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Sample records for myxobacterium anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans

  1. Characterization and Description of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov., an Aryl-Halorespiring Facultative Anaerobic Myxobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Robert A.; Cole, James R.; Tiedje, James M.

    2002-01-01

    Five strains were isolated which form a physiologically and phylogenetically coherent group of chlororespiring microorganisms and represent the first taxon in the Myxobacteria capable of anaerobic growth. The strains were enriched and isolated from various soils and sediments based on their ability to grow using acetate as an electron donor and 2-chlorophenol (2-CPh) as an electron acceptor. They are slender gram-negative rods with a bright red pigmentation that exhibit gliding motility and form spore-like structures. These unique chlororespiring myxobacteria also grow with 2,6-dichlorophenol, 2,5-dichlorophenol, 2-bromophenol, nitrate, fumarate, and oxygen as terminal electron acceptors, with optimal growth occurring at low concentrations (Myxococcaceae within the class Myxobacteria and are mostly closely associated with the Myxococcus subgroup. With the exception of anaerobic growth and lack of a characteristic fruiting body, these strains closely resemble previously characterized myxobacteria and therefore should be considered part of the Myxococcus subgroup. The anaerobic growth and 9.0% difference in 16S rDNA sequence from those of other myxobacterial genera are sufficient to place these strains in a new genus and species designated Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans. The type strain is 2CP-1 (ATCC BAA-258). PMID:11823233

  2. The mosaic genome of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C suggests an aerobic common ancestor to the delta-proteobacteria.

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    Sara H Thomas

    Full Text Available Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C is a versaphilic delta-Proteobacterium distributed throughout many diverse soil and sediment environments. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis groups A. dehalogenans together with the myxobacteria, which have distinguishing characteristics including strictly aerobic metabolism, sporulation, fruiting body formation, and surface motility. Analysis of the 5.01 Mb strain 2CP-C genome substantiated that this organism is a myxobacterium but shares genotypic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria (i.e., the Desulfuromonadales. Reflective of its respiratory versatility, strain 2CP-C possesses 68 genes coding for putative c-type cytochromes, including one gene with 40 heme binding motifs. Consistent with its relatedness to the myxobacteria, surface motility was observed in strain 2CP-C and multiple types of motility genes are present, including 28 genes for gliding, adventurous (A- motility and 17 genes for type IV pilus-based motility (i.e., social (S- motility that all have homologs in Myxococcus xanthus. Although A. dehalogenans shares many metabolic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria, strain 2CP-C grows under microaerophilic conditions and possesses detoxification systems for reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, two gene clusters coding for NADH dehydrogenase subunits and two cytochrome oxidase gene clusters in strain 2CP-C are similar to those in M. xanthus. Remarkably, strain 2CP-C possesses a third NADH dehydrogenase gene cluster and a cytochrome cbb(3 oxidase gene cluster, apparently acquired through ancient horizontal gene transfer from a strictly anaerobic green sulfur bacterium. The mosaic nature of the A. dehalogenans strain 2CP-C genome suggests that the metabolically versatile, anaerobic members of the delta-Proteobacteria may have descended from aerobic ancestors with complex lifestyles.

  3. Identification of a c-Type Cytochrome Specific for Manganese Dioxide (MnO2) Reduction in Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans Strain 2CP-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiffner, S. M.; Nissen, S.; Liu, X.; Chourey, K.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Hettich, R.; Loeffler, F.

    2014-12-01

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans is a metabolically versatile Deltaproteobacterium and conserves energy from the reduction of various electron acceptors, including insoluble MnO2 and ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides (FeOOH). The goal of this study was to identify c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to MnO2. The characterization of deletion mutants has revealed a number of c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to solid metal oxides in Shewanella spp. and Geobacter spp; however, a genetic system for Anaeromyxobacter is not available. The A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C genome encodes 68 putative c-type cytochromes, which all lack functional assignments. To identify c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to solid MnO2, protein expression profiles of A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C cells grown with acetate as electron donor and MnO2, ferric citrate, FeOOH, nitrate or fumarate as electron acceptors were compared. Whole cell proteomes were analyzed after trypsin proteolysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Distinct c-type cytochrome expression patterns were observed with cells grown with different electron acceptors. A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C grown with MnO2 expressed 25 out of the 68 c-type cytochromes encoded on the genome. The c-type cytochrome Adeh_1278 was only expressed in strain 2CP-C grown with MnO2. Reverse transcription PCR confirmed that the Adeh_1278 gene was transcribed in MnO2-grown cells but not in cells grown with other terminal electron acceptors. The expression of the Adeh_1278 gene correlated with Mn(IV) reduction activity. Adeh_1278 has three heme binding motifs and is predicted to be located in the periplasm. The identification of Adeh_1278 as a protein uniquely expressed when MnO2 serves as electron acceptor suggests its utility as a biomarker for MnO2 reduction. This example demonstrates the value of the LC-MS/MS approach for identifying specific proteins of interest and making functional assignments

  4. Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qingzhong Wu; Cornell Gayle; Frank Löffler; Sanford, Robert

    2004-03-17

    Recent findings suggest that Anaeromyxobacter populations play relevant roles in metal and radionuclide reduction and immobilization at contaminated DOE sites. This research effort will characterize Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C as well as other Anaeromyxobacter isolates in hand, and assess their contribution towards metal detoxification and plume stabilization under environmentally relevant conditions.

  5. Genomic, proteomic and biochemical analysis of the organohalide respiratory pathway in Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruse, T.; Pas, van de B.A.; Atteia, A.; Krab, K.; Hagen, W.R.; Goodwin, L.; Chain, P.; Boeren, S.; Maphosa, F.; Schraa, G.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.; Smidt, H.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans is able to grow by organohalide respiration using 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenyl acetate (Cl-OHPA) as an electron acceptor. We used a combination of genome sequencing, biochemical analysis of redox active components and shotgun proteomics to study elements of the organohali

  6. O-demethylase from Acetobacterium dehalogenans--substrate specificity and function of the participating proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, F; Wohlfarth, G; Diekert, G

    1998-05-01

    The ether-cleaving O-demethylase isolated from syringate-grown cells of Acetobacterium dehalogenans (formerly named strain MC) consists of four proteins, components A, B, C and D. The enzyme system converts only phenyl methyl ethers with a hydroxyl group in the ortho position to the methoxyl moiety. The presence of a carboxyl group in the aromatic compound was not required for O-demethylase reaction. Component B mediated the conversion of vanillate to 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate in the presence of the Ti(III)-reduced corrinoid-containing component A. After addition of component D and tetrahydrofolate, methyl tetrahydrofolate was formed from vanillate in stoichiometric amounts. Titanium(III) citrate as a reductant could be replaced by H2, methyl viologen or ferredoxin, partially purified hydrogenase, purified component C obtained from A. dehalogenans, and ATP. From these findings, it was deduced that component B serves as vanillate:corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I) mediating the methyl transfer from vanillate to the reduced corrinoid protein component A. Component D functions as methylcorrinoid protein:tetrahydrofolate transferase (methyltransferase II). The role of component C is probably that of an activating protein reversing accidental oxidation of the protein-bound cob(I)alamin to cob(II)alamin in the presence of ATP and reducing equivalents supplied by the enzymatic oxidation of hydrogen.

  7. An Unusual Diterpene—Enhygromic Acid and Deoxyenhygrolides from a Marine Myxobacterium, Enhygromyxa sp.

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    Tomohiko Tomura

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Three new compounds, enhygromic acid (1 and deoxyenhygrolides A (2 and B (3, were isolated from a marine myxobacterium, Enhygromyxa sp. Compound 1 was found to be an acrylic acid derivative with a rare polycyclic carbon skeleton, decahydroacenaphthylene, by spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 2 and 3 were deoxy analogs of the known γ-alkylidenebutenolides, enhygrolides. Compound 1 exhibited cytotoxicity against B16 melanoma cells and anti-bacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis, and enhanced the NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells.

  8. Salimyxins and enhygrolides: antibiotic, sponge-related metabolites from the obligate marine myxobacterium Enhygromyxa salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Stephan; Kehraus, Stefan; Neu, Edith; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Schäberle, Till F; König, Gabriele M

    2013-07-22

    Unlike their terrestrial counterparts, marine myxobacteria are hardly investigated for their secondary metabolites. This study describes three new compounds (1-3), named salimyxins and enhygrolides, obtained from the obligate marine myxobacterium Enhygromyxa salina. These are the first natural products obtained from Enhygromyxa species. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis, including NMR and CD spectroscopy. Enhygrolides are closely related to the nostoclides, which were initially isolated from a cyanobacterium of the genus Nostoc. The salimyxins, representing structurally most unusual degraded sterols, are close to identical to demethylincisterol from the sponge Homaxinella sp. Salimyxin B and enhygrolide A inhibit the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium Arthrobacter cristallopoietes (MIC salimyxin B, 8 μg mL⁻¹; enhygrolide A, 4 μg mL⁻¹).

  9. Isolation and characterization of Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium which reductively dechlorinates chlorophenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, I; Woese, C; Wiegel, J

    1994-10-01

    An organism that is able to reductively ortho-dechlorinate 2,4-dichlorophenol and 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate (3-Cl-4-OHPA) was isolated from a methanogenic lake sediment. This organism, an anaerobic, motile, Gram-type-positive, rod-shaped bacterium, grew in the presence of 0.1% yeast extract when pyruvate, lactate, formate, or hydrogen was used as the electron donor for reductive dehalogenation of 3-Cl-4-OHPA. Sulfite, thiosulfate, and sulfur were reduced to sulfide, nitrate was reduced to nitrite, and fumarate was reduced to succinate. Dissimilatory reduction of sulfate could not be demonstrated, and no adenylylsulfate reductase was detected with an immunoassay. The organism fermented two pyruvate molecules to one lactate molecule, one acetate molecule, and one carbon dioxide molecule. The pH and temperature optima for both growth and dechlorination of 3-Cl-4-OHPA were 7.5 and 38 degrees C, respectively. The doubling time under these conditions was approximately 3.5 h. On the basis of the results of a 16S rRNA analysis and the inability of the organism to use sulfate as an electron acceptor, strain JW/IU-DC1 is described as the type strain of the new taxon Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov.

