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Sample records for mutation affecting symbiosis

  1. The rhizobium-pea symbiosis as affected by high temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frings, J.F.J.

    1976-01-01

    A study has been made concerning the effect of high temperatures on the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum and pea plants (Pisum sativum). At 30°C, no nodules were found on the roots of plants growing in nutrient solution after inoculation with

  2. Some Root Traits of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. as Affected by Mycorrhizal Symbiosis under Drought Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bayani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of drought stress and mycorrhizal symbiosis on the colonization, root and leaf phosphorous content, root and leaf phosphatase activity, root volume and area as well as shoot dry weight of a variety of hulless barley were evaluated using a completely randomized experimental design (CRD with 3 replications. Treatments were three levels of drought stress of 30, 60 and 90% field capacity and two levels of mycorrhizal with and without inoculation. According to the results, the highest value of leaf phosphorous (1.54 mg/g was observed at mycorrhizal symbiosis against severe drought treatment. Root phosphatase activity was highest (297.9 OD min -1 FW-1 at severe drought stress with mycorrhizal symbiosis which in comparison with mild stress in the presence of mycorrhiza showed 16.6 fold increasing. The control and non-mycorrhizal symbiosis treatments had highest root dry weight (0.091 g. The lowest root volume (0.016 cm2 observed at mycorrhizal symbiosis × severe drought treatment. Generally, Inoculation of barley seed with mycorrhiza at severe water stress could transport more phosphorous to shoot, especially leaf via inducing of leaf and root phosphatase activity. Also, in addition to supply of nutrient sources especially phosphorous for plant, mycorrhizal symbiosis could play an important role in withstanding water stress in plant via increasing of root dry weight and area.

  3. How Symbiosis Creates Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Diversity in habitats on Earth is astounding--whether on land or in the sea--and this is in part due to symbiosis. The lesson described in this article helps students understand how symbiosis affects different organisms through a fun and engaging game where they match hosts and symbionts based on their respective needs. This 45-minute lesson is…

  4. Identifying pathways affected by cancer mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iengar, Prathima

    2017-12-16

    Mutations in 15 cancers, sourced from the COSMIC Whole Genomes database, and 297 human pathways, arranged into pathway groups based on the processes they orchestrate, and sourced from the KEGG pathway database, have together been used to identify pathways affected by cancer mutations. Genes studied in ≥15, and mutated in ≥10 samples of a cancer have been considered recurrently mutated, and pathways with recurrently mutated genes have been considered affected in the cancer. Novel doughnut plots have been presented which enable visualization of the extent to which pathways and genes, in each pathway group, are targeted, in each cancer. The 'organismal systems' pathway group (including organism-level pathways; e.g., nervous system) is the most targeted, more than even the well-recognized signal transduction, cell-cycle and apoptosis, and DNA repair pathway groups. The important, yet poorly-recognized, role played by the group merits attention. Pathways affected in ≥7 cancers yielded insights into processes affected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Host-selected mutations converging on a global regulator drive an adaptive leap towards symbiosis in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabrina Pankey, M; Foxall, Randi L; Ster, Ian M; Perry, Lauren A; Schuster, Brian M; Donner, Rachel A; Coyle, Matthew; Cooper, Vaughn S; Whistler, Cheryl A

    2017-01-01

    Host immune and physical barriers protect against pathogens but also impede the establishment of essential symbiotic partnerships. To reveal mechanisms by which beneficial organisms adapt to circumvent host defenses, we experimentally evolved ecologically distinct bioluminescent Vibrio fischeri by colonization and growth within the light organs of the squid Euprymna scolopes. Serial squid passaging of bacteria produced eight distinct mutations in the binK sensor kinase gene, which conferred an exceptional selective advantage that could be demonstrated through both empirical and theoretical analysis. Squid-adaptive binK alleles promoted colonization and immune evasion that were mediated by cell-associated matrices including symbiotic polysaccharide (Syp) and cellulose. binK variation also altered quorum sensing, raising the threshold for luminescence induction. Preexisting coordinated regulation of symbiosis traits by BinK presented an efficient solution where altered BinK function was the key to unlock multiple colonization barriers. These results identify a genetic basis for microbial adaptability and underscore the importance of hosts as selective agents that shape emergent symbiont populations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24414.001 PMID:28447935

  6. Designing symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Kazufumi; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Organisms rarely live as isolated species and usually show symbiosis in nature. As natural selection is not simple in symbiosis, the establishment and development of symbiosis is still unclear. Insight can be gained by not only retracing the history of well-developed natural symbiotic relationships, but also by observing the development of nascent symbiosis. By using synthetic symbiosis composed of two previously noninteracting populations, we can observe the establishment and its development. We have recently simulated the establishment of nascent symbiosis using two genetically engineered auxotrophic strains of Escherichia coli. One strain, 10 h after mixing with the partner strain, began to oversupply metabolites essential for the partner's growth, eventually leading to continual growth of both strains. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the oversupply was accompanied by global metabolic changes. This study demonstrated that an organism has the potential to adapt to the first encounter with another organism to establish symbiosis.

  7. Symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and Medicago truncatula is not significantly affected by silver and silver sulfide nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Jonathan D; Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Mike J; McNear, David; Bertsch, Paul M

    2016-07-01

    Silver (Ag) engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are being released into waste streams and are being discharged, largely as Ag2S aged-ENMs (a-ENMs), into agroecosystems receiving biosolids amendments. Recent research has demonstrated that biosolids containing an environmentally relevant mixture of ZnO, TiO2, and Ag ENMs and their transformation products, including Ag2S a-ENMs, disrupted the symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and legumes. However, this study was unable to unequivocally determine which ENM or combination of ENMs and a-ENMs was responsible for the observed inhibition. Here, we examined further the effects of polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP) coated pristine Ag ENMs (PVP-Ag), Ag2S a-ENMs, and soluble Ag (as AgSO4) at 1, 10, and 100 mg Ag kg(-1) on the symbiosis between the legume Medicago truncatula and the nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Sinorhizobium melliloti in biosolids-amended soil. Nodulation frequency, nodule function, glutathione reductase production, and biomass were not significantly affected by any of the Ag treatments, even at 100 mg kg(-1), a concentration analogous to a worst-case scenario resulting from long-term, repeated biosolids amendments. Our results provide additional evidence that the disruption of the symbiosis between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and legumes in response to a mixture of ENMs in biosolids-amended soil reported previously may not be attributable to Ag ENMs or their transformation end-products. We anticipate these findings will provide clarity to regulators and industry regarding potential unintended consequences to terrestrial ecosystems resulting from of the use of Ag ENMs in consumer products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative symbiotic plasmid analysis indicates that symbiosis gene ancestor type affects plasmid genetic evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Zhao, L; Zhang, L; Wu, Y; Chou, M; Wei, G

    2018-07-01

    Rhizobial symbiotic plasmids play vital roles in mutualistic symbiosis with legume plants by executing the functions of nodulation and nitrogen fixation. To explore the gene composition and genetic constitution of rhizobial symbiotic plasmids, comparison analyses of 24 rhizobial symbiotic plasmids derived from four rhizobial genera was carried out. Results illustrated that rhizobial symbiotic plasmids had higher proportion of functional genes participating in amino acid transport and metabolism, replication; recombination and repair; carbohydrate transport and metabolism; energy production and conversion and transcription. Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 symbiotic plasmid - pM0123d had similar gene composition with pR899b and pSNGR234a. All symbiotic plasmids shared 13 orthologous genes, including five nod and eight nif/fix genes which participate in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis process. These plasmids contained nod genes from four ancestors and fix genes from six ancestors. The ancestral type of pM0123d nod genes was similar with that of Rhizobium etli plasmids, while the ancestral type of pM0123d fix genes was same as that of pM7653Rb. The phylogenetic trees constructed based on nodCIJ and fixABC displayed different topological structures mainly due to nodCIJ and fixABC ancestral type discordance. The study presents valuable insights into mosaic structures and the evolution of rhizobial symbiotic plasmids. This study compared 24 rhizobial symbiotic plasmids that included four genera and 11 species, illuminating the functional gene composition and symbiosis gene ancestor types of symbiotic plasmids from higher taxonomy. It provides valuable insights into mosaic structures and the evolution of symbiotic plasmids. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Differentiation as symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigira, M; Watanabe, H

    1994-07-01

    Preservation of the identity of DNA is the ultimate goal of multicellular organisms. An abnormal DNA sequence in cells within an individual means its parasitic nature in cell society as shown in tumors. Somatic gene arrangement and gene mutation in development may be considered as de novo formation of parasites. It is likely that the developmental process with genetic alterations means symbiosis between altered cells and germ line cells preserving genetic information without alterations, when somatic alteration of DNA sequence is a major mechanism of differentiation. According to the selfish gene theory of Dawkins, germ line cells permit symbiosis when somatic cell society derives clear profit for the replication of original DNA copies.

  10. Industrial symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sacchi, Romain; Remmen, Arne

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the development of industrial symbiosis through a practical model for physical, organizational, and social interactions in six different cases from around the world. The results provide a framework that can be used by industrial symbiosis practitioners to facilitate the creation...

  11. Schoolyard Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, David W.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses different types of symbiosis--mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism--and examples of each type including lichens, legumes, mistletoe, and epiphytes. Describes how teachers can use these examples in the study of symbiosis which allows teachers to focus on many basic concepts in evolution, cell biology, ecology, and other fields of…

  12. Mycorrhizal symbiosis in leeks increases plant growth under low phosphorus and affects the levels of specific flavonoid glycosides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction- Mycorrhizae symbiosis is a universal phenomenon in nature that promotes plant growth and food quality in most plants, especially, under phosphorus deficiency and water stress. Objective- The objective of this study was to assess the effects of mycorrhizal symbiosis on changes in the le...

  13. From root to fruit: RNA-Seq analysis shows that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis may affect tomato fruit metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Inès, Zouari; Alessandra, Salvioli; Matteo, Chialva; Mara, Novero; Laura, Miozzi; Gian Carlo, Tenore; Paolo, Bagnaresi; Paola, Bonfante

    2014-01-01

    Background Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) establishes a beneficial symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. The formation of the mycorrhizal association in the roots leads to plant-wide modulation of gene expression. To understand the systemic effect of the fungal symbiosis on the tomato fruit, we used RNA-Seq to perform global transcriptome profiling on Moneymaker tomato fruits at the turning ripening stage. Results Fruits were collected at 55 days after flowering, from plants coloni...

  14. New mutations affecting induced mutagenesis in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C W; Krauss, B R; Christensen, R B

    1985-01-01

    Previously isolated mutations in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that impair induced mutagenesis were all identified with the aid of tests that either exclusively or predominantly detect base-pair substitutions. To avoid this bias, we have screened 11 366 potentially mutant clones for UV-induced reversion of the frameshift allele, his4-38, and have identified 10 mutants that give much reduced yields of revertants. Complementation and recombination tests show that 6 of these carry mutations at the previously known REV1, REV1 and REV3 loci, while the remaining 4 define 3 new genes, REV4 (2 mutations), REV5 and REV6. The rev4 mutations are readily suppressed in many genetic backgrounds and, like the rev5 mutation, impart only a limited deficiency for induced mutagenesis: it is likely, therefore that the REV4+ and REV5+ gene functions are only remotely concerned with this process. The rev6 mutants have a more general deficiency, however, as well as marked sensitivity to UV and an increased spontaneous mutation rate, properties that suggest the REV6 gene is directly involved in mutation induction. The REV5 gene is located about 1 cM proximal to CYC1 on chromosome X.

  15. Teaching Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Argues that the meaning of the word "symbiosis" be standardized and that it should be used in a broad sense. Also criticizes the orthodox teaching of general principles in this subject and recommends that priority be given to continuity, intimacy, and associated adaptations, rather than to the harm/benefit relationship. (Author/JN)

  16. Structural implications of mutations in the pea SYM8 symbiosis gene, the DMI1 ortholog, encoding a predicted ion channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Anne; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau; Yousafzai, Faridoon

    2007-01-01

    the aspartate to valine and identified a missense mutation (changing alanine to valine adjacent to the aspartate residues) in this predicted filter region; both mutations caused a loss of function. We also identified a loss-of-function missense mutation (changing arginine to isoleucine) in a domain proposed...

  17. W342F Mutation in CCaMK Enhances Its Affinity to Calmodulin But Compromises Its Role in Supporting Root Nodule Symbiosis in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard Jauregui

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK is regulated by free Ca2+ and Ca2+-loaded calmodulin. This dual binding is believed to be involved in its regulation and associated physiological functions, although direct experimental evidence for this is lacking. Here we document that site-directed mutations in the calmodulin-binding domain of CCaMK alters its binding capacity to calmodulin, providing an effective approach to study how calmodulin regulates CCaMK in terms of kinase activity and regulation of rhizobial symbiosis in Medicago truncatula. We observed that mutating the tryptophan at position 342 to phenylalanine (W342F markedly increased the calmodulin-binding capability of the mutant. The mutant CCaMK underwent autophosphorylation and catalyzed substrate phosphorylation in the absence of calcium and calmodulin. When the mutant W342F was expressed in ccamk-1 roots, the transgenic roots exhibited an altered nodulation phenotype. These results indicate that altering the calmodulin-binding domain of CCaMK could generate a constitutively activated kinase with a negative role in the physiological function of CCaMK.

  18. Nickel tolerance of serpentine and non-serpentine Knautia arvensis plants as affected by arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doubková, Pavla; Sudová, Radka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 3 (2014), s. 209-217 ISSN 0940-6360 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600050812 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal * symbiosis * nickel toxicity * semi-hydroponics Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.459, year: 2014

  19. Symbiosis: An Evolutionary Innovator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Emily

    2003-01-01

    Defines symbiosis and describes the connection between symbiosis and evolution, how it is described in science textbooks, and genetic variability. Discusses educational policy and science curriculum content. (YDS)

  20. From root to fruit: RNA-Seq analysis shows that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis may affect tomato fruit metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouari, Inès; Salvioli, Alessandra; Chialva, Matteo; Novero, Mara; Miozzi, Laura; Tenore, Gian Carlo; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-03-21

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) establishes a beneficial symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. The formation of the mycorrhizal association in the roots leads to plant-wide modulation of gene expression. To understand the systemic effect of the fungal symbiosis on the tomato fruit, we used RNA-Seq to perform global transcriptome profiling on Moneymaker tomato fruits at the turning ripening stage. Fruits were collected at 55 days after flowering, from plants colonized with Funneliformis mosseae and from control plants, which were fertilized to avoid responses related to nutrient deficiency. Transcriptome analysis identified 712 genes that are differentially expressed in fruits from mycorrhizal and control plants. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of these genes showed 81 overrepresented functional GO classes. Up-regulated GO classes include photosynthesis, stress response, transport, amino acid synthesis and carbohydrate metabolism functions, suggesting a general impact of fungal symbiosis on primary metabolisms and, particularly, on mineral nutrition. Down-regulated GO classes include cell wall, metabolism and ethylene response pathways. Quantitative RT-PCR validated the RNA-Seq results for 12 genes out of 14 when tested at three fruit ripening stages, mature green, breaker and turning. Quantification of fruit nutraceutical and mineral contents produced values consistent with the expression changes observed by RNA-Seq analysis. This RNA-Seq profiling produced a novel data set that explores the intersection of mycorrhization and fruit development. We found that the fruits of mycorrhizal plants show two transcriptomic "signatures": genes characteristic of a climacteric fleshy fruit, and genes characteristic of mycorrhizal status, like phosphate and sulphate transporters. Moreover, mycorrhizal plants under low nutrient conditions produce fruits with a nutrient content similar to those from non-mycorrhizal plants under high nutrient conditions

  1. Grain legume cultivars derived from induced mutations, and mutations affecting nodulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, C.R.; Maluszynski, M.; Nichterlein, K.; Zanten, L. van

    2001-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty-five grain legume cultivars developed using induced mutations have been released in 32 countries. A maximum number of cultivars have been released in soybean (58), followed by common bean (50), groundnut (44), pea (32) and mungbean (14). Gamma or x-ray exposures of seeds led to the direct development of 111 cultivars, while neutron and chemical mutagen treatments resulted in 8 and 36 cultivars respectively. One hundred and three cultivars have been developed using mutants in cross breeding. Attempts have been made to estimate the successful dose range for gamma and x-rays, defined as the dose range, which led to the development, registration and release of a maximum number of mutant cultivars. Exposures to seeds ranging between 100-200 Gy in all grain legumes, except faba bean, resulted in 49 out of 111 cultivars being developed as direct mutants. Successful doses reported for faba bean are lower than 100 Gy. Modified crop plant characters are listed. Besides the development of new cultivars, a large number of induced mutants that show altered nodulation pattern have been isolated in grain legumes. Such mutants have made a significant contribution in basic studies on host-symbiont interactions and towards cloning of plant genes related to symbiosis and nitrogen fixation. Their exploitation in breeding programs for enhancing nitrogen fixation is just beginning. Available information on nodulation mutants in grain legume crops is summarised. Mainly, four types of nodulation mutants have been isolated. They show either: no nodulation (nod -), few nodules (nod +/-), ineffective nodulation (Fix-), hypernodulation (nod ++) or hypernodulation even in the presence of otherwise inhibitory nitrate levels (nts). Hypernodulating and nts mutants are of great interest. A soybean cultivar incorporating nts trait has been released in Australia. (author)

  2. Plant hormones as signals in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miransari, Mohammad; Abrishamchi, A; Khoshbakht, K; Niknam, V

    2014-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are non-specific symbionts developing mutual and beneficial symbiosis with most terrestrial plants. Because of the obligatory nature of the symbiosis, the presence of the host plant during the onset and proceeding of symbiosis is necessary. However, AM fungal spores are able to germinate in the absence of the host plant. The fungi detect the presence of the host plant through some signal communications. Among the signal molecules, which can affect mycorrhizal symbiosis are plant hormones, which may positively or adversely affect the symbiosis. In this review article, some of the most recent findings regarding the signaling effects of plant hormones, on mycorrhizal fungal symbiosis are reviewed. This may be useful for the production of plants, which are more responsive to mycorrhizal symbiosis under stress.

  3. Adaptive response of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to accumulation of elements and translocation in Phragmites australis affected by cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaochen; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Zhu, Shishu; Ma, Fang; Wu, Jieting; Yang, Jixian; Wang, Li

    2017-07-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been reported to play a central role in improving plant tolerance to cadmium (Cd)-contaminated sites. This is achieved by enhancing both the growth of host plants and the nutritive elements in plants. This study assessed potential regulatory effects of AM symbiosis with regard to nutrient uptake and transport, and revealed different response strategies to various Cd concentrations. Phragmites australis was inoculated with Rhizophagus irregularis in the greenhouse cultivation system, where it was treated with 0-20 mg L -1 of Cd for 21days to investigate growth parameters, as well as Cd and nutritive element distribution in response to AM fungus inoculation. Mycorrhizal plants showed a higher tolerance, particularly under high Cd-level stress in the substrate. Moreover, our results determined the roots as dominant Cd reservoirs in plants. The AM fungus improved Cd accumulation and saturated concentration in the roots, thus inhibiting Cd uptake to shoots. The observed distributions of nutritive elements and the interactions among these indicated the highest microelement contribution to roots, Ca contributed maximally in leaves, and K and P contributed similarly under Cd stress. In addition, AM fungus inoculation effectively impacted Mn and P uptake and accumulation while coping with Cd toxicity. This study also demonstrated translocation factor from metal concentration (TF) could be a good parameter to evaluate different transportation strategies induced by various Cd stresses in contrast to the bioconcentration factor (BCF) and translocation factor from metal accumulation (TF'). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Autosomal mutations affecting Y chromosome loops in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrucci Romano

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster harbors several genes required for male fertility. The genes for these fertility factors are very large in size and contain conspicuous amounts of repetitive DNA and transposons. Three of these loci (ks-1, kl-3 and kl-5 have the ability to develop giant lampbrush-like loops in primary spermatocytes, a cytological manifestation of their active state in these cells. Y-loops bind a number of non-Y encoded proteins, but the mechanisms regulating their development and their specific functions are still to be elucidated. Results Here we report the results of a screen of 726 male sterile lines to identify novel autosomal genes controlling Y-loop function. We analyzed mutant testis preparations both in vivo and by immunofluorescence using antibodies directed against Y-loop-associated proteins. This screen enabled us to isolate 17 mutations at 15 loci whose wild-type function is required for proper Y-loop morphogenesis. Six of these loci are likely to specifically control loop development, while the others display pleiotropic effects on both loops and meiotic processes such as spermiogenesis, sperm development and maturation. We also determined the map position of the mutations affecting exclusively Y-loop morphology. Conclusion Our cytological screening permitted us to identify novel genetic functions required for male spermatogenesis, some of which show pleiotropic effects. Analysis of these mutations also shows that loop development can be uncoupled from meiosis progression. These data represent a useful framework for the characterization of Y-loop development at a molecular level and for the study of the genetic control of heterochromatin.

  5. A mutation affecting symbiosis in the pea line Risnod27 changes the ion selectivity filter of the DMI1 homolog

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Karel; Felsberg, Jürgen; Biedermannová, E.; Vondrys, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2009), s. 451-460 ISSN 0006-3134 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Nod factor * Pisum sativum * recognition Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.656, year: 2009

  6. Mutations induced by ultraviolet radiation affecting virulence in Puccinia striiformis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Hongsheng; Jing Jinxue; Li Zhenqi

    1994-01-01

    Uredospores of parent culture, cy 29-1, were treated by ultraviolet radiation and mutations to virulent were tested on resistant wheat cultivars inoculated with treated spores. 7 mutant cultures virulent to the test cultivars were developed with estimated mutation rate 10~6~10~4. The virulence of mutant cultures was different from the all known races of stripe rust. Resistance segregation to mutant cultures was detected in two test cultivars. The results suggested that mutation was important mechanism of virulence variation operative in asexual population of rust fungi

  7. Symbiosis: Rich, Exciting, Neglected Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Jane Thomas

    1974-01-01

    Argues that the topic of symbiosis has been greatly neglected and underemphasized in general-biology textbooks. Discusses many types and examples of symbiosis, and provides an extensive bibliography of the literature related to this topic. (JR)

  8. Somatic mutations affect key pathways in lung adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Getz, Gad; Wheeler, David A.; Mardis, Elaine R.; McLellan, Michael D.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sougnez, Carrie; Greulich, Heidi; Muzny, Donna M.; Morgan, Margaret B.; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert S.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wendl, Michael C.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Larson, David E.; Chen, Ken; Dooling, David J.; Sabo, Aniko; Hawes, Alicia C.; Shen, Hua; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Lewis, Lora R.; Hall, Otis; Zhu, Yiming; Mathew, Tittu; Ren, Yanru; Yao, Jiqiang; Scherer, Steven E.; Clerc, Kerstin; Metcalf, Ginger A.; Ng, Brian; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Osborne, John R.; Meyer, Rick; Shi, Xiaoqi; Tang, Yuzhu; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Lin, Ling; Abbott, Rachel; Miner, Tracie L.; Pohl, Craig; Fewell, Ginger; Haipek, Carrie; Schmidt, Heather; Dunford-Shore, Brian H.; Kraja, Aldi; Crosby, Seth D.; Sawyer, Christopher S.; Vickery, Tammi; Sander, Sacha; Robinson, Jody; Winckler, Wendy; Baldwin, Jennifer; Chirieac, Lucian R.; Dutt, Amit; Fennell, Tim; Hanna, Megan; Johnson, Bruce E.; Onofrio, Robert C.; Thomas, Roman K.; Tonon, Giovanni; Weir, Barbara A.; Zhao, Xiaojun; Ziaugra, Liuda; Zody, Michael C.; Giordano, Thomas; Orringer, Mark B.; Roth, Jack A.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Ozenberger, Bradley; Good, Peter J.; Chang, Andrew C.; Beer, David G.; Watson, Mark A.; Ladanyi, Marc; Broderick, Stephen; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Travis, William D.; Pao, William; Province, Michael A.; Weinstock, George M.; Varmus, Harold E.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Meyerson, Matthew; Wilson, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    Determining the genetic basis of cancer requires comprehensive analyses of large collections of histopathologically well-classified primary tumours. Here we report the results of a collaborative study to discover somatic mutations in 188 human lung adenocarcinomas. DNA sequencing of 623 genes with known or potential relationships to cancer revealed more than 1,000 somatic mutations across the samples. Our analysis identified 26 genes that are mutated at significantly high frequencies and thus are probably involved in carcinogenesis. The frequently mutated genes include tyrosine kinases, among them the EGFR homologue ERBB4; multiple ephrin receptor genes, notably EPHA3; vascular endothelial growth factor receptor KDR; and NTRK genes. These data provide evidence of somatic mutations in primary lung adenocarcinoma for several tumour suppressor genes involved in other cancers—including NF1, APC, RB1 and ATM—and for sequence changes in PTPRD as well as the frequently deleted gene LRP1B. The observed mutational profiles correlate with clinical features, smoking status and DNA repair defects. These results are reinforced by data integration including single nucleotide polymorphism array and gene expression array. Our findings shed further light on several important signalling pathways involved in lung adenocarcinoma, and suggest new molecular targets for treatment. PMID:18948947

  9. Factors affecting the spontaneous mutational spectra in somatic mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.А. Ковальова

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available  In our survey of references we are discussed the influence of factors biological origin on the spontaneous mutation specters in mammalian. Seasonal and age components influence on the frequence of cytogenetic anomalies. The immune and endocrinous systems are take part in control of the alteration of the spontaneous mutation specters. Genetical difference of sensibility in animal and human at the alteration of factors enviroment as and  genetical differences of repair systems activity are may influence on individual variation of spontaneous destabilization characters of chromosomal apparatus.

  10. Nonsense mutations in the human β-globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baserga, S.J.; Benz, E.J. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human α- and β-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with β 0 -thalassemia have shown that for both the β-17 and the β-39 mutations less than normal levels of β-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human β-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned β-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human β-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation

  11. Human Machine Learning Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth R.; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Williams, Kim H.

    2017-01-01

    Human Machine Learning Symbiosis is a cooperative system where both the human learner and the machine learner learn from each other to create an effective and efficient learning environment adapted to the needs of the human learner. Such a system can be used in online learning modules so that the modules adapt to each learner's learning state both…

  12. Survival through Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, S. Wali

    1992-01-01

    Describes symbiosis and its significance in the day-to-day lives of plants and animals. Gives specific examples of mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism in the relationships among fungus and plant roots, animals and bacteria, birds and animals, fish, and predator and prey. (MDH)

  13. Deep mutational scanning identifies sites in influenza nucleoprotein that affect viral inhibition by MxA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orr Ashenberg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The innate-immune restriction factor MxA inhibits influenza replication by targeting the viral nucleoprotein (NP. Human influenza virus is more resistant than avian influenza virus to inhibition by human MxA, and prior work has compared human and avian viral strains to identify amino-acid differences in NP that affect sensitivity to MxA. However, this strategy is limited to identifying sites in NP where mutations that affect MxA sensitivity have fixed during the small number of documented zoonotic transmissions of influenza to humans. Here we use an unbiased deep mutational scanning approach to quantify how all single amino-acid mutations to NP affect MxA sensitivity in the context of replication-competent virus. We both identify new sites in NP where mutations affect MxA resistance and re-identify mutations known to have increased MxA resistance during historical adaptations of influenza to humans. Most of the sites where mutations have the greatest effect are almost completely conserved across all influenza A viruses, and the amino acids at these sites confer relatively high resistance to MxA. These sites cluster in regions of NP that appear to be important for its recognition by MxA. Overall, our work systematically identifies the sites in influenza nucleoprotein where mutations affect sensitivity to MxA. We also demonstrate a powerful new strategy for identifying regions of viral proteins that affect inhibition by host factors.

  14. Lamin A/C mutation affecting primarily the right side of the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ollila

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available LMNA mutations are amongst the most important causes of familial dilated cardiomyopathy. The most important cause of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC is desmosomal pathology. The aim of the study was to elucidate the role of LMNA mutations among Finnish cardiomyopathy patients. We screened 135 unrelated cardiomyopathy patients for LMNA mutations. Because of unusual phenotype, two patients were screened for the known Finnish ARVC-related mutations of desmosomal genes, and their Plakophilin-2b gene was sequenced. Myocardial samples from two patients were examined by immunohistochemical plakoglobin staining and in one case by electron microscopy. We found a new LMNA mutation Phe237Ser in a family of five affected members with a cardiomyopathy affecting primarily the right side of the heart. The phenotype resembles ARVC but does not fulfill the Task Force Criteria. The main clinical manifestations of the mutation were severe tricuspid insufficiency, right ventricular enlargement and failure. Three of the affected patients died of the heart disease, and the two living patients received heart transplants at ages 44 and 47. Electron microscopy showed nuclear blebbing compatible with laminopathy. Immunohisto - chemical analysis did not suggest desmosomal pathology. No desmosomal mutations were found. The Phe237Ser LMNA mutation causes a phenotype different from traditional cardiolaminopathy. Our findings suggest that cardiomyopathy affecting primarily the right side of the heart is not always caused by desmosomal pathology. Our observations highlight the challenges in classifying cardiomyopathies, as there often is significant overlap between the traditional categories.

  15. Novel CLCNKB mutations causing Bartter syndrome affect channel surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Mathilde; Andrini, Olga; Lahuna, Olivier; Burgos, Johanna; Cid, L Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V; L'hoste, Sébastien; Blanchard, Anne; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Lourdel, Stéphane; Teulon, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    Mutations in the CLCNKB gene encoding the ClC-Kb Cl(-) channel cause Bartter syndrome, which is a salt-losing renal tubulopathy. Here, we investigate the functional consequences of seven mutations. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, four mutants carried no current (c.736G>C, p.Gly246Arg; c.1271G>A, p.Gly424Glu; c.1313G>A, p.Arg438His; c.1316T>C, p.Leu439Pro), whereas others displayed a 30%-60% reduction in conductance as compared with wild-type ClC-Kb (c.242T>C, p.Leu81Pro; c.274C>T, p.Arg92Trp; c.1052G>C, p.Arg351Pro). Anion selectivity and sensitivity to external Ca(2+) and H(+), typical of the ClC-Kb channel, were not modified in the partially active mutants. In oocytes, we found that all the mutations reduced surface expression with a profile similar to that observed for currents. In HEK293 cells, the currents in the mutants had similar profiles to those obtained in oocytes, except for p.Leu81Pro, which produced no current. Furthermore, p.Arg92Trp and p.Arg351Pro mutations did not modify the unit-conductance of closely related ClC-K1. Western blot analysis in HEK293 cells showed that ClC-Kb protein abundance was lower for the nonconducting mutants but similar to wild-type for other mutants. Overall, two classes of mutants can be distinguished: nonconducting mutants associated with low total protein expression, and partially conducting mutants with unaltered channel properties and ClC-Kb protein abundance. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. Increased Ac excision (iae): Arabidopsis thaliana mutations affecting Ac transposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, P.; Belzile, F.; Page, T.; Dean, C.

    1997-01-01

    The maize transposable element Ac is highly active in the heterologous hosts tobacco and tomato, but shows very much reduced levels of activity in Arabidopsis. A mutagenesis experiment was undertaken with the aim of identifying Arabidopsis host factors responsible for the observed low levels of Ac activity. Seed from a line carrying a single copy of the Ac element inserted into the streptomycin phosphotransferase (SPT) reporter fusion, and which displayed typically low levels of Ac activity, were mutagenized using gamma rays. Nineteen mutants displaying high levels of somatic Ac activity, as judged by their highly variegated phenotypes, were isolated after screening the M2 generation on streptomycin-containing medium. The mutations fall into two complementation groups, iae1 and iae2, are unlinked to the SPT::Ac locus and segregate in a Mendelian fashion. The iae1 mutation is recessive and the iae2 mutation is semi-dominant. The iae1 and iae2 mutants show 550- and 70-fold increases, respectively, in the average number of Ac excision sectors per cotyledon. The IAE1 locus maps to chromosome 2, whereas the SPT::Ac reporter maps to chromosome 3. A molecular study of Ac activity in the iae1 mutant confirmed the very high levels of Ac excision predicted using the phenotypic assay, but revealed only low levels of Ac re-insertion. Analyses of germinal transposition in the iae1 mutant demonstrated an average germinal excision frequency of 3% and a frequency of independent Ac re-insertions following germinal excision of 22%. The iae mutants represents a possible means of improving the efficiency of Ac/Ds transposon tagging systems in Arabidopsis, and will enable the dissection of host involvement in Ac transposition and the mechanisms employed for controlling transposable element activity

  17. The callipyge mutation and other genes that affect muscle hypertrophy in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cockett Noelle E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic strategies to improve the profitability of sheep operations have generally focused on traits for reproduction. However, natural mutations exist in sheep that affect muscle growth and development, and the exploitation of these mutations in breeding strategies has the potential to significantly improve lamb-meat quality. The best-documented mutation for muscle development in sheep is callipyge (CLPG, which causes a postnatal muscle hypertrophy that is localized to the pelvic limbs and loin. Enhanced skeletal muscle growth is also observed in animals with the Carwell (or rib-eye muscling mutation, and a double-muscling phenotype has been documented for animals of the Texel sheep breed. However, the actual mutations responsible for these muscular hypertrophy phenotypes in sheep have yet to be identified, and further characterization of the genetic basis for these phenotypes will provide insight into the biological control of muscle growth and body composition.

  18. Diaphanous gene mutation affects spiral cleavage and chirality in snails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Reiko; Fujikura, Kohei; Abe, Masanori; Hosoiri, Yuji; Asakawa, Shuichi; Shimizu, Miho; Umeda, Shin; Ichikawa, Futaba; Takahashi, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    L-R (left and right) symmetry breaking during embryogenesis and the establishment of asymmetric body plan are key issues in developmental biology, but the onset including the handedness-determining gene locus still remains unknown. Using pure dextral (DD) and sinistral (dd) strains of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis as well as its F2 through to F10 backcrossed lines, the single handedness-determining-gene locus was mapped by genetic linkage analysis, BAC cloning and chromosome walking. We have identified the actin-related diaphanous gene Lsdia1 as the strongest candidate. Although the cDNA and derived amino acid sequences of the tandemly duplicated Lsdia1 and Lsdia2 genes are very similar, we could discriminate the two genes/proteins in our molecular biology experiments. The Lsdia1 gene of the sinistral strain carries a frameshift mutation that abrogates full-length LsDia1 protein expression. In the dextral strain, it is already translated prior to oviposition. Expression of Lsdia1 (only in the dextral strain) and Lsdia2 (in both chirality) decreases after the 1-cell stage, with no asymmetric localization throughout. The evolutionary relationships among body handedness, SD/SI (spiral deformation/spindle inclination) at the third cleavage, and expression of diaphanous proteins are discussed in comparison with three other pond snails (L. peregra, Physa acuta and Indoplanorbis exustus). PMID:27708420

  19. Collaborative planning of operations in industrial symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herczeg, Gabor; Akkerman, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    Industrial symbiosis (IS) is cooperation between companies to achieve collective benefits by supplying and reusing industrial waste to substitute virgin resources in production. In this paper, we investigate the IS phenomenon from a supply chain management perspective. We propose a collaborative...... planning model to coordinate master planning of operations of waste suppliers and buyers. Furthermore, we analyze planning decisions related to IS when waste exchange is combined with virgin resource procurement. We demonstrate that conditions of virgin resource procurement affect the economic feasibility...

  20. Determinant factors of industrial symbiosis: greening Pasir Gudang industrial park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, B T; Ho, C S; Chau, L W; Matsuoka, Y; Gomi, K

    2014-01-01

    Green industry has been identified as an important element in attaining greater sustainability. It calls for harmonizing robust economic growth with environment protection. Industries, particularly in developing and transitional nations such as Malaysia, are in need of a reform. Many experts and international organizations suggest the concept of industrial symbiosis. Mainly, there are successful cases of industrial symbiosis practices around the world. However, there are numerous cases of failure too. As industrial symbiosis is an emerging new approach, with a short history of two decades, a lot of researches are generally focused on narrow context and technical details. There is a lack of concerted efforts to look into the drivers and barriers of industrial symbiosis across different cases. This paper aims to examine the factors influencing the development of industrial symbiosis from various countries to supports such networks to evolve in Pasir Gudang. The findings show institution, law and regulation, finance, awareness and capacity building, technology, research and development, information, collaboration, market, geography proximity, environmental issues and industry structure affect the formation of industrial symbiosis

  1. Determinant factors of industrial symbiosis: greening Pasir Gudang industrial park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, B. T.; Ho, C. S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Chau, L. W.; Gomi, K.

    2014-02-01

    Green industry has been identified as an important element in attaining greater sustainability. It calls for harmonizing robust economic growth with environment protection. Industries, particularly in developing and transitional nations such as Malaysia, are in need of a reform. Many experts and international organizations suggest the concept of industrial symbiosis. Mainly, there are successful cases of industrial symbiosis practices around the world. However, there are numerous cases of failure too. As industrial symbiosis is an emerging new approach, with a short history of two decades, a lot of researches are generally focused on narrow context and technical details. There is a lack of concerted efforts to look into the drivers and barriers of industrial symbiosis across different cases. This paper aims to examine the factors influencing the development of industrial symbiosis from various countries to supports such networks to evolve in Pasir Gudang. The findings show institution, law and regulation, finance, awareness and capacity building, technology, research and development, information, collaboration, market, geography proximity, environmental issues and industry structure affect the formation of industrial symbiosis.

  2. [Analysis of SOX10 gene mutation in a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Yan, Yousheng; Chen, Xue; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Qinghua; Feng, Xuan; Hao, Shen

    2018-02-10

    OBJECTIVE To detect potential mutation of SOX10 gene in a pedigree affected with Warrdenburg syndrome type II. METHODS Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of the proband and his family members. Exons and flanking sequences of MITF, PAX3, SOX10, SNAI2, END3 and ENDRB genes were analyzed by chip capturing and high throughput sequencing. Suspected mutations were verified with Sanger sequencing. RESULTS A c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of the SOX10 gene was detected in the proband, for which both parents showed a wild-type genotype. CONCLUSION The c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of SOX10 gene probably underlies the ocular symptoms and hearing loss of the proband.

  3. Analysis of factors affecting the development of food crop varieties bred by mutation method in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhidong; Hu Ruifa

    2002-01-01

    The research developed a production function on crop varieties developed by mutation method in order to explore factors affecting the development of new varieties. It is found that the research investment, human capital and radiation facilities were the most important factors that affected the development and cultivation area of new varieties through the mutation method. It is concluded that not all institutions involved in the breeding activities using mutation method must have radiation facilities and the national government only needed to invest in those key research institutes, which had strong research capacities. The saved research budgets can be used in the entrusting the institutes that have stronger research capacities with irradiating more breeding materials developed by the institutes that have weak research capacities, by which more opportunities to breed better varieties can be created

  4. Mutations affecting RNA polymerase I-stimulated exchange and rDNA recombination in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.H.; Keil, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    HOT1 is a cis-acting recombination-stimulatory sequence isolated from the rDNA repeat unit of yeast. The ability of HOT1 to stimulate mitotic exchange appears to depend on its ability to promote high levels of RNA polymerase I transcription. A qualitative colony color sectoring assay was developed to screen for trans-acting mutations that alter the activity of HOT1. Both hypo-recombination and hyper-recombination mutants were isolated. Genetic analysis of seven HOT1 recombination mutants (hrm) that decrease HOT1 activity shows that they behave as recessive nuclear mutations and belong to five linkage groups. Three of these mutations, hrm1, hrm2, and hrm3, also decrease rDNA exchange but do not alter recombination in the absence of HOT1. Another mutation, hrm4, decreases HOT1-stimulated recombination but does not affect rDNA recombination or exchange in the absence of HOT1. Two new alleles of RAD52 were also isolated using this screen. With regard to HOT1 activity, rad52 is epistatic to all four hrm mutations indicating that the products of the HRM genes and of RAD52 mediate steps in the same recombination pathway. Finding mutations that decrease both the activity of HOT1 and exchange in the rDNA supports the hypothesis that HOT1 plays a role in rDNA recombination

  5. A novel mutation in TFL1 homolog affecting determinacy in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekar, P; Reddy, K S

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the widely conserved Arabidopsis Terminal Flower 1 (TFL1) gene and its homologs have been demonstrated to result in determinacy across genera, the knowledge of which is lacking in cowpea. Understanding the molecular events leading to determinacy of apical meristems could hasten development of cowpea varieties with suitable ideotypes. Isolation and characterization of a novel mutation in cowpea TFL1 homolog (VuTFL1) affecting determinacy is reported here for the first time. Cowpea TFL1 homolog was amplified using primers designed based on conserved sequences in related genera and sequence variation was analysed in three gamma ray-induced determinate mutants, their indeterminate parent "EC394763" and two indeterminate varieties. The analyses of sequence variation exposed a novel SNP distinguishing the determinate mutants from the indeterminate types. The non-synonymous point mutation in exon 4 at position 1,176 resulted from transversion of cytosine (C) to adenine (A) leading to an amino acid change (Pro-136 to His) in determinate mutants. The effect of the mutation on protein function and stability was predicted to be detrimental using different bioinformatics/computational tools. The functionally significant novel substitution mutation is hypothesized to affect determinacy in the cowpea mutants. Development of suitable regeneration protocols in this hitherto recalcitrant crop and subsequent complementation assay in mutants or over-expressing assay in parents could decisively conclude the role of the SNP in regulating determinacy in these cowpea mutants.

  6. [Analysis of USH2A gene mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Mingchang; Wang, Qiufen; Liu, Mugen

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the disease-causing mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome type II. All of the 11 members from the family underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examination and hearing test, and their genomic DNA were isolated from venous leukocytes. PCR and direct sequencing of USH2A gene were performed for the proband. Wild type and mutant type minigene vectors containing exon 42, intron 42 and exon 43 of the USH2A gene were constructed and transfected into Hela cells by lipofectamine reagent. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was carried out to verify the splicing of the minigenes. Pedigree analysis and clinical diagnosis indicated that the patients have suffered from autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type II. DNA sequencing has detected a homozygous c.8559-2A>G mutation of the USH2A gene in the proband, which has co-segregated with the disease in the family. The mutation has affected a conserved splice site in intron 42, which has led to inactivation of the splice site. Minigene experiment has confirmed the retaining of intron 42 in mature mRNA. The c.8559-2A>G mutation in the USH2A gene probably underlies the Usher syndrome type II in this family. The splice site mutation has resulted in abnormal splicing of USH2A pre-mRNA.

  7. Mutations affecting components of the SWI/SNF complex cause Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kosho, Tomoki; Imai, Yoko; Hibi-Ko, Yumiko; Kaname, Tadashi; Naritomi, Kenji; Kawame, Hiroshi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Homma, Tomomi; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Hiraki, Yoko; Yamagata, Takanori; Yano, Shoji; Mizuno, Seiji; Sakazume, Satoru; Ishii, Takuma; Nagai, Toshiro; Shiina, Masaaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Ohta, Tohru; Niikawa, Norio; Miyatake, Satoko; Okada, Ippei; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Doi, Hiroshi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-18

    By exome sequencing, we found de novo SMARCB1 mutations in two of five individuals with typical Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), a rare autosomal dominant anomaly syndrome. As SMARCB1 encodes a subunit of the SWItch/Sucrose NonFermenting (SWI/SNF) complex, we screened 15 other genes encoding subunits of this complex in 23 individuals with CSS. Twenty affected individuals (87%) each had a germline mutation in one of six SWI/SNF subunit genes, including SMARCB1, SMARCA4, SMARCA2, SMARCE1, ARID1A and ARID1B.

  8. Bacterial Associations: Antagonism to Symbiosis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.

    mutualism through commensalisms and competition, to antagonism, determined ultimately by balancing the cost of the association against the benefits received (Pianka, 1994). A continuum can be envisioned that spans a dynamic bridge from antagonism... when two organisms form a relationship, which provides an advantage for both the partners at least temporarily. In commensalisms only one partner derives benefit and the other does not. Symbiosis The word, ?symbiosis? is derived from the Greek word...

  9. MeCP2 Rett mutations affect large scale chromatin organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Noopur Agarwal; Becker, Annette; Jost, K Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological, X chromosomal-linked disorder associated with mutations in the MECP2 gene. MeCP2 protein has been proposed to play a role in transcriptional regulation as well as in chromatin architecture. Since MeCP2 mutant cells exhibit surprisingly mild changes in gene...... expression, we have now explored the possibility that Rett mutations may affect the ability of MeCP2 to bind and organize chromatin. We found that all but one of the 21 missense MeCP2 mutants analyzed accumulated at heterochromatin and about half of them were significantly affected. Furthermore, two......-thirds of all mutants showed a significantly decreased ability to cluster heterochromatin. Three mutants containing different proline substitutions (P101H, P101R and P152R) were severely affected only in heterochromatin clustering and located far away from the DNA interface in the MeCP2 methyl-binding domain...

