expression beyond that seen in the absence of any one of these factors. These results indicate that the N15 Sop system has a dual role: partition and regulation of late gene transcription during lytic growth.

  11. Perturbations and quantum relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Kandhadai, Adithya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate whether small perturbations can cause relaxation to quantum equilibrium over very long timescales. We consider in particular a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator, which can serve as a model of a field mode on expanding space. We assume an initial wave function with small perturbations to the ground state. We present evidence that the trajectories are highly confined so as to preclude relaxation to equilibrium even over very long timescales. Cosmological implications are briefly discussed.

  12. Fully automated system for pulsed NMR measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, David Milton

    1977-01-01

    A system is described which places many of the complex, tedious operations for pulsed NMR experiments under computer control. It automatically optimizes the experiment parameters of pulse length and phase, and precision, accuracy, and measurement speed are improved. The hardware interface between the computer and the NMR instrument is described. Design features, justification of the choices made between alternative design strategies, and details of the implementation of design goals are presented. Software features common to all the available experiments are discussed. Optimization of pulse lengths and phases is performed via a sequential search technique called Uniplex. Measurements of the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times and of diffusion constants are automatic. Options for expansion of the system are explored along with some of the limitations of the system.

  13. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  14. NMR logging apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  15. NMR logging apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  16. NMR studies of metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteins represent a large share of the proteomes, with the intrinsic metal ions providing catalytic, regulatory, and structural roles critical to protein functions. Structural characterization of metalloproteins and identification of metal coordination features including numbers and types of ligands and metal-ligand geometry, and mapping the structural and dynamic changes upon metal binding are significant for understanding biological functions of metalloproteins. NMR spectroscopy has long been used as an invaluable tool for structure and dynamic studies of macromolecules. Here we focus on the application of NMR spectroscopy in characterization of metalloproteins, including structural studies and identification of metal coordination spheres by hetero-/homo-nuclear metal NMR spectroscopy. Paramagnetic NMR as well as (13)C directly detected protonless NMR spectroscopy will also be addressed for application to paramagnetic metalloproteins. Moreover, these techniques offer great potential for studies of other non-metal binding macromolecules.

  17. Optimization of CPMG sequences for NMR borehole measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ronczka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nuklear Magnetic Resonance (NMR can provide key information such as porosity and permeability for hydrological characterization of geological material. Especially the NMR transverse relaxation time T2 is used to estimate permeability since it reflects a pore-size dependent relaxation process. The measurement sequence (CPMG usually used consists of several thousands of electromagnetic pulses to densely record the relaxation process. These pulses are equidistantly spaced by a time constant τ. In NMR borehole applications the use of CPMG sequences for measuring the transverse relaxation time T2 is limited due to requirements on energy consumption. It is state of the art to conduct at least two sequences with different echo spacings (τ for recording fast and slow relaxing processes that correspond to different pore-sizes. For the purpose to reduce the amount of energy used for conducting CPMG sequences and to obtain both, slow and fast, decaying components within one sequence we tested the usage of CPMG sequences with an increasing τ and a decreasing number of pulses. A synthetic study as well as laboratory measurements on samples of glass beads and granulate of different grain size spectra were conducted to evaluate the effects of of an increasing τ spacing, e.g. an enhanced relaxation due to diffusion processes. The results are showing broadened T2 distributions if the number of pulses is decreasing and the mean grain size is increasing, which is mostly an effect of a significantly shortened acquisition time. The shift of T2 distributions to small decay times in dependence of the τ spacing and the mean grain size distribution is observable. We found that it is possible to conduct CPMG sequences with an increased τ spacing. According to the acquisition time and enhanced diffusion the sequence parameters (number of pulses and τmax has to be chosen carefully. Otherwise the underestimated relaxation time (T2 will lead to misinterpretations.

  18. Dynamic isotope effects on relaxation of quadrupolar nuclei in 12 simple organic molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛希安; andM.Holz

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic isotope effects on relaxation rate of quadrupolar nuclei are preliminarily reported. The relaxation rates of 17O and 14N in 12 simple organic molecules and their 18 corresponding deuterated species have been systematically measured. The principal components of the molecular inertia tensors have been calculated. The results show that there is an intrinsic correlation between the dynamic isotope effects of the relaxation rate and the static isotope effects of the molecular inertia. The concepts of molecular collision frequency and translation-rotation coupling have been introduced into the NMR relaxation theory. Therefore, a reasonable explanation of the experimental results has been given.

  19. UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition For the UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition proposal, a new 400 MHz and an upgraded 500 MHz NMR ...UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition Report Title For the UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition proposal, a new 400 MHz and an upgraded 500...MHz NMR have been delivered, installed, and incorporated into research and two lab courses. While no results from these instruments have been

  20. Fresco paintings studied by unilateral NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, N.; Capitani, D.; Lamanna, R.; Presciutti, F.; Rossi, E.; Segre, A. L.

    2005-11-01

    Unilateral NMR has been used to monitor the state of conservation of frescoes in the Vasari's house in Florence. The causes of deterioration of ancient frescoes are varied, which result in the detachment and crumbling of the painted film from the supporting plaster and in the outcropping of salts. Unilateral measurements of Hahn echo performed on such frescoes have allowed a perfect identification of the detachment of the painted film from the plaster. The presence of soluble salts on the pictorial film affects the spin-spin relaxation times, T2. It is then possible using this technique, to characterize the effect of chemical treatments, of cleansing and consolidation procedures using the distribution of T2 spin-spin relaxation times.

  1. Spin-lattice relaxation in deuterium at reduced para concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, R.V.; Candela, D.; Buchman, S.; Vetterling, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The authors measured NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in solid D/sub 2/ for para-D/sub 2/ concentrations 0.24 < X < 0.31 and temperatures 40 mK < T < 700 mK. No evidence is seen for the sharp features in t/sub 1/ vs T that were reported by others. A model for cross-relaxation has been developed which allows the data for solid D/sub 2/ to be compared directly with earlier data for solid H/sub 2/. 8 references, 2 figures.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and

  3. Caracterização dos constituintes poliméricos da Maytenus ilicifolia por relaxação nuclear de ¹H por RMN no estado sólido Characterization of Maytenus ilicifolia Samples by ¹H NMR relaxation in the solid state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica S. de M. Preto

    2011-01-01

    , verificação de autenticidade e/ou avaliação de eventual adulteração nesse tipo de amostra. Pelos resultados obtidos foi possível diferenciar as duas amostras comerciais por comparação com a amostra controle.The Maytenus ilicifolia (espinheira-santa is a popular medicinal plant with different uses. It is native of South America and can be found in Brazil. In the Brazilian market it is possible found products labeled as M. ilicifolia. So far, the studies published in the literature involve the modification of the natural materials and do not concern the comparison between commercial the raw natural materials. Different non-destructive NMR techniques can be used to study natural materials. In this work it is presented a characterization study by Fast Field Cycling of the ¹H spin-lattice relaxation time (T1 NMR, in the frequency range 100 kHz-10 MHz. The results obtained in two commercial M. ilicifolia samples and one control sample collected in natura are compared. It was intended to study the possibility to elaborate a characterization method using FFCNMR suitable for the verification of authenticity and/or evaluation of tampering on products. The differences detected by FFCNMR relaxometry were confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy.

  4. Noninvasive testing of art and cultural heritage by mobile NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Perlo, Juan; Presciutti, Federica; Anselmi, Chiara; Doherty, Brenda

    2010-06-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has many applications in science, medicine, and technology. Conventional instrumentation is large and expensive, however, because superconducting magnets offer maximum sensitivity. Yet NMR devices can also be small and inexpensive if permanent magnets are used, and samples need not be placed within the magnet but can be examined externally in the stray magnetic field. Mobile stray-field NMR is a method of growing interest for nondestructive testing of a diverse range of materials and processes. A well-known stray-field sensor is the commercially available NMR-MOUSE, which is small and can readily be carried to an object to be studied. In this Account, we describe mobile stray-field NMR, with particular attention to its use in analyzing objects of cultural heritage. The most common data recorded are relaxation measurements of (1)H because the proton is the most sensitive NMR nucleus, and relaxation can be measured despite the inhomogeneous magnetic field that typically accompanies a simple magnet design. Through NMR relaxation, the state of matter can be analyzed locally, and the signal amplitude gives the proton density. A variety of stray-field sensors have been designed. Small devices weighing less than a kilogram have a shallow penetration depth of just a few millimeters and a resolution of a few micrometers. Access to greater depths requires larger sensors that may weigh 30 kg or more. The use of these sensors is illustrated by selected examples, including examinations of (i) the stratigraphy of master paintings, (ii) binder aging, (iii) the deterioration of paper, (iv) wood density in master violins, (v) the moisture content and moisture profiles in walls covered with paintings and mosaics, and (vi) the evolution of stone conservation treatments. The NMR data provide unique information to the conservator on the state of the object--including past conservation measures. The use of mobile NMR remains relatively new, expanding

  5. Dynamic processes and chemical composition of Lepidium sativum seeds determined by means of field-cycling NMR relaxometry and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachocki, A; Latanowicz, L; Tritt-Goc, J

    2012-12-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as field-cycling relaxometry, wide-line NMR spectroscopy, and magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, were applied to study the seeds of cress, Lepidium sativum. Field-cycling NMR relaxometry was used for the first time to investigate the properties of the whole molecular system of dry cress seeds. This method not only allowed the dynamics to be studied, but was also successful in the differentiation among the solid (i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, or fats forming a solid form of lipids) and liquid-like (oil compounds) components of the seeds. The (1)H NMR relaxation dispersion of oils was interpreted as a superposition of intramolecular and intermolecular contributions. The intramolecular part was described in terms of a Lorentzian spectral density function, whereas a log-Gaussian distribution of correlation times was applied for the intermolecular dipole-dipole contribution. The models applied led to very good agreement with the experimental data and demonstrate that the contribution of the intermolecular relaxation to the overall relaxation should not be disregarded, especially at low frequencies. A power-law frequency dependence of the proton relaxation dispersion was used for the interpretation of the solid components. From the analysis of the (1)H wide-line NMR spectra of the liquid-like component of hydrated cress seeds, we can conclude that the contribution of oil protons should always be taken into account when evaluating the spin-lattice relaxation times values or measuring the moisture and oil content. The application of (1)H magic angle spinning NMR significantly improves resolution in the liquid-like spectrum of seeds and allows the determination of the chemical composition of cress seeds.

  6. In situ fluid typing and quantification with 1D and 2D NMR logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Boqin

    2007-05-01

    In situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fluid typing has recently gained momentum due to data acquisition and inversion algorithm enhancement of NMR logging tools. T(2) distributions derived from NMR logging contain information on bulk fluids and pore size distributions. However, the accuracy of fluid typing is greatly overshadowed by the overlap between T(2) peaks arising from different fluids with similar apparent T(2) relaxation times. Nevertheless, the shapes of T(2) distributions from different fluid components are often different and can be predetermined. Inversion with predetermined T(2) distributions allows us to perform fluid component decomposition to yield individual fluid volume ratios. Another effective method for in situ fluid typing is two-dimensional (2D) NMR logging, which results in proton population distribution as a function of T(2) relaxation time and fluid diffusion coefficient (or T(1) relaxation time). Since diffusion coefficients (or T(1) relaxation time) for different fluid components can be very different, it is relatively easy to separate oil (especially heavy oil) from water signal in a 2D NMR map and to perform accurate fluid typing. Combining NMR logging with resistivity and/or neutron/density logs provides a third method for in situ fluid typing. We shall describe these techniques with field examples.

  7. 2D relaxation/diffusion correlations in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroy, S; Callaghan, P T

    2003-01-01

    2D correlations between NMR relaxation and/or diffusion have been used to investigate water and oil dynamics in food and micro-emulsion systems. In the case of Mozzarella and Gouda cheese samples, a significant change in D/T2 correlation is appearing with cheese aging. In the case of a water/toluene micro-emulsion, some evidence for coalescence effects is suggested by D/D exchange spectra.

  8. Molecular Relaxation in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Biman

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together many different relaxation phenomena in liquids under a common umbrella and provides a unified view of apparently diverse phenomena. It aligns recent experimental results obtained with modern techniques with recent theoretical developments. Such close interaction between experiment and theory in this area goes back to the works of Einstein, Smoluchowski, Kramers' and de Gennes. Development of ultrafast laser spectroscopy recently allowed study of various relaxation processes directly in the time domain, with time scales going down to picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs

  9. Benford distributions in NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Bhole, Gaurav; Mahesh, T S

    2014-01-01

    Benford's Law is an empirical law which predicts the frequency of significant digits in databases corresponding to various phenomena, natural or artificial. Although counter intuitive at the first sight, it predicts a higher occurrence of digit 1, and decreasing occurrences to other larger digits. Here we report the Benford analysis of various NMR databases and draw several interesting inferences. We observe that, in general, NMR signals follow Benford distribution in time-domain as well as in frequency domain. Our survey included NMR signals of various nuclear species in a wide variety of molecules in different phases, namely liquid, liquid-crystalline, and solid. We also studied the dependence of Benford distribution on NMR parameters such as signal to noise ratio, number of scans, pulse angles, and apodization. In this process we also find that, under certain circumstances, the Benford analysis can distinguish a genuine spectrum from a visually identical simulated spectrum. Further we find that chemical-sh...

  10. [Sop proteins can cause transcriptional silencing of genes located close to the centromere sites of linear plasmid N15].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanov, A V; Lane, D; Ravin, N V

    2010-01-01

    Stable inheritance of bacterial chromosomes and low copy number plasmids is ensured by accurate partitioning of replicated molecules between the daughter cells at division. Partitioning of the prophage of the temperate bacteriophage N15, which exists as a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed ends, depends on the sop locus, comprising genes sopA and sopB, as well as four centromere sites located in different regions of the N15 genome essential for replication and the control of lysogeny. We found that binding of SopB to the centromere can silence centromere-proximal promoters, presumably due to subsequent polymerizing of SopB along the DNA. Close to the IR4 centromere site we identified a promoter, P59, able to drive expression of phage late genes encoding the structural proteins of virion. We found that following binding to IR4 the N15 Sop proteins can cause repression of this promoter. The repression depends on SopB and became stronger in the presence of SopA. Sop-dependent silencing of centromere-proximal promoters control gene expression in phage N15, particularly preventing undesired expression of late genes in the N15 prophage. Thus, the phage N15 sop system not only ensures plasmid partitioning but is also involved in the genetic network controlling prophage replication and the maintenance of lysogeny.

  11. An NMR study of adsorbed helium films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Anthony Joseph

    The properties of sub-monolayer Helium-3 films adsorbed on two totally different but planar substrates, Mylar† film and exfoliated graphite have been studied using NMR. The nuclear magnetic relaxation times T1 and T 2 have been measured as functions of fractional monolayer completion, temperature, substrate plane orientation and Larmor frequency using a specially designed and constructed NMR spectrometer system. The results obtained with a Mylar film substrate are consistent3with the formation of patches of solid 3He at regions of preferential adsorption on the substrate. Measurements of T2 m very low coverage 3He films on exfoliated graphite also indicate that the adsorbate forms areas of relatively high density solid, in agreement with the thermodynamic analysis of Elgin and Goodstein. Finally, detailed measurements of T2 as a function of all of the above parameters at low areal densities will help us to characterise the relaxation processes for the fluid phase of 33He on exfoliated graphite. †Mylar is the tradename of poly(ethelene-terephthalate) film, marketed by Du Pont.

  12. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT2 measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  13. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  14. N2H+ and N15NH+ toward the prestellar core 16293E in L1689N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, F.; Faure, A.; Pagani, L.; Lique, F.; Gérin, M.; Lis, D.; Hily-Blant, P.; Bacmann, A.; Roueff, E.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Understanding the processes that could lead to an enrichment of molecules in 15N atoms is of particular interest because this may shed light on the relatively strong variations observed in the 14N/15N ratio in various solar system environments. Aims: The sample of molecular clouds where 14N/15N ratios have been measured currently is small and has to be enlarged to allow statistically significant studies. In particular, the N2H+ molecule currently shows the broadest spread of 14N/15N ratios in high-mass star-forming regions. However, the 14N/15N ratio in N2H+ was obtained in only two low-mass star-forming regions (L1544 and B1b). We here extend this sample to a third dark cloud. Methods: We targeted the 16293E prestellar core, where the N15NH+J = 1-0 line was detected. Using a model previously developed for the physical structure of the source, we solved the molecular excitation with a nonlocal radiative transfer code. For this purpose, we computed specific collisional rate coefficients for the N15NH+-H2 collisional system. As a first step of the analysis, the N2H+ abundance profile was constrained by reproducing the N2H+J = 1-0 and 3-2 maps. A scaling factor was then applied to this profile to match the N15NH+J = 1-0 spectrum. Results: We derive a column density ratio N2H+/N15NH. Conclusions: We performed a detailed analysis of the excitation of N2H+ and N15NH+ in the direction of the 16293E core with modern models that solve the radiative transfer and with the most accurate collisional rate coefficients available to date. We obtained the third estimate of the N2H+/N15NH+ column density ratio in the direction of a cold prestellar core. The current estimate ~330 agrees with the typical value of the elemental isotopic ratio in the local interstellar medium. It is lower than in some other cores, however, where values as high as 1300 have been reported.

  15. NMR Studies of Cartilage Dynamics, Diffusion, Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huster, Daniel; Schiller, Jurgen; Naji, Lama; Kaufmann Jorn; Arnold, Klaus

    An increasing number of people is suffering from rheumatic diseases, and, therefore, methods of early diagnosis of joint degeneration are urgently required. For their establishment, however, an improved knowledge about the molecular organisation of cartilage would be helpful. Cartilage consists of three main components: Water, collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS) that is (together with further polysaccharides and proteins) a major constituent of the proteoglycans of cartilage. 1H and 13C MAS (magic-angle spinning) NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) opened new perspectives for the study of the macromolecular components in cartilage. We have primarily studied the mobilities of CS and collagen in bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage (that differ significantly in their collagen/polysaccharide content) by measuring 13C NMR relaxation times as well as the corresponding 13C CP (cross polarisation) MAS NMR spectra. These data clearly indicate that the mobility of cartilage macromolecules is broadly distributed from almost completely rigid (collagen) to highly mobile (polysaccharides), which lends cartilage its mechanical strength and shock-absorbing properties.

  16. Protein backbone dynamics revealed by quasi spectral density function analysis of amide N-15 nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishima, R; Nagayama, K

    1995-03-14

    Spectral density functions J(0), J(omega N), and J(omega H + omega N) of individual amide N-15 nuclei in proteins were approximated by a quasi spectral density function (QSDF). Using this function, the backbone dynamics were analyzed for seven protein systems on which data have been published. We defined J(0; omega N) as the difference between the J(0) and the J(omega N) values, which describes motions slower than 50 (or 60) MHz, and J(omega N; omega H+N) as the difference between the J(omega N) and the J(omega H + omega N) values, which describes motions slower than 450 (or 540) MHz. The QSDF analysis can easily extract the J(0; omega N) of protein backbones, which have often some relation to biologically relevant reactions. Flexible N-terminal regions in eglin c and glucose permease IIA and a loop region in eglin c showed smaller values of both the J(0; omega N) and the J(omega N; omega H+N) as compared with the other regions, indicating increases in motions faster than nanosecond. The values of the J(0; omega N) for the backbone of the FK506 binding protein showed a large variation in the apoprotein but fell in a very narrow range after the binding of FK506. Characteristic increase or decrease in the values of J(0) and J(omega N) was observed in two or three residues located between secondary structures.

  17. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  18. Teaching NMR Using Online Textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Hornak

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy has almost become an essential analytical tool for the chemist. High-resolution one- and multi-dimensional NMR, timedomain NMR, and NMR microscopy are but a few of the NMR techniques at a chemist's disposal to determine chemical structure and dynamics. Consequently, even small chemistry departments are finding it necessary to provide students with NMR training and experience in at least some of these techniques. The hands-on experience is readily provided with access to state-of-the-art commercial spectrometers. Instruction in the principles of NMR is more difficult to achieve as most instructors try to teach NMR using single organic or analytical chemistry book chapters with static figures. This paper describes an online textbook on NMR spectroscopy called The Basics of NMR (http://www.cis.rit.edu/htbooks/nmr/ suitable for use in teaching the principles of NMR spectroscopy. The book utilizes hypertext and animations to present the principles of NMR spectroscopy. The book can be used as a textbook associated with a lecture or as a stand-alone teaching tool. Conference participants are encouraged to review the textbook and evaluate its suitability for us in teaching NMR spectroscopy to undergraduate chemistry majors.

  19. Ultralow field NMR spectrometer with an atomic magnetometer near room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guobin; Li, Xiaofeng; Sun, Xianping; Feng, Jiwen; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2013-12-01

    We present a Cs atomic magnetometer with a sensitivity of 150fT/Hz(1/2) operating near room temperature. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal of 125μL tap water was detected at an ultralow magnetic field down to 47nT, with the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the NMR signal approaching 50 after eight averages. Relaxivity experiments with a Gd(DTPA) contrast agent in zero field were performed, in order to show the magnetometer's ability to measure spin-lattice relaxation time with high accuracy. This demonstrates the feasibility of an ultralow field NMR spectrometer based on a Cs atomic magnetometer, which has a low working temperature, short data acquisition time and high sensitivity. This kind of NMR spectrometer has great potential in applications such as chemical analysis and magnetic relaxometry detection in ultralow or zero fields.

  20. NMR analysis, protonation equilibria and decomposition kinetics of tolperisone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgován, Gábor; Tihanyi, Károly; Noszál, Béla

    2009-12-05

    The rate constants of spontaneous and hydroxide-catalyzed decomposition and the tautomer-specific protonation constants of tolperisone, a classical muscle relaxant were determined. A solution NMR method without any separation techniques was elaborated to quantitate the progress of decomposition. All the rate and equilibrium constants were determined at four different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The molecular mechanism of decomposition is proposed.

  1. 13C NMR Quantitative Study-Part 1: Relationships between the Conformation of Amino Acids, Peptide, Carboxylic Acids and Integration Intensity of 13C NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN; JinPing

    2001-01-01

    In proton broad band decoupling 13C NMR, carbon atoms have different integration intensity because of NOE effects and their different relaxation time(T1), thus it makes a 13C NMR quantitative analyses very difficult. To acquire a 3C NMR quantitative analyses, a gated decoupling with suppressed NOE technology, i.e., an inversed gated decoupling pulse (IGDP), must be used. In IGDP relay time (tR) between two acquisition cycles must be more than 5T1, the time needed for a acquisition cycles is so long that makes the total 13C NMR quantitative analyses time much longer. For this reason, the 13C NMR quantitative analyses is paid less attention.  ……

  2. 13C NMR Quantitative Study-Part 1: Relationships between the Conformation of Amino Acids, Peptide, Carboxylic Acids and Integration Intensity of 13C NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ In proton broad band decoupling 13C NMR, carbon atoms have different integration intensity because of NOE effects and their different relaxation time(T1), thus it makes a 13C NMR quantitative analyses very difficult. To acquire a 3C NMR quantitative analyses, a gated decoupling with suppressed NOE technology, i.e., an inversed gated decoupling pulse (IGDP), must be used. In IGDP relay time (tR) between two acquisition cycles must be more than 5T1, the time needed for a acquisition cycles is so long that makes the total 13C NMR quantitative analyses time much longer. For this reason, the 13C NMR quantitative analyses is paid less attention.

  3. Kinetic Actviation Relaxation Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Béland, Laurent Karim; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si, self-interstitial diffusion in Fe and structural relaxation in amorphous silicon.

  4. N$_2$H$^+$ and N$^{15}$NH$^+$ towards the prestellar core 16293E in L1689N

    CERN Document Server

    Daniel, F; Pagani, L; Lique, F; Gérin, M; Lis, D C; Hily-Blant, P; Bacmann, A; Roueff, E

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the processes that could lead to enrichment of molecules in $^{15}$N atoms is of particular interest in order to shed light on the relatively large variations observed in the $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N ratio in various solar system environments. Currently, the sample of molecular clouds where $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N ratios have been measured is small and has to be enlarged in order to allow statistically significant studies. In particular, the N$_2$H$^+$ molecule currently shows the largest spread of $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N ratios in high-mass star forming regions. However, the $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N ratio in N$_2$H$^+$ was obtained in only two low-mass star forming regions (L1544 and B1b). The current work extends this sample to a third dark cloud. We targeted the 16293E prestellar core, where the N$^{15}$NH$^+$ $J$=1-0 line was detected. Using a model previously developed for the physical structure of the source, we solved the molecular excitation with a non-local radiative transfer code. For that purpose, we computed ...