  10. Isolation and Biosynthetic Analysis of Haliamide, a New PKS-NRPS Hybrid Metabolite from the Marine Myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum

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    Yuwei Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myxobacteria of marine origin are rare and hard-to-culture microorganisms, but they genetically harbor high potential to produce novel antibiotics. An extensive investigation on the secondary metabolome of the unique marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 led to the isolation of a new polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrid product, haliamide (1. Its structure was elucidated by spectroscopic analyses including NMR and HR-MS. Haliamide (1 showed cytotoxicity against HeLa-S3 cells with IC50 of 12 μM. Feeding experiments were performed to identify the biosynthetic building blocks of 1, revealing one benzoate, one alanine, two propionates, one acetate and one acetate-derived terminal methylene. The biosynthetic gene cluster of haliamide (hla, 21.7 kbp was characterized through the genome mining of the producer, allowing us to establish a model for the haliamide biosynthesis. The sulfotransferase (ST-thioesterase (TE domains encoded in hlaB appears to be responsible for the terminal alkene formation via decarboxylation.

  11. O-demethylase from Acetobacterium dehalogenans--cloning, sequencing, and active expression of the gene encoding the corrinoid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, F; Wohlfarth, G; Diekert, G

    1998-10-15

    The ether-cleaving O-demethylase from the strictly anaerobic homoacetogen Acetobacterium dehalogenans catalyses the methyltransfer from 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzoate (vanillate) to tetrahydrofolate. In the first step a vanillate :corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I) mediates the methylation of a 25-kDa corrinoid protein with the cofactor reduced to cob(I)alamin. The methyl group is then transferred to tetrahydrofolate by the action of a methylcorrinoid protein:tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase (methyltransferase II). Using primers derived from the amino-terminal sequences of the corrinoid protein and the vanillate:corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I), a 723-bp fragment was amplified by PCR, which contained the gene odmA encoding the corrinoid protein of O-demethylase. Downstream of odmA, part of the odmB gene encoding methyltransferase I was identified. The amino acid sequence deduced from odmA showed about 60% similarity to the cobalamin-binding domain of methionine synthase from Escherichia coli (MetH) and to corrinoid proteins of methyltransferase systems involved in methanogenesis from methanol and methylamines. The sequence contained the DXHXXG consensus sequence typical for displacement of the dimethylbenzimidazole base of the corrinoid cofactor by a histidine from the protein. Heterologous expression of odmA in E. coli yielded a colourless, oxygen-insensitive apoprotein, which was able to bind one mol cobalamin or methylcobalamin/mol protein. Both of these reconstituted forms of the protein were active in the overall O-demethylation reaction. OdmA reconstituted with hydroxocobalamin and reduced by titanium(III) citrate to the cob(I)alamin form was methylated with vanillate by methyltransferase I in an irreversible reaction. Methylcobalamin carrying OdmA served as methyl group donor for the methylation of tetrahydrofolate by methyltransferase II. This reaction was found to be reversible, since methyltranSferase II

  12. Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Anaerolineae populations are enriched on anodes of root exudate-driven microbial fuel cells in rice field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, Angela; Pommerenke, Bianca; Boon, Nico; Friedrich, Michael W

    2015-06-01

    Plant-based sediment microbial fuel cells (PMFCs) couple the oxidation of root exudates in living rice plants to current production. We analysed the composition of the microbial community on anodes from PMFC with natural rice field soil as substratum for rice by analysing 16S rRNA as an indicator of microbial activity and diversity. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis indicated that the active bacterial community on anodes from PMFCs differed strongly compared with controls. Moreover, clones related to Deltaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi were highly abundant (49% and 21%, respectively) on PMFCs anodes. Geobacter (19%), Anaeromyxobacter (15%) and Anaerolineae (17%) populations were predominant on anodes with natural rice field soil and differed strongly from those previously detected with potting soil. In open circuit (OC) control PMFCs, not allowing electron transfer, Deltaproteobacteria (33%), Betaproteobacteria (20%), Chloroflexi (12%), Alphaproteobacteria (10%) and Firmicutes (10%) were detected. The presence of an electron accepting anode also had a strong influence on methanogenic archaea. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were more active on PMFC (21%) than on OC controls (10%), whereas acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae were more active on OC controls (31%) compared with PMFCs (9%). In conclusion, electron accepting anodes and rice root exudates selected for distinct potential anode-reducing microbial populations in rice soil inoculated PMFC.

  13. Pheromone produced by the myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, K.; Hegeman, G D; White, D

    1982-01-01

    An extracellular, diffusible signaling molecule (pheromone) was produced by Stigmatella aurantiaca during fruiting body formation. The pheromone decreased the aggregation period in both the light and the dark and substituted for light in stimulating the maturation of aggregates into fruiting bodies. The cells were more sensitive to lower concentrations of pheromone in the light than in the dark, possibly explaining the stimulation of aggregation and fruiting body formation by light. The phero...

  14. Improved Understanding of Microbial Iron and Sulfate Reduction Through a Combination of Bottom-up and Top-down Functional Proteomics Assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Ruth [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-02-28

    Our overall goal was to improve the understanding of microbial iron and sulfate reduction by evaluating a diverse iron and sulfate reducing organisms utilizing a multi-omics approach combining “top-down” and “bottom-up” omics methodologies. We initiated one of the first combined comparative genomics, shotgun proteomics, RTqPCR, and heterologous expression studies in pursuit of our project objectives. Within the first year of this project, we created a new bioinformatics tool for ortholog identification (“SPOCS”). SPOCS is described in our publication, Curtis et al., 2013. Using this tool we were able to identify conserved orthologous groups across diverse iron and sulfate reducing microorganisms from Firmicutes, gamma-proteobacteria and delta-proteobacteria. For six iron and sulfate reducers we also performed shotgun proteomics (“bottom-up” proteomics including accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and iTRAQ approaches). Cultures include Gram (-) and Gram (+) microbes. Gram (-) were: Geobacter sulfureducens (grown on iron citrate and fumarate), Geobacter bemidjiensis (grown on iron citrate and fumarate), Shewanella oneidiensis (grown on iron citrate and fumarate) and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans (grown on iron citrate and fumarate). Although all cultures grew on insoluble iron, the iron precipitates interfered with protein extraction and analysis; which remains a major challenge for researchers in disparate study systems. Among the Gram (-) organisms studied, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans remains the most poorly characterized. Yet, it is arguably the most versatile organisms we studied. In this work we have used comparative proteomics to hypothesize which two of the dozens of predicted c-type cytochromes within Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans may be directly involved in soluble iron reduction. Unfortunately, heterologous expression of these Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans ctype cytochromes led to poor protein production and/or formation of inclusion bodies

  15. Salimabromide: unexpected chemistry from the obligate marine myxobacterium Enhygromxya salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Stephan; Dreisigacker, Sandra; Kehraus, Stefan; Neu, Edith; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Wright, Patrick R; Menche, Dirk; Schäberle, Till F; König, Gabriele M

    2013-07-08

    Marine myxobacteria (Enhygromyxa, Plesiocystis, Pseudoenhygromyxa, Haliangium) are phylogenetically distant from their terrestrial counterparts. Salimabromide is the first natural product from the Plesiocystis/Enhygromyxa clade of obligatory marine myxobacteria. Salimabromide has a new tetracyclic carbon skeleton, comprising a brominated benzene ring, a furano lactone residue, and a cyclohexane ring, bridged by a seven-membered cyclic moiety. The absolute configuration was deduced from experimental and calculated CD data. Salimabromide revealed antibiotic activity towards Arthrobacter cristallopoietes.

  16. Complete genome sequence of the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneiker, S; Perlova, O; Kaiser, O

    2007-01-01

    The genus Sorangium synthesizes approximately half of the secondary metabolites isolated from myxobacteria, including the anti-cancer metabolite epothilone. We report the complete genome sequence of the model Sorangium strain S. cellulosum Soce56, which produces several natural products and has m...

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06548-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3( CP001359 |pid:none) Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2C... 86 2e-15 AF205887_1( AF205887 |pid:none) Leishmania donovani peroxido...Bacteroides fragilis YCH46 DNA,... 85 2e-15 AF134161_1( AF134161 |pid:none) Leishmania chagasi peroxidoxin 1...971 |pid:none) Finegoldia magna ATCC 29328 DNA,... 84 7e-15 AF312397_1( AF312397 |pid:none) Leishmania chagasi peroxido...5 AF312398_1( AF312398 |pid:none) Leishmania chagasi peroxidoxin 3 (... 84 7e-15 ...anella halifaxensis HAW-EB4... 84 7e-15 DQ071681_1( DQ071681 |pid:none) Leishmania aethiopica peroxidoxin ..

  18. Genomic Analyses of Bacterial Porin-Cytochrome Gene Clusters

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    Liang eShi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The porin-cytochrome (Pcc protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr gene clusters of other Fe(III-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III and Mn(IV oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III and Mn(IV oxides.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomics of a Novel Myxobacterium Myxococcus hansupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Narwani, Tarun; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria, a group of Gram-negative aerobes, belong to the class δ-proteobacteria and order Myxococcales. Unlike anaerobic δ-proteobacteria, they exhibit several unusual physiogenomic properties like gliding motility, desiccation-resistant myxospores and large genomes with high coding density. Here we report a 9.5 Mbp complete genome of Myxococcus hansupus that encodes 7,753 proteins. Phylogenomic and genome-genome distance based analysis suggest that Myxococcus hansupus is a novel member of the genus Myxococcus. Comparative genome analysis with other members of the genus Myxococcus was performed to explore their genome diversity. The variation in number of unique proteins observed across different species is suggestive of diversity at the genus level while the overrepresentation of several Pfam families indicates the extent and mode of genome expansion as compared to non-Myxococcales δ-proteobacteria.

  20. Cystochromones, Unusual Chromone-Containing Polyketides from the Myxobacterium Cystobacter sp. MCy9104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadmid, Suvd; Plaza, Alberto; Garcia, Ronald; Müller, Rolf

    2015-08-28

    Seven new chromone-containing polyketides, termed cystochromones A-G, were isolated from the myxobacterial strain Cystobacter sp. MCy9104. Their structures were elucidated using comprehensive NMR spectroscopy and HR-MS/MS. Cystochromones bear a pentadecyl moiety unusually attached at C-5 of the chromone ring. Moreover, isotope-labeled substrate feeding experiments and NMR analysis suggested a hybrid iso-fatty acid and polyketide synthase biosynthetic pathway for these secondary metabolites.