  10. Isolation of mutations affecting the development of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, G; McKown, R; Marin, A L; Teutonico, R

    1996-08-01

    We screened for mutations deleterious to the freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. ecotype Columbia. Tolerance was assayed by the vigor and regrowth of intact plants after cold acclimation and freezing. From a chemically mutagenized population, we obtained 13 lines of mutants with highly penetrant phenotypes. In 5 of these, freezing sensitivity was attributable to chilling injury sustained during cold acclimation, but in the remaining 8 lines, the absence of injury prior to freezing suggested that they were affected specifically in the development of freezing tolerance. In backcrosses, freezing sensitivity from each line segregated as a single nuclear mutation. Complementation tests indicated that the 8 lines contained mutations in 7 different genes. The mutants' freezing sensitivity was also detectable in the leakage of electrolytes from frozen leaves. However, 1 mutant line that displayed a strong phenotype at the whole-plant level showed a relatively weak phenotype by the electrolyte leakage assay.

  11. PROGRANULIN MUTATIONS AFFECTS BRAIN OSCILLATORY ACTIVITY IN FRONTO-TEMPORAL DEMENTIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Vito Moretti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: mild cognitive impairment (MCI is a clinical stage indicating a prodromal phase of dementia. This practical concept could be used also for fronto-temporal dementia (FTD. Progranulin (PGRN has been recently recognized as a useful diagnostic biomarker for fronto-temporal lobe degeneration (FTLD due to GRN null mutations. Electroencephalography (EEG is a reliable tool in detecting brain networks changes. The working hypothesis of the present study is that EEG oscillations could detect different modifications among FTLD stages (FTD-MCI versus overt FTD as well as differences between GRN mutation carriers versus non carriers in patients with overt FTD. Methods: EEG in all patients and PGRN dosage in patients with a clear FTD were detected. The cognitive state has been investigated through mini mental state examination (MMSE. Results: MCI-FTD showed a significant lower spectral power in both alpha and theta oscillations as compared to overt FTD. GRN mutations carriers affected by FTLD show an increase in high alpha and decrease in theta oscillations as compared to non-carriers.Conclusion: EEG frequency rhythms are sensible to different stage of FTD and could detect changes in brain oscillatory activity affected by GRN mutations

  12. [Identification of a novel GPR143 mutation in a Chinese family affected with X-linked ocular albinism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Guan, Menglong; Wang, Ling; Liao, Yong; Li-Ling, Jesse; Wan, Huajing

    2017-04-10

    To detect mutation of GPR143 gene in a Chinese patient affected with ocular albinism. Peripheral blood samples were collected from the proband and his parents. The coding regions of the GPR143 gene were subjected to PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. A previously unreported mutation (c.758T>A) was found in exon 6 of the GPR143 gene in the proband and his mother. The same mutation was not found in his father. As predicted, the mutation has resulted in a stop codon, causing premature termination of protein translation. A novel mutation of the GPR143 gene related to X-linked ocular albinism has been identified.

  13. Characterization of three Agrobacterium tumefaciens avirulent mutants with chromosomal mutations that affect induction of vir genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Metts, J; West, J; Doares, S H; Matthysse, A G

    1991-01-01

    Three Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants with chromosomal mutations that affect bacterial virulence were isolated by transposon mutagenesis. Two of the mutants were avirulent on all hosts tested. The third mutant, Ivr-211, was a host range mutant which was avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana, Nicotiana tabacum, N. debneyi, N. glauca, and Daucus carota but was virulent on Zinnia elegans and Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato). That the mutant phenotype was due to the transposon insertion was d...

  14. Mutations in the human adenosine deaminase gene that affect protein structure and RNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akeson, A.L.; Wiginton, D.A.; States, C.J.; Perme, C.M.; Dusing, M.R.; Hutton, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is one cause of the genetic disease severe combined immunodeficiency. To identify mutations responsible for ADA deficiency, the authors synthesized cDNAs to ADA mRNAs from two cell lines, GM2756 and GM2825A, derived from ADA-deficient immunodeficient patients. Sequence analysis of GM2756 cDNA clones revealed a different point mutation in each allele that causes amino acid changes of alanine to valine and arginine to histidine. One allele of GM2825A also has a point mutation that causes an alanine to valine substitution. The other allele of GM2825A was found to produce an mRNA in which exon 4 had been spliced out but had no other detrimental mutations. S1 nuclease mapping of GM2825A mRNA showed equal abundance of the full-length ADA mRNA and the ADA mRNA that was missing exon 4. Several of the ADA cDNA clones extended 5' of the major initiation start site, indicating multiple start sites for ADA transcription. The point mutations in GM2756 and GM2825A and the absence of exon 4 in GM2825A appear to be directly responsible for the ADA deficiency. Comparison of a number of normal and mutant ADA cDNA sequences showed a number of changes in the third base of codons. These change do not affect the amino acid sequence. Analyses of ADA cDNAs from different cell lines detected aberrant RNA species that either included intron 7 or excluded exon 7. Their presence is a result of aberrant splicing of pre-mRNAs and is not related to mutations that cause ADA deficiency

  15. Symbiosis, Empathy, Suicidal Behavior, and the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Joseph

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the theoretical concept of symbiosis, as described by Mahler and her co-workers, and its clinical applications in suicidal situations. Also, the practical implications of the concept of symbiosis for assessment and treatment are discussed (Author)

  16. The rad2 mutation affects the molecular nature of UV and acridine-mustard-induced mutations in the ADE2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.L.; Kovaltzova, S.V.; Kassinova, G.V.; Gracheva, L.M.; Korolev, V.G.; Zakharov, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have studied the molecular nature of ade2 mutations induced by UV light and bifunctional acridine-mustard (BAM) in wild-type (RAD) and in excision-deficient (rad2) strains of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the RAD strain, UV causes 45% GC → AT transitions among all mutations; in the rad2 strain this value is 77%. BAM was shown to be highly specific for frameshift mutagenesis: 60% frameshifts in the RAD strain, and as many as 84% frameshifts in the rad2 strain were induced. Therefore, the rad2 mutation affects the specificity of UV- and BAM-induced mutagenesis in yeast. Experimental data agree with the view that the majority of mutations in the RAD strain are induced by a prereplicative mechanism, whereas mutations in the rad2 strain are predominantly postreplicative events. (Auth.)

  17. A genetic screen for mutations affecting embryonic development in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosli, F; Köster, R W; Carl, M; Kühnlein, R; Henrich, T; Mücke, M; Krone, A; Wittbrodt, J

    2000-10-01

    In a pilot screen, we assayed the efficiency of ethylnitrosourea (ENU) as a chemical mutagen to induce mutations that lead to early embryonic and larval lethal phenotypes in the Japanese medaka fish, Oryzias latipes. ENU acts as a very efficient mutagen inducing mutations at high rates in germ cells. Three repeated treatments of male fish in 3 mM ENU for 1 h results in locus specific mutation rates of 1.1-1.95 x10(-3). Mutagenized males were outcrossed to wild type females and the F1 offspring was used to establish F2 families. F2 siblings were intercrossed and the F3 progeny was scored 24, 48 and 72 h after fertilization for morphological alterations affecting eye development. The presented mutant phenotypes were identified using morphological criteria and occur during early developmental stages of medaka. They are stably inherited in a Mendelian fashion. The high efficiency of ENU to induce mutations in this pilot screen indicates that chemical mutagenesis and screening for morphologically visible phenotypes in medaka fish allows the genetic analysis of specific aspects of vertebrate development complementing the screens performed in other vertebrate model systems.

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis-mediated tomato tolerance to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarra, Walter; Maserti, Biancaelena; Gambino, Giorgio; Guerrieri, Emilio; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2016-07-02

    A multidisciplinary approach, involving eco-physiological, morphometric, biochemical and molecular analyses, has been used to study the impact of two different AM fungi, i.e. Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices, on tomato response to water stress. Overall, results show that AM symbiosis positively affects the tolerance to drought in tomato with a different plant response depending on the involved AM fungal species.

  19. Mendelian and non-mendelian mutations affecting surface antigen expression in Paramecium tetraurelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, L.M.; Forney, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A screening procedure was devised for the isolation of X-ray-induced mutations affecting the expression of the A immobilization antigen (i-antigen) in Paramecium tetraurelia. Two of the mutations isolated by this procedure proved to be in modifier genes. The two genes are unlinked to each other and unlinked to the structural A i-antigen gene. These are the first modifier genes identified in a Paramecium sp. that affect surface antigen expression. Another mutation was found to be a deletion of sequences just downstream from the A i-antigen gene. In cells carrying this mutation, the A i-antigen gene lies in close proximity to the end of a macronuclear chromosome. The expression of the A i-antigen is not affected in these cells, demonstrating that downstream sequences are not important for the regulation and expression of the A i-antigen gene. A stable cell line was also recovered which shows non-Mendelian inheritance of a macronuclear deletion of the A i-antigen gene. This mutant does not contain the gene in its macronucleus, but contains a complete copy of the gene in its micronucleus. In the cytoplasm of wild-type animals, the micronuclear gene is included in the developing macronucleus; in the cytoplasm of the mutant, the incorporation of the A i-antigen gene into the macronucleus is inhibited. This is the first evidence that a mechanism is available in ciliates to control the expression of a gene by regulating its incorporation into developing macronuclei

  20. Identification of a novel FAM83H mutation and microhardness of an affected molar in autosomal dominant hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, H-K; Lee, S-K; Lee, K-E; Kang, H-Y; Kim, E-J; Choung, P-H; Kim, J-W

    2009-11-01

    To determine the underlying molecular genetic aetiology of a family with the hypocalcified form of amelogenesis imperfecta and to investigate the hardness of the enamel and dentine of a known FAM83H mutation. Mutational screening of the FAM83H on the basis of candidate gene approach was performed. All exons and exon-intron boundaries was amplified and sequenced. A microhardness test was performed to measure the Vickers microhardness value. A novel nonsense mutation (c.1354C>T, p.Q452X) was identified in the last exon of FAM83H, which resulted in soft, uncalcified enamel. The affected enamel was extremely soft (about 17% of the normal control), but the underlying dentine was as hard as the normal control. Mutational analysis revealed a novel mutation in FAM83H gene. Hardness of dentine was not affected by the mutation, whilst the enamel was extremely soft.

  1. Gr and hp-1 tomato mutants unveil unprecedented interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chialva, Matteo; Zouari, Inès; Salvioli, Alessandra; Novero, Mara; Vrebalov, Julia; Giovannoni, James J; Bonfante, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Systemic responses to an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus reveal opposite phenological patterns in two tomato ripening mutants depending whether ethylene or light reception is involved. The availability of tomato ripening mutants has revealed many aspects of the genetics behind fleshy fruit ripening, plant hormones and light signal reception. Since previous analyses revealed that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis influences tomato berry ripening, we wanted to test the hypothesis that an interplay might occur between root symbiosis and fruit ripening. With this aim, we screened seven tomato mutants affected in the ripening process for their responsiveness to the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae. Following their phenological responses we selected two mutants for a deeper analysis: Green ripe (Gr), deficient in fruit ethylene perception and high-pigment-1 (hp-1), displaying enhanced light signal perception throughout the plant. We investigated the putative interactions between ripening processes, mycorrhizal establishment and systemic effects using biochemical and gene expression tools. Our experiments showed that both mutants, notwithstanding a normal mycorrhizal phenotype at root level, exhibit altered arbuscule functionality. Furthermore, in contrast to wild type, mycorrhization did not lead to a higher phosphate concentration in berries of both mutants. These results suggest that the mutations considered interfere with arbuscular mycorrhiza inducing systemic changes in plant phenology and fruits metabolism. We hypothesize a cross talk mechanism between AM and ripening processes that involves genes related to ethylene and light signaling.

  2. Mutation types and aging differently affect revertant fiber expansion in dystrophic mdx and mdx52 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Echigoya

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, one of the most common and lethal genetic disorders, and the mdx mouse myopathies are caused by a lack of dystrophin protein. These dystrophic muscles contain sporadic clusters of dystrophin-expressing revertant fibers (RFs, as detected by immunohistochemistry. RFs are known to arise from muscle precursor cells with spontaneous exon skipping (alternative splicing and clonally expand in size with increasing age through the process of muscle degeneration/regeneration. The expansion of revertant clusters is thought to represent the cumulative history of muscle regeneration and proliferation of such precursor cells. However, the precise mechanisms by which RFs arise and expand are poorly understood. Here, to test the effects of mutation types and aging on RF expansion and muscle regeneration, we examined the number of RFs in mdx mice (containing a nonsense mutation in exon 23 and mdx52 mice (containing deletion mutation of exon 52 with the same C57BL/6 background at 2, 6, 12, and 18months of age. Mdx mice displayed a significantly higher number of RFs compared to mdx52 mice in all age groups, suggesting that revertant fiber expansion largely depends on the type of mutation and/or location in the gene. A significant increase in the expression and clustering levels of RFs was found beginning at 6months of age in mdx mice compared with mdx52 mice. In contrast to the significant expansion of RFs with increasing age, the number of centrally nucleated fibers and embryonic myosin heavy chain-positive fibers (indicative of cumulative and current muscle regeneration, respectively decreased with age in both mouse strains. These results suggest that mutation types and aging differently affect revertant fiber expansion in mdx and mdx52 mice.

  3. A mild phenotype of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency and developmental retardation associated with a missense mutation affecting cofactor binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weidensee, Sabine; Goettig, Peter; Bertone, Marko; Haas, Dorothea; Magdolen, Viktor; Kiechle, Marion; Meindl, Alfons; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.; Gross, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of a non-synonymous mutation associated with dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency. DPD enzyme analysis, mutation analysis and molecular dynamics simulations based on the 3D-model of DPD. The substitution Lys63Glu is likely to affect the FAD binding pocket within the DPD

  4. ramR Mutations Affecting Fluoroquinolone Susceptibility in Epidemic Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky ST198

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eCloeckaert

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A screening for non-target mutations affecting fluoroquinolone susceptibility was conducted in epidemic multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky ST198. Among a panel of representative isolates (n=30, covering the epidemic, only three showed distinct mutations in ramR resulting in enhanced expression of genes encoding the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and low increase in ciprofloxacin MIC. No mutations were detected in other regulatory regions of this efflux system. Ciprofloxacin resistance in serovar Kentucky ST198 is thus currently mainly due to multiple target gene mutations.

  5. MED and PSACH COMP mutations affect chondrogenesis in chicken limb bud micromass cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Blas, J; Dion, A S; Seghatoleslami, M R; Giunta, K; Oca, P; Jimenez, S A; Williams, C J

    2010-09-01

    Mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) cause pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). We studied the effects of over-expression of wild type and mutant COMP on early stages of chondrogenesis in chicken limb bud micromass cultures. Cells were transduced with RCAS virus harboring wild type or mutant (C328R, PSACH; T585R, MED) COMP cDNAs and cultured for 3, 4, and 5 days. The effect of COMP constructs on chondrogenesis was assessed by analyzing mRNA and protein expression of several COMP binding partners. Cell viability was assayed, and evaluation of apoptosis was performed by monitoring caspase 3 processing. Over-expression of COMP, and especially expression of COMP mutants, had a profound affect on the expression of syndecan 3 and tenascin C, early markers of chondrogenesis. Over-expression of COMP did not affect levels of type II collagen or matrilin-3; however, there were increases in type IX collagen expression and sulfated proteoglycan synthesis, particularly at day 5 of harvest. In contrast to cells over-expressing COMP, cells with mutant COMP showed reduction in type IX collagen expression and increased matrilin 3 expression. Finally, reduction in cell viability, and increased activity of caspase 3, at days 4 and 5, were observed in cultures expressing either wild type or mutant COMP. MED, and PSACH mutations, despite displaying phenotypic differences, demonstrated only subtle differences in their cellular viability and mRNA and protein expression of components of the extracellular matrix, including those that interact with COMP. These results suggest that COMP mutations, by disrupting normal interactions between COMP and its binding partners, significantly affect chondrogenesis. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. A New Generalizable Test for Detection of Mutations Affecting Tn10 Transposition

    OpenAIRE

    Huisman, Olivier; Kleckner, Nancy

    1987-01-01

    We describe here a new rapid screen that allows easy detection of transposon or host mutations that affect Tn10 transposition in Escherichia coli. This test involves a new Tn10 derivative called the "mini-lacZ-kanR fusion hopper" or mini-Tn10-LK for short. This element does not direct expression of β-galactosidase when present at its original starting location on a suitably engineered plasmid or phage genome because it lacks appropriate transcription and translation start signals. However, t...

  7. Prevalence of GJB2 Mutations in Affected Individuals from United Arab Emirates with Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, Abdelaziz; Al Mutery, Abdullah; Kamal Eddine Ahmad Mohamed, Walaa; Mahfood, Mona; Hadj Kacem, Hassen

    2017-11-01

    Mutations in the gap junction protein beta 2 (GJB2) gene are responsible for more cases of nonsyndromic recessive hearing loss than any other gene. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of GJB2 mutations among affected individuals from United Arab Emirates (UAE). There were 50 individuals diagnosed with hereditary hearing loss and 120 healthy individuals enrolled in the study. The Sanger sequencing method was used to screen the GJB2 coding region in all affected individuals. The c.-1G>A variant was determined by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method in normal individuals. Nine cases with bi-allelic mutations and three cases with mono-allelic mutations were detected in 12 out of 50 patients (24%). The homozygous mutation c.35delG was identified as the cause of hearing loss in six participants (12%). The mutation c.506G>A was identified in three affected individuals (6%). The allelic frequency (14%) and low percentage of individuals that were homozygous (2%) for the c.35delG mutation suggest that there are other genes responsible for nonsyndromic deafness in the UAE population. The results reported here are a preliminary step in collecting epidemiological data regarding autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss related to GJB2 gene mutations among the UAE population. The c.35delG mutation of the GJB2 gene is the most frequently seen causative mutation in the UAE and is followed by the p.Cys169Tyr mutation.

  8. Effect of Mycorrhiza Symbiosis on Yield, Yield Components and Water Use Efficiency of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. Affected by Different Irrigation Regimes in Mashhad Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Koocheki

    2016-02-01

    4000 m3 ha-1, inoculation with two species of mycorrhiza fungi (Glomus mosseae and G. intraradices and control allocated to the main and sub plots, respectively. Results and Discussion Results showed that the effect of irrigation regimes were significant (p≤0.05 on yield components except 1000-seed weight, biological yield, seed yield, harvest index (HI and WUE based on biological yield and seed yield. By increasing the irrigation level from 2000 to 4000 m3 ha-1 biological and seed yield enhanced up to 52% and 118%, respectively. Increasing the irrigation level from 2000 to 4000 m3 ha-1 also improved WUE based on seed yield up to 22%. Inoculation with mycorrhiza species had significant effect on yield components, biological yield, seed yield, HI and WUE based on biological yield and seed yield P ≤ 0.05. Inoculation with G. mosseae improved seed yield compared to G. intraradices and control with 7 and 12%, respectively. These improvement of WUE based on seed yield were 7% and 24%, respectively. In general, mycorrhiza inoculation enhanced WUE through root system development and nutrient availability as this effect for G. mosseae was higher than G. intraradices. Conclusions Yield and yield components of sesame were generally more responsive to irrigation level under mycorhiza inoculation. Sesame yield and its components were significantly affected by irrigation treatments. Increase the irrigation level enhanced biological and seed yield- and also improved WUE. The water was used more efficiently in the deficit irrigation treatments where WUE increased with lower amounts of water. Inoculation with G. mosseae improved seed yield compared to G. intraradices and control. Mycorrhiza inoculation enhanced WUE due to root system development and nutrient availability. These results highlight the importance of determining the interaction effects between water level and mycorrhiza inoculation on yield of sesame to formulate proper management practices for sustainable production.

  9. A Novel KCNJ2 Mutation Identified in an Autistic Proband Affects the Single Channel Properties of Kir2.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Binda

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir have been historically associated to several cardiovascular disorders. In particular, loss-of-function mutations in the Kir2.1 channel have been reported in cases affected by Andersen-Tawil syndrome while gain-of-function mutations in the same channel cause the short QT3 syndrome. Recently, a missense mutation in Kir2.1, as well as mutations in the Kir4.1, were reported to be involved in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs suggesting a role of potassium channels in these diseases and introducing the idea of the existence of K+ channel ASDs. Here, we report the identification in an Italian affected family of a novel missense mutation (p.Phe58Ser in the KCNJ2 gene detected in heterozygosity in a proband affected by autism and borderline for short QT syndrome type 3. The mutation is located in the N-terminal region of the gene coding for the Kir2.1 channel and in particular in a very conserved domain. In vitro assays demonstrated that this mutation results in an increase of the channel conductance and in its open probability. This gain-of-function of the protein is consistent with the autistic phenotype, which is normally associated to an altered neuronal excitability.

  10. Affect of Presenilin Mutations on APP Cleavage; Insights into the Pathogenesis of FAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuomin eLi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is characterized by progressive memory loss, reduction in cognitive functions, and damage to the brain. The β-amyloid precursor protein can be sequentially cleaved by β- secretase and γ-secretase. Mutations in the presenilin1(PS1) are the most common cause of Familial Alzheimer’s disease ( FAD. PS1 mutations can alter the activity of γ-secretase on the cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein, causing increased Aβ production. Previous studies show that the βAPP-C-terminal fragment is first cleaved by β-scretase, primarily generating long fragments of Aβ48 and Aβ49, followed by the stepwise cleavage of every three amino acid residues at the C terminus, resulting in Aβ48-, 45-, 42 line and Aβ49-, 46-, 43-, 40 line. Here, we used LC-MS/MS to analyze unique peptides IAT, VVIA, ITL,TVI,IVI through sequential cleavage, combined with ELISA to test the level of Aβ42 and Aβ40 for validation. The results show that most FAD mutant PS1 can alter the level of Aβ42 and Aβ40 monitored by the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio. Among them, 6 mutants (I143T, H163P, S170F, Q223R, M233V and G384A affect the Aβ42/40 ratio through both Aβ49-40 and Aβ48-38 lines; L166P through decreasing the Aβ49-40 line, 6 mutants (I143V, M146V, G217A, E280A, L381V and L392V through increasing the Aβ48-42 line. More importantly, we found some mutations can affect the γ-secretase cleavage preference of α-CTF and β-CTF. In conclusion, we found that the FAD PS1 mutations mainly increase the generation of Aβ42 by decreasing the cleavage of Aβ42-Aβ38 and Aβ43-Aβ40.

  11. SLC30A9 mutation affecting intracellular zinc homeostasis causes a novel cerebro-renal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Yonatan; Shorer, Zamir; Liani-Leibson, Keren; Chabosseau, Pauline; Kadir, Rotem; Volodarsky, Michael; Halperin, Daniel; Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Shalev, Hanna; Schreiber, Ruth; Gradstein, Libe; Gurevich, Evgenia; Zarivach, Raz; Rutter, Guy A; Landau, Daniel; Birk, Ohad S

    2017-04-01

    A novel autosomal recessive cerebro-renal syndrome was identified in consanguineous Bedouin kindred: neurological deterioration was evident as of early age, progressing into severe intellectual disability, profound ataxia, camptocormia and oculomotor apraxia. Brain MRI was normal. Four of the six affected individuals also had early-onset nephropathy with features of tubulo-interstitial nephritis, hypertension and tendency for hyperkalemia, though none had rapid deterioration of renal function. Genome wide linkage analysis identified an ∼18 Mb disease-associated locus on chromosome 4 (maximal logarithm of odds score 4.4 at D4S2971; θ = 0). Whole exome sequencing identified a single mutation in SLC30A9 within this locus, segregating as expected within the kindred and not found in a homozygous state in 300 Bedouin controls. We showed that SLC30A9 (solute carrier family 30 member 9; also known as ZnT-9) is ubiquitously expressed with high levels in cerebellum, skeletal muscle, thymus and kidney. Confocal analysis of SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing SLC30A9 fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein demonstrated vesicular cytosolic localization associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, not co-localizing with endosomal or Golgi markers. SLC30A9 encodes a putative zinc transporter (by similarity) previously associated with Wnt signalling. However, using dual-luciferase reporter assay in SH-SY5Y cells we showed that Wnt signalling was not affected by the mutation. Based on protein modelling, the identified mutation is expected to affect SLC30A9's highly conserved cation efflux domain, putatively disrupting its transmembrane helix structure. Cytosolic Zn2+ measurements in HEK293 cells overexpressing wild-type and mutant SLC30A9 showed lower zinc concentration within mutant rather than wild-type SLC30A9 cells. This suggests that SLC30A9 has zinc transport properties affecting intracellular zinc homeostasis, and that the molecular mechanism of the disease is through

  12. Identification of a novel mutation in WFS1 in a family affected by low-frequency hearing impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Juergen; Marquez-Klaka, Ben; Uebe, Steffen; Volz-Peters, Anja; Berger, Roswitha; Rausch, Peter

    2003-04-09

    Previously we confirmed linkage of autosomal dominantly inherited low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) in a German family to the genetic locus DFNA6/DFNA14 on chromosome 4p16.3 close to the markers D4S432 and D4S431. Analysis of data from the Human Genome Project, showed that WFS1 is located in this region. Mutations in WFS1 are known to be responsible for Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD, MIM no. 606201), which follows an autosomal recessive trait. Studies in low-frequency hearing loss families showed that mutations in WFS1 were responsible for the phenotype. In all affected family members analysed, we detected a missense mutation in WFS1 (K705N) and therefore confirm the finding that the majority of mutations responsible for LFSNHI are missense mutations which localise to the C-terminal domain of the protein.

  13. Identification of a novel mutation in WFS1 in a family affected by low-frequency hearing impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, Juergen; Marquez-Klaka, Ben; Uebe, Steffen; Volz-Peters, Anja; Berger, Roswitha; Rausch, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Previously we confirmed linkage of autosomal dominantly inherited low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) in a German family to the genetic locus DFNA6/DFNA14 on chromosome 4p16.3 close to the markers D4S432 and D4S431. Analysis of data from the Human Genome Project, showed that WFS1 is located in this region. Mutations in WFS1 are known to be responsible for Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD, MIM no. 606201), which follows an autosomal recessive trait. Studies in low-frequency hearing loss families showed that mutations in WFS1 were responsible for the phenotype. In all affected family members analysed, we detected a missense mutation in WFS1 (K705N) and therefore confirm the finding that the majority of mutations responsible for LFSNHI are missense mutations which localise to the C-terminal domain of the protein

  14. The slaty mutation affects the morphology and maturation of melanosomes in the mouse melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirobe, Tomohisa; Abe, Hiroyuki

    2006-10-01

    The slaty (Dct(slt)) mutation is known to reduce the activity of dopachrome tautomerase in melanocytes and to reduce the melanin content in skin, hairs and eyes. Although the melanosomes in slaty melanocytes are reported to be eumelanosome-like, detailed melanosome biogenesis is not well studied. To address this point, melanosomes in neonatal epidermal melanocytes from wild-type (Dct+/Dct+) mice at the slaty locus as well as its congenic mouse mutant (Dct(slt)/Dct(slt)) in serum-free primary culture were observed under the electron microscope. Wild-type melanocytes possessed exclusively elliptical melanosomes with internal longitudinal structures, whereas in mutant melanocytes, numerous spherical melanosomes with globular depositions of pigment and elliptical melanosomes as well as mixed type of the two melanosomes were observed. Mature stage IV melanosomes were greatly decreased in mutant melanocytes, whereas immature stage III melanosomes were more numerous than in wild-type melanocytes. These results suggest that the slaty mutation affects the morphology and maturation of melanosomes in mouse melanocytes.

  15. A plastome mutation affects processing of both chloroplast and nuclear DNA-encoded plastid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E M; Schnabelrauch, L S; Sears, B B

    1991-01-01

    Immunoblotting of a chloroplast mutant (pm7) of Oenothera showed that three proteins, cytochrome f and the 23 kDa and 16 kDa subunits of the oxygen-evolving subcomplex of photosystem II, were larger than the corresponding mature proteins of the wild type and, thus, appear to be improperly processed in pm7. The mutant is also chlorotic and has little or no internal membrane development in the plastids. The improperly processed proteins, and other proteins that are completely missing, represent products of both the plastid and nuclear genomes. To test for linkage of these defects, a green revertant of pm7 was isolated from cultures in which the mutant plastids were maintained in a nuclear background homozygous for the plastome mutator (pm) gene. In this revertant, all proteins analyzed co-reverted to the wild-type condition, indicating that a single mutation in a plastome gene is responsible for the complex phenotype of pm7. These results suggest that the defect in pm7 lies in a gene that affects a processing protease encoded in the chloroplast genome.

  16. Mutations in the RNA-binding domains of tombusvirus replicase proteins affect RNA recombination in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panaviene, Zivile; Nagy, Peter D.

    2003-01-01

    RNA recombination, which is thought to occur due to replicase errors during viral replication, is one of the major driving forces of virus evolution. In this article, we show evidence that the replicase proteins of Cucumber necrosis virus, a tombusvirus, are directly involved in RNA recombination in vivo. Mutations within the RNA-binding domains of the replicase proteins affected the frequency of recombination observed with a prototypical defective-interfering (DI) RNA, a model template for recombination studies. Five of the 17 replicase mutants tested showed delay in the formation of recombinants when compared to the wild-type helper virus. Interestingly, two replicase mutants accelerated recombinant formation and, in addition, these mutants also increased the level of subgenomic RNA synthesis (Virology 308 (2003), 191-205). A trans-complementation system was used to demonstrate that mutation in the p33 replicase protein resulted in altered recombination rate. Isolated recombinants were mostly imprecise (nonhomologous), with the recombination sites clustered around a replication enhancer region and a putative cis-acting element, respectively. These RNA elements might facilitate the proposed template switching events by the tombusvirus replicase. Together with data in the article cited above, results presented here firmly establish that the conserved RNA-binding motif of the replicase proteins is involved in RNA replication, subgenomic RNA synthesis, and RNA recombination

  17. Affected female carriers of MTM1 mutations display a wide spectrum of clinical and pathological involvement: delineating diagnostic clues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biancalana, V.; Scheidecker, S.; Miguet, M.; Laquerriere, A.; Romero, N.B.; Stojkovic, T.; Neto, O. Abath; Mercier, S.; Voermans, N.C.; Tanner, L.; Rogers, C.; Ollagnon-Roman, E.; Roper, H.; Boutte, C.; Ben-Shachar, S.; Lornage, X.; Vasli, N.; Schaefer, E.; Laforet, P.; Pouget, J.; Moerman, A.; Pasquier, L.; Marcorelle, P.; Magot, A.; Kusters, B.; Streichenberger, N.; Tranchant, C.; Dondaine, N.; Schneider, R.; Gasnier, C.; Calmels, N.; Kremer, V.; Nguyen, K. Van; Perrier, J.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Carlier, P.; Carlier, R.Y.; Thompson, J.; Boland, A.; Deleuze, J.F.; Fardeau, M.; Zanoteli, E.; Eymard, B.; Laporte, J.

    2017-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a severe congenital myopathy, is caused by mutations in the MTM1 gene located on the X chromosome. A majority of affected males die in the early postnatal period, whereas female carriers are believed to be usually asymptomatic. Nevertheless, several affected

  18. Novel somatic mutations in large granular lymphocytic leukemia affecting the STAT-pathway and T-cell activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, E I; Rajala, H L M; Eldfors, S; Ellonen, P; Olson, T; Jerez, A; Clemente, M J; Kallioniemi, O; Porkka, K; Heckman, C; Loughran, T P Jr; Maciejewski, J P; Mustjoki, S

    2013-01-01

    T-cell large granular lymphocytic (T-LGL) leukemia is a clonal disease characterized by the expansion of mature CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. It is often associated with autoimmune disorders and immune-mediated cytopenias. Our recent findings suggest that up to 40% of T-LGL patients harbor mutations in the STAT3 gene, whereas STAT5 mutations are present in 2% of patients. In order to identify putative disease-causing genetic alterations in the remaining T-LGL patients, we performed exome sequencing from three STAT mutation-negative patients and validated the findings in 113 large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia patients. On average, 11 CD8+ LGL leukemia cell-specific high-confidence nonsynonymous somatic mutations were discovered in each patient. Interestingly, all patients had at least one mutation that affects either directly the STAT3-pathway (such as PTPRT) or T-cell activation (BCL11B, SLIT2 and NRP1). In all three patients, the STAT3 pathway was activated when studied by RNA expression or pSTAT3 analysis. Screening of the remaining 113 LGL leukemia patients did not reveal additional patients with same mutations. These novel mutations are potentially biologically relevant and represent rare genetic triggers for T-LGL leukemia, and are associated with similar disease phenotype as observed in patients with mutations in the STAT3 gene

  19. Induced plasmon mutations affecting the growth habit of peanuts, A. hypogaea L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, A.; Ashri, A.

    1978-01-01

    The effectiveness of the acridines ethidium bromide (EB) and acriflavine in inducing plasmon mutations was compared with the alkylating agents ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) and diethyl sulphate and to γ-rays. The growth habit (trailing versus bunch) of peanuts (A. hypogaea), controlled by genic-cytoplasmic interactions, was utilized. Breeding tests distinguishing nuclear from plasmon mutations were developed and are described in detail. Plasmon mutations were induced, but there were differences in mutation yields between the cultivars and the mutagens. (Auth.)

  20. Missense mutation in GRN gene affecting RNA splicing and plasma progranulin level in a family affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzi, Simona; Colleoni, Lara; Corbetta, Paola; Baldinelli, Sara; Fiori, Chiara; Girelli, Francesca; Silvestrini, Mauro; Caroppo, Paola; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Rossi, Giacomina

    2017-06-01

    Gene coding for progranulin, GRN, is a major gene linked to frontotemporal lobar degeneration. While most of pathogenic GRN mutations are null mutations leading to haploinsufficiency, GRN missense mutations do not have an obvious pathogenicity, and only a few have been revealed to act through different pathogenetic mechanisms, such as cytoplasmic missorting, protein degradation, and abnormal cleavage by elastase. The aim of this study was to disclose the pathogenetic mechanisms of the GRN A199V missense mutation, which was previously reported not to alter physiological progranulin features but was associated with a reduced plasma progranulin level. After investigating the family pedigree, we performed genetic and biochemical analysis on its members and performed RNA expression studies. We found that the mutation segregates with the disease and discovered that its pathogenic feature is the alteration of GRN mRNA splicing, actually leading to haploinsufficiency. Thus, when facing with a missense GRN mutation, its pathogenetic effects should be investigated, especially if associated with low plasma progranulin levels, to determine its nature of either benign polymorphism or pathogenic mutation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunohistochemical loss of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine expression in acute myeloid leukaemia: relationship to somatic gene mutations affecting epigenetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magotra, Minoti; Sakhdari, Ali; Lee, Paul J; Tomaszewicz, Keith; Dresser, Karen; Hutchinson, Lloyd M; Woda, Bruce A; Chen, Benjamin J

    2016-12-01

    Genes affecting epigenetic pathways are frequently mutated in myeloid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The genes encoding TET2, IDH1 and IDH2 are among the most commonly mutated genes, and cause defective conversion of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), impairing demethylation of DNA, and presumably serving as driver mutations in leukaemogenesis. The aim of this study was to correlate 5hmC immunohistochemical loss with the mutation status of genes involved in epigenetic pathways in AML. Immunohistochemical staining with an anti-5hmC antibody was performed on 41 decalcified, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) bone marrow biopsies from patients with AML. Archived DNA was subjected to next-generation sequencing for analysis of a panel of genes, including TET2, IDH1, IDH2, WT1 and DNMT3A. TET2, IDH1, IDH2, WT1 and DNMT3A mutations were found in 46% (19/41) of the cases. Ten of 15 cases (67%) with TET2, IDH1, IDH2 or WT1 mutations showed deficient 5hmC staining, whereas nine of 26 cases (35%) without a mutation in these genes showed loss of 5hmC. It is of note that all four cases with TET2 mutations showed deficient 5hmC staining. Overall, somatic mutations in TET2, IDH1, IDH2, WT1 and DNMT3A were common in our cohort of AML cases. Immunohistochemical staining for 5hmC was lost in the majority of cases harbouring mutations in these genes, reflecting the proposed relationship between dysfunctional epigenetic pathways and leukaemogenesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Nonredundant Regulation of Rice Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis by Two Members of the Phosphate Transporter 1 Gene Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Shu-Yi; Grønlund, Mette; Jakobsen, Iver

    2012-01-01

    Pi acquisition of crops via arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is becoming increasingly important due to limited highgrade rock Pi reserves and a demand for environmentally sustainable agriculture. Here, we show that 70% of the overall Pi acquired by rice (Oryza sativa) is delivered via...... or PT13 affected the development of the symbiosis, demonstrating that both genes are important for AM symbiosis. For symbiotic Pi uptake, however, only PT11 is necessary and sufficient. Consequently, our results demonstrate that mycorrhizal rice depends on the AM symbiosis to satisfy its Pi demands...... the symbiotic route. To better understand this pathway, we combined genetic, molecular, and physiological approaches to determine the specific functions of two symbiosis-specific members of the PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1 (PHT1) gene family from rice, ORYsa;PHT1;11 (PT11) and ORYsa;PHT1;13 (PT13). The PT11 lineage...

  3. Specificity and stability of the Acromyrmex–Pseudonocardia symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sandra Breum; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sapountzis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    The stability of mutualistic interactions is likely to be affected by the genetic diversity of symbionts that compete for the same functional niche. Fungus-growing (attine) ants have multiple complex symbioses and thus provide ample opportunities to address questions of symbiont specificity and d...... and diversity. Among the partners are Actinobacteria of the genus Pseudonocardia that are maintained on the ant cuticle to produce antibiotics, primarily against a fungal parasite of the mutualistic gardens. The symbiosis has been assumed to ...

  4. Mutations affecting the SAND domain of DEAF1 cause intellectual disability with severe speech impairment and behavioral problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Rajamanickam, Shivakumar; Jensik, Philip J; Vergult, Sarah; de Rocker, Nina; Newhall, Kathryn J; Raghavan, Ramya; Reardon, Sara N; Jarrett, Kelsey; McIntyre, Tara; Bulinski, Joseph; Ownby, Stacy L; Huggenvik, Jodi I; McKnight, G Stanley; Rose, Gregory M; Cai, Xiang; Willaert, Andy; Zweier, Christiane; Endele, Sabine; de Ligt, Joep; van Bon, Bregje W M; Lugtenberg, Dorien; de Vries, Petra F; Veltman, Joris A; van Bokhoven, Hans; Brunner, Han G; Rauch, Anita; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Carvill, Gemma L; Hoischen, Alexander; Mefford, Heather C; Eichler, Evan E; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Menten, Björn; Collard, Michael W; de Vries, Bert B A

    2014-05-01

    Recently, we identified in two individuals with intellectual disability (ID) different de novo mutations in DEAF1, which encodes a transcription factor with an important role in embryonic development. To ascertain whether these mutations in DEAF1 are causative for the ID phenotype, we performed targeted resequencing of DEAF1 in an additional cohort of over 2,300 individuals with unexplained ID and identified two additional individuals with de novo mutations in this gene. All four individuals had severe ID with severely affected speech development, and three showed severe behavioral problems. DEAF1 is highly expressed in the CNS, especially during early embryonic development. All four mutations were missense mutations affecting the SAND domain of DEAF1. Altered DEAF1 harboring any of the four amino acid changes showed impaired transcriptional regulation of the DEAF1 promoter. Moreover, behavioral studies in mice with a conditional knockout of Deaf1 in the brain showed memory deficits and increased anxiety-like behavior. Our results demonstrate that mutations in DEAF1 cause ID and behavioral problems, most likely as a result of impaired transcriptional regulation by DEAF1. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular marker genes for ectomycorrhizal symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiv Hiremath; Carolyn McQuattie; Gopi Podila; Jenise. Bauman

    2013-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is a mutually beneficial association very commonly found among most vascular plants. Formation of mycorrhiza happens only between compatible partners and predicting this is often accomplished through a trial and error process. We investigated the possibility of using expression of symbiosis specific genes as markers to predict the formation of...

  6. Cell Biology of Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Denis; Weis, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The symbiosis between cnidarians (e.g., corals or sea anemones) and intracellular dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium is of immense ecological importance. In particular, this symbiosis promotes the growth and survival of reef corals in nutrient-poor tropical waters; indeed, coral reefs could not exist without this symbiosis. However, our fundamental understanding of the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis and of its links to coral calcification remains poor. Here we review what we currently know about the cell biology of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. In doing so, we aim to refocus attention on fundamental cellular aspects that have been somewhat neglected since the early to mid-1980s, when a more ecological approach began to dominate. We review the four major processes that we believe underlie the various phases of establishment and persistence in the cnidarian/coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis: (i) recognition and phagocytosis, (ii) regulation of host-symbiont biomass, (iii) metabolic exchange and nutrient trafficking, and (iv) calcification. Where appropriate, we draw upon examples from a range of cnidarian-alga symbioses, including the symbiosis between green Hydra and its intracellular chlorophyte symbiont, which has considerable potential to inform our understanding of the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. Ultimately, we provide a comprehensive overview of the history of the field, its current status, and where it should be going in the future. PMID:22688813

  7. Characterization of three Agrobacterium tumefaciens avirulent mutants with chromosomal mutations that affect induction of vir genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metts, J; West, J; Doares, S H; Matthysse, A G

    1991-02-01

    Three Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants with chromosomal mutations that affect bacterial virulence were isolated by transposon mutagenesis. Two of the mutants were avirulent on all hosts tested. The third mutant, Ivr-211, was a host range mutant which was avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana, Nicotiana tabacum, N. debneyi, N. glauca, and Daucus carota but was virulent on Zinnia elegans and Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato). That the mutant phenotype was due to the transposon insertion was determined by cloning the DNA containing the transposon insertion and using the cloned DNA to replace the wild-type DNA in the parent bacterial strain by marker exchange. The transposon insertions in the three mutants mapped at three widely separated locations on the bacterial chromosome. The effects of the mutations on various steps in tumor formation were examined. All three mutants showed no alteration in binding to carrot cells. However, none of the mutants showed any induction of vir genes by acetosyringone under conditions in which the parent strain showed vir gene induction. When the mutant bacteria were examined for changes in surface components, it was found that all three of the mutants showed a similar alteration in lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS from the mutants was larger in size and more heavily saccharide substituted than LPS from the parent strain. Two of the mutants showed no detectable alteration in outer membrane and periplasmic space proteins. The third mutant, Ivr-225, was missing a 79-kDa surface peptide. The reason(s) for the failure of vir gene induction in these mutants and its relationship, if any, to the observed alteration in LPS are unknown.

  8. Psychological Distress, Anxiety, and Depression of Cancer-Affected BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, Johanna; Wochnowski, Christina; Bosse, Kristin; Giel, Katrin Elisabeth; Schäffeler, Norbert; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the intermediate- and long-term psychological consequences of genetic testing for cancer patients has led to encouraging research, but a clear consensus of the psychosocial impact and clinical routine for cancer-affected BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers is still missing. We performed a systematic review of intermediate- and long-term studies investigating the psychological impact like psychological distress, anxiety, and depression in cancer-affected BRCA mutation carriers compared to unaffected mutation carriers. This review included the screening of 1243 studies. Eight intermediate- and long-term studies focusing on distress, anxiety, and depression symptoms among cancer-affected mutation carriers at least six months after the disclosure of genetic testing results were included. Studies reported a great variety of designs, methods, and patient outcomes. We found evidence indicating that cancer-affected mutation carriers experienced a negative effect in relation to psychological well-being in terms of an increase in symptoms of distress, anxiety, and depression in the first months after test disclosure. In the intermediate- and long-term, no significant clinical relevant symptoms occurred. However, none of the included studies used specific measurements, which can clearly identify psychological burdens of cancer-affected mutation carriers. We concluded that current well-implemented distress screening instruments are not sufficient for precisely identifying the psychological burden of genetic testing. Therefore, future studies should implement coping strategies, specific personality structures, the impact of genetic testing, supportive care needs and disease management behaviour to clearly screen for the possible intermediate- and long-term psychological impact of a positive test disclosure.

  9. Factors affecting the loss of MED12-mutated leiomyoma cells during in vitro growth

    OpenAIRE

    Bloch, Jeannine; Holzmann, Carsten; Koczan, Dirk; Helmke, Burkhard Maria; Bullerdiek, J?rn

    2017-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (UL) are the most prevalent symptomatic human tumors at all and somatic mutations of the gene encoding mediator subcomplex 12 (MED12) constitute the most frequent driver mutations in UL. Recently, a rapid loss of mutated cells during in vitro growth of UL-derived cell cultures was reported, resulting in doubts about the benefits of UL-derived cell cultures. To evaluate if the rapid loss of MED12-mutated cells in UL cell cultures depends on in vitro passaging, we set up cell...