  5. 1H NMR relaxometry, viscometry, and PFG NMR studies of magnetic and nonmagnetic ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Carla I; Chávez, Fabián Vaca; Feio, Gabriel; Portugal, Carla A M; Crespo, João G; Sebastião, Pedro J

    2013-10-03

    A study is presented of the molecular dynamics and of the viscosity in pure [Aliquat][Cl] ionic liquid and in a mixture of [Aliquat][Cl] with 1% (v/v) of [Aliquat][FeCl4]. The (1)H spin-lattice relaxation rate, R1, was measured by NMR relaxometry between 8 and 300 MHz. In addition, the translation self-diffusion, D, was measured by pulse field gradient NMR. The ILs' viscosity was measured as a function of an applied magnetic field, B, and it was found that the IL mixture's viscosity decreased with increasing B, whereas the [Aliquat][Cl] viscosity is independent of B. All experimental results were analyzed taking into account the viscosity's magnetic field dependence, assuming a modified Stokes-Einstein diffusion/viscosity relation. The main difference between the relaxation mechanisms responsible for R1 in the two IL systems is related to the additional paramagnetic relaxation contribution associated with the (1)H spins-[FeCl4] paramagnetic moments' interactions. Cross-relaxation cusps in the R1 dispersion, associated with (35)Cl and (1)H nuclear spins in the IL systems, were detected. The R1 model considered was successfully fitted to the experimental results, and it was possible to estimate the value of D at zero field in the case of the IL mixture which was consistent with the values of D measured at 7 and 14.1 T and with the magnetic field dependence estimated from the viscosity measurements. It was observed that a small concentration of [Aliquat][FeCl4] in the [Aliquat][Cl] was enough to produce a "superparamagnetic"-like effect and to change the IL mixture's molecular dynamics and viscosity and to allow for their control with an external magnetic field.

  6. Nonlinear fractional relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Tofighi

    2012-04-01

    We define a nonlinear model for fractional relaxation phenomena. We use -expansion method to analyse this model. By studying the fundamental solutions of this model we find that when → 0 the model exhibits a fast decay rate and when → ∞ the model exhibits a power-law decay. By analysing the frequency response we find a logarithmic enhancement for the relative ratio of susceptibility.

  7. NMR imaging of fluid dynamics in reservoir core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, B A; Yamanashi, W S

    1988-01-01

    A medical NMR imaging instrument has been modified to image water and oil in reservoir rocks by the construction of a new receiving coil. Both oil and water inside the core produced readily detectable proton NMR signals, while the rock matrix produced no signal. Because of similar T2 NMR relaxation times, the water was doped with a paramagnetic ion, Mn+2, to reduce its T2 relaxation time. This procedure enhanced the separation between the oil and water phases in the resulting images. Sequential measurements, as water imbibed into one end and oil was expelled from the other end of a core plug, produced a series of images which showed the dynamics of the fluids. For water-wet Berea Sandstone a flood front was readily observed, but some of the oil was apparently left behind in small, isolated pockets which were larger than individual pores. After several additional pore volumes of water flowed through the plug the NMR image indicated a homogeneous distribution of oil. The amount of residual oil, as determined from the ratio of NMR intensities, closely approximated the residual oil saturation of fully flooded Berea samples measured by Dean-Stark extraction. A Berea sandstone core treated to make it partially oil-wet, did not show a definitive flood front, but appeared to channel the water around the perimeter of the core plug. The relative ease with which these images were made indicates that NMR imaging can be a useful technique to follow the dynamics of oil and water through a core plug for a variety of production processes.

  8. Electron spin relaxation due to reorientation of a permanent zero field splitting tensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefle, Nathaniel; Sharp, Robert

    2004-09-15

    Electron spin relaxation of transition metal ions with spin S> or =1 results primarily from thermal modulation of the zero field splitting (zfs) tensor. This occurs both by distortion of the zfs tensor due to intermolecular collisions and, for complexes with less than cubic symmetry, by reorientational modulation of the permanent zfs tensor. The reorientational mechanism is much less well characterized in previous work than the distortional mechanism although it is an important determinant of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) paramagnetic relaxation enhancement phenomena (i.e., the enhancement of NMR relaxation rates produced by paramagnetic ions in solution or NMR-PRE). The classical density matrix theory of spin relaxation does not provide an appropriate description of the reorientational mechanism at low Zeeman field strengths because the zero-order spin wave functions are stochastic functions of time. Using spin dynamics simulation techniques, the time correlation functions of the spin operators have been computed and used to determine decay times for the reorientational relaxation mechanism for S=1. In the zfs limit of laboratory field strengths (H(Zeem)spin decay is exponential, the spin relaxation time, tau(S) (composite function) approximately 0.53tau(R)((1)), where tau(R)((1)) is the reorientational correlation time of a molecule-fixed vector. The value of tau(S) (composite function) is independent of the magnitude of the cylindrical zfs parameter (D), but it depends strongly on low symmetry zfs terms (the E/D ratio). Other spin dynamics (SD) simulations examined spin decay in the intermediate regime of field strengths where H(Zeem) approximately H(zfs) (composite function), and in the vicinity of the Zeeman limit. The results demonstrate that the reorientational electron spin relaxation mechanism is often significant when H(zfs) (composite function)> or =H(Zeem), and that its neglect can lead to serious errors in the interpretation of NMR-PRE data.

  9. NMR, Water and Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.

    1982-01-01

    This Thesis describes the application of a non-destructive pulsed proton NMR method mainly to measure water transport in the xylem vessels of plant stems and in some model systems. The results are equally well applicable to liquid flow in other biological objects than plants, e.g. flow of blood and

  10. Single-sided NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Casanova, Federico; Blümich, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Single-Sided NMR describes the design of the first functioning single-sided tomograph, the related measurement methods, and a number of applications. One of the key advantages to this method is the speed at which the images are obtained.

  11. Autonomous driving in NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The automatic analysis of NMR data has been a much-desired endeavour for the last six decades, as it is the case with any other analytical technique. This need for automation has only grown as advances in hardware; pulse sequences and automation have opened new research areas to NMR and increased the throughput of data. Full automatic analysis is a worthy, albeit hard, challenge, but in a world of artificial intelligence, instant communication and big data, it seems that this particular fight is happening with only one technique at a time (let this be NMR, MS, IR, UV or any other), when the reality of most laboratories is that there are several types of analytical instrumentation present. Data aggregation, verification and elucidation by using complementary techniques (e.g. MS and NMR) is a desirable outcome to pursue, although a time-consuming one if performed manually; hence, the use of automation to perform the heavy lifting for users is required to make the approach attractive for scientists. Many of the decisions and workflows that could be implemented under automation will depend on the two-way communication with databases that understand analytical data, because it is desirable not only to query these databases but also to grow them in as much of an automatic manner as possible. How these databases are designed, set up and the data inside classified will determine what workflows can be implemented. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Dynamical properties of confined supercooled water: an NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Faraone, Antonio; Liu, Li; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2006-09-01

    We report a set of dynamical data of confined water measured in a very deeply supercooled regime (290-190 K). Water is contained in silica matrices (MCM-41-S) which consist of 1D cylindrical pores with diameters d = 14,18 and 24 Å. When confined in these tubular pores, water does not crystallize, and can be supercooled well below 200 K. We use the NMR technique to obtain the characteristic proton relaxation time-constants (the spin-lattice relaxation time-constant T1 and the spin-spin relaxation time-constant T2) and a direct measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient in the whole temperature range. We give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) at TL = 225 K from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient. A combination of the NMR self-diffusion coefficient with the average translational relaxation time, as measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, shows a well defined decoupling of transport coefficients, i.e. the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, on approaching the crossover temperature TL.

  13. Dynamical properties of confined supercooled water: an NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Broccio, Matteo [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Faraone, Antonio [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Liu Li [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Mou, C-Y [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, S-H [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2006-09-13

    We report a set of dynamical data of confined water measured in a very deeply supercooled regime (290-190 K). Water is contained in silica matrices (MCM-41-S) which consist of 1D cylindrical pores with diameters d = 14,18 and 24 A. When confined in these tubular pores, water does not crystallize, and can be supercooled well below 200 K. We use the NMR technique to obtain the characteristic proton relaxation time-constants (the spin-lattice relaxation time-constant T1 and the spin-spin relaxation time-constant T2) and a direct measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient in the whole temperature range. We give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) at T{sub L} = 225 K from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient. A combination of the NMR self-diffusion coefficient with the average translational relaxation time, as measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, shows a well defined decoupling of transport coefficients, i.e. the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, on approaching the crossover temperature T{sub L}.

  14. H-1 and N-15 resonance assignment of the second fibronectin type III module of the neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiselyov, Vladislav V; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth;

    2008-01-01

    We report here the NMR assignment of the second fibronectin type III module of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). This module has previously been shown to interact with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), and the FGFR-binding site was mapped by NMR to the FG-loop region...... of the module. The FG-loop region also contains a putative nucleotide-binding motif, which was shown by NMR to interact with ATP. Furthermore, ATP was demonstrated to inhibit binding of the second F3 module of NCAM to FGFR....

  15. NMR for chemists and biologists

    CERN Document Server

    Carbajo, Rodrigo J

    2013-01-01

    This book offers a concise introduction to the field of nuclear magnetic resonance or NMR. It presents the basic foundations of NMR in a non-mathematical way and provides an overview of both recent and important biological applications of NMR.

  16. NMR magnet technology at MIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.C.; Bobrov, E.S.; Iwasa, Y.; Punchard, W.F.B.; Wrenn, J.; Zhukovsky, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    The design and construction of high field superconducting NMR magnets has much in common with other types of adiabatic superconducting magnets. However, two issues have a particular relevance to NMR magnets. They are field drift and homogeneity. In this paper the control of these factors in the particular context of high field NMR spectrometer magnets is examined.

  17. Proton magnetic relaxation study of the thermodynamic characteristics of water adsorbed by cellulose fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunin, Yu. B.; Grunin, L. Yu.; Masas, D. S.; Talantsev, V. I.; Sheveleva, N. N.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of determining the thermodynamic parameters that characterize the sorption properties of cellulose and the state of water associated with its fibers is demonstrated using modern concepts of the structure of this vegetable polymer and methods based on theories of adsorption and NMR relaxation in heterogeneous systems.

  18. Temperature-induced transitions in disordered proteins probed by NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are abundant in nature and perform many important physiological functions. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy has been crucial for the understanding of the conformational properties of disordered proteins and is increasingly used to probe their conformational...... ensembles. Compared to folded proteins, disordered proteins are more malleable and more easily perturbed by environmental factors. Accordingly, the experimental conditions and especially the temperature modify the structural and functional properties of disordered proteins. NMR spectroscopy allows analysis...... of temperature-induced structural changes at residue resolution using secondary chemical shift analysis, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, and residual dipolar couplings. This chapter discusses practical aspects of NMR studies of temperature-induced structural changes in disordered proteins....

  19. Nitrate and ammonium influxes in soybean (Glycine max) roots : Direct comparison of N-13 and N-15 tracing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarkson, DT; Gojon, A; Saker, LR; Wiersema, PK; Purves, JV; Tillard, P; Arnold, GM; Paans, AJM; Vaalburg, W; Stulen, [No Value

    1996-01-01

    We compared influxes and internal transport in soybean plants (Glycine max cv. Kingsoy) of labelled N from external solutions where either ammonium or nitrate was labelled with the stable isotope N-15 and the radioactive isotope N-13. The objective was to see whether mass spectrometric determination

  20. Nitrate and ammonium influxes in soybean (Glycine max) roots : Direct comparison of N-13 and N-15 tracing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarkson, DT; Gojon, A; Saker, LR; Wiersema, PK; Purves, JV; Tillard, P; Arnold, GM; Paans, AJM; Vaalburg, W; Stulen, [No Value

    We compared influxes and internal transport in soybean plants (Glycine max cv. Kingsoy) of labelled N from external solutions where either ammonium or nitrate was labelled with the stable isotope N-15 and the radioactive isotope N-13. The objective was to see whether mass spectrometric

  1. DNA Packaging Specificity of Bacteriophage N15 with an Excursion into the Genetics of a Cohesive End Mismatch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Feiss

    Full Text Available During DNA replication by the λ-like bacteriophages, immature concatemeric DNA is produced by rolling circle replication. The concatemers are processed into mature chromosomes with cohesive ends, and packaged into prohead shells, during virion assembly. Cohesive ends are generated by the viral enzyme terminase, which introduces staggered nicks at cos, an approx. 200 bp-long sequence containing subsites cosQ, cosN and cosB. Interactions of cos subsites of immature concatemeric DNA with terminase orchestrate DNA processing and packaging. To initiate DNA packaging, terminase interacts with cosB and nicks cosN. The cohesive ends of N15 DNA differ from those of λ at 2/12 positions. Genetic experiments show that phages with chromosomes containing mismatched cohesive ends are functional. In at least some infections, the cohesive end mismatch persists through cyclization and replication, so that progeny phages of both allelic types are produced in the infected cell. N15 possesses an asymmetric packaging specificity: N15 DNA is not packaged by phages λ or 21, but surprisingly, N15-specific terminase packages λ DNA. Implications for genetic interactions among λ-like bacteriophages are discussed.

  2. DNA Packaging Specificity of Bacteriophage N15 with an Excursion into the Genetics of a Cohesive End Mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiss, Michael; Young Min, Jea; Sultana, Sawsan; Patel, Priyal; Sippy, Jean

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication by the λ-like bacteriophages, immature concatemeric DNA is produced by rolling circle replication. The concatemers are processed into mature chromosomes with cohesive ends, and packaged into prohead shells, during virion assembly. Cohesive ends are generated by the viral enzyme terminase, which introduces staggered nicks at cos, an approx. 200 bp-long sequence containing subsites cosQ, cosN and cosB. Interactions of cos subsites of immature concatemeric DNA with terminase orchestrate DNA processing and packaging. To initiate DNA packaging, terminase interacts with cosB and nicks cosN. The cohesive ends of N15 DNA differ from those of λ at 2/12 positions. Genetic experiments show that phages with chromosomes containing mismatched cohesive ends are functional. In at least some infections, the cohesive end mismatch persists through cyclization and replication, so that progeny phages of both allelic types are produced in the infected cell. N15 possesses an asymmetric packaging specificity: N15 DNA is not packaged by phages λ or 21, but surprisingly, N15-specific terminase packages λ DNA. Implications for genetic interactions among λ-like bacteriophages are discussed.

  3. Methyl group rotation, 1H spin-lattice relaxation in an organic solid, and the analysis of nonexponential relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Peter A; Schneider, Evan

    2012-02-07

    We report (1)H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in polycrystalline 4,4'-dimethoxybiphenyl at temperatures between 80 and 300 K at NMR frequencies of ω(0)/2π = 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz. The data are interpreted in terms of the simplest possible Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield methyl group hopping model. Different solid states are observed at low temperatures. The (1)H spin-lattice relaxation is nonexponential at higher temperatures where a stretched-exponential function fits the data very well, but this approach is phenomenological and not amenable to theoretical interpretation. (We provide a brief literature review of the stretched-exponential function.) The Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield model applies only to the relaxation rate that characterizes the initial (1)H magnetization decay in a high-temperature nonexponential (1)H spin-lattice relaxation measurement. A detailed procedure for determining this initial relaxation rate is described since large systematic errors can result if this is not done carefully.

  4. Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature-dependent property of the Grueneisen parameter has been employed in photoacoustic imaging mainly to measure tissue temperature. Here we explore this property using a different approach and develop Grueneisen-relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM), a technique that images non-radiative absorption with confocal optical resolution. GR-PAM sequentially delivers two identical laser pulses with a micro-second-scale time delay. The first laser pulse generates a photoacoustic signal and thermally tags the in-focus absorbers. Owing to the temperature dependence of the Grueneisen parameter, when the second laser pulse excites the tagged absorbers within the thermal relaxation time, a photoacoustic signal stronger than the first one is produced. GR-PAM detects the amplitude difference between the two co-located photoacoustic signals, confocally imaging the non-radiative absorption. We greatly improved axial resolution from 45 µm to 2.3 µm and at the same time slightly improved lateral resolution from 0.63 µm to 0.41 µm. In addition, the optical sectioning capability facilitates the measurement of the absolute absorption coefficient without fluence calibration. PMID:25379919

  5. Solution NMR structure of a designed metalloprotein and complementary molecular dynamics refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Jennifer R; Liu, Weixia; Spiegel, Katrin; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Klein, Michael L; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua; DeGrado, William F

    2008-02-01

    We report the solution NMR structure of a designed dimetal-binding protein, di-Zn(II) DFsc, along with a secondary refinement step employing molecular dynamics techniques. Calculation of the initial NMR structural ensemble by standard methods led to distortions in the metal-ligand geometries at the active site. Unrestrained molecular dynamics using a nonbonded force field for the metal shell, followed by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical dynamics of DFsc, were used to relax local frustrations at the dimetal site that were apparent in the initial NMR structure and provide a more realistic description of the structure. The MD model is consistent with NMR restraints, and in good agreement with the structural and functional properties expected for DF proteins. This work demonstrates that NMR structures of metalloproteins can be further refined using classical and first-principles molecular dynamics methods in the presence of explicit solvent to provide otherwise unavailable insight into the geometry of the metal center.

  6. A genetic algorithm for finding pulse sequences for NMR quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Rethinam, M J; Behrman, E C; Steck, J E; Skinner, S R

    2004-01-01

    We present a genetic algorithm for finding a set of pulse sequences, or rotations, for a given quantum logic gate, as implemented by NMR. We demonstrate the utility of the method by showing that shorter sequences than have been previously published can be found for both a CNOT and for the central part of Shor's algorithm (for N=15.) Artificial intelligence techniques like the genetic algorithm here presented have an enormous potential for simplifying the implementation of working quantum computers.

  7. Experimental implementation of a NMR entanglement witness

    CERN Document Server

    Filgueiras, J G; Auccaise, R E; Vianna, R O; Sarthour, R S; Oliveira, I S

    2012-01-01

    Entanglement witnesses (EW) allow the detection of entanglement in a quantum system, from the measurement of some few observables. They do not require the complete determination of the quantum state, which is regarded as a main advantage. On this paper it is experimentally analyzed an entanglement witness recently proposed in the context of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments to test it in some Bell-diagonal states. We also propose some optimal entanglement witness for Bell-diagonal states. The efficiency of the two types of EW's are compared to a measure of entanglement with tomographic cost, the generalized robustness of entanglement. It is used a GRAPE algorithm to produce an entangled state which is out of the detection region of the EW for Bell-diagonal states. Upon relaxation, the results show that there is a region in which both EW fails, whereas the generalized robustness still shows entanglement, but with the entanglement witness proposed here with a better performance.

  8. hNCOcanH pulse sequence and a robust protocol for rapid and unambiguous assignment of backbone ((1)H(N), (15)N and (13)C') resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2011-09-01

    A three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence named as hNCOcanH has been described to aid rapid sequential assignment of backbone resonances in (15)N/(13)C-labeled proteins. The experiment has been derived by a simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147]; t2 evolution is used to frequency label (13)C' rather than (15)N (similar trick has also been used in the design of hNCAnH pulse sequence from hNcaNH [Frueh et al., JACS, 131 (2009) 12880-12881]). The modification results in a spectrum equivalent to HNCO, but in addition to inter-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi , Ci-1), the spectrum also contains additional intra-residue correlation peaks (i.e. Hi-1 , Ci-1) in the direct proton dimension which has maximum resolution. This is the main strength of the experiment and thus, even a small difference in amide (1) H chemical shifts (5-6 Hz) can be used for establishing a sequential connectivity. This experiment in combination with the HNN experiment described previously [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] leads to a more robust assignment protocol for backbone resonances ((1) H(N) , (15)N) than could be derived from the combination of HNN and HN(C)N experiments [Bhavesh et al., Biochemistry, 40 (2001) 14727-14735]. Further, this new protocol enables assignment of (13)C' resonances as well. We believe that the experiment and the protocol presented here will be of immense value for structural-and functional-proteomics research by NMR. Performance of this experiment has been demonstrated using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin.

  9. Time domain NMR evaluation of poly(vinyl alcohol) xerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Elton Jorge da Rocha; Cavalcante, Maxwell de Paula; Tavares, Maria Ines Bruno, E-mail: mibt@ima.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia. Instituto de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano

    2016-05-15

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-based chemically cross-linked xerogels, both neat and loaded with nanoparticulate hydrophilic silica (SiO{sub 2}), were obtained and characterized mainly through time domain NMR experiments (TD-NMR). Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) analyses were employed as secondary methods. TD-NMR, through the interpretation of the spin-lattice relaxation constant values and related information, showed both cross-linking and nanoparticle influences on PVA matrix. SiO{sub 2} does not interact chemically with the PVA chains, but has effect on its molecular mobility, as investigated via TD-NMR. Apparent energy of activation, spin-lattice time constant and size of spin domains in the sample have almost linear dependence with the degree of cross-linking of the PVA and are affected by the addition of SiO{sub 2}. These three parameters were derived from a single set of TD-NMR experiments, which demonstrates the versatility of the technique for characterization of inorganic-organic hybrid xerogels, an important class of materials. (author)

  10. Recovering Invisible Signals by Two-Field NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Samuel F; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Haddou, Baptiste; Charlier, Cyril; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Tyburn, Jean-Max; Bovier, Pierre-Alain; Engelke, Frank; Maas, Werner; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-08-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have benefited tremendously from the steady increase in the strength of magnetic fields. Spectacular improvements in both sensitivity and resolution have enabled the investigation of molecular systems of rising complexity. At very high fields, this progress may be jeopardized by line broadening, which is due to chemical exchange or relaxation by chemical shift anisotropy. In this work, we introduce a two-field NMR spectrometer designed for both excitation and observation of nuclear spins in two distinct magnetic fields in a single experiment. NMR spectra of several small molecules as well as a protein were obtained, with two dimensions acquired at vastly different magnetic fields. Resonances of exchanging groups that are broadened beyond recognition at high field can be sharpened to narrow peaks in the low-field dimension. Two-field NMR spectroscopy enables the measurement of chemical shifts at optimal fields and the study of molecular systems that suffer from internal dynamics, and opens new avenues for NMR spectroscopy at very high magnetic fields.

  11. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amarnath Chtterjee; Ashutosh Kumar; Jeetender Chugh; Sudha Srivastava; Neel S Bhavesh; Ramakrishna V Hosur

    2005-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, as more and more genome sequences are becoming known and hectic efforts are underway to decode the information content in them, it is becoming increasingly evident that flexibility in proteins plays a crucial role in many of the biological functions. Many proteins have intrinsic disorder either wholly or in specific regions. It appears that this disorder may be important for regulatory functions of the proteins, on the one hand, and may help in directing the folding process to reach the compact native state, on the other. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has over the last two decades emerged as the sole, most powerful technique to help characterize these disordered protein systems. In this review, we first discuss the significance of disorder in proteins and then describe the recent developments in NMR methods for their characterization. A brief description of the results obtained on several disordered proteins is presented at the end.

  12. Following Metabolism in Living Microorganisms by Hyperpolarized (1)H NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzien, Piotr; Fages, Anne; Jona, Ghil; Brindle, Kevin M; Schwaiger, Markus; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-21

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dDNP) is used to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), enabling monitoring of metabolism and specific enzymatic reactions in vivo. dDNP involves rapid sample dissolution and transfer to a spectrometer/scanner for subsequent signal detection. So far, most biologically oriented dDNP studies have relied on hyperpolarizing long-lived nuclear spin species such as (13)C in small molecules. While advantages could also arise from observing hyperpolarized (1)H, short relaxation times limit the utility of prepolarizing this sensitive but fast relaxing nucleus. Recently, it has been reported that (1)H NMR peaks in solution-phase experiments could be hyperpolarized by spontaneous magnetization transfers from bound (13)C nuclei following dDNP. This work demonstrates the potential of this sensitivity-enhancing approach to probe the enzymatic process that could not be suitably resolved by (13)C dDNP MR. Here we measured, in microorganisms, the action of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and pyruvate formate lyase (PFL)-enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of pyruvate to form acetaldehyde and formate, respectively. While (13)C NMR did not possess the resolution to distinguish the starting pyruvate precursor from the carbonyl resonances in the resulting products, these processes could be monitored by (1)H NMR at 500 MHz. These observations were possible in both yeast and bacteria in minute-long kinetic measurements where the hyperpolarized (13)C enhanced, via (13)C → (1)H cross-relaxation, the signals of protons binding to the (13)C over the course of enzymatic reactions. In addition to these spontaneous heteronuclear enhancement experiments, single-shot acquisitions based on J-driven (13)C → (1)H polarization transfers were also carried out. These resulted in higher signal enhancements of the (1)H resonances but were not suitable for multishot kinetic studies. The potential of these (1)H-based approaches for

  13. [Spin-lattice relaxation of water protons in plant and animal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuilov, F D; Nikiforov, E A; Nikiforova, V I

    2012-01-01

    NMR-spin echo method has been used to study spin-lattice relaxation time of protons T1 in plant and animal cells - muscle tissue of fish, the cells of which unlike plant cells have no developed system of vacuoles, plastids and a solid cell wall. According to the values of T1 time a new NMR parameter K, a coefficient of relaxation effectiveness of a cell structure, has been calculated. This parameter can be used for quantitative characterization of the influence of different cell structures, the tissue water interact with, for a time of spin-lattice relaxation of water protons. It has been ascertained that the values of K coefficient in animal tissue and in storing tissues of some plants differ little; it may be stipulated by permanent transmembrane water exchange which occurs at high rate in the living cell. It has been concluded that there exists a certain similarity between water state in protoplast of plant and animal cells.