  1. Damage of Streptococcus mutans biofilms by carolacton, a secondary metabolite from the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum

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    Irschik Herbert

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen in human dental caries. One of its important virulence properties is the ability to form biofilms (dental plaque on tooth surfaces. Eradication of such biofilms is extremely difficult. We therefore screened a library of secondary metabolites from myxobacteria for their ability to damage biofilms of S. mutans. Results Here we show that carolacton, a secondary metabolite isolated from Sorangium cellulosum, has high antibacterial activity against biofilms of S. mutans. Planktonic growth of bacteria was only slightly impaired and no acute cytotoxicity against mouse fibroblasts could be observed. Carolacton caused death of S. mutans biofilm cells, elongation of cell chains, and changes in cell morphology. At a concentration of 10 nM carolacton, biofilm damage was already at 35% under anaerobic conditions. A knock-out mutant for comD, encoding a histidine kinase specific for the competence stimulating peptide (CSP, was slightly less sensitive to carolacton than the wildtype. Expression of the competence related alternate sigma factor ComX was strongly reduced by carolacton, as determined by a pcomX luciferase reporter strain. Conclusions Carolacton possibly interferes with the density dependent signalling systems in S. mutans and may represent a novel approach for the prevention of dental caries.

  2. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  3. Genome Analysis of the Fruiting Body-Forming Myxobacterium Chondromyces crocatus Reveals High Potential for Natural Product Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaburannyi, Nestor; Bunk, Boyke; Maier, Josef; Overmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the type strain of the myxobacterial genus Chondromyces, Chondromyces crocatus Cm c5. It presents one of the largest prokaryotic genomes featuring a single circular chromosome and no plasmids. Analysis revealed an enlarged set of tRNA genes, along with reduced pressure on preferred codon usage compared to that of other bacterial genomes. The large coding capacity and the plethora of encoded secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters are in line with the capability of Cm c5 to produce an arsenal of antibacterial, antifungal, and cytotoxic compounds. Known pathways of the ajudazol, chondramide, chondrochloren, crocacin, crocapeptin, and thuggacin compound families are complemented by many more natural compound biosynthetic gene clusters in the chromosome. Whole-genome comparison of the fruiting-body-forming type strain (Cm c5, DSM 14714) to an accustomed laboratory strain which has lost this ability (nonfruiting phenotype, Cm c5 fr−) revealed genetic changes in three loci. In addition to the low synteny found with the closest sequenced representative of the same family, Sorangium cellulosum, extensive genetic information duplication and broad application of eukaryotic-type signal transduction systems are hallmarks of this 11.3-Mbp prokaryotic genome. PMID:26773087

  4. Biosynthesis of Phenylnannolone A, a Multidrug Resistance Reversal Agent from the Halotolerant Myxobacterium Nannocystis pusilla B150

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouhired, Sarah M.; Crüsemann, Max; Almeida, Celso

    2014-01-01

    product P‐glycoprotein and reverses daunorubicin resistance in cancer cells. To decipher the biochemical reactions leading to the formation of phenylnannolone A, the putative biosynthetic genes were identified (phn1, phn2). Phn2 is a polyketide synthase (PKS) with an NRPS‐like loading module, and its...

  5. Enhanced production of undecylprodigiosin in Streptomyces coelicolor by co-cultivation with the corallopyronin A-producing myxobacterium, Corallococcus coralloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäberle, Till F; Orland, Annika; König, Gabriele M

    2014-03-01

    Prolific producers of natural products like streptomycetes and myxobacteria live in complex natural frameworks consisting of many microorganisms. Presumably intricate physiological and metabolic regulatory networks have evolved to enable the organisms to respond to intra- and interspecies interactions, e.g. biosynthesis of specific natural products is up-regulated due to competitors in the surrounding area. The soil-dwelling bacterium, Streptomyces coelicolor, produces the biologically-active compound, undecylprodigiosin (Red). Co-incubation with the corallopyronin A-producer, Corallococcus coralloides, was performed to explore the hypothesis that Red production can be enhanced by a myxobacterial competitor. Co-cultivation resulted in earlier onset and increased production of Red (60-fold increase of the intra-cellular concentration). Using different Corallococcus-derived extracts for elicitation, revealed that water-soluble factors triggered the enhanced production of Red which shows antimicrobial, immunosuppressive and anticancer properties.

  6. Uranium isotopic fractionation factors during U(VI) reduction by bacterial isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Sanford, Robert A.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2014-07-01

    We experimentally determined the magnitude of uranium isotopic fractionation induced by U(VI) reduction by metal reducing bacterial isolates. Our results indicate that microbial U(VI) reduction induces isotopic fractionation; heavier isotopes (i.e., 238U) partition into the solid U(IV) products. The magnitudes of isotopic fractionation (expressed as ε = 1000‰ * (α-1)) for 238U/235U were 0.68‰ ± 0.05‰ and 0.99‰ ± 0.12‰ for Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and strain IFRC-N, respectively. The ε values for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain FRC-W, strain FRC-R5, a novel Shewanella isolate, and Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1 were 0.72‰ ± 0.15‰, 0.99‰ ± 0.12‰, 0.96‰ ± 0.16‰ and 0.86‰ ± 0.06‰, respectively. Our results show that the maximum ε values of ∼1.0‰ were obtained with low biomass (∼107 cells/mL) and low electron donor concentrations (∼500 μM). These results provide an initial assessment of 238U/235U shifts induced by microbially-mediated U(VI) reduction, which is needed as 238U/235U data are increasingly applied as redox indicators in various geochemical settings.

  7. Sequence space coverage, entropy of genomes and the potential to detect non-human DNA in human samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maley Carlo C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes store information for building and maintaining organisms. Complete sequencing of many genomes provides the opportunity to study and compare global information properties of those genomes. Results We have analyzed aspects of the information content of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Escherichia coli (K-12 genomes. Virtually all possible (> 98% 12 bp oligomers appear in vertebrate genomes while 98% to D. melanogaster (12–17 bp, C. elegans (11–17 bp, A. thaliana (11–17 bp, S. cerevisiae (10–16 bp and E. coli (9–15 bp. Frequencies of unique oligomers in the genomes follow similar patterns. We identified a set of 2.6 M 15-mers that are more than 1 nucleotide different from all 15-mers in the human genome and so could be used as probes to detect microbes in human samples. In a human sample, these probes would detect 100% of the 433 currently fully sequenced prokaryotes and 75% of the 3065 fully sequenced viruses. The human genome is significantly more compact in sequence space than a random genome. We identified the most frequent 5- to 20-mers in the human genome, which may prove useful as PCR primers. We also identified a bacterium, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans, which has an exceptionally low diversity of oligomers given the size of its genome and its GC content. The entropy of coding regions in the human genome is significantly higher than non-coding regions and chromosomes. However chromosomes 1, 2, 9, 12 and 14 have a relatively high proportion of coding DNA without high entropy, and chromosome 20 is the opposite with a low frequency of coding regions but relatively high entropy. Conclusion Measures of the frequency of oligomers are useful for designing PCR assays and for identifying chromosomes and organisms with hidden structure that had not been previously recognized. This information may be used to detect

  8. Characterization of CYP264B1 and a terpene cyclase of a terpene biosynthesis gene cluster from the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce56

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, Thuy Thi Bich

    2011-01-01

    In the work presented here, CYP264B1 and the terpene cyclase GeoA of Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 have been characterized. CYP264B1 is able to convert norisoprenoids (a-ionone and b-ionone) and diverse sesquiterpene compounds, including nootkatone. Three products, 3-hydroxy-a-ionone, 3-hydroxy-b-ionone and 13-hydroxy-nootkatone were characterized using HPLC and 1H and 13C NMR. CYP264B1 is the first enzyme reported to be capable to hydroxylate regioselectively both norisoprenoids at the positi...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-1212 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-1212 ref|YP_001379363.1| Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone [Anaeromyxobacter s...p. Fw109-5] gb|ABS26379.1| Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone [Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5] YP_001379363.1 0.041 27% ...

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15493-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 99564 |pid:none) Pinus torreyana subsp. torreyana ... 99 2e-19 (Q85FI1) RecName: Full=50S ribosomal protein ... CP001131 |pid:none) Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, complet... 99 2e-19 FJ899564_45( FJ8

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U00572-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 22274( T22274 )hypothetical protein F46B3.9 - Caenorhabditis eleg... 44 0.016 JS0209( JS0209 ) antistasin precursor - Mexican...cursor... 41 0.080 X52105_1( X52105 |pid:none) Dictyostelium discoideum SP60 gene for... 41 0.080 S13904( S13904 )antistasin - Mexica...28806( A28806 )antistasin A - Mexican leech 40 0.23 CP000251_2584( CP000251 |pid:none) Anaeromyxobacter deha... AF375477 |pid:none) Danio rerio granulin-A precursor, ... 38 0.89 B28806( B28806 )antistasin B - Mexican le

  12. Myxotyrosides A and B, Unusual rhamnosides from Myxococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlendorf, Birgit; Lorenzen, Wolfram; Kehraus, Stefan; Krick, Anja; Bode, Helge B; König, Gabriele M

    2009-01-01

    Myxobacteria are gliding bacteria of the delta-subdivision of the Proteobacteria and known for their unique biosynthetic capabilities. Two examples of a new class of metabolites, myxotyrosides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from a Myxococcus sp. The myxotyrosides have a tyrosine-derived core structure glycosylated with rhamnose and acylated with unusual fatty acids such as (Z)-15-methyl-2-hexadecenoic and (Z)-2-hexadecenoic acid. The fatty acid profile of the investigated Myxococcus sp. (strain 131) is that of a typical myxobacterium with a high similarity to those described for M. fulvus and M. xanthus, with significant concentrations of neither 15-methyl-2-hexadecenoic acid nor 2-hexadecenoic acid being detected.