  10. High prevalence of mutations affecting the splicing process in a Spanish cohort with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Barandika, Olatz; Anasagasti, Ander; Irigoyen, Cristina; López de Munain, Adolfo; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is the most frequent group of inherited retinal dystrophies. It is highly heterogeneous, with more than 80 disease-causing genes 27 of which are known to cause autosomal dominant RP (adRP), having been identified. In this study a total of 29 index cases were ascertained based on a family tree compatible with adRP. A custom panel of 31 adRP genes was analysed by targeted next-generation sequencing using the Ion PGM platform in combination with Sanger sequencing. This allowed us to detect putative disease-causing mutations in 14 out of the 29 (48.28%) families analysed. Remarkably, around 38% of all adRP cases analysed showed mutations affecting the splicing process, mainly due to mutations in genes coding for spliceosome factors (SNRNP200 and PRPF8) but also due to splice-site mutations in RHO. Twelve of the 14 mutations found had been reported previously and two were novel mutations found in PRPF8 in two unrelated patients. In conclusion, our results will lead to more accurate genetic counselling and will contribute to a better characterisation of the disease. In addition, they may have a therapeutic impact in the future given the large number of studies currently underway based on targeted RNA splicing for therapeutic purposes. PMID:28045043

  11. Mutations in TSPEAR, Encoding a Regulator of Notch Signaling, Affect Tooth and Hair Follicle Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Peled

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of ectodermal dysplasias (EDs, the molecular basis of many of these disorders remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed at elucidating the genetic basis of a new form of ED featuring facial dysmorphism, scalp hypotrichosis and hypodontia. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified 2 frameshift and 2 missense mutations in TSPEAR segregating with the disease phenotype in 3 families. TSPEAR encodes the thrombospondin-type laminin G domain and EAR repeats (TSPEAR protein, whose function is poorly understood. TSPEAR knock-down resulted in altered expression of genes known to be regulated by NOTCH and to be involved in murine hair and tooth development. Pathway analysis confirmed that down-regulation of TSPEAR in keratinocytes is likely to affect Notch signaling. Accordingly, using a luciferase-based reporter assay, we showed that TSPEAR knock-down is associated with decreased Notch signaling. In addition, NOTCH1 protein expression was reduced in patient scalp skin. Moreover, TSPEAR silencing in mouse hair follicle organ cultures was found to induce apoptosis in follicular epithelial cells, resulting in decreased hair bulb diameter. Collectively, these observations indicate that TSPEAR plays a critical, previously unrecognized role in human tooth and hair follicle morphogenesis through regulation of the Notch signaling pathway.

  12. Joint analysis of quantitative trait loci and majoreffect causative mutations affecting meat quality and carcass composition traits in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Cherel, Pierre; Pires, José; Glénisson, Jérôme; Milan, Denis; Iannuccelli, Nathalie; Herault, Frédéric; Damon, Marie; Le Roy, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting meat quality traits in pigs is crucial for the design of efficient marker-assisted selection programs and to initiate efforts toward the identification of underlying polymorphisms. The RYR1 and PRKAG3 causative mutations, originally identified from major effects on meat characteristics, can be used both as controls for an overall QTL detection strategy for diversely affected traits and as a scale for detected QTL effect...

  13. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Erdem-Eraslan (Lale); D. Heijsman (Daphne); M. De Wit (Maurice); A.E. Kremer (Andreas); A. Sacchetti (Andrea); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); P.J. French (Pim)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCausal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes

  14. Mutations Affecting G-Protein Subunit α11 in Hypercalcemia and Hypocalcemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babinsky, Valerie N.; Head, Rosie A.; Cranston, Treena; Rust, Nigel; Hobbs, Maurine R.; Heath, Hunter; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia is a genetically heterogeneous disorder with three variants: types 1, 2, and 3. Type 1 is due to loss-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor, a guanine nucleotide–binding protein (G-protein)–coupled receptor that signals through the G-protein subunit α11 (Gα11). Type 3 is associated with adaptor-related protein complex 2, sigma 1 subunit (AP2S1) mutations, which result in altered calcium-sensing receptor endocytosis. We hypothesized that type 2 is due to mutations effecting Gα11 loss of function, since Gα11 is involved in calcium-sensing receptor signaling, and its gene (GNA11) and the type 2 locus are colocalized on chromosome 19p13.3. We also postulated that mutations effecting Gα11 gain of function, like the mutations effecting calcium-sensing receptor gain of function that cause autosomal dominant hypocalcemia type 1, may lead to hypocalcemia. METHODS We performed GNA11 mutational analysis in a kindred with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia type 2 and in nine unrelated patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia who did not have mutations in the gene encoding the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) or AP2S1. We also performed this analysis in eight unrelated patients with hypocalcemia who did not have CASR mutations. In addition, we studied the effects of GNA11 mutations on Gα11 protein structure and calcium-sensing receptor signaling in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. RESULTS The kindred with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia type 2 had an in-frame deletion of a conserved Gα11 isoleucine (Ile200del), and one of the nine unrelated patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia had a missense GNA11 mutation (Leu135Gln). Missense GNA11 mutations (Arg181Gln and Phe341Leu) were detected in two unrelated patients with hypocalcemia; they were therefore identified as having autosomal dominant hypocalcemia type 2. All four GNA11 mutations predicted disrupted protein

  15. Identification of novel mutations in HEXA gene in children affected with Tay Sachs disease from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul Mistri

    Full Text Available Tay Sachs disease (TSD is a neurodegenerative disorder due to β-hexosaminidase A deficiency caused by mutations in the HEXA gene. The mutations leading to Tay Sachs disease in India are yet unknown. We aimed to determine mutations leading to TSD in India by complete sequencing of the HEXA gene. The clinical inclusion criteria included neuroregression, seizures, exaggerated startle reflex, macrocephaly, cherry red spot on fundus examination and spasticity. Neuroimaging criteria included thalamic hyperdensities on CT scan/T1W images of MRI of the brain. Biochemical criteria included deficiency of hexosaminidase A (less than 2% of total hexosaminidase activity for infantile patients. Total leukocyte hexosaminidase activity was assayed by 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine lysis and hexosaminidase A activity was assayed by heat inactivation method and 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine-6-sulphate lysis method. The exons and exon-intron boundaries of the HEXA gene were bidirectionally sequenced using an automated sequencer. Mutations were confirmed in parents and looked up in public databases. In silico analysis for mutations was carried out using SIFT, Polyphen2, MutationT@ster and Accelrys Discovery Studio softwares. Fifteen families were included in the study. We identified six novel missense mutations, c.340 G>A (p.E114K, c.964 G>A (p.D322N, c.964 G>T (p.D322Y, c.1178C>G (p.R393P and c.1385A>T (p.E462V, c.1432 G>A (p.G478R and two previously reported mutations. c.1277_1278insTATC and c.508C>T (p.R170W. The mutation p.E462V was found in six unrelated families from Gujarat indicating a founder effect. A previously known splice site mutation c.805+1 G>C and another intronic mutation c.672+30 T>G of unknown significance were also identified. Mutations could not be identified in one family. We conclude that TSD patients from Gujarat should be screened for the common mutation p.E462V.

  16. Identification of novel mutations in HEXA gene in children affected with Tay Sachs disease from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistri, Mehul; Tamhankar, Parag M; Sheth, Frenny; Sanghavi, Daksha; Kondurkar, Pratima; Patil, Swapnil; Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Gupta, Sarita; Sheth, Jayesh

    2012-01-01

    Tay Sachs disease (TSD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to β-hexosaminidase A deficiency caused by mutations in the HEXA gene. The mutations leading to Tay Sachs disease in India are yet unknown. We aimed to determine mutations leading to TSD in India by complete sequencing of the HEXA gene. The clinical inclusion criteria included neuroregression, seizures, exaggerated startle reflex, macrocephaly, cherry red spot on fundus examination and spasticity. Neuroimaging criteria included thalamic hyperdensities on CT scan/T1W images of MRI of the brain. Biochemical criteria included deficiency of hexosaminidase A (less than 2% of total hexosaminidase activity for infantile patients). Total leukocyte hexosaminidase activity was assayed by 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine lysis and hexosaminidase A activity was assayed by heat inactivation method and 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine-6-sulphate lysis method. The exons and exon-intron boundaries of the HEXA gene were bidirectionally sequenced using an automated sequencer. Mutations were confirmed in parents and looked up in public databases. In silico analysis for mutations was carried out using SIFT, Polyphen2, MutationT@ster and Accelrys Discovery Studio softwares. Fifteen families were included in the study. We identified six novel missense mutations, c.340 G>A (p.E114K), c.964 G>A (p.D322N), c.964 G>T (p.D322Y), c.1178C>G (p.R393P) and c.1385A>T (p.E462V), c.1432 G>A (p.G478R) and two previously reported mutations. c.1277_1278insTATC and c.508C>T (p.R170W). The mutation p.E462V was found in six unrelated families from Gujarat indicating a founder effect. A previously known splice site mutation c.805+1 G>C and another intronic mutation c.672+30 T>G of unknown significance were also identified. Mutations could not be identified in one family. We conclude that TSD patients from Gujarat should be screened for the common mutation p.E462V.

  17. TET2 mutations in B cells of patients affected by angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Friederike H; Cai, Qian; Fellmann, Eva; Hartmann, Sylvia; Mäyränpää, Mikko I; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Sundström, Christer; Scholtysik, René; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Küppers, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas (AITLs) frequently carry mutations in the TET2 and IDH2 genes. TET2 mutations represent early genetic lesions as they had already been detected in haematopoietic precursor cells of AITL patients. We show by analysis of whole-tissue sections and microdissected PD1 + cells that the frequency of TET2-mutated AITL is presumably even higher than reported (12/13 cases in our collection; 92%). In two-thirds of informative AITLs (6/9), a fraction of B cells was also TET2-mutated. Investigation of four AITLs by TET2 and IGHV gene sequencing of single microdissected B cells showed that between 10% and 60% of polyclonal B cells in AITL lymph nodes harboured the identical TET2 mutations of the respective T-cell lymphoma clone. Thus, TET2-mutated haematopoietic precursor cells in AITL patients not only give rise to the T-cell lymphoma but also generate a large population of mutated mature B cells. Future studies will show whether this is a reason why AITL patients frequently also develop B-cell lymphomas. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Mutation analysis of 272 Spanish families affected by autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa using a genotyping microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Fernández, Almudena; Cantalapiedra, Diego; Aller, Elena; Vallespín, Elena; Aguirre-Lambán, Jana; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Corton, M; Riveiro-Álvarez, Rosa; Allikmets, Rando; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Millán, José M; Cremers, Frans P M; Ayuso, Carmen

    2010-12-03

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive loss of vision. The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutations in 272 Spanish families using a genotyping microarray. 272 unrelated Spanish families, 107 with autosomal recessive RP (arRP) and 165 with sporadic RP (sRP), were studied using the APEX genotyping microarray. The families were also classified by clinical criteria: 86 juveniles and 186 typical RP families. Haplotype and sequence analysis were performed to identify the second mutated allele. At least one-gene variant was found in 14% and 16% of the juvenile and typical RP groups respectively. Further study identified four new mutations, providing both causative changes in 11% of the families. Retinol Dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) was the most frequently mutated gene in the juvenile RP group, and Usher Syndrome 2A (USH2A) and Ceramide Kinase-Like (CERKL) were the most frequently mutated genes in the typical RP group. The only variant found in CERKL was p.Arg257Stop, the most frequent mutation. The genotyping microarray combined with segregation and sequence analysis allowed us to identify the causative mutations in 11% of the families. Due to the low number of characterized families, this approach should be used in tandem with other techniques.

  19. Shoot- and root-borne cytokinin influences arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Marco; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Franken, Philipp; Schmülling, Thomas; Wurst, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is functionally important for the nutrition and growth of most terrestrial plants. Nearly all phytohormones are employed by plants to regulate the symbiosis with AM fungi, but the regulatory role of cytokinin (CK) is not well understood. Here, we used transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with a root-specific or constitutive expression of CK-degrading CKX genes and the corresponding wild-type to investigate whether a lowered content of CK in roots or in both roots and shoots influences the interaction with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. Our data indicates that shoot CK has a positive impact on AM fungal development in roots and on the root transcript level of an AM-responsive phosphate transporter gene (NtPT4). A reduced CK content in roots caused shoot and root growth depression following AM colonization, while neither the uptake of phosphorus or nitrogen nor the root transcript levels of NtPT4 were significantly affected. This suggests that root CK may restrict the C availability from the roots to the fungus thus averting parasitism by AM fungi. Taken together, our study indicates that shoot- and root-borne CK have distinct roles in AM symbiosis. We propose a model illustrating how plants may employ CK to regulate nutrient exchange with the ubiquitous AM fungi.

  20. Identification of a mutation in the CHAT gene of Old Danish Pointing Dogs affected with congenital myasthenic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proschowsky, Helle Friis; Flagstad, Annette; Cirera, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    The presence of a recessive inherited muscle disease in Old Danish Pointing Dogs has been well known for years. Comparisons of this disease with myasthenic diseases of other dog breeds and humans have pointed toward a defect in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine possibly due...... to decreased activity of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase. We sequenced exons 5-18 of the gene encoding choline acetyltransferase (CHAT) in 2 affected and 2 unaffected dogs and identified a G to A missense mutation in exon 6. The mutation causes a valine to methionine substitution and segregates...... in agreement with the inheritance of the disease. The mutation was not detected in 50 dogs representing 25 other dog breeds. A DNA test has been developed and is now available to the breeders of Old Danish Pointing Dogs....

  1. Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicevskis, Rob

    2002-01-01

    Exposing today's students to a balance of science and the outside world is critical. The outdoors provides a context for practical applications of science, exposing the relevance of science to everyday life. Outdoor education instills an awareness that the health of the environment is directly coupled with our own health, enabling us to make…

  2. Sporadic infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in PCDH19 resembles Dravet syndrome but mainly affects females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Depienne

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Dravet syndrome (DS is a genetically determined epileptic encephalopathy mainly caused by de novo mutations in the SCN1A gene. Since 2003, we have performed molecular analyses in a large series of patients with DS, 27% of whom were negative for mutations or rearrangements in SCN1A. In order to identify new genes responsible for the disorder in the SCN1A-negative patients, 41 probands were screened for micro-rearrangements with Illumina high-density SNP microarrays. A hemizygous deletion on chromosome Xq22.1, encompassing the PCDH19 gene, was found in one male patient. To confirm that PCDH19 is responsible for a Dravet-like syndrome, we sequenced its coding region in 73 additional SCN1A-negative patients. Nine different point mutations (four missense and five truncating mutations were identified in 11 unrelated female patients. In addition, we demonstrated that the fibroblasts of our male patient were mosaic for the PCDH19 deletion. Patients with PCDH19 and SCN1A mutations had very similar clinical features including the association of early febrile and afebrile seizures, seizures occurring in clusters, developmental and language delays, behavioural disturbances, and cognitive regression. There were, however, slight but constant differences in the evolution of the patients, including fewer polymorphic seizures (in particular rare myoclonic jerks and atypical absences in those with PCDH19 mutations. These results suggest that PCDH19 plays a major role in epileptic encephalopathies, with a clinical spectrum overlapping that of DS. This disorder mainly affects females. The identification of an affected mosaic male strongly supports the hypothesis that cellular interference is the pathogenic mechanism.

  3. HERC 1 ubiquitin ligase mutation affects neocortical, CA3 hippocampal and spinal cord projection neurons. An ultrastructural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío eRuiz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous mutation tambaleante is caused by the Gly483Glu substitution in the highly conserved N terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein, which leads to the increase of mutated protein levels responsible for cerebellar Purkinje cell death by autophagy. Until now, Purkinje cells have been the only central nervous neurons reported as being targeted by the mutation, and their degeneration elicits an ataxic syndrome in adult mutant mice. However, the ultrastructural analysis performed here demonstrates that signs of autophagy, such as autophagosomes, lysosomes, and altered mitochondria, are present in neocortical pyramidal, CA3 hippocampal pyramidal, and spinal cord motor neurons. The main difference is that the reduction in the number of neurons affected in the tambaleante mutation in the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the spinal cord is not so evident as the dramatic loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Interestingly, signs of autophagy are absent in both interneurons and neuroglia cells. Affected neurons have in common that they are projection neurons which receive strong and varied synaptic inputs, and possess the highest degree of neuronal activity. Therefore, because the integrity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for protein degradation and, hence, for normal protein turnover, it could be hypothesized that the deleterious effects of the misrouting of these pathways would depend directly on the neuronal activity.

  4. Heritable symbiosis: The advantages and perils of an evolutionary rabbit hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gordon M; Moran, Nancy A

    2015-08-18

    Many eukaryotes have obligate associations with microorganisms that are transmitted directly between generations. A model for heritable symbiosis is the association of aphids, a clade of sap-feeding insects, and Buchnera aphidicola, a gammaproteobacterium that colonized an aphid ancestor 150 million years ago and persists in almost all 5,000 aphid species. Symbiont acquisition enables evolutionary and ecological expansion; aphids are one of many insect groups that would not exist without heritable symbiosis. Receiving less attention are potential negative ramifications of symbiotic alliances. In the short run, symbionts impose metabolic costs. Over evolutionary time, hosts evolve dependence beyond the original benefits of the symbiosis. Symbiotic partners enter into an evolutionary spiral that leads to irreversible codependence and associated risks. Host adaptations to symbiosis (e.g., immune-system modification) may impose vulnerabilities. Symbiont genomes also continuously accumulate deleterious mutations, limiting their beneficial contributions and environmental tolerance. Finally, the fitness interests of obligate heritable symbionts are distinct from those of their hosts, leading to selfish tendencies. Thus, genes underlying the host-symbiont interface are predicted to follow a coevolutionary arms race, as observed for genes governing host-pathogen interactions. On the macroevolutionary scale, the rapid evolution of interacting symbiont and host genes is predicted to accelerate host speciation rates by generating genetic incompatibilities. However, degeneration of symbiont genomes may ultimately limit the ecological range of host species, potentially increasing extinction risk. Recent results for the aphid-Buchnera symbiosis and related systems illustrate that, whereas heritable symbiosis can expand ecological range and spur diversification, it also presents potential perils.

  5. Death and population dynamics affect mutation rate estimates and evolvability under stress in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenoy, Antoine; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2018-05-01

    The stress-induced mutagenesis hypothesis postulates that in response to stress, bacteria increase their genome-wide mutation rate, in turn increasing the chances that a descendant is able to better withstand the stress. This has implications for antibiotic treatment: exposure to subinhibitory doses of antibiotics has been reported to increase bacterial mutation rates and thus probably the rate at which resistance mutations appear and lead to treatment failure. More generally, the hypothesis posits that stress increases evolvability (the ability of a population to generate adaptive genetic diversity) and thus accelerates evolution. Measuring mutation rates under stress, however, is problematic, because existing methods assume there is no death. Yet subinhibitory stress levels may induce a substantial death rate. Death events need to be compensated by extra replication to reach a given population size, thus providing more opportunities to acquire mutations. We show that ignoring death leads to a systematic overestimation of mutation rates under stress. We developed a system based on plasmid segregation that allows us to measure death and division rates simultaneously in bacterial populations. Using this system, we found that a substantial death rate occurs at the tested subinhibitory concentrations previously reported to increase mutation rate. Taking this death rate into account lowers and sometimes removes the signal for stress-induced mutagenesis. Moreover, even when antibiotics increase mutation rate, we show that subinhibitory treatments do not increase genetic diversity and evolvability, again because of effects of the antibiotics on population dynamics. We conclude that antibiotic-induced mutagenesis is overestimated because of death and that understanding evolvability under stress requires accounting for the effects of stress on population dynamics as much as on mutation rate. Our goal here is dual: we show that population dynamics and, in particular, the

  6. Search for gene mutations affecting protein structure in children of A-bomb survivors, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Chiyoko; Fujita, Mikio; Goriki, Kazuaki; Asakawa, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Norio; Hamilton, H.B.; Hazama, Ryuji; Neel, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Children who were born between May 1, 1946 and April 1, 1971 to survivor(s) exposed to A-bombing within 2,000 m from the hypocenter in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were selected as exposed group; their sex- and age-matched children born to survivor(s) who were exposed at 2,500 m or farther were selected as control group. When these children were in junior high school, mutation of protein structure was examined by using electrophoresis and by determining red cell enzymes with decreased activity and heat-unstable red cell enzymes. Electrophoretic study revealed a ''rare type of protein mutation'' in 635 of 12,242 individuals in the exposed group and in 448 of 10,154 individuals in the control group. The number of locuses in all proteins examined was calculated. The number of locuses per protein was corrected using the rate of parents' mutation type, and relative number of locuses were obtained. As a result, there was no difference in the mutation frequency per locus and generation between the exposed and control groups. Among children having red cell enzymes with decreased activity, mutant in triose phosphate isomerase was detected in one child in the exposed group, in whom electrophoretic pattern was normal and red cell enzymes were stable to heat. Heat-unstable red cell enzymes were seen in 9 children and their parents. However, family survey revealed genetic mutation in all instances irrespective of A-bombing. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Screening of mutations affecting protein stability and dynamics of FGFR1—A simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. George Priya Doss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Single amino acid substitutions in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1 destabilize protein and have been implicated in several genetic disorders like various forms of cancer, Kallamann syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Jackson Weiss syndrome, etc. In order to gain functional insight into mutation caused by amino acid substitution to protein function and expression, special emphasis was laid on molecular dynamics simulation techniques in combination with in silico tools such as SIFT, PolyPhen 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0 and SNAP. It has been estimated that 68% nsSNPs were predicted to be deleterious by I-Mutant, slightly higher than SIFT (37%, PolyPhen 2.0 (61% and SNAP (58%. From the observed results, P722S mutation was found to be most deleterious by comparing results of all in silico tools. By molecular dynamics approach, we have shown that P722S mutation leads to increase in flexibility, and deviated more from the native structure which was supported by the decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds. In addition, biophysical analysis revealed a clear insight of stability loss due to P722S mutation in FGFR1 protein. Majority of mutations predicted by these in silico tools were in good concordance with the experimental results.

  8. Rich Medium Composition Affects Escherichia coli Survival, Glycation, and Mutation Frequency during Long-Term Batch Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kram, Karin E; Finkel, Steven E

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli are frequently grown to high density to produce biomolecules for study in the laboratory. To achieve this, cells can be incubated in extremely rich media that increase overall cell yield. In these various media, bacteria may have different metabolic profiles, leading to changes in the amounts of toxic metabolites produced. We have previously shown that stresses experienced during short-term growth can affect the survival of cells during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP). Here, we incubated cells in LB, 2× yeast extract-tryptone (YT), Terrific Broth, or Super Broth medium and monitored survival during the LTSP, as well as other reporters of genetic and physiological change. We observe differential cell yield and survival in all media studied. We propose that differences in long-term survival are the result of changes in the metabolism of components of the media that may lead to increased levels of protein and/or DNA damage. We also show that culture pH and levels of protein glycation, a covalent modification that causes protein damage, affect long-term survival. Further, we measured mutation frequency after overnight incubation and observed a correlation between high mutation frequencies at the end of the log phase and loss of viability after 4 days of LTSP incubation, indicating that mutation frequency is potentially predictive of long-term survival. Since glycation and mutation can be caused by oxidative stress, we measured expression of the oxyR oxidative stress regulator during log-phase growth and found that higher levels of oxyR expression during the log phase are consistent with high mutation frequency and lower cell density during the LTSP. Since these complex rich media are often used when producing large quantities of biomolecules in the laboratory, the observed increase in damage resulting in glycation or mutation may lead to production of a heterogeneous population of plasmids or proteins, which could affect the

  9. Characterization of novel Brown midrib 6 mutations affecting lignin biosynthesis in sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of lignin reduces the quality of lignocellulosic biomass for forage materials and feedstock for biofuels. In C4 grasses, the brown midrib phenotype has been linked to mutations to genes in the monolignol biosynthesis pathway. For example, the Bmr6 gene in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) has b...

  10. Rooting, growth, and color mutation of poinsettias affected by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Kim, Won Hee; Kim, Seung Tae; Kang, Si Yong

    2010-01-01

    This experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of gamma-radiation on the rooting, growth, and color mutation in poinsettia. Using 10 poinsettia varieties ('Lollipop', 'Little Peace', 'Happy Day', 'Early Bird', 'Pixy Red', 'Happy Time', 'Heidi', 'Red Bell', 'Clara', and 'Scarlet') bred by National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, 100 Gy of gamma ray was irradiated at the stage of callused cuttings. Four weeks after sticking cuttings in the rooting media, 8 cultivars showed 100% of root formation, but 'Early Bird' rooted 24.4% and even died off during the cutting propagation. After planting rooted cuttings, survival rate until flowering time varied among irradiated cultivars. While 'Pixy Red' and 'Heidi' survived about 98%, 'Clara', 'Happy Day', and 'Early Bird' survived lesser than 30%. All irradiated plants showed remarkably shorter plant height, lesser branch numbers than non-irradiated control plants. Thirty color mutants were obtained among 281 plants survived until flowering time. Nine were complete color mutated branches, whereas 21 mutants were partially color mutated bracts and transitional leaves. Color patterns mutated by 100 Gy of gamma ray were divided into pink, hot pink, light red and spotted (pink spots with red main color). Pink mutants were commonly obtained. Complete color mutants were discovered from 4 plants of 'Pixy Red', 2 plants of 'Red Bell' and 3 plants of Lollipop

  11. Mutations in NRXN1 in a family multiply affected with brain disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duong, Linh; Klitten, Laura L; Møller, Rikke S

    2012-01-01

    to be deleterious to NRXN1. The deletion was passed on from the patient's mother who was clinically characterized by sub-diagnostic autistic traits in addition to type 1 diabetes mellitus. The point mutation was subsequently found in the patient's brother, suffering from a psychotic disorder, which implies...

  12. Vps33b pathogenic mutations preferentially affect VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornieri, Karine; Zlatic, Stephanie A; Mullin, Ariana P; Werner, Erica; Harrison, Robert; L'hernault, Steven W; Faundez, Victor

    2013-12-20

    Mutations in Vps33 isoforms cause pigment dilution in mice (Vps33a, buff) and Drosophila (car) and the neurogenic arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction and cholestasis syndrome in humans (ARC1, VPS33B). The later disease is also caused by mutations in VIPAS39, (Vps33b interacting protein, apical-basolateral polarity regulator, SPE-39 homolog; ARC2), a protein that interacts with the HOmotypic fusion and Protein Sorting (HOPS) complex, a tether necessary for endosome-lysosome traffic. These syndromes offer insight into fundamental endosome traffic processes unique to metazoans. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these mutant phenotypes remain poorly understood. Here we investigate interactions of wild-type and disease-causing mutations in VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b by yeast two hybrid, immunoprecipitation and quantitative fluorescent microscopy. We find that although few mutations prevent interaction between VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b, some mutants fragment VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes, but all mutants alter the subcellular localization of Vps33b to VIPAS39/SPE-39-positive endosomes. Our data suggest that the ARC syndrome may result through impaired VIPAS39/SPE-39 and Vps33b-dependent endosomal maturation or fusion.

  13. Mutation analysis of 272 Spanish families affected by autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa using a genotyping microarray.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avila-Fernandez, A.; Cantalapiedra, D.; Aller, E.; Vallespin, E.; Aguirre-Lamban, J.; Blanco-Kelly, F.; Corton, M.; Riveiro-Alvarez, R.; Allikmets, R.; Trujillo-Tiebas, M.J.; Millan, J.M.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Ayuso, C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive loss of vision. The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutations in 272 Spanish families using a genotyping microarray. METHODS: 272 unrelated Spanish families, 107 with autosomal

  14. Promoting low-carbon city through industrial symbiosis: A case in China by applying HPIMO model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Liang; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Hui; Dai, Ming; Fujii, Minoru; Ohnishi, Satoshi; Geng, Yong; Liu, Zhu

    2013-01-01

    China launched low-carbon city strategy to respond global climate change. Industrial symbiosis (IS) could generate both economic and environmental benefits in clustered industries and communities. This research shed light on how industrial symbiosis contributes to city's low-carbon development. An urban-level hybrid physical input and monetary output (HPIMO) model which covers physical energy inputs and air pollutants emissions, is established for addressing case study in a Chinese typical industrial city (Liuzhou). Based on current energy consumption and industrial symbiosis and the application of HPIMO model, scenarios related to industrial symbiosis, including waste plastics recycling, scrap tires recycling, flying ash recycling and biomass utilization are explored. Results show that compared with business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, IS can reduce solid wastes and further contribute to the co-benefits of energy saving, CO 2 emissions reduction and air pollutants reduction. The finding is critical for national low-carbon strategy. Finally, policy implications to support the ever-improvement of IS promotion in China are proposed and discussed. - Highlights: • Industrial symbiosis could contribute to low-carbon city in terms of co-benefit. • Co-benefit of IS was in terms of waste reduction and air pollutants reduction. • Waste plastics recycling and biomass utilization generated large co-benefit. • Coal fly ash recycling reduced the solid waste while increased air pollutants. • The prices of wastes and facilities investment affected the total cost-benefit

  15. MVP-Associated Filamin A Mutations Affect FlnA-PTPN12 (PTP-PEST) Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Damien; Labbé, Pauline; Bureau, Léa; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Norris, Russell A; Markwald, Roger R; Levine, Robert; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Mérot, Jean

    2015-09-08

    Although the genetic basis of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) has now been clearly established, the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathological processes associated to a specific mutation often remain to be determined. The FLNA gene (encoding Filamin A; FlnA) was the first gene associated to non-syndromic X-linked myxomatous valvular dystrophy, but the impacts of the mutations on its function remain un-elucidated. Here, using the first repeats (1-8) of FlnA as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN12 (PTP-PEST) as a specific binding partner of this region of FlnA protein. In addition, using yeast two-hybrid trap assay pull down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments, we showed that the MVP-associated FlnA mutations (G288R, P637Q, H743P) abolished FlnA/PTPN12 interactions. PTPN12 is a key regulator of signaling pathways involved in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) crosstalk, cellular responses to mechanical stress that involve integrins, focal adhesion transduction pathways, and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Interestingly, we showed that the FlnA mutations impair the activation status of two PTPN12 substrates, the focal adhesion associated kinase Src, and the RhoA specific activating protein p190RhoGAP. Together, these data point to PTPN12/FlnA interaction and its weakening by FlnA mutations as a mechanism potentially involved in the physiopathology of FlnA-associated MVP.

  16. MVP-Associated Filamin A Mutations Affect FlnA-PTPN12 (PTP-PEST Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Duval

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the genetic basis of mitral valve prolapse (MVP has now been clearly established, the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathological processes associated to a specific mutation often remain to be determined. The FLNA gene (encoding Filamin A; FlnA was the first gene associated to non-syndromic X-linked myxomatous valvular dystrophy, but the impacts of the mutations on its function remain un-elucidated. Here, using the first repeats (1–8 of FlnA as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN12 (PTP-PEST as a specific binding partner of this region of FlnA protein. In addition, using yeast two-hybrid trap assay pull down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments, we showed that the MVP-associated FlnA mutations (G288R, P637Q, H743P abolished FlnA/PTPN12 interactions. PTPN12 is a key regulator of signaling pathways involved in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM crosstalk, cellular responses to mechanical stress that involve integrins, focal adhesion transduction pathways, and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Interestingly, we showed that the FlnA mutations impair the activation status of two PTPN12 substrates, the focal adhesion associated kinase Src, and the RhoA specific activating protein p190RhoGAP. Together, these data point to PTPN12/FlnA interaction and its weakening by FlnA mutations as a mechanism potentially involved in the physiopathology of FlnA-associated MVP.

  17. DNMT1 mutations found in HSANIE patients affect interaction with UHRF1 and neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Martha; Link, Stephanie; Wolf, Patricia; Schneider, Katrin; Solis, Veronica; Ryan, Joel; Meilinger, Daniela; Qin, Weihua; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2017-04-15

    DNMT1 is recruited to substrate sites by PCNA and UHRF1 to maintain DNA methylation after replication. The cell cycle dependent recruitment of DNMT1 is mediated by the PCNA-binding domain (PBD) and the targeting sequence (TS) within the N-terminal regulatory domain. The TS domain was found to be mutated in patients suffering from hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies with dementia and hearing loss (HSANIE) and autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) and is associated with global hypomethylation and site specific hypermethylation. With functional complementation assays in mouse embryonic stem cells, we showed that DNMT1 mutations P496Y and Y500C identified in HSANIE patients not only impair DNMT1 heterochromatin association, but also UHRF1 interaction resulting in hypomethylation. Similar DNA methylation defects were observed when DNMT1 interacting domains in UHRF1, the UBL and the SRA domain, were deleted. With cell-based assays, we could show that HSANIE associated mutations perturb DNMT1 heterochromatin association and catalytic complex formation at methylation sites and decrease protein stability in late S and G2 phase. To investigate the neuronal phenotype of HSANIE mutations, we performed DNMT1 rescue assays and could show that cells expressing mutated DNMT1 were prone to apoptosis and failed to differentiate into neuronal lineage. Our results provide insights into the molecular basis of DNMT1 dysfunction in HSANIE patients and emphasize the importance of the TS domain in the regulation of DNA methylation in pluripotent and differentiating cells. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. A mutation in the aroE gene affects pigment production, virulence, and chemotaxis in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Il; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Park, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight (BB) in rice. To study its function, a random insertion mutation library of Xoo was constructed using the Tn5 transposon. A mutant strain with decreased virulence against the susceptible rice cultivar IR24 was isolated from the library (aroE mutant), which also had extremely low pigment production. Thermal asymmetric interlaced-polymerase chain reaction (TAIL-PCR) and sequence analysis of the mutant revealed that the transposon was inserted into the aroE gene (encoding shikimate dehydrogenase). To investigate gene expression changes in the pigment- and virulence-deficient mutant, DNA microarray analysis was performed, which showed downregulation of 20 genes involved in the chemotaxis of Xoo. Our findings reveal that mutation of the aroE gene affects virulence and pigment production, as well as expression of genes involved in Xoo chemotaxis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. cld and lec23 are disparate mutations that affect maturation of lipoprotein lipase in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briquet-Laugier, V; Ben-Zeev, O; White, A; Doolittle, M H

    1999-11-01

    The mutations cld (combined lipase deficiency) and lec23 disrupt in a similar manner the expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Whereas cld affects an unknown gene, lec23 abolishes the activity of alpha-glucosidase I, an enzyme essential for proper folding and assembly of nascent glycoproteins. The hypothesis that cld, like lec23, affects the folding/assembly of nascent LPL was confirmed by showing that in cell lines homozygous for these mutations (Cld and Lec23, respectively), the majority of LPL was inactive, displayed heterogeneous aggregation, and had a decreased affinity for heparin. While inactive LPL was retained in the ER, a small amount of LPL that had attained a native conformation was transported through the Golgi and secreted. Thus, Cld and Lec23 cells recognized and retained the majority of LPL as misfolded, maintaining the standard of quality control. Examination of candidate factors affecting protein maturation, such as glucose addition and trimming, proteins involved in lectin chaperone cycling, and other abundant ER chaperones, revealed that calnexin levels were dramatically reduced in livers from cld/cld mice; this finding was also confirmed in Cld cells. We conclude that cld may affect components in the ER, such as calnexin, that play a role in protein maturation. Whether the reduced calnexin levels per se contribute to the LPL deficiency awaits confirmation.

  20. Compound heterozygous mutations in two different domains of ALDH18A1 do not affect the amino acid levels in a patient with hereditary spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenhof, Maria; Kibæk, Maria; Larsen, Martin J.

    2018-01-01

    with mutations affecting the GR5P domain. We present a 19-year old male patient with autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia and compound heterozygosity for two ALDH18A1 mutations, one in each of the P5CS domains. This young man has spastic paraplegia with onset in childhood and temporal lobe epilepsy, but normal...

  1. Proteomic Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Presymptomatic and Affected Persons Carrying Familial Alzheimer Disease Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringman, John M.; Schulman, Howard; Becker, Chris; Jones, Ted; Bai, Yuchen; Immermann, Fred; Cole, Gregory; Sokolow, Sophie; Gylys, Karen; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Cummings, Jeffrey L.; Wan, Hong I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein changes in persons who will develop familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) due to PSEN1 and APP mutations, using unbiased proteomics. Design We compared proteomic profiles of CSF from individuals with FAD who were mutation carriers (MCs) and related noncarriers (NCs). Abundant proteins were depleted and samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography– electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry on a high-resolution time-of-flight instrument. Tryptic peptides were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Proteins differing in concentration between the MCs and NCs were identified. Setting A tertiary dementia referral center and a proteomic biomarker discovery laboratory. Participants Fourteen FAD MCs (mean age, 34.2 years; 10 are asymptomatic, 12 have presenilin-1 [PSEN1] gene mutations, and 2 have amyloid precursor protein [APP] gene mutations) and 5 related NCs (mean age, 37.6 years). Results Fifty-six proteins were identified, represented by multiple tryptic peptides showing significant differences between MCs and NCs (46 upregulated and 10 downregulated); 40 of these proteins differed when the analysis was restricted to asymptomatic individuals. Fourteen proteins have been reported in prior proteomic studies in late-onset AD, including amyloid precursor protein, transferrin, α1β-glycoprotein, complement components, afamin precursor, spondin 1, plasminogen, hemopexin, and neuronal pentraxin receptor. Many other proteins were unique to our study, including calsyntenin 3, AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) 4 glutamate receptor, CD99 antigen, di-N-acetyl-chitobiase, and secreted phosphoprotein 1. Conclusions We found much overlap in CSF protein changes between individuals with presymptomatic and symptomatic FAD and those with late-onset AD. Our results are consistent with inflammation and synaptic loss early in FAD and suggest new presymptomatic biomarkers of potential usefulness in drug

  2. Rooting, growth, and color mutation of poinsettias affected by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Kim, Won Hee; Kim, Seung Tae [National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, RDA, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Si Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    This experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of gamma-radiation on the rooting, growth, and color mutation in poinsettia. Using 10 poinsettia varieties ('Lollipop', 'Little Peace', 'Happy Day', 'Early Bird', 'Pixy Red', 'Happy Time', 'Heidi', 'Red Bell', 'Clara', and 'Scarlet') bred by National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, 100 Gy of gamma ray was irradiated at the stage of callused cuttings. Four weeks after sticking cuttings in the rooting media, 8 cultivars showed 100% of root formation, but 'Early Bird' rooted 24.4% and even died off during the cutting propagation. After planting rooted cuttings, survival rate until flowering time varied among irradiated cultivars. While 'Pixy Red' and 'Heidi' survived about 98%, 'Clara', 'Happy Day', and 'Early Bird' survived lesser than 30%. All irradiated plants showed remarkably shorter plant height, lesser branch numbers than non-irradiated control plants. Thirty color mutants were obtained among 281 plants survived until flowering time. Nine were complete color mutated branches, whereas 21 mutants were partially color mutated bracts and transitional leaves. Color patterns mutated by 100 Gy of gamma ray were divided into pink, hot pink, light red and spotted (pink spots with red main color). Pink mutants were commonly obtained. Complete color mutants were discovered from 4 plants of 'Pixy Red', 2 plants of 'Red Bell' and 3 plants of Lollipop.

  3. A new Gsdma3 mutation affecting anagen phase of first hair cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shigekazu; Tamura, Masaru; Aoki, Aya; Fujii, Tomoaki; Komiyama, Hiromitsu; Sagai, Tomoko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2007-01-01

    Recombination-induced mutation 3 (Rim3) is a spontaneous mouse mutation that exhibits dominant phenotype of hyperkeratosis and hair loss. Fine linkage analysis of Rim3 and sequencing revealed a novel single point mutation, G1124A leading to Ala348Thr, in Gsdma3 in chromosome 11. Transgenesis with BAC DNA harboring the Rim3-type Gsdma3 recaptured the Rim3 phenotype, providing direct evidence that Gsdma3 is the causative gene of Rim3. We examined the spatial expression of Gsdma3 and characterized the Rim3 phenotype in detail. Gsdma3 is expressed in differentiated epidermal cells in the skin, but not in the proliferating epidermal cells. Histological analysis of Rim3 mutant showed hyperplasia of the epidermal cells in the upper hair follicles and abnormal anagen phase at the first hair cycle. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed hyperproliferation and misdifferentiation of the upper follicular epidermis in Rim3 mutant. These results suggest that Gsdma3 is involved in the proliferation and differentiation of epidermal stem cells

  4. Myotonia congenita-associated mutations in chloride channel-1 affect zebrafish body wave swimming kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Tian, Jing; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Hunziker, Walter; Eng, How-Lung

    2014-01-01

    Myotonia congenita is a human muscle disorder caused by mutations in CLCN1, which encodes human chloride channel 1 (CLCN1). Zebrafish is becoming an increasingly useful model for human diseases, including muscle disorders. In this study, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing, under the control of a muscle specific promoter, human CLCN1 carrying mutations that have been identified in human patients suffering from myotonia congenita. We developed video analytic tools that are able to provide precise quantitative measurements of movement abnormalities in order to analyse the effect of these CLCN1 mutations on adult transgenic zebrafish swimming. Two new parameters for body-wave kinematics of swimming reveal changes in body curvature and tail offset in transgenic zebrafish expressing the disease-associated CLCN1 mutants, presumably due to their effect on muscle function. The capability of the developed video analytic tool to distinguish wild-type from transgenic zebrafish could provide a useful asset to screen for compounds that reverse the disease phenotype, and may be applicable to other movement disorders besides myotonia congenita.

  5. Myotonia congenita-associated mutations in chloride channel-1 affect zebrafish body wave swimming kinematics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cheng

    Full Text Available Myotonia congenita is a human muscle disorder caused by mutations in CLCN1, which encodes human chloride channel 1 (CLCN1. Zebrafish is becoming an increasingly useful model for human diseases, including muscle disorders. In this study, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing, under the control of a muscle specific promoter, human CLCN1 carrying mutations that have been identified in human patients suffering from myotonia congenita. We developed video analytic tools that are able to provide precise quantitative measurements of movement abnormalities in order to analyse the effect of these CLCN1 mutations on adult transgenic zebrafish swimming. Two new parameters for body-wave kinematics of swimming reveal changes in body curvature and tail offset in transgenic zebrafish expressing the disease-associated CLCN1 mutants, presumably due to their effect on muscle function. The capability of the developed video analytic tool to distinguish wild-type from transgenic zebrafish could provide a useful asset to screen for compounds that reverse the disease phenotype, and may be applicable to other movement disorders besides myotonia congenita.

  6. Effects of nano-TiO2 on the agronomically-relevant Rhizobium-legume symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of nano-TiO2 on Rhizobium-legume symbiosis was studied using garden peas and the compatible bacterial partner Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Exposure to nano-TiO2 did not affect the germination of peas grown aseptically, nor did it impact the gross root structure. However, nano-...

  7. Effects of nano-ZnO on the agronomically relevant Rhizobium-legume symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of nano-ZnO (nZnO) on Rhizobium-legume symbiosis was studied with garden pea and its compatible bacterial partner Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Exposure of peas to nZnO had no impact on germination, but significantly affected root length. Chronic exposure of plant to nZnO impac...