  14. Magnetoviscosity and relaxation in ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhof

    2000-09-01

    The increase in viscosity of a ferrofluid due to an applied magnetic field is discussed on the basis of a phenomenological relaxation equation for the magnetization. The relaxation equation was derived earlier from irreversible thermodynamics, and differs from that postulated by Shliomis. The two relaxation equations lead to a different dependence of viscosity on magnetic field, unless the relaxation rates are related in a specific field-dependent way. Both planar Couette flow and Poiseuille pipe flow in parallel and perpendicular magnetic field are discussed. The entropy production for these situations is calculated and related to the magnetoviscosity.

  15. [Death in a relaxation tank].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Wolf; Simon, Karl-Heinz; Bohnert, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Complete relaxation can be achieved by floating in a darkened, sound-proof relaxation tank filled with salinated water kept at body temperature. Under these conditions, meditation exercises up to self-hypnosis may lead to deep relaxation with physical and mental revitalization. A user manipulated his tank, presumably to completely cut off all optical and acoustic stimuli and accidentally also covered the ventilation hole. The man was found dead in his relaxation tank. The findings suggested lack of oxygen as the cause of death.

  16. NMR studies of metalloproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Li, H; H. Sun

    2011-01-01

    Metalloproteins represent a large share of the proteomes, with the intrinsic metal ions providing catalytic, regulatory, and structural roles critical to protein functions. Structural characterization of metalloproteins and identification of metal coordination features including numbers and types of ligands and metal-ligand geometry, and mapping the structural and dynamic changes upon metal binding are significant for understanding biological functions of metalloproteins. NMR spectroscopy has...

  17. Relaxing Behavioural Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Amálio

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Object-oriented (OO inheritance allows the definition of families of classes in a hierarchical way. In behavioural inheritance, a strong version, it should be possible to substitute an object of a subclass for an object of its superclass without any observable effect on the system. Behavioural inheritance is related to formal refinement, but, as observed in the literature, the refinement constraints are too restrictive, ruling out many useful OO subclassings. This paper studies behavioural inheritance in the context of ZOO, an object-oriented style for Z. To overcome refinement's restrictions, this paper proposes relaxations to the behavioural inheritance refinement rules. The work is presented for Z, but the results are applicable to any OO language that supports design-by-contract.

  18. NMR study of magnetism and superparamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shaojie

    The research described in this dissertation is concerned with two different types of magnetic materials. Both types of systems involve competing interactions between transition metal ions. New approaches involving magnetic resonance in the large hyperfine fields at nuclear sites have been developed. The interactions responsible for the properties that have been investigated in the materials studied are geometric frustration in an insulator and ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions in a metal alloy. Further details are given below. The extended kagome frustrated system YBaCo4O7 has 2D kagome and triangular lattices of Co ions stacked along the c-axis. Antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering accompanied by a structural transition has been reported in the literature. From a zero field (ZF) NMR single crystal rotation experiment, we have obtained the Co spin configurations for both the kagome and triangular layers. A 'spin-flop' configuration between the spins on the kagome layer and the spins on the triangular layer is indicated by our results. Our NMR findings are compared with neutron scattering results for this intriguing frustrated AF spin system. The non-stoichiometric oxygenated sister compound YBaCo4O7.1 has application potential for oxygen storage. While, its' magnetic properties are quite different from those of the stoichiometric compound, in spite of their similar structures of alternating kagome and triangular Co layers. Various techniques, including ZF NMR have been used to investigate the spin dynamics and spin configuration in a single crystal of YBaCo4O7.1. A magnetic transition at 80 K is observed, which is interpreted as the freezing out of spins in the triangular layers. At low temperatures (below 50 K), the spin dynamics persists and a fraction of spins in the kagome layers form a viscous spin liquid. Below 10 K, a glass-like spin structure forms and a large distribution of spin correlation times are suggested by nuclear spin lattice relaxation

  19. Moisture in untreated, a cetylated, and furfurylated Norway spruce studied during drying using time domain NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisabeth G. Thygesen; Thomas Elder

    2008-01-01

    Using time domain NMR, the moisture in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) sapwood subjected to four different treatments (never-dried, dried and remoistened, acetylated, and furfurylated) was studied during drying at 40°C, at sample average moisture contents above fiber saturation. Spin-spin relaxation time distributions were derived from CPMG...

  20. Time-domain NMR study of the drying of hemicellulose extracted aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Elder; Carl Houtman

    2013-01-01

    The effect of hot water on aspen chips has been evaluated using time-domain low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. At moisture contents above fiber saturation point, treated chips exhibit relaxation times of free water longer than for the control. This is consistent with the removal of hemicelluloses given the hydrophilicity of these polysaccharides....

  1. Modification of the Varian XL-100 NMR spectrometer for submilligram natural abundance C-13 analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. M.; Olsen, R. W.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Quadrature detection modifications and a microcell arrangement are described for the Varian XL-100 NMR spectrometer which routinely improve sensitivity in C-13 Fourier transform sample-limited studies by a factor of 4 to 5. The power requirement of the RF pulse amplifier is relaxed by a factor of 4. Previously attainable resolution is not affected.

  2. International school on high field NMR spectroscopy for solids and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, D.; Meier, B.; Keeler, J.; Berthault, P.; Vedrine, P.; Grandinetti, P.; Delsuc, M.A.; Spiess, H

    2006-07-01

    The aim of the school is to offer high-level pedagogical courses on a wide range of liquid- and solid-state NMR concepts and techniques: theory, instrumentation (magnets and probes), data acquisition, processing and analysis, measurement of dipolar and quadrupolar couplings, spin relaxation and hyper-polarization. This document gathers only the slides of most presentations.

  3. Limitations in biexponential fitting of NMR inversion-recovery curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Sotak, Christopher H.

    2017-03-01

    NMR relaxation agents have long been employed as contrast agents in MRI. In many cases, the contrast agent is confined to either (i) the vascular and/or extracellular compartment (EC), as is the case with gadolinium(III)-based agents, or (ii) the intracellular compartment (IC), as is the case with manganese(II) ions. The compartmentalization of contrast agents often results in tissue-water 1H relaxation profiles that are well modeled as biexponential. It has long been recognized that water exchange between compartments modifies the biexponential relaxation parameters (amplitudes and rate constants) from those that would be found in the absence of exchange. Nevertheless, interpretation in terms of an ;apparent; two-compartment biophysical model, apparent EC vs. apparent IC, can provide insight into tissue structure and function, and changes therein, in the face of physiologic challenge. The accuracy of modeling biexponential data is highly dependent upon the amplitudes, rate constants, and signal-to-noise characterizing the data. Herein, simulated (in silico) inversion-recovery relaxation data are modeled by standard, nonlinear-least-squares analysis and the error in parameter values assessed for a range of amplitudes and rate constants characteristic of in vivo systems following administration of contrast agent. The findings provide guidance for laboratories seeking to exploit contrast-agent-driven, biexponential relaxation to differentiate MRI-based compartmental properties, including the apparent diffusion coefficient.

  4. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse or...

  5. A new laboratory approach to shale analysis using NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) relaxometry is a non-invasive technique commonly used to assess hydrogen-bearing fluids in petroleum reservoir rocks. Measurements made using LF-NMR provide information on rock porosity, pore-size distributions, and in some cases, fluid types and saturations (Timur, 1967; Kenyon et al., 1986; Straley et al., 1994; Brown, 2001; Jackson, 2001; Kleinberg, 2001; Hurlimann et al., 2002). Recent improvements in LF-NMR instrument electronics have made it possible to apply methods used to measure pore fluids to assess highly viscous and even solid organic phases within reservoir rocks. T1 and T2 relaxation responses behave very differently in solids and liquids; therefore the relationship between these two modes of relaxation can be used to differentiate organic phases in rock samples or to characterize extracted organic materials. Using T1-T2 correlation data, organic components present in shales, such as kerogen and bitumen, can be examined in laboratory relaxometry measurements. In addition, implementation of a solid-echo pulse sequence to refocus T2 relaxation caused by homonuclear dipolar coupling during correlation measurements allows for improved resolution of solid-phase protons. LF-NMR measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions were carried out on raw oil shale samples from the Eocene Green River Formation and pyrolyzed samples of these shales processed by hydrous pyrolysis and techniques meant to mimic surface and in-situ retorting. Samples processed using the In Situ Simulator approach ranged from bitumen and early oil generation through to depletion of petroleum generating potential. The standard T1-T2 correlation plots revealed distinct peaks representative of solid- and liquid-like organic phases; results on the pyrolyzed shales reflect changes that occurred during thermal processing. The solid-echo T1 and T2 measurements were used to improve assessment of the solid organic phases, specifically

  6. Introductory Chemistry: A Molar Relaxivity Experiment in the High School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawsey, Anna C; Hathaway, Kathryn L; Kim, Susie; Williams, Travis J

    2013-07-09

    Dotarem and Magnevist, two clinically available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, were assessed in a high school science classroom with respect to which is the better contrast agent. Magnevist, the more efficacious contrast agent, has negative side effects because its gadolinium center can escape from its ligand. However, Dotarem, though a less efficacious contrast agent, is a safer drug choice. After the experiment, students are confronted with the FDA warning on Magnevist, which enabled a discussion of drug efficacy versus safety. We describe a laboratory experiment in which NMR spin lattice relaxation rate measurements are used to quantify the relaxivities of the active ingredients of Dotarem and Magnevist. The spin lattice relaxation rate gives the average amount of time it takes the excited nucleus to relax back to the original state. Students learn by constructing molar relaxivity curves based on inversion recovery data sets that Magnevist is more relaxive than Dotarem. This experiment is suitable for any analytical chemistry laboratory with access to NMR.

  7. Local spin relaxation within the random Heisenberg chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbrych, J; Kokalj, J; Prelovšek, P

    2013-10-04

    Finite-temperature local dynamical spin correlations S(nn)(ω) are studied numerically within the random spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain. The aim is to explain measured NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in BaCu(2)(Si(0.5)Ge(0.5))(2)O(7), which is the realization of a random spin chain. In agreement with experiments we find that the distribution of relaxation times within the model shows a very large span similar to the stretched-exponential form. The distribution is strongly reduced with increasing T, but stays finite also in the high-T limit. Anomalous dynamical correlations can be associated with the random singlet concept but not directly with static quantities. Our results also reveal the crucial role of the spin anisotropy (interaction), since the behavior is in contrast with the ones for the XX model, where we do not find any significant T dependence of the distribution.

  8. Gd[sup 3+] chelates of interest in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): studies using [sup 17]O NMR and EPR at several magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh Powell, D. (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Lausanne, Place du Chateau 3, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland)); Gonzalez, Gabriel (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Lausanne, Place du Chateau 3, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland)); Tissieres, Veronique (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Lausanne, Place du Chateau 3, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland)); Micskei, Karoly (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Lausanne, Place du Chateau 3, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland) Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Kossuth University, 4010, Debrecen (Hungary)); Bruecher, Ernoe (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Kossuth University, 4010, Debrecen (Hungary)); Helm, Lothar (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Lausanne, Place du Chateau 3, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland)); Merbach, Andre E. (Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry,

    1994-06-01

    The combination of [sup 17]O NMR relaxation rate and chemical shift measurements and EPR linewidth measurements at several magnetic fields provides a powerful probe of water exchange, rotational dynamics and electronic relaxation in aqueous solutions of Gd[sup 3+] complexes. This information is important for the understanding of the proton relaxivity of the complexes. Variable pressure measurements show a change of water exchange mechanism from associatively activated on [Gd(H[sub 2]O)[sub 8

  9. Porous structure of membranes of an acrylonitrile copolymer. Porosity, ^1H-NMR permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallat, A.; Margulies, M. M.

    2000-06-01

    Nanoporous polymer membranes (porosity φ≈ 0.7) used for dialysis are studied from NMR relaxation times of water confined in the pore space. Fast interpore water diffusion is observed. Two structural parameters are evidenced: i) a reduced NMR relaxation time, tau, which reflects the width of the pore-size distribution; ii) the average polymer-grain size of the solid matrix deduced from NMR experiments performed on membranes partially filled by water. A relation is found between the ratio k/tau^2, where k is the permeability to water and the porosity. This relation is in qualitative agreement with numerical simulations reported in the literature on low-porosity systems and with experimental results obtained for sedimentary rocks and for fused glass model systems. It supports the idea that tau is the relevant structural parameter to describe convective transport in a wide class of porous systems.

  10. Features of rubber swelling in transformer oil, according to NMR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavin, R. R.; Fursov, D. I.; Vasil'ev, S. G.; Tarasov, V. P.; Zabrodin, V. A.; Volkov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    NMR spectroscopy, NMR relaxation, and NMR with a pulsed magnetic field gradient methods are used to study the swelling of the elastomers based on ethylene-propylene rubber, butadiene-nitrile rubber, and fluororubber SKF-26 in transformer oil. Components corresponding to the fractions of oil and polymer network are identified. It is shown that the affinity of the polymers toward transformer oil displays an increase in the orderly sequence of ethylene-propylene rubber, fluororubber, and butadiene-nitrile rubber; the stability of the polymers towards carbon tetrachloride falls in the same sequence. Based on an analysis of the spin-spin relaxation time depending on the degree of swelling, it is found that fluororubber elastomers are characterized by the formation of a polymer network that prevents further sorption, In contrast, elastomer based on ethylene-propylene rubber gives no indication of the formation of a rigid polymer network.

  11. Transformer-coupled NMR probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsuzawa, Shin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we propose an NMR probe circuit that uses a transformer with a ferromagnetic core for impedance matching. The ferromagnetic core provides a strong but confined coupling that result in efficient energy transfer between the sample coil and NMR spectrometer, while not disturbing the B1 field generated by the sample coil. We built a transformer-coupled NMR probe and found that it offers comparable performance (loss NQR.

  12. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachleben, J. R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and {sup 13}C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 {angstrom}. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1}. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O{sub 2} and ultraviolet. A method for measuring {sup 14}N-{sup 1}H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in {sup 13}C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  13. Characterization of Oat (Avena nuda L.) β-Glucan Cryogelation Process by Low-Field NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia; Li, Linlin; Wu, Xiaoyan; Dai, Qiaoling; Zhang, Ru; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-13

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) is a useful method in studying the water distribution and mobility in heterogeneous systems. This technique was used to characterize water in an oat β-glucan aqueous system during cryogelation by repeated freeze-thaw treatments. The results indicated that microphase separation occurred during cryogelation, and three water components were determined in the cryostructure. The spin-spin relaxation time was analyzed on the basis of chemical exchange and diffusion exchange theory. The location of each water component was identified in the porous microstructure of the cryogel. The pore size measured from the SEM image is in accordance with that estimated from relaxation time. The formation of cryogel is confirmed by rheological method. The results suggested that the cryogelation process of the polysaccharide could be monitored by LF-NMR through the evolution of spin-spin relaxation characteristics.

  14. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Z.

    2016-05-31

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive, quantitative, reproducible, untargeted and unbiased method that requires no or minimal sample preparation, and is one of the leading analytical tools for metabonomics research [1-3]. The easy quantification and the no need of prior knowledge about compounds present in a sample associated with NMR are advantageous over other techniques [1,4]. 1H NMR is especially attractive because protons are present in virtually all metabolites and its NMR sensitivity is high, enabling the simultaneous identification and monitoring of a wide range of low molecular weight metabolites.

  15. Two new Ni(II) Schiff base complexes : X-ray absolute structure determination, synthesis of a N-15-labelled complex and full assignment of its H-1 NMR and C-13 NMR spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langer, Vratislav; Popkov, Alexander; Nadvornik, Milan; Lycka, Antonin

    2007-01-01

    The Ni(II) complex of the Schiff base of (S)-N-(2-benzoyl-4-chlorophenyl)-1-benzylpyrrolidine-2-carboxamide and glycine (1) [GKCI] and the hemihydrate of the Ni(II) complex of the Schiff base of (S)-N-(2-benzoylphenyl)-1-benzylpyrrolidine-2-carboxamide and 2-aminoisobutiric acid (2) Me(2)GK] were pr

  16. Dry-cured ham tissue characterization by fast field cycling NMR relaxometry and quantitative magnetization transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajd, Franci; Gradišek, Anton; Apih, Tomaž; Serša, Igor

    2016-05-31

    Fast field cycling (FFC) and quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) NMR methods are two powerful tools in NMR analysis of biological tissues. The qMT method is well established in biomedical NMR applications, while the FFC method is often used in investigations of molecular dynamics on which longitudinal NMR relaxation times of the investigated material critically depend. Despite their proven analytical potential, these two methods were rarely used in NMR studies of food, especially when combined together. In our study, we demonstrate the feasibility of a combined FFC/qMT-NMR approach for the fast and nondestructive characterization of dry-curing ham tissues differing by protein content. The characterization is based on quantifying the pure quadrupolar peak area (area under the quadrupolar contribution of dispersion curve obtained by FFC-NMR) and the restricted magnetization pool size (obtained by qMT-NMR). Both quantities correlate well with concentration of partially immobilized, nitrogen-containing and proton magnetization exchanging muscle proteins. Therefore, these two quantities could serve as potential markers for dry-curing process monitoring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of water in frozen biological tissues. Cross-relaxation effects between protein and bound water protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escanyé, J. M.; Canet, D.; Robert, J.

    Water proton longitudinal relaxation has been investigated in frozen mouse tissues including tumors. The nonfreezable water which gives rise to a relatively sharp NMR signal at this temperature (263 K) is identified as water bound to macromolecules. Measurements have been carried out by the nonselective inversion-recovery method at 90 and 6 MHz. Partially selective inversion has been achieved at 90 MHz by the DANTE sequence. The experimental data are analyzed by means of Solomon-type equations. This analysis provides the cross-relaxation term from which the dipolar contribution to water relaxation rate, arising from interactions with macromolecular protons, is calculated. This contribution seems to be dominant. The number of water protons interacting with a given macromolecular proton is found to be of the order of 10. The data at both frequencies can be consistently interpreted in terms of water diffusion, with a characteristic time of about 10 -9 sec. These conclusions are valid for all the tissues investigated here, their relaxation parameters exhibiting only slight differences.

  18. Application of rate equations to ELDOR and saturation recovery experiments on 14N: 15N spin-label pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun-Jie; Hyde, James S.

    Rate equations describing the time dependence of population differences of the five allowed transitions in an 14N 15N spin-label pair problem are set up. Included in the formulation are the three Heisenberg exchange rate constants and different nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates, electron spin-lattice relaxation rates, and populations for the 14N and 15N moieties. Using matrix algebra, stationary and time-dependent solutions are obtained in a unified theoretical framework. The calculations apply to stationary and pulse electron-electron double resonance and to saturation-recovery ESR. Particular emphasis is placed on short pulse initial excitation, where the transverse relaxation processes are sufficiently slow that only the population difference of the irradiated transition departs significantly from Boltzmann equilibrium during the excitation.

  19. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodukhin, S. N.

    2005-03-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  20. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    OpenAIRE

    Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2004-01-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the...

  1. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    CERN Document Server

    Solodukhin, S N

    2004-01-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  2. A NMR reverse diffusion filter for the simplification of spectra of complex mixtures and the study of drug receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Vázquez, M; Cobas, J C; Oliveira de Sousa, F F; Martin-Pastor, M

    2011-08-01

    A reverse diffusion filter NMR experiment (Drev) is proposed for the study of small molecules in binding with macromolecules. The filtering efficiency of Drev to eliminate the signals of the macromolecule is shown to be superior to conventional transverse relaxation filters at least for macromolecules containing a significant fraction of flexible residues. The Drev filter was also a useful complement for ligand-based NMR screening in combination with saturation transfer difference experiments.

  3. Direct synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles from iron(II) carboxymethylcellulose and their performance as NMR contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Delmarcio Gomes; Hiroshi Toma, Sergio; de Melo, Fernando Menegatti; Carvalho, Larissa Vieira C.; Magalhães, Alvicler; Sabadini, Edvaldo; dos Santos, Antônio Domingues; Araki, Koiti; Toma, e. Henrique E.

    2016-01-01

    Iron(II) carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) has been successfully employed in the synthesis of hydrophylic magnetite nanoparticles stabilized with a biopolymer coating, aiming applications in NMR imaging. The new method encompasses a convenient one-step synthetic procedure, allowing a good size control and yielding particles of about 10 nm (core size). In addition to the biocompatibility, the nanoparticles have promoted a drastic reduction in the transverse relaxation time (T2) of the water protons. The relaxivity rates have been investigated as a function of the nanoparticles concentration, showing a better performance in relation to the common NMR contrast agents available in the market.

  4. Size dependence of 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in micro- and nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panich, A. M.; Sergeev, N. A.; Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; Boudou, J.-P.; Goren, S. D.

    2015-02-01

    Size dependence of physical properties of nanodiamond particles is of crucial importance for various applications in which defect density and location as well as relaxation processes play a significant role. In this work, the impact of defects induced by milling of micron-sized synthetic diamonds was studied by magnetic resonance techniques as a function of the particle size. EPR and 13C NMR studies of highly purified commercial synthetic micro- and nanodiamonds were done for various fractions separated by sizes. Noticeable acceleration of 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation with decreasing particle size was found. We showed that this effect is caused by the contribution to relaxation coming from the surface paramagnetic centers induced by sample milling. The developed theory of the spin-lattice relaxation for such a case shows good compliance with the experiment.

  5. Size dependence of 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in micro- and nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panich, A M; Sergeev, N A; Shames, A I; Osipov, V Yu; Boudou, J-P; Goren, S D

    2015-02-25

    Size dependence of physical properties of nanodiamond particles is of crucial importance for various applications in which defect density and location as well as relaxation processes play a significant role. In this work, the impact of defects induced by milling of micron-sized synthetic diamonds was studied by magnetic resonance techniques as a function of the particle size. EPR and (13)C NMR studies of highly purified commercial synthetic micro- and nanodiamonds were done for various fractions separated by sizes. Noticeable acceleration of (13)C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation with decreasing particle size was found. We showed that this effect is caused by the contribution to relaxation coming from the surface paramagnetic centers induced by sample milling. The developed theory of the spin-lattice relaxation for such a case shows good compliance with the experiment.

  6. NMR Studies of 3-Acylcamphor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    NMR studies of some chiral 3-acyclcamphor were conducted.A complete assignment was given to 3-(4-pyridyl)carbonylcamphor by the 2D NMR technology.Assignments were also given to other b -diketones.The results showed that those 3-acylcamphors exist in the enol forms,while 2-benzoyl menthone exists in diketon form.

  7. NMR in pulsed magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30.4 T focused on 1H and 93Nb nuclei are reported. Here we discuss the advantage and limitation of pulsed field NMR and why this technique is able to become a promising research tool. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  8. 125Te NMR study of IrTe 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kiyoshi; Magishi, Ko-ichi; Shinonome, Yasuaki; Saito, Takahito; Koyama, Kuniyuki; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nagata, Shoichi

    2002-03-01

    We have measured 125Te NMR of IrTe2 in order to elucidate the origin of the anomalous behaviors in electrical and magnetic properties around 270 K. In high-temperature region, the NMR spectrum exhibits a sharp line. On the other hand, in low-temperature region, the spectrum shifts to higher magnetic field and splits into three lines. Also, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, is proportional to the temperature in both temperature sides; Korringa-like behavior which is characteristic of a metallic state. From the T dependences of the spectrum and 1/T1 around 270 K, it is suggested that these anomalous behaviors may not be due to the charge density wave formation but be caused by a kind of lattice distortion at low temperature.