  13. Heterologous Production of the Marine Myxobacterial Antibiotic Haliangicin and Its Unnatural Analogues Generated by Engineering of the Biochemical Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuwei; Feng, Zhiyang; Tomura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Akira; Miyano, Seishi; Tsuge, Takashi; Mori, Hitoshi; Suh, Joo-Won; Iizuka, Takashi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Ojika, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite their fastidious nature, marine myxobacteria have considerable genetic potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. The marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 produces the antifungal polyketide haliangicin (1), but its productivity is unsatisfactory. The biosynthetic gene cluster hli (47.8 kbp) associated with 1 was identified and heterologously expressed in Myxococcus xanthus to permit the production of 1 with high efficiency (tenfold greater amount and threefold faster in growth speed compared with the original producer), as well as the generation of bioactive unnatural analogues of 1 through gene manipulation. A unique acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was found to catalyse an unusual γ,δ-dehydrogenation of the diketide starter unit, leading to the formation of the terminal alkene moiety of 1. Biological evaluation of the analogues obtained through this study revealed that their bioactivities (anti-oomycete and cytotoxic activities) can be modified by manipulating the vinyl epoxide at the terminus opposite the β-methoxyacrylate pharmacophore. PMID:26915413

  14. Revealing the macromolecular targets of complex natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reker, Daniel; Perna, Anna M.; Rodrigues, Tiago; Schneider, Petra; Reutlinger, Michael; Mönch, Bettina; Koeberle, Andreas; Lamers, Christina; Gabler, Matthias; Steinmetz, Heinrich; Müller, Rolf; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Werz, Oliver; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-12-01

    Natural products have long been a source of useful biological activity for the development of new drugs. Their macromolecular targets are, however, largely unknown, which hampers rational drug design and optimization. Here we present the development and experimental validation of a computational method for the discovery of such targets. The technique does not require three-dimensional target models and may be applied to structurally complex natural products. The algorithm dissects the natural products into fragments and infers potential pharmacological targets by comparing the fragments to synthetic reference drugs with known targets. We demonstrate that this approach results in confident predictions. In a prospective validation, we show that fragments of the potent antitumour agent archazolid A, a macrolide from the myxobacterium Archangium gephyra, contain relevant information regarding its polypharmacology. Biochemical and biophysical evaluation confirmed the predictions. The results obtained corroborate the practical applicability of the computational approach to natural product ‘de-orphaning’.

  15. Heterologous Production of the Marine Myxobacterial Antibiotic Haliangicin and Its Unnatural Analogues Generated by Engineering of the Biochemical Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuwei; Feng, Zhiyang; Tomura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Akira; Miyano, Seishi; Tsuge, Takashi; Mori, Hitoshi; Suh, Joo-Won; Iizuka, Takashi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Ojika, Makoto

    2016-02-26

    Despite their fastidious nature, marine myxobacteria have considerable genetic potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. The marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 produces the antifungal polyketide haliangicin (1), but its productivity is unsatisfactory. The biosynthetic gene cluster hli (47.8 kbp) associated with 1 was identified and heterologously expressed in Myxococcus xanthus to permit the production of 1 with high efficiency (tenfold greater amount and threefold faster in growth speed compared with the original producer), as well as the generation of bioactive unnatural analogues of 1 through gene manipulation. A unique acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was found to catalyse an unusual γ,δ-dehydrogenation of the diketide starter unit, leading to the formation of the terminal alkene moiety of 1. Biological evaluation of the analogues obtained through this study revealed that their bioactivities (anti-oomycete and cytotoxic activities) can be modified by manipulating the vinyl epoxide at the terminus opposite the β-methoxyacrylate pharmacophore.

  16. Co-cultivation of Sorangium cellulosum strains affects cellular growth and biosynthesis of secondary metabolite epothilones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-fei; Li, Shu-guang; Li, Zhi-feng; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Ting; Pan, Hong-wei; Liu, Hong; Wu, Zhi-hong; Li, Yue-zhong

    2013-08-01

    Sorangium cellulosum, a cellulolytic myxobacterium, is capable of producing a variety of bioactive secondary metabolites. Epothilones are anti-eukaryotic secondary metabolites produced by some S. cellulosum strains. In this study, we analyzed interactions between 12 strains of S. cellulosum consisting of epothilone-producers and non-epothilone producers isolated from two distinct soil habitats. Co-cultivation on filter papers showed that different Sorangium strains inhibited one another's growth, whereas epothilone production by the producing strains changed markedly for most (73%) pairwise mixtures. Using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we demonstrated that the expression of epothilone biosynthetic genes in the epothilone producers typically changed significantly when these bacteria were mixed with non-producing strains. The results indicated that intraspecies interactions between different S. cellulosum strains not only inhibited the growth of partners, but also could change epothilone production.

  17. Archazolid and apicularen: Novel specific V-ATPase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeck Axel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background V-ATPases constitute a ubiquitous family of heteromultimeric, proton translocating proteins. According to their localization in a multitude of eukaryotic membranes, they energize many different transport processes. Since their malfunction is correlated with various diseases in humans, the elucidation of the properties of this enzyme for the development of selective inhibitors and drugs is one of the challenges in V-ATPase research. Results Archazolid A and B, two recently discovered cytotoxic macrolactones produced by the myxobacterium Archangium gephyra, and apicularen A and B, two novel benzolactone enamides produced by different species of the myxobacterium Chondromyces, exerted a similar inhibitory efficacy on a wide range of mammalian cell lines as the well established plecomacrolidic type V-ATPase inhibitors concanamycin and bafilomycin. Like the plecomacrolides both new macrolides also prevented the lysosomal acidification in cells and inhibited the V-ATPase purified from the midgut of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, with IC50 values of 20–60 nM. However, they did not influence the activity of mitochondrial F-ATPase or that of the Na+/K+-ATPase. To define the binding sites of these new inhibitors we used a semi-synthetic radioactively labelled derivative of concanamycin which exclusively binds to the membrane Vo subunit c. Whereas archazolid A prevented, like the plecomacrolides concanamycin A, bafilomycin A1 and B1, labelling of subunit c by the radioactive I-concanolide A, the benzolactone enamide apicularen A did not compete with the plecomacrolide derivative. Conclusion The myxobacterial antibiotics archazolid and apicularen are highly efficient and specific novel inhibitors of V-ATPases. While archazolid at least partly shares a common binding site with the plecomacrolides bafilomycin and concanamycin, apicularen adheres to an independent binding site.

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16475-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |pid:none) Oryza sativa Japonica Group cultiv... 44 0.029 M33753_1( M33753 |pid:none) D.melanogaster crumbs...oideum chromoso... 44 0.038 ( P10040 ) RecName: Full=Protein crumbs; AltName: Full=95F; Flags:... 44 0.038 A... 0.42 AY720432_1( AY720432 |pid:none) Homo sapiens crumbs-like protein 2... 40 0....d:none) Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, complet... 39 0.71 BC162451_1( BC162451 |pid:none) Danio rerio crumbs homolo...Q314735 |pid:none) Danio rerio crumbs-like protein 1 ... 37 2.7 AM050637_1( AM050637 |pid:none) Blattella ge

  19. Enhanced Production of Epothilone by Immobilized Sorangium cellulosum in Porous Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Guo-Li; Huang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Li-Li; Chen, Xue-Feng; Liu, Huan

    2015-10-01

    Epothilone, which is produced by the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum, contributes significant value in medicinal development. However, under submerged culture conditions, S. cellulosum will accumulate to form bacterial clumps, which hinder nutrient and metabolite transportation. Therefore, the production of epothilone by liquid fermentation is limited. In this study, diatomite-based porous ceramics were made from diatomite, paraffin, and poremaking agent (saw dust). Appropriate methods to modify the porous ceramics were also identified. After optimizing the preparation and modification conditions, we determined the optimal prescription to prepare high-performance porous ceramics. The structure of porous ceramics can provide a solid surface area where S. cellulosum can grow and metabolize to prevent the formation of bacterial clumps. S. cellulosum cells that do not form clumps will change their erratic metabolic behavior under submerged culture conditions. As a result, the unstable production of epothilone by this strain can be changed in the fermentation process, and the purpose of increasing epothilone production can be achieved. After 8 days of fermentation under optimized conditions, the epothilone yield reached 90.2 mg/l, which was increased four times compared with the fermentation without porous ceramics.

  20. Methods to optimize myxobacterial fermentations using off-gas analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüttel Stephan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of carbon dioxide and oxygen on microbial secondary metabolite producers and the maintenance of these two parameters at optimal levels have been studied extensively. Nevertheless, most studies have focussed on their influence on specific product formation and condition optimization of established processes. Considerably less attention has been paid to the influence of reduced or elevated carbon dioxide and oxygen levels on the overall metabolite profiles of the investigated organisms. The synergistic action of both gases has garnered even less attention. Results We show that the composition of the gas phase is highly important for the production of different metabolites and present a simple approach that enables the maintenance of defined concentrations of both O2 and CO2 during bioprocesses over broad concentration ranges with a minimal instrumental setup by using endogenously produced CO2. The metabolite profiles of a myxobacterium belonging to the genus Chondromyces grown under various concentrations of CO2 and O2 showed considerable differences. Production of two unknown, highly cytotoxic compounds and one antimicrobial substance was found to increase depending on the gas composition. In addition, the observation of CO2 and O2 in the exhaust gas allowed optimization and control of production processes. Conclusions Myxobacteria are becoming increasingly important due to their potential for bioactive secondary metabolite production. Our studies show that the influence of different gas partial pressures should not be underestimated during screening processes for novel compounds and that our described method provides a simple tool to investigate this question.

  1. Complete Genome of the Starch-Degrading Myxobacteria Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria are members of δ-proteobacteria and are typified by large genomes, well-coordinated social behavior, gliding motility, and starvation-induced fruiting body formation. Here, we report the 10.33 Mb whole genome of a starch-degrading myxobacterium Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668T that encodes 8,962 proteins, 56 tRNA, and two rRNA operons. Phylogenetic analysis, in silico DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity reveal its divergence from other myxobacterial species and support its taxonomic characterization into a separate family Sandaracinaceae, within the suborder Sorangiineae. Sequence similarity searches using the Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZyme) database help identify the enzyme repertoire of S. amylolyticus involved in starch, agar, chitin, and cellulose degradation. We identified 16 α-amylases and two γ-amylases in the S. amylolyticus genome that likely play a role in starch degradation. While many of the amylases are seen conserved in other δ-proteobacteria, we notice several novel amylases acquired via horizontal transfer from members belonging to phylum Deinococcus-Thermus, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. No agar degrading enzyme(s) were identified in the S. amylolyticus genome. Interestingly, several putative β-glucosidases and endoglucanases proteins involved in cellulose degradation were identified. However, the absence of cellobiohydrolases/exoglucanases corroborates with the lack of cellulose degradation by this bacteria. PMID:27358428

  2. Assembly of Robust Bacterial Microcompartment Shells Using Building Blocks from an Organelle of Unknown Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassila, JK; Bernstein, SL; Kinney, JN; Axen, SD; Kerfeld, CA