  8. Does origin of mycorrhizal fungus on mycorrhizal plant influence effectiveness of the mycorrhizal symbiosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der E.W.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2001-01-01

    Mycorrhizal effectiveness depends on the compatibility between fungus and plant. Therefore, genetic variation in plant and fungal species affect the effectiveness of the symbiosis. The importance of mycorrhizal plant and mycorrhizal fungus origin was investigated in two experiments. In the first

  9. The prevalence of ABCB1:c.227_230delATAG mutation in affected dog breeds from European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdova, Zuzana; Turnova, Evelina; Bielikova, Marcela; Turna, Jan; Dudas, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    Deletion of 4-base pairs in the canine ABCB1 (MDR1) gene, responsible for encoding P-glycoprotein, leads to nonsense frame-shift mutation, which causes hypersensitivity to macrocyclic lactones drugs (e.g. ivermectin). To date, at least 12 purebred dog breeds have been found to be affected by this mutation. The aim of this study was to update information about the prevalence of ABCB1 mutation (c.227_230delATAG) in predisposed breeds in multiple European countries. This large scale survey also includes countries which were not involved in previous studies. The samples were collected in the period from 2012 to 2014. The overview is based on genotyping data of 4729 individuals. The observed mutant allele frequencies were 58.5% (Smooth Collie), 48.3% (Rough Collie), 35% (Australian Shepherd), 30.3% (Shetland Sheepdog), 28.1% (Silken Windhound), 26.1% (Miniature Australian Shepherd), 24.3% (Longhaired Whippet), 16.2% (White Swiss Shepherd) and 0% (Border Collie). The possible presence of an ABCB1 mutant allele in Akita-Inu breed has been investigated with negative results. This information could be helpful for breeders in optimization of their breeding strategy and for veterinarians when prescribing drug therapy for dogs of predisposed breeds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell surface fucosylation does not affect development of colon tumors in mice with germline Smad3 mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Steven E.; Karnak, David M.; Hurd, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    Background/Aims: Neoplasia-related alterations in cell surface α(1,2)fucosylated glycans have been reported in multiple tumors including colon, pancreas, endometrium, cervix, bladder, lung, and choriocarcinoma. Spontaneous colorectal tumors from mice with a germline null mutation of transforming growth factor-β signaling gene Smad3 (Madh3) were tested for α(1,2)fucosylated glycan expression. Methods: Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin-I lectin staining, fucosyltransferase gene northern blot analysis, and a cross of mutant mice with Fut2 and Smad3 germline mutations were performed. Results: Spontaneous colorectal tumors from Smad3 (-/-) homozygous null mice were found to express α(1,2)fucosylated glycans in an abnormal pattern compared to adjacent nonneoplastic colon. Northern blot analysis of α(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes Fut1 and Fut2 revealed that Fut2, but not Fut1, steady-state mRNA levels were significantly increased in tumors relative to adjacent normal colonic mucosa. Mutant mice with a Fut2-inactivating germline mutation were crossed with Smad3 targeted mice. In Smad3 (-/-)/Fut2 (-/-) double knock-out mice, UEA-I lectin staining was eliminated from colon and colon tumors, however, the number and size of tumors present by 24 weeks of age did not vary regardless of the Fut2 genotype. Conclusions: In this model of colorectal cancer, cell surface α(1,2)fucosylation does not affect development of colon tumors. PMID:17264540

  11. Mutations altering the gammaretrovirus endoproteolytic motif affect glycosylation of the envelope glycoprotein and early events of the virus life cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argaw, Takele; Wilson, Carolyn A., E-mail: carolyn.wilson@fda.hhs.gov

    2015-01-15

    Previously, we found that mutation of glutamine to proline in the endoproteolytic cleavage signal of the PERV-C envelope (RQKK to RPKK) resulted in non-infectious vectors. Here, we show that RPKK results in a non-infectious vector when placed in not only a PERV envelope, but also the envelope of a related gammaretrovirus, FeLV-B. The amino acid substitutions do not prevent envelope precursor cleavage, viral core and genome assembly, or receptor binding. Rather, the mutations result in the formation of hyperglycosylated glycoprotein and a reduction in the reverse transcribed minus strand synthesis and undetectable 2-LTR circular DNA in cells exposed to vectors with these mutated envelopes. Our findings suggest novel functions associated with the cleavage signal sequence that may affect trafficking through the glycosylation machinery of the cell. Further, the glycosylation status of the envelope appears to impact post-binding events of the viral life cycle, either membrane fusion, internalization, or reverse transcription. - Highlights: • Env cleavage signal impacts infectivity of gammaretroviruses. • Non-infectious mutants have hyper-glycosylated envelope that bind target cells. • Non-infectious mutants have defects in the formation of the double-stranded DNA. • Env cleavage motif has functions beyond cleavage of the env precursor.

  12. Mutational Biases and GC-Biased Gene Conversion Affect GC Content in the Plastomes of Dendrobium Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitao Niu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The variation of GC content is a key genome feature because it is associated with fundamental elements of genome organization. However, the reason for this variation is still an open question. Different kinds of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the variation of GC content during genome evolution. However, these hypotheses have not been explicitly investigated in whole plastome sequences. Dendrobium is one of the largest genera in the orchid species. Evolutionary studies of the plastomic organization and base composition are limited in this genus. In this study, we obtained the high-quality plastome sequences of D. loddigesii and D. devonianum. The comparison results showed a nearly identical organization in Dendrobium plastomes, indicating that the plastomic organization is highly conserved in Dendrobium genus. Furthermore, the impact of three evolutionary forces—selection, mutational biases, and GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC—on the variation of GC content in Dendrobium plastomes was evaluated. Our results revealed: (1 consistent GC content evolution trends and mutational biases in single-copy (SC and inverted repeats (IRs regions; and (2 that gBGC has influenced the plastome-wide GC content evolution. These results suggest that both mutational biases and gBGC affect GC content in the plastomes of Dendrobium genus.

  13. Mutational Biases and GC-Biased Gene Conversion Affect GC Content in the Plastomes of Dendrobium Genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhitao; Xue, Qingyun; Wang, Hui; Xie, Xuezhu; Zhu, Shuying; Liu, Wei; Ding, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    The variation of GC content is a key genome feature because it is associated with fundamental elements of genome organization. However, the reason for this variation is still an open question. Different kinds of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the variation of GC content during genome evolution. However, these hypotheses have not been explicitly investigated in whole plastome sequences. Dendrobium is one of the largest genera in the orchid species. Evolutionary studies of the plastomic organization and base composition are limited in this genus. In this study, we obtained the high-quality plastome sequences of D. loddigesii and D. devonianum. The comparison results showed a nearly identical organization in Dendrobium plastomes, indicating that the plastomic organization is highly conserved in Dendrobium genus. Furthermore, the impact of three evolutionary forces—selection, mutational biases, and GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC)—on the variation of GC content in Dendrobium plastomes was evaluated. Our results revealed: (1) consistent GC content evolution trends and mutational biases in single-copy (SC) and inverted repeats (IRs) regions; and (2) that gBGC has influenced the plastome-wide GC content evolution. These results suggest that both mutational biases and gBGC affect GC content in the plastomes of Dendrobium genus. PMID:29099062

  14. A novel COL11A1 mutation affecting splicing in a patient with Stickler syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Kobayashi, Haruka; Watanabe, Miki; Okamoto, Nana; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous collagenopathy characterized by ocular, auditory, skeletal and orofacial abnormalities, commonly occurring as an autosomal dominant trait. We conducted target resequencing to analyze candidate genes associated with known clinical phenotypes from a 4-year-old girl with Stickler syndrome. We detected a novel heterozygous intronic mutation (NM_001854.3:c.3168+5G>A) in COL11A1 that may impair splicing, which was suggested by in silico prediction and a minigene assay.

  15. A UV-induced mutation in neurospora that affects translational regulation in response to arginine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitag, M.; Dighde, N.; Sachs, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa arg-2 gene encodes the small subunit of arginine-specific carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. The levels of arg-2 mRNA and mRNA translation are negatively regulated by arginine. An upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the transcript's 5' region has been implicated in arginine-specific control. An arg-2-hph fusion gene encoding hygromycin phosphotransferase conferred arginine-regulated resistance to hygromycin when introduced into N. crassa. We used an arg-2-hph strain to select for UV-induced mutants that grew in the presence of hygromycin and arginine, and we isolated 46 mutants that had either of two phenotypes. One phenotype indicated altered expression of both arg-2-hph and arg-2 genes; the other, altered expression of arg-2-hph but not arg-2. One of the latter mutations, which was genetically closely linked to arg-2-hph, was recovered from the 5' region of the arg-2-hph gene using PCR Sequence analyses and transformation experiments revealed a mutation at uORF codon 12 (Asp to Asn) that abrogated negative regulation. Examination of the distribution of ribosomes on arg-2-hph transcripts showed that loss of regulation had a translational component, indicating the uORF sequence was important for Arg-specific translational control. Comparisons with other uORFs suggest common elements in translational control mechanisms

  16. Heavy metal stress in alders: Tolerance and vulnerability of the actinorhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Roy, Sébastien

    2015-11-01

    Alders have already demonstrated their potential for the revegetation of both mining and industrial sites. These actinorhizal trees and shrubs and the actinobacteria Frankia associate in a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis which could however be negatively affected by the presence of heavy metals, and accumulate them. In our hydroponic assay with black alders, quantification of the roots and shoots metal concentrations showed that, in the absence of stress, symbiosis increases Mo and Ni root content and simultaneously decreases Mo shoot content. Interestingly, the Mo shoot content also decreases in the presence of Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd for symbiotic alders. In symbiotic alders, Pb shoot translocation was promoted in presence of Pb. On the other hand, Cd exclusion in symbiotic root tissues was observed with Pb and Cd. In the presence of symbiosis, only Cd and Pb showed translocation into aerial tissues when present in the nutrient solution. Moreover, the translocation of Ni to shoot was prevented by symbiosis in the presence of Cd, Ni and Pb. The hydroponic experiment demonstrated that alders benefit from the symbiosis, producing more biomass (total, root and shoot) than non nodulated alders in control condition, and in the presence of metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd). Heavy metals did not reduce the nodule numbers (SNN), but the presence of Zn or Cd did reduce nodule allocation. Our study suggests that the Frankia-alder symbiosis is a promising (and a compatible) plant-microorganism association for the revegetation of contaminated sites, with minimal risk of metal dispersion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Supply chain coordination in industrial symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herczeg, Gabor; Akkerman, Renzo; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2013-01-01

    Industrial symbiosis (IS) is a form of supply chain cooperation in industrial networks in order to achieve collective benefits by leveraging each other’s by-products and sharing services and utilities. This paper investigates the concept of IS from the perspective of supply chain coordination (SC...

  18. Unethical and Deadly Symbiosis in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumbley, D. Larry; Flinn, Ronald; Reichelt, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    As administrators are pressured to increase retention rates in accounting departments, and higher education in general, a deadly symbiosis is occurring. Most students and parents only wish for high grades, so year after year many educators engage in unethical grade inflation and course work deflation. Since administrators use the students to audit…

  19. Supply chain collaboration in industrial symbiosis networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herczeg, Gábor; Akkerman, Renzo; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2018-01-01

    A strategy supporting the development towards a circular economy is industrial symbiosis (IS). It is a form of collaborative supply chain management aiming to make industry more sustainable and achieve collective benefits based on utilization of waste, by-products, and excess utilities between

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis induces strigolactone biosynthesis under drought and improves drought tolerance in lettuce and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Aroca, Ricardo; Zamarreño, Ángel María; Molina, Sonia; Andreo-Jiménez, Beatriz; Porcel, Rosa; García-Mina, José María; Ruyter-Spira, Carolien; López-Ráez, Juan Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis alleviates drought stress in plants. However, the intimate mechanisms involved, as well as its effect on the production of signalling molecules associated with the host plant-AM fungus interaction remains largely unknown. In the present work, the effects of drought on lettuce and tomato plant performance and hormone levels were investigated in non-AM and AM plants. Three different water regimes were applied, and their effects were analysed over time. AM plants showed an improved growth rate and efficiency of photosystem II than non-AM plants under drought from very early stages of plant colonization. The levels of the phytohormone abscisic acid, as well as the expression of the corresponding marker genes, were influenced by drought stress in non-AM and AM plants. The levels of strigolactones and the expression of corresponding marker genes were affected by both AM symbiosis and drought. The results suggest that AM symbiosis alleviates drought stress by altering the hormonal profiles and affecting plant physiology in the host plant. In addition, a correlation between AM root colonization, strigolactone levels and drought severity is shown, suggesting that under these unfavourable conditions, plants might increase strigolactone production in order to promote symbiosis establishment to cope with the stress. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Community analysis of microbial sharing and specialization in a Costa Rican ant-plant-hemipteran symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Elizabeth G; Moreau, Corrie S

    2017-03-15

    Ants have long been renowned for their intimate mutualisms with trophobionts and plants and more recently appreciated for their widespread and diverse interactions with microbes. An open question in symbiosis research is the extent to which environmental influence, including the exchange of microbes between interacting macroorganisms, affects the composition and function of symbiotic microbial communities. Here we approached this question by investigating symbiosis within symbiosis. Ant-plant-hemipteran symbioses are hallmarks of tropical ecosystems that produce persistent close contact among the macroorganism partners, which then have substantial opportunity to exchange symbiotic microbes. We used metabarcoding and quantitative PCR to examine community structure of both bacteria and fungi in a Neotropical ant-plant-scale-insect symbiosis. Both phloem-feeding scale insects and honeydew-feeding ants make use of microbial symbionts to subsist on phloem-derived diets of suboptimal nutritional quality. Among the insects examined here, Cephalotes ants and pseudococcid scale insects had the most specialized bacterial symbionts, whereas Azteca ants appeared to consume or associate with more fungi than bacteria, and coccid scale insects were associated with unusually diverse bacterial communities. Despite these differences, we also identified apparent sharing of microbes among the macro-partners. How microbial exchanges affect the consumer-resource interactions that shape the evolution of ant-plant-hemipteran symbioses is an exciting question that awaits further research. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. The Impact of Nitrogen Limitation and Mycorrhizal Symbiosis on Aspen Tree Growth and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Bich Thi Ngoc [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2014-08-18

    Nitrogen deficiency is the most common and widespread nutritional deficiency affecting plants worldwide. Ectromycorrhizal symbiosis involves the beneficial interaction of plants with soil fungi and plays a critical role in nutrient cycling, including the uptake of nitrogen from the environment. The main goal of this study is to understand how limiting nitrogen in the presence or absence of an ectomycorrhizal fungi, Laccaria bicolor, affects the health of aspen trees, Populus temuloides.

  3. Mutations in the C-terminal region affect subcellular localization of crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) GPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Gui, Lang; Chen, Zong-Yan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2016-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known as seven transmembrane domain receptors and consequently can mediate diverse biological functions via regulation of their subcellular localization. Crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) was recently isolated from infected fish with acute gill hemorrhage. CaHV GPCR of 349 amino acids (aa) was identified based on amino acid identity. A series of variants with truncation/deletion/substitution mutation in the C-terminal (aa 315-349) were constructed and expressed in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. The roles of three key C-terminal regions in subcellular localization of CaHV GPCR were determined. Lysine-315 (K-315) directed the aggregation of the protein preferentially at the nuclear side. Predicted N-myristoylation site (GGGWTR, aa 335-340) was responsible for punctate distribution in periplasm or throughout the cytoplasm. Predicted phosphorylation site (SSR, aa 327-329) and GGGWTR together determined the punctate distribution in cytoplasm. Detection of organelles localization by specific markers showed that the protein retaining K-315 colocalized with the Golgi apparatus. These experiments provided first evidence that different mutations of CaHV GPCR C-terminals have different affects on the subcellular localization of fish herpesvirus-encoded GPCRs. The study provided valuable information and new insights into the precise interactions between herpesvirus and fish cells, and could also provide useful targets for antiviral agents in aquaculture.

  4. Identification of two novel mutations in the SLC45A2 gene in a Hungarian pedigree affected by unusual OCA type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Lola; Fábos, Beáta; Farkas, Katalin; Sulák, Adrienn; Tripolszki, Kornélia; Széll, Márta; Nagy, Nikoletta

    2017-03-15

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a clinically and genetically heterogenic group of pigmentation abnormalities. OCA type IV (OCA4, OMIM 606574) develops due to homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the solute carrier family 45, member 2 (SLC45A2) gene. This gene encodes a membrane-associated transport protein, which regulates tyrosinase activity and, thus, melanin content by changing melanosomal pH and disrupting the incorporation of copper into tyrosinase. Here we report two Hungarian siblings affected by an unusual OCA4 phenotype. After genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of the patients, the coding regions of the SLC45A2 gene were sequenced. In silico tools were applied to identify the functional impact of the newly detected mutations. Direct sequencing of the SLC45A2 gene revealed two novel, heterozygous mutations, one missense (c.1226G > A, p.Gly409Asp) and one nonsense (c.1459C > T, p.Gln437*), which were present in both patients, suggesting the mutations were compound heterozygous. In silico tools suggest that these variations are disease causing mutations. The newly identified mutations may affect the transmembrane domains of the protein, and could impair transport function, resulting in decreases in both melanosomal pH and tyrosinase activity. Our study provides expands on the mutation spectrum of the SLC45A2 gene and the genetic background of OCA4.

  5. Cell culture-adaptive mutations of NS5A affect replication of hepatitis C virus differentially depending on the viral genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Aeri; Jin, Bora; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Kim, Seungtaek

    2017-01-01

    Most of HCV RNAs require cell culture-adaptive mutations for efficient replication in cell culture and a number of such mutations have been described including a well-known S2204I substitution mutation in NS5A protein. In contrast, the replication of genotype 2a JFH1 RNA in cell culture does not require any cell culture-adaptive mutation. Rather, the presence of S2204I mutation impaired the JFH1 RNA replication. In this study, we examined the effect of reversions and substitutions of NS5A cell culture-adaptive mutations on virus replication in different genotypic backgrounds after either placing genotype 1a NS5A in the genotype 2a JFH1 or vice versa. The results from this investigation suggest that the S2204I mutation affects HCV RNA replication differentially depending on the viral genotypes but that the effect was not simply explained by the genotypic background. Perhaps, the effect of the S2204I mutation on HCV replication reflects both intra- and intergenic interactions of NS5A protein. J. Med. Virol. 89:146-152, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Molecular analysis of HEXA gene in Argentinean patients affected with Tay-Sachs disease: possible common origin of the prevalent c.459+5A>G mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Stefania; Montalvo, Annalisa; Blanco, Mariana; Zanin, Irene; Amartino, Hernan; Vlahovicek, Kristian; Szlago, Marina; Schenone, Andrea; Pittis, Gabriela; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2012-05-15

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited disorder caused by the deficient activity of hexosaminidase A due to mutations in the HEXA gene. Up to date there is no information regarding the molecular genetics of TSD in Argentinean patients. In the present study we have studied 17 Argentinean families affected by TSD, including 20 patients with the acute infantile form and 3 with the sub-acute form. Overall, we identified 14 different mutations accounting for 100% of the studied alleles. Eight mutations were novel: 5 were single base changes leading to drastic residue changes or truncated proteins, 2 were small deletions and one was an intronic mutation that may cause a splicing defect. Although the spectrum of mutations was highly heterogeneous, a high frequency of the c.459+5G>A mutation, previously described in different populations was found among the studied cohort. Haplotype analysis suggested that in these families the c.459+5G>A mutation might have arisen by a single mutational event. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of pseudo-microgravity on the symbiosis of plants and microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Maki, Asano; Aoki, Toshio; Tamura, Kenji; Wada, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamashita, Masamichi

    The symbiosis of plants and microorganisms is important to conduct agriculture under space environment. However, we have less knowledge on whether this kind of symbiosis can be established under space condition. We examined the functional compounds responsible to symbiosis between rhizobiaum and Lotus japonicus as a model of symbiotic combination. The existence of the substances for their symbiosis, some flavonoids, have already been known from the study of gene expression, but the detail structures have not yet been elucidated. Pseudomicrogravity was generated by the 3D-clinorotation. Twenty flavonoids were found in the extracts of 16 days plants of Lotus japonicus grown under the normal gravity by HPLC. Content of two flavonoids among them was affected by the infection of Mesorhizobium loti to them. It has a possibility that the two flavonoids were key substances for their combination process. The productions of those flavonoids were confirmed also under the pseudo-microgravity. The amount of one flavonoid was increased by both infection of rhizobium and exposure to the normal and pseudo-micro gravity. Chemical species of these flavonoids were identified by LC- ESI/MS and spectroscopic analysis. To show the effects of pseudo-microgravity on the gene expression, enzymic activities related to the functional compounds are evaluated after the rhizobial infection.

  8. Insights on the Impact of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis on Tomato Tolerance to Water Stress1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Ilenia

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, which form symbioses with the roots of the most important crop species, are usually considered biofertilizers, whose exploitation could represent a promising avenue for the development in the future of a more sustainable next-generation agriculture. The best understood function in symbiosis is an improvement in plant mineral nutrient acquisition, as exchange for carbon compounds derived from the photosynthetic process: this can enhance host growth and tolerance to environmental stresses, such as water stress (WS). However, physiological and molecular mechanisms occurring in arbuscular mycorrhiza-colonized plants and directly involved in the mitigation of WS effects need to be further investigated. The main goal of this work is to verify the potential impact of AM symbiosis on the plant response to WS. To this aim, the effect of two AM fungi (Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) under the WS condition was studied. A combined approach, involving ecophysiological, morphometric, biochemical, and molecular analyses, has been used to highlight the mechanisms involved in plant response to WS during AM symbiosis. Gene expression analyses focused on a set of target genes putatively involved in the plant response to drought, and in parallel, we considered the expression changes induced by the imposed stress on a group of fungal genes playing a key role in the water-transport process. Taken together, the results show that AM symbiosis positively affects the tolerance to WS in tomato, with a different plant response depending on the AM fungi species involved. PMID:27208301

  9. [Effect of five fungicides on growth of Glycyrrhiza uralensis and efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-ying; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Xiu-teng; Zhou, Liane-yun; Shao, Ai-juan; Chen, Mei-lan

    2015-12-01

    In order to obtain the fungicides with minimal impact on efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis, the effect of five fungicides including polyoxins, jinggangmycins, thiophanate methylate, chlorothalonil and carbendazim on the growth of medicinal plant and efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis were studied. Pot cultured Glycyrrhiza uralensis was treated with different fungicides with the concentration that commonly used in the field. 60 d after treated with fungicides, infection rate, infection density, biomass indexes, photosyn- thetic index and the content of active component were measured. Experimental results showed that carbendazim had the strongest inhibition on mycorrhizal symbiosis effect. Carbendazim significantly inhibited the mycorrhizal infection rate, significantly suppressed the actual photosynthetic efficiency of G. uralensis and the most indicators of biomass. Polyoxins showed the lowest inhibiting affection. Polyoxins had no significant effect on mycorrhizal infection rate, the actual photosynthetic efficiency of G. uralensis and the most indicators of biomass. The other three fungicides also had an inhibitory effect on efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis, and the inhibition degrees were all between polyoxins's and carbendazim's. The author considered that fungicide's inhibition degree on mycorrhizal effect might be related with the species of fungicides, so the author suggested that the farmer should try to choose bio-fungicides like polyoxins.

  10. Interleukin-6 Deficiency Does Not Affect Motor Neuron Disease Caused by Superoxide Dismutase 1 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongmei; Ripley, Barry; Serada, Satoshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Fujimoto, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset, progressive, motor neuron degenerative disease. Recent evidence indicates that inflammation is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases including ALS. Previously, abnormal levels of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were described in ALS patients and/or in mouse ALS models. In addition, one study showed that blocking IL-1β could slow down progression of ALS-like symptoms in mice. In this study, we examined a role for IL-6 in ALS, using an animal model for familial ALS. Mice with mutant SOD1 (G93A) transgene, a model for familial ALS, were used in this study. The expression of the major inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α, in spinal cords of these SOD1 transgenic (TG) mice were assessed by real time PCR. Mice were then crossed with IL-6(-/-) mice to generate SOD1TG/IL-6(-/-) mice. SOD1 TG/IL-6(-/-) mice (n = 17) were compared with SOD1 TG/IL-6(+/-) mice (n = 18), SOD1 TG/IL-6(+/+) mice (n = 11), WT mice (n = 15), IL-6(+/-) mice (n = 5) and IL-6(-/-) mice (n = 8), with respect to neurological disease severity score, body weight and the survival. We also histologically compared the motor neuron loss in lumber spinal cords and the atrophy of hamstring muscles between these mouse groups. Levels of IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α in spinal cords of SOD1 TG mice was increased compared to WT mice. However, SOD1 TG/IL-6(-/-) mice exhibited weight loss, deterioration in motor function and shortened lifespan (167.55 ± 11.52 days), similarly to SOD1 TG /IL-6(+/+) mice (164.31±12.16 days). Motor neuron numbers and IL-1β and TNF-α levels in spinal cords were not significantly different in SOD1 TG /IL-6(-/-) mice and SOD1 TG /IL-6 (+/+) mice. These results provide compelling preclinical evidence indicating that IL-6 does not directly contribute to motor neuron disease caused by SOD1 mutations.

  11. Interleukin-6 Deficiency Does Not Affect Motor Neuron Disease Caused by Superoxide Dismutase 1 Mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmei Han

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is an adult-onset, progressive, motor neuron degenerative disease. Recent evidence indicates that inflammation is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases including ALS. Previously, abnormal levels of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were described in ALS patients and/or in mouse ALS models. In addition, one study showed that blocking IL-1β could slow down progression of ALS-like symptoms in mice. In this study, we examined a role for IL-6 in ALS, using an animal model for familial ALS.Mice with mutant SOD1 (G93A transgene, a model for familial ALS, were used in this study. The expression of the major inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α, in spinal cords of these SOD1 transgenic (TG mice were assessed by real time PCR. Mice were then crossed with IL-6(-/- mice to generate SOD1TG/IL-6(-/- mice. SOD1 TG/IL-6(-/- mice (n = 17 were compared with SOD1 TG/IL-6(+/- mice (n = 18, SOD1 TG/IL-6(+/+ mice (n = 11, WT mice (n = 15, IL-6(+/- mice (n = 5 and IL-6(-/- mice (n = 8, with respect to neurological disease severity score, body weight and the survival. We also histologically compared the motor neuron loss in lumber spinal cords and the atrophy of hamstring muscles between these mouse groups.Levels of IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α in spinal cords of SOD1 TG mice was increased compared to WT mice. However, SOD1 TG/IL-6(-/- mice exhibited weight loss, deterioration in motor function and shortened lifespan (167.55 ± 11.52 days, similarly to SOD1 TG /IL-6(+/+ mice (164.31±12.16 days. Motor neuron numbers and IL-1β and TNF-α levels in spinal cords were not significantly different in SOD1 TG /IL-6(-/- mice and SOD1 TG /IL-6 (+/+ mice.These results provide compelling preclinical evidence indicating that IL-6 does not directly contribute to motor neuron disease caused by SOD1 mutations.

  12. Aphid thermal tolerance is governed by a point mutation in bacterial symbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen E Dunbar

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Symbiosis is a ubiquitous phenomenon generating biological complexity, affecting adaptation, and expanding ecological capabilities. However, symbionts, which can be subject to genetic limitations such as clonality and genomic degradation, also impose constraints on hosts. A model of obligate symbiosis is that between aphids and the bacterium Buchnera aphidicola, which supplies essential nutrients. We report a mutation in Buchnera of the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum that recurs in laboratory lines and occurs in field populations. This single nucleotide deletion affects a homopolymeric run within the heat-shock transcriptional promoter for ibpA, encoding a small heat-shock protein. This Buchnera mutation virtually eliminates the transcriptional response of ibpA to heat stress and lowers its expression even at cool or moderate temperatures. Furthermore, this symbiont mutation dramatically affects host fitness in a manner dependent on thermal environment. Following a short heat exposure as juveniles, aphids bearing short-allele symbionts produced few or no progeny and contained almost no Buchnera, in contrast to aphids bearing symbionts without the deletion. Conversely, under constant cool conditions, aphids containing symbionts with the short allele reproduced earlier and maintained higher reproductive rates. The short allele has appreciable frequencies in field populations (up to 20%, further supporting the view that lowering of ibpA expression improves host fitness under some conditions. This recurring Buchnera mutation governs thermal tolerance of aphid hosts. Other cases in which symbiont microevolution has a major effect on host ecological tolerance are likely to be widespread because of the high mutation rates of symbiotic bacteria and their crucial roles in host metabolism and development.

  13. Supply Chain Management in Industrial Symbiosis Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herczeg, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    , as well as in policy documents from e.g. the European Union, the concepts of circular econ- omy and closed-loop supply chains have received significant attention. One of the manifestations of these developments are industrial symbiosis networks. These networks are a collaborative effort to more...... sustainable production op- erations, and are characterized by a supply chain reconfiguration that uses one company’s wastes or by-products as a raw material for another company, avoiding waste disposal while also reducing material requirements. The re- sulting networks of relationships contribute to regional...... sustainable develop- ment efforts, and emphasize synergistic relations, community, and collabora- tion. This thesis takes an operations and supply chain management perspec- tive on industrial symbiosis networks. More specifically, the thesis elaborates on the collaborative and competitive characteristics...

  14. Supply chain collaboration in industrial symbiosis networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herczeg, Gabor; Akkerman, Renzo; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2018-01-01

    A strategy supporting the development towards a circular economy is industrial symbiosis (IS). It is a form of collaborative supply chain management aiming to make industry more sustainable and achieve collective benefits based on utilization of waste, by-products, and excess utilities between...... economically independent industries. Based on an extensive analysis of published studies on existing IS collaborations and interviews with central stakeholders of a comprehensive IS, this paper investigates IS from a supply chain collaboration perspective. A theoretical framework is built and used to discuss...... how industrial symbiosis pursues sustainability and to identify the main collaboration aspects and performance impacts. This framework is then used in the analysis of selected published cases. Based on this, we derive propositions on the organizational and operational requirements for collaboration...

  15. Alpha-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MYH6) mutations affecting myofibril formation are associated with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Riveron, Javier T; Ghosh, Tushar K; Pope, Mark; Bu'Lock, Frances; Thornborough, Christopher; Eason, Jacqueline; Kirk, Edwin P; Fatkin, Diane; Feneley, Michael P; Harvey, Richard P; Armour, John A L; David Brook, J

    2010-10-15

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are collectively the most common form of congenital malformation. Studies of human cases and animal models have revealed that mutations in several genes are responsible for both familial and sporadic forms of CHD. We have previously shown that a mutation in MYH6 can cause an autosomal dominant form of atrial septal defect (ASD), whereas others have identified mutations of the same gene in patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy. In the present study, we report a mutation analysis of MYH6 in patients with a wide spectrum of sporadic CHD. The mutation analysis of MYH6 was performed in DNA samples from 470 cases of isolated CHD using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and sequence analysis to detect point mutations and small deletions or insertions, and multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization to detect partial or complete copy number variations. One non-sense mutation, one splicing site mutation and seven non-synonymous coding mutations were identified. Transfection of plasmids encoding mutant and non-mutant green fluorescent protein-MYH6 fusion proteins in mouse myoblasts revealed that the mutations A230P and A1366D significantly disrupt myofibril formation, whereas the H252Q mutation significantly enhances myofibril assembly in comparison with the non-mutant protein. Our data indicate that functional variants of MYH6 are associated with cardiac malformations in addition to ASD and provide a novel potential mechanism. Such phenotypic heterogeneity has been observed in other genes mutated in CHD.

  16. Speciation by Symbiosis: the Microbiome and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shropshire, J Dylan; Bordenstein, Seth R

    2016-03-31

    Species are fundamental units of comparison in biology. The newly discovered importance and ubiquity of host-associated microorganisms are now stimulating work on the roles that microbes can play in animal speciation. We previously synthesized the literature and advanced concepts of speciation by symbiosis with notable attention to hybrid sterility and lethality. Here, we review recent studies and relevant data on microbes as players in host behavior and behavioral isolation, emphasizing the patterns seen in these analyses and highlighting areas worthy of additional exploration. We conclude that the role of microbial symbionts in behavior and speciation is gaining exciting traction and that the holobiont and hologenome concepts afford an evolving intellectual framework to promote research and intellectual exchange between disciplines such as behavior, microbiology, genetics, symbiosis, and speciation. Given the increasing centrality of microbiology in macroscopic life, microbial symbiosis is arguably the most neglected aspect of animal and plant speciation, and studying it should yield a better understanding of the origin of species. Copyright © 2016 Shropshire and Bordenstein.

  17. Secondary metabolism in the lichen symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcott, Mark J; Ackerley, David F; Knight, Allison; Keyzers, Robert A; Owen, Jeremy G

    2018-03-05

    Lichens, which are defined by a core symbiosis between a mycobiont (fungal partner) and a photobiont (photoautotrophic partner), are in fact complex assemblages of microorganisms that constitute a largely untapped source of bioactive secondary metabolites. Historically, compounds isolated from lichens have predominantly been those produced by the dominant fungal partner, and these continue to be of great interest for their unique chemistry and biotechnological potential. In recent years it has become apparent that many photobionts and lichen-associated bacteria also produce a range of potentially valuable molecules. There is evidence to suggest that the unique nature of the symbiosis has played a substantial role in shaping many aspects of lichen chemistry, for example driving bacteria to produce metabolites that do not bring them direct benefit but are useful to the lichen as a whole. This is most evident in studies of cyanobacterial photobionts, which produce compounds that differ from free living cyanobacteria and are unique to symbiotic organisms. The roles that these and other lichen-derived molecules may play in communication and maintaining the symbiosis are poorly understood at present. Nonetheless, advances in genomics, mass spectrometry and other analytical technologies are continuing to illuminate the wealth of biological and chemical diversity present within the lichen holobiome. Implementation of novel biodiscovery strategies such as metagenomic screening, coupled with synthetic biology approaches to reconstitute, re-engineer and heterologously express lichen-derived biosynthetic gene clusters in a cultivable host, offer a promising means for tapping into this hitherto inaccessible wealth of natural products.

  18. Whole-Genome Sequencing and iPLEX MassARRAY Genotyping Map an EMS-Induced Mutation Affecting Cell Competition in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Rimesso, Gerard; Reynolds, David M; Cai, Jinlu; Baker, Nicholas E

    2016-10-13

    Cell competition, the conditional loss of viable genotypes only when surrounded by other cells, is a phenomenon observed in certain genetic mosaic conditions. We conducted a chemical mutagenesis and screen to recover new mutations that affect cell competition between wild-type and RpS3 heterozygous cells. Mutations were identified by whole-genome sequencing, making use of software tools that greatly facilitate the distinction between newly induced mutations and other sources of apparent sequence polymorphism, thereby reducing false-positive and false-negative identification rates. In addition, we utilized iPLEX MassARRAY for genotyping recombinant chromosomes. These approaches permitted the mapping of a new mutation affecting cell competition when only a single allele existed, with a phenotype assessed only in genetic mosaics, without the benefit of complementation with existing mutations, deletions, or duplications. These techniques expand the utility of chemical mutagenesis and whole-genome sequencing for mutant identification. We discuss mutations in the Atm and Xrp1 genes identified in this screen. Copyright © 2016 Lee et al.

  19. Whole-Genome Sequencing and iPLEX MassARRAY Genotyping Map an EMS-Induced Mutation Affecting Cell Competition in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hyun Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell competition, the conditional loss of viable genotypes only when surrounded by other cells, is a phenomenon observed in certain genetic mosaic conditions. We conducted a chemical mutagenesis and screen to recover new mutations that affect cell competition between wild-type and RpS3 heterozygous cells. Mutations were identified by whole-genome sequencing, making use of software tools that greatly facilitate the distinction between newly induced mutations and other sources of apparent sequence polymorphism, thereby reducing false-positive and false-negative identification rates. In addition, we utilized iPLEX MassARRAY for genotyping recombinant chromosomes. These approaches permitted the mapping of a new mutation affecting cell competition when only a single allele existed, with a phenotype assessed only in genetic mosaics, without the benefit of complementation with existing mutations, deletions, or duplications. These techniques expand the utility of chemical mutagenesis and whole-genome sequencing for mutant identification. We discuss mutations in the Atm and Xrp1 genes identified in this screen.

  20. Joint analysis of quantitative trait loci and major-effect causative mutations affecting meat quality and carcass composition traits in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherel, Pierre; Pires, José; Glénisson, Jérôme; Milan, Denis; Iannuccelli, Nathalie; Hérault, Frédéric; Damon, Marie; Le Roy, Pascale

    2011-08-29

    Detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting meat quality traits in pigs is crucial for the design of efficient marker-assisted selection programs and to initiate efforts toward the identification of underlying polymorphisms. The RYR1 and PRKAG3 causative mutations, originally identified from major effects on meat characteristics, can be used both as controls for an overall QTL detection strategy for diversely affected traits and as a scale for detected QTL effects. We report on a microsatellite-based QTL detection scan including all autosomes for pig meat quality and carcass composition traits in an F2 population of 1,000 females and barrows resulting from an intercross between a Pietrain and a Large White-Hampshire-Duroc synthetic sire line. Our QTL detection design allowed side-by-side comparison of the RYR1 and PRKAG3 mutation effects seen as QTLs when segregating at low frequencies (0.03-0.08), with independent QTL effects detected from most of the same population, excluding any carrier of these mutations. Large QTL effects were detected in the absence of the RYR1 and PRKGA3 mutations, accounting for 12.7% of phenotypic variation in loin colour redness CIE-a* on SSC6 and 15% of phenotypic variation in glycolytic potential on SSC1. We detected 8 significant QTLs with effects on meat quality traits and 20 significant QTLs for carcass composition and growth traits under these conditions. In control analyses including mutation carriers, RYR1 and PRKAG3 mutations were detected as QTLs, from highly significant to suggestive, and explained 53% to 5% of the phenotypic variance according to the trait. Our results suggest that part of muscle development and backfat thickness effects commonly attributed to the RYR1 mutation may be a consequence of linkage with independent QTLs affecting those traits. The proportion of variation explained by the most significant QTLs detected in this work is close to the influence of major-effect mutations on the least affected

  1. Joint analysis of quantitative trait loci and major-effect causative mutations affecting meat quality and carcass composition traits in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iannuccelli Nathalie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs affecting meat quality traits in pigs is crucial for the design of efficient marker-assisted selection programs and to initiate efforts toward the identification of underlying polymorphisms. The RYR1 and PRKAG3 causative mutations, originally identified from major effects on meat characteristics, can be used both as controls for an overall QTL detection strategy for diversely affected traits and as a scale for detected QTL effects. We report on a microsatellite-based QTL detection scan including all autosomes for pig meat quality and carcass composition traits in an F2 population of 1,000 females and barrows resulting from an intercross between a Pietrain and a Large White-Hampshire-Duroc synthetic sire line. Our QTL detection design allowed side-by-side comparison of the RYR1 and PRKAG3 mutation effects seen as QTLs when segregating at low frequencies (0.03-0.08, with independent QTL effects detected from most of the same population, excluding any carrier of these mutations. Results Large QTL effects were detected in the absence of the RYR1 and PRKGA3 mutations, accounting for 12.7% of phenotypic variation in loin colour redness CIE-a* on SSC6 and 15% of phenotypic variation in glycolytic potential on SSC1. We detected 8 significant QTLs with effects on meat quality traits and 20 significant QTLs for carcass composition and growth traits under these conditions. In control analyses including mutation carriers, RYR1 and PRKAG3 mutations were detected as QTLs, from highly significant to suggestive, and explained 53% to 5% of the phenotypic variance according to the trait. Conclusions Our results suggest that part of muscle development and backfat thickness effects commonly attributed to the RYR1 mutation may be a consequence of linkage with independent QTLs affecting those traits. The proportion of variation explained by the most significant QTLs detected in this work is close to the

  2. Point mutation in FGF receptor eliminates phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis without affecting mitogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, M; Dionne, C A; Li, W; Li, N; Spivak, T; Honegger, A M; Jaye, M; Schlessinger, J

    1992-08-20

    Stimulation of growth factor receptors with tyrosine kinase activity is followed by rapid receptor dimerization, tyrosine autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of signalling molecules such as phospholipase C gamma (PLC gamma) and the ras GTPase-activating protein. PLC gamma and GTPase-activating protein bind to specific tyrosine-phosphorylated regions in growth factor receptors through their src-homologous SH2 domains. Growth factor-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma is essential for stimulation of phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that a short phosphorylated peptide containing tyrosine at position 766 from a conserved region of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor is a binding site for the SH2 domain of PLC gamma (ref. 8). Here we show that an FGF receptor point mutant in which Tyr 766 is replaced by a phenylalanine residue (Y766F) is unable to associate with and tyrosine-phosphorylate PLC gamma or to stimulate hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol. Nevertheless, the Y766F FGF receptor mutant can be autophosphorylated, and can phosphorylate several cellular proteins and stimulate DNA synthesis. Our data show that phosphorylation of the conserved Tyr 766 of the FGF receptor is essential for phosphorylation of PLC gamma and for hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol, but that elimination of this hydrolysis does not affect FGF-induced mitogenesis.

  3. Hemoglobin LjGlb1-1 is involved in nodulation and regulates the level of nitric oxide in the Lotus japonicus-Mesorhizobium loti symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukudome, Mitsutaka; Calvo-Begueria, Laura; Kado, Tomohiro; Osuki, Ken-Ichi; Rubio, Maria Carmen; Murakami, Ei-Ichi; Nagata, Maki; Kucho, Ken-Ichi; Sandal, Niels; Stougaard, Jens; Becana, Manuel; Uchiumi, Toshiki

    2016-09-01

    Leghemoglobins transport and deliver O2 to the symbiosomes inside legume nodules and are essential for nitrogen fixation. However, the roles of other hemoglobins (Hbs) in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis are unclear. Several Lotus japonicus mutants affecting LjGlb1-1, a non-symbiotic class 1 Hb, have been used to study the function of this protein in symbiosis. Two TILLING alleles with single amino acid substitutions (A102V and E127K) and a LORE1 null allele with a retrotransposon insertion in the 5'-untranslated region (96642) were selected for phenotyping nodulation. Plants of all three mutant lines showed a decrease in long infection threads and nodules, and an increase in incipient infection threads. About 4h after inoculation, the roots of mutant plants exhibited a greater transient accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) than did the wild-type roots; nevertheless, in vitro NO dioxygenase activities of the wild-type, A102V, and E127K proteins were similar, suggesting that the mutated proteins are not fully functional in vivo The expression of LjGlb1-1, but not of the other class 1 Hb of L. japonicus (LjGlb1-2), was affected during infection of wild-type roots, further supporting a specific role for LjGlb1-1. In conclusion, the LjGlb1-1 mutants reveal that this protein is required during rhizobial infection and regulates NO levels. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Shoot- and root-borne cytokinin influences arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebeca Cosme, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is functionally important for the nutrition and growth of most terrestrial plants. Nearly all phytohormones are employed by plants to regulate the symbiosis with AM fungi, but the regulatory role of cytokinin (CK) is not well understood. Here, we used

  5. Fanconi anemia with biallelic FANCD1/BRCA2 mutations - Case report of a family with three affected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svojgr, Karel; Sumerauer, David; Puchmajerova, Alena; Vicha, Ales; Hrusak, Ondrej; Michalova, Kyra; Malis, Josef; Smisek, Petr; Kyncl, Martin; Novotna, Drahuse; Machackova, Eva; Jencik, Jan; Pycha, Karel; Vaculik, Miroslav; Kodet, Roman; Stary, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Fanconi anemia, complementation group D1 with bi-allelic FANCD1 (BRCA2) mutations, is a very rare genetic disorder characterized by early onset of childhood malignancies, including acute leukemia, brain cancer and nephroblastoma. Here, we present a case report of a family with 3 affected children in terms of treatment outcome, toxicity and characterization of the malignancies using comprehensive cytogenetic analysis. The first child was diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia when he was 11 months old. During chemotherapy, he suffered from repeated pancytopenia, sepsis and severe vincristine polyneuropathy, and 18 months after primary diagnosis, he succumbed to secondary acute monocytic leukemia. The second child was diagnosed with stage 2 triphasic nephroblastoma (Wilms tumor), when he was 3 years and 11 months old. During chemotherapy, he suffered from vincristine polyneuropathy. Currently, he is in complete remission, 29 months following the initial diagnosis. The third child was diagnosed with medulloblastoma with classical histology, when she was 4 years and 5 months old. After the first cycle of chemotherapy, she suffered from prolonged pancytopenia, sepsis and severe skin and mucosal toxicity. Six weeks after primary diagnosis, a first relapse in the posterior fossa was diagnosed, and at 7 and half months after primary diagnosis, a second relapse was diagnosed that led to the patient's death. Our case report underscores tumor heterogeneity, treatment toxicity and poor outcome in Fanconi anemia patients of complementation group D1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Big Data Approaches To Coral-Microbe Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaneveld, J.; Pollock, F. J.; McMinds, R.; Smith, S.; Payet, J.; Hanna, B.; Welsh, R.; Foster, A.; Ohdera, A.; Shantz, A. A.; Burkepile, D. E.; Maynard, J. A.; Medina, M.; Vega Thurber, R.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reefs face increasing challenges worldwide, threatened by overfishing and nutrient pollution, which drive growth of algal competitors of corals, and periods of extreme temperature, which drive mass coral bleaching. I will discuss two projects that examine how coral's complex relationships with microorganisms affect the response of coral colonies and coral species to environmental challenge. Microbiological studies have documented key roles for coral's microbial symbionts in energy harvest and defense against pathogens. However, the evolutionary history of corals and their microbes is little studied. As part of the Global Coral Microbiome Project, we are characterizing bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and Symbiodinium diversity across >1400 DNA samples from all major groups of corals, collected from 15 locations worldwide. This collection will allow us to ask how coral- microbe associations evolved over evolutionary time, and to determine whether microbial symbiosis helps predict the relative vulnerability of certain coral species to environmental stress. In the second project, we experimentally characterized how the long-term effects of human impacts such as overfishing and nutrient pollution influence coral-microbe symbiosis. We conducted a three-year field experiment in the Florida Keys applying nutrient pollution or simulated overfishing to reef plots, and traced the effects on reef communities, coral microbiomes, and coral health. The results show that extremes of temperature and algal competition destabilize coral microbiomes, increasing pathogen blooms, coral disease, and coral death. Surprisingly, these local stressors interacted strongly with thermal stress: the greatest microbiome disruption, and >80% of coral mortality happened in the hottest periods. Thus, overfishing and nutrient pollution may interact with increased climate-driven episodes of sub-bleaching thermal stress to increase coral mortality by disrupt reef communities down to microbial scales.