  9. Compact NMR relaxometry of human blood and blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cistola, David P; Robinson, Michelle D

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry is a uniquely practical and versatile implementation of NMR technology. Because it does not depend on chemical shift resolution, it can be performed using low-field compact instruments deployed in atypical settings. Early relaxometry studies of human blood were focused on developing a diagnostic test for cancer. Those efforts were misplaced, as the measurements were not specific to cancer. However, important lessons were learned about the factors that drive the water longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times. One key factor is the overall distribution of proteins and lipoproteins. Plasma water T2 can detect shifts in the blood proteome resulting from inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. In whole blood, T2 is sensitive to hemoglobin content and oxygenation, although the latter can be suppressed by manipulating the static and applied magnetic fields. Current applications of compact NMR relaxometry include blood tests for candidiasis, hemostasis, malaria and insulin resistance.

  10. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  11. Gradient-Diffusion Methods for Simulating Decoherence by NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Havel, T F; Viola, L; Cory, D G; Havel, Timothy F.; Sharf, Yehuda; Viola, Lorenza; Cory, David G.

    2001-01-01

    Theoretical techniques are developed for designing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to simulate a variety of adiabatic decoherence (aka T_2 relaxation) processes, using sequences of pulsed field gradients and diffusion periods. To this end an efficient Hadamard product formalism is introduced and used to derive Lindblad master equations from NMR pulse sequences for both collective and independent phase damping on any number of spins. The Kraus operator sum form is shown to be related to the Hadamard form by diagonalization, and explicit Lindblad and Kraus operators given for arbitrary correlations between two spins. Finally, gradient-diffusion methods are outlined for more complex forms of decoherence, including the three-axis collective model.

  12. Heterogeneities in gelatin film formation using single-sided NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Sushanta; Mattea, Carlos; Denner, Paul; Stapf, Siegfried

    2010-12-16

    Gelatin solutions were prepared in D(2)O. The drying process of cast solutions was followed with a single-sided nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scanner until complete solidification occurred. Spin-spin relaxation times (T(2)) were measured at different layers with microscopic resolution and were correlated with the drying process during film formation. Additionally, the evaporation of the gelatin solution was observed optically from the reduction of the sample thickness, revealing that at the macroscopic level, the rate of evaporation is not uniform throughout the experiment. A crossover in the spatial evolution of the drying process is observed from the NMR results. At the early stages, the gel appears to be drier in the upper layers near the evaporation front, while this tendency is inverted at the later stages, when drying is faster from the bottom. XRD (X-ray diffraction) data showed that a structural heterogeneity persists in the final film.

  13. Profiling formulated monoclonal antibodies by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Leszek; Jordan, John B; Lawson, Ken; Jerums, Matthew; Apostol, Izydor; Schnier, Paul D

    2013-10-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is arguably the most direct methodology for characterizing the higher-order structure of proteins in solution. Structural characterization of proteins by NMR typically utilizes heteronuclear experiments. However, for formulated monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics, the use of these approaches is not currently tenable due to the requirements of isotope labeling, the large size of the proteins, and the restraints imposed by various formulations. Here, we present a new strategy to characterize formulated mAbs using (1)H NMR. This method, based on the pulsed field gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) experiment, facilitates the use of (1)H NMR to generate highly resolved spectra of intact mAbs in their formulation buffers. This method of data acquisition, along with postacquisition signal processing, allows the generation of structural and hydrodynamic profiles of antibodies. We demonstrate how variation of the PGSTE pulse sequence parameters allows proton relaxation rates and relative diffusion coefficients to be obtained in a simple fashion. This new methodology can be used as a robust way to compare and characterize mAb therapeutics.

  14. Structural Characterization of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins by NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Tompa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in NMR methodology and techniques allow the structural investigation of biomolecules of increasing size with atomic resolution. NMR spectroscopy is especially well-suited for the study of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs and intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs which are in general highly flexible and do not have a well-defined secondary or tertiary structure under functional conditions. In the last decade, the important role of IDPs in many essential cellular processes has become more evident as the lack of a stable tertiary structure of many protagonists in signal transduction, transcription regulation and cell-cycle regulation has been discovered. The growing demand for structural data of IDPs required the development and adaption of methods such as 13C-direct detected experiments, paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs or residual dipolar couplings (RDCs for the study of ‘unstructured’ molecules in vitro and in-cell. The information obtained by NMR can be processed with novel computational tools to generate conformational ensembles that visualize the conformations IDPs sample under functional conditions. Here, we address NMR experiments and strategies that enable the generation of detailed structural models of IDPs.

  15. An Exact Relaxation of Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2009-01-01

    of clustering problems such as the K-means objective and pairwise clustering as well as graph partition problems, e.g., for community detection in complex networks. In particular we show that a relaxation to the simplex can be given for which the extreme solutions are stable hard assignment solutions and vice......Continuous relaxation of hard assignment clustering problems can lead to better solutions than greedy iterative refinement algorithms. However, the validity of existing relaxations is contingent on problem specific fuzzy parameters that quantify the level of similarity between the original...... versa. Based on the new relaxation we derive the SR-clustering algorithm that has the same complexity as traditional greedy iterative refinement algorithms but leading to significantly better partitions of the data. A Matlab implementation of the SR-clustering algorithm is available for download....

  16. The relaxation & stress reduction workbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Martha; Eshelman, Elizabeth Robbins; McKay, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    "The Relaxation & Stress Reduction Workbook broke new ground when it was first published in 1980, detailing easy, step-by-step techniques for calming the body and mind in an increasingly overstimulated world...

  17. Relaxation Dynamics in Heme Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Reinhard Wilhelm

    A protein molecule possesses many conformational substates that are likely arranged in a hierarchy consisting of a number of tiers. A hierarchical organization of conformational substates is expected to give rise to a multitude of nonequilibrium relaxation phenomena. If the temperature is lowered, transitions between substates of higher tiers are frozen out, and relaxation processes characteristic of lower tiers will dominate the observational time scale. This thesis addresses the following questions: (i) What is the energy landscape of a protein? How does the landscape depend on the environment such as pH and viscosity, and how can it be connected to specific structural parts? (ii) What relaxation phenomena can be observed in a protein? Which are protein specific, and which occur in other proteins? How does the environment influence relaxations? (iii) What functional form best describes relaxation functions? (iv) Can we connect the motions to specific structural parts of the protein molecule, and are these motions important for the function of the protein?. To this purpose, relaxation processes after a pressure change are studied in carbonmonoxy (CO) heme proteins (myoglobin-CO, substrate-bound and substrate-free cytochrome P450cam-CO, chloroperoxidase-CO, horseradish peroxidase -CO) between 150 K and 250 K using FTIR spectroscopy to monitor the CO bound to the heme iron. Two types of p -relaxation experiments are performed: p-release (200 to ~eq40 MPa) and p-jump (~eq40 to 200 MPa) experiments. Most of the relaxations fall into one of three groups and are characterized by (i) nonexponential time dependence and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIM1( nu), FIM1(Gamma)); (ii) exponential time dependence and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIM0(A_{i}to A_{j})); exponential time dependence and Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIMX( nu)). The influence of pH is studied in myoglobin-CO and shown to have a strong influence on the substate population of the

  18. Structural Biology: Practical NMR Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Quincy

    2005-01-01

    This textbook begins with an overview of NMR development and applications in biological systems. It describes recent developments in instrument hardware and methodology. Chapters highlight the scope and limitation of NMR methods. While detailed math and quantum mechanics dealing with NMR theory have been addressed in several well-known NMR volumes, chapter two of this volume illustrates the fundamental principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy in a more descriptive manner. Topics such as instrument setup, data acquisition, and data processing using a variety of offline software are discussed. Chapters further discuss several routine stategies for preparing samples, especially for macromolecules and complexes. The target market for such a volume includes researchers in the field of biochemistry, chemistry, structural biology and biophysics.

  19. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  20. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  1. NMR molecular photography

    CERN Document Server

    Khitrin, A K; Fung, B M; Khitrin, Anatoly K.; Ermakov, Vladimir L.

    2002-01-01

    A procedure is described for storing a 2D pattern consisting of 32x32 = 1024 bits in a spin state of a molecular system and then retrieving the stored information as a stack of NMR spectra. The system used is a nematic liquid crystal, the protons of which act as spin clusters with strong intramolecular interactions. The technique used is a programmable multi-frequency irradiation with low amplitude. When it is applied to the liquid crystal, a large number of coherent long-lived 1H response signals can be excited, resulting in a spectrum showing many sharp peaks with controllable frequencies and amplitudes. The spectral resolution is enhanced by using a second weak pulse with a 90 phase shift, so that the 1024 bits of information can be retrieved as a set of well-resolved pseudo-2D spectra reproducing the input pattern.

  2. Applications of high resolution NMR to geochemistry: crystalline, glass, and molten silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, E.

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear spin interactions and the associated quantum mechanical dynamics which are present in solid state NMR are introduced. A brief overview of aluminosilicate structure is presented and crystalline structure is then reviewed, with emphasis on the contributions made by /sup 29/Si NMR spectroscopy. The local structure of glass aluminosilicates as observed by NMR, is presented with analysis of the information content of /sup 29/Si spectra. A high-temperature (to 1300/sup 0/C) NMR spectroscopic investigation of the local environment and dynamics of molecular motion in molten aluminosilicates is described. A comparison is made of silicate liquid, glass, and crystalline local structure. The atomic and molecular motions present in a melt are investigated through relaxation time (T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/) measurements as a function of composition and temperature for /sup 23/Na and /sup 29/Si.

  3. Anomalous hyperfine coupling and nuclear magnetic relaxation in Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okvátovity, Zoltán; Simon, Ferenc; Dóra, Balázs

    2016-12-01

    The electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction shows up in a variety of phenomena including, e.g., NMR studies of correlated states and spin decoherence effects in quantum dots. Here we focus on the hyperfine coupling and the NMR spin relaxation time T1 in Weyl semimetals. Since the density of states in Weyl semimetals varies with the square of the energy around the Weyl point, a naive power counting predicts a 1 /T1T ˜E4 scaling, with E the maximum of temperature (T ) and chemical potential. By carefully investigating the hyperfine interaction between nuclear spins and Weyl fermions, we find that while its spin part behaves conventionally, its orbital part diverges unusually, with the inverse of the energy around the Weyl point. Consequently, the nuclear spin relaxation rate scales in a graphenelike manner as 1 /T1T ˜E2ln(E /ω0) , with ω0 the nuclear Larmor frequency. This allows us to identify an effective hyperfine coupling constant, which is tunable by gating or doping. This is relevant for the decoherence effect in spintronics devices and double quantum dots, where hyperfine coupling is the dominant source of spin-blockade lifting.

  4. NMR STUDY ON THE COMPATIBILITY OF ACR/PVC BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiaoqing; QIU Lingshi; WANG Dongsheng; WANG Yuanshen

    1988-01-01

    A 300MHz solid NMR study on the compatibility of ACR (poly (methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylate),in the ratio of 1:1)-PVC (poly (vinyl chloride)) blends is reported. Spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2)relaxation time of ACR, PVC and their blends are recorded in the temperature range from 215K to 355K.Experimental results indicate that ACR and PVC are compatible with each other and the domain size is smaller than 25 nm, but heterogeneities of molecular dimensions still exist. Some problems of mechanism of compatibility and data analysis are also discussed.

  5. Cooking effects on water distribution in potatoes using nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Margit; Thybo, Anette K; Bertram, Hanne C; Andersen, Henrik J; Engelsen, Søren B

    2005-07-27

    Continuous low-field (LF) (1)H NMR relaxometry was used to monitor the structural changes during cooking of potatoes with two different dry matter (DM) contents. A principal component analysis of the relaxation decay curves revealed major events related to water mobility during cooking, which occur at 53 and 60 degrees C for potatoes with medium and low DM contents, respectively. Exponential analysis of the relaxation decays reveals two major water populations in the potato: a slow-relaxing (assigned to water in cytoplasm and extracellular cavities) water component, T(22) ( approximately 350-550 ms), and a fast-relaxing component (primarily assigned to water associated with starch and cell walls), T(21) ( approximately 45-65 ms). Significant DM dependent shifts in both the T(21) and T(22) relaxation time constants were observed during cooking, indicating that starch gelatinizes between 53 and 70 degrees C with water exchanging with the hydroxyls of starch (transition in T(21)) and cells start to disrupt with an increase in diffusion volumes at approximately 60 degrees C (transition in T(22)). The study reveals that continuous LF NMR measurement is an excellent and highly sensitive method to study changes in water mobility and water populations during the cooking of potatoes.

  6. Diffusion effects on volume-selective NMR at small length scales; Diffusionseffekte in volumenselektiver NMR auf kleinen Laengenskalen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaedke, Achim

    2009-01-21

    In this thesis, the interplay between diffusion and relaxation effects in spatially selective NMR experiments at short length scales is explored. This is especially relevant in the context of both conventional and mechanically detected MRI at (sub)micron resolution in biological specimens. Recent results on selectively excited very thin slices showed an in-slice-magnetization recovery orders of magnitude faster than the longitudinal relaxation time T1. However, those experiments were run on fully relaxed samples while MRI and especially mechanically detected NMR experiments are typically run in a periodic fashion with repetition times far below T1. The main purpose of this work therefore was to extend the study of the interplay between diffusion and longitudinal relaxation to periodic excitations. In some way, this is inverse phenomenon to the DESIRE (Diffusive Enhancement of SIgnal and REsolution) approach, proposed 1992 by Lauterbur. Experiments on periodically excited thin slices were carried out at a dedicated static field gradient cryomagnet with magnetic field gradients up to 180 T/m. In order to obtain plane slices, an appropriate isosurface of the gradient magnet had to be identified. It was found at a field of 3.8 T with a gradient of 73 T/m. In this field, slices down to a thickness of 3.2 {mu}m could be excited. The detection of the NMR signal was done using FIDs instead of echoes as the excitation bandwidth of those thin slices is sufficiently small to observe FIDs which are usually considered to be elusive to detection in such strong static field gradients. A simulation toolbox based on the full Bloch-Torrey-equation was developed to describe the excitation and the formation of NMR signals under those unusual conditions as well as the interplay of diffusion and magnetization recovery. Both the experiments and the simulations indicate that diffusion effects lead to a strongly enhanced magnetization modulation signal also under periodic excitation

  7. Single Particle Strengths and Mirror States in $^{15}$N$-^{15}$O below 12.0 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Mertin, C E; Crisp, A M; Keeley, N; Kemper, K W; Momtyuk, O; Roeder, B T; Volya, A

    2014-01-01

    New $^{14}$N(d,p) angular distribution data were taken at a deuteron bombarding energy of 16 MeV to locate all narrow single particle neutron states up to 15 MeV in excitation. A new shell model calculation is able to reproduce all levels in $^{15}$N up to 11.5 MeV and is used to characterize a narrow single particle level at 11.236 MeV and to provide a map of the single particle strengths. The known levels in $^{15}$N are then used to determine their mirrors in the lesser known nucleus $^{15}$O. The 2s$_{1/2}$ and 1d$_{5/2}$ single particle centroid energies are determined for the $^{15}$N$-^{15}$O mirror pair as: $^{15}$N $(\\text{2s}_{1/2}) = 8.08$ MeV, $^{15}$O $(\\text{2s}_{1/2}) = 7.43$ MeV, $^{15}$N $(\\text{1d}_{5/2}) = 7.97$ MeV, and $^{15}$O $(\\text{1d}_{5/2}) = 7.47$ MeV. These results confirm the degeneracy of these orbits and that the $^{15}$N$-^{15}$O nuclei are where the transition between the $\\text{2s}_{1/2}$ lying below the $\\text{1d}_{5/2}$ to lying above it, takes place. The $\\text{1d}_{3/2}$...

  8. Dynamics of unloaded and green tea extract loaded lecithin based liposomal dispersions investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance T2 relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtil, Emrah; Dag, Damla; Guner, Selen; Unal, Kubra; Oztop, Mecit H

    2017-09-01

    Liposomes are lipid bilayer vesicles that can be used as encapsulation systems for bioactive agents to provide increased protection against environmental stresses (such as pH or temperature extremes). Time Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (TD-NMR) that is based on differentiation of specimen contents with respect to magnetic relaxation rates provides detailed information on amount, state and distribution of water and oil and provide reproducible results on the samples. These make TD-NMR particularly suitable for time-dependent monitoring of emulsion system dynamics. In this study, spin-spin (T2) relaxation times and relaxation spectra were used for characterizing green tea extract loaded and unloaded liposomes prepared with soy (S75) and egg lecithins (E80) by different preparation methods (such as homogenization type, pressure and solvent type). Mean particle sizes of liposomes were found to be the most influential factor in shaping mono-exponential T2 relaxation times. The differences in particle sizes of E80 and S75 samples along with samples with different homogenization pressures could be monitored with T2 relaxation times. Additionally, T2 relaxation times were found to be correlated with particle shape irregularity, and chemical instability of samples due to lipid oxidation. With relaxation spectrum analysis, particular components in the sample could be distinguished (internal/external water and lipid bilayers), which gave more elaborate results on mechanisms of instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagonalization-free implementation of spin relaxation theory for large spin systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kuprov, Ilya

    2010-01-01

    The Liouville space spin relaxation theory equations are reformulated in such a way as to avoid the computationally expensive Hamiltonian diagonalization step, replacing it by numerical evaluation of the integrals in the generalized cumulant expansion. The resulting algorithm is particularly useful in the cases where the static part of the Ha-miltonian is dominated by interactions other than Zeeman (e.g. in quadrupolar reson-ance, low-field EPR and Spin Chemistry). When used together with state space re-striction tools, the algorithm reported is capable of computing full relaxation supero-perators for NMR systems with more than 15 spins.

  10. Anisotropic nuclear relaxation in YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walstedt, R.E.; Warren W.W. Jr.; Bell, R.F.; Brennert, G.F.; Espinosa, G.P.; Cava, R.J.; Schneemeyer, L.F.; Waszczak, J.V.

    1988-11-01

    Data are presented for the magnetic susceptibility of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/ and for the anisotropy of the copper nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time T/sub 1/ in the normal state for planar (Cu(2)) sites in this system. Using the Cu NMR shift to partition the susceptibility and estimate the density of states, we analyze the conventional enhanced Korringa model of T/sub 1/ contributions, finding it incapable of accounting for the anisotropy of the observed relaxation times. A localized spin-fluctuation picture is also discussed briefly.

  11. A detailed comparison of laboratory and borehole NMR estimated parameters in unconsolidated aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, A. A.; Auken, E.; Christiansen, A. V.; Müller-Petke, M.; Johnson, C. D.; Vilhelmsen, T. N.; Barfod, A. A. S.; Ferré, T. P. A.; Knight, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Borehole nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements can be used to obtain information about the hydrologic properties of unconsolidated aquifers. The NMR estimated parameters, water content and relaxation time, can be linked to hydraulic conductivity (K). In unconsolidated aquifers, attempts have been made to establish the NMR-K relationship by acquiring NMR and K data in boreholes. However, it is challenging in unconsolidated aquifers to obtain reliable estimates of the NMR parameters from borehole data. The aquifer formation can be altered due to severe washout during drilling and there can be a large disturbed zone around the PVC casing. Laboratory-NMR data could be used to assist in the development of reliable NMR-K models, as is typically done in the petroleum industry. The challenge has been obtaining high quality laboratory samples, from unconsolidated aquifers. In this study, we present a detailed comparison of laboratory and borehole NMR data at a study site in Denmark. To address the challenges with both laboratory and borehole measurements in unconsolidated aquifers, we drilled a borehole using a sonic rig that minimally disturbs the formation and produces essentially no disturbed zone around the PVC casing, thus providing ideal conditions for borehole NMR measurements. Moreover, continuous undisturbed samples, 3 in in diameter, were obtained for the entire depth of the borehole, 32 m. These samples are excellent for the laboratory NMR measurements because they are representative of in-situ conditions. With this drilling method we obtained reliable borehole NMR results that are supported by other logging data and lithologic description of the cores. In addition, we successfully acquired laboratory-NMR data that are in excellent agreement with our borehole NMR estimated parameters. This study provides insights into the impact of sample size and condition on laboratory measurements. Laboratory measurements of hydraulic conductivity were made in an

  12. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K.

  13. nmr spectroscopic study and dft calculations of giao nmr shieldings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    various fields of science and industry such as microelectronic and aerospace ... GIAO/DFT (Gauge Including Atomic Orbitals/Density Functional Theory) approach is .... successfully by using NMR and quantum chemical calculations.

  14. NMR spectrometers as "magnetic tongues"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Amoresano, Claudia; Trotta, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    opened up the possibility to calibrate the sensory perception. In this frame, we have tested the potentiality of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a predictive tool to measure sensory descriptors. In particular, we have used an NMR metabolomic approach that allowed us to differentiate...... the analyzed samples based on their chemical composition. We were able to correlate the NMR metabolomic fingerprints recorded for canned tomato samples to the sensory descriptors bitterness, sweetness, sourness, saltiness, tomato and metal taste, redness, and density, suggesting that NMR might be a very useful...

  15. Annual reports on NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Graham A; McCarthy, M J

    1995-01-01

    Over recent years, no other technique has grown to such importance as that of NMR spectroscopy. It is used in all branches of science where precise structural determination is required and where the nature of interactions and reactions in solution is being studied. Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy has established itself as a means for the specialist and non-specialist alike to become familiar with new applications of the technique in all branches of chemistry, including biochemistry, and pharmaceutics. This volume focuses on theoretical aspects of NMR nuclear shielding and on applications of

  16. Numerical simulation of multi-dimensional NMR response in tight sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiangfeng; Xie, Ranhong; Zou, Youlong; Ding, Yejiao

    2016-06-01

    Conventional logging methods have limitations in the evaluation of tight sandstone reservoirs. The multi-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging method has the advantage that it can simultaneously measure transverse relaxation time (T 2), longitudinal relaxation time (T 1) and diffusion coefficient (D). In this paper, we simulate NMR measurements of tight sandstone with different wettability and saturations by the random walk method and obtain the magnetization decays of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences with different wait times (TW) and echo spacings (TE) under a magnetic field gradient, resulting in D-T 2-T 1 maps by the multiple echo trains joint inversion method. We also study the effects of wettability, saturation, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of data and restricted diffusion on the D-T 2-T 1 maps in tight sandstone. The results show that with decreasing wetting fluid saturation, the surface relaxation rate of the wetting fluid gradually increases and the restricted diffusion phenomenon becomes more and more obvious, which leads to the wetting fluid signal moving along the direction of short relaxation and the direction of the diffusion coefficient decreasing in D-T 2-T 1 maps. Meanwhile, the non-wetting fluid position in D-T 2-T 1 maps does not change with saturation variation. With decreasing SNR, the ability to identify water and oil signals based on NMR maps gradually decreases. The wetting fluid D-T 1 and D-T 2 correlations in NMR diffusion-relaxation maps of tight sandstone are obtained through expanding the wetting fluid restricted diffusion models, and are further applied to recognize the wetting fluid in simulated D-T 2 maps and D-T 1 maps.

  17. Change of LF-NMR relaxation properties of sunflower seed oil at different temperatures and its correlation with physicochemical indexes%不同温度下葵花籽油低场核磁弛豫特性的变化及与理化指标的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    借助于低场核磁共振(LF-NMR)技术快速监测葵花籽油理化品质的变化,有利于油脂品质及安全保障.对葵花籽油在105℃和180℃氧化过程中的LF-NMR弛豫特性变化规律进行了研究,并应用逐步回归分析了其与多个理化指标间的相关性.结果表明:在105℃氧化过程中,S21和T22变化规律较为明显,分别呈二项式上升和下降趋势,其他弛豫特性变化规律不明显;相关性分析表明,除酸值和碘值外,过氧化值、共轭二烯、共轭三烯和茴香胺值均与S21和T22呈显著相关(P≤0.05)或极显著相关(P≤0.01),极性化合物与T21 、S21 、S22和T23均呈显著或极显著相关,预测模型经验证后发现,仅过氧化值、共轭二烯和极性化合物含量模型可靠(R2 >0.78);在180℃氧化过程中,S21和S22呈二项式上升,T21呈线性下降,T22和S23呈二项式下降趋势,且S21、T21、T22和S23均与除过氧化值外的其他理化指标呈显著相关或极显著相关,T23变化规律不明显,只有S22与过氧化值相关性显著;除过氧化值外,所有理化指标预测模型均建立准确(R2 >0.89),验证可靠(R2 >0.85).