    2014-05-29

    Bacterial microconnpartnnents (BMCs) sequester enzymes from the cytoplasmic environment by encapsulation inside a selectively permeable protein shell. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that many bacteria encode BMC clusters of unknown function and with diverse combinations of shell proteins. The genome of the halophilic myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum encodes one of the most atypical sets of shell proteins in terms of composition and primary structure. We found that microconnpartnnent shells could be purified in high yield when all seven H. ochraceum BMC shell genes were expressed from a synthetic operon in Escherichia coll. These shells differ substantially from previously isolated shell systems in that they are considerably smaller and more homogeneous, with measured diameters of 39 2 nm. The size and nearly uniform geometry allowed the development of a structural model for the shells composed of 260 hexagonal units and 13 hexagons per icosahedral face. We found that new proteins could be recruited to the shells by fusion to a predicted targeting peptide sequence, setting the stage for the use of these remarkably homogeneous shells for applications such as three-dimensional scaffolding and the construction of synthetic BMCs. Our results demonstrate the value of selecting from the diversity of BMC shell building blocks found in genomic sequence data for the construction of novel compartments. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Complete Genome of the Starch-Degrading Myxobacteria Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-08-29

    Myxobacteria are members of δ-proteobacteria and are typified by large genomes, well-coordinated social behavior, gliding motility, and starvation-induced fruiting body formation. Here, we report the 10.33 Mb whole genome of a starch-degrading myxobacterium Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668(T) that encodes 8,962 proteins, 56 tRNA, and two rRNA operons. Phylogenetic analysis, in silico DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity reveal its divergence from other myxobacterial species and support its taxonomic characterization into a separate family Sandaracinaceae, within the suborder Sorangiineae. Sequence similarity searches using the Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZyme) database help identify the enzyme repertoire of S. amylolyticus involved in starch, agar, chitin, and cellulose degradation. We identified 16 α-amylases and two γ-amylases in the S. amylolyticus genome that likely play a role in starch degradation. While many of the amylases are seen conserved in other δ-proteobacteria, we notice several novel amylases acquired via horizontal transfer from members belonging to phylum Deinococcus-Thermus, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. No agar degrading enzyme(s) were identified in the S. amylolyticus genome. Interestingly, several putative β-glucosidases and endoglucanases proteins involved in cellulose degradation were identified. However, the absence of cellobiohydrolases/exoglucanases corroborates with the lack of cellulose degradation by this bacteria.

  4. Scrutiny of electrochemically-driven electrocatalysis of C-19 steroid 1α-hydroxylase (CYP260A1) from Sorangium cellulosum So ce56.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzikov, Alexey V; Masamrekh, Rami A; Khatri, Yogan; Zavialova, Maria G; Bernhardt, Rita; Archakov, Alexander I; Shumyantseva, Victoria V

    2016-11-15

    Direct electrochemistry and bioelectrocatalysis of a newly discovered C-19 steroid 1α-hydroxylase (CYP260A1) from the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 were investigated. CYP260A1 was immobilized on screen-printed graphite electrodes (SPE) modified with gold nanoparticles, stabilized by didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (SPE/DDAB/Au). Cyclic voltammograms in argon-saturated substrate free 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, and in enzyme-substrate complex with androstenedione demonstrated a redox processes with a single redox couple of E(0') of -299 ± 16 mV and -297.5 ± 21 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl), respectively. CYP260A1 exhibited an electrocatalytic activity detected by an increase of the reduction current in the presence of dissolved oxygen and upon addition of the substrate (androstenedione) in the air-saturated buffer. The catalytic current of the enzyme correlated with substrate concentration in the electrochemical system and this dependence can be described by electrochemical Michaelis-Menten model. The products of CYP260A1-depended electrolysis at controlled working electrode potential of androstenedione were analyzed by mass-spectrometry. MS analysis revealed a mono-hydroxylated product of CYP260A1-dependent electrocatalytic reaction towards androstenedione.

  5. Survey of Microbial Diversity in Flood Areas during Thailand 2011 Flood Crisis Using High-Throughput Tagged Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Wongwilaiwalin, Sarunyou; Laothanachareon, Thanaporn; Eurwilaichitr, Lily; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Boonchayaanant, Benjaporn; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Pattaragulwanit, Kobchai; Punmatharith, Thantip; McEvoy, John; Khan, Eakalak; Rachakornkij, Manaskorn; Champreda, Verawat

    2015-01-01

    The Thailand flood crisis in 2011 was one of the largest recorded floods in modern history, causing enormous damage to the economy and ecological habitats of the country. In this study, bacterial and fungal diversity in sediments and waters collected from ten flood areas in Bangkok and its suburbs, covering residential and agricultural areas, were analyzed using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer sequences. Analysis of microbial community showed differences in taxa distribution in water and sediment with variations in the diversity of saprophytic microbes and sulfate/nitrate reducers among sampling locations, suggesting differences in microbial activity in the habitats. Overall, Proteobacteria represented a major bacterial group in waters, while this group co-existed with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria in sediments. Anaeromyxobacter, Steroidobacter, and Geobacter were the dominant bacterial genera in sediments, while Sulfuricurvum, Thiovirga, and Hydrogenophaga predominated in waters. For fungi in sediments, Ascomycota, Glomeromycota, and Basidiomycota, particularly in genera Philipsia, Rozella, and Acaulospora, were most frequently detected. Chytridiomycota and Ascomycota were the major fungal phyla, and Rhizophlyctis and Mortierella were the most frequently detected fungal genera in water. Diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria, related to odor problems, was further investigated using analysis of the dsrB gene which indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria of families Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, Syntrobacteraceae, and Desulfoarculaceae in the flood sediments. The work provides an insight into the diversity and function of microbes related to biological processes in flood areas.

  6. Microbial community structure in the rhizosphere of rice plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn eBreidenbach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbial community in the rhizosphere environment is critical for the health of land plants and the processing of soil organic matter. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which rice plants shape the microbial community in rice field soil over the course of a growing season. Rice (Oryza sativa was cultivated under greenhouse conditions in rice field soil from Vercelli, Italy and the microbial community in the rhizosphere of planted soil microcosms was characterized at four plant growth stages using quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis and compared to that of unplanted bulk soil. The abundances of 16S rRNA genes in the rice rhizosphere were on average twice that of unplanted bulk soil, indicating a stimulation of microbial growth in the rhizosphere. Soil environment type (i.e. rhizosphere versus bulk soil had a greater effect on the community structure than did time (e.g. plant growth stage. Numerous phyla were affected by the presence of rice plants, but the strongest effects were observed for Gemmatimonadetes, Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. With respect to functional groups of microorganisms, potential iron reducers (e.g. Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and fermenters (e.g. Clostridiaceae, Opitutaceae were notably enriched in the rhizosphere environment. A Herbaspirillum species was always more abundant in the rhizosphere than bulk soil and was enriched in the rhizosphere during the early stage of plant growth.

  7. Eukaryotic-like protein kinases in the prokaryotes and the myxobacterial kinome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J.; Castañeda-García, A.; Jenke-Kodama, H.; Müller, R.; Muñoz-Dorado, J.

    2008-01-01

    Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which together comprise a major class of regulatory proteins in eukaryotes, were not believed to play an important role in prokaryotes until recently. However, our analysis of 626 prokaryotic genomes reveals that eukaryotic-like protein kinases (ELKs) are found in nearly two-thirds of the sequenced strains. We have identified 2697 ELKs, most of which are encoded by multicellular strains of the phyla Proteobacteria (Myxococcales), Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Chloroflexi, and 2 Acidobacteria and 1 Planctomycetes. Astonishingly, 7 myxobacterial strains together encode 892 ELKs, with 4 of the strains exhibiting a genomic ELK density similar to that observed in eukaryotes. Most myxobacterial ELKs show a modular organization in which the kinase domain is located at the N terminus. The C-terminal portion of the ELKs is highly diverse and often contains sequences with similarity to characterized domains, most of them involved in signaling mechanisms or in protein–protein interactions. However, many of these architectures are unique to the myxobacteria, an observation that suggests that this group exploits sophisticated and novel signal transduction systems. Phylogenetic reconstruction using the kinase domains revealed many orthologous sequence pairs and a huge number of gene duplications that probably occurred after speciation. Furthermore, studies of the microsynteny in the ELK-encoding regions reveal only low levels of synteny among Myxococcus xanthus, Plesiocystis pacifica, and Sorangium cellulosum. However, extensive similarities between M. xanthus, Stigmatella aurantiaca, and 3 Anaeromyxobacter strains were observed, indicating that they share regulatory pathways involving various ELKs. PMID:18836084

  8. Unique Organic Matter and Microbial Properties in the Rhizosphere of a Wetland Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Xu, Chen; Huang, Shan; Lin, Youmin; Tolic, Nikola; Roscioli, Kristyn M.; Santschi, Peter H.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2016-04-19

    Wetlands attenuate the migration of many contaminants through a wide range of biogeochemical reactions. Recent research has shown that the rhizosphere, the zone near plant roots, in wetlands is especially effective at promoting contaminant attenuation. The objective of this study was to compare the soil organic matter (OM) composition and microbial communities of a rhizosphere soil (primarily an oxidized environment) to that of the bulk wetland soil (primarily a reduced environment). The rhizosphere had elevated C, N, Mn, and Fe concentrations and total bacteria, including Anaeromyxobacter, counts (as identified by qPCR). Furthermore, the rhizosphere contained several organic molecules that were not identified in the nonrhizosphere soil (54% of the >2200 ESI-FTICR-MS identified compounds). The rhizosphere OM molecules generally had (1) greater overall molecular weights, (2) less aromaticity, (3) more carboxylate and N-containing COO functional groups, and (4) a greater hydrophilic character. These latter two OM properties typically promote metal binding. This study showed for the first time that not only the amount but also the molecular characteristics of OM in the rhizosphere may in part be responsible for the enhanced immobilization of contaminants in wetlands. These finding have implications on the stewardship and long-term management of contaminated wetlands

  9. The Role of Enriched Microbial Consortium on Iron-Reducing Bioaugmentation in Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuanyuan; Yang, Xunan; Xu, Meiying; Sun, Guoping

    2017-01-01

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process and involved in various engineered processes, including the traditional clay dyeing processes. Bioaugmentation with iron reducing bacteria (IRB) is generally considered as an effective method to enhance the activity of iron reduction. However, limited information is available about the role of IRB on bioaugmentation. To reveal the roles of introduced IRB on bioaugmentation, an IRB consortium enriched with ferric citrate was inoculated into three Fe(II)-poor sediments which served as the pigments for Gambiered Guangdong silk dyeing. After bioaugmentation, the dyeabilities of all sediments met the demands of Gambiered Guangdong silk through increasing the concentration of key agent [precipitated Fe(II)] by 35, 27, and 61%, respectively. The microbial community analysis revealed that it was the minor species but not the dominant ones in the IRB consortium that promoted the activity of iron reduction. Meanwhile, some indigenous bacteria with the potential of iron reduction, such as Clostridium, Anaeromyxobacter, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Geothrix, and Acinetobacter, were also stimulated to form mutualistic interaction with introduced consortium. Interestingly, the same initial IRB consortium led to the different community successions among the three sediments and there was even no common genus increasing or decreasing synchronously among the potential IRB of all bioaugmented sediments. The Mantel and canonical correspondence analysis showed that different physiochemical properties of sediments influenced the microbial community structures. This study not only provides a novel bioremediation method for obtaining usable sediments for dyeing Gambiered Guangdong silk, but also contributes to understanding the microbial response to IRB bioaugmentation.