  7. Mutations affecting the SAND domain of DEAF1 cause intellectual disability with severe speech impairment and behavioral problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silfhout, A.T. van; Rajamanickam, S.; Jensik, P.J.; Vergult, S.; Rocker, N. de; Newhall, K.J.; Raghavan, R.; Reardon, S.N.; Jarrett, K.; McIntyre, T.; Bulinski, J.; Ownby, S.L.; Huggenvik, J.I.; McKnight, G.S.; Rose, G.M.; Cai, X; Willaert, A.; Zweier, C.; Endele, S.; Ligt, J. de; Bon, B.W.M. van; Lugtenberg, D.; Vries, P.F. de; Veltman, J.A.; Bokhoven, H. van; Brunner, H.G.; Rauch, A.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Carvill, G.L.; Hoischen, A.; Mefford, H.C.; Eichler, E.E.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Menten, B.; Collard, M.W.; Vries, L.B.A. de

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we identified in two individuals with intellectual disability (ID) different de novo mutations in DEAF1, which encodes a transcription factor with an important role in embryonic development. To ascertain whether these mutations in DEAF1 are causative for the ID phenotype, we performed

  8. X-linked retinoschisis: RS1 mutation severity and age affect the ERG phenotype in a cohort of 68 affected male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Kristen; Cukras, Catherine; Turriff, Amy; Sergeev, Yuri; Vitale, Susan; Bush, Ronald A; Sieving, Paul A

    2011-11-29

    To assess the effect of age and RS1 mutation on the phenotype of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) subjects using the clinical electroretinogram (ERG) in a cross-sectional analysis. Sixty-eight XLRS males 4.5 to 55 years of age underwent genotyping, and the retinoschisis (RS1) mutations were classified as less severe (27 subjects) or more severe (41 subjects) based on the putative impact on the protein. ERG parameters of retinal function were analyzed by putative mutation severity with age as a continuous variable. The a-wave amplitude remained greater than the lower limit of normal (mean, -2 SD) for 72% of XLRS males and correlated with neither age nor mutation class. However, b-wave and b/a-ratio amplitudes were significantly lower in the more severe than in the less severe mutation groups and in older than in younger subjects. Subjects up to 10 years of age with more severe RS1 mutations had significantly greater b-wave amplitudes and faster a-wave trough implicit times than older subjects in this group. RS1 mutation putative severity and age both had significant effects on retinal function in XLRS only in the severe mutation group, as judged by ERG analysis of the b-wave amplitude and the b/a-ratio, whereas the a-wave amplitude remained normal in most. A new observation was that increasing age (limited to those aged 55 and younger) caused a significant delay in XLRS b-wave onset (i.e., a-wave implicit time), even for those who retained considerable b-wave amplitudes. The delayed b-wave onset suggested that dysfunction of the photoreceptor synapse or of bipolar cells increases with age of XLRS subjects.

  9. Expression of apoplast-targeted plant defensin MtDef4.2 confers resistance to leaf rust pathogen Puccinia triticina but does not affect mycorrhizal symbiosis in transgenic wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Fellers, John; Adholeya, Alok; Velivelli, Siva L S; El-Mounadi, Kaoutar; Nersesian, Natalya; Clemente, Thomas; Shah, Dilip

    2017-02-01

    Rust fungi of the order Pucciniales are destructive pathogens of wheat worldwide. Leaf rust caused by the obligate, biotrophic basidiomycete fungus Puccinia triticina (Pt) is an economically important disease capable of causing up to 50 % yield losses. Historically, resistant wheat cultivars have been used to control leaf rust, but genetic resistance is ephemeral and breaks down with the emergence of new virulent Pt races. There is a need to develop alternative measures for control of leaf rust in wheat. Development of transgenic wheat expressing an antifungal defensin offers a promising approach to complement the endogenous resistance genes within the wheat germplasm for durable resistance to Pt. To that end, two different wheat genotypes, Bobwhite and Xin Chun 9 were transformed with a chimeric gene encoding an apoplast-targeted antifungal plant defensin MtDEF4.2 from Medicago truncatula. Transgenic lines from four independent events were further characterized. Homozygous transgenic wheat lines expressing MtDEF4.2 displayed resistance to Pt race MCPSS relative to the non-transgenic controls in growth chamber bioassays. Histopathological analysis suggested the presence of both pre- and posthaustorial resistance to leaf rust in these transgenic lines. MtDEF4.2 did not, however, affect the root colonization of a beneficial arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. This study demonstrates that the expression of apoplast-targeted plant defensin MtDEF4.2 can provide substantial resistance to an economically important leaf rust disease in transgenic wheat without negatively impacting its symbiotic relationship with the beneficial mycorrhizal fungus.

  10. Molecular analysis using DHPLC of cystic fibrosis: increase of the mutation detection rate among the affected population in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardone Anna

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystem disorder characterised by mutations of the CFTR gene, which encodes for an important component in the coordination of electrolyte movement across of epithelial cell membranes. Symptoms are pulmonary disease, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, male infertility and elevated sweat concentrations. The CFTR gene has numerous mutations (>1000 and functionally important polymorphisms (>200. Early identification is important to provide appropriate therapeutic interventions, prognostic and genetic counselling and to ensure access to specialised medical services. However, molecular diagnosis by direct mutation screening has proved difficult in certain ethnic groups due to allelic heterogeneity and variable frequency of causative mutations. Methods We applied a gene scanning approach using DHPLC system for analysing specifically all CFTR exons and characterise sequence variations in a subgroup of CF Italian patients from the Lazio region (Central Italy characterised by an extensive allelic heterogeneity. Results We have identified a total of 36 different mutations representing 88% of the CF chromosomes. Among these are two novel CFTR mutations, including one missense (H199R and one microdeletion (4167delCTAAGCC. Conclusion Using this approach, we were able to increase our standard power rate of mutation detection of about 11% (77% vs. 88%.

  11. Nuclear symbiosis. Why, when and how

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, H.B.

    1978-01-01

    A distinction can be made between an ''asymptotic'' nuclear symbiosis and a ''transitional'' nuclear symbiosis. With the currently projected nuclear energy growth, there appears to be no urgency for introducing nuclear systems required for the asymptotic era before, say, another 50 to 75 years. Consequently, more attention should be directed toward desirable systems for the transitional era, i.e., the next 30 to 50 years. In the classical asymptotic system, an optimal system would consist of a relatively small number of fast breeder reactor plants operating largely as ''fuel factories'' and a large number of thermal spectrum near breeder reactor plants serving as ''energy factories''. The breeding ratio of 238 U/Pu in the FBR plants would be chosen at unity to assure that FBR primary fuel could sustain itself. Excess breeding capacity would be utilized to convert 232 Th and 233 U in the blankets. This excess fuel would then be used to supply make-up requirements for thermal near breeder (NBR) plants. With an FBR breeder ratio of 1.4 and an NBR conversion ratio of 0.9, approximately four NBR plants could be supported for each FBR plant. Perhaps more importantly, the sale of 233 U to the NBR could be used to offset a probable higher capital cost of the FBR plants. In this way, a capital cost penalty of some 30 to 40% relative to LWR plants might be allowable for FBR plants. (author)

  12. A splice acceptor mutation in C. elegans daf-19/Rfx disrupts functional specialization of male-specific ciliated neurons but does not affect ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kristen L; Rowneki, Mazhgan; Killian, Darrell J

    2015-04-01

    RFX transcription factors are master regulators of ciliogenesis in diverse animal species. The sole Caenorhabditis elegans RFX homolog, DAF-19, plays at least two roles in the formation of functional cilia. The DAF-19(C) isoform is required for ciliogenesis and the DAF-19(M) isoform is required for the functional specialization of a subset of male-specific ciliated neurons called PKD neurons. Here we report the identification of a novel mutation, daf-19(sm129), which disrupts the functional specification of PKD neurons and thus suggests that daf-19m activity is compromised. However, ciliogenesis is not disrupted in daf-19(sm129) mutants suggesting that daf-19c activity is retained. The sm129 mutation disrupts a splice acceptor site adjacent to an exon common to the daf-19c and daf-19m isoforms resulting in aberrant splicing in a proportion of transcripts. While aberrant splicing of daf-19c to upstream cryptic sites results in in-frame and functional products, a large proportion of daf-19m mRNAs include the entire upstream intron, which introduces a frameshift and stop codons. At least 15% of disease-causing mutations affect splicing of the gene bearing the mutation, thus it is important to understand the consequences of splice site mutations on gene function. However, predicting the effects of a splice site mutation remains difficult and experimental determination is still required. Using daf-19(sm129) as a model, our results suggest that this problem is exacerbated when a splice acceptor mutation is used by multiple isoforms of the same gene because the effects on each isoform can be dramatically different. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel point mutation within the EDA gene causes an exon dropping in mature RNA in Holstein Friesian cattle breed affected by X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pariset Lorraine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is a disorder characterized by abnormal development of tissues and organs of ectodermal origin caused by mutations in the EDA gene. The bovine EDA gene encodes the ectodysplasin A, a membrane protein expressed in keratinocytes, hair follicles and sweat glands, which is involved in the interactions between cell and cell and/or cell and matrix. Four mutations causing ectodermal dysplasia in cattle have been described so far. Results We identified a new single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at the 9th base of exon 8 in the EDA gene in two calves of Holstein Friesian cattle breed affected by ectodermal dysplasia. This SNP is located in the exonic splicing enhancer (ESEs recognized by SRp40 protein. As a consequence, the spliceosome machinery is no longer able to recognize the sequence as exonic and causes exon skipping. The mutation determines the deletion of the entire exon (131 bp in the RNA processing, causing a severe alteration of the protein structure and thus the disease. Conclusion We identified a mutation, never described before, that changes the regulation of alternative splicing in the EDA gene and causes ectodermal dysplasia in cattle. The analysis of the SNP allows the identification of carriers that can transmit the disease to the offspring. This mutation can thus be exploited for a rational and efficient selection of unequivocally healthy cows for breeding.

  14. A novel mutation in the NOD2 gene associated with Blau syndrome: a Norwegian family with four affected members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N; Ursin, K; Rødevand, E

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blau syndrome is a chronic granulomatous disease with an autosomal dominant trait characterized by the triad granulomatous dermatitis, arthritis, and uveitis. It is caused by mutations in the NOD2 gene, also termed the CARD15 gene. OBJECTIVE: To report a novel mutation in the NOD2 gen...... with an autosomal dominant heritage. Most likely the mutation has arisen de novo in the proband. Genetic counselling and antenatal diagnostics should be available to the involved families....... associated with Blau syndrome. METHODS AND RESULTS: The proband was a 68-year-old ethnic Norwegian male who had uveitis and arthritis since 10 years of age followed by lifelong recurrent arthritis and chronic eye involvement. Genetic analysis showed a heterozygous c.1814 C>A, T605N mutation in NOD2 that has...

  15. A search for mutations affecting protein structure in children of proximally and distally exposed atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.; Satoh, Chiyoko; Hamilton, H.B.; Otake, Masanori; Goriki, Kazuaki; Kageoka, Takeshi; Fujita, Mikio; Neriishi, Shotaro; Asakawa, Jun-ichi.

    1981-07-01

    A total of 289,868 locus tests based on 28 different protein phenotypes, employing one-dimensional electrophoresis to detect variant proteins, has yielded one probable mutation in the offspring of 'proximally exposed' parents, who received an estimated average gonadal exposure dose of between 31 and 39 rem from the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. There were no mutations in 208,196 locus tests involving children of 'distally exposed' parents, who had essentially no radiation exposure. (author)

  16. A novel dominant D109A CRYAB mutation in a family with myofibrillar myopathy affects αB-crystallin structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub P. Fichna

    2017-06-01

    Molecular modeling in accordance with muscle biopsy microscopic analyses predicted that D109A mutation influence both structure and function of CRYAB due to decreased stability of oligomers leading to aggregate formation. In consequence disrupted sarcomere cytoskeleton organization might lead to muscle pathology. We also suggest that mutated RQDE sequence of CRYAB could impair CRYAB chaperone-like activity and promote aggregation of lens crystallins.

  17. Antibodies to Mutated Citrullinated Vimentin in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Diagnostic Value, Association with Radiological Damage and Axial Skeleton Affection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howaida E. Mansour

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Early definitive diagnosis and effective treatment are mandatory in rheumatoid arthritis (RA as it can halt the disease progression and subsequent joints destruction. Objective: To investigate the diagnostic and prognostic value of anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV and its correlation with disease activity, peripheral and axial skeleton affection in RA patients. Patients and methods: A total of 123 patients with different rheumatic diseases were enrolled in a prospective-two year study at Ain Shams University hospital: 64 patients with RA and 59 patients with other rheumatic diseases as controls. RA patients were fulfilling the traditional and the new ACR/EULAR diagnostic criteria for RA. They have been followed up for two years. At baseline, all RA patients were subjected to: Clinical assessment of disease activity by taking full histories, general and local examination, measurement of 28 joint count of tender and swollen joints with calculation of disease activity score (DAS-28 for each patient. Complete blood count, erythrocytes sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and rheumatoid factor titers were performed. Anti-MCV IgG immunoglobulins’ assay was performed at the study endpoint by ELISA. RA patients were then classified into; anti-MCV positive and anti-MCV negative groups for statistical comparison. Plain X-ray was performed on the peripheral joints and scored by the Simple Erosion Narrowing score (SEN-score. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI scans were carried out to 22 RA patients on cervical and lumbosacral regions. Results: Anti-MCV antibodies were found to be of high sensitivity (79.6% and specificity (96.6% in diagnosing RA. The area under the curve was 0.893 at 95% confidence interval (CI, confers an odds ratio of 23.5. Anti-MCV positive RA patients had significantly higher DAS-28 and SEN-scores than anti-MCV negative patients; who were found to have more benign disease with lower incidence of

  18. Evolution of Fungal enzymes in the attine ant symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Schiøtt, Morten; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    The attine ant symbiosis is characterized by ancient but varying degrees of diffuse co-evolution between the ants and their fungal cultivars. Domesticated fungi became dependent on vertical transmission by queens and the ant colonies came to rely on their symbiotic fungus for food and thus...... as garden substrate, whereas the more basal genera use leaf litter, insect feces and insect carcasses. We hypothesized that enzyme activity of fungal symbionts has co-evolved with substrate use and we measured enzyme activities of fungus gardens in the field to test this, focusing particularly on plant...... essential for the symbiosis in general, but have contributed specifically to the evolution of the symbiosis....

  19. Fungal and plant gene expression in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2006-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AMs) are a unique example of symbiosis between two eukaryotes, soil fungi and plants. This association induces important physiological changes in each partner that lead to reciprocal benefits, mainly in nutrient supply. The symbiosis results from modifications in plant and fungal cell organization caused by specific changes in gene expression. Recently, much effort has gone into studying these gene expression patterns to identify a wider spectrum of genes involved. We aim in this review to describe AM symbiosis in terms of current knowledge on plant and fungal gene expression profiles.

  20. Compatibility between Legumes and Rhizobia for the Establishment of a Successful Nitrogen-Fixing Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clúa, Joaquín; Roda, Carla; Zanetti, María Eugenia; Blanco, Flavio A

    2018-02-27

    The root nodule symbiosis established between legumes and rhizobia is an exquisite biological interaction responsible for fixing a significant amount of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. The success of this interaction depends on the recognition of the right partner by the plant within the richest microbial ecosystems on Earth, the soil. Recent metagenomic studies of the soil biome have revealed its complexity, which includes microorganisms that affect plant fitness and growth in a beneficial, harmful, or neutral manner. In this complex scenario, understanding the molecular mechanisms by which legumes recognize and discriminate rhizobia from pathogens, but also between distinct rhizobia species and strains that differ in their symbiotic performance, is a considerable challenge. In this work, we will review how plants are able to recognize and select symbiotic partners from a vast diversity of surrounding bacteria. We will also analyze recent advances that contribute to understand changes in plant gene expression associated with the outcome of the symbiotic interaction. These aspects of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis should contribute to translate the knowledge generated in basic laboratory research into biotechnological advances to improve the efficiency of the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in agronomic systems.

  1. Insights on the Impact of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis on Tomato Tolerance to Water Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarra, Walter; Pagliarani, Chiara; Maserti, Biancaelena; Lumini, Erica; Siciliano, Ilenia; Cascone, Pasquale; Schubert, Andrea; Gambino, Giorgio; Balestrini, Raffaella; Guerrieri, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, which form symbioses with the roots of the most important crop species, are usually considered biofertilizers, whose exploitation could represent a promising avenue for the development in the future of a more sustainable next-generation agriculture. The best understood function in symbiosis is an improvement in plant mineral nutrient acquisition, as exchange for carbon compounds derived from the photosynthetic process: this can enhance host growth and tolerance to environmental stresses, such as water stress (WS). However, physiological and molecular mechanisms occurring in arbuscular mycorrhiza-colonized plants and directly involved in the mitigation of WS effects need to be further investigated. The main goal of this work is to verify the potential impact of AM symbiosis on the plant response to WS To this aim, the effect of two AM fungi (Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) under the WS condition was studied. A combined approach, involving ecophysiological, morphometric, biochemical, and molecular analyses, has been used to highlight the mechanisms involved in plant response to WS during AM symbiosis. Gene expression analyses focused on a set of target genes putatively involved in the plant response to drought, and in parallel, we considered the expression changes induced by the imposed stress on a group of fungal genes playing a key role in the water-transport process. Taken together, the results show that AM symbiosis positively affects the tolerance to WS in tomato, with a different plant response depending on the AM fungi species involved. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Mutations that alter a repeated ACCA element located at the 5' end of the Potato virus X genome affect RNA accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Ri; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Choi, Hong-Soo; Hemenway, Cynthia L; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2008-08-15

    The repeated ACCA or AC-rich sequence and structural (SL1) elements in the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of the Potato virus X (PVX) RNA play vital roles in the PVX life cycle by controlling translation, RNA replication, movement, and assembly. It has already been shown that the repeated ACCA or AC-rich sequence affect both gRNA and sgRNA accumulation, while not affecting minus-strand RNA accumulation, and are also required for host protein binding. The functional significance of the repeated ACCA sequence elements in the 5' NTR region was investigated by analyzing the effects of deletion and site-directed mutations on PVX replication in Nicotiana benthamiana plants and NT1 protoplasts. Substitution (ACCA into AAAA or UUUU) mutations introduced in the first (nt 10-13) element in the 5' NTR of the PVX RNA significantly affected viral replication, while mutations introduced in the second (nt 17-20) and third (nt 20-23) elements did not. The fourth (nt 29-32) ACCA element weakly affected virus replication, whereas mutations in the fifth (nt 38-41) significantly reduced virus replication due to the structure disruption of SL1 by AAAA and/or UUUU substitutions. Further characterization of the first ACCA element indicated that duplication of ACCA at nt 10-13 (nt 10-17, ACCAACCA) caused severe symptom development as compared to that of wild type, while deletion of the single element (nt 10-13), DeltaACCA) or tripling of this element caused reduced symptom development. Single- and double-nucleotide substitutions introduced into the first ACCA element revealed the importance of CC located at nt positions 11 and 12. Altogether, these results indicate that the first ACCA element is important for PVX replication.

  3. Symbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing work to test the hypothesis of the origin of eukaryotic cell organelles by microbial symbioses is discussed. Because of the widespread acceptance of the serial endosymbiotic theory (SET) of the origin of plastids and mitochondria, the idea of the symbiotic origin of the centrioles and axonemes for spirochete bacteria motility symbiosis was tested. Intracellular microtubular systems are purported to derive from symbiotic associations between ancestral eukaryotic cells and motile bacteria. Four lines of approach to this problem are being pursued: (1) cloning the gene of a tubulin-like protein discovered in Spirocheata bajacaliforniesis; (2) seeking axoneme proteins in spirochets by antibody cross-reaction; (3) attempting to cultivate larger, free-living spirochetes; and (4) studying in detail spirochetes (e.g., Cristispira) symbiotic with marine animals. Other aspects of the investigation are presented.

  4. Distinct mutations in yeast TAF(II)25 differentially affect the composition of TFIID and SAGA complexes as well as global gene expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Doris B; vom Baur, Elmar; Thibault, Christelle; Sanders, Steven L; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Davidson, Irwin; Weil, P Anthony; Tora, Làszlò

    2002-05-01

    The RNA polymerase II transcription factor TFIID, composed of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAF(II)s), nucleates preinitiation complex formation at protein-coding gene promoters. SAGA, a second TAF(II)-containing multiprotein complex, is involved in transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of the essential protein components common to SAGA and TFIID is yTAF(II)25. We define a minimal evolutionarily conserved 91-amino-acid region of TAF(II)25 containing a histone fold domain that is necessary and sufficient for growth in vivo. Different temperature-sensitive mutations of yTAF(II)25 or chimeras with the human homologue TAF(II)30 arrested cell growth at either the G(1) or G(2)/M cell cycle phase and displayed distinct phenotypic changes and gene expression patterns. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed that TAF(II)25 mutation-dependent gene expression and phenotypic changes correlated at least partially with the integrity of SAGA and TFIID. Genome-wide expression analysis revealed that the five TAF(II)25 temperature-sensitive mutant alleles individually affect the expression of between 18 and 33% of genes, whereas taken together they affect 64% of all class II genes. Thus, different yTAF(II)25 mutations induce distinct phenotypes and affect the regulation of different subsets of genes, demonstrating that no individual TAF(II) mutant allele reflects the full range of its normal functions.

  5. HIV-1 Nef mutations abrogating downregulation of CD4 affect other Nef functions and show reduced pathogenicity in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Zaher; Priceputu, Elena; Hu, Chunyan; Vincent, Patrick; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Nef Wt Tg mice. Our data suggest that the RD35/36AA and D174K mutations affect other Nef functions, namely those involved in the development of lung and kidney diseases, in addition to their known role in CD4 downregulation. Similarly, in HIV-1-infected individuals, loss of CD4 downregulation by Nef alleles may reflect their lower intrinsic pathogenicity, independently of their effects on virus replication

  6. Symbiosis-inspired approaches to antibiotic discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnani, Navid; Rajski, Scott R; Bugni, Tim S

    2017-07-06

    Covering: 2010 up to 2017Life on Earth is characterized by a remarkable abundance of symbiotic and highly refined relationships among life forms. Defined as any kind of close, long-term association between two organisms, symbioses can be mutualistic, commensalistic or parasitic. Historically speaking, selective pressures have shaped symbioses in which one organism (typically a bacterium or fungus) generates bioactive small molecules that impact the host (and possibly other symbionts); the symbiosis is driven fundamentally by the genetic machineries available to the small molecule producer. The human microbiome is now integral to the most recent chapter in animal-microbe symbiosis studies and plant-microbe symbioses have significantly advanced our understanding of natural products biosynthesis; this also is the case for studies of fungal-microbe symbioses. However, much less is known about microbe-microbe systems involving interspecies interactions. Microbe-derived small molecules (i.e. antibiotics and quorum sensing molecules, etc.) have been shown to regulate transcription in microbes within the same environmental niche, suggesting interspecies interactions whereas, intraspecies interactions, such as those that exploit autoinducing small molecules, also modulate gene expression based on environmental cues. We, and others, contend that symbioses provide almost unlimited opportunities for the discovery of new bioactive compounds whose activities and applications have been evolutionarily optimized. Particularly intriguing is the possibility that environmental effectors can guide laboratory expression of secondary metabolites from "orphan", or silent, biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). Notably, many of the studies summarized here result from advances in "omics" technologies and highlight how symbioses have given rise to new anti-bacterial and antifungal natural products now being discovered.

  7. Germline CYBB mutations that selectively affect macrophages in kindreds with X-linked predisposition to tuberculous mycobacterial disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Jacinta; Arias, Andres A; Vogt, Guillaume; Picard, Capucine; Galicia, Lizbeth Blancas; Prando, Carolina; Grant, Audrey V; Marchal, Christophe C; Hubeau, Marjorie; Chapgier, Ariane; de Beaucoudrey, Ludovic; Puel, Anne; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Valinetz, Ethan; Jannière, Lucile; Besse, Céline; Boland, Anne; Brisseau, Jean-Marie; Blanche, Stéphane; Lortholary, Olivier; Fieschi, Claire; Emile, Jean-François; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Woda, Bruce; Newburger, Peter E; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Dinauer, Mary C; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutations in CYBB, the human gene encoding the gp91phox subunit of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase, impair the respiratory burst of all types of phagocytes and result in X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). We report here two kindreds in which otherwise healthy male adults developed X-linked recessive Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) syndromes. These patients had previously unknown mutations in CYBB that resulted in an impaired respiratory burst in monocyte-derived macrophages but not in monocytes or granulocytes. The macrophage-specific functional consequences of the germline mutation resulted from cell-specific impairment in the assembly of the NADPH oxidase. This ‘experiment of nature’ indicates that CYBB is associated with MSMD and demonstrates that the respiratory burst in human macrophages is a crucial mechanism for protective immunity to tuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:21278736

  8. Neurodevelopmental disease-associated de novo mutations and rare sequence variants affect TRIO GDP/GTP exchange factor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrancha, Sara M; Wu, Yi; Zhu, Minsheng; Eipper, Betty A; Koleske, Anthony J; Mains, Richard E

    2017-12-01

    Bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism and intellectual disability are complex neurodevelopmental disorders, debilitating millions of people. Therapeutic progress is limited by poor understanding of underlying molecular pathways. Using a targeted search, we identified an enrichment of de novo mutations in the gene encoding the 330-kDa triple functional domain (TRIO) protein associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. By generating multiple TRIO antibodies, we show that the smaller TRIO9 isoform is the major brain protein product, and its levels decrease after birth. TRIO9 contains two guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) domains with distinct specificities: GEF1 activates both Rac1 and RhoG; GEF2 activates RhoA. To understand the impact of disease-associated de novo mutations and other rare sequence variants on TRIO function, we utilized two FRET-based biosensors: a Rac1 biosensor to study mutations in TRIO (T)GEF1, and a RhoA biosensor to study mutations in TGEF2. We discovered that one autism-associated de novo mutation in TGEF1 (K1431M), at the TGEF1/Rac1 interface, markedly decreased its overall activity toward Rac1. A schizophrenia-associated rare sequence variant in TGEF1 (F1538Intron) was substantially less active, normalized to protein level and expressed poorly. Overall, mutations in TGEF1 decreased GEF1 activity toward Rac1. One bipolar disorder-associated rare variant (M2145T) in TGEF2 impaired inhibition by the TGEF2 pleckstrin-homology domain, resulting in dramatically increased TGEF2 activity. Overall, genetic damage to both TGEF domains altered TRIO catalytic activity, decreasing TGEF1 activity and increasing TGEF2 activity. Importantly, both GEF changes are expected to decrease neurite outgrowth, perhaps consistent with their association with neurodevelopmental disorders. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Reciprocal mouse and human limb phenotypes caused by gain- and loss-of-function mutations affecting Lmbr1.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, R M; Marker, P C; Roessler, E; Dutra, A; Schimenti, J C; Muenke, M; Kingsley, D M

    2001-01-01

    The major locus for dominant preaxial polydactyly in humans has been mapped to 7q36. In mice the dominant Hemimelic extra toes (Hx) and Hammertoe (Hm) mutations map to a homologous chromosomal region and cause similar limb defects. The Lmbr1 gene is entirely within the small critical intervals recently defined for both the mouse and human mutations and is misexpressed at the exact time that the mouse Hx phenotype becomes apparent during limb development. This result suggests that Lmbr1 may un...

  10. Importance of mycorrhizal symbiosis for local adaptations of Aster amellus

    OpenAIRE

    Plachá, Hana

    2006-01-01

    3 Abstract The importance of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis for survival and growth of many plant species is generally recognized. It has been repeatedly shown that symbiosis with mycorrhizal fungi can increase the fitness of many plant species. This increasing fitness is caused by increased uptake of phosphorus and other nutrients or pathogen protection. Most studies on mycorrhizal associations explore these types of relationship using single plant population and single fungal species...

  11. alpha-Adducin mutations increase Na/K pump activity in renal cells by affecting constitutive endocytosis: implications for tubular Na reabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torielli, Lucia; Tivodar, Simona; Montella, Rosa Chiara; Iacone, Roberto; Padoani, Gloria; Tarsini, Paolo; Russo, Ornella; Sarnataro, Daniela; Strazzullo, Pasquale; Ferrari, Patrizia; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2008-08-01

    Genetic variation in alpha-adducin cytoskeletal protein is implicated in the polymerization and bundling of actin and alteration of the Na/K pump, resulting in abnormal renal sodium transport and hypertension in Milan hypertensive rats and humans. To investigate the molecular involvement of alpha-adducin in controlling Na/K pump activity, wild-type or mutated rat and human alpha-adducin forms were, respectively, transfected into several renal cell lines. Through multiple experimental approaches (microscopy, enzymatic assays, coimmunoprecipitation), we showed that rat and human mutated forms increased Na/K pump activity and the number of pump units; moreover, both variants coimmunoprecipitate with Na/K pump. The increased Na/K pump activity was not due to changes in its basolateral localization, but to an alteration of Na/K pump residential time on the plasma membrane. Indeed, both rat and human mutated variants reduced constitutive Na/K pump endocytosis and similarly affected transferrin receptor trafficking and fluid-phase endocytosis. In fact, alpha-adducin was detected in clathrin-coated vesicles and coimmunoprecipitated with clathrin. These results indicate that adducin, besides its modulatory effects on actin cytoskeleton dynamics, might play a direct role in clathrin-dependent endocytosis. The constitutive reduction of the Na/K pump endocytic rate induced by mutated adducin variants may be relevant in Na-dependent hypertension.

  12. COL1A2 gene analysis in a Czech osteogenesis imperfecta patient: a candidate novel mutation in a patient affected by osteogenesis imperfecta type 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrušková L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lucie Hrušková,1 Ivo Mařík,2,3 Stella Mazurová,1 Pavel Martásek,1 Ivan Mazura1 1Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic; 2Ambulant Centre for Defects of Locomotor Apparatus 1.1.c., Prague, Czech Republic; 3Faculty of Medical Studies, West Bohemia University, Pilsen, Czech RepublicAbstract: Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable bone fragility disease with a heterogenic genetic origin. Most cases result from mutations of either the COL1A1 gene or the COL1A2 gene. We identified a novel COL1A2 gene mutation in a Czech patient, born to unaffected parents, who was diagnosed according to clinical and anthropometric findings and radiographic features as having type 3 osteogenesis imperfecta, which is a severe form of this disease. The identified Gly814Trp mutation was predicted by a number of complementary bioinformatic programs to result in functional alteration of the protein. This case report provides both evidence of a novel COL1A2 mutation resulting in type 3 osteogenesis imperfecta and a genotype:phenotype correlation in this affected individual. Keywords: osteogenesis imperfecta type 3, collagen, alpha-2 (I chain, substitution, sequencing 

  13. Study of cnidarian-algal symbiosis in the "omics" age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Eli; Weis, Virginia M

    2012-08-01

    The symbiotic associations between cnidarians and dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium) support productive and diverse ecosystems in coral reefs. Many aspects of this association, including the mechanistic basis of host-symbiont recognition and metabolic interaction, remain poorly understood. The first completed genome sequence for a symbiotic anthozoan is now available (the coral Acropora digitifera), and extensive expressed sequence tag resources are available for a variety of other symbiotic corals and anemones. These resources make it possible to profile gene expression, protein abundance, and protein localization associated with the symbiotic state. Here we review the history of "omics" studies of cnidarian-algal symbiosis and the current availability of sequence resources for corals and anemones, identifying genes putatively involved in symbiosis across 10 anthozoan species. The public availability of candidate symbiosis-associated genes leaves the field of cnidarian-algal symbiosis poised for in-depth comparative studies of sequence diversity and gene expression and for targeted functional studies of genes associated with symbiosis. Reviewing the progress to date suggests directions for future investigations of cnidarian-algal symbiosis that include (i) sequencing of Symbiodinium, (ii) proteomic analysis of the symbiosome membrane complex, (iii) glycomic analysis of Symbiodinium cell surfaces, and (iv) expression profiling of the gastrodermal cells hosting Symbiodinium.

  14. Factors affecting mutational specificity in mammalian cells: Informal [technical] progress report, February 1, 1987-January 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    We analyzed the different c-H-ras mutations produced in cells after treatment with chemical carcinogens. The overall goal of this work is an understanding of the changes produced by environmental mutagens and carcinogens to learn how closely the results obtained with bacterial and cellular assay systems apply to the in vivo situation

  15. The hunt for a functional mutation affecting conformation and calving traits on chromosome 18 in Holstein cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequence data from 11 US Holstein bulls were analyzed to identify putative causal mutations associated with calving and conformation traits. The SNP ARS-BFGL-NGS-109285 at 57,589,121 bp (UMD 3.1 assembly) on BTA18 has large effects on 4 measures of body shape and size, 2 measures of dystocia, longev...

  16. HIV-1 protease inhibitor mutations affect the development of HIV-1 resistance to the maturation inhibitor bevirimat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fun, A.; Maarseveen van, N. M.; Pokorná, Jana; Maas, R. E.; Schipper, P. J.; Konvalinka, Jan; Nijhuis, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 70 (2011), s. 1-12 ISSN 1742-4690 Grant - others:European Union(XE) LWSHP-CT-2007-037693 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : immunodeficiency-virus type-1 * gag spacer peptide-1 * replication capacity * compensatory mutations * cleavage sites Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.470, year: 2011

  17. What affects the predictability of evolutionary constraints using a G-matrix? The relative effects of modular pleiotropy and mutational correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebib, Jobran; Guillaume, Frédéric

    2017-10-01

    Phenotypic traits do not always respond to selection independently from each other and often show correlated responses to selection. The structure of a genotype-phenotype map (GP map) determines trait covariation, which involves variation in the degree and strength of the pleiotropic effects of the underlying genes. It is still unclear, and debated, how much of that structure can be deduced from variational properties of quantitative traits that are inferred from their genetic (co) variance matrix (G-matrix). Here we aim to clarify how the extent of pleiotropy and the correlation among the pleiotropic effects of mutations differentially affect the structure of a G-matrix and our ability to detect genetic constraints from its eigen decomposition. We show that the eigenvectors of a G-matrix can be predictive of evolutionary constraints when they map to underlying pleiotropic modules with correlated mutational effects. Without mutational correlation, evolutionary constraints caused by the fitness costs associated with increased pleiotropy are harder to infer from evolutionary metrics based on a G-matrix's geometric properties because uncorrelated pleiotropic effects do not affect traits' genetic correlations. Correlational selection induces much weaker modular partitioning of traits' genetic correlations in absence then in presence of underlying modular pleiotropy. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Mutations in conserved helix 69 of 23S rRNA of Thermus thermophilus that affect capreomycin resistance but not posttranscriptional modifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monshupanee, Tanakarn; Gregory, Steven T; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    of previously reported capreomycin resistance base substitutions. Capreomycin resistance in other bacteria has been shown to result from inactivation of the TlyA methyltransferase which 2'-O methylates C1920 of 23S rRNA. Inactivation of the tlyA gene in T. thermophilus does not affect its sensitivity...... for resistance to the tuberactinomycin antibiotic capreomycin. Two base substitutions, A1913U and mU1915G, and a single base deletion, DeltamU1915, were identified in helix 69 of 23S rRNA, a structural element that forms part of an interribosomal subunit bridge with the decoding center of 16S rRNA, the site...... to capreomycin. Finally, none of the mutations in helix 69 interferes with methylation at C1920 or with pseudouridylation at positions 1911 and 1917. We conclude that the resistance phenotype is a consequence of structural changes introduced by the mutations....

  19. The nitrate-reduction gene cluster components exert lineage-dependent contributions to optimization of Sinorhizobium symbiosis with soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li Xue; Li, Qin Qin; Zhang, Yun Zeng; Hu, Yue; Jiao, Jian; Guo, Hui Juan; Zhang, Xing Xing; Zhang, Biliang; Chen, Wen Xin; Tian, Chang Fu

    2017-12-01

    Receiving nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes does not guarantee rhizobia an effective symbiosis with legumes. Here, variations in gene content were determined for three Sinorhizobium species showing contrasting symbiotic efficiency on soybeans. A nitrate-reduction gene cluster absent in S. sojae was found to be essential for symbiotic adaptations of S. fredii and S. sp. III. In S. fredii, the deletion mutation of the nap (nitrate reductase), instead of nir (nitrite reductase) and nor (nitric oxide reductase), led to defects in nitrogen-fixation (Fix - ). By contrast, none of these core nitrate-reduction genes were required for the symbiosis of S. sp. III. However, within the same gene cluster, the deletion of hemN1 (encoding oxygen-independent coproporphyrinogen III oxidase) in both S. fredii and S. sp. III led to the formation of nitrogen-fixing (Fix + ) but ineffective (Eff - ) nodules. These Fix + /Eff - nodules were characterized by significantly lower enzyme activity of glutamine synthetase indicating rhizobial modulation of nitrogen-assimilation by plants. A distant homologue of HemN1 from S. sojae can complement this defect in S. fredii and S. sp. III, but exhibited a more pleotropic role in symbiosis establishment. These findings highlighted the lineage-dependent optimization of symbiotic functions in different rhizobial species associated with the same host. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The ataxia related G1107D mutation of the plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase isoform 3 affects its interplay with calmodulin and the autoinhibition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Tito; Frizzarin, Martina; Luoni, Laura; Zonta, Francesco; Pantano, Sergio; Cruz, Carlos; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Bertipaglia, Ilenia; Ruzzene, Maria; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Damiano, Nunzio; Marin, Oriano; Zanni, Ginevra; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Brini, Marisa; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    The plasma membrane Ca 2+ ATPases (PMCA pumps) have a long, cytosolic C-terminal regulatory region where a calmodulin-binding domain (CaM-BD) is located. Under basal conditions (low Ca 2+ ), the C-terminal tail of the pump interacts with autoinhibitory sites proximal to the active center of the enzyme. In activating conditions (i.e., high Ca 2+ ), Ca 2+ -bound CaM displaces the C-terminal tail from the autoinhibitory sites, restoring activity. We have recently identified a G1107D replacement within the CaM-BD of isoform 3 of the PMCA pump in a family affected by X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia. Here, we investigate the effects of the G1107D replacement on the interplay of the mutated CaM-BD with both CaM and the pump core, by combining computational, biochemical and functional approaches. We provide evidence that the affinity of the isolated mutated CaM-BD for CaM is significantly reduced with respect to the wild type (wt) counterpart, and that the ability of CaM to activate the pump in vitro is thus decreased. Multiscale simulations support the conclusions on the detrimental effect of the mutation, indicating reduced stability of the CaM binding. We further show that the G1107D replacement impairs the autoinhibition mechanism of the PMCA3 pump as well, as the introduction of a negative charge perturbs the contacts between the CaM-BD and the pump core. Thus, the mutation affects both the ability of the pump to optimally transport Ca 2+ in the activated state, and the autoinhibition mechanism in its resting state. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Language disorder with mild intellectual disability in a child affected by a novel mutation of SLC6A8 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battini, R; Chilosi, A M; Casarano, M; Moro, F; Comparini, A; Alessandrì, M G; Leuzzi, V; Tosetti, M; Cioni, G

    2011-02-01

    We describe the clinical and molecular features of a child harboring a novel mutation in SLC6A8 gene in association with a milder phenotype than other creatine transporter (CT1) deficient patients (OMIM 300352) [1-7]. The mutation c.757 G>C p.G253R in exon 4 of SLC6A8 was hemizygous in the child, aged 6 years and 6 months, who showed mild intellectual disability with severe speech and language delay. His carrier mother had borderline intellectual functioning. Although the neurochemical and biochemical parameters were fully consistent with those reported in the literature for subjects with CT1 deficit, in our patient within a general cognitive disability, a discrepancy between nonverbal and verbal skills was observed, confirming the peculiar vulnerability of language development under brain Cr depletion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Academia–Industry Symbiosis in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial “sponsoring” is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry’s point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry’s desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply “pure science” research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the “real world” at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate

  3. Academia-industry symbiosis in organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaudel, Quentin; Ishihara, Yoshihiro; Baran, Phil S

    2015-03-17

    Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial "sponsoring" is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry's point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry's desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply "pure science" research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the "real world" at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate groups, thereby presenting an

  4. Compound heterozygosity for two GHR missense mutations in a patient affected by Laron Syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moia, Stefania; Tessaris, Daniele; Einaudi, Silvia; de Sanctis, Luisa; Bona, Gianni; Bellone, Simonetta; Prodam, Flavia

    2017-10-12

    Mutations localized in the Growth Hormone Receptor (GHR) gene are often associated with the pathogenesis of Laron Syndrome, an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder characterized by severe growth retardation. Biochemically, patients present normal to high circulating GH levels, in presence of very low or undetectable IGF-I levels, which do not rise after rhGH treatment. We describe the case of a 3.8 years old girl with symmetrical short stature (-3.76 SDS), low IGF-1 and IGFBP-3, in presence of normal GH levels. Parents were not relatives and there was no family history of short stature. During the second day of birth, she developed severe hypoglycaemia that required glucose infusion. She presented frontal bossing and depressed nasal bridge. IGF-1 generation test showed no response, suggesting a GH resistance evidence. In the hypothesis of Laron Syndrome, we decided to perform a molecular analysis of Growth Hormone Receptor (GHR) gene. This analysis demonstrated that the patient was compound heterozygote for two missense mutations. GHR gene mutations are a well demonstrated cause of GH insensitivity. In heterozygous patients, probably the normal stature may be achieved by a compensatory mechanism of GH secretion or signalling. On the contrary, in homozygous or compound heterozygous patients these compensatory mechanisms are inadequate, and short stature may be the consequence.

  5. Affect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cetinic, M.; Diamanti, J.; Szeman, I.; Blacker, S.; Sully, J.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter historicizes four divergent but historically contemporaneous genres of affect theory – romantic, realist, speculative, and materialist. While critics credited with the turn to affect in the 1990s wrote largely in the wake of poststructuralism from the perspective of gender and queer

  6. Mutation in cyclophilin B that causes hyperelastosis cutis in American Quarter Horse does not affect peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity but shows altered cyclophilin B-protein interactions and affects collagen folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A; Boudko, Sergei P; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-06-22

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

  7. Mutation in Cyclophilin B That Causes Hyperelastosis Cutis in American Quarter Horse Does Not Affect Peptidylprolyl cis-trans Isomerase Activity but Shows Altered Cyclophilin B-Protein Interactions and Affects Collagen Folding*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A.; Boudko, Sergei P.; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R.; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M.; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:22556420

  8. The erratic mitochondrial clock: variations of mutation rate, not population size, affect mtDNA diversity across birds and mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galtier Nicolas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last ten years, major advances have been made in characterizing and understanding the evolution of mitochondrial DNA, the most popular marker of molecular biodiversity. Several important results were recently reported using mammals as model organisms, including (i the absence of relationship between mitochondrial DNA diversity and life-history or ecological variables, (ii the absence of prominent adaptive selection, contrary to what was found in invertebrates, and (iii the unexpectedly large variation in neutral substitution rate among lineages, revealing a possible link with species maximal longevity. We propose to challenge these results thanks to the bird/mammal comparison. Direct estimates of population size are available in birds, and this group presents striking life-history trait differences with mammals (higher mass-specific metabolic rate and longevity. These properties make birds the ideal model to directly test for population size effects, and to discriminate between competing hypotheses about the causes of substitution rate variation. Results A phylogenetic analysis of cytochrome b third-codon position confirms that the mitochondrial DNA mutation rate is quite variable in birds, passerines being the fastest evolving order. On average, mitochondrial DNA evolves slower in birds than in mammals of similar body size. This result is in agreement with the longevity hypothesis, and contradicts the hypothesis of a metabolic rate-dependent mutation rate. Birds show no footprint of adaptive selection on cytochrome b evolutionary patterns, but no link between direct estimates of population size and cytochrome b diversity. The mutation rate is the best predictor we have of within-species mitochondrial diversity in birds. It partly explains the differences in mitochondrial DNA diversity patterns observed between mammals and birds, previously interpreted as reflecting Hill-Robertson interferences with the W

  9. Mutations that abrogate transactivational activity of the feline leukemia virus long terminal repeat do not affect virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abujamra, Ana L.; Faller, Douglas V.; Ghosh, Sajal K.