  18. Time domain NMR as a new process monitoring method for characterization of pharmaceutical hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Stefanie Ulrike; Rothenhäusler, Benno; Willmann, Alf; Thun, Jürgen; Moog, Regina; Kuentz, Martin

    2017-04-15

    Hydrates are of great pharmaceutical relevance and even though they have been characterized thoroughly by various analytical techniques, there is barely literature available on molecular mobility of the hydrate water studied by NMR relaxation in the time domain. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of differentiating hydration states of drugs by (1)H time domain NMR (TD-NMR) regarding spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times (T2 and T1) using benchtop equipment. Caffeine and theophylline were selected as model compounds and binary mixtures of hydrate to anhydrate were analyzed for each drug using a spin echo and inversion recovery pulse sequence. It was possible to extract a signal that was specific for the water in the hydrates so that differentiation from anhydrous solid forms was enabled. Excellent calibrations were obtained for quantitative analysis of hydrate/anhydrate mixtures and predicted water contents were in good agreement with water amounts determined in desiccator sorption experiments. TD-NMR was therefore found to be a suitable new technique to characterize pharmaceutical hydrates in a non-invasive and hence sample-sparing manner. Quantification of the hydrate content in pharmaceutical mixtures appears highly attractive for product development and process monitoring. TD-NMR provides here a valuable and complementary technique to established process analytics, such as for example Raman spectroscopy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Milli-tesla NMR and spectrophotometry of liquids hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yue; Chen, Chia-Hsiu; Wilson, Zechariah; Savukov, Igor; Hilty, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization methods offer a unique means of improving low signal strength obtained in low-field NMR. Here, simultaneous measurements of NMR at a field of 0.7 mT and laser optical absorption from samples hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP) are reported. The NMR measurement field closely corresponds to a typical field encountered during sample injection in a D-DNP experiment. The optical spectroscopy allows determination of the concentration of the free radical required for DNP. Correlation of radical concentration to NMR measurement of spin polarization and spin-lattice relaxation time allows determination of relaxivity and can be used for optimization of the D-DNP process. Further, the observation of the nuclear Overhauser effect originating from hyperpolarized spins is demonstrated. Signals from 1H and 19F in a mixture of trifluoroethanol and water are detected in a single spectrum, while different atoms of the same type are distinguished by J-coupling patterns. The resulting signal changes of individual peaks are indicative of molecular contact, suggesting a new application area of hyperpolarized low-field NMR for the determination of intermolecular interactions.

  20. Sb-doped PbTe: An NMR Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, E. M.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Jaworski, C. M.; Heremans, J. P.

    2010-03-01

    In PbTe, Sb as a dopant can occupy either Pb or Te sites. To understand the effect of Sb on the local charge-carrier concentration in both cases, we have studied high-resolution ^125Te and ^207Pb NMR spectra of Pb1-xSbxTe, PbSbxTe1-x, and n- and p-type PbTe samples. The spectra of Pb0.9975Sb0.0025Te and PbSb0.0025Te0.9975 have distinctly different resonance frequencies due to Knight shifts and chemical shifts produced by Sb at Pb or Te sites. Pb0.9975Sb0.0025Te is n-type while in PbSb0.0025Te0.9975 both n- and p-type are found. NMR spectra and spin-lattice T1 relaxation of ^207Pb nuclei in PbSb0.0025Te0.9975, which are sensitive to the hyperfine interaction between charge carriers and NMR nuclei, reveal at least four components, which reflect electronic inhomogeneity of the sample. The local carrier concentrations estimated from T1 NMR varies from n<3x10^17 to p˜10^19 cm-3. These multiple components help rationalize the complex temperature dependence of the thermopower of PbSb0.0025Te0.9975. However, comparison with Hall and Seebeck effects data indicates that some NMR signals are due to localized electron states, which do not directly contribute to transport.

  1. Solid State NMR Studies of Energy Conversion and Storage Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankuru Hennadige, Sohan Roshel De Silva

    NMR (Nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy is utilized to study energy conversion and storage materials. Different types of NMR techniques including Magic Angle Spinning, Cross-polarization and relaxation measurement experiments were employed. Four different projects are discussed in this dissertation. First, three types of CFx battery materials were investigated. Electrochemical studies have demonstrated different electrochemical performances by one type, delivering superior performance over the other two. 13C and 19F MAS NMR techniques are employed to identify the atomic/molecular structural factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among different types. Next as the second project, layered polymer dielectrics were investigated by NMR. Previous studies have shown that thin film capacitors are improved by using alternate layers of two polymers with complementary properties: one with a high breakdown strength and one with high dielectric constant as opposed to monolithic layers. 13C to 1H cross-polarization techniques were used to investigate any inter-layer properties that may cause the increase in the dielectric strength. The third project was to study two types of thermoelectric materials. These samples were made of heavily doped phosphorous and boron in silicon by two different methods: ball-milled and annealed. These samples were investigated by NMR to determine the degree of disorder and obtain insight into the doping efficiency. The last ongoing project is on a lithium-ion battery system. The nature of passivating layers or the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed on the electrodes surface is important because of the direct correlation between the SEI and the battery life time/durability. Multinuclear (7Li, 19F, 31P) techniques are employed to identify the composition of the SEI formation of both positive and negative electrodes.

  2. β-NMR sample optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Zakoucka, Eva

    2013-01-01

    During my summer student programme I was working on sample optimization for a new β-NMR project at the ISOLDE facility. The β-NMR technique is well-established in solid-state physics and just recently it is being introduced for applications in biochemistry and life sciences. The β-NMR collaboration will be applying for beam time to the INTC committee in September for three nuclei: Cu, Zn and Mg. Sample optimization for Mg was already performed last year during the summer student programme. Therefore sample optimization for Cu and Zn had to be completed as well for the project proposal. My part in the project was to perform thorough literature research on techniques studying Cu and Zn complexes in native conditions, search for relevant binding candidates for Cu and Zn applicable for ß-NMR and eventually evaluate selected binding candidates using UV-VIS spectrometry.

  3. Integrative NMR for biomolecular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Dashti, Hesam; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Butcher, Samuel E; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A; Markley, John L

    2016-04-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determining structural and functional features of biomolecules in physiological solution as well as for observing their intermolecular interactions in real-time. However, complex steps associated with its practice have made the approach daunting for non-specialists. We introduce an NMR platform that makes biomolecular NMR spectroscopy much more accessible by integrating tools, databases, web services, and video tutorials that can be launched by simple installation of NMRFAM software packages or using a cross-platform virtual machine that can be run on any standard laptop or desktop computer. The software package can be downloaded freely from the NMRFAM software download page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html ), and detailed instructions are available from the Integrative NMR Video Tutorial page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html ).

  4. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  5. Multi-scales nuclear spin relaxation of liquids in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Jean-Pierre

    2010-03-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(ω) is a rich source of dynamical information for characterizing the molecular dynamics of liquids in confined environments. Varying the magnetic field changes the Larmor frequency ω, and thus the fluctuations to which the nuclear spin relaxation is sensitive. Moreover, this method permits a more complete characterization of the dynamics than the usual measurements as a function of temperature at fixed magnetic field strength, because many common solvent liquids have phase transitions that may alter significantly the character of the dynamics over the temperature range usually studied. Further, the magnetic field dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T(ω), provides a good test of the theories that relate the measurement to the microdynamical behavior of the liquid. This is especially true in spatially confined systems where the effects of reduced dimensionality may force more frequent reencounters of the studied proton spin-bearing molecules with paramagnetic impurities at the pore surfaces that may alter the correlation functions that enter the relaxation equations in a fundamental way. We show by low field NMR relaxation that changing the amount of surface paramagnetic impurities leads to striking different pore-size dependences of the relaxation times T and T of liquids in pores. Here, we focus mainly on high surface area porous materials including calibrated porous silica glasses, granular packings, heterogeneous catalytic materials, cement-based materials and natural porous materials such as clay minerals and rocks. Recent highlights NMR relaxation works are reviewed for these porous materials, like continuous characterization of the evolving microstructure of various cementitious materials and measurement of wettability in reservoir carbonate rocks. Although, the recent applications of 2-dimensional T-T and T-z-store-T correlation experiments for characterization of

  6. The effects of frontal EMG biofeedback and progressive relaxation upon hyperactivity and its behavioral concomitants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braud, L W

    1978-03-01

    Hyperactive children (N = 15) and nonhyperactive children (N = 15) were compared. Hyperactive children were found to possess significantly higher (p less than .002) muscular tension levels and, in addition, presented more behavioral problems and had lower test scores. Both electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback and progressive relaxation exercises were successful in the significant reduction of muscular tension, hyperactivity, distractability, irritability, impulsivity, explosiveness, aggressivity, and emotionality in hyperactive children. The greatest improvement was seen in the area of "emotionality-aggression" (irritability, explosiveness, impulsivity, low frustration tolerance, aggresion). No differences were seen in the EMG improvement of drug and nondrug hyperactive children; both made progress under these self-control techniques. However, nondrug children made greater improvements in the behavioral area. Both EMG biofeedback and progressive relaxation resulted in improvements on the test scores of hyperactive subjects (Bender-Gestalt, Visual Sequential Memory, Digit Span, Coding). The therapy would appear to be improved by the inclusion of mental relaxation, concentration, meditation, and mind-blanking exercises for mental control.

  7. Dynamical theory of spin relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Timothy R.; Bain, Alex D.

    2013-02-01

    The dynamics of a spin system is usually calculated using the density matrix. However, the usual formulation in terms of the density matrix predicts that the signal will decay to zero, and does not address the issue of individual spin dynamics. Using stochastic calculus, we develop a dynamical theory of spin relaxation, the origins of which lie in the component spin fluctuations. This entails consideration of random pure states for individual protons, and how these pure states are correctly combined when the density matrix is formulated. Both the lattice and the spins are treated quantum mechanically. Such treatment incorporates both the processes of spin-spin and (finite temperature) spin-lattice relaxation. Our results reveal the intimate connections between spin noise and conventional spin relaxation.

  8. A mixed relaxed clock model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  9. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raftery, M. Daniel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping 129Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the 131Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  10. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  11. NMR characterization of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  12. {sup 77}Se NMR study of nonmagnetic-magnetic transition in (TMTSF){sub 2}X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mito, T., E-mail: mito_takeshi@hotmail.co [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Nishiyama, K.; Koyama, T.; Ueda, K.; Kohara, T.; Takeuchi, K.; Akutsu, H.; Yamada, J. [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Kornilov, A.; Pudalov, V.M. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Qualls, J.S. [Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA 94928 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    {sup 77}Se NMR measurements have been carried out on (TMTSF){sub 2}X (X = PF{sub 6} and AsF{sub 6}) single crystals. For both compounds, NMR lines split into double-peaked spectra in the SDW state, which is explained with sinusoidal internal field at Se nucleus positions having the same incommensurate wave number with that of the SDW order. No change in the lineshape was observed at T{sub x} at which the spin-relaxation rate shows a kink, suggesting that this anomaly does not cause significant static changes in internal field at the Se-site.

  13. New method for the determination of diffusion constants from partially narrowed NMR lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, D.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of atomic and molecular motions on the NMR free-induction decay (FID) and lineshape is investigated theoretically in the intermediate temperature range in which the NMR line is only partially narrowed. It is shown that the FID may be decomposed into the weighted sum of a rigid-lattice (background) contribution and an exponentially decaying part containing all the information on the diffusive or reorientational motions in the crystal in terms of the spin-spin relaxation time T/sub 2/.

  14. EFFICACY OF POST ISOMETRIC RELAXATION VERSUS STATIC STRECHING IN SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC NON SPECIFIC NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Haritha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neck pain is a common problem within our society. Upper trapezius sternocleidomastoid and the levator scapulae are the most common postural muscles that tends to get shorten leading to restricted neck mobility. There is lack of evidence to allow conclusions to be drawn about the effectiveness of post isometric relaxation when compared with static stretching exercises. The aim is to find out the effectiveness of Post isometric relaxation Versus Static stretching in the subjects with chronic nonspecific neck pain. To evaluate the effectiveness of post isometric relaxation technique on pain by using Visual analoge scale, range of motion by using Universal Goniometry, and functional disability by using Neck Disability Index in chronic nonspecific neck pain. Methods: A convenient sample of thirty seven subjects was diagnosed with nonspecific neck pain was randomly allocated to one of the two treatment groups on the basis of the inclusion criteria. The experimental group (n=15 received three sessions of post isometric relaxation technique for trapezius, sternocleidomastoid and the levator scapulae and control group (n=15 received the three sessions of static stretching for trapezius, sternocliedomastiod and levator scapulae for four weeks. Results: Non parametric tests demonstrated a statistically significant difference with experimental group showing greater improvement in ROM, VAS, and NDI than the control group and significant difference within the group also. Conclusion: This study concluded and the results reflected that post isometric relaxation technique group had better improvement in reduction of pain, improvement in the range of motion, and increased neck functional activities than the static stretching group.

  15. LAVENDER AROMATERAPHY AS A RELAXANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGA Prima Dewi AP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aromatherapy is a kind of treatment that used aroma with aromatherapy essential oil. Extraction process from essential oil generally doing in three methods, there are distilling with water (boiled, distilling with water and steam, and distilling with steam. One of the most favorite aroma is lavender. The main content from lavender is linalyl acetate and linalool (C10H18O. Linalool is main active contents in lavender which can use for anti-anxiety (relaxation. Based on some research, the conclusion indicates that essential oil from lavender can give relaxation (carminative, sedative, reduce anxiety level and increasing mood.

  16. Statistical mechanics of violent relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spergel, David N.; Hernquist, Lars

    1992-01-01

    We propose a functional that is extremized through violent relaxation. It is based on the Ansatz that the wave-particle scattering during violent dynamical processes can be approximated as a sequence of discrete scattering events that occur near a particle's perigalacticon. This functional has an extremum whose structure closely resembles that of spheroidal stellar systems such as elliptical galaxies. The results described here, therefore, provide a simple framework for understanding the physical nature of violent relaxation and support the view that galaxies are structured in accord with fundamental statistical principles.

  17. Active optomechanics through relaxation oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Princepe, Debora; Frateschi, Newton

    2014-01-01

    We propose an optomechanical laser based on III-V compounds which exhibits self-pulsation in the presence of a dissipative optomechanical coupling. In such a laser cavity, radiation pressure drives the mechanical degree of freedom and its back-action is caused by the mechanical modulation of the cavity loss rate. Our numerical analysis shows that even in a wideband gain material, such dissipative coupling couples the mechanical oscillation with the laser relaxation oscillations process. Laser self-pulsation is observed for mechanical frequencies below the laser relaxation oscillation frequency under sufficiently high optomechanical coupling factor.

  18. Thermal relaxation and mechanical relaxation of rice gel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁玉琴; 赵思明; 熊善柏

    2008-01-01

    Rice gel was prepared by simulating the production processes of Chinese local rice noodles,and the properties of thermal relaxation and mechanical relaxation during gelatinization were studied by differential scanning calorimetry(DSC) measurement and dynamic rheometer.The results show that during gelatinization,the molecular chains of rice starch undergo the thermal relaxation and mechanical relaxation.During the first heating and high temperature holding processes,the starch crystallites in the rice slurry melt,and the polymer chains stretch and interact,then viscoelastic gel forms.The cooling and low temperatures holding processes result in reinforced networks and decrease the viscoelasticity of the gel.During the second heating,the remaining starch crystallites further melt,the network is reinforced,and the viscoelasticity increases.The viscoelasticity,the molecular conformation and texture of the gel are adjusted by changing the temperature,and finally construct the gel with the textural characteristics of Chinese local rice noodle.

  19. 95Mo NMR: hyperfine interactions in MoO3, MoS2, MoSe2 Mo3Se4, MoSi2 and Mo2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastow, T J

    1998-10-01

    Nuclear hyperfine interactions have been obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for 95Mo in a number of binary Mo compounds, both insulators and metals, which illustrate the interplay between nuclear quadrupole and chemical (Knight) shift terms. The insulating phases are characterised by nuclear spin lattice relaxation times greater than 100 s, demonstrating the ineffectiveness of indirect phonon Raman relaxation for these compounds.

  20. Exploring hyperpolarized 83Kr by remotely detected NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Stupic, Karl F.; LeNoir, Catherine F.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    For the first time, a hyperpolarized (hp) noble gas with a nuclear electric quadrupole moment is available for high-field nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance imaging. Hp Kr83 (I=9/2) is generated by spin-exchange optical pumping and separated from the rubidium vapor used in the pumping process. Optical pumping occurs under the previously unstudied condition of high krypton gas densities. Signal enhancements of more than three orders of magnitude compared to the thermal equilibrium Kr83 signal at 9.4T magnetic-field strength are obtained. The spin-lattice relaxation of Kr83 is caused primarly by quadrupolar couplings during the brief adsorption periods of the krypton atoms on the surrounding container walls and significantly limits the currently obtained spin polarization. Measurements in macroscopic glass containers and in desiccated canine lung tissue at field strengths between 0.05 and 3T using remotely detected hp Kr83 NMR spectroscopy reveal that the longitudinal relaxation dramatically accelerates as the magnetic-field strength decreases.

  1. Multi-exponential inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Weimin(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Kenyon, W. E. , Petrophysical principles of applications of NMR logging, The Log Analyst, 1997, March-April: 21-43.[2]Timur, A., Producible porosity and permeability of sandstone investigated through nuclear magnetic resonance principles,Journal of Petroleum Technology, 1969, 21: 775-786.[3]Chakrabarty, T. , Longo, J. , A new method for mineral quantification to aid in hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation,Journal of Canadian Petroleum Technology, 1997, 36(11 ): 15-21.[4]Kleinberg, R. L. , Vinegar, H. J. , NMR properties of reservoir fluids, The Log Analyst, 1996, November-December: 20-32.[5]Wahba, G. , Practical approximate solutions to linear operator equations when the data are noisy, SIAM. J. Numer. Anal. ,1977, 14(4): 651-667.[6]Butler, J. P. , Reeds, J. A. , Dawson, S. V. , Estimating solutions of first kind integral equations with nonnegative constraints and optimal smoothing, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. , 1981, 18(3): 381-397.[7]Munn, K. , Smith, D. M., A NMR technique for the analysis of pore structure: Numerical inversion of relaxation measurements, Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 1987,19(1): 117-126.[8]Provencher, S. W., A constrained regularization method for inverting data represented by linear algebraic or integral equations, Computer Physics Communications, 1982, 27: 213-227.[9]Bergman, D. J., Dunn, K. J., Magnetic susceptibility contrasted fixed field gradient effects on the spin-echo amplitude in a periodic porous media with diffusion, Phys. Soc., 1995, 40: 695-702.[10]Wang Weimin, The basic experiment studies of NMR logging, Well Logging Technology, 1997, 21 (6): 385-392.

  2. Spin dynamics in charge doped antiferromagnets : a Li-7 NMR study in Ni1-xLixO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tedoldi, F; Marini, S; Corti, M

    1997-01-01

    The effects of heterovalent substitutions causing itinerant holes in strongly correlated 3d electron systems are studied by means of Li-7 NMR in lithium-doped antiferromagnetic NiO. The spin-lattice relaxation rates, driven by the fluctuation of Ni2+ (S = 1) ions, in the temperature range 10 K

  3. Spin dynamics in charge doped antiferromagnets : a Li-7 NMR study in Ni1-xLixO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tedoldi, F; Marini, S; Corti, M

    1997-01-01

    The effects of heterovalent substitutions causing itinerant holes in strongly correlated 3d electron systems are studied by means of Li-7 NMR in lithium-doped antiferromagnetic NiO. The spin-lattice relaxation rates, driven by the fluctuation of Ni2+ (S = 1) ions, in the temperature range 10 K

  4. Spin dynamics in charge doped antiferromagnets : a Li-7 NMR study in Ni1-xLixO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tedoldi, F; Marini, S; Corti, M

    1997-01-01

    The effects of heterovalent substitutions causing itinerant holes in strongly correlated 3d electron systems are studied by means of Li-7 NMR in lithium-doped antiferromagnetic NiO. The spin-lattice relaxation rates, driven by the fluctuation of Ni2+ (S = 1) ions, in the temperature range 10 K

  5. A HTS dc SQUID-NMR: fabrication of the SQUID and application to low-field NMR for fruit quality detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isingizwe Nturambirwe, J. Frédéric; Perold, Willem J.; Opara, Linus U.

    2014-06-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have made the detection of low-field (LF) and ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF-NMR) a reality. The latter has been proven to be a potential tool for non-destructive quality testing of horticultural products, amongst many other applications. High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) dc SQUIDS are likely to allow for the development of not only low-cost NMR systems but also prototypes that are mobile and easily maintainable. A HTS dc SQUID was manufactured on an YBCO thin film, using a novel laser based lithography method. The lithography was implemented by a new laser system developed in-house, as a model of low-cost lithography systems. The junctions of the dc SQUID were tested and displayed normal I-V characteristics in the acceptable range for the application. In order to determine the viability of low-field NMR for non-destructive quality measurement of horticultural products, a commercial HTS dc SQUID-NMR system was used to measure quality parameters of banana during ripening. The trend of color change and sugar increase of the banana during ripening were the most highly correlated attributes to the SQUID-NMR measured parameter, average T1 (spin-lattice relaxation time). Further studies were done, that involved processing of the NMR signal into relaxation time resolved spectra. A spectral signature of banana was obtained, where each peak is a T1 value corresponding to a proton pool, and is reported here. These results will potentially lead to deeper understanding of the quality of the samples under study.

  6. Nitrogen content and delta N-15 of marine algae and associated waters of Maui, Hawaii from 2012-07-28 to 2014-04-01. (NCEI Accession 0156294)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes nutrient data related to algal and water samples collected between 2012 and 2014 on Maui, Hawaii. Algal tissue N%, C:N ratios, and delta N-15...

  7. Solid state 1H NMR studies of cell wall materials of potatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huiru; Belton, Peter S.; Ng, Annie; Waldron, Keith W.; Ryden, Peter

    1999-04-01

    Cell wall materials from potatoes ( Solanum tuberosum) prepared by two different methods have been studied using NMR proton relaxation times. Spin lattice relaxation in both the rotating and laboratory frames as well as transverse relaxation have been measured over a range of temperatures and hydration levels. It was observed that the sample prepared using a DMSO extraction showed anomalous behaviour of spin lattice relaxation in the laboratory frame probably due to residual solvent in the sample. Spin lattice relaxation in the laboratory frame is the result of hydroxymethyl rotation and another unidentified high frequency motion. In the rotating frame relaxation is adequately explained by hydroxymethyl rotation alone. In neither experiment is methyl group rotation observed, calculation suggests that this is due to the low density of methyl groups in the sample. Non-freezing water in potato cell walls, α-cellulose and pectin was found about 0.2, 0.04 and 0.18 g per gram dry matter, indicating preferable hydration of pectin compared to cellulose. The effects of hydration are most noticeable in the measurements that reflect low frequency motions, particularly transverse relaxation, where both second moments and the relative intensity of signals arising from immobile material are reduced by hydration.

  8. Parsimony and goodness-of-fit in multi-dimensional NMR inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babak, Petro; Kryuchkov, Sergey; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    Multi-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are often used for study of molecular structure and dynamics of matter in core analysis and reservoir evaluation. Industrial applications of multi-dimensional NMR involve a high-dimensional measurement dataset with complicated correlation structure and require rapid and stable inversion algorithms from the time domain to the relaxation rate and/or diffusion domains. In practice, applying existing inverse algorithms with a large number of parameter values leads to an infinite number of solutions with a reasonable fit to the NMR data. The interpretation of such variability of multiple solutions and selection of the most appropriate solution could be a very complex problem. In most cases the characteristics of materials have sparse signatures, and investigators would like to distinguish the most significant relaxation and diffusion values of the materials. To produce an easy to interpret and unique NMR distribution with the finite number of the principal parameter values, we introduce a new method for NMR inversion. The method is constructed based on the trade-off between the conventional goodness-of-fit approach to multivariate data and the principle of parsimony guaranteeing inversion with the least number of parameter values. We suggest performing the inversion of NMR data using the forward stepwise regression selection algorithm. To account for the trade-off between goodness-of-fit and parsimony, the objective function is selected based on Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). The performance of the developed multi-dimensional NMR inversion method and its comparison with conventional methods are illustrated using real data for samples with bitumen, water and clay.