  10. Effect of the redox dynamics on microbial-mediated As transformation coupled with Fe and S in flow-through sediment columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hee Sun; Kim, Bo-A; Hyun, Sung Pil; Lee, Yoon-Ho; Shin, Doyun

    2017-05-05

    Arsenic (As) biogeochemistry coupled with iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) was studied using columns packed with As(V)-contaminated sediments under two phases: a reduction phase followed by an oxidation phase. During the reduction phase, four identical columns inoculated with G. sulfurreducens were stimulated with 3mM acetate for 60days. The As(III) in the effluent rapidly increased then gradually decreased. The Fe(II) and sulfate concentration indicated ferrous sulfide precipitation inside the column after day 14 and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra showed that As(III) was enriched at the column outlet. The genera Desulfosporosinus and Anaeromyxobacter as well as the Geobacter inoculum played a primary role in As reduction. During the oxidation phase, dissolved oxygen was consumed by heterotrophic aerobes belonging to the phylum Cloroflexi in the column with acetate, resulting in more As in the effluent. When only nitrate was injected, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria such as Thiobacillus thioparus instantly oxidized the sulfide formed during the first phase, resulting in less As(V) in the aqueous phase compared to the column with dissolved oxygen alone. This study showed that redox gradients and dynamics linked to Fe and S biogeochemistry have an important role in controlling As mobility in subsurface environments.

  11. Survey of Microbial Diversity in Flood Areas during Thailand 2011 Flood Crisis Using High-Throughput Tagged Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuttichai Mhuantong

    Full Text Available The Thailand flood crisis in 2011 was one of the largest recorded floods in modern history, causing enormous damage to the economy and ecological habitats of the country. In this study, bacterial and fungal diversity in sediments and waters collected from ten flood areas in Bangkok and its suburbs, covering residential and agricultural areas, were analyzed using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer sequences. Analysis of microbial community showed differences in taxa distribution in water and sediment with variations in the diversity of saprophytic microbes and sulfate/nitrate reducers among sampling locations, suggesting differences in microbial activity in the habitats. Overall, Proteobacteria represented a major bacterial group in waters, while this group co-existed with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria in sediments. Anaeromyxobacter, Steroidobacter, and Geobacter were the dominant bacterial genera in sediments, while Sulfuricurvum, Thiovirga, and Hydrogenophaga predominated in waters. For fungi in sediments, Ascomycota, Glomeromycota, and Basidiomycota, particularly in genera Philipsia, Rozella, and Acaulospora, were most frequently detected. Chytridiomycota and Ascomycota were the major fungal phyla, and Rhizophlyctis and Mortierella were the most frequently detected fungal genera in water. Diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria, related to odor problems, was further investigated using analysis of the dsrB gene which indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria of families Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, Syntrobacteraceae, and Desulfoarculaceae in the flood sediments. The work provides an insight into the diversity and function of microbes related to biological processes in flood areas.

  12. On the origin of 3-methylglutaconic acid in disorders of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikon, Nikita; Ryan, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA)-uria occurs in numerous inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) associated with compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism. This organic acid arises from thioester cleavage of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA (3MG CoA), an intermediate in leucine catabolism. In individuals harboring mutations in 3MG CoA hydratase (i.e., primary 3MGA-uria), dietary leucine is the source of 3MGA. In secondary 3MGA-uria, however, no leucine metabolism defects have been reported. While others have suggested 3MGA arises from aberrant isoprenoid shunting from cytosol to mitochondria, an alternative route posits that 3MG CoA arises in three steps from mitochondrial acetyl CoA. Support for this biosynthetic route in IEMs is seen by its regulated occurrence in microorganisms. The fungus, Ustilago maydis, the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus and the marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya majuscule, generate 3MG CoA (or acyl carrier protein derivative) in the biosynthesis of iron chelating siderophores, iso-odd chain fatty acids and polyketide/nonribosomal peptide products, respectively. The existence of this biosynthetic machinery in these organisms supports a model wherein, under conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of acetyl CoA in the inner mitochondrial space as a result of inefficient fuel utilization drives de novo synthesis of 3MG CoA. Since humans lack the downstream biosynthetic capability of the organisms mentioned above, as 3MG CoA levels rise, thioester hydrolysis yields 3MGA, which is excreted in urine as unspent fuel. Understanding the metabolic origins of 3MGA may increase its utility as a biomarker.

  13. Diversity and function of the microbial community on anodes of sediment microbial fuel cells fueled by root exudates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabezas da Rosa, Angela

    2010-11-26

    Anode microbial communities are essential for current production in microbial fuel cells. Anode reducing bacteria are capable of using the anode as final electron acceptor in their respiratory chain. The electrons delivered to the anode travel through a circuit to the cathode where they reduce oxygen to water generating an electric current. A novel type of sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) harvest energy from photosynthetically derived compounds released through the roots. Nothing is known about anode microbial communities of this type of microbial fuel cell. This work consists of three parts. The first part focuses on the study of bacterial and archaeal community compositions on anodes of SMFCs fueled by rice root exudates. By using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), a profiling technique, and cloning / sequencing of 16S rRNA, we determined that the support type used for the plant (vermiculite, potting soil or rice field soil) is an important factor determining the composition of the microbial community. Finally, by comparing microbial communities of current producing anodes and non-current producing controls we determined that Desulfobulbus- and Geobacter-related populations were probably most important for current production in potting soil and rice field soil SMFCs, respectively. However, {delta}-proteobacterial Anaeromyxobacter spp., unclassified {delta}-proteobacteria and Anaerolineae were also part of the anode biofilm in rice field soil SMFCs and these populations might also play a role in current production. Moreover, distinct clusters of Geobacter and Anaeromyxobacter populations were stimulated by rice root exudates. Regarding Archaea, uncultured Euryarchaea were abundant on anodes of potting soil SMFCs indicating a potential role in current production. In both, rice field soil and potting soil SMFCs, a decrease of Methanosaeta, an acetotrophic methanogen, was detected on current producing anodes. In the second part we focused

  14. Vulgatibacter incomptus gen. nov., sp. nov. and Labilithrix luteola gen. nov., sp. nov., two myxobacteria isolated from soil in Yakushima Island, and the description of Vulgatibacteraceae fam. nov., Labilitrichaceae fam. nov. and Anaeromyxobacteraceae fam. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Eisaku; Muramatsu, Hideyuki; Nagai, Koji

    2014-10-01

    Two myxobacterial strains (designated B00001(T) and B00002(T)) were isolated from forest soil samples collected from Yakushima Island, Kagoshima, Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains B00001(T) and B00002(T) respectively formed independent branches within the suborders Cystobacterineae and Sorangiineae and were most closely related to Cystobacter armeniaca DSM 14710(T) (90.4% similarity) and Byssovorax cruenta DSM 14553(T) (91.3%). Neither strain showed typical features of myxobacteria such as bacteriolytic action or fruiting body formation, but both had high DNA G+C contents (66.3-68.3 mol%). Swarming motility was observed in strain B00002(T) only. Cells of both strains were vegetative, chemoheterotrophic, mesophilic, strictly aerobic, Gram-negative, motile rods, and both strains exhibited esterase lipase (C8), leucine arylamidase, naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase and β-galactosidase activities. Strain B00001(T) contained MK-7 as the predominant respiratory quinone and the major fatty acid was iso-C15:0. In contrast, strain B00002(T) contained MK-8 as the major cellular quinone and the major fatty acids were C16 : 1ω5c and iso-C17 : 0. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic data presented, strains B00001(T) and B00002(T) represent novel genera and species, for which we propose the names Vulgatibacter incomptus gen. nov., sp. nov. and Labilithrix luteola gen. nov., sp. nov., respectively. The type strains of Vulgatibacter incomptus and Labilithrix luteola are B00001(T) ( = NBRC 109945(T) = DSM 27710(T)) and B00002(T) ( = NBRC 109946(T) = DSM 27648(T)), respectively. The new genera are assigned to the new families Vulgatibacteraceae fam. nov. and Labilitrichaceae fam. nov., respectively. In addition, Anaeromyxobacteraceae fam. nov., is proposed to accommodate the genus Anaeromyxobacter, which is related to the genus Vulgatibacter.

  15. Bioreduction of U(VI) in the presence of phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanov, M. I.; Mishra, B.; Latta, D. E.; Rui, X.; Kwon, M.-J.; Fletcher, K. E.; Loeffler, F. E.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Kemner, K. M.

    2012-04-01

    Phosphate/phosphoryl moieties are ubiquitous in biological and environmental systems and can potentially affect the speciation of uranium during natural attenuation or stimulated bioremediation processes. The reactivity between U(VI) and phosphate has been studied extensively, but the significant influence of phosphate groups on the formation of reduced U(IV) species has only recently been recognized. We will compare and contrast the bioreduction of dissolved and solid-phase U(VI) by Gram-positive and Gram-negative metal-reducing bacteria (Shewanella, Anaeromyxobacter, Geobacter, and Desulfitobacterium) in the presence and absence of phosphate, from the perspective of solid-phase U speciation as determined by U L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS). In all cases examined, the presence of phosphate at concentrations of P/U > 1 led to the formation of reduced, inner-sphere complexed U(IV)-phosphate species that prevented the lowest-solubility U(IV) mineral uraninite (UO2) from forming over at least several months. In the absence of phosphate, nanoparticulate uraninite or complexed non-uraninite U(IV) species were observed (depending on the system and conditions), suggesting that the interplay between the chemical conditions at the location of electron transfer to U(VI) control the U(IV) product and subsequently the stability of reduced U. The importance of non-uraninite U(IV) species will be discussed in the context of their predominance in biostimulated sediments from the Oak Ridge field site in the United States.