    2003-01-01

    The U3 region of the LTR of oncogenic Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) and feline leukemia viruses (FeLV) have been previously reported to activate expression of specific cellular genes in trans, such as MHC class I, collagenase IV, and MCP-1, in an integration-independent manner. It has been suggested that transactivation of these specific cellular genes by leukemia virus U3-LTR may contribute to the multistage process of leukemogenesis. The U3-LTR region, necessary for gene transactivational activity, also contains multiple transcription factor-binding sites that are essential for normal virus replication. To dissect the promoter activity and the gene transactivational activity of the U3-LTR, we conducted mutational analysis of the U3-LTR region of FeLV-A molecular clone 61E. We identified minimal nucleotide substitution mutants on the U3 LTR that did not disturb transcription factor-binding sites but abrogated its ability to transactivate the collagenase gene promoter. To determine if these mutations actually have altered any uncharacterized important transcription factor-binding site, we introduced these U3-LTR mutations into the full-length infectious molecular clone 61E. We demonstrate that the mutant virus was replication competent but could not transactivate cellular gene expression. These results thus suggest that the gene transactivational activity is a distinct property of the LTR and possibly not related to its promoter activity. The cellular gene transactivational activity-deficient mutant FeLV generated in this study may also serve as a valuable reagent for testing the biological significance of LTR-mediated cellular gene activation in the tumorigenesis caused by leukemia viruses

  10. Applying industrial symbiosis to chemical industry: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hua; Liu, Changhao

    2017-08-01

    Chemical industry plays an important role in promoting the development of global economy and human society. However, the negative effects caused by chemical production cannot be ignored, which often leads to serious resource consumption and environmental pollution. It is essential for chemical industry to achieve a sustainable development. Industrial symbiosis is one of the key topics in the field of industrial ecology and circular economy, which has been identified as a creative path leading to sustainability. Based on an extensively searching for literatures on linking industrial symbiosis with chemical industry, this paper aims to review the literatures which involves three aspects: (1) economic and environmental benefits achieved by chemical industry through implementing industrial symbiosis, (2) chemical eco-industrial parks, (3) and safety issues for chemical industry. An outlook is also provided. This paper concludes that: (1) chemical industry can achieve both economic and environmental benefits by implementing industrial symbiosis, (2) establishing eco-industrial parks is essential for chemical industry to implement and improve industrial symbiosis, and (3) there is a close relationship between IS and safety issues of chemical industry.

  11. DELLA proteins regulate arbuscule formation in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floss, Daniela S; Levy, Julien G; Lévesque-Tremblay, Véronique; Pumplin, Nathan; Harrison, Maria J

    2013-12-17

    Most flowering plants are able to form endosymbioses with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In this mutualistic association, the fungus colonizes the root cortex and establishes elaborately branched hyphae, called arbuscules, within the cortical cells. Arbuscule development requires the cellular reorganization of both symbionts, and the resulting symbiotic interface functions in nutrient exchange. A plant symbiosis signaling pathway controls the development of the symbiosis. Several components of the pathway have been identified, but transcriptional regulators that control downstream pathways for arbuscule formation are still unknown. Here we show that DELLA proteins, which are repressors of gibberellic acid (GA) signaling and function at the nexus of several signaling pathways, are required for arbuscule formation. Arbuscule formation is severely impaired in a Medicago truncatula Mtdella1/Mtdella2 double mutant; GA treatment of wild-type roots phenocopies the della double mutant, and a dominant DELLA protein (della1-Δ18) enables arbuscule formation in the presence of GA. Ectopic expression of della1-Δ18 suggests that DELLA activity in the vascular tissue and endodermis is sufficient to enable arbuscule formation in the inner cortical cells. In addition, expression of della1-Δ18 restores arbuscule formation in the symbiosis signaling pathway mutant cyclops/ipd3, indicating an intersection between DELLA and symbiosis signaling for arbuscule formation. GA signaling also influences arbuscule formation in monocots, and a Green Revolution wheat variety carrying dominant DELLA alleles shows enhanced colonization but a limited growth response to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

  12. Disease-causing missense mutations affect enzymatic activity, stability and oligomerization of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keyser, B.; Muhlhausen, C.; Dickmanns, A.

    2008-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is an autosomal recessive neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase gene (GCDH), leading to an accumulation and high excretion of glutaric acid and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid. Considerable variation in severity of the clinical phenotype......Da GCDH complexes. Molecular modeling of mutant GCDH suggests that Met263 at the surface of the GCDH protein might be part of the contact interface to interacting proteins. These results indicate that reduced intramitochondrial stability as well as the impaired formation of homo- and heteromeric GCDH...

  13. Mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway affect root waving on tilted agar surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, R.; Gallois, P.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow in a wavy pattern upon a slanted surface. A novel mutation in the anthranilate synthase alpha 1 (ASA1) gene, named trp5-2wvc1, and mutations in the tryptophan synthase alpha and beta 1 genes (trp3-1 and trp2-1, respectively) confer a compressed root wave phenotype on tilted agar surfaces. When trp5-2wvc1 seedlings are grown on media supplemented with anthranilate metabolites, their roots wave like wild type. Genetic and pharmacological experiments argue that the compressed root wave phenotypes of trp5-2wvc1, trp2-1 and trp3-1 seedlings are not due to reduced IAA biosynthetic potential, but rather to a deficiency in L-tryptophan (L-Trp), or in a L-Trp derivative. Although the roots of 7-day-old seedlings possess higher concentrations of free L-Trp than the shoot as a whole, trp5-2wvc1 mutants show no detectable alteration in L-Trp levels in either tissue type, suggesting that a very localized shortage of L-Trp, or of a L-Trp-derived compound, is responsible for the observed phenotype.

  14. A mutation in human VAP-B--MSP domain, present in ALS patients, affects the interaction with other cellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitne-Neto, M; Ramos, C R R; Pimenta, D C; Luz, J S; Nishimura, A L; Gonzales, F A; Oliveira, C C; Zatz, M

    2007-09-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult-onset Motor Neuron Disease (MND), characterized by motor neurons death in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. Ten loci linked to Familial ALS have been mapped. ALS8 is caused by a substitution of a proline by a serine in the Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein-Associated protein-B/C (VAP-B/C). VAP-B belongs to a highly conserved family of proteins implicated in Endoplasmic Reticulum-Golgi and intra-Golgi transport and microtubules stabilization. Previous studies demonstrated that the P56S mutation disrupts the subcellular localization of VAP-B and that this position would be essential for Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) induced by VAP-B. In the present work we expressed and purified recombinant wild-type and P56S mutant VAP-B-MSP domain for the analysis of its interactions with other cellular proteins. Our findings suggest that the P56S mutation may lead to a less stable interaction of this endoplasmic reticulum protein with at least two other proteins: tubulin and GAPDH. These two proteins have been previously related to other forms of neurodegenerative diseases and are potential key points to understand ALS8 pathogenesis and other forms of MND. Understanding the role of these protein interactions may help the treatment of this devastating disease in the future.

  15. Factors affecting mutational specificity in mammalian cells: [Informal technical progress report], February 1, 1986-January 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    We analyzed the different c-H-ras mutations produced in cells after treatment with chemical carcinogens. The overall goal of this work is an understanding of the changes produced by environmental mutagens and carcinogens to learn how closely the results obtained with bacterial and cellular assay systems apply to the in vivo situation. Our work continues to utilize the technique for the study of DNA synthesis termination in vitro developed in this laboraory and utilized for the past several years. This technology can be characterized as a Sanger dideoxy sequencing technique with mutation induced lesions in the template strand serving as chain terminators instead of the dideoxynucleotides used in the Sanger technique to terminate the growing strand. We have added to this technique a modification for the study of termination on double stranded templates as possibly modeling more closely the natural situation. For this modification, double stranded M13 DNA is split once with a restriction enzyme which makes a unique cut and the linearized DNA is hybridized with single stranded circular DNA to make a uniquely nicked double stranded circle with a single 3'OH to serve as a primer for DNA synthesis which can occur by either strand displacement or nick translation

  16. On Human Symbiosis and the Vicissitudes of Individuation. Infantile Psychosis, Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Margaret S.

    The concepts of symbiosis and separation-individuation are explained, and the symbiosis theory of infantile psychosis is presented. Diagnostic considerations and clinical cases of child psychosis are reviewed; prototypes of mother-child interaction are described; and therapy is discussed. A summary of the symbiosis theory and a bibliography of…

  17. Protocol: using virus-induced gene silencing to study the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette; Olsen, Anne; Johansen, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    , the available PEBV-VIGS protocols are inadequate for studying genes involved in the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Here we describe a PEBV-VIGS protocol suitable for reverse genetics studies in pea of genes involved in the symbiosis with AMF and show its effectiveness in silencing genes...... involved in the early and late stages of AMF symbiosis....

  18. Understanding the low occurrence of Symbiosis Industrial in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Tonissi Moroni Cutovoi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the understanding of the low occurrence of Industrial Symbiosis in Brazil. The importance of public policies in Brazil, the development of public policies is confirmed by the institution of the National Solid Waste Policy (PNRS by Law No. 12,305 / 10. Note that companies seek symbiosis in response to regulatory pressure or to increase the efficiency of resource use, emissions reduction, or wastes. Further the importance of including social, cultural and business approaches in planning synergies between companies. Identifies environmental and cooperation regarding the responsibilities and capabilities of each aspect environmental management. Methodologically the study can be regarded as descriptive and exploratory purposes and in relation to the literature regarding methods. Finally, it will be possible barriers are raised on the relationship to the Industrial Symbiosis practices

  19. Symbiodinium genomes reveal adaptive evolution of functions related to symbiosis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Huanle; Stephens, Timothy G.; Gonzá lez-Pech, Raú l; Beltran, Victor H.; Lapeyre, Bruno; Bongaerts, Pim; Cooke, Ira; Bourne, David G.; Forê t, Sylvain; Miller, David John; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.; Voolstra, Christian R.; Ragan, Mark A.; Chan, Cheong Xin

    2017-01-01

    Symbiosis between dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium and reef-building corals forms the trophic foundation of the world's coral reef ecosystems. Here we present the first draft genome of Symbiodinium goreaui (Clade C, type C1: 1.03 Gbp), one of the most ubiquitous endosymbionts associated with corals, and an improved draft genome of Symbiodinium kawagutii (Clade F, strain CS-156: 1.05 Gbp), previously sequenced as strain CCMP2468, to further elucidate genomic signatures of this symbiosis. Comparative analysis of four available Symbiodinium genomes against other dinoflagellate genomes led to the identification of 2460 nuclear gene families that show evidence of positive selection, including genes involved in photosynthesis, transmembrane ion transport, synthesis and modification of amino acids and glycoproteins, and stress response. Further, we identified extensive sets of genes for meiosis and response to light stress. These draft genomes provide a foundational resource for advancing our understanding Symbiodinium biology and the coral-algal symbiosis.

  20. Symbiodinium genomes reveal adaptive evolution of functions related to symbiosis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Huanle

    2017-10-06

    Symbiosis between dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium and reef-building corals forms the trophic foundation of the world\\'s coral reef ecosystems. Here we present the first draft genome of Symbiodinium goreaui (Clade C, type C1: 1.03 Gbp), one of the most ubiquitous endosymbionts associated with corals, and an improved draft genome of Symbiodinium kawagutii (Clade F, strain CS-156: 1.05 Gbp), previously sequenced as strain CCMP2468, to further elucidate genomic signatures of this symbiosis. Comparative analysis of four available Symbiodinium genomes against other dinoflagellate genomes led to the identification of 2460 nuclear gene families that show evidence of positive selection, including genes involved in photosynthesis, transmembrane ion transport, synthesis and modification of amino acids and glycoproteins, and stress response. Further, we identified extensive sets of genes for meiosis and response to light stress. These draft genomes provide a foundational resource for advancing our understanding Symbiodinium biology and the coral-algal symbiosis.

  1. Nutrient Exchange and Regulation in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanxiao; Shi, Jincai; Xie, Qiujin; Jiang, Yina; Yu, Nan; Wang, Ertao

    2017-09-12

    Most land plants form symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. These are the most common and widespread terrestrial plant symbioses, which have a global impact on plant mineral nutrition. The establishment of AM symbiosis involves recognition of the two partners and bidirectional transport of different mineral and carbon nutrients through the symbiotic interfaces within the host root cells. Intriguingly, recent discoveries have highlighted that lipids are transferred from the plant host to AM fungus as a major carbon source. In this review, we discuss the transporter-mediated transfer of carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, potassium and sulfate, and present hypotheses pertaining to the potential regulatory mechanisms of nutrient exchange in AM symbiosis. Current challenges and future perspectives on AM symbiosis research are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The scid mutation does not affect slowly repairing potentially lethal damage that is sensitive to 0.23 M NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Ikebuchi, Makoto; Fushiki, Masato; Komatsu, Kenshi.

    1996-01-01

    The repair of slowly repairing potentially lethal damage (PLD) in radiosensitive cells from the severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mouse was compared with that in Balb/c 3T3 cells with ''wild-type'' radiosensitivity and that in RD13B2 cells derived from scid cells whose sensitivity is normal because of the presence of fragments of human chromosome 8. Treatment with 0.23 M NaCl was used for fixation of slowly repairing PLD. The scid cells repaired PLD sensitive to 0.23 M NaCl to a great extent whin 3-4 h, similarly to Balb/c 3T3 and RD13B2 cells. This indicates that the scid mutation hardly affects the repair of PLD sensitive to 0.23 M NaCl. On the other hand, as reported previously, the rapidly repairing PLD that is sensitive to 0.5 M NaCl was repaired only slowly (3-4 h) in scid cells, in contrast to the rapid repair (within 1 h) seen with Balb/c 3T3 and RD13B2. This suggests that scid mutation is responsible for this repair at reduced rate. To confirm the independence of repair of 0.23 M NaCl-sensitive PLD from that of 0.5 M NaCl-sensitive PLD, both treatments with 0.23 M NaCl and 0.5 M NaCl were combined in each line. It is found that the repair of either PLD was not affected by the other treatment. The scid mutation impaired only the repair of 0.5 M NaCl-sensitive PLD. (author)

  3. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Affecting Residue Arg138 of Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase Cause a Progeroid Form of Autosomal-Dominant Cutis Laxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Ganesh, Jaya; Tan, Yu Xuan; Al Bughaili, Mohammed; Lin, Angela E; Sahai, Inderneel; Bahena, Paulina; Reichert, Sara L; Loh, Abigail; Wright, Graham D; Liu, Jaron; Rahikkala, Elisa; Pivnick, Eniko K; Choudhri, Asim F; Krüger, Ulrike; Zemojtel, Tomasz; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Mostafavi, Roya; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Symoens, Sofie; Pajunen, Leila; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Meierhofer, David; Robinson, Peter N; Mundlos, Stefan; Villarroel, Camilo E; Byers, Peter; Masri, Amira; Robertson, Stephen P; Schwarze, Ulrike; Callewaert, Bert; Reversade, Bruno; Kornak, Uwe

    2015-09-03

    Progeroid disorders overlapping with De Barsy syndrome (DBS) are collectively denoted as autosomal-recessive cutis laxa type 3 (ARCL3). They are caused by biallelic mutations in PYCR1 or ALDH18A1, encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), respectively, which both operate in the mitochondrial proline cycle. We report here on eight unrelated individuals born to non-consanguineous families clinically diagnosed with DBS or wrinkly skin syndrome. We found three heterozygous mutations in ALDH18A1 leading to amino acid substitutions of the same highly conserved residue, Arg138 in P5CS. A de novo origin was confirmed in all six probands for whom parental DNA was available. Using fibroblasts from affected individuals and heterologous overexpression, we found that the P5CS-p.Arg138Trp protein was stable and able to interact with wild-type P5CS but showed an altered sub-mitochondrial distribution. A reduced size upon native gel electrophoresis indicated an alteration of the structure or composition of P5CS mutant complex. Furthermore, we found that the mutant cells had a reduced P5CS enzymatic activity leading to a delayed proline accumulation. In summary, recurrent de novo mutations, affecting the highly conserved residue Arg138 of P5CS, cause an autosomal-dominant form of cutis laxa with progeroid features. Our data provide insights into the etiology of cutis laxa diseases and will have immediate impact on diagnostics and genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutations in the DNA-binding domain of NR2E3 affect in vivo dimerization and interaction with CRX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Roduit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NR2E3 (PNR is an orphan nuclear receptor essential for proper photoreceptor determination and differentiation. In humans, mutations in NR2E3 have been associated with the recessively inherited enhanced short wavelength sensitive (S- cone syndrome (ESCS and, more recently, with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP. NR2E3 acts as a suppressor of the cone generation program in late mitotic retinal progenitor cells. In adult rod photoreceptors, NR2E3 represses cone-specific gene expression and acts in concert with the transcription factors CRX and NRL to activate rod-specific genes. NR2E3 and CRX have been shown to physically interact in vitro through their respective DNA-binding domains (DBD. The DBD also contributes to homo- and heterodimerization of nuclear receptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed NR2E3 homodimerization and NR2E3/CRX complex formation in an in vivo situation by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET(2. NR2E3 wild-type protein formed homodimers in transiently transfected HEK293T cells. NR2E3 homodimerization was impaired in presence of disease-causing mutations in the DBD, except for the p.R76Q and p.R104W mutant proteins. Strikingly, the adRP-linked p.G56R mutant protein interacted with CRX with a similar efficiency to that of NR2E3 wild-type and p.R311Q proteins. In contrast, all other NR2E3 DBD-mutant proteins did not interact with CRX. The p.G56R mutant protein was also more effective in abolishing the potentiation of rhodospin gene transactivation by the NR2E3 wild-type protein. In addition, the p.G56R mutant enhanced the transrepression of the M- and S-opsin promoter, while all other NR2E3 DBD-mutants did not. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest different disease mechanisms in adRP- and ESCS-patients carrying NR2E3 mutations. Titration of CRX by the p.G56R mutant protein acting as a repressor in trans may account for the severe clinical phenotype in adRP patients.

  5. Symbiosis-induced adaptation to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richier, Sophie; Furla, Paola; Plantivaux, Amandine; Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Allemand, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Cnidarians in symbiosis with photosynthetic protists must withstand daily hyperoxic/anoxic transitions within their host cells. Comparative studies between symbiotic (Anemonia viridis) and non-symbiotic (Actinia schmidti) sea anemones show striking differences in their response to oxidative stress. First, the basal expression of SOD is very different. Symbiotic animal cells have a higher isoform diversity (number and classes) and a higher activity than the non-symbiotic cells. Second, the symbiotic animal cells of A. viridis also maintain unaltered basal values for cellular damage when exposed to experimental hyperoxia (100% O(2)) or to experimental thermal stress (elevated temperature +7 degrees C above ambient). Under such conditions, A. schmidti modifies its SOD activity significantly. Electrophoretic patterns diversify, global activities diminish and cell damage biomarkers increase. These data suggest symbiotic cells adapt to stress while non-symbiotic cells remain acutely sensitive. In addition to being toxic, high O(2) partial pressure (P(O(2))) may also constitute a preconditioning step for symbiotic animal cells, leading to an adaptation to the hyperoxic condition and, thus, to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in aposymbiotic animal cells of A. viridis, repression of some animal SOD isoforms is observed. Meanwhile, in cultured symbionts, new activity bands are induced, suggesting that the host might protect its zooxanthellae in hospite. Similar results have been observed in other symbiotic organisms, such as the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Molecular or physical interactions between the two symbiotic partners may explain such variations in SOD activity and might confer oxidative stress tolerance to the animal host.

  6. In Azospirillum brasilense, mutations in flmA or flmB genes affect polar flagellum assembly, surface polysaccharides, and attachment to maize roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Fernando Ariel; Medeot, Daniela Beatriz; Liaudat, Juan Pablo; Pistorio, Mariano; Jofré, Edgardo

    2016-09-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a soil bacterium capable of promoting plant growth. Several surface components were previously reported to be involved in the attachment of A. brasilense to root plants. Among these components are the exopolysaccharide (EPS), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the polar flagellum. Flagellin from polar flagellum is glycosylated and it was suggested that genes involved in such a posttranslational modification are the same ones involved in the biosynthesis of sugars present in the O-antigen of the LPS. In this work, we report on the characterization of two homologs present in A. brasilense Cd, to the well characterized flagellin modification genes, flmA and flmB, from Aeromonas caviae. We show that mutations in either flmA or flmB genes of A. brasilense resulted in non-motile cells due to alterations in the polar flagellum assembly. Moreover, these mutations also affected the capability of A. brasilense cells to adsorb to maize roots and to produce LPS and EPS. By generating a mutant containing the polar flagellum affected in their rotation, we show the importance of the bacterial motility for the early colonization of maize roots. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic and epigenetic mutations affect the DNA binding capability of human ZFP57 in transient neonatal diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglivo, Ilaria; Esposito, Sabrina; De Cesare, Lucia; Sparago, Angela; Anvar, Zahra; Riso, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Marco; Fattorusso, Roberto; Grimaldi, Giovanna; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Paolo V

    2013-05-21

    In the mouse, ZFP57 contains three classical Cys2His2 zinc finger domains (ZF) and recognizes the methylated TGC(met)CGC target sequence using the first and the second ZFs. In this study, we demonstrate that the human ZFP57 (hZFP57) containing six Cys2His2 ZFs, binds the same methylated sequence through the third and the fourth ZFs, and identify the aminoacids critical for DNA interaction. In addition, we present evidences indicating that hZFP57 mutations and hypomethylation of the TNDM1 ICR both associated with Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus type 1 result in loss of hZFP57 binding to the TNDM1 locus, likely causing PLAGL1 activation. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sweat chloride and immunoreactive trypsinogen in infants carrying two CFTR mutations and not affected by cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Carlo; Tridello, Gloria; Tamanini, Anna; Assael, Baroukh M

    2017-07-01

    Newborns with raised immunotrypsinogen levels who have non-pathological sweat chloride values and carry two cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator ( CFTR ) mutations of which at least one is not acknowledged to be cystic fibrosis (CF)-causing are at risk of developing clinical manifestations consistent with CFTR-related disorders or even CF. It is not known whether newborns with similar genotypes and normal immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) may share the same risk. This study found that newborns with these characteristics and normal IRT have lower sweat chloride values than those with raised IRT (p=0.007). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. MILDEW LOCUS O Mutation Does Not Affect Resistance to Grain Infections with Fusarium spp. and Ramularia collo-cygni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Katharina; Linkmeyer, Andrea; Textor, Katharina; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Hess, Michael

    2015-09-01

    MILDEW LOCUS O defines a major susceptibility gene for powdery mildew, and recessive mlo resistance alleles are widely used in breeding for powdery mildew resistance in spring barley. Barley powdery mildew resistance, which is conferred by mlo genes, is considered to be costly in terms of spontaneous defense reactions and enhanced susceptibility to cell-death-inducing pathogens. We assessed fungal infestation of barley (Hordeum vulgare) grain by measuring fungal DNA after natural infection with Fusarium spp. and Ramularia collo-cygni or after inoculation with Fusarium spp. in the field. Powdery-mildew-resistant mlo5 genotypes did not show enhanced Fusarium spp. or R. collo-cygni DNA content of grain over four consecutive years. Data add to our understanding of pleiotropic effects of mlo-mediated powdery mildew resistance and contributes to the discussion of whether or not application of barley mlo mutations may support pathogenesis of cell-death-inducing fungal pathogens under field conditions.

  10. Using answer set programming to integrate RNA expression with signalling pathway information to infer how mutations affect ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Irene; Ziehm, Matthias; Wieser, Daniela; Alic, Nazif; Partridge, Linda; Thornton, Janet M

    2012-01-01

    A challenge of systems biology is to integrate incomplete knowledge on pathways with existing experimental data sets and relate these to measured phenotypes. Research on ageing often generates such incomplete data, creating difficulties in integrating RNA expression with information about biological processes and the phenotypes of ageing, including longevity. Here, we develop a logic-based method that employs Answer Set Programming, and use it to infer signalling effects of genetic perturbations, based on a model of the insulin signalling pathway. We apply our method to RNA expression data from Drosophila mutants in the insulin pathway that alter lifespan, in a foxo dependent fashion. We use this information to deduce how the pathway influences lifespan in the mutant animals. We also develop a method for inferring the largest common sub-paths within each of our signalling predictions. Our comparisons reveal consistent homeostatic mechanisms across both long- and short-lived mutants. The transcriptional changes observed in each mutation usually provide negative feedback to signalling predicted for that mutation. We also identify an S6K-mediated feedback in two long-lived mutants that suggests a crosstalk between these pathways in mutants of the insulin pathway, in vivo. By formulating the problem as a logic-based theory in a qualitative fashion, we are able to use the efficient search facilities of Answer Set Programming, allowing us to explore larger pathways, combine molecular changes with pathways and phenotype and infer effects on signalling in in vivo, whole-organism, mutants, where direct signalling stimulation assays are difficult to perform. Our methods are available in the web-service NetEffects: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/software/NetEffects.

  11. CARBON CYCLES, NITROGEN FIXATION AND THE LEGUME-RHIZOBIA SYMBIOSIS AS SOIL CONTAMINANT BIOTEST SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Werner

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The major pools and turnover  rates of the global carbon (C cycles are presented and compared to the human production of CO2  from the burning of fossil fuels (e.g. coal and oil and geothermal  fuels (natural  gases, both categorized as non-renewable energy resources which  in amount  reaches around  6.5 Gigatons C per year. These pools that serve as C-holding stallions  are in the atmosphere,  the land plant biomass, the organic soils carbon, the ocean carbon and the lithosphere. In another related case, the present focus in the area of nitrogen  fixation  is discussed with  data on world  production of grain  legumes  compared  to cereals production and nitrogen  fertilizer use. The focus to understand  the molecular  biology of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis as a major contributor to nitrogen  fixation  is in the areas of signal exchange between  host plants and rhizobia  in the rhizophere including  the nod factor signalling, the infection  and nodule compartmentation and the soils stress factors affecting the symbiosis. The use of the Legume-Rhizobia symbiosis as a biotest system for soil contaminants includes data for cadmium,  arsenate, atrazine,  lindane,  fluoranthene, phenantrene and acenaphthene and also results  on the mechanism,  why the symbiotic system is more sensitive  than test systems with plant growth  parameters.

  12. Context Dependency of a Marine Defensive Symbiosis over a Wide Geographic Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopanik, N.; Linneman, J.; Mathew, M.

    2016-02-01

    The invasive, temperate marine bryozoan Bugula neritina possesses an uncultured, vertically-transmitted bacterial symbiont that produces natural products known as bryostatins. These unpalatable polyketides protect the host larvae from predation. In the western Atlantic, two host genotypes were thought to be restricted to differing latitudes based on the presence of the defensive symbiont: undefended aposymbiotic Type N animals were found at high latitudes, while defended symbiotic Type S colonies were found at low latitudes, where predation pressure is higher. We found that the host genotypes are more widespread than previously thought, but that the symbiont appeared to be restricted to hosts at lower latitudes, regardless of host phylotype, leading to the question of what factors are involved in restricting the symbiont's range. We performed reciprocal transplant experiments of symbiotic and antibiotic-cured hosts, and measured host growth, a proxy for fitness. Our data indicate that possession of the symbiont appears to present a physiological cost to the host. This cost may be more pronounced at higher latitudes where the benefit of symbiosis is less apparent. In addition, preliminary evidence suggests that symbiont titer in a Type S colony from North Carolina transplanted to Virginia is reduced over a period of nearly 4 months. Taken together, these results suggest that a combination of factors may play a role in the distribution of the defensive symbiont: (i) hosts that possess the symbiont are outcompeted by aposymbiotic conspecifics at high latitude and reduced levels of predation pressure; and (ii) symbiont growth may be inhibited or sanctioned by the host at high latitudes. As defensive symbiosis is an important trait in marine habitats, understanding factors that affect the distribution of both the host and symbiont are necessary to fully appreciate the ecological impact of symbiosis.

  13. Point mutations in EBV gH that abrogate or differentially affect B cell and epithelial cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Liguo; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M.

    2007-01-01

    Cell fusion mediated by Epstein-Barr virus requires three conserved glycoproteins, gB and gHgL, but activation is cell type specific. B cell fusion requires interaction between MHC class II and a fourth virus glycoprotein, gp42, which complexes non-covalently with gHgL. Epithelial cell fusion requires interaction between gHgL and a novel epithelial cell coreceptor and is blocked by excess gp42. We show here that gp42 interacts directly with gH and that point mutations in the region of gH recognized by an antibody that differentially inhibits epithelial and B cell fusion significantly impact both the core fusion machinery and cell-specific events. Substitution of alanine for glycine at residue 594 completely abrogates fusion with either B cells or epithelial cells. Substitution of alanine for glutamic acid at residue 595 reduces fusion with epithelial cells, greatly enhances fusion with B cells and allows low levels of B cell fusion even in the absence of gL

  14. Mutations that promote furin-independent growth of Semliki Forest virus affect p62-E1 interactions and membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinyong; Kielian, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    The enveloped alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a low pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction mediated by the E1 protein. E1's fusion activity is regulated by its heterodimeric interaction with a companion membrane protein E2. Mature E2 protein is generated by furin processing of the precursor p62. Processing destabilizes the heterodimer, allowing dissociation at acidic pH, E1 conformational changes, and membrane fusion. We used a furin-deficient cell line, FD11, to select for SFV mutants that show increased growth in the absence of p62 processing. We isolated and characterized 7 such pci mutants (p62 cleavage independent), which retained the parental furin cleavage site but showed significant increases in their ability to carry out membrane fusion in the p62 form. Sequence analysis of the pci mutants identified mutations primarily on the E2 protein, and suggested sites important in the interaction of p62 with E1 and the regulation of fusion

  15. Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli. Pt. 2. Factors affecting loss of photoreversibility of UV induced mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doubleday, O P; Bridges, B A; Green, M H.L. [Medical Research Council, Brighton (UK). Cell Mutation Unit

    1975-01-01

    The photoreversibility of UV-induced mutations to Trp/sup +/ in strain Escherichia coli WP2 uvr A trp (unable to excise pyrimidine dimers) was lost at different rates during incubation in different media. In Casamino acids medium after a short initial lag, photoreversibility was lost over about one generation time; in minimal medium with tryptophan, photoreversibility persisted for more than two generations; in Casamino acids medium with pantoyl lactone photoreversibility was lost extremely slowly. The rate of loss of photoreversibility was unaffected by UV dose in either Casamino acids medium or in minimal medium. The same eventual number of induced mutants was obtained when cells were incubated for two generations in any of the three media before being transferred to selective plates supplemented with Casamino acids. Thus in each the proportion of cells capable of giving rise to a mutant was the same and only the rate at which these cells did so during post-irradiation growth varied, suggesting that there might be a specific fraction of pyrimidine dimers at a given site capable of initiating a mutagenic repair event, and that the size of this fraction is dose dependent. Segregation experiments have shown that error-prone repair appears to occur once only and is not repeated in subsequent replication cycles, in contrast to (presumed error-free) recombination repair. The results are discussed in the light of current models of UV mutagenesis.

  16. Brain-Based Indices for User System Symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Veltman, J.A.; Grootjen, M.

    2010-01-01

    The future generation user system interfaces need to be user-centric which goes beyond user-friendly and includes understanding and anticipating user intentions. We introduce the concept of operator models, their role in implementing user-system symbiosis, and the usefulness of brain-based indices

  17. Symbiosis of chemometrics and metabolomics: past, present, and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Greef, J.; Smilde, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    Metabolomics is a growing area in the field of systems biology. Metabolomics has already a long history and also the connection of metabolomics with chemometrics goes back some time. This review discusses the symbiosis of metabolomics and chemometrics with emphasis on the medical domain, puts the

  18. The vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis | Quilambo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi are associated with the majority ot the terrestrial plants. Their function ranges from stress alleviation to bioremediation in soils polluted with heavy metals. However, our knowledge about this symbiosis is still limited. For the semi-arid tropics, where some african countries are located, ...

  19. Reciprocal genomic evolution in the ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Sanne; Hu, Haofu; Li, Cai

    2016-01-01

    The attine ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis evolved over tens of millions of years, producing complex societies with industrial-scale farming analogous to that of humans. Here we document reciprocal shifts in the genomes and transcriptomes of seven fungus-farming ant species and their fungal...

  20. Signaling events during initiation of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Alexa M; Harrison, Maria J

    2014-03-01

    Under nutrient-limiting conditions, plants will enter into symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi for the enhancement of mineral nutrient acquisition from the surrounding soil. AM fungi live in close, intracellular association with plant roots where they transfer phosphate and nitrogen to the plant in exchange for carbon. They are obligate fungi, relying on their host as their only carbon source. Much has been discovered in the last decade concerning the signaling events during initiation of the AM symbiosis, including the identification of signaling molecules generated by both partners. This signaling occurs through symbiosis-specific gene products in the host plant, which are indispensable for normal AM development. At the same time, plants have adapted complex mechanisms for avoiding infection by pathogenic fungi, including an innate immune response to general microbial molecules, such as chitin present in fungal cell walls. How it is that AM fungal colonization is maintained without eliciting a defensive response from the host is still uncertain. In this review, we present a summary of the molecular signals and their elicited responses during initiation of the AM symbiosis, including plant immune responses and their suppression. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Clinical and molecular features of an infant patient affected by Leigh Disease associated to m.14459G > A mitochondrial DNA mutation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moggio Maurizio

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leigh Syndrome (LS is a severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by bilateral symmetrical necrotic lesions in the basal ganglia and brainstem. Onset is in early infancy and prognosis is poor. Causative mutations have been disclosed in mitochondrial DNA and nuclear genes affecting respiratory chain subunits and assembly factors. Case presentation Here we report the clinical and molecular features of a 15-month-old female LS patient. Direct sequencing of her muscle-derived mtDNA revealed the presence of two apparently homoplasmic variants: the novel m.14792C > G and the already known m.14459G > A resulting in p.His16Asp change in cytochrome b (MT-CYB and p.Ala72Val substitution in ND6 subunit, respectively. The m.14459G > A was heteroplasmic in the mother's blood-derived DNA. Conclusions The m.14459G > A might lead to LS, complicated LS or Leber Optic Hereditary Neuropathy. A comprehensive re-evaluation of previously described 14459G > A-mutated patients does not explain this large clinical heterogeneity.

  2. Mutations that alter a conserved element upstream of the potato virus X triple block and coat protein genes affect subgenomic RNA accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K H; Hemenway, C

    1997-05-26

    The putative subgenomic RNA (sgRNA) promoter regions upstream of the potato virus X (PVX) triple block and coat protein (CP) genes contain sequences common to other potexviruses. The importance of these sequences to PVX sgRNA accumulation was determined by inoculation of Nicotiana tabacum NT1 cell suspension protoplasts with transcripts derived from wild-type and modified PVX cDNA clones. Analyses of RNA accumulation by S1 nuclease digestion and primer extension indicated that a conserved octanucleotide sequence element and the spacing between this element and the start-site for sgRNA synthesis are critical for accumulation of the two major sgRNA species. The impact of mutations on CP sgRNA levels was also reflected in the accumulation of CP. In contrast, genomic minus- and plus-strand RNA accumulation were not significantly affected by mutations in these regions. Studies involving inoculation of tobacco plants with the modified transcripts suggested that the conserved octanucleotide element functions in sgRNA accumulation and some other aspect of the infection process.

  3. Novel ETHE1 mutation in a carrier couple having prior offspring affected with ethylmalonic encephalopathy: Genetic analysis, clinical management and reproductive outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, David J

    2010-03-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is an autosomally recessive inherited disorder with a relentlessly progressive decline in neurological function, usually fatal by the age of ten. It is characterised by generalised hypotonia, psychomotor regression, spastic tetraparesis, dystonia, seizures and, eventually, global neurological failure. Approximately 50 reports have been published worldwide describing this devastating disease, most involving patients of Mediterranean or Arab origin. The fundamental defect in EE likely involves the impairment of a mitochondrial sulphur dioxygenase coded by the ETHE1 gene responsible for the catabolism of sulphide, which subsequently accumulates to toxic levels. A diagnosis of EE should initiate careful genetic evaluation and counselling, particularly if the parents intend to have additional offspring. The present report describes the diagnosis of EE in a reproductive endocrinology context, where both members of a non-consanguineous couple were confirmed to be carriers of an identical A↷G mutation. This previously unknown mutation at nucleotide position c.494 resulted in an amino acid substitution, p.Asp165Gly. Although consideration was given to in vitro fertilisation, embryo biopsy and single gene pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, the couple decided to first utilise a less aggressive therapeutic approach with donor sperm insemination. Pregnancy with a low risk of EE was indeed achieved; however, the infant was affected with a different anomaly (hypoplastic left heart). As this case demonstrates, prior to the initiation of fertility therapy, genetic analysis may be used to provide a confirmatory diagnosis when EE is suspected.

  4. Mutational analysis of the Wolfram syndrome gene in two families with chromosome 4p-linked bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, K L; Lawson, D; Meitinger, T; Blackwood, D H; Porteous, D J

    2000-04-03

    Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) is a complex disease with a significant genetic component. Heterozygous carriers of Wolfram syndrome (WFS) are at increased risk of psychiatric illness. A gene for WFS (WFS1) has recently been cloned and mapped to chromosome 4p, in the general region we previously reported as showing linkage to BPAD. Here we present sequence analysis of the WFS1 coding sequence in five affected individuals from two chromosome 4p-linked families. This resulted in the identification of six polymorphisms, two of which are predicted to change the amino acid sequence of the WFS1 protein, however none of the changes segregated with disease status. Am. J. Med. Genet. (Neuropsychiatr. Genet.) 96:158-160, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Mutations in the voltage-sensing domain affect the alternative ion permeation pathway in the TRPM3 channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Katharina; Gruss, Fabian; Aloi, Vincenzo Davide; Janssens, Annelies; Ulens, Chris; Voets, Thomas; Vriens, Joris

    2018-03-31

    mutations in S4 can create an analogous 'omega' pore, we performed site-directed mutagenesis studies and patch clamp experiments to identify amino acid residues involved in the formation of the non-canonical pore in TRPM3. Based on our results, we pinpoint four residues in S4 (W982, R985, D988 and G991) as crucial determinants of the properties of the alternative ion permeation pathway. © 2018 KU Leuven The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  6. Pyrosequencing-Based Assays for Rapid Detection of HER2 and HER3 Mutations in Clinical Samples Uncover an E332E Mutation Affecting HER3 in Retroperitoneal Leiomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula González-Alonso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors (HER are associated with poor prognosis of several types of solid tumors. Although HER-mutation detection methods are currently available, such as Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS, alternative pyrosequencing allow the rapid characterization of specific mutations. We developed specific PCR-based pyrosequencing assays for identification of most prevalent HER2 and HER3 mutations, including S310F/Y, R678Q, L755M/P/S/W, V777A/L/M, 774-776 insertion, and V842I mutations in HER2, as well as M91I, V104M/L, D297N/V/Y, and E332E/K mutations in HER3. We tested 85 Formalin Fixed and Paraffin Embbeded (FFPE samples and we detected three HER2-V842I mutations in colorectal carcinoma (CRC, ovarian carcinoma, and pancreatic carcinoma patients, respectively, and a HER2-L755M mutation in a CRC specimen. We also determined the presence of a HER3-E332K mutation in an urothelial carcinoma sample, and two HER3-D297Y mutations, in both gastric adenocarcinoma and CRC specimens. The D297Y mutation was previously detected in breast and gastric tumors, but not in CRC. Moreover, we found a not-previously-described HER3-E332E synonymous mutation in a retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma patient. The pyrosequencing assays presented here allow the detection and characterization of specific HER2 and HER3 mutations. These pyrosequencing assays might be implemented in routine diagnosis for molecular characterization of HER2/HER3 receptors as an alternative to complex NGS approaches.

  7. Toward a better understanding of the mechanisms of symbiosis: a comprehensive proteome map of a nascent insect symbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renoz, François; Champagne, Antoine; Degand, Hervé; Faber, Anne-Marie; Morsomme, Pierre; Foray, Vincent; Hance, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria are common in insects and can affect various aspects of their hosts' biology. Although the effects of insect symbionts have been clarified for various insect symbiosis models, due to the difficulty of cultivating them in vitro , there is still limited knowledge available on the molecular features that drive symbiosis. Serratia symbiotica is one of the most common symbionts found in aphids. The recent findings of free-living strains that are considered as nascent partners of aphids provide the opportunity to examine the molecular mechanisms that a symbiont can deploy at the early stages of the symbiosis (i.e., symbiotic factors). In this work, a proteomic approach was used to establish a comprehensive proteome map of the free-living S. symbiotica strain CWBI-2.3 T . Most of the 720 proteins identified are related to housekeeping or primary metabolism. Of these, 76 were identified as candidate proteins possibly promoting host colonization. Our results provide strong evidence that S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3 T is well-armed for invading insect host tissues, and suggest that certain molecular features usually harbored by pathogenic bacteria are no longer present. This comprehensive proteome map provides a series of candidate genes for further studies to understand the molecular cross-talk between insects and symbiotic bacteria.

  8. Toward a better understanding of the mechanisms of symbiosis: a comprehensive proteome map of a nascent insect symbiont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Renoz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic bacteria are common in insects and can affect various aspects of their hosts’ biology. Although the effects of insect symbionts have been clarified for various insect symbiosis models, due to the difficulty of cultivating them in vitro, there is still limited knowledge available on the molecular features that drive symbiosis. Serratia symbiotica is one of the most common symbionts found in aphids. The recent findings of free-living strains that are considered as nascent partners of aphids provide the opportunity to examine the molecular mechanisms that a symbiont can deploy at the early stages of the symbiosis (i.e., symbiotic factors. In this work, a proteomic approach was used to establish a comprehensive proteome map of the free-living S. symbiotica strain CWBI-2.3T. Most of the 720 proteins identified are related to housekeeping or primary metabolism. Of these, 76 were identified as candidate proteins possibly promoting host colonization. Our results provide strong evidence that S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T is well-armed for invading insect host tissues, and suggest that certain molecular features usually harbored by pathogenic bacteria are no longer present. This comprehensive proteome map provides a series of candidate genes for further studies to understand the molecular cross-talk between insects and symbiotic bacteria.

  9. The Metronome of Symbiosis: Interactions Between Microbes and the Host Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C

    2016-11-01

    The entrainment of circadian rhythms, physiological cycles with a period of about 24 h, is regulated by a variety of mechanisms, including nonvisual photoreception. While circadian rhythms have been shown to be integral to many processes in multicellular organisms, including immune regulation, the effect of circadian rhythms on symbiosis, or host-microbe interactions, has only recently begun to be studied. This review summarizes recent work in the interactions of both pathogenic and mutualistic associations with host and symbiont circadian rhythms, focusing specifically on three mutualistic systems in which this phenomenon has been best studied. One important theme taken from these studies is the fact that mutualisms are profoundly affected by the circadian rhythms of the host, but that the microbial symbionts in these associations can, in turn, manipulate host rhythms. The interplay between circadian rhythms and symbiosis is a promising new field with effects that should be kept in mind when designing future studies across biology. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Industrial Symbiosis as a Social Process : Developing theory and methods for the longitudinal investigation of social dynamics in the emergence and development of industrial symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Spekkink (Wouter)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractIndustrial symbiosis is a process in which firms in regional industrial systems engage in the exchange of by-products and sharing of utilities and services in order to improve their environmental and economic performance. Industrial symbiosis has a prominent social dimension. To

  11. Establishment of coral-algal symbiosis requires attraction and selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yamashita

    Full Text Available Coral reef ecosystems are based on coral-zooxanthellae symbiosis. During the initiation of symbiosis, majority of corals acquire their own zooxanthellae (specifically from the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium from surrounding environments. The mechanisms underlying the initial establishment of symbiosis have attracted much interest, and numerous field and laboratory experiments have been conducted to elucidate this establishment. However, it is still unclear whether the host corals selectively or randomly acquire their symbionts from surrounding environments. To address this issue, we initially compared genetic compositions of Symbiodinium within naturally settled about 2-week-old Acropora coral juveniles (recruits and those in the adjacent seawater as the potential symbiont source. We then performed infection tests using several types of Symbiodinium culture strains and apo-symbiotic (does not have Symbiodinium cells yet Acropora coral larvae. Our field observations indicated apparent preference toward specific Symbiodinium genotypes (A1 and D1-4 within the recruits, despite a rich abundance of other Symbiodinium in the environmental population pool. Laboratory experiments were in accordance with this field observation: Symbiodinium strains of type A1 and D1-4 showed higher infection rates for Acropora larvae than other genotype strains, even when supplied at lower cell densities. Subsequent attraction tests revealed that three Symbiodinium strains were attracted toward Acropora larvae, and within them, only A1 and D1-4 strains were acquired by the larvae. Another three strains did not intrinsically approach to the larvae. These findings suggest the initial establishment of corals-Symbiodinium symbiosis is not random, and the infection mechanism appeared to comprise two steps: initial attraction step and subsequent selective uptake by the coral.