  9. Pulsed NMR studies of water under extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFries, Timothy Hatmaker

    1978-01-01

    The dynamic structure of water and heavy water was studied using NMR spin-lattice relaxation and self-diffusion techniques. For both compounds, the relaxation rate is proportional to the ratio of viscosity to absolute temperature at constant density. The coupling between rotational and translational motions decreases with increasing temperature and increasing density. The temperature and density dependence of the deuteron quadrupole coupling constant in D/sub 2/O was determined. The proton spin-lattice relaxation times of supercritical H/sub 2/O were measured from 400 to 700/sup 0/C and to 1 kbar. The times were found to be roughly proportional to density and were found to decrease with temperature. The angular momentum correlation times tau/sub J/ were calculated and compared with the times between collisions for a hard sphere fluid, the Enskog times, tau/sub E/. The values of tau/sub E//tau/sub J/ were roughly 6 at 400/sup 0/C and low densities. The values decreased at higher densities and higher temperatures. The proton spin-lattice relaxation times of H/sub 2/O were also measured from 90 to 350/sup 0/C up to 2 to 5 kbar. The data clearly show the change from dipolar to spin-rotation relaxation as a function of temperature and density. Both the low and the high temperature results agree with the idea that it is the strong and anisotropic intermolecular potential which causes the dynamic behavior of water to be so different from that of normal liquids.

  10. Direct simulation of magnetic resonance relaxation rates and line shapes from molecular trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, David P; Baveye, Philippe C; Robinson, Bruce H

    2012-06-07

    We simulate spin relaxation processes, which may be measured by either continuous wave or pulsed magnetic resonance techniques, using trajectory-based simulation methodologies. The spin-lattice relaxation rates are extracted numerically from the relaxation simulations. The rates obtained from the numerical fitting of the relaxation curves are compared to those obtained by direct simulation from the relaxation Bloch-Wangsness-Abragam-Redfield theory (BWART). We have restricted our study to anisotropic rigid-body rotational processes, and to the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) and a single spin-spin dipolar (END) coupling mechanisms. Examples using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) nitroxide and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) deuterium quadrupolar systems are provided. The objective is to compare those rates obtained by numerical simulations with the rates obtained by BWART. There is excellent agreement between the simulated and BWART rates for a Hamiltonian describing a single spin (an electron) interacting with the bath through the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) mechanism undergoing anisotropic rotational diffusion. In contrast, when the Hamiltonian contains both the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) and the spin-spin dipolar (END) mechanisms, the decay rate of a single exponential fit of the simulated spin-lattice relaxation rate is up to a factor of 0.2 smaller than that predicted by BWART. When the relaxation curves are fit to a double exponential, the slow and fast rates extracted from the decay curves bound the BWART prediction. An extended BWART theory, in the literature, includes the need for multiple relaxation rates and indicates that the multiexponential decay is due to the combined effects of direct and cross-relaxation mechanisms.

  11. Dielectric relaxation of samarium aluminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhya, Anup Pradhan; Dutta, Alo; Sinha, T.P. [Bose Institute, Department of Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2014-03-15

    A ceramic SmAlO{sub 3} (SAO) sample is synthesized by the solid-state reaction technique. The Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction pattern has been done to find the crystal symmetry of the sample at room temperature. An impedance spectroscopy study of the sample has been performed in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 1 MHz and in the temperature range from 313 K to 573 K. Dielectric relaxation peaks are observed in the imaginary parts of the spectra. The Cole-Cole model is used to analyze the dielectric relaxation mechanism in SAO. The temperature-dependent relaxation times are found to obey the Arrhenius law having an activation energy of 0.29 eV, which indicates that polaron hopping is responsible for conduction or dielectric relaxation in this material. The complex impedance plane plot of the sample indicates the presence of both grain and grain-boundary effects and is analyzed by an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of a resistance and a constant-phase element. The frequency-dependent conductivity spectra follow a double-power law due to the presence of two plateaus. (orig.)

  12. Choosing a skeletal muscle relaxant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Sharon; Ginzburg, Regina

    2008-08-01

    Skeletal muscle relaxants are widely used in treating musculoskeletal conditions. However, evidence of their effectiveness consists mainly of studies with poor methodologic design. In addition, these drugs have not been proven to be superior to acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses support using skeletal muscle relaxants for short-term relief of acute low back pain when nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or acetaminophen are not effective or tolerated. Comparison studies have not shown one skeletal muscle relaxant to be superior to another. Cyclobenzaprine is the most heavily studied and has been shown to be effective for various musculoskeletal conditions. The sedative properties of tizanidine and cyclobenzaprine may benefit patients with insomnia caused by severe muscle spasms. Methocarbamol and metaxalone are less sedating, although effectiveness evidence is limited. Adverse effects, particularly dizziness and drowsiness, are consistently reported with all skeletal muscle relaxants. The potential adverse effects should be communicated clearly to the patient. Because of limited comparable effectiveness data, choice of agent should be based on side-effect profile, patient preference, abuse potential, and possible drug interactions.

  13. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author). 36 refs.

  14. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  15. Two-dimensional NMR relaxometry study of pore space characteristics of carbonate rocks from a Permian aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Wiete; Gläser, Hans-Reinhard; Mitreiter, Ivonne; Stallmach, Frank

    2008-06-01

    Limestones and karstified limestones (dolostones) from a Permian aquifer in Central Germany were studied by 1H 2D NMR relaxometry and PFG NMR diffusometry, aiming at a non-destructive characterization of the pore space. Information concerning pore size distribution and water diffusion were in accord for different samples of each type of rock, but differed fundamentally between limestones and dolostones. The results of the 2D relaxometry measurements revealed a ratio of surface relaxation times Ts1/ Ts2 of about 2 for the limestones and about 4.5 for the dolostones, mirroring the different content of iron and manganese in the solid pore walls. In consideration of thin section interpretation, the corresponding fraction in the T1- T2 relaxation time distributions was attributed to interparticle porosity. Porosity of large vugs is clearly displayed by relaxation times longer than 1 s in the dolostones only. A third fraction of the total water-saturated pore space in the dolostones, which is clearly displayed in the 2D relaxation time distributions at the smallest relaxation times and a Ts1/ Ts2 ratio of about 12, is attributed to intrafossil porosity. The porosity classification, basing on non-destructive NMR experiments, is verified by mercury intrusion porosimetry and thin section interpretation.

  16. A frequency determination method for digitized NMR signals

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, H; Khatiwada, R; Smith, E; Snow, W M; Fu, C B; Chu, P -H; Gao, H; Zheng, W

    2013-01-01

    We present a high precision frequency determination method for digitized NMR FID signals. The method employs high precision numerical integration rather than simple summation as in many other techniques. With no independent knowledge of the other parameters of a NMR FID signal (phase $\\phi$, amplitude $A$, and transverse relaxation time $T_{2}$) this method can determine the signal frequency $f_{0}$ with a precision of $1/(8\\pi^{2}f_{0}^{2}T_{2}^{2})$ if the observation time $T$ is long enough. The method is especially convenient when the detailed shape of the observed FT NMR spectrum is not well defined. When $T_{2}$ is $+\\infty$ and the signal becomes pure sinusoidal, the precision of the method is $3/(2\\pi^{2}f_{0}^{2}T^{2})$ which is one order more precise than a typical frequency counter. Analysis of this method shows that the integration reduces the noise by bandwidth narrowing as in a lock-in amplifier, and no extra signal filters are needed. For a pure sinusoidal signal we find from numerical simulati...

  17. Multivariate analysis relating oil shale geochemical properties to NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Washburn, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry has been used to provide insight into shale composition by separating relaxation responses from the various hydrogen-bearing phases present in shales in a noninvasive way. Previous low-field NMR work using solid-echo methods provided qualitative information on organic constituents associated with raw and pyrolyzed oil shale samples, but uncertainty in the interpretation of longitudinal-transverse (T1–T2) relaxometry correlation results indicated further study was required. Qualitative confirmation of peaks attributed to kerogen in oil shale was achieved by comparing T1–T2 correlation measurements made on oil shale samples to measurements made on kerogen isolated from those shales. Quantitative relationships between T1–T2 correlation data and organic geochemical properties of raw and pyrolyzed oil shales were determined using partial least-squares regression (PLSR). Relaxometry results were also compared to infrared spectra, and the results not only provided further confidence in the organic matter peak interpretations but also confirmed attribution of T1–T2 peaks to clay hydroxyls. In addition, PLSR analysis was applied to correlate relaxometry data to trace element concentrations with good success. The results of this work show that NMR relaxometry measurements using the solid-echo approach produce T1–T2 peak distributions that correlate well with geochemical properties of raw and pyrolyzed oil shales.

  18. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2001-07-13

    This semi-annual report briefly summarizes the progress since the 1st Annual Report issued September, 2000 and the next annual report. More detailed results will be in the annual reports. The main emphasis on fluid properties was on measurements of the relaxation time and self-diffusion coefficient of ethane and propane. Ethane is similar to methane while propane is more similar to the higher alkanes. The ratio of T1 and T2 is demonstrated to be a function of both viscosity and the NMR frequency. The diffusion-induced T2 in a uniform magnetic gradient was simulated in one dimension to seek improved understanding NMR diffusion in restricted geometry. Analytical solutions can be found for this system if the correct region of validity is used. Estimation of permeability of vuggy carbonates has been problematic because the pore body size does not correlate well with pore throat size. CT scans and CPMG NMR measurements were made on a set of vuggy carbonate rocks.

  19. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  20. The Effect of the Presence and Density of Shewanella oneidensis on Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, K.; Halsey, J.

    2011-12-01

    A recent interest in the use of non-invasive geophysical methods to detect the presence of and measure the growth of microbes in the subsurface has arisen due to the potential use of such methods to monitor the progress of bioremediation. Previous research to this end has focused on electrical measurements, such as complex resistivity, which are sensitive to the presence of microbes but can be difficult to interpret. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), an emerging near-surface geophysical method, is sensitive to the presence and physiochemical environment of hydrogen. Typically, NMR measurements in geophysics are used to detect hydrogen in water or hydrocarbons and to determine its pore environment; however, NMR imaging measurements have shown that NMR can also detect hydrogen in microbes. Geophysical NMR measurements thus have the potential to directly detect microbes in geologic material or indirectly detect the way in which the presence of microbes alters the physical and chemical properties of a water-saturated geologic material. This laboratory-scale study was designed to explore the effect of the presence and density of microbes on NMR relaxation measurements. Measurements were collected on microbial slurries and microbes in porous media both during microbial growth and on samples with known microbial density. Shewanella oneidensis was used as a representative environmental microbe in this study. The research shows that low field NMR measurements are sensitive to the presence and density of microbes and provides fundamental information required to determine if low-field NMR measurements can be used to monitor microbial growth during bioremediation.

  1. Quantum mechanical NMR simulation algorithm for protein-size spin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Luke J; Savostyanov, D V; Welderufael, Z T; Lee, Donghan; Kuprov, Ilya

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is one of the few remaining areas of physical chemistry for which polynomially scaling quantum mechanical simulation methods have not so far been available. In this communication we adapt the restricted state space approximation to protein NMR spectroscopy and illustrate its performance by simulating common 2D and 3D liquid state NMR experiments (including accurate description of relaxation processes using Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory) on isotopically enriched human ubiquitin - a protein containing over a thousand nuclear spins forming an irregular polycyclic three-dimensional coupling lattice. The algorithm uses careful tailoring of the density operator space to only include nuclear spin states that are populated to a significant extent. The reduced state space is generated by analysing spin connectivity and decoherence properties: rapidly relaxing states as well as correlations between topologically remote spins are dropped from the basis set.

  2. /sup 13/C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munro, S.L.; Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Gale, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants.

  3. A Study of Quantum Error Correction by Geometric Algebra and Liquid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sharf, Y; Somaroo, S S; Havel, T F; Knill, E H; Laflamme, R; Sharf, Yehuda; Cory, David G.; Somaroo, Shyamal S.; Havel, Timothy F.; Knill, Emanuel; Laflamme, Raymond

    2000-01-01

    Quantum error correcting codes enable the information contained in a quantum state to be protected from decoherence due to external perturbations. Applied to NMR, quantum coding does not alter normal relaxation, but rather converts the state of a ``data'' spin into multiple quantum coherences involving additional ancilla spins. These multiple quantum coherences relax at differing rates, thus permitting the original state of the data to be approximately reconstructed by mixing them together in an appropriate fashion. This paper describes the operation of a simple, three-bit quantum code in the product operator formalism, and uses geometric algebra methods to obtain the error-corrected decay curve in the presence of arbitrary correlations in the external random fields. These predictions are confirmed in both the totally correlated and uncorrelated cases by liquid-state NMR experiments on 13C-labeled alanine, using gradient-diffusion methods to implement these idealized decoherence models. Quantum error correcti...

  4. Wettability testing of unconsolidated oil sands using low field NMR technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, X.; Kantzas, A.; Bryan, J. [University of Calgary/TIPM Laboratory (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In an oil field it is important to understand wettability within the reservoir as it has an important impact on several parameters. However it is difficult to measure wettability in oil sands since conventional Amott/USBM testing cannot be applied. The aim of this paper is to develop protocols to assess wettability from NMR spectra in heavy oil reservoirs. Research was conducted on water wet and oil wet conditions; 3 sets of experiments were carried out with oil phases of different viscosity. Results showed that the signal from oil is insensitive to the location of the oil when viscosity increases but that water relaxation times are linked to the presence of water so water peak shifts can be used to determine different wettability states. This study determined that using water phase NMR relaxation presents several advantages to extract wettability information in unconsolidated sand systems and a technique was developed to interpret wettability.

  5. Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation of {sup 82}BrFe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tramm, C., E-mail: tramm@hiskp.uni-bonn.de; Eversheim, P. D.; Herzog, P. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen-und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2004-12-15

    The field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) of cold implanted {sup 82}Br (T {<=} 25 mK) in {alpha}-Fe single crystals was investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance of oriented nuclei (NMR/ON) at low temperatures as experimental technique. The SLR at the lattice sites with the hyperfine fields found by earlier NMR/ON experiments was measured as a function of the applied external magnetic field B{sub ext} parallel to the three principle axes [100], [110] and [111] of the iron single crystal. The data were evaluated with the full relaxation formalism in the single impurity limit and for comparison also with the often employed model of a single exponential function with an effective relaxation time T{sub 1}'. With a phenomenological model the high field values of the relaxation rates r{sub {infinity},[100]'} = 6.6(2) . 10{sup -15} T{sup 2}sK{sup -1}, r{sub {infinity},[110]} = 5.4(2) . 10{sup -15} T{sup 2}sK{sup -1} and r{sub {infinity},[111]} 5.2(1) . 10{sup -15} T{sup 2}sK{sup -1} were obtained.

  6. Acquisition strategy to obtain quantitative diffusion NMR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrère, Caroline; Thureau, Pierre; Thévand, André; Viel, Stéphane

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo (PGSE) diffusion NMR experiments constitute a powerful tool for analyzing complex mixtures because they can in principle separate the NMR spectra of each mixture component. However, because these experiments intrinsically rely on spin echoes, they are traditionally regarded as non-quantitative, due to the signal attenuation caused by longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) nuclear magnetic relaxation during the rather long delays of the pulse sequence. Alternatively to the quantitative Direct Exponential Curve Resolution Algorithm (qDECRA) approach proposed by Antalek (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128 (2006) 8402-8403), this work presents an acquisition strategy that renormalizes this relaxation attenuation using estimates of the T1 and T2 relaxation times for all the nuclei in the mixture, as obtained directly with the pulse sequence used to record the PGSE experiment. More specifically, it is shown that only three distinct PGSE experiments need to be recorded, each with a specific set of acquisition parameters. For small- and medium-sized molecules, only T1 is required for obtaining accurate quantification. For larger molecular weight species, which typically exhibit short T2 values, estimates of T2 must also be included but only a rough estimation is required. This appears fortunate because these data are especially hard to obtain with good accuracy when analyzing homonuclear scalar-coupled systems. Overall, the proposed methodology is shown to yield a quantification accuracy of ±5%, both in the absence and in the presence of spectral overlap, giving rise - at least, in our hands - to results that superseded those achieved by qDECRA, while requiring substantially less experimental time.

  7. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  8. Temperature dependence of the spin relaxation time of Fe3O4 and hemozoin superparamagnetic nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelinskii, I.; Makarov, V.

    2017-08-01

    We report experimental temperature and concentration dependences of the natural spin relaxation time of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 and hemozoin nanocrystals. We recorded the 1H NMR spectrum of 0.5% benzene dissolved in CS2 in function of superparamagnetic particle concentration and temperature, interpreting the 7.261 ± 0.002 ppm benzene line broadening. Our model for the line broadening includes natural, hyperfine magnetic dipole-dipole, and contact hyperfine contributions. The latter arises due to exchange interaction between benzene molecules and suspended nanoparticles. Estimated frequency of fluctuation in the 1 cm3 sample volume is in the 107 Hz scale. Estimated natural electron spin-lattice relaxation frequencies of the superparamagnetic nanocrystals using frequency of fluctuations, and developed theoretical model applied to analysis of experimental data are in good agreement between each other. Thus the presently developed approach may be used to study fluctuations and natural spin-lattice relaxation frequencies in different media.

  9. A 1-year time course study of the relaxation times and histology for irradiated rat lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shioya, S.; Haida, M.; Fukuzaki, M.; Ono, Y.; Tsuda, M.; Ohta, Y.; Yamabayashi, H. (Tokai Univ. School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    To investigate the NMR relaxation times for irradiated rat lung tissue, we measured T1 and T2 at 11 different times during the injury's 1-year time course. A biexponential analysis of T2 was used to determine T2 fast (T2f) and T2 slow (T2s). In addition, we measured water content and correlated changes in the relaxation times with pathological changes. The correlation indicates the following: (1) Shortly after irradiation, the biexponential T2 decay for 1/3 of the samples became monoexponential and there were no noticeable pathological changes observed using light microscopy. (2) During radiation pneumonitis, T2f and T2s were prolonged. This accompanied acute edematous changes and inflammatory cell infiltration. (3) Finally, during radiation fibrosis T1 shortened and collagen increased. We observed no significant correlation between relaxation time changes and water content changes throughout the 1-year time course.

  10. Ion distribution in copper exchanged zeolites by using Si-29 spin lattice relaxation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Joseph; Seidel, Karsten; Moini, Ahmad; Prasad, Subramanian

    2016-06-01

    Transition metal-containing zeolites, particularly those with smaller pore size, have found extensive application in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of environmental pollutants containing nitrogen oxides. We report these zeolites have dramatically faster silicon-29 (Si-29) spin lattice relaxation times (T1) compared to their sodium-containing counterparts. Paramagnetic doping allows one to acquire Si-29 MAS spectra in the order of tens of seconds without significantly affecting the spectral resolution. Moreover, relaxation times depend on the method of preparation and the next-nearest neighbor silicon Qn(mAl) sites, where n = 4 and m = 0-4, respectively. A clear trend is noted between the effectiveness of Cu exchange and the Si-29 NMR relaxation times. It is anticipated that the availability of this tool, and the enhanced understanding of the nature of the active sites, will provide the means for designing improved SCR catalysts.

  11. Ion distribution in copper exchanged zeolites by using Si-29 spin lattice relaxation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Joseph; Seidel, Karsten; Moini, Ahmad; Prasad, Subramanian

    2016-06-01

    Transition metal-containing zeolites, particularly those with smaller pore size, have found extensive application in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of environmental pollutants containing nitrogen oxides. We report these zeolites have dramatically faster silicon-29 (Si-29) spin lattice relaxation times (T1) compared to their sodium-containing counterparts. Paramagnetic doping allows one to acquire Si-29 MAS spectra in the order of tens of seconds without significantly affecting the spectral resolution. Moreover, relaxation times depend on the method of preparation and the next-nearest neighbor silicon Qn(mAl) sites, where n=4 and m=0-4, respectively. A clear trend is noted between the effectiveness of Cu exchange and the Si-29 NMR relaxation times. It is anticipated that the availability of this tool, and the enhanced understanding of the nature of the active sites, will provide the means for designing improved SCR catalysts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. NMR Dynamic Studies in Living Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫永彬; 范明杰; 罗雪春; 张日清

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can noninvasively monitor the intracellular concentrations and kinetic properties of numerous inorganic and organic compounds. These characteristics have made NMR a useful tool for dynamic studies of living systems. Applications of NMR to living systems have successfully extended to many areas, including studies of metabolic regulation, ion transport, and intracellular reaction rates in vivo. The major purpose of this review is to summarize the results that can be obtained by modern NMR techniques in living systems. With the advances of new techniques, NMR measurements of various nuclides have been performed for specific physiological purposes. Although some technical problems still remain and there are still discrepancies between NMR and traditional biochemical results, the abundant and unique information obtained from NMR spectra suggests that NMR will be more extensively applied in future studies of living systems. The fast development of these new techniques is providing many new NMR applications in living systems, as well as in structural biology.

  13. A Field Study of NMR Logging to Quantify Petroleum Contamination in Subsurface Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, E. L.; Knight, R. J.; Grunewald, E. D.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements are directly sensitive to hydrogen-bearing fluids including water and petroleum products. NMR logging tools can be used to detect and quantify petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the sediments surrounding a well or borehole. An advantage of the NMR method is that data can be collected in both cased and uncased holes. In order to estimate the volume of in-situ hydrocarbon, there must be sufficient contrast between either the relaxation times (T2) or the diffusion coefficients (D) of water and the contaminant. In a field study conducted in Pine Ridge, South Dakota, NMR logging measurements were used to investigate an area of hydrocarbon contamination from leaking underground storage tanks. A contaminant sample recovered from a monitoring well at the site was found to be consistent with a mixture of gasoline and diesel fuel. NMR measurements were collected in two PVC-cased monitoring wells; D and T2 measurements were used together to detect and quantify contaminant in the sediments above and below the water table at both of the wells. While the contrast in D between the fluids was found to be inadequate for fluid typing, the T2 contrast between the contaminant and water in silt enabled the estimation of the water and contaminant volumes. This study shows that NMR logging can be used to detect and quantify in-situ contamination, but also highlights the importance of sediment and contaminant properties that lead to a sufficiently large contrast in T2 or D.

  14. Investigation of Rhodopsin Dynamics in its Signaling State by Solid-State Deuterium NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struts, Andrey V.; Chawla, Udeep; Perera, Suchithranga M.D.C.; Brown, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Site-directed deuterium NMR spectroscopy is a valuable tool to study the structural dynamics of biomolecules in cases where solution NMR is inapplicable. Solid-state 2H NMR spectral studies of aligned membrane samples of rhodopsin with selectively labeled retinal provide information on structural changes of the chromophore in different protein states. In addition, solid-state 2H NMR relaxation time measurements allow one to study the dynamics of the ligand during the transition from the inactive to the active state. Here we describe the methodological aspects of solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy for functional studies of rhodopsin, with an emphasis on the dynamics of the retinal cofactor. We provide complete protocols for the preparation of NMR samples of rhodopsin with 11-cis-retinal selectively deuterated at the methyl groups in aligned membranes. In addition, we review optimized conditions for trapping the rhodopsin photointermediates; and lastly we address the challenging problem of trapping the signaling state of rhodopsin in aligned membrane films. PMID:25697522

  15. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  16. Organic semiconductors: What makes the spin relax?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Peter A.

    2010-04-01

    Spin relaxation in organic materials is expected to be slow because of weak spin-orbit coupling. The effects of deuteration and coherent spin excitation show that the spin-relaxation time is actually limited by hyperfine fields.

  17. Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms Details Content Last Updated: ... Topic Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for IBS You’ve been to the doctor ...