  16. Differential assemblage of functional units in paddy soil microbiomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongkyu Kim

    Full Text Available Flooded rice fields are not only a global food source but also a major biogenic source of atmospheric methane. Using metatranscriptomics, we comparatively explored structural and functional succession of paddy soil microbiomes in the oxic surface layer and anoxic bulk soil. Cyanobacteria, Fungi, Xanthomonadales, Myxococcales, and Methylococcales were the most abundant and metabolically active groups in the oxic zone, while Clostridia, Actinobacteria, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Anaerolineae, and methanogenic archaea dominated the anoxic zone. The protein synthesis potential of these groups was about 75% and 50% of the entire community capacity, respectively. Their structure-function relationships in microbiome succession were revealed by classifying the protein-coding transcripts into core, non-core, and taxon-specific transcripts based on homologous gene distribution. The differential expression of core transcripts between the two microbiomes indicated that structural succession is primarily governed by the cellular ability to adapt to the given oxygen condition, involving oxidative stress, nitrogen/phosphorus metabolism, and fermentation. By contrast, the non-core transcripts were expressed from genes involved in the metabolism of various carbon sources. Among those, taxon-specific transcripts revealed highly specialized roles of the dominant groups in community-wide functioning. For instance, taxon-specific transcripts involved in photosynthesis and methane oxidation were a characteristic of the oxic zone, while those related to methane production and aromatic compound degradation were specific to the anoxic zone. Degradation of organic matters, antibiotics resistance, and secondary metabolite production were detected to be expressed in both the oxic and anoxic zones, but by different taxonomic groups. Cross-feeding of methanol between members of the Methylococcales and Xanthomonadales was suggested by the observation that in the oxic zone

  17. Effects of water-saving irrigation on emissions of greenhouse gases and prokaryotic communities in rice paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Choi, Min-Young; Kim, Byung-Yong; Lee, Jong-Sik; Song, Jaekyeong; Kim, Gun-Yeob; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2014-08-01

    The effects of water-saving irrigation on emissions of greenhouse gases and soil prokaryotic communities were investigated in an experimental rice field. The water layer was kept at 1-2 cm in the water-saving (WS) irrigation treatment and at 6 cm in the continuous flooding (CF) irrigation treatment. WS irrigation decreased CH(4) emissions by 78 % and increased N(2)O emissions by 533 %, resulting in 78 % reduction of global warming potential compared to the CF irrigation. WS irrigation did not affect the abundance or phylogenetic distribution of bacterial/archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the abundance of bacterial/archaeal 16S rRNAs. The transcript abundance of CH(4) emission-related genes generally followed CH(4) emission patterns, but the difference in abundance between mcrA transcripts and amoA/pmoA transcripts best described the differences in CH(4) emissions between the two irrigation practices. WS irrigation increased the relative abundance of 16S rRNAs and functional gene transcripts associated with Anaeromyxobacter and Methylocystis spp., suggesting that their activities might be important in emissions of the greenhouse gases. The N(2)O emission patterns were not reflected in the abundance of N(2)O emission-related genes and transcripts. We showed that the alternative irrigation practice was effective for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from rice fields and that it did not affect the overall size and structure of the soil prokaryotic community but did affect the activity of some groups.

  18. Kinetic Analysis of a Globin-Coupled Histidine Kinase, AfGcHK: Effects of the Heme Iron Complex, Response Regulator, and Metal Cations on Autophosphorylation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtikova, Veronika; Stranava, Martin; Vos, Marten H; Liebl, Ursula; Hranicek, Jakub; Kitanishi, Kenichi; Shimizu, Toru; Martinkova, Marketa

    2015-08-18

    The globin-coupled histidine kinase, AfGcHK, is a part of the two-component signal transduction system from the soil bacterium Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5. Activation of its sensor domain significantly increases its autophosphorylation activity, which targets the His183 residue of its functional domain. The phosphate group of phosphorylated AfGcHK is then transferred to the cognate response regulator. We investigated the effects of selected variables on the autophosphorylation reaction's kinetics. The kcat values of the heme Fe(III)-OH(-), Fe(III)-cyanide, Fe(III)-imidazole, and Fe(II)-O2 bound active AfGcHK forms were 1.1-1.2 min(-1), and their Km(ATP) values were 18.9-35.4 μM. However, the active form bearing a CO-bound Fe(II) heme had a kcat of 1.0 min(-1) but a very high Km(ATP) value of 357 μM, suggesting that its active site structure differs strongly from the other active forms. The Fe(II) heme-bound inactive form had kcat and Km(ATP) values of 0.4 min(-1) and 78 μM, respectively, suggesting that its low activity reflects a low affinity for ATP relative to that of the Fe(III) form. The heme-free form exhibited low activity, with kcat and Km(ATP) values of 0.3 min(-1) and 33.6 μM, respectively, suggesting that the heme iron complex is essential for high catalytic activity. Overall, our results indicate that the coordination and oxidation state of the sensor domain heme iron profoundly affect the enzyme's catalytic activity because they modulate its ATP binding affinity and thus change its kcat/Km(ATP) value. The effects of the response regulator and different divalent metal cations on the autophosphorylation reaction are also discussed.

  19. Microbial and genetic ecology of tropical Vertisols under intensive chemical farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Jaya; Aparna, K; Dua, Ankita; Sangwan, Naseer; Trimurtulu, N; Rao, D L N; Lal, Rup

    2015-01-01

    There are continued concerns on unscientific usage of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, particularly in many developing countries leading to adverse consequences for soil biological quality and agricultural sustainability. In farmers' fields in tropical Vertisols of peninsular India, "high" fertilizer and pesticide usage at about 2.3 times the recommended rates in black gram (Vigna mungo) did not have a deleterious effect on the abundance of culturable microorganisms, associative nitrogen fixers, nitrifiers, and 16S rRNA gene diversity compared to normal rates. However, "very high" application at about five times the fertilizers and 1.5 times pesticides in chilies (Capsicum annuum) adversely affected the populations of fungi, actinomycetes, and ammonifiers, along with a drastic change in the eubacterial community profile and diversity over normal rates. Actinobacteria were dominant in black gram normal (BG1) (47%), black gram high (BG2) (36%), and chili normal (CH1) (30%) and were least in chili very high (CH2) (14%). Geodermatophilus formed 20% of Actinobacteria in BG1 but disappeared in BG2, CH1, and CH2. Asticcacaulis dominated at "very high" input site (CH2). Diversity of nitrogen fixers was completely altered; Dechloromonas and Anaeromyxobacter were absent in BG1 but proliferated well in BG2. There was reduction in rhizobial nifH sequences in BG2 by 46%. Phylogenetic differences characterized by UniFrac and principal coordinate analysis showed that BG2 and CH2 clustered together depicting a common pattern of genetic shift, while BG1 and CH1 fell at different axis. Overall, there were adverse consequences of "very high" fertilizer and pesticide usage on soil microbial diversity and function in tropical Vertisols.

  20. Influence of electron donors and copper concentration on geochemical and mineralogical processes under conditions of biological sulphate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolicka, Dorota; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Sulphidogenous microorganism communities were isolated from soil polluted by crude oil. The study was focused on determining the influence of 1) copper (II) concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and 2) the applied electron donor on the course and evolution of mineral-forming processes under conditions favouring growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The influence of copper concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and the type of mineral phases formed was determined during experiments in which copper (II) chloride at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.7 g/L was added to SRB cultures. The experiments were performed in two variants: with ethanol (4 g/L) or lactate (4 g/L) as the sole carbon source. In order to determine the taxonomic composition of the selected microorganism communities, the 16S rRNA method was used. Results of this analysis confirmed the presence of Desulfovibrio, Desulfohalobium, Desulfotalea, Thermotoga, Solibacter, Gramella, Anaeromyxobacter and Myxococcus sp. in the stationary cultures. The post-culture sediments contained covelline (CuS) and digenite (Cu9S5 ). Based on the results, it can be stated that the type of carbon source applied during incubation plays a crucial role in determining the mineral composition of the post-culture sediments. Thus, regardless of the amount of copper ion introduced to a culture with lactate as the sole carbon source, no copper sulphide was observed in the post-culture sediments. Cultures with ethanol as the sole carbon source, on the other hand, yielded covelline or digenite in all post-culture sediments.

  1. Crop rotation of flooded rice with upland maize impacts the resident and active methanogenic microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenbach, Björn; Blaser, Martin B; Klose, Melanie; Conrad, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Crop rotation of flooded rice with upland crops is a common management scheme allowing the reduction of water consumption along with the reduction of methane emission. The introduction of an upland crop into the paddy rice ecosystem leads to dramatic changes in field conditions (oxygen availability, redox conditions). However, the impact of this practice on the archaeal and bacterial communities has scarcely been studied. Here, we provide a comprehensive study focusing on the crop rotation between flooded rice in the wet season and upland maize (RM) in the dry season in comparison with flooded rice (RR) in both seasons. The composition of the resident and active microbial communities was assessed by 454 pyrosequencing targeting the archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA. The archaeal community composition changed dramatically in the rotational fields indicated by a decrease of anaerobic methanogenic lineages and an increase of aerobic Thaumarchaeota. Members of Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanosaetaceae and Methanocellaceae were equally suppressed in the rotational fields indicating influence on both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. On the contrary, members of soil crenarchaeotic group, mainly Candidatus Nitrososphaera, were higher in the rotational fields, possibly indicating increasing importance of ammonia oxidation during drainage. In contrast, minor effects on the bacterial community were observed. Acidobacteria and Anaeromyxobacter spp. were enriched in the rotational fields, whereas members of anaerobic Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing members of Deltaproteobacteria were found in higher abundance in the rice fields. Combining quantitative polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing data revealed increased ribosomal numbers per cell for methanogenic species during crop rotation. This stress response, however, did not allow the methanogenic community to recover in the rotational fields during re-flooding and rice

  2. Responses of microbial community functional structures to pilot-scale uranium in situ bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, M.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; He, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y.; Luo, J.; Carley, J.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Gentry, T.J.; Gu, B.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Criddle, C.S.; Zhou, J.

    2010-02-15

    A pilot-scale field test system with an inner loop nested within an outer loop was constructed for in situ U(VI) bioremediation at a US Department of Energy site, Oak Ridge, TN. The outer loop was used for hydrological protection of the inner loop where ethanol was injected for biostimulation of microorganisms for U(VI) reduction/immobilization. After 2 years of biostimulation with ethanol, U(VI) levels were reduced to below drinking water standard (<30 {micro}gl{sup -1}) in the inner loop monitoring wells. To elucidate the microbial community structure and functions under in situ uranium bioremediation conditions, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip) to examine the microbial functional gene composition of the sediment samples collected from both inner and outer loop wells. Our study results showed that distinct microbial communities were established in the inner loop wells. Also, higher microbial functional gene number, diversity and abundance were observed in the inner loop wells than the outer loop wells. In addition, metal-reducing bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Shewanella, and other bacteria, for example, Rhodopseudomonas and Pseudomonas, are highly abundant in the inner loop wells. Finally, the richness and abundance of microbial functional genes were highly correlated with the mean travel time of groundwater from the inner loop injection well, pH and sulfate concentration in groundwater. These results suggest that the indigenous microbial communities can be successfully stimulated for U bioremediation in the groundwater ecosystem, and their structure and performance can be manipulated or optimized by adjusting geochemical and hydrological conditions.