  12. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.; Aerts, A.; Ahren, D.; Brun, A.; Danchin, E. G. J.; Duchaussoy, F.; Gibon, J.; Kohler, A.; Lindquist, E.; Peresa, V.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H. J.; Wuyts, J.; Blaudez, D.; Buee, M.; Brokstein, P.; Canback, B.; Cohen, D.; Courty, P. E.; Coutinho, P. M.; Delaruelle, C.; Detter, J. C.; Deveau, A.; DiFazio, S.; Duplessis, S.; Fraissinet-Tachet, L.; Lucic, E.; Frey-Klett, P.; Fourrey, C.; Feussner, I.; Gay, G.; Grimwood, J.; Hoegger, P. J.; Jain, P.; Kilaru, S.; Labbe, J.; Lin, Y. C.; Legue, V.; Le Tacon, F.; Marmeisse, R.; Melayah, D.; Montanini, B.; Muratet, M.; Nehls, U.; Niculita-Hirzel, H.; Secq, M. P. Oudot-Le; Peter, M.; Quesneville, H.; Rajashekar, B.; Reich, M.; Rouhier, N.; Schmutz, J.; Yin, T.; Chalot, M.; Henrissat, B.; Kues, U.; Lucas, S.; Van de Peer, Y.; Podila, G. K.; Polle, A.; Pukkila, P. J.; Richardson, P. M.; Rouze, P.; Sanders, I. R.; Stajich, J. E.; Tunlid, A.; Tuskan, G.; Grigoriev, I. V.

    2007-08-10

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants 1, 2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are

  13. Zooxanthellar symbiosis in planula larvae of the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaither, Michelle R; Rowan, Rob

    2010-04-30

    We characterized the planular-zooxanthellae symbiosis of the coral Pocillopora damicornis using criteria that are familiar in studies on corals. Similar to adult corals, planulae exhibited photoacclimation, as changes in symbiont chlorophyll a (chl a); changes in the light-saturation constant for photosynthesis (I(k)); and, at insufficient light, fewer zooxanthellae, decreased respiration, increased weight loss, and increased sensitivity to photoinhibition. Numbers of zooxanthellae in newly-released planulae varied by at least three-fold within broods. Planulae with low versus high numbers of zooxanthellae (termed pale versus dark planulae, respectively) did not differ in symbiont chl-a content, I(k), or biomass-specific rate of dark respiration. Pale planulae had lower rates of photosynthesis, but this difference vanished after three weeks, when zooxanthellar numbers increased by 225% in pale planulae and by 31% in dark planulae. Numbers of zooxanthellae also increased significantly in planulae cultured in ammonium-enriched seawater; ammonium also apparently prevented weight loss and induced settlement. Approximately 70% of photosynthetically-fixed carbon (labeled using (14)C) apparently was translocated from the zooxanthellae to their host. A comparison of planulae cultured at 0.3% versus 11% sunlight suggested that photosynthesis provided ~ 31% of the energy utilized by the latter. Overall, we conclude that the physiology of symbiosis in planulae of P. damicornis is broadly similar to symbiosis physiology in adult corals.

  14. Phosphorus and Nitrogen Regulate Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis in Petunia hybrida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Eva; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Feller, Urs; Reinhardt, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen are essential nutrient elements that are needed by plants in large amounts. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis between plants and soil fungi improves phosphorus and nitrogen acquisition under limiting conditions. On the other hand, these nutrients influence root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi and symbiotic functioning. This represents a feedback mechanism that allows plants to control the fungal symbiont depending on nutrient requirements and supply. Elevated phosphorus supply has previously been shown to exert strong inhibition of arbuscular mycorrhizal development. Here, we address to what extent inhibition by phosphorus is influenced by other nutritional pathways in the interaction between Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis. We show that phosphorus and nitrogen are the major nutritional determinants of the interaction. Interestingly, the symbiosis-promoting effect of nitrogen starvation dominantly overruled the suppressive effect of high phosphorus nutrition onto arbuscular mycorrhiza, suggesting that plants promote the symbiosis as long as they are limited by one of the two major nutrients. Our results also show that in a given pair of symbiotic partners (Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis), the entire range from mutually symbiotic to parasitic can be observed depending on the nutritional conditions. Taken together, these results reveal complex nutritional feedback mechanisms in the control of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. PMID:24608923

  15. Quantitative assessment of urban and industrial symbiosis in Kawasaki, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Rene; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Hashimoto, Shizuka; Fujii, Minoru

    2009-03-01

    Colocated firms can achieve environmental benefit and competitive advantage from exchanging physical resources (known as industrial symbiosis) with each other or with residential areas (referenced here as urban symbiosis). Past research illustrated that economic and environmental benefits appear self-evident, although detailed quantification has only been attempted of symbioses for energy and water utilities. This article provides a complimentary case studyfor Kawasaki, Japan. The 14 documented symbioses connect steel, cement, chemical, and paperfirms and their spin-off recycling businesses. Seven key material exchanges divert annually at least 565 000 tons of waste from incineration or landfill. Four of these collectively present an estimated economic opportunity of 13.3 billion JPY (approximately 130 million USD) annually. Five symbioses involve utilization of byproduct and two sharing of utilities. The others are traditional or new recycling industries that do not specifically benefit from geographic proximity. The synergistic effect of urban and industrial symbiosis is unique. The legislative framework for a recycling-oriented society has contributed to realization of the symbioses, as has the availability of government subsidies through the Eco-Town program.

  16. Coral Reef Genomics: Developing tools for functional genomics ofcoral symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Jodi; Brokstein, Peter; Manohar, Chitra; Coffroth, MaryAlice; Szmant, Alina; Medina, Monica

    2005-03-01

    Symbioses between cnidarians and dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are widespread in the marine environment. The importance of this symbiosis to reef-building corals and reef nutrient and carbon cycles is well documented, but little is known about the mechanisms by which the partners establish and regulate the symbiosis. Because the dinoflagellate symbionts live inside the cells of their host coral, the interactions between the partners occur on cellular and molecular levels, as each partner alters the expression of genes and proteins to facilitate the partnership. These interactions can examined using high-throughput techniques that allow thousands of genes to be examined simultaneously. We are developing the groundwork so that we can use DNA microarray profiling to identify genes involved in the Montastraea faveolata and Acropora palmata symbioses. Here we report results from the initial steps in this microarray initiative, that is, the construction of cDNA libraries from 4 of 16 target stages, sequencing of 3450 cDNA clones to generate Expressed Sequenced Tags (ESTs), and annotation of the ESTs to identify candidate genes to include in the microarrays. An understanding of how the coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis is regulated will have implications for atmospheric and ocean sciences, conservation biology, the study and diagnosis of coral bleaching and disease, and comparative studies of animal-protest interactions.

  17. Phosphorus and nitrogen regulate arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Petunia hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Eva; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Feller, Urs; Reinhardt, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen are essential nutrient elements that are needed by plants in large amounts. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis between plants and soil fungi improves phosphorus and nitrogen acquisition under limiting conditions. On the other hand, these nutrients influence root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi and symbiotic functioning. This represents a feedback mechanism that allows plants to control the fungal symbiont depending on nutrient requirements and supply. Elevated phosphorus supply has previously been shown to exert strong inhibition of arbuscular mycorrhizal development. Here, we address to what extent inhibition by phosphorus is influenced by other nutritional pathways in the interaction between Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis. We show that phosphorus and nitrogen are the major nutritional determinants of the interaction. Interestingly, the symbiosis-promoting effect of nitrogen starvation dominantly overruled the suppressive effect of high phosphorus nutrition onto arbuscular mycorrhiza, suggesting that plants promote the symbiosis as long as they are limited by one of the two major nutrients. Our results also show that in a given pair of symbiotic partners (Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis), the entire range from mutually symbiotic to parasitic can be observed depending on the nutritional conditions. Taken together, these results reveal complex nutritional feedback mechanisms in the control of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

  18. Ready or Not: Microbial Adaptive Responses in Dynamic Symbiosis Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mengyi; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2017-08-01

    In mutually beneficial and pathogenic symbiotic associations, microbes must adapt to the host environment for optimal fitness. Both within an individual host and during transmission between hosts, microbes are exposed to temporal and spatial variation in environmental conditions. The phenomenon of phenotypic variation, in which different subpopulations of cells express distinctive and potentially adaptive characteristics, can contribute to microbial adaptation to a lifestyle that includes rapidly changing environments. The environments experienced by a symbiotic microbe during its life history can be erratic or predictable, and each can impact the evolution of adaptive responses. In particular, the predictability of a rhythmic or cyclical series of environments may promote the evolution of signal transduction cascades that allow preadaptive responses to environments that are likely to be encountered in the future, a phenomenon known as adaptive prediction. In this review, we summarize environmental variations known to occur in some well-studied models of symbiosis and how these may contribute to the evolution of microbial population heterogeneity and anticipatory behavior. We provide details about the symbiosis between Xenorhabdus bacteria and Steinernema nematodes as a model to investigate the concept of environmental adaptation and adaptive prediction in a microbial symbiosis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Stepwise Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to Pleuromutilins Is Associated with Stepwise Acquisition of Mutations in rplC and Minimally Affects Susceptibility to Retapamulin▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Daniel R.; Rittenhouse, Stephen F.; McCloskey, Lynn; Holmes, David J.

    2007-01-01

    To assess their effects on susceptibility to retapamulin in Staphylococcus aureus, first-, second-, and third-step mutants with elevated MICs to tiamulin and other investigational pleuromutilin compounds were isolated and characterized through exposure to high drug concentrations. All first- and second-step mutations were in rplC, encoding ribosomal protein L3. Most third-step mutants acquired a third mutation in rplC. While first- and second-step mutations did cause an elevation in tiamulin and retapamulin MICs, a significant decrease in activity was not seen until a third mutation was acquired. All third-step mutants exhibited severe growth defects, and faster-growing variants arose at a high frequency from most isolates. These faster-growing variants were found to be more susceptible to pleuromutilins. In the case of a mutant with three alterations in rplC, the fast-growing variants acquired an additional mutation in rplC. In the case of fast-growing variants of isolates with two mutations in rplC and at least one mutation at an unmapped locus, one of the two rplC mutations reverted to wild type. These data indicate that mutations in rplC that lead to pleuromutilin resistance have a direct, negative effect on fitness. While reduction in activity of retapamulin against S. aureus can be seen through mutations in rplC, it is likely that target-specific resistance to retapamulin will be slow to emerge due to the need for three mutations for a significant effect on activity and the fitness cost of each mutational step. PMID:17404009

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis ameliorates the optimum quantum yield of photosystem II and reduces non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Rosa; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Aroca, Ricardo; Garcia, Rosalva; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Rice is the most important food crop in the world and is a primary source of food for more than half of the world population. However, salinity is considered the most common abiotic stress reducing its productivity. Soil salinity inhibits photosynthetic processes, which can induce an over-reduction of the reaction centres in photosystem II (PSII), damaging the photosynthetic machinery. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis may improve host plant tolerance to salinity, but it is not clear how the AM symbiosis affects the plant photosynthetic capacity, particularly the efficiency of PSII. This study aimed at determining the influence of the AM symbiosis on the performance of PSII in rice plants subjected to salinity. Photosynthetic activity, plant gas-exchange parameters, accumulation of photosynthetic pigments and rubisco activity and gene expression were also measured in order to analyse comprehensively the response of the photosynthetic processes to AM symbiosis and salinity. Results showed that the AM symbiosis enhanced the actual quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and reduced the quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salinity. AM rice plants maintained higher net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate than nonAM plants. Thus, we propose that AM rice plants had a higher photochemical efficiency for CO2 fixation and solar energy utilization and this increases plant salt tolerance by preventing the injury to the photosystems reaction centres and by allowing a better utilization of light energy in photochemical processes. All these processes translated into higher photosynthetic and rubisco activities in AM rice plants and improved plant biomass production under salinity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Rhizobacteria and plant symbiosis in heavy metal uptake and its implications for soil bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobariu, Dana Luminița; Fertu, Daniela Ionela Tudorache; Diaconu, Mariana; Pavel, Lucian Vasile; Hlihor, Raluca-Maria; Drăgoi, Elena Niculina; Curteanu, Silvia; Lenz, Markus; Corvini, Philippe François-Xavier; Gavrilescu, Maria

    2017-10-25

    Certain species of plants can benefit from synergistic effects with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) that improve plant growth and metal accumulation, mitigating toxic effects on plants and increasing their tolerance to heavy metals. The application of PGPR as biofertilizers and atmospheric nitrogen fixators contributes considerably to the intensification of the phytoremediation process. In this paper, we have built a system consisting of rhizospheric Azotobacter microbial populations and Lepidium sativum plants, growing in solutions containing heavy metals in various concentrations. We examined the ability of the organisms to grow in symbiosis so as to stimulate the plant growth and enhance its tolerance to Cr(VI) and Cd(II), to ultimately provide a reliable phytoremediation system. The study was developed at the laboratory level and, at this stage, does not assess the inherent interactions under real conditions occurring in contaminated fields with autochthonous microflora and under different pedoclimatic conditions and environmental stresses. Azotobacter sp. bacteria could indeed stimulate the average germination efficiency of Lepidium sativum by almost 7%, average root length by 22%, average stem length by 34% and dry biomass by 53%. The growth of L. sativum has been affected to a greater extent in Cd(II) solutions due its higher toxicity compared to that of Cr(VI). The reduced tolerance index (TI, %) indicated that plant growth in symbiosis with PGPR was however affected by heavy metal toxicity, while the tolerance of the plant to heavy metals was enhanced in the bacteria-plant system. A methodology based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) and differential evolution (DE), specifically a neuro-evolutionary approach, was applied to model germination rates, dry biomass and root/stem length and proving the robustness of the experimental data. The errors associated with all four variables are small and the correlation coefficients higher than 0

  2. Range expansion drives dispersal evolution in an equatorial three-species symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Léotard

    Full Text Available Recurrent climatic oscillations have produced dramatic changes in species distributions. This process has been proposed to be a major evolutionary force, shaping many life history traits of species, and to govern global patterns of biodiversity at different scales. During range expansions selection may favor the evolution of higher dispersal, and symbiotic interactions may be affected. It has been argued that a weakness of climate fluctuation-driven range dynamics at equatorial latitudes has facilitated the persistence there of more specialized species and interactions. However, how much the biology and ecology of species is changed by range dynamics has seldom been investigated, particularly in equatorial regions.We studied a three-species symbiosis endemic to coastal equatorial rainforests in Cameroon, where the impact of range dynamics is supposed to be limited, comprised of two species-specific obligate mutualists--an ant-plant and its protective ant--and a species-specific ant parasite of this mutualism. We combined analyses of within-species genetic diversity and of phenotypic variation in a transect at the southern range limit of this ant-plant system. All three species present congruent genetic signatures of recent gradual southward expansion, a result compatible with available regional paleoclimatic data. As predicted, this expansion has been accompanied by the evolution of more dispersive traits in the two ant species. In contrast, we detected no evidence of change in lifetime reproductive strategy in the tree, nor in its investment in food resources provided to its symbiotic ants.Despite the decreasing investment in protective workers and the increasing investment in dispersing females by both the mutualistic and the parasitic ant species, there was no evidence of destabilization of the symbiosis at the colonization front. To our knowledge, we provide here the first evidence at equatorial latitudes that biological traits associated

  3. Range expansion drives dispersal evolution in an equatorial three-species symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léotard, Guillaume; Debout, Gabriel; Dalecky, Ambroise; Guillot, Sylvain; Gaume, Laurence; McKey, Doyle; Kjellberg, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent climatic oscillations have produced dramatic changes in species distributions. This process has been proposed to be a major evolutionary force, shaping many life history traits of species, and to govern global patterns of biodiversity at different scales. During range expansions selection may favor the evolution of higher dispersal, and symbiotic interactions may be affected. It has been argued that a weakness of climate fluctuation-driven range dynamics at equatorial latitudes has facilitated the persistence there of more specialized species and interactions. However, how much the biology and ecology of species is changed by range dynamics has seldom been investigated, particularly in equatorial regions. We studied a three-species symbiosis endemic to coastal equatorial rainforests in Cameroon, where the impact of range dynamics is supposed to be limited, comprised of two species-specific obligate mutualists--an ant-plant and its protective ant--and a species-specific ant parasite of this mutualism. We combined analyses of within-species genetic diversity and of phenotypic variation in a transect at the southern range limit of this ant-plant system. All three species present congruent genetic signatures of recent gradual southward expansion, a result compatible with available regional paleoclimatic data. As predicted, this expansion has been accompanied by the evolution of more dispersive traits in the two ant species. In contrast, we detected no evidence of change in lifetime reproductive strategy in the tree, nor in its investment in food resources provided to its symbiotic ants. Despite the decreasing investment in protective workers and the increasing investment in dispersing females by both the mutualistic and the parasitic ant species, there was no evidence of destabilization of the symbiosis at the colonization front. To our knowledge, we provide here the first evidence at equatorial latitudes that biological traits associated with dispersal are

  4. Missense mutation Lys18Asn in dystrophin that triggers X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy decreases protein stability, increases protein unfolding, and perturbs protein structure, but does not affect protein function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder M Singh

    Full Text Available Genetic mutations in a vital muscle protein dystrophin trigger X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM. However, disease mechanisms at the fundamental protein level are not understood. Such molecular knowledge is essential for developing therapies for XLDCM. Our main objective is to understand the effect of disease-causing mutations on the structure and function of dystrophin. This study is on a missense mutation K18N. The K18N mutation occurs in the N-terminal actin binding domain (N-ABD. We created and expressed the wild-type (WT N-ABD and its K18N mutant, and purified to homogeneity. Reversible folding experiments demonstrated that both mutant and WT did not aggregate upon refolding. Mutation did not affect the protein's overall secondary structure, as indicated by no changes in circular dichroism of the protein. However, the mutant is thermodynamically less stable than the WT (denaturant melts, and unfolds faster than the WT (stopped-flow kinetics. Despite having global secondary structure similar to that of the WT, mutant showed significant local structural changes at many amino acids when compared with the WT (heteronuclear NMR experiments. These structural changes indicate that the effect of mutation is propagated over long distances in the protein structure. Contrary to these structural and stability changes, the mutant had no significant effect on the actin-binding function as evident from co-sedimentation and depolymerization assays. These results summarize that the K18N mutation decreases thermodynamic stability, accelerates unfolding, perturbs protein structure, but does not affect the function. Therefore, K18N is a stability defect rather than a functional defect. Decrease in stability and increase in unfolding decrease the net population of dystrophin molecules available for function, which might trigger XLDCM. Consistently, XLDCM patients have decreased levels of dystrophin in cardiac muscle.

  5. THE THN MUTATION OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE, WHICH SUPPRESSES FORMATION OF AERIAL HYPHAE, AFFECTS EXPRESSION OF THE SC3 HYDROPHOBIN GENE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WESSELS, JGH; DEVRIES, OMH; ASGEIRSDOTTIR, SA; SPRINGER, J

    1991-01-01

    The spontaneous and recessive mutation thn in the basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune suppresses the formation of aerial hyphae in the monokaryon and, if present as a double dose, the formation of both aerial hyphae and fruit-bodies in the dikaryon. In the monokaryon, the mutation prevents

  6. Differential radiosensitivity phenotypes of DNA-PKcs mutations affecting NHEJ and HRR systems following irradiation with gamma-rays or very low fluences of alpha particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Fen; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B; Kato, Takamitsu A; Shih, Hung-Ying; Xie, Xian-Jin; Wilson, Paul F; Brogan, John R; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Chen, David J; Bedford, Joel S; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2014-01-01

    We have examined cell-cycle dependence of chromosomal aberration induction and cell killing after high or low dose-rate γ irradiation in cells bearing DNA-PKcs mutations in the S2056 cluster, the T2609 cluster, or the kinase domain. We also compared sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) production by very low fluences of α-particles in DNA-PKcs mutant cells, and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) mutant cells including Rad51C, Rad51D, and Fancg/xrcc9. Generally, chromosomal aberrations and cell killing by γ-rays were similarly affected by mutations in DNA-PKcs, and these mutant cells were more sensitive in G1 than in S/G2 phase. In G1-irradiated DNA-PKcs mutant cells, both chromosome- and chromatid-type breaks and exchanges were in excess than wild-type cells. For cells irradiated in late S/G2 phase, mutant cells showed very high yields of chromatid breaks compared to wild-type cells. Few exchanges were seen in DNA-PKcs-null, Ku80-null, or DNA-PKcs kinase dead mutants, but exchanges in excess were detected in the S2506 or T2609 cluster mutants. SCE induction by very low doses of α-particles is resulted from bystander effects in cells not traversed by α-particles. SCE seen in wild-type cells was completely abolished in Rad51C- or Rad51D-deficient cells, but near normal in Fancg/xrcc9 cells. In marked contrast, very high levels of SCEs were observed in DNA-PKcs-null, DNA-PKcs kinase-dead and Ku80-null mutants. SCE induction was also abolished in T2609 cluster mutant cells, but was only slightly reduced in the S2056 cluster mutant cells. Since both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and HRR systems utilize initial DNA lesions as a substrate, these results suggest the possibility of a competitive interference phenomenon operating between NHEJ and at least the Rad51C/D components of HRR; the level of interaction between damaged DNA and a particular DNA-PK component may determine the level of interaction of such DNA with a relevant HRR component.

  7. Man-Computer Symbiosis Through Interactive Graphics: A Survey and Identification of Critical Research Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Patricia A.

    The purpose of this report was to determine the research areas that appear most critical to achieving man-computer symbiosis. An operational definition of man-computer symbiosis was developed by: (1) reviewing and summarizing what others have said about it, and (2) attempting to distinguish it from other types of man-computer relationships. From…

  8. Feathermoss and epiphytic Nostoc cooperate differently: expanding the spectrum of plant–cyanobacteria symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warshan, Denis; Espinoza, Josh L.; Stuart, Rhona; Richter, Alexander R.; Kim, Sea-Yong; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Kyripides, Nikos; Barry, Kerrie W.; Singan, Vasanth; Lindquist, Erika; Ansong, Charles K.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Brewer, Heather M.; Weyman, Philip D.; Dupont, Chris; Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-12-31

    Dinitrogen (N2)-fixation by cyanobacteria in symbiosis with feather mosses represents the main pathway of biological N input into boreal forests. Despite its significance, little is known about the gene repertoire needed for the establishment and maintenance of the symbiosis. To determine gene acquisitions or regulatory rewiring allowing cyanobacteria to form this symbiosis, we compared closely related Nostoc strains that were either symbiosis-competent or non-competent, using a proteogenomics approach and a unique experimental setup allowing for controlled chemical and physical contact between partners. Thirty-two protein families were only in the genomes of competent strains, including some never before associated with symbiosis. We identified conserved orthologs that were differentially expressed in competent strains, including gene families involved in chemotaxis and motility, NO regulation, sulfate/phosphate transport, sugar metabolism, and glycosyl-modifying and oxidative stress-mediating exoenzymes. In contrast to other cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, the moss-cyanobacteria epiphytic symbiosis is distinct, with the symbiont retaining motility and chemotaxis, and not modulating N-fixation, photosynthesis, GS-GOGAT cycle, and heterocyst formation. Our work expands our knowledge of plant cyanobacterial symbioses, provides an interaction model of this ecologically significant symbiosis, and suggests new currencies, namely nitric oxide and aliphatic sulfonates, may be involved in establishing and maintaining this symbiosis.

  9. Impediment to Symbiosis Establishment between Giant Clams and Symbiodinium Algae Due to Sterilization of Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Takeo; Yamada, Hideaki; Inoue, Ken; Iwai, Kenji; Hatta, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    To survive the juvenile stage, giant clam juveniles need to establish a symbiotic relationship with the microalgae Symbiodinium occurring in the environment. The percentage of giant clam juveniles succeeding in symbiosis establishment (“symbiosis rate”) is often low, which is problematic for seed producers. We investigated how and why symbiosis rates vary, depending on whether giant clam seeds are continuously reared in UV treated or non treated seawater. Results repeatedly demonstrated that symbiosis rates were lower for UV treated seawater than for non treated seawater. Symbiosis rates were also lower for autoclaved seawater and 0.2-µm filtered seawater than for non treated seawater. The decreased symbiosis rates in various sterilized seawater suggest the possibility that some factors helping symbiosis establishment in natural seawater are weakened owing to sterilization. The possible factors include vitality of giant clam seeds, since additional experiments revealed that survival rates of seeds reared alone without Symbiodinium were lower in sterilized seawater than in non treated seawater. In conclusion, UV treatment of seawater was found to lead to decreased symbiosis rates, which is due possibly to some adverse effects common to the various sterilization techniques and relates to the vitality of the giant clam seeds. PMID:23613802

  10. The symbiosis between Rhizobium leguminosarum and Pisum sativum : regulation of the nitrogenase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appels, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Rhizobium can form a symbiosis with plants of the family Leguminosae. Both bacteria and plant show considerable biochemical and morphological changes in order to develop and carry out the symbiosis. The Rhizobia

  11. The Symbiodinium kawagutii genome illuminates dinoflagellate gene expression and coral symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Senjie; Cheng, Shifeng; Song, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Symbiodinium-specific gene families. No whole-genome duplication was observed, but instead we found active (retro) transposition and gene family expansion, especially in processes important for successful symbiosis with corals. We also documented genes potentially governing sexual reproduction and cyst...... the molecular basis and evolution of coral symbiosis....

  12. Impediment to symbiosis establishment between giant clams and Symbiodinium algae due to sterilization of seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Takeo; Yamada, Hideaki; Inoue, Ken; Iwai, Kenji; Hatta, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    To survive the juvenile stage, giant clam juveniles need to establish a symbiotic relationship with the microalgae Symbiodinium occurring in the environment. The percentage of giant clam juveniles succeeding in symbiosis establishment ("symbiosis rate") is often low, which is problematic for seed producers. We investigated how and why symbiosis rates vary, depending on whether giant clam seeds are continuously reared in UV treated or non treated seawater. Results repeatedly demonstrated that symbiosis rates were lower for UV treated seawater than for non treated seawater. Symbiosis rates were also lower for autoclaved seawater and 0.2-µm filtered seawater than for non treated seawater. The decreased symbiosis rates in various sterilized seawater suggest the possibility that some factors helping symbiosis establishment in natural seawater are weakened owing to sterilization. The possible factors include vitality of giant clam seeds, since additional experiments revealed that survival rates of seeds reared alone without Symbiodinium were lower in sterilized seawater than in non treated seawater. In conclusion, UV treatment of seawater was found to lead to decreased symbiosis rates, which is due possibly to some adverse effects common to the various sterilization techniques and relates to the vitality of the giant clam seeds.

  13. Carbon availability for the fungus triggers nitrogen uptake and transport in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is characterized by a transfer of nutrients in exchange for carbon. We tested the effect of the carbon availability for the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on nitrogen (N) uptake and transport in the symbiosis. We followed the uptake and transport of 15N and ...

  14. Niche differentiation and expansion of plant species are associated with mycorrhizal symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerz, Maret; Guillermo Bueno, C.; Ozinga, Wim A.; Zobel, Martin; Moora, Mari

    2018-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is a widespread association between plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi, which is thought to contribute to plant niche differentiation and expansion. However, this has so far not been explicitly tested. To address the effect of mycorrhizal symbiosis on plants’ realized niches, we

  15. LysM-Type Mycorrhizal Receptor Recruited for Rhizobium Symbiosis in Nonlegume Parasponia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, Op den R.H.M.; Streng, A.J.; Mita, De S.; Cao, Q.; Polone, E.; Liu, W.; Ammiraju, J.S.S.; Kudrna, D.; Wing, R.; Untergasser, A.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2011-01-01

    Rhizobium root nodule symbiosis is generally considered to be unique for legumes. However, there is one exception and that is Parasponia. In this nonlegume, the rhizobial nodule symbiosis evolved independently and is, like in legumes, induced by rhizobium Nod factors. We used Parasponia to identify

  16. The p.A382T TARDBP gene mutation in Sardinian patients affected by Parkinson’s disease and other degenerative parkinsonisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Antonino; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Solla, Paolo; Chiò, Adriano; Traynor, Bryan J.; Calvo, Andrea; Restagno, Gabriella; Majounie, Elisa; Costantino, Emanuela; Piras, Valeria; Lavra, Loredana; Pani, Carla; Orofino, Gianni; Di Stefano, Francesca; Tacconi, Paolo; Mascia, Marcello Mario; Muroni, Antonella; Murru, Maria Rita; Tranquilli, Stefania; Corongiu, Daniela; Rolesu, Marcella; Cuccu, Stefania; Marrosu, Francesco; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on our previous finding of the p.A382T founder mutation in ALS patients with concomitant parkinsonism in the Sardinian population, we hypothesized that the same variant may underlie PD and/or other forms of degenerative parkinsonism on this Mediterranean island. Design We screened a cohort of 611 patients with PD (544 cases) and other forms of degenerative parkinsonism (67 cases), and 604 unrelated controls for the c.1144G>A (p.A382T) missense mutation of the TARDBP gene. Results The p.A382T mutation was identified in 9 patients with parkinsonism. Of these, 5 (0.9% of PD patients) presented a typical PD (2 with familiar forms), while 4 patients (6.0% of all other forms of parkinsonism) presented a peculiar clinical presentation quite different from classical atypical parkinsonism with an overlap of extrapyramidal-pyramidal-cognitive clinical signs. The mutation was found in 8 Sardinian controls (1.3%) consistent with a founder mutation in the island population. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the clinical presentation of the p.A382T TARDBP gene mutation may include forms of parkinsonism in which the extrapyramidal signs are the crucial core of the disease at onset. These forms can present PSP or CBD-like clinical signs, with bulbar and/or extrabulbar pyramidal signs and cognitive impairment. No evidence of association has been found between TARDBP gene mutation and typical PD. PMID:23546887

  17. A novel mutation affecting the arginine-137 residue of AVPR2 in dizygous twins leads to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and attenuated urine exosome aquaporin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichs, Gitte R; Hansen, Louise H; Nielsen, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene AVPR2 may cause X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus by defective apical insertion of aquaporin-2 in the renal collecting duct principal cell. Substitution mutations with exchange of arginine at codon 137 can cause nephrogenic syndrome...... of inappropriate antidiuresis or congenital X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. We present a novel mutation in codon 137 within AVPR2 with substitution of glycine for arginine in male dizygotic twins. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated by water deprivation test and resistance to vasopressin...

  18. How Are Substrate Binding and Catalysis Affected by Mutating Glu127 and Arg161 in Prolyl-4-hydroxylase? A QM/MM and MD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Amy; de Visser, Sam P.

    2017-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylase is a vital enzyme for human physiology involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyproline, an essential component for collagen formation. The enzyme performs a unique stereo- and regioselective hydroxylation at the C4 position of proline despite the fact that the C5 hydrogen atoms should be thermodynamically easier to abstract. To gain insight into the mechanism and find the origin of this regioselectivity, we have done a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study on wildtype and mutant structures. In a previous study (Timmins et al., 2017) we identified several active site residues critical for substrate binding and positioning. In particular, the Glu127 and Arg161 were shown to form multiple hydrogen bonding and ion-dipole interactions with substrate and could thereby affect the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction. In this work, we decided to test that hypothesis and report a QM/MM and molecular dynamics (MD) study on prolyl-4-hydroxylase and several active site mutants where Glu127 or Arg161 are mutated for Asp, Gln, or Lys. Thus, the R161D and R161Q mutants give very high barriers for hydrogen atom abstraction from any proline C–H bond and therefore will be inactive. The R161K mutant, by contrast, sees the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction change but still is expected to hydroxylate proline at room temperature. By contrast, the Glu127 mutants E127D and E127Q show possible changes in regioselectivity with the former being more probable to react compared to the latter. PMID:29170737

  19. Structural investigation of a C-terminal EphA2 receptor mutant: Does mutation affect the structure and interaction properties of the Sam domain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Costantini, Susan; Di Natale, Concetta; Pirone, Luciano; Guariniello, Stefano; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Marasco, Daniela; Pedone, Emilia M; Leone, Marilisa

    2017-09-01

    Ephrin A2 receptor (EphA2) plays a key role in cancer, it is up-regulated in several types of tumors and the process of ligand-induced receptor endocytosis, followed by degradation, is considered as a potential path to diminish tumor malignancy. Protein modulators of this mechanism are recruited at the cytosolic Sterile alpha motif (Sam) domain of EphA2 (EphA2-Sam) through heterotypic Sam-Sam associations. These interactions engage the C-terminal helix of EphA2 and close loop regions (the so called End Helix side). In addition, several studies report on destabilizing mutations in EphA2 related to cataract formation and located in/or close to the Sam domain. Herein, we analyzed from a structural point of view, one of these mutants characterized by the insertion of a novel 39 residue long polypeptide at the C-terminus of EphA2-Sam. A 3D structural model was built by computational methods and revealed partial disorder in the acquired C-terminal tail and a few residues participating in an α-helix and two short β-strands. We investigated by CD and NMR studies the conformational properties in solution of two peptides encompassing the whole C-terminal tail and its predicted helical region, respectively. NMR binding experiments demonstrated that these peptides do not interact relevantly with either EphA2-Sam or its interactor Ship2-Sam. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further indicated that the EphA2 mutant could be represented only through a conformational ensemble and that the C-terminal tail should not largely wrap the EphA2-Sam End-Helix interface and affect binding to other Sam domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. How Are Substrate Binding and Catalysis Affected by Mutating Glu127 and Arg161 in Prolyl-4-hydroxylase? A QM/MM and MD Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Timmins

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prolyl-4-hydroxylase is a vital enzyme for human physiology involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyproline, an essential component for collagen formation. The enzyme performs a unique stereo- and regioselective hydroxylation at the C4 position of proline despite the fact that the C5 hydrogen atoms should be thermodynamically easier to abstract. To gain insight into the mechanism and find the origin of this regioselectivity, we have done a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM study on wildtype and mutant structures. In a previous study (Timmins et al., 2017 we identified several active site residues critical for substrate binding and positioning. In particular, the Glu127 and Arg161 were shown to form multiple hydrogen bonding and ion-dipole interactions with substrate and could thereby affect the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction. In this work, we decided to test that hypothesis and report a QM/MM and molecular dynamics (MD study on prolyl-4-hydroxylase and several active site mutants where Glu127 or Arg161 are mutated for Asp, Gln, or Lys. Thus, the R161D and R161Q mutants give very high barriers for hydrogen atom abstraction from any proline C–H bond and therefore will be inactive. The R161K mutant, by contrast, sees the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction change but still is expected to hydroxylate proline at room temperature. By contrast, the Glu127 mutants E127D and E127Q show possible changes in regioselectivity with the former being more probable to react compared to the latter.

  1. Helical computed tomography and the workstation: introduction to a symbiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Santos, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    We do a brief introduction to the possibilities of an helical computed tomography system when it is associated with a powerful workstation. The fast and volumetric way of acquisition constitutes, basically, the main advantage of this sort of computed tomography. The anatomical and radio pathological study, in a workstation, of the acquired information (thanks to multiplanar and 3D reconstruction), increases significantly our capacity of analysis in each patient. Only the clinical and radiological experience will tell us which is the right place that this symbiosis occupies within our diagnosis tools. (Author) 11 refs

  2. Symbiosis of near breeder HTR's with hybrid fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1978-07-01

    In this contribution to INFCE a symbiotic fusion/fission reactor system, consisting of a hybrid beam-driven micro-explosion fusion reactor (HMER) and associated high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR) with a coupled fuel cycle, is proposed. This system is similar to the well known Fast Breeder/Near Breeder HTR symbiosis except that the fast fission breeder - running on the U/Pu-cycle in the core and the axial blankets and breeding the surplus fissile material as U-233 in its radial thorium metal or thorium oxide blankets - is replaced by a hybrid micro-explosion DT fusion reactor

  3. Stars and Symbiosis: MicroRNA- and MicroRNA*-Mediated Transcript Cleavage Involved in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devers, Emanuel A.; Branscheid, Anja; May, Patrick; Krajinski, Franziska

    2011-01-01

    The majority of plants are able to form the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in association with AM fungi. During symbiosis development, plant cells undergo a complex reprogramming resulting in profound morphological and physiological changes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important components of the regulatory network of plant cells. To unravel the impact of miRNAs and miRNA-mediated mRNA cleavage on root cell reprogramming during AM symbiosis, we carried out high-throughput (Illumina) sequencing of small RNAs and degradome tags of Medicago truncatula roots. This led to the annotation of 243 novel miRNAs. An increased accumulation of several novel and conserved miRNAs in mycorrhizal roots suggest a role of these miRNAs during AM symbiosis. The degradome analysis led to the identification of 185 root transcripts as mature miRNA and also miRNA*-mediated mRNA cleavage targets. Several of the identified miRNA targets are known to be involved in root symbioses. In summary, the increased accumulation of specific miRNAs and the miRNA-mediated cleavage of symbiosis-relevant genes indicate that miRNAs are an important part of the regulatory network leading to symbiosis development. PMID:21571671

  4. Mutations blocking side chain assembly, polymerization, or transport of a Wzy-dependent Streptococcus pneumoniae capsule are lethal in the absence of suppressor mutations and can affect polymer transfer to the cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xayarath, Bobbi; Yother, Janet

    2007-05-01

    Extracellular polysaccharides of many bacteria are synthesized by the Wzy polymerase-dependent mechanism, where long-chain polymers are assembled from undecaprenyl-phosphate-linked repeat units on the outer face of the cytoplasmic membrane. In gram-positive bacteria, Wzy-dependent capsules remain largely cell associated via membrane and peptidoglycan linkages. Like many Wzy-dependent capsules, the Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 2 capsule is branched. In this study, we found that deletions of cps2K, cps2J, or cps2H, which encode a UDP-glucose dehydrogenase necessary for side chain synthesis, the putative Wzx transporter (flippase), and the putative Wzy polymerase, respectively, were obtained only in the presence of suppressor mutations. Most of the suppressor mutations were in cps2E, which encodes the initiating glycosyltransferase for capsule synthesis. The cps2K mutants containing the suppressor mutations produced low levels of high-molecular-weight polymer that was detected only in membrane fractions. cps2K-repaired mutants exhibited only modest increases in capsule production due to the effect of the secondary mutation, but capsule was detectable in both membrane and cell wall fractions. Lethality of the cps2K, cps2J, and cps2H mutations was likely due to sequestration of undecaprenyl-phosphate in the capsule pathway and either preclusion of its turnover for utilization in essential pathways or destabilization of the membrane due to an accumulation of lipid-linked intermediates. The results demonstrate that proper polymer assembly requires not only a functional transporter and polymerase but also complete repeat units. A central role for the initiating glycosyltransferase in controlling capsule synthesis is also suggested.

  5. Root nodule symbiosis in Lotus japonicus drives the establishment of distinctive rhizosphere, root, and nodule bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Jensen, Dorthe Bodker; Koprivova, Anna; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Radutoiu, Simona

    2016-12-06

    Lotus japonicus has been used for decades as a model legume to study the establishment of binary symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia that trigger root nodule organogenesis for bacterial accommodation. Using community profiling of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we reveal that in Lotus, distinctive nodule- and root-inhabiting communities are established by parallel, rather than consecutive, selection of bacteria from the rhizosphere and root compartments. Comparative analyses of wild-type (WT) and symbiotic mutants in Nod factor receptor5 (nfr5), Nodule inception (nin) and Lotus histidine kinase1 (lhk1) genes identified a previously unsuspected role of the nodulation pathway in the establishment of different bacterial assemblages in the root and rhizosphere. We found that the loss of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis dramatically alters community structure in the latter two compartments, affecting at least 14 bacterial orders. The differential plant growth phenotypes seen between WT and the symbiotic mutants in nonsupplemented soil were retained under nitrogen-supplemented conditions that blocked the formation of functional nodules in WT, whereas the symbiosis-impaired mutants maintain an altered community structure in the nitrogen-supplemented soil. This finding provides strong evidence that the root-associated community shift in the symbiotic mutants is a direct consequence of the disabled symbiosis pathway rather than an indirect effect resulting from abolished symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Our findings imply a role of the legume host in selecting a broad taxonomic range of root-associated bacteria that, in addition to rhizobia, likely contribute to plant growth and ecological performance.

  6. A sea slug’s guide to plastid symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan de Vries

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Some 140 years ago sea slugs that contained chlorophyll-pigmented granules similar to those of plants were described. While we now understand that these “green granules” are plastids the slugs sequester from siphonaceous algae upon which they feed, surprisingly little is really known about the molecular details that underlie this one of a kind animal-plastid symbiosis. Kleptoplasts are stored in the cytosol of epithelial cells that form the slug’s digestive tubules, and one would guess that the stolen organelles are acquired for their ability to fix carbon, but studies have never really been able to prove that. We also do not know how the organelles are distinguished from the remaining food particles the slugs incorporate with their meal and that include algal mitochondria and nuclei. We know that the ability to store kleptoplasts long-term has evolved only a few times independently among hundreds of sacoglossan species, but we have no idea on what basis. Here we take a closer look at the history of sacoglossan research and discuss recent developments. We argue that, in order to understand what makes this symbiosis work, we will need to focus on the animal’s physiology just as much as we need to commence a detailed analysis of the plastids’ photobiology. Understanding kleptoplasty in sacoglossan slugs requires an unbiased multidisciplinary approach.

  7. Metabolic and physiological interdependencies in the Bathymodiolus azoricus symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnudurai, Ruby; Kleiner, Manuel; Sayavedra, Lizbeth; Petersen, Jillian M; Moche, Martin; Otto, Andreas; Becher, Dörte; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Satoh, Noriyuki; Dubilier, Nicole; Schweder, Thomas; Markert, Stephanie

    2017-02-01

    The hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in an intimate symbiosis with two types of chemosynthetic Gammaproteobacteria in its gills: a sulfur oxidizer and a methane oxidizer. Despite numerous investigations over the last decades, the degree of interdependence between the three symbiotic partners, their individual metabolic contributions, as well as the mechanism of carbon transfer from the symbionts to the host are poorly understood. We used a combination of proteomics and genomics to investigate the physiology and metabolism of the individual symbiotic partners. Our study revealed that key metabolic functions are most likely accomplished jointly by B. azoricus and its symbionts: (1) CO 2 is pre-concentrated by the host for carbon fixation by the sulfur-oxidizing symbiont, and (2) the host replenishes essential biosynthetic TCA cycle intermediates for the sulfur-oxidizing symbiont. In return (3), the sulfur oxidizer may compensate for the host's putative deficiency in amino acid and cofactor biosynthesis. We also identified numerous 'symbiosis-specific' host proteins by comparing symbiont-containing and symbiont-free host tissues and symbiont fractions. These proteins included a large complement of host digestive enzymes in the gill that are likely involved in symbiont digestion and carbon transfer from the symbionts to the host.

  8. Improving the environmental performance of biofuels with industrial symbiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Michael; Eklund, Mats

    2011-01-01

    In the production of biofuels for transport many critics have argued about the poor energy efficiency and environmental performance of the production industries. Optimism is thus set on the production of second generation biofuels, while first generation biofuels continue to dominate worldwide. Therefore it is interesting to consider how the environmental performance of first generation biofuel industries can be improved. The field of industrial symbiosis offers many possibilities for potential improvements in the biofuel industry and theories from this research field are used in this paper to highlight how environmental performance improvements can be accomplished. This comes in the form of by-product synergies and utility synergies which can improve material and energy handling. Furthermore, the processes and products can gain increased environmental performance improvements by the adaption of a renewable energy system which will act as a utility provider for many industries in a symbiotic network. By-products may thereafter be upcycled through biogas production processes to generate both energy and a bio-fertilizer. A case study of an actual biofuel industrial symbiosis is also reviewed to provide support for these theories. -- Highlights: → By-product and utility synergies may improve the production processes of biofuel industries for reduced energy consumption and improved environmental performance. → Upcycling tenants can make use of wastes to upgrade waste to a valuable product and/or energy source. → Energy systems for biofuel production have a large influence on the performance of biofuel industries.