  18. Heteronuclear Adiabatic Relaxation Dispersion (HARD) for quantitative analysis of conformational dynamics in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Chao, Fa-An; Masterson, Larry R; Mangia, Silvia; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom; Seelig, Burckhard; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2012-06-01

    NMR relaxation methods probe biomolecular motions over a wide range of timescales. In particular, the rotating frame spin-lock R(1ρ) and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) R(2) experiments are commonly used to characterize μs to ms dynamics, which play a critical role in enzyme folding and catalysis. In an effort to complement these approaches, we introduced the Heteronuclear Adiabatic Relaxation Dispersion (HARD) method, where dispersion in rotating frame relaxation rate constants (longitudinal R(1ρ) and transverse R(2ρ)) is created by modulating the shape and duration of adiabatic full passage (AFP) pulses. Previously, we showed the ability of the HARD method to detect chemical exchange dynamics in the fast exchange regime (k(ex)∼10(4)-10(5) s(-1)). In this article, we show the sensitivity of the HARD method to slower exchange processes by measuring R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) relaxation rates for two soluble proteins (ubiquitin and 10C RNA ligase). One advantage of the HARD method is its nominal dependence on the applied radio frequency field, which can be leveraged to modulate the dispersion in the relaxation rate constants. In addition, we also include product operator simulations to define the dynamic range of adiabatic R(1ρ) and R(2ρ) that is valid under all exchange regimes. We conclude from both experimental observations and simulations that this method is complementary to CPMG-based and rotating frame spin-lock R(1ρ) experiments to probe conformational exchange dynamics for biomolecules. Finally, this approach is germane to several NMR-active nuclei, where relaxation rates are frequency-offset independent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. NMR studies of actinide dioxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: tokunaga.yo@jaea.go.jp; Sakai, H.; Fujimoto, T.; Kambe, S.; Walstedt, R.E.; Ikushima, K.; Yasuoka, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Aoki, D.; Homma, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Haga, Y.; Matsuda, T.D.; Ikeda, S.; Yamamoto, E.; Nakamura, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shiokawa, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nakajima, K.; Arai, Y. [Department of Nuclear Energy System, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Onuki, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2007-10-11

    {sup 17}O NMR measurements have been performed on a series of the actinide dioxides, UO{sub 2}, NpO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. Although the {sup 17}O NMR spectra in these materials are similar at higher temperatures, the low-temperature spectra present are significantly different. In UO{sub 2} we have observed a wide spectrum, forming a rectangular shape below T{sub N}=30 K. In NpO{sub 2}, on the other hand, the spectra broaden rather gradually and exhibit a two-peak structure below T{sub 0}=26 K. In PuO{sub 2}, neither spectrum broadening nor splitting has been observed. We show that these NMR spectra clearly indicate the different nature of the low-temperature magnetic ground states in these actinide compounds.

  20. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, D. K. [School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5706 (United States); Somphonsane, R. [Department of Physics, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology, Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, the State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-1500 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  1. Recent excitements in protein NMR: Large proteins and biologically relevant dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAI CHAITANYA CHILIVERI; MANDAR V DESHMUKH

    2016-12-01

    The advent of Transverse Relaxation Optimized SpectroscopY (TROSY) and perdeuteration allowed biomolecularNMR spectroscopists to overcome the size limitation barrier (~20 kDa) in de novo structure determination of proteins.The utility of these techniques was immediately demonstrated on large proteins and protein complexes (e.g. GroELGroES,ClpP protease, Hsp90-p53, 20S proteasome, etc.). Further, recent methodological developments such asResidual Dipolar Couplings and Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancement allowed accurate measurement of long-rangestructural restraints. Additionally, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG), rotating frame relaxation experiments (R1ρ)and saturation transfer experiments (CEST and DEST) created never-before accessibility to the μs–ms timescaledynamic parameters that led to the deeper understanding of biological processes. Meanwhile, the excitement in thefield continued with a series of developments in the fast data acquisition methods allowing rapid structural studies onless stable proteins. This review aims to discuss important developments in the field of biomolecular NMRspectroscopy in the recent past, i.e., in the post TROSY era. These developments not only gave access to the structuralstudies of large protein assemblies, but also revolutionized tools in the arsenal of today’s biomolecular NMR and pointto a bright future of biomolecular NMR spectroscopy.

  2. Collisionless Relaxation of Stellar Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kandrup, H E

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the work summarised here has been to exploit and extend ideas from plasma physics and accelerator dynamics to formulate a unified description of collisionless relaxation that views violent relaxation, Landau damping, and phase mixing as (manifestations of) a single phenomenon. This approach embraces the fact that the collisionless Boltzmann equation (CBE), the basic object of the theory, is an infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian system, with the distribution function f playing the role of the fundamental dynamical variable, and that, interpreted appropriately, an evolution described by the other Hamiltonian system. Equilibrium solutions correspond to extremal points of the Hamiltonian subject to the constraints associated with Liouville's Theorem. Stable equilibria correspond to energy minima. The evolution of a system out of equilibrium involves (in general nonlinear) phase space oscillations which may -- or may not -- interfere destructively so as to damp away.

  3. Collisionless Relaxation of Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandrup, Henry E.

    1999-08-01

    The objective of the work summarized here has been to exploit and extend ideas from plasma physics and accelerator dynamics to formulate a unified description of collisionless relaxation of stellar systems that views violent relaxation, Landau damping, and phase mixing as (manifestations of) a single phenomenon. This approach embraces the fact that the collisionless Boltzmann equation (CBE), the basic object of the theory, is an infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian system, with the distribution function f playing the role of the fundamental dynamical variable, and that, interpreted appropriately, an evolution described by the CBE is no different fundamentally from an evolution described by any other Hamiltonian system. Equilibrium solutions f0 correspond to extremal points of the Hamiltonian subject to the constraints associated with Liouville's Theorem. Stable equilibria correspond to energy minima. The evolution of a system out of equilibrium involves (in general nonlinear) phase space oscillations which may - or may not - interfere destructively so as to damp away.

  4. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  5. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  6. Brief relaxation training program for hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Judith L; Chung, Sheng-Chia; Beigi, Richard; Brooks, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Employee stress leads to attrition, burnout, and increased medical costs. We aimed to assess if relaxation training leads to decreased stress levels based on questionnaire and thermal biofeedback. Thirty-minute relaxation training sessions were conducted for hospital employees and for cancer patients. Perceived Stress levels and skin temperature were analyzed before and after relaxation training.

  7. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: nitroxide radicals in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Kubica, A; Meier, R; Rössler, E A; Moscicki, J

    2013-01-14

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which (1)H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the (1)H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)] with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for (14)N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to (15)N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)]). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data-(1)H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of (14)N and (15)N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in (1)H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  8. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: Nitroxide radicals in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-01-01

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the 1H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854 with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for 14N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to 15N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)], 10.1021/jp980397h). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data—1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of 14N and 15N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in 1H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  9. POS Tagging Using Relaxation Labelling

    CERN Document Server

    Padro, L

    1995-01-01

    Relaxation labelling is an optimization technique used in many fields to solve constraint satisfaction problems. The algorithm finds a combination of values for a set of variables such that satisfies -to the maximum possible degree- a set of given constraints. This paper describes some experiments performed applying it to POS tagging, and the results obtained. It also ponders the possibility of applying it to word sense disambiguation.

  10. {sup 27}Al NMR studies of NpPd{sub 5}Al{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chudo, H., E-mail: chudo.hiroyuki@jaea.go.j [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sakai, H.; Tokunaga, Y.; Kambe, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Aoki, D.; Homma, Y.; Shiokawa, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Haga, Y.; Ikeda, S.; Matsuda, T.D. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Onuki, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yasuoka, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    We present {sup 27}Al NMR studies for a single crystal of the Np-based superconductor NpPd{sub 5}Al{sub 2}(T{sub c}=4.9K). We have observed a five-line {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum with a center line and four satellite lines separated by first-order nuclear quadrupole splittings. The Knight shift clearly drops below T{sub c}. The temperature dependence of the {sup 27}Al nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate shows no coherence peak below T{sub c}, indicating that NpPd{sub 5}Al{sub 2} is an unconventional superconductor with an anisotropic gap. The analysis of the present NMR data provides evidence for strong-coupling d-wave superconductivity in NpPd{sub 5}Al{sub 2}.

  11. New Insights into High-Performance Thermoelectric Tellurides from ^125Te NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, E. M.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Cook, B. A.; Harringa, J. L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2009-11-01

    Thermoelectric materials are widely used for direct transformation of heat to electricity (Seebeck effect) and for solid state refrigeration (Peltier effect). Efforts to increase the efficiency of high-performance thermoelectrics, which include narrow-gap, doped tellurium-based semiconductors, require detailed knowledge of their local structure and bonding. We have used ^125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a local probe for obtaining better understanding of these high-performance thermoelectric tellurides, specifically PbTe doped with Ag and Sb (LAST materials) and GeTe doped with Ag and Sb (TAGS materials). The resonance frequencies and line shapes of the NMR spectra, as well as spin-lattice relaxation times and chemical shift anisotropies are highly sensitive to the composition and synthesis conditions of LAST and TAGS materials, enabling studies of the local composition, distortion, bonding, and carrier concentration. Several intriguing phenomena including electronic inhomogeneity and local distortions of the crystal lattice have been observed by NMR.

  12. 125Te and 139La NMR Studies of Single Crystal LaTe3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Michioka, Chishiro; Itoh, Yutaka; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi

    2007-12-01

    We report 125Te and 139La NMR studies for single crystals of LaTe3 between 10 and 160 K under an applied field of H = 7.4841 T. We observed the broad 125Te(1) NMR signals of metallic Te(1) sheets with a superlattice modulation and the sharp 125Te(2) and 139La NMR signals of LaTe(2) bi-layers. Temperature dependence of 125Te(1) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times of the modulated Te(1) sheets obeys a modified Korringa relation. The results indicate that the electronic state on the Te(1) sheets is a Landau-Fermi liquid on a misfit superlattice or a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid in a two-dimensional charge-density wave ordering state.

  13. NMR detection of thermal damage in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Steven K; Conradi, Mark S; Vaccaro, Christopher M

    2005-02-01

    Composite materials of epoxy resins reinforced by carbon fibers are increasingly being used in the construction of aircraft. In these applications, the material may be thermally damaged and weakened by jet blast and accidental fires. The feasibility of using proton NMR relaxation times T1, T1rho, and T2 to detect and quantify the thermal damage is investigated. In conventional spectrometers with homogeneous static magnetic fields, T1rho is readily measured and is found to be well correlated with thermal damage. This suggests that NMR measurements of proton T1rho may be used for non-destructive evaluation of carbon fiber-epoxy composites. Results from T1rho measurements in the inhomogeneous static and RF magnetic fields of an NMR-MOUSE are also discussed.

  14. Two-dimensional NMR exchange spectroscopy. Quantitative treatment of multisite exchanging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Edward W.; Coston, Timothy P. J.; Orrell, Keith G.; Šik, Vladimir; Stephenson, David

    A general method for evaluating rate constants in complex exchange networks with N-sites from two-dimensional EXSY (NOESY) NMR spectra is proposed. A computer program D2DNMR capable of performing signal intensity to exchange rate calculations (and vice versa), based on a matrix formalism, is outlined. The method is illustrated by 195Pt 2D NMR studies of the A ⇌ B ⇌ C spin system arising from pyramidal sulfur inversion in platinum(IV) complexes of type [Pt XMe 3(MeSCH 2CH 2SMe)] ( X = Cl, I). Comparison with 1H NMR bandshape analyses of the same compounds shows high agreement between the rate constants and activation parameters determined by both techniques. Mechanisms of 195Pt spin-lattice relaxation are briefly discussed.

  15. NMR difference spectroscopy with a dual saddle-coil difference probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnaughtan, Megan A; Smith, Aaron P; Goldsbrough, Peter B; Santini, Robert E; Raftery, Daniel

    2004-03-01

    A new difference probe for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented. The difference probe uses two saddle-shaped coils to excite and detect two samples simultaneously. The samples are held in a specially modified 3-mm NMR tube with an Ultem plastic disk to separate the samples. The probe's resonant circuit contains two crossed diodes that passively switch the relative phase of each coil during the NMR experiment. The result is a difference spectrum from the two samples. The degree of cancellation of common signals was determined to be approximately 90%, and the application of the probe to relaxation-edited difference spectroscopy for identifying protein-ligand interactions was demonstrated using glutathione and glutathione S-transferase binding protein.

  16. Field-cycling-NMR: A new magnet design for reduced energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plendl, Dirk; Privalov, Alexei F.; Fujara, Franz [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Field-cycling-NMR is an established method for the investigation of field dependent spin phenomena, like relaxation dispersion, polarization transfer, enhanced NQR etc. In contrast to normal NMR, the magnetic field in a field-cycling experiment is switched between several distinct levels within milliseconds. This can only be achieved with specially designed, low inductive magnets. Today, nearly all FC-spectrometers utilize air core coils made of copper or silver. Producing strong magnetic fields with normal-conducting magnets results in a large energy dissipation (tens of kW) so that the maximum field strength is limited by the amount of heat that can be extracted by the cooling system. We present a new magnet design for fast field-cycling-NMR which uses a magnet with an iron core for field amplification, thus generating the same field with significantly reduced energy consumption and system complexity.

  17. NMR study of pyrochlore lattice antiferromagnet, melanothallite Cu2OCl2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Masahide; Oyamada, Akira; Itou, Tetsuaki; Maegawa, Satoru; Okabe, Hirotaka; Akimitsu, Jun

    2011-09-01

    The melanothallite Cu2OCl2 is a new example of pyrochlore-like antiferromagnet, which is composed of 3d transition metal electrons. We performed Cu- and Cl-NMR experiments on powder samples of Cu2OCl2 below transition temperature TN = 70 K and we observed six resonant peaks of Cu nuclei, which are composed of three symmetric peaks corresponding to 63Cu and three corresponding to 65Cu. The Cu nuclei feel the strong hyperfine fields because of ordered magnetic moments and the electric field gradients. We determined the spin structure by analyzing the Cu-NMR spectra. The melanothallite has an all-in-all-out spin structure. The spin lattice relaxation rates T1-1 of Cu- and Cl-NMR in the ordered phase are proportional to the temperature; This suggests that although long-range ordering occurs at rather high temperature, the large spin fluctuations caused by the geometrical frustration still remain.

  18. Detection of Virgin Olive Oil Adulteration Using Low Field Unilateral NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of adulteration in edible oils is a concern in the food industry, especially for the higher priced virgin olive oils. This article presents a low field unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR method for the detection of the adulteration of virgin olive oil that can be performed through sealed bottles providing a non-destructive screening technique. Adulterations of an extra virgin olive oil with different percentages of sunflower oil and red palm oil were measured with a commercial unilateral instrument, the profile NMR-Mouse. The NMR signal was processed using a 2-dimensional Inverse Laplace transformation to analyze the transverse relaxation and self-diffusion behaviors of different oils. The obtained results demonstrated the feasibility of detecting adulterations of olive oil with percentages of at least 10% of sunflower and red palm oils.

  19. Nondestructive Quantification of Local Plasticizer Concentration in PVC by (1)H NMR Relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alina; Kwamen, Rance; Woldt, Benjamin; Graß, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The properties of plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) , one of the most important polymers today, are strongly dictated by the concentration of plasticizer. Yet, it has been impossible to quantify this concentration at different positions inside a PVC product without its destruction because of a lack of suitable analytical methods. Thus, this paper introduces a simple, fast, and efficient way to determine truly nondestructively the concentration of plasticizer in PVC by single-sided nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). With the help of correlation curves between the concentration of plasticizer inside nonaged PVC samples and the corresponding volume-averaged NMR parameters, single-sided NMR allows the quantification of the local concentration of plasticizer in aged PVC plates at different depths by spatially resolved relaxation measurements. The presented approach represents a fundamental step toward in situ characterization of plasticized PVC.

  20. Spin relaxation in metallic ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, L.

    2011-02-01

    The Elliott theory of spin relaxation in metals and semiconductors is extended to metallic ferromagnets. Our treatment is based on the two-current model of Fert, Campbell, and Jaoul. The d→s electron-scattering process involved in spin relaxation is the inverse of the s→d process responsible for the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). As a result, spin-relaxation rate 1/τsr and AMR Δρ are given by similar formulas, and are in a constant ratio if scattering is by solute atoms. Our treatment applies to nickel- and cobalt-based alloys which do not have spin-up 3d states at the Fermi level. This category includes many of the technologically important magnetic materials. And we show how to modify the theory to apply it to bcc iron-based alloys. We also treat the case of Permalloy Ni80Fe20 at finite temperature or in thin-film form, where several kinds of scatterers exist. Predicted values of 1/τsr and Δρ are plotted versus resistivity of the sample. These predictions are compared to values of 1/τsr and Δρ derived from ferromagnetic-resonance and AMR experiments in Permalloy.

  1. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  2. NMR spectroscopy study of agar-based polymers electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, R.I.; Tambelli, C.E. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos; Raphael, E. [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del-Rey (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Naturais; Silva, I.D.A.; Magon, C.J.; Donoso, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: This communication presents the results of preparation and characterization of transparent films obtained from agar and acetic acid. The films were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The film formed by agar (Sigma Aldrich) was dispersed in water and kept under stirring and heating at 100 deg C. Next, glycerol, formaldehyde and different quantities of acetic acid (25 and 50 wt%) were added to this solution. The obtained solution was placed on a glass plate and left to dry for 48 hours in oven at 50 deg C to obtain the films, which were kept under vacuum before characterization. The ionic conductivity of the films display an Arrhenius behavior with activation energy E{sub a} = 78 (25 wt% of acetic acid) and E{sub a} = 87 kJ/mol (50 wt% of acetic acid). The conductivity values were 3:0 X 10{sup -6} and 1:2 X 10{sup -4} S/cm at room temperature and 4:4 X 10{sup -4} and 1:5 X 10{sup -3}S/cm at 70 deg C, for the 25 and 50 wt% of acetic acid respectively. To investigate the mechanism of protonic conduction in the polymer proton conductor proton NMR measurements were performed in the temperature range 200-370 K. The {sup 1}H-NMR results exhibit the qualitative feature associated with the proton mobility, namely the presence of well defined {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation maxima at 300 K. Activation energy of the order of 40 kJ/mol was obtained from the {sup 1}H-NMR line narrowing data. The ionic conductivity of the film combined with their transparency, flexibility, homogeneity and good adhesion to the glasses or metals indicate that agar-based SPEs are promising materials for used on optoelectronic applications. (author)

  3. NMR characterization of membrane protein-detergent micelle solutions by use of microcoil equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczak, Pawel; Horst, Reto; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2009-12-30

    Using microcoil NMR technology, the uniformly (2)H,(15)N-labeled integral membrane protein OmpX, and the phosphocholine derivative detergent Fos-10 (n-decylphosphocholine), we investigated solutions of mixed protein-detergent micelles to determine the influence of the detergent concentration on the NMR spectra of the protein. In a first step, we identified key parameters that influence the composition of the micelle solutions, which resulted in a new protocol for the preparation of well-defined concentrated protein solutions. This led to the observation that high-quality 2D [(15)N,(1)H]-transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) spectra of OmpX reconstituted in mixed micelles with Fos-10 were obtained only in a limited range of detergent concentrations. Outside of this range from about 90-180 mM, we observed a significant decrease of the average peak intensity. Relaxation-optimized NMR measurements of the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of the OmpX/Fos-10 mixed micelles, D(r) and D(t), respectively, then showed that the stoichiometry and the effective hydrodynamic radius of the protein-containing micelles are not significantly affected by high Fos-10 concentrations and that the deterioration of NMR spectra is due to the increased viscosity at high detergent concentrations. The paper thus provides a basis for refined guidelines on the preparation of integral membrane proteins for structural studies.

  4. Development of a method for reconstruction of crowded NMR spectra from undersampled time-domain data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takumi; Yoshiura, Chie; Matsumoto, Masahiko; Kofuku, Yutaka; Okude, Junya; Kondo, Keita; Shiraishi, Yutaro [The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan); Takeuchi, Koh [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (Japan); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    NMR is a unique methodology for obtaining information about the conformational dynamics of proteins in heterogeneous biomolecular systems. In various NMR methods, such as transferred cross-saturation, relaxation dispersion, and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments, fast determination of the signal intensity ratios in the NMR spectra with high accuracy is required for analyses of targets with low yields and stabilities. However, conventional methods for the reconstruction of spectra from undersampled time-domain data, such as linear prediction, spectroscopy with integration of frequency and time domain, and analysis of Fourier, and compressed sensing were not effective for the accurate determination of the signal intensity ratios of the crowded two-dimensional spectra of proteins. Here, we developed an NMR spectra reconstruction method, “conservation of experimental data in analysis of Fourier” (Co-ANAFOR), to reconstruct the crowded spectra from the undersampled time-domain data. The number of sampling points required for the transferred cross-saturation experiments between membrane proteins, photosystem I and cytochrome b{sub 6}f, and their ligand, plastocyanin, with Co-ANAFOR was half of that needed for linear prediction, and the peak height reduction ratios of the spectra reconstructed from truncated time-domain data by Co-ANAFOR were more accurate than those reconstructed from non-uniformly sampled data by compressed sensing.

  5. Solid-state and unilateral NMR study of deterioration of a Dead Sea Scroll fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, A; Chierotti, M R; Gobetto, R; Martra, G; Rabin, I; Coluccia, S

    2012-02-01

    Unilateral and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses were performed on a parchment fragment of the Dead Sea Scroll (DSS). The analyzed sample belongs to the collection of non-inscribed and nontreated fragments of known archaeological provenance from the John Rylands University Library in Manchester. Therefore, it can be considered as original DSS material free from any contamination related to the post-discovery period. Considering the paramount significance of the DSS, noninvasive approaches and portable in situ nondestructive methods are of fundamental importance for the determination of composition, structure, and chemical-physical properties of the materials under study. NMR studies reveal low amounts of water content associated with very short proton relaxation times, T(1), indicating a high level of deterioration of collagen molecules within scroll fragments. In addition, (13)C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy shows characteristic peaks of lipids whose presence we attribute to the production technology that did not involve liming. Extraction with chloroform led to the reduction of both lipid and protein signals in the (13)C CPMAS spectrum indicating probable involvement of lipids in parchment degradation processes. NMR absorption and relaxation measurements provide nondestructive, discriminative, and sensitive tools for studying the deterioration effects on the organization and properties of water and collagen within ancient manuscripts.

  6. Homogeneity characterization of ethylene-co-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) and hydrophobic silica nanocomposite by low field NMR; Caracterizacao da homogeneidade de nanocomposito do copolimero etileno acetato de vinila (EVA) e silica hidrofobica atraves de ressonancia magnetica nuclear de baixo campo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stael, Giovanni Chaves [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Geofisica (DGE)]. E-mail: stael@on.br; Tavares, Maria I.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas]. E-mail: mibt@ima.ufrj.br

    2005-07-01

    This project proposes the characterization of a polymeric matrix composite material using nanometric scale hydrophobic silica as charge element, with the ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA), by using the spin-lattice relaxation time measurement applying the low field NMR.

  7. [sup 13]C NMR on C[sub 60] single-crystal. RMN du [sup 13]C sur un monocristal de C[sub 60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerkoud, R.; Auban-Senzier, P.; Godard, J.; Jerome, D. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. de Physique des Solides); Lambert, J.M.; Bernier, P. (Montpellier-1 Univ., 34 (France))

    1994-01-01

    The authors report a [sup 13]C NMR study performed on a C[sub 60] single crystal (8% enriched in [sup 13]C) grown by sublimation. Molecular motions are tested by spin-lattice relaxation data and spectral shapes below and above the structural transition at T[sub c] = 262 K. The sharpness of this transition and the long relaxation times at low temperature, compared to previous data on powdered samples, confirm the high purity of the crystal.

  8. Capturing molecular multimode relaxation processes in excitable gases based on decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Kesheng

    2017-08-01

    Existing two-frequency reconstructive methods can only capture primary (single) molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases. In this paper, we present a reconstructive method based on the novel decomposition of frequency-dependent acoustic relaxation spectra to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process. This decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra is developed from the frequency-dependent effective specific heat, indicating that a multi-relaxation process is the sum of the interior single-relaxation processes. Based on this decomposition, we can reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation process by capturing the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N interior single-relaxation processes, using the measurements of acoustic absorption and sound speed at 2N frequencies. Experimental data for the gas mixtures CO2-N2 and CO2-O2 validate our decomposition and reconstruction approach.

  9. Lithological control on gas hydrate saturation as revealed by signal classification of NMR logging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Klaus; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Henninges, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) downhole logging data are analyzed with a new strategy to study gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Mackenzie Delta (NW Canada). In NMR logging, transverse relaxation time (T2) distribution curves are usually used to determine single-valued parameters such as apparent total porosity or hydrocarbon saturation. Our approach analyzes the entire T2 distribution curves as quasi-continuous signals to characterize the rock formation. We apply self-organizing maps, a neural network clustering technique, to subdivide the data set of NMR curves into classes with a similar and distinctive signal shape. The method includes (1) preparation of data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning, (3) cluster definition, and (4) classification and depth mapping of all NMR signals. Each signal class thus represents a specific pore size distribution which can be interpreted in terms of distinct lithologies and reservoir types. A key step in the interpretation strategy is to reconcile the NMR classes with other log data not considered in the clustering analysis, such as gamma ray, hydrate saturation, and other logs. Our results defined six main lithologies within the target zone. Gas hydrate layers were recognized by their low signal amplitudes for all relaxation times. Most importantly, two subtypes of hydrate-bearing shaly sands were identified. They show distinct NMR signals and differ in hydrate saturation and gamma ray values. An inverse linear relationship between hydrate saturation and clay content was concluded. Finally, we infer that the gas hydrate is not grain coating, but rather, pore filling with matrix support is the preferred growth habit model for the studied formation.