  3. Passive methods for quantifying the In Situ Flux of Water, Uranium, and Microbial Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M. A.; Peacock, A.; Hatfield, K.; Stucker, V.; Cho, J.; Klammler, H.; Ranville, J. F.; Cabaniss, S.; Annable, M. D.; Perminova, I.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a novel sensor that incorporates field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter (PFM) to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly-sensor principles and design will apply to fluxes of other radionuclides, metals, and co-contaminants. Flux measurements will assist in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. Field tests in the La Quinta and Super 8 galleries at the Rifle IFRC site were conducted to assess ambient groundwater, uranium, and microbial biomass fluxes. The latter were determined using a newly designed Baffled Multilevel Sampling (BMLS) device installed in typical screened monitoring wells to provide aqueous concentrations of dissolved or suspended constituents over multiple isolated vertical sections of the well. Biomass mass fluxes were calculated from the product of BMLS data for microbial cell counts from PCR analyses and PFM water fluxes collected from coincident well sections. Expected microbial discharge for Eubacteria in the La Quinta gallery was estimated to be 1.7 x 1012 cells per day. The biomass discharges for Geobacter, Methanogens, and Anaeromyxobacter remain to be determined. Expected uranium discharges predicted from stochastic simulations using PFM measures of flux over the La Quinta gallery transect and the injection-well transect of the Super 8 gallery were 26 mg

  4. Structural characterization of the heme-based oxygen sensor, AfGcHK, its interactions with the cognate response regulator, and their combined mechanism of action in a bacterial two-component signaling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranava, Martin; Martínek, Václav; Man, Petr; Fojtikova, Veronika; Kavan, Daniel; Vaněk, Ondřej; Shimizu, Toru; Martinkova, Marketa

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen sensor histidine kinase AfGcHK from the bacterium Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw 109-5 forms a two-component signal transduction system together with its cognate response regulator (RR). The binding of oxygen to the heme iron of its N-terminal sensor domain causes the C-terminal kinase domain of AfGcHK to autophosphorylate at His183 and then transfer this phosphate to Asp52 or Asp169 of the RR protein. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that AfGcHK and the RR protein form a complex with 2:1 stoichiometry. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) suggested that the most flexible part of the whole AfGcHK protein is a loop that connects the two domains and that the heme distal side of AfGcHK, which is responsible for oxygen binding, is the only flexible part of the sensor domain. HDX-MS studies on the AfGcHK:RR complex also showed that the N-side of the H9 helix in the dimerization domain of the AfGcHK kinase domain interacts with the helix H1 and the β-strand B2 area of the RR protein's Rec1 domain, and that the C-side of the H8 helix region in the dimerization domain of the AfGcHK protein interacts mostly with the helix H5 and β-strand B6 area of the Rec1 domain. The Rec1 domain containing the phosphorylable Asp52 of the RR protein probably has a significantly higher affinity for AfGcHK than the Rec2 domain. We speculate that phosphorylation at Asp52 changes the overall structure of RR such that the Rec2 area containing the second phosphorylation site (Asp169) can also interact with AfGcHK. Proteins 2016; 84:1375-1389. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Bacterial community structure and composition in Lake Poyang:a case study in the Songmenshan Region, China%鄱阳湖湖泊细菌群落组成及结构--以松门山为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寇文伯; 黄正云; 张杰; 刘倩纯; 刘芳鹏; 刘以珍; 吴兰

    2015-01-01

    were also found, the dominant genera in the benthic bacterial community were Subdivision3 genera incertae sedis, Geobacter and Anaeromyxobacter etc. In the bacterioplankton community, the dominant genera were Acidovorax, Polynucleobacter, Hydrogenophaga, Acinetobacter, and Arcicella etc. Of note, Comamonadaceae, which included Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga etc, was consistently dominant in the bacterioplankton community. In addition, Anaeromyxobacter was only detected in sediment, while Polynucleobacter, Hydrogenophaga, Acinetobacter, and Arcicella were only detected in the bacterioplankton community. The results demonstrated that the relative abundances of bacterial communities at the phylum level are correlated with their diversity, and that the correlation between the relative abundance and number of unique OTUs was significant for benthic and planktonic bacterial communities.

  6. Screening of Epothilones Producing Strains Sorangium cellulosum%产生埃博霉素的纤维堆囊菌的分子筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧一新; Thomas Hoffmann; 任闪闪; 常宁宁; 吴莹莹; 苏文金; Rolf Müller; 钱晓鸣

    2012-01-01

    为寻找潜在的产生埃博霉素(epothilone)的纤维堆囊菌(Sorangium cellulosum),以埃博霉素生物合成基因簇中的epoA,epoC和epoK基因为探针,分别对60株不同土壤样品来源的纤维堆囊菌的DNA样品进行PCR筛选.筛选结果得到了7株阳性菌株,进一步对其进行发酵和粗提物的HPLC-MS分析,检测结果显示3株菌XMU-Nc-03,XMU-So-64和XMU-So-112能产生埃博霉素B,其中XMU-So-112的产量最高.本实验在筛选产埃博霉素活性菌株的同时,还建立了一个快速可靠的发现埃博霉素产生菌的方法.%Epothilones are a new class of anticancer compounds produced by the Gram-negative myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. It shows high cytotoxicity for animal cells and mimic biological effect of taxol. In order to obtain epothilone producing strains, three pairs of primers were used to amplify fragments of epoA,epoC and epoK which encoding loading module,polyketide synthases (PKS) and P450 enzyme respectively in epothiione biosynthesis cluster from sixty S. Cellulosum strains,and the PCR products were sequenced to avoid the false-positive strains. Seven isolates XMU-So-58,XMU-So-64,XMU-So-70,XMU-So-72,XMU-So-112.XMU-So-264 and XMU-Nc-03 were found to have at least one fragment of epoA,epoC and epoK. Then they were successfully purified and their secondary metabolites were analyzed using epothilone Bas positive control by HPLC-MS. The result showed that XMU-So-58, XMU-So-70,XMU-So-72 and XMU-So-264 didn't produce epothilone. While epothilone B were detected in the fermentation products of three strains,XMU-Nc-03,XMU-So-64 and XMU-So-112 with intensity of 2. 7×105,6. 2× 105 and 7. 0× 106 respectively,at the retention time of 9. 8-9. 9 min. Thus,XMU-So-112 was proved to be the best producer. In summary,the best producer of epothilone B not only was obtained from 60 Sorangium strains,but also it was established that an efficient method for screening antibiotic producers based on PCR screening coupled

  7. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfiffner, Susan M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Löffler, Frank [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ritalahti, Kirsti [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sayler, Gary [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Layton, Alice [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hettich, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-31

    analyses, and gene expression studies to support the metaproteomics characterizations. Growth experiments of target microorganisms (Anaeromyxobacter, Shewanella, Geobacter) revealed tremendous respiratory versatility, as evidenced by the ability to utilize a range of electron donors (e.g. acetate, hydrogen, pyruvate, lactate, succinate, formate) and electron acceptors (e.g. nitrate, fumarate, halogenated phenols, ferric iron, nitrous oxide, etc.). In particular, the dissimilatory metabolic reduction of metals, including radionuclides, by target microorganisms spurred interest for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils and sediments. Distinct c-type cytochrome expression patterns were observed in target microorganisms grown with the different electron acceptors. For each target microorganism, the core proteome covered almost all metabolic pathways represented by their corresponding pan-proteomes. Unique proteins were detected for each target microorganism, and their expression and possible functionalities were linked to specific growth conditions through proteomics measurements. Optimization of the proteomic tools included in-depth comprehensive metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses on a limited number of samples. The optimized metaproteomic analyses were then applied to Oak Ridge IFRC field samples from the slow-release substrate biostimulation. Metaproteomic analysis and pathway mapping results demonstrated the distinct effects of metal and non-metal growth conditions on the proteome expression. With these metaproteomic tools, we identified which previously hypothetical metabolic pathways were active during the analyzed time points of the slow release substrate biostimulation. Thus, we demonstrated the utility of these tools for site assessment, efficient implementation of bioremediation and long-term monitoring. This research of detailed protein analysis linked with metal reduction activity did (1) show that c-type cytochrome isoforms, previously associated with

  8. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfiffner, Susan M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Löffler, Frank [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ritalahti, Kirsti [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sayler, Gary [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Layton, Alice [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hettich, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-31

    analyses, and gene expression studies to support the metaproteomics characterizations. Growth experiments of target microorganisms (Anaeromyxobacter, Shewanella, Geobacter) revealed tremendous respiratory versatility, as evidenced by the ability to utilize a range of electron donors (e.g. acetate, hydrogen, pyruvate, lactate, succinate, formate) and electron acceptors (e.g. nitrate, fumarate, halogenated phenols, ferric iron, nitrous oxide, etc.). In particular, the dissimilatory metabolic reduction of metals, including radionuclides, by target microorganisms spurred interest for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils and sediments. Distinct c-type cytochrome expression patterns were observed in target microorganisms grown with the different electron acceptors. For each target microorganism, the core proteome covered almost all metabolic pathways represented by their corresponding pan-proteomes. Unique proteins were detected for each target microorganism, and their expression and possible functionalities were linked to specific growth conditions through proteomics measurements. Optimization of the proteomic tools included in-depth comprehensive metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses on a limited number of samples. The optimized metaproteomic analyses were then applied to Oak Ridge IFRC field samples from the slow-release substrate biostimulation. Metaproteomic analysis and pathway mapping results demonstrated the distinct effects of metal and non-metal growth conditions on the proteome expression. With these metaproteomic tools, we identified which previously hypothetical metabolic pathways were active during the analyzed time points of the slow release substrate biostimulation. Thus, we demonstrated the utility of these tools for site assessment, efficient implementation of bioremediation and long-term monitoring. This research of detailed protein analysis linked with metal reduction activity did (1) show that c-type cytochrome isoforms, previously associated with