  10. Time of relaxation in dusty plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Dust particles in plasma may have different values of average kinetic energy for vertical and horizontal motion. The partial equilibrium of the subsystems and the relaxation processes leading to this asymmetry are under consideration. A method for the relaxation time estimation in nonideal dusty plasma is suggested. The characteristic relaxation times of vertical and horizontal motion of dust particles in gas discharge are estimated by analytical approach and by analysis of simulation results. These relaxation times for vertical and horizontal subsystems appear to be different. A single hierarchy of relaxation times is proposed.

  11. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  12. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  13. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  14. The second round of Critical Assessment of Automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR: CASD-NMR-2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosato, Antonio [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Center (Italy); Vranken, Wim [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Structural Biology Brussels (Belgium); Fogh, Rasmus H.; Ragan, Timothy J. [University of Leicester, Department of Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom); Tejero, Roberto [Universidad de Valencia, Departamento de Química Física (Spain); Pederson, Kari; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Prestegard, James H. [University of Georgia, Complex Carbohydrate Research Center and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States); Yee, Adelinda; Wu, Bin; Lemak, Alexander; Houliston, Scott; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Biophysics, Cancer Genomics and Proteomics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Kennedy, Michael [Miami University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States); Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Liu, Gaohua; Montelione, Gaetano T., E-mail: guy@cabm.rutgers.edu [The State University of New Jersey, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers (United States); Vuister, Geerten W., E-mail: gv29@le.ac.uk [University of Leicester, Department of Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    The second round of the community-wide initiative Critical Assessment of automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR (CASD-NMR-2013) comprised ten blind target datasets, consisting of unprocessed spectral data, assigned chemical shift lists and unassigned NOESY peak and RDC lists, that were made available in both curated (i.e. manually refined) or un-curated (i.e. automatically generated) form. Ten structure calculation programs, using fully automated protocols only, generated a total of 164 three-dimensional structures (entries) for the ten targets, sometimes using both curated and un-curated lists to generate multiple entries for a single target. The accuracy of the entries could be established by comparing them to the corresponding manually solved structure of each target, which was not available at the time the data were provided. Across the entire data set, 71 % of all entries submitted achieved an accuracy relative to the reference NMR structure better than 1.5 Å. Methods based on NOESY peak lists achieved even better results with up to 100 % of the entries within the 1.5 Å threshold for some programs. However, some methods did not converge for some targets using un-curated NOESY peak lists. Over 90 % of the entries achieved an accuracy better than the more relaxed threshold of 2.5 Å that was used in the previous CASD-NMR-2010 round. Comparisons between entries generated with un-curated versus curated peaks show only marginal improvements for the latter in those cases where both calculations converged.

  15. Rapid determination of fluid viscosity using low-field two-dimensional NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Feng; Xiao, Lizhi; Chen, Weiliang; Liu, Huabing; Liao, Guangzhi; Wang, Mengying; Xie, Qingming

    2014-10-01

    The rapid prediction of fluid viscosity, especially the fluid in heavy-oil petroleum reservoirs, is of great importance for oil exploration and transportation. We suggest a new method for rapid prediction of fluid viscosity using two-dimensional (2D) NMR relaxation time distributions. DEFIR, Driven-Equilibrium Fast-Inversion Recovery, a new pulse sequence for rapid measurement of 2D relaxation times, is proposed. The 2D relation between the ratio of transverse relaxation time to longitudinal relaxation time (T1/T2) and T1 distribution of fluid are obtained by means of DEFIR with only two one-dimensional measurements. The measurement speed of DEFIR pulse sequence over 2 times as fast as that of the traditional 2D method. Using Bloembergen theory, the relation between the distributions and fluid viscosity is found. Precise method for viscosity prediction is then established. Finally, we apply this method to a down-hole NMR fluid analysis system and realized on-site and on-line prediction of viscosity for formation fluids. The results demonstrated that the new method for viscosity prediction is efficient and accurate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Letter to the Editor: H-1, C-13 and N-15 Assignments for the Archaeglobus fulgidis Protein AF2095.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Robert; Acton, Thomas; Chiang, Yiwen; Rajan, Paranji K.; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Liu, Jinfeng; Ma, LiChung; Rost, Burkhard; Montelione, Gaetano

    2004-09-01

    The Human genome project promises to provide an unprecedented wealth of information on cell biology, development, evolution and physiology. Translating this immense increase in genomic information into advances in medicine and human health requires a concerted effort to explore and investigate the structure and molecular activity for the vast amount of proteins in the Human proteome that lack any such explicit experimental information. Structural genomics is providing a means to determine the molecular and cellular function of these proteins by characterizing the complete range of protein folds (Montelione, 2001). By annotating sequence information with a protein structure, it is sometimes possible to decipher the biochemical activity of hypothetical proteins from structural similarity and the conservation of spatial arrangement of active site residues. Homology can often be inferred by structural similarity even in the absence of recognizable sequence similarity, and can sometimes be used to identify functional relationships between distantly related proteins. Determining an experimental structure for each protein in a proteome is currently impractical because of the significant time commitment and resources required by X-ray and NMR. Therefore, the current paradigm of structural genomics is to determine a representative structure for each cluster of homologous protein domain sequences that lack similarity to a protein domain with a known structure. In this manner, comparative modeling using a single experimental structure can provide approximate but useful 3D structural information for an entire protein domain family. The Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG; www.nesg.org) is a pilot project funded by the National Institutes of Health Protein Structure Initiative, focusing on proteins from eukaryotic model organisms including humans. The thermophillic archaea Archaeglobus fulgidis AF2095 protein is an example of a protein of unknown biological function

  17. Does fertilizer (N15P15K15) amendment enhance phytoremediation of petroleum-polluted aquatic ecosystem in the presence of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes [Mart.] Solms)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndimele, Prince Emeka; Jenyo-Oni, Adetola; Chukwuka, Kanayo S; Ndimele, Chinatu Charity; Ayodele, Ibukunoluwa Augustine

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of inorganic fertilizer (N15P15K15) amendments on crude oil uptake by water hyacinth. Experimental units (water hyacinth grown in fresh water) were spiked with 0, 20, 40 and 60 mg/L crude oil. After 24 h, they were randomly assigned fertilizer (N15P15K15) at three different concentrations; 0, 6 and 10 mg/L. Crude oil degradation and absorption were determined by measuring total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in the water column and water hyacinth, respectively. The measurements were taken monthly for six months (February-August 2010). The results showed that TPH concentration in the water column in the treatment amended at 6 mg/L (0.30 ± 0.01 mg/L) was significantly lower (p phytoremediation) absorbed significantly higher (p phytoremediation of crude oil by water hyacinth and biostimulation with fertilizer (N15P15K15) is possible.

  18. 5 Things To Know About Relaxation Techniques for Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X Y Z 5 Things To Know About Relaxation Techniques for Stress Share: When you’re under stress, ... creating the relaxation response through regular use of relaxation techniques could counteract the negative effects of stress. Relaxation ...

  19. Time domain NMR applied to food products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duynhoven, van J.P.M.; Voda, A.; Witek, M.M.; As, van H.

    2010-01-01

    Time-domain NMR is being used throughout all areas of food science and technology. A wide range of one- and two-dimensional relaxometric and diffusometric applications have been implemented on cost-effective, robust and easy-to-use benchtop NMR equipment. Time-domain NMR applications do not only

  20. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  1. Sensitivity enhancement and contrasting information provided by free radicals in oriented-sample NMR of bicelle-reconstituted membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, Deanna M.; Nevzorov, Alexander A.

    2014-02-01

    Elucidating structure and topology of membrane proteins (MPs) is essential for unveiling functionality of these important biological constituents. Oriented-sample solid-state NMR (OS-NMR) is capable of providing such information on MPs under nearly physiological conditions. However, two dimensional OS-NMR experiments can take several days to complete due to long longitudinal relaxation times combined with the large number of scans to achieve sufficient signal sensitivity in biological samples. Here, free radicals 5-DOXYL stearic acid, TEMPOL, and CAT-1 were added to uniformly 15N-labeled Pf1 coat protein reconstituted in DMPC/DHPC bicelles, and their effect on the longitudinal relaxation times (T1Z) was investigated. The dramatically shortened T1Z's allowed for the signal gain per unit time to be used for either: (i) up to a threefold reduction of the total experimental time at 99% magnetization recovery or (ii) obtaining up to 74% signal enhancement between the control and radical samples during constant experimental time at “optimal” relaxation delays. In addition, through OS-NMR and high-field EPR studies, free radicals were able to provide positional constraints in the bicelle system, which provide a description of the location of each residue in Pf1 coat protein within the bicellar membranes. This information can be useful in the determination of oligomerization states and immersion depths of larger membrane proteins.

  2. Impurity effects in a S=1/2 Heisenberg spin chain probed by {sup 63}Cu NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utz, Yannic; Bruening, Eva Maria; Hammerath, Franziska; Rudisch, Christian; Grafe, Hans-Joachim; Mohan, Ashwin; Hess, Christian; Nishimoto, Satoshi; Drechsler, Stefan-Ludwig; Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden (Germany); Saint-Martin, Romuald; Revcolevschi, Alexandre [LPCES, Orsay (France)

    2013-07-01

    We present {sup 63}Cu NMR measurements on undoped, Ni doped and Mg doped SrCuO{sub 2} single crystals. SrCuO{sub 2} is a good realization of a one-dimensional S=1/2 Heisenberg spin chain. This is confirmed by the theoretically-expected temperature independent NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate T{sup -1}{sub 1}. Doping with Ni, which can be regarded as a S=1 impurity, has a major impact on the magnetic properties of the spin chains. On the one hand, this is manifested by unusual features in the NMR spectra below 100 K, revealing the existence of an impurity-induced local alternating magnetisation. On the other hand, exponentially decaying spin lattice relaxation rates towards low temperatures indicate the opening of a spin gap similar to Ca doped SrCuO{sub 2}. Mg doping (S=0) has, however, no influence on the magnetic properties of the spin chains. Neither the NMR spectra nor the spin lattice relaxation rates differ from those measured on pure SrCuO{sub 2}. While the different impact of Ni and Mg doping on the spin chains could be explained by their different impurity spins, the opening of a spin gap in case of Ni doping is totally unexpected and not yet understood.

  3. Accurate structure and dynamics of the metal-site of paramagnetic metalloproteins from NMR parameters using natural bond orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D Flemming; Westler, William M; Kunze, Micha B A; Markley, John L; Weinhold, Frank; Led, Jens J

    2012-03-14

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal-ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal-ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for (15)N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site.

  4. Sensitivity enhancement and contrasting information provided by free radicals in oriented-sample NMR of bicelle-reconstituted membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, Deanna M; Nevzorov, Alexander A

    2014-02-01

    Elucidating structure and topology of membrane proteins (MPs) is essential for unveiling functionality of these important biological constituents. Oriented-sample solid-state NMR (OS-NMR) is capable of providing such information on MPs under nearly physiological conditions. However, two dimensional OS-NMR experiments can take several days to complete due to long longitudinal relaxation times combined with the large number of scans to achieve sufficient signal sensitivity in biological samples. Here, free radicals 5-DOXYL stearic acid, TEMPOL, and CAT-1 were added to uniformly (15)N-labeled Pf1 coat protein reconstituted in DMPC/DHPC bicelles, and their effect on the longitudinal relaxation times (T1Z) was investigated. The dramatically shortened T1Z's allowed for the signal gain per unit time to be used for either: (i) up to a threefold reduction of the total experimental time at 99% magnetization recovery or (ii) obtaining up to 74% signal enhancement between the control and radical samples during constant experimental time at "optimal" relaxation delays. In addition, through OS-NMR and high-field EPR studies, free radicals were able to provide positional constraints in the bicelle system, which provide a description of the location of each residue in Pf1 coat protein within the bicellar membranes. This information can be useful in the determination of oligomerization states and immersion depths of larger membrane proteins.

  5. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  6. Synthesis and relaxivity of polycarboxylic hydrazone rare earth complexes--Relaxivity of a -oxo-pentanedioic acid benzoyl hydrazone Gd-complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Synthesis of ligand, a -oxo-pentanedioic acid benzoyl hydrazone (H2LPB), and its six rare earth (La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd and Er) complexes are reported. The composition and the properties of the complexes were characterized by element analysis, thermal analysis, UV, IR and 1H NMR spectra. Besides, relaxivity (R1) of Gd-complex has been determined by INVREC.Au program, using inversion recovery pulse sequences, R1=8.05 mmol.L-1.s-1. The acute toxicity of Gd-complex in animal has also been tested, and the median lethal dose (LD50) is equal to (468.2±30) mg/kg.

  7. The effect of rough surfaces on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance relaxation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nordin, Matias

    2015-01-01

    Most theoretical treatments of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) assume ideal smooth geometries (i.e. slabs, spheres or cylinders) with well-defined surface-to-volume ratios (S/V). This same assumption is commonly adopted for naturally occurring materials, where the pore geometry can differ substantially from these ideal shapes. In this paper the effect of surface roughness on the T2 relaxation spectrum is studied. By homogenization of the problem using an electrostatic approach it is found that the effective surface relaxivity can increase dramatically in the presence of rough surfaces. This leads to a situation where the system responds as a smooth pore, but with significantly increased surface relaxivity. As a result: the standard approach of assuming an idealized geometry with known surface-to-volume and inverting the T2 relaxation spectrum to a pore size distribution is no longer valid. The effective relaxivity is found to be fairly insensitive to the shape of roughness but strongly dependent on the width...

  8. ELISE NMR: Experimental liquid sealing of NMR samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Landrieu, Isabelle; Hanoulle, Xavier; Lippens, Guy

    2006-08-01

    We present a simple, generally applicable approach to prevent sample evaporation when working at elevated temperatures in high resolution NMR. It consists of experimentally sealing the NMR sample by a second liquid (Experimental Liquid Sealing, ELISE). For aqueous samples, we identified the mineral oil commonly used in PCR application as the best candidate, because it contains only a very limited amount of water-soluble contaminants, is stable over time and heat resistant. The procedure does not interfere with shim settings, and is compatible with a wide variety of samples, including oligosaccharides and proteins. For chloroform samples, a simple drop of water allows to efficiently seal the sample, avoiding solvent evaporation even over lengthy time periods.

  9. Plasma Relaxation in Hall Magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shivamoggi, B K

    2011-01-01

    Parker's formulation of isotopological plasma relaxation process in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is extended to Hall MHD. The torsion coefficient alpha in the Hall MHD Beltrami condition turns out now to be proportional to the "potential vorticity." The Hall MHD Beltrami condition becomes equivalent to the "potential vorticity" conservation equation in two-dimensional hydrodynamics if the Hall MHD Lagrange multiplier beta is taken to be proportional to the "potential vorticity" as well. The winding pattern of the magnetic field lines in Hall MHD then appears to evolve in the same way as "potential vorticity" lines in 2D hydrodynamics.

  10. Relaxing Chosen-Ciphertext Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canetti, Ran; Krawczyk, Hugo; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2003-01-01

    Security against adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks (or, CCA security) has been accepted as the standard requirement from encryption schemes that need to withstand active attacks. In particular, it is regarded as the appropriate security notion for encryption schemes used as components within...... “for most practical purposes.” We propose a relaxed variant of CCA security, called Replayable CCA (RCCA) security. RCCA security accepts as secure the non-CCA (yet arguably secure) schemes mentioned above; furthermore, it suffices for most existing applications of CCA security. We provide three...

  11. Similarities between intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in RNA kissing complexes found by means of cross-correlated relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittmer, Jens [Institut de Chimie Moleculaire et Biologique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, BCH (Switzerland); Kim, Chul-Hyun [University of California, Department of Chemistry (United States); Bodenhausen, Geoffrey [Institut de Chimie Moleculaire et Biologique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, BCH (Switzerland)], E-mail: Geoffrey.Bodenhausen@ens.fr

    2003-07-15

    The bond lengths and dynamics of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in an RNA kissing complex have been characterized by determining the NMR relaxation rates of various double- and triple-quantum coherences that involve an imino proton and two neighboring nitrogen-15 nuclei belonging to opposite bases. New experiments allow one to determine the chemical shift anisotropy of the imino protons. The bond lengths derived from dipolar relaxation and the lack of modulations of the nitrogen chemical shifts indicate that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds which hold the kissing complex together are very similar to the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the double-stranded stem of the RNA.

  12. Distinguishing bicontinuous lipid cubic phases from isotropic membrane morphologies using (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Yao, Hongwei; Hong, Mei

    2015-04-16

    Nonlamellar lipid membranes are frequently induced by proteins that fuse, bend, and cut membranes. Understanding the mechanism of action of these proteins requires the elucidation of the membrane morphologies that they induce. While hexagonal phases and lamellar phases are readily identified by their characteristic solid-state NMR line shapes, bicontinuous lipid cubic phases are more difficult to discern, since the static NMR spectra of cubic-phase lipids consist of an isotropic (31)P or (2)H peak, indistinguishable from the spectra of isotropic membrane morphologies such as micelles and small vesicles. To date, small-angle X-ray scattering is the only method to identify bicontinuous lipid cubic phases. To explore unique NMR signatures of lipid cubic phases, we first describe the orientation distribution of lipid molecules in cubic phases and simulate the static (31)P chemical shift line shapes of oriented cubic-phase membranes in the limit of slow lateral diffusion. We then show that (31)P T2 relaxation times differ significantly between isotropic micelles and cubic-phase membranes: the latter exhibit 2 orders of magnitude shorter T2 relaxation times. These differences are explained by the different time scales of lipid lateral diffusion on the cubic-phase surface versus the time scales of micelle tumbling. Using this relaxation NMR approach, we investigated a DOPE membrane containing the transmembrane domain (TMD) of a viral fusion protein. The static (31)P spectrum of DOPE shows an isotropic peak, whose T2 relaxation times correspond to that of a cubic phase. Thus, the viral fusion protein TMD induces negative Gaussian curvature, which is an intrinsic characteristic of cubic phases, to the DOPE membrane. This curvature induction has important implications to the mechanism of virus-cell fusion. This study establishes a simple NMR diagnostic probe of lipid cubic phases, which is expected to be useful for studying many protein-induced membrane remodeling phenomena

  13. Off-resonance rotating-frame relaxation dispersion experiment for 13C in aromatic side chains using L-optimized TROSY-selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weininger, Ulrich; Brath, Ulrika; Modig, Kristofer

    2014-01-01

    Protein dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scales often play a critical role in biological function. NMR relaxation dispersion experiments are powerful approaches for investigating biologically relevant dynamics with site-specific resolution, as shown by a growing number of publications...

  14. Phenol-formaldehyde resins: A quantitative NMR study of molecular structure and molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenbourgs, Benjamin Tony

    Phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins have been the subject of this work. 13C liquid-state and solid-state NMR has been used to investigate the molecular structure of mainly novolak and partially of resole resins. 1H wideline in combination with 13C solid-state NMR relaxometry has been applied to study the curing and the molecular dynamics of phenolic resins. It was the intention to provide an insight in the relationship between resin composition, resin structure and subsequent resin properties (by means of the molecular dynamics). An improved 13C liquid-state NMR quantification technique of novolaks in THF-CDCl3 solutions is demonstrated. Full quantitative 13C liquid-state spectra of phenol-formaldehyde resins with high signal- to-noise ratio were obtained by using chromium acetylacetonate under optimized spectral conditions within a few hours spectrometer time. Attached proton test (APT) spectra enabled proper peak assignments in the region with significant overlap. For several novolaks, prepared under different catalytic conditions, the degree of polymerization, degree of branching, number average molecular weight, isomeric distribution, and the number of unreacted ortho and para phenol ring positions was determined with a reduced margin of error, by analyzing and integrating the 13C spectra. The power of 13C solid-state NMR in the analysis of cured PF resins is shown. Particular importance was ascribed to the question of the quantifiability of the experiments when it was desired to measure the degree of conversion by means of a 13C CP/MAS contact time study. The network structure present, and thus also the mechanical properties, is critically dependent upon the final degree of conversion obtained after curing. The degree of conversion, which depended on the cure conditions (cure temperature, cure pressure and cure time), was limited by vitrification as was demonstrated by DSC experiments. Changes in the spin-lattice relaxation time T 1H were observed, providing

  15. Study of advanced ion conducting polymers by relaxation, diffusion and spectroscopy NMR methods

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Jardón Álvarez

    2016-01-01

    Advances on secondary lithium ion batteries imply the use of solid polymer electrolytes, which represent a promising solution to improve safety issues in high energy density batteries. Through dissolution of lithium salts into a polymeric host, such as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), ion conducting polymers are obtained. The Li+ ions will be localized in the proximity of the oxygen atoms in the PEO chains and thus, their motion strongly correlated with the segmental reorientation of the polymer. ...

  16. Wettability of quartz surface as observed by NMR transverse relaxation time (T2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Katika, Konstantina; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Injection of optimized water composition (smart water) is an advanced water flooding method for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). Low saline waterflooding has been proved successful in sandstone reservoir. However, there is still controversy on the mechanism of smart water flooding. We studied...

  17. NMR studies of alkali C{sub 60} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenger, V.A.; Recchia, C.; Pennington, C.H. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    The authors report {sup 13}C, {sup 87}Rb, {sup 39}K, and {sup 133}Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of lineshapes, Knight shifts, and spin-lattice relaxation rates in the normal and superconducting states of M{sub 3}C{sub 60}, where M{sub 3} = Rb{sub 3}, K{sub 3}, Rb{sub 2}K, RbK{sub 2}, Rb{sub 2}Cs, and RbCs{sub 2}. Measurements are used as a guide to a new ammonia solvent synthesis technique. Temperature dependence of the superconducting state electron spin susceptibility is found to follow BCS weak coupling predictions. The issue of the Hebel-Slichter coherence peak is addressed.

  18. Molecular dynamics of solid cortisol studied by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, E. R.

    Polycrystalline cortisol (hydrocortisone; 11β,17α,21-trihydroxy-4-preg- nene-3,20-dione; C21H30O5) has been investigated by continuous and pulse proton NMR methods between 78 and 400 K at Larmor frequencies of 7, 25 and 60 MHz. A reduced value of second moment was found above 90 K and is ascribed to reorientation of two methyl groups. A single asymmetric minimum was found in the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation times and this also is attributed to reorientation of two methyl groups. The asymmetry suggests an asymmetric distribution of correlation times of the motion. Using the Cole-Davidson distribution, the best computer fit yields the following parameters characterizing the motion: Ea = 11ṡ8 ± 0ṡ1 kJ mol-1, τ0 = 4ṡ6 ± 0ṡ4) x 10-13s, distribution parameter δ = 0ṡ62.

  19. NMR study of size effects in relaxor PMN nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinc, Robert [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zalar, Bostjan; Zupancic, Blaz [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); EN-FIST Centre of Excellence, Dunajska cesta 156, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Morozovska, Anna N. [Institute for Problems of Material Science, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Krjijanovskogo 3, 03142 Kiev (Ukraine); V. Lashkarev Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, prospekt Nauki 41, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Glinchuk, Maya D. [Institute for Problems of Material Science, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Krjijanovskogo 3, 03142 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2011-11-15

    {sup 93}Nb 1/2{yields} -1/2 NMR line shape and spin-lattice measurements show that microcrystalline PbMg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3}O{sub 3} (PMN) powder is dynamically disordered at room temperature, whereas nanocrystalline PMN powder is orientationally frozen out and long-range ordered at room temperature. The dynamical disorder of the microcrystalline powder results in a motional averaging of the anisotropic part of the {sup 93}Nb chemical shift tensor and second order quadrupole shift, whereas this averaging is absent in the nanocrystalline powder, resulting in a broader central line and a longer spin-lattice relaxation time. This seems to be the first observation of such size effects in a relaxor. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Present status of development of NMR imaging devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatta, Junichi; Yazaki, Takehito; Abe, Yuzo; Komoike, Mitsutaka (Sanyo Electric Co. Ltd., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan))

    1981-12-01

    The NMR spectrum of the protons in a graded magnetic field contains information on the distribution of water within the specimen. A system to process such information was made on trial, and examples of the cross-sections of a champignon, okra, lotus root and green onion are given. These proton density distribution images, i.e., the density distribution images of water have the highest resolution among those obtained to date in Japan. Studies are reported to be underway to improve the precision of this instrument and to enlarge its scale. The technical problems in obtaining an image of the relaxation time distribution, which has been proposed to be helpful in diagnosing cancer, are discussed. The present state of research in this field is reviewed.