  9. Understanding resilience in industrial symbiosis networks: insights from network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Shauhrat S; Khanna, Vikas

    2014-08-01

    Industrial symbiotic networks are based on the principles of ecological systems where waste equals food, to develop synergistic networks. For example, industrial symbiosis (IS) at Kalundborg, Denmark, creates an exchange network of waste, water, and energy among companies based on contractual dependency. Since most of the industrial symbiotic networks are based on ad-hoc opportunities rather than strategic planning, gaining insight into disruptive scenarios is pivotal for understanding the balance of resilience and sustainability and developing heuristics for designing resilient IS networks. The present work focuses on understanding resilience as an emergent property of an IS network via a network-based approach with application to the Kalundborg Industrial Symbiosis (KIS). Results from network metrics and simulated disruptive scenarios reveal Asnaes power plant as the most critical node in the system. We also observe a decrease in the vulnerability of nodes and reduction in single points of failure in the system, suggesting an increase in the overall resilience of the KIS system from 1960 to 2010. Based on our findings, we recommend design strategies, such as increasing diversity, redundancy, and multi-functionality to ensure flexibility and plasticity, to develop resilient and sustainable industrial symbiotic networks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeshi, E-mail: tsakurai@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  11. Feathermoss and epiphytic Nostoc cooperate differently: expanding the spectrum of plant–cyanobacteria symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshan, Denis; Espinoza, Josh L; Stuart, Rhona K; Richter, R Alexander; Kim, Sea-Yong; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; C Kyrpides, Nikos; Barry, Kerrie; Singan, Vasanth; Lindquist, Erika; Ansong, Charles; Purvine, Samuel O; M Brewer, Heather; Weyman, Philip D; Dupont, Christopher L; Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Dinitrogen (N2)-fixation by cyanobacteria in symbiosis with feathermosses is the primary pathway of biological nitrogen (N) input into boreal forests. Despite its significance, little is known about the cyanobacterial gene repertoire and regulatory rewiring needed for the establishment and maintenance of the symbiosis. To determine gene acquisitions and regulatory changes allowing cyanobacteria to form and maintain this symbiosis, we compared genomically closely related symbiotic-competent and -incompetent Nostoc strains using a proteogenomics approach and an experimental set up allowing for controlled chemical and physical contact between partners. Thirty-two gene families were found only in the genomes of symbiotic strains, including some never before associated with cyanobacterial symbiosis. We identified conserved orthologs that were differentially expressed in symbiotic strains, including protein families involved in chemotaxis and motility, NO regulation, sulfate/phosphate transport, and glycosyl-modifying and oxidative stress-mediating exoenzymes. The physical moss–cyanobacteria epiphytic symbiosis is distinct from other cyanobacteria–plant symbioses, with Nostoc retaining motility, and lacking modulation of N2-fixation, photosynthesis, GS-GOGAT cycle and heterocyst formation. The results expand our knowledge base of plant–cyanobacterial symbioses, provide a model of information and material exchange in this ecologically significant symbiosis, and suggest new currencies, namely nitric oxide and aliphatic sulfonates, may be involved in establishing and maintaining the cyanobacteria–feathermoss symbiosis. PMID:28800136

  12. Feathermoss and epiphytic Nostoc cooperate differently: expanding the spectrum of plant-cyanobacteria symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshan, Denis; Espinoza, Josh L; Stuart, Rhona K; Richter, R Alexander; Kim, Sea-Yong; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; C Kyrpides, Nikos; Barry, Kerrie; Singan, Vasanth; Lindquist, Erika; Ansong, Charles; Purvine, Samuel O; M Brewer, Heather; Weyman, Philip D; Dupont, Christopher L; Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-12-01

    Dinitrogen (N 2 )-fixation by cyanobacteria in symbiosis with feathermosses is the primary pathway of biological nitrogen (N) input into boreal forests. Despite its significance, little is known about the cyanobacterial gene repertoire and regulatory rewiring needed for the establishment and maintenance of the symbiosis. To determine gene acquisitions and regulatory changes allowing cyanobacteria to form and maintain this symbiosis, we compared genomically closely related symbiotic-competent and -incompetent Nostoc strains using a proteogenomics approach and an experimental set up allowing for controlled chemical and physical contact between partners. Thirty-two gene families were found only in the genomes of symbiotic strains, including some never before associated with cyanobacterial symbiosis. We identified conserved orthologs that were differentially expressed in symbiotic strains, including protein families involved in chemotaxis and motility, NO regulation, sulfate/phosphate transport, and glycosyl-modifying and oxidative stress-mediating exoenzymes. The physical moss-cyanobacteria epiphytic symbiosis is distinct from other cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, with Nostoc retaining motility, and lacking modulation of N 2 -fixation, photosynthesis, GS-GOGAT cycle and heterocyst formation. The results expand our knowledge base of plant-cyanobacterial symbioses, provide a model of information and material exchange in this ecologically significant symbiosis, and suggest new currencies, namely nitric oxide and aliphatic sulfonates, may be involved in establishing and maintaining the cyanobacteria-feathermoss symbiosis.

  13. Identification of novel mutations in HFE, HFE2, TfR2, and SLC40A1 genes in Chinese patients affected by hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongwei; Du, Yali; Liu, Gang; Guo, Shanshan; Hou, Bo; Jiang, Xianyong; Han, Bing; Chang, Yanzhong; Nie, Guangjun

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a group of inherited iron-overload disorders associated with pathogenic defects in the genes encoding hemochromatosis (HFE), hemojuvelin (HJV/HFE2), hepcidin (HAMP), transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2), and ferroportin (FPN1/SLC40A1) proteins, and the clinical features are well described. However, there have been only a few detailed reports of HH in Chinese populations. Thus, there is insufficient patient information for population-based analyses in Chinese populations or comparative studies among different ethical groups. In the current work, we describe eight Chinese cases of hereditary hemochromatosis. Gene sequencing results revealed eight mutations (five novel mutations) in HFE, HFE2, TfR2, and SLC40A1 genes in these Chinese HH patients. In addition, we used Polymorphism Phenotyping v2 (Polyphen), Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT), and a sequence alignment program to predict the molecular consequences of missense mutations.

  14. A novel TNNI2 mutation causes Freeman-Sheldon syndrome in a Chinese family with an affected adult with only facial contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuefu; Jiang, Miao; Han, Weitian; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Wei; Sui, Yu; Lu, Yongping; Li, Jianxin

    2013-09-25

    Distal arthrogryposes (DAs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by congenital contractures with predominant involvement of the hands and feet, can be classified into at least 12 different forms. These autosomal dominant disorders are of variable expressivity and reduced penetrance. Mutations in sarcomeric protein genes, including troponin I2 (TNNI2), troponin T3 (TNNT3), tropomyosin 2 (TPM2), embryonic myosin heavy chain 3 (MYH3), and myosin binding protein C1 (MYBPC1), have been identified in distal arthrogryposis type 1 (DA1, MIM 108120), type 2B (DA2B, MIM 601680) and type 2A (DA2A)/Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS, MIM 193700). However, mutations causing FSS have only been reported in MYH3. Herein we describe a Chinese DA family whose members meet classical strict criteria for FSS, as well as one member of the family who has isolated facial features consistent with FSS. No disease-causing mutation was found in MYH3. Segregation of microsatellite markers flanking the TNNI2 and TNNT3 genes at 11p15.5 was compatible with linkage. Subsequent sequencing of TNNI2 revealed a novel mutation, c.A493T (p.I165F), located in the C-terminal region, which is critical for proper protein function. This mutation was found to cosegregate with the FSS phenotype in this family, and assessment using SIFT and PolyPhen-2 predicted a damaging effect. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first TNNI2 mutation in classical FSS and describe an atypical adult FSS case with only facial contractures resulting from somatic mosaicism. We infer that DA1, DA2B and FSS represent a phenotypic continuum of the same disorder and provide further genetic evidence for this hypothesis. © 2013.

  15. A splice-site mutation affecting the paired box of PAX3 in a three generation family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaie, A; Kim, E; Wilcox, E R; Lalwani, A K

    1997-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary disturbances and other developmental defects, is the most frequent form of congenital deafness in humans. Mutations in the PAX3 gene, a transcription factor expressed during embryonic development, is associated with WS types I and III. Here we report the identification of a novel acceptor splice site mutation (86-2 A-->G) in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene causing WS type I in a three generation family.

  16. Kidney adysplasia and variable hydronephrosis, a new mutation affecting the odd-skipped related 1 gene in the mouse, causes variable defects in kidney development and hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davisson, Muriel T; Cook, Susan A; Akeson, Ellen C; Liu, Don; Heffner, Caleb; Gudis, Polyxeni; Fairfield, Heather; Murray, Stephen A

    2015-06-15

    Many genes, including odd-skipped related 1 (Osr1), are involved in regulation of mammalian kidney development. We describe here a new recessive mutation (kidney adysplasia and variable hydronephrosis, kavh) in the mouse that leads to downregulation of Osr1 transcript, causing several kidney defects: agenesis, hypoplasia, and hydronephrosis with variable age of onset. The mutation is closely associated with a reciprocal translocation, T(12;17)4Rk, whose Chromosome 12 breakpoint is upstream from Osr1. The kavh/kavh mutant provides a model to study kidney development and test therapies for hydronephrosis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Fabry Disease: prevalence of affected males and heterozygotes with pathogenic GLA mutations identified by screening renal, cardiac and stroke clinics, 1995-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doheny, Dana; Srinivasan, Ram; Pagant, Silvere; Chen, Brenden; Yasuda, Makiko; Desnick, Robert J

    2018-04-01

    Fabry Disease (FD), an X linked lysosomal storage disease due to pathogenic α-galactosidase A ( GLA ) mutations, results in two major subtypes, the early-onset Type 1 'Classic' and the Type 2 'Later-Onset' phenotypes. To identify previously unrecognised patients, investigators screened cardiac, renal and stroke clinics by enzyme assays. However, some screening studies did not perform confirmatory GLA mutation analyses, and many included recently recognised 'benign/likely-benign' variants, thereby inflating prevalence estimates. Online databases were searched for all FD screening studies in high-risk clinics (1995-2017). Studies reporting GLA mutations were re-analysed for pathogenic mutations, sex and phenotype. Phenotype-specific and sex-specific prevalence rates were determined. Of 67 studies, 63 that screened 51363patients (33943M and 17420F) and provided GLA mutations were reanalysed for disease-causing mutations. Of reported GLA mutations, benign variants occurred in 47.9% of males and 74.1% of females. The following were the revised prevalence estimates: among 36820 (23954M and 12866F) haemodialysis screenees, 0.21% males and 0.15% females; among 3074 (2031M and 1043F) renal transplant screenees, 0.25% males and no females; among 5491 (4054M and 1437F) cardiac screenees, 0.94% males and 0.90% females; and among 5978 (3904M and 2074F) stroke screenees, 0.13% males and 0.14% females. Among male and female screenees with pathogenic mutations, the type 1 Classic phenotype was predominant (~60%), except more male cardiac patients (75%) had type 2 Later-Onset phenotype. Compared with previous findings, reanalysis of 63 studies increased the screenee numbers (~3.4-fold), eliminated 20 benign/likely benign variants, and provided more accurate sex-specific and phenotype-specific prevalence estimates, ranging from ~0.13% of stroke to ~0.9% of cardiac male or female screenees. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article

  18. A modified Lotka-Volterra model for the evolution of coordinate symbiosis in energy enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Teng; Lyu, Xiaohuan; Yu, Jing

    2018-02-01

    Recent developments in energy markets make the operating industries more dynamic and complex, and energy enterprises cooperate more closely in the industrial chain and symbiosis. In order to further discuss the evolution of coordinate symbiosis in energy enterprises, a modified Lotka-Volterra equation is introduced to develop a symbiosis analysis model of energy groups. According to the equilibrium and stability analysis, a conclusion is obtained that if the upstream energy group and the downstream energy group are in symbiotic state, the growth of their utility will be greater than their independent value. Energy enterprises can get mutual benefits and positive promotions in industrial chain by their cooperation.

  19. Realizing CO2 emission reduction through industrial symbiosis: A cement production case study for Kawasaki

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, Shizuka; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Geng, Yong; Nagasawa, Emiri

    2010-01-01

    This article is one effort to examine the present and potential performances of CO2 emission reduction though industrial symbiosis by employing a case study approach and life cycle CO2 analysis for alternative industrial symbiosis scenarios. As one of the first and the best-known eco-town projects, Kawasaki Eco-town was chosen as a case study area. First, the current industrial symbiosis practices in this area are introduced. To evaluate the potential of reducing the total CO2 emission throug...

  20. The mvp2 mutation affects the generative transition through the modification of transcriptome pattern, salicylic acid and cytokinin metabolism in Triticum monococcum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boldizsár, A.; Vaňková, Radomíra; Novák, A.; Kalapos, S.; Gulyás, Z.; Pál, M.; Floková, Kristýna; Janda, T.; Galiba, G.; Kocsy, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 202, SEP 1 (2016), s. 21-33 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cytokinin * mvp2 mutation * Triticum monococcum Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.121, year: 2016

  1. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Affecting Residue Arg1 38 of Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase Cause a Progeroid Form of Autosomal-Dominant Cutis Laxa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Ganesh, Jaya; Tan, Yu Xuan; Al Bughaili, Mohammed; Lin, Angela E.; Sahai, Inderneel; Bahena, Paulina; Reichert, Sara L.; Loh, Abigail; Wright, Graham D.; Liu, Jaron; Rahikkala, Elisa; Pivnick, Eniko K.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Krüger, Ulrike; Zemojtel, Tomasz; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Mostafavi, Roya; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Symoens, Sofie; Pajunen, Leila; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Meierhofer, David; Robinson, Peter N.; Mundlos, Stefan; Villarroel, Camilo E.; Byers, Peter; Masri, Amira; Robertson, Stephen P.; Schwarze, Ulrike; Callewaert, Bert; Reversade, Bruno; Kornak, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Progeroid disorders overlapping with De Barsy syndrome (DBS) are collectively denoted as autosomal-recessive cutis laxa type 3 (ARCL3). They are caused by biallelic mutations in PYCR1 or ALDH18A1, encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), respectively,

  2. Phenotypic Variability in a Family with Acrodysostosis Type 2 Caused by a Novel PDE4D Mutation Affecting the Serine Target of Protein Kinase-A Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppmann, Julia; Gesing, Julia; Silve, Caroline; Leroy, Chrystel; Bertsche, Astrid; Hirsch, Franz Wolfgang; Kiess, Wieland; Pfäffle, Roland; Schuster, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Acrodysostosis is a very rare congenital multisystem condition characterized by skeletal dysplasia with severe brachydactyly, midfacial hypoplasia, and short stature, varying degrees of intellectual disability, and possible resistance to multiple G protein-coupled receptor signalling hormones. Two distinct subtypes are differentiated: acrodysostosis type 1 resulting from defects in protein kinase type 1-α regulatory subunit and acrodysostosis type 2 caused by mutations in phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D). Most cases are sporadic. We report on a rare multigenerational familial case of acrodysostosis type 2 due to a novel autosomal dominantly inherited PDE4D mutation. A 3.5-year-old boy presented with short stature, midfacial hypoplasia, severe brachydactyly, developmental delay, and behavioural problems. Laboratory investigations revealed mild thyrotropin resistance. His mother shared some characteristic features, such as midfacial hypoplasia and severe brachydactyly, but did not show short stature, intellectual disability or hormonal resistance. Genetic analysis identified the identical, novel heterozygous missense mutation of the PDE4D gene c.569C>T (p.Ser190Phe) in both patients. This case illustrates the significant phenotypic variability of acrodysostosis even within one family with identical mutations. Hence, a specific clinical diagnosis of acrodysostosis remains challenging because of great interindividual variability and a substantial overlap of the two subtypes as well as with other related Gsα-cAMP-signalling-linked disorders. PMID:28515031

  3. Mutations within the LINC-HELLP non-coding RNA differentially bind ribosomal and RNA splicing complexes and negatively affect trophoblast differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.; Visser, A.; Buabeng, K.M.L.; Poutsma, A.; van der Schors, R.C.; Oudejans, C.B.M.

    2015-01-01

    LINC-HELLP, showing chromosomal linkage with the pregnancy-specific HELLP syndrome in Dutch families, reduces differentiation from a proliferative to an invasive phenotype of first-trimester extravillous trophoblasts. Here we show that mutations in LINC-HELLP identified in HELLP families negatively

  4. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in NF1: Evidence for a More Severe Phenotype Associated with Missense Mutations Affecting NF1 Codons 844–848

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koczkowska, M. (Magdalena); Chen, Y. (Yunjia); Callens, T. (Tom); Gomes, A. (Alicia); Sharp, A. (Angela); Johnson, S. (Sherrell); Hsiao, M.-C. (Meng-Chang); Chen, Z. (Zhenbin); Balasubramanian, M. (Meena); Barnett, C.P. (Christopher P.); Becker, T.A. (Troy A.); Ben-Shachar, S. (Shay); D.R. Bertola (Débora Romeo); J.O. Blakeley (Jaishri O.); Burkitt-Wright, E.M.M. (Emma M.M.); Callaway, A. (Alison); Crenshaw, M. (Melissa); Cunha, K.S. (Karin S.); Cunningham, M. (Mitch); M.D. D'Agostino (Maria Daniela); K. Dahan (Karin); De Luca, A. (Alessandro); A. Destrée (Anne); Dhamija, R. (Radhika); Eoli, M. (Marica); Evans, D.G.R. (D. Gareth R.); Galvin-Parton, P. (Patricia); George-Abraham, J.K. (Jaya K.); K.W. Gripp (Karen); Guevara-Campos, J. (Jose); Hanchard, N.A. (Neil A.); Hernández-Chico, C. (Concepcion); Immken, L. (LaDonna); S. Janssens (Sandra); K.J. Jones (Kristi); Keena, B.A. (Beth A.); Kochhar, A. (Aaina); Liebelt, J. (Jan); Martir-Negron, A. (Arelis); Mahoney, M.J. (Maurice J.); I. Maystadt (Isabelle); McDougall, C. (Carey); M. McEntagart (Meriel); N.J. Mendelsohn; Miller, D.T. (David T.); G. Mortier (Geert); J. Morton (Jenny); Pappas, J. (John); S.R. Plotkin (Scott R.); Pond, D. (Dinel); Rosenbaum, K. (Kenneth); Rubin, K. (Karol); Russell, L. (Laura); Rutledge, L.S. (Lane S.); Saletti, V. (Veronica); Schonberg, R. (Rhonda); Schreiber, A. (Allison); Seidel, M. (Meredith); Siqveland, E. (Elizabeth); D.W. Stockton (David); Trevisson, E. (Eva); N.J. Ullrich (Nicole J.); M. Upadhyaya (Meena); A.S. Thornton (Andrew); H. Verhelst (H.); M.R. Wallace (Margaret); Yap, Y.-S. (Yoon-Sim); Zackai, E. (Elaine); Zonana, J. (Jonathan); Zurcher, V. (Vickie); K. Claes (Kathleen); Martin, Y. (Yolanda); B. Korf (Bruce); E. Legius (Eric); L.M. Messiaen (Ludwine)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractNeurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a common genetic disorder with a birth incidence of 1:2,000–3,000, is characterized by a highly variable clinical presentation. To date, only two clinically relevant intragenic genotype-phenotype correlations have been reported for NF1 missense mutations

  5. A new LH receptor splice mutation responsible for male hypogonadism with subnormal sperm production in the propositus, and infertility with regular cycles in an affected sister

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.P. Bruysters (Martijn); S. Christin-Maitre (Sophie); M. Verhoef-Post (Miriam); C. Sultan; J. Auger; I. Faugeron; L. Larue; S. Lumbroso; A.P.N. Themmen (Axel); P. Bouchard (Philippe)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Inactivating LH receptor (LHR) mutations have been described so far in men as well as in women. Phenotypes in men have been variable with in nearly all cases impairment of sex differentiation or azoospermia. We report a milder reproductive phenotype both in a male patient and

  6. Understanding regulation of the host-mediated gut symbiont population and the symbiont-mediated host immunity in the Riptortus-Burkholderia symbiosis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Lee, Jun Beom; Jang, Ho Am; Han, Yeon Soo; Fukatsu, Takema; Lee, Bok Luel

    2016-11-01

    Valuable insect models have tremendously contributed to our understanding of innate immunity and symbiosis. Bean bug, Riptortus pedestris, is a useful insect symbiosis model due to harboring cultivable monospecific gut symbiont, genus Burkholderia. Bean bug is a hemimetabolous insect whose immunity is not well-understood. However, we recently identified three major antimicrobial peptides of Riptortus and examined the relationship between gut symbiosis and host immunity. We found that the presence of Burkholderia gut symbiont positively affects Riptortus immunity. From studying host regulation mechanisms of symbiont population, we revealed that the symbiotic Burkholderia cells are much more susceptible to Riptortus immune responses than the cultured cells. We further elucidated that the immune-susceptibility of the Burkholderia gut symbionts is due to the drastic change of bacterial cell envelope. Finally, we show that the immune-susceptible Burkholderia symbionts are able to prosper in host owing to the suppression of immune responses of the symbiotic midgut. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of some fungicides on mycorrhizal symbiosis between two Glomus species from commercial inocula and Allium porrum L. seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Dorrego, A.; Mestre Pares, J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper reports the effect of twenty-five commonly used fungicides in agriculture on two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) present in commercial products of ATENS, S.L.: Glomus intra radices (Schenck and Smith) and Glomus mosseae [(Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerdemann and Trappe], forming the symbiosis with leek plants. Systemic fungicides (Aliette, Beltanol, Caddy 10, Forum, Moncut, Ortiva, Previcur, Ridomil Gold MZ, Ridomil Gold SL, Rubigan, Sinthane, Stroby, Swich, Tachigarem, Teldor, Topas 10 EC, Frupica) and non systemic fungicides (Daconil 75%, Ditiver, Euparem, INACOP, Octagon, Parmex, Terrazole and Metaram), started to be applied to soil and leaves at recommended concentrations and frequencies 4 weeks after transplant and AMF inoculation. The effect of the fungicides was assessed by comparing treated and untreated plants that were inoculated with the AMF through quantification of root mycorrhizal colonization. Among the fungicides applied to the soil, Octagon, Ditiver, Parmex and Metaram virtually eliminated the mycorrhizal symbiosis in treated plants, while the mycorrhizal colonization was not affected by the soil treatment with Beltanol, INACOP and Previcur. Three fungicides of foliar recommended application: Rubigan, Frupica, and Sinthane, strongly inhibited mycorrhizal colonization, but Aliette, Forum, Teldor, Swich and Ortiva, did not seem to reduce it substantially. In addition, the work describes the individual effect of each fungicide applied on both, foliage and soil. (Author) 29 refs.

  8. Genetics of mycorrhizal symbiosis in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Heike; Serfling, Albrecht; Enders, Matthias; Friedt, Wolfgang; Ordon, Frank

    2017-07-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is a major staple food and therefore of prime importance for feeding the Earth's growing population. Mycorrhiza is known to improve plant growth, but although extensive knowledge concerning the interaction between mycorrhizal fungi and plants is available, genotypic differences concerning the ability of wheat to form mycorrhizal symbiosis and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) involved in mycorrhization are largely unknown. Therefore, a diverse set of 94 bread wheat genotypes was evaluated with regard to root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In order to identify genomic regions involved in mycorrhization, these genotypes were analyzed using the wheat 90k iSelect chip, resulting in 17 823 polymorphic mapped markers, which were used in a genome-wide association study. Significant genotypic differences (P wheat. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Aspects of narcissism and symbiosis, or, essential neurosis of twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Charlotte

    2012-06-01

    Following a brief introduction I address the relationships of twins from five different perspectives: the Intimate Connection, the Mirror Image and Complementarity, Object- and Self-Representation, Self and Object or Rivalry, and Intersubjective Communication. This approach attempts to understand twin relationships and the individual development of twins in terms of their intense mutual dependence, akin to infantile symbiosis, and in terms of narcissism. In their similarity to each other, twins may choose each other as love objects even as they see themselves in the other. That is, a twin may "love what he himself is" or "someone who was once part of himself." This "type of object-choice … must be termed 'narcissistic'" (Freud, 1914, pp. 90, 88). Such "cathexis of an undifferentiated self-object" is considered to be "primary narcissism" (Burstein, 1977, p. 103). Hoffer (1952) describes primary narcissism as "the lack of all qualities discriminating between self and not-self, inside and outside" (p. 33).

  10. The United States and Israel, from alliance to symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferran Izquierdo Brichs

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between Israel and the United States has been evolving from that of an alliance during the Cold War to a symbiosis nowadays. American policy toward the Middle East is marked by its interest in oil, to which its growing relationship with Israelhas gradually been added. However, although for a long time the interests it shared with Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries moderated its policy and balanced its support of Israel somewhat, in the last few years its alliance with Israel has come to dominate Washington’s strategy. This is reflected in its invasion of Iraq and its tensions with Arab countries. The reason for this evolution must be sought, primarily, in the influence that Israel and pro-Zionist lobbies have gained in the domestic policy of the United States.

  11. Bacterial Molecular Signals in the Sinorhizobium fredii-Soybean Symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. López-Baena

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sinorhizobium (Ensifer fredii (S. fredii is a rhizobial species exhibiting a remarkably broad nodulation host-range. Thus, S. fredii is able to effectively nodulate dozens of different legumes, including plants forming determinate nodules, such as the important crops soybean and cowpea, and plants forming indeterminate nodules, such as Glycyrrhiza uralensis and pigeon-pea. This capacity of adaptation to different symbioses makes the study of the molecular signals produced by S. fredii strains of increasing interest since it allows the analysis of their symbiotic role in different types of nodule. In this review, we analyze in depth different S. fredii molecules that act as signals in symbiosis, including nodulation factors, different surface polysaccharides (exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, cyclic glucans, and K-antigen capsular polysaccharides, and effectors delivered to the interior of the host cells through a symbiotic type 3 secretion system.

  12. Making the Most of Omics for Symbiosis Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaston, J.; Douglas, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Omics, including genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, enable us to explain symbioses in terms of the underlying molecules and their interactions. The central task is to transform molecular catalogs of genes, metabolites etc. into a dynamic understanding of symbiosis function. We review four exemplars of omics studies that achieve this goal, through defined biological questions relating to metabolic integration and regulation of animal-microbial symbioses, the genetic autonomy of bacterial symbionts, and symbiotic protection of animal hosts from pathogens. As omic datasets become increasingly complex, computationally-sophisticated downstream analyses are essential to reveal interactions not evident to visual inspection of the data. We discuss two approaches, phylogenomics and transcriptional clustering, that can divide the primary output of omics studies – long lists of factors – into manageable subsets, and we describe how they have been applied to analyze large datasets and generate testable hypotheses. PMID:22983030

  13. Long-distance transport of signals during symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi-Ping; Illana, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Legumes enter nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia), whereas most flowering plants establish symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Once first steps of symbiosis are initiated, nodule formation and mycorrhization in legumes is negatively controlled by a shoot-derived inhibitor (SDI), a phenomenon termed autoregulation. According to current views, autoregulation of nodulation and mycorrhization in legumes is regulated in a similar way. CLE peptides induced in response to rhizobial nodulation signals (Nod factors) have been proposed to represent the ascending long-distance signals to the shoot. Although not proven yet, these CLE peptides are likely perceived by leucine-rich repeat (LRR) autoregulation receptor kinases in the shoot. Autoregulation of mycorrhization in non-legumes is reminiscent to the phenomenon of “systemic acquired resistance” in plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:21455020

  14. Lichen Symbiosis: Nature's High Yielding Machines for Induced Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Kastanaki, Elizabeth; Pirintsos, Stergios; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939) and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont’s and photobiont’s consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration) establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont’s hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein) to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state) constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications. PMID:25826211

  15. Lichen symbiosis: nature's high yielding machines for induced hydrogen production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Papazi

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is a promising future energy source. Although the ability of green algae to produce hydrogen has long been recognized (since 1939 and several biotechnological applications have been attempted, the greatest obstacle, being the O2-sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme, has not yet been overcome. In the present contribution, 75 years after the first report on algal hydrogen production, taking advantage of a natural mechanism of oxygen balance, we demonstrate high hydrogen yields by lichens. Lichens have been selected as the ideal organisms in nature for hydrogen production, since they consist of a mycobiont and a photobiont in symbiosis. It has been hypothesized that the mycobiont's and photobiont's consumption of oxygen (increase of COX and AOX proteins of mitochondrial respiratory pathways and PTOX protein of chrolorespiration establishes the required anoxic conditions for the activation of the phycobiont's hydrogenase in a closed system. Our results clearly supported the above hypothesis, showing that lichens have the ability to activate appropriate bioenergetic pathways depending on the specific incubation conditions. Under light conditions, they successfully use the PSII-dependent and the PSII-independent pathways (decrease of D1 protein and parallel increase of PSaA protein to transfer electrons to hydrogenase, while under dark conditions, lichens use the PFOR enzyme and the dark fermentative pathway to supply electrons to hydrogenase. These advantages of lichen symbiosis in combination with their ability to survive in extreme environments (while in a dry state constitute them as unique and valuable hydrogen producing natural factories and pave the way for future biotechnological applications.

  16. The genome of Aiptasia, a sea anemone model for coral symbiosis

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgarten, Sebastian; Simakov, Oleg; Esherick, Lisl Y.; Liew, Yi Jin; Lehnert, Erik M.; Michell, Craig; Li, Yong; Hambleton, Elizabeth A.; Guse, Annika; Oates, Matt E.; Gough, Julian; Weis, Virginia M.; Aranda, Manuel; Pringle, John R.; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2015-01-01

    The most diverse marine ecosystems, coral reefs, depend upon a functional symbiosis between a cnidarian animal host (the coral) and intracellular photosynthetic dinoflagellate algae. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying

  17. The ambrosia symbiosis is specific in some species and promiscuous in others: evidence from community pyrosequencing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostovčík, Martin; Bateman, C.C.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Stelinski, L.L.; Jordal, B.H.; Hulcr, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2015), s. 126-138 ISSN 1751-7362 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : ambrosia symbiosis * pyrosequencing Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.328, year: 2015

  18. Genetic Regulation in the Aiptasia pallida Symbiosis - Performance Report, Year 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomb, Jean-Francois

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the progress of the project 'Genetic Regulation in A. pallida Symbiosis'. The main goal of the project in year 1 was to identify sequence tags for differentially expressed genes using the SAGE approach...

  19. Organizational Boundary Change in Industrial Symbiosis: Revisiting the Guitang Group in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study revisits the Guitang Group, one of the best known industrial symbiosis cases in the sugar industry. Our goal is to offer an evolutionary understanding of industrial symbiosis at the Guitang Group. This article focuses on the organizational boundary change of the Guitang Group over time, and acknowledges this process as one of the seven industrial symbiosis dynamics proposed by Boons et al. We offer a historical view of the critical forces behind Guitang’s industrial symbiosis evolution since the 1950s; particularly how these changes were influenced by broader economic and institutional contexts of importance in China. These insights include the role of institutionalized research and development (R&D as well as technology-oriented leadership as driving forces for Guitang’s innovation, particularly since the 1990s, when greater efficiency and productivity were emphasized, leading to the establishment of further symbiotic relationships in the company’s evolutionary process. As a result, the Guitang Group grew from 2 internal to 11 internal and external symbiotic exchanges and is now a conglomeration with more than 3000 employees generating more than 1 billion RMB (150 million USD in revenue annually. The driving forces of the Guitang Group’s industrial symbiosis evolution helped to create, disseminate and share information by continuously reinforcing the industrial symbiosis message as part of the Guitang Group’s business model and competitive strategy. In addition, state-level policies such as establishing the Guigang (the city where Guitang is located Eco-Industrial Park enabled industrial symbiosis in Guitang. This study provides prospects for future research on the organizational boundary change dynamic of industrial symbiosis in the sugar manufacturing industry and beyond.

  20. The engine of the reef: Photobiology of the coral-algal symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Susan Roth

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Coral reef ecosystems thrive in tropical oligotrophic oceans because of the relationship between corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae called Symbiodinium. Symbiodinium convert sunlight and carbon dioxide into organic carbon and oxygen to fuel coral growth and calcification, creating habitat for these diverse and productive ecosystems. Light is thus a key regulating factor shaping the productivity, physiology and ecology of the coral holobiont. Similar to all oxygenic photoautotrophs, Symbiodinium must safely harvest sunlight for photosynthesis and dissipate excess energy to prevent oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is caused by environmental stressors such as those associated with global climate change, and ultimately leads to breakdown of the coral-algal symbiosis known as coral bleaching. Recently, large-scale coral bleaching events have become pervasive and frequent threatening and endangering coral reefs. Because the coral-algal symbiosis is the biological engine producing the reef, the future of coral reef ecosystems depends on the ecophysiology of the symbiosis. This review examines the photobiology of the coral-algal symbiosis with particular focus on the photophysiological responses and timescales of corals and Symbiodinium. Additionally, this review summarizes the light environment and its dynamics, the vulnerability of the symbiosis to oxidative stress, the abiotic and biotic factors influencing photosynthesis, the diversity of the coral-algal symbiosis and recent advances in the field. Studies integrating physiology with the developing omics fields will provide new insights into the coral-algal symbiosis. Greater physiological and ecological understanding of the coral-algal symbiosis is needed for protection and conservation of coral reefs.

  1. Origin and Evolution of Nitrogen Fixation Genes on Symbiosis Islands and Plasmid in Bradyrhizobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Takashi; Piromyou, Pongdet; Tittabutr, Panlada; Teaumroong, Neung; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2016-01-01

    The nitrogen fixation (nif) genes of nodule-forming Bradyrhizobium strains are generally located on symbiosis islands or symbiosis plasmids, suggesting that these genes have been transferred laterally. The nif genes of rhizobial and non-rhizobial Bradyrhizobium strains were compared in order to infer the evolutionary histories of nif genes. Based on all codon positions, the phylogenetic tree of concatenated nifD and nifK sequences showed that nifDK on symbiosis islands formed a different clade from nifDK on non-symbiotic loci (located outside of symbiosis islands and plasmids) with elongated branches; however, these genes were located in close proximity, when only the 1st and 2nd codon positions were analyzed. The guanine (G) and cytosine (C) content of the 3rd codon position of nifDK on symbiosis islands was lower than that on non-symbiotic loci. These results suggest that nif genes on symbiosis islands were derived from the non-symbiotic loci of Bradyrhizobium or closely related strains and have evolved toward a lower GC content with a higher substitution rate than the ancestral state. Meanwhile, nifDK on symbiosis plasmids clustered with nifDK on non-symbiotic loci in the tree representing all codon positions, and the GC content of symbiotic and non-symbiotic loci were similar. These results suggest that nif genes on symbiosis plasmids were derived from the non-symbiotic loci of Bradyrhizobium and have evolved with a similar evolutionary pattern and rate as the ancestral state. PMID:27431195

  2. The engine of the reef: photobiology of the coral–algal symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Melissa S.

    2014-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems thrive in tropical oligotrophic oceans because of the relationship between corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae called Symbiodinium. Symbiodinium convert sunlight and carbon dioxide into organic carbon and oxygen to fuel coral growth and calcification, creating habitat for these diverse and productive ecosystems. Light is thus a key regulating factor shaping the productivity, physiology, and ecology of the coral holobiont. Similar to all oxygenic photoautotrophs, Symbiodinium must safely harvest sunlight for photosynthesis and dissipate excess energy to prevent oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is caused by environmental stressors such as those associated with global climate change, and ultimately leads to breakdown of the coral–algal symbiosis known as coral bleaching. Recently, large-scale coral bleaching events have become pervasive and frequent threatening and endangering coral reefs. Because the coral–algal symbiosis is the biological engine producing the reef, the future of coral reef ecosystems depends on the ecophysiology of the symbiosis. This review examines the photobiology of the coral–algal symbiosis with particular focus on the photophysiological responses and timescales of corals and Symbiodinium. Additionally, this review summarizes the light environment and its dynamics, the vulnerability of the symbiosis to oxidative stress, the abiotic and biotic factors influencing photosynthesis, the diversity of the coral–algal symbiosis, and recent advances in the field. Studies integrating physiology with the developing “omics” fields will provide new insights into the coral–algal symbiosis. Greater physiological and ecological understanding of the coral–algal symbiosis is needed for protection and conservation of coral reefs. PMID:25202301

  3. A Costa Rican family affected with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease due to the myelin protein zero (MPZ p.Thr124Met mutation shares the Belgian haplotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Leal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The p.Thr124Met mutation in the myelin protein zero (MPZ causes the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2J, a peripheral neuropathy with additional symptoms as pupillary alterations and deafness. It was observed in several families around the world originating e. g. from Germany, Belgium, Japan, Italy and North America. Here we report Central American patients originating from a family in Costa Rica carrying this mutation. Clinical, electrophysiological and molecular analysis of patients and controls were performed, including gene and linked markers´ sequencing. Carriers share almost the entire haplotype with two non related Belgian CMT patients. As a result of the haplotype analysis, based on ten markers (seven SNPs, two microsatellites and an intronic polyA stretch, the founder effect hypothesis for this allele migration is suggestive. Rev. Biol. Trop. 62 (4: 1285-1293. Epub 2014 December 01.

  4. The Micro-RNA172c-APETALA2-1 Node as a Key Regulator of the Common Bean-Rhizobium etli Nitrogen Fixation Symbiosis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova-Franco, Bárbara; Íñiguez, Luis P.; Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Leija, Alfonso; Fuentes, Sara I.; Ramírez, Mario; Paul, Sujay

    2015-01-01

    Micro-RNAs are recognized as important posttranscriptional regulators in plants. The relevance of micro-RNAs as regulators of the legume-rhizobia nitrogen-fixing symbiosis is emerging. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the role of micro-RNA172 (miR172) and its conserved target APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factor in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium etli symbiosis. Our expression analysis revealed that mature miR172c increased upon rhizobial infection and continued increasing during nodule development, reaching its maximum in mature nodules and decaying in senescent nodules. The expression of AP2-1 target showed a negative correlation with miR172c expression. A drastic decrease in miR172c and high AP2-1 mRNA levels were observed in ineffective nodules. Phenotypic analysis of composite bean plants with transgenic roots overexpressing miR172c or a mutated AP2-1 insensitive to miR172c cleavage demonstrated the pivotal regulatory role of the miR172 node in the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis. Increased miR172 resulted in improved root growth, increased rhizobial infection, increased expression of early nodulation and autoregulation of nodulation genes, and improved nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In addition, these plants showed decreased sensitivity to nitrate inhibition of nodulation. Through transcriptome analysis, we identified 114 common bean genes that coexpressed with AP2-1 and proposed these as being targets for transcriptional activation by AP2-1. Several of these genes are related to nodule senescence, and we propose that they have to be silenced, through miR172c-induced AP2-1 cleavage, in active mature nodules. Our work sets the basis for exploring the miR172-mediated improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean, the most important grain legume for human consumption. PMID:25739700

  5. Book review of Insect Symbiosis. Volume 2. Bourtzis, K.A. and Miller, T.A. editros. 2006 CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, Boca Raton, FL, 276 pp. ISBN 0-8493-1286-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    There are several definitions of symbiosis, but in this book it involves an association where one organism (the symbiont) lives within or on the body of another organism (the host), regardless of the actual effect on the host. Some symbioses are mutualistic, some parasitic, and some involve commensalism, in which one partner derives some benefit without either harming or benefiting the other. This is the second volume in this exciting and rapidly advancing topic by these editors. The first volume was published in 2003 and during the intervening three years additional data have been produced that make this book a useful addition to your library. The first book provided chapters that provided an overview of insect symbiosis, discussions of the primary aphid symbiont Buchnera and other aphid symbionts, symbiosis in tsetse, symbionts in the weevil Sitophilus , the possible use of paratransgenic symbionts of Rhodnius prolixis to prevent disease transmission, bark beetle and fungal symbiosis, symbionts of tephritid fruit flies, symbionts affecting termite behavior, an overview of microsporidia as symbionts (parasites?) of insects, an overview of a newly discovered bacterium that causes sex-ratio distortion in insects and mites (from the Bacteroides group), symbionts that selectively kill male insects, and several chapters on the ubiquitous endosymbiont Wolbachia

  6. Resistance mutations of Pro197, Asp376 and Trp574 in the acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) affect pigments, growths, and competitiveness of Descurainia sophia L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongzhi; Xu, Yufang; Wang, Shipeng; Li, Xuefeng; Zheng, Mingqi

    2017-11-27

    D. Sophia is one of the most problematic weed species infesting winter wheat in China, and has evolved high resistance to tribenuron-methyl. Amino acid substitutions at site of Pro197, Asp376 and Trp574 in acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) were mainly responsible for D. sophia resistance to tribenuron-methyl. In this study, D. sophia plant individually homozygous for specific AHAS mutation (Pro197Leu, Pro197His, Pro197Ser, Pro197Thr, Asp376Glu and Trp574Leu) were generated. In addition, the effects of resistance mutations on pigments, growths and competitiveness of susceptible (S) and resistant (R) plants of D. sophia were investigated. The results indicated the R plants carrying Pro197Leu or Pro197His or Asp376Glu or Trp574Leu displayed stronger competitiveness than S plants. The adverse effects on R plants aggravated with the increase of R plants proportion, which made the R plants against domination the weed community in absent of herbicide selection. Therefore, these resistance mutation have no obvious adverse effects on the pigments (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoid), relative growth rates (RGR), leaf area ratio (LAR) and net assimilation rate (NAR) of R plants.

  7. The LRRK2 G2385R variant is a partial loss-of-function mutation that affects synaptic vesicle trafficking through altered protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Maria Dolores Perez; Marsicano, Silvia; Daniele, Federica; Marte, Antonella; Pischedda, Francesca; Di Cairano, Eliana; Piovesana, Ester; von Zweydorf, Felix; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Onofri, Franco; Perego, Carla; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2017-07-14

    Mutations in the Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 protein contains several functional domains, including protein-protein interaction domains at its N- and C-termini. In this study, we analyzed the functional features attributed to LRRK2 by its N- and C-terminal domains. We combined TIRF microscopy and synaptopHluorin assay to visualize synaptic vesicle trafficking. We found that N- and C-terminal domains have opposite impact on synaptic vesicle dynamics. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that different proteins are bound at the two extremities, namely β3-Cav2.1 at N-terminus part and β-Actin and Synapsin I at C-terminus domain. A sequence variant (G2385R) harboured within the C-terminal WD40 domain increases the risk for PD. Complementary biochemical and imaging approaches revealed that the G2385R variant alters strength and quality of LRRK2 interactions and increases fusion of synaptic vesicles. Our data suggest that the G2385R variant behaves like a loss-of-function mutation that mimics activity-driven events. Impaired scaffolding capabilities of mutant LRRK2 resulting in perturbed vesicular trafficking may arise as a common pathophysiological denominator through which different LRRK2 pathological mutations cause disease.

  8. Mutations in the Atp1p and Atp3p subunits of yeast ATP synthase differentially affect respiration and fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Brian R; White, Karen H; Thorsness, Peter E

    2007-04-01

    ATP1-111, a suppressor of the slow-growth phenotype of yme1Delta lacking mitochondrial DNA is due to the substitution of phenylalanine for valine at position 111 of the alpha-subunit of mitochondrial ATP synthase (Atp1p in yeast). The suppressing activity of ATP1-111 requires intact beta (Atp2p) and gamma (Atp3p) subunits of mitochondrial ATP synthase, but not the stator stalk subunits b (Atp4p) and OSCP (Atp5p). ATP1-111 and other similarly suppressing mutations in ATP1 and ATP3 increase the growth rate of wild-type strains lacking mitochondrial DNA. These suppressing mutations decrease the growth rate of yeast containing an intact mitochondrial chromosome on media requiring oxidative phosphorylation, but not when grown on fermentable media. Measurement of chronological aging of yeast in culture reveals that ATP1 and ATP3 suppressor alleles in strains that contain mitochondrial DNA are longer lived than the isogenic wild-type strain. In contrast, the chronological life span of yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA and containing these mutations is shorter than that of the isogenic wild-type strain. Spore viability of strains bearing ATP1-111 is reduced compared to wild type, although ATP1-111 enhances the survival of spores that lacked mitochondrial DNA.

  9. The role of iron uptake in pathogenicity and symbiosis in Photorhabdus luminescens TT01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram negative bacteria that are pathogenic to insect larvae whilst also having a mutualistic interaction with nematodes from the family Heterorhabditis. Iron is an essential nutrient and bacteria have different mechanisms for obtaining both the ferrous (Fe2+ and ferric (Fe3+ forms of this metal from their environments. In this study we were interested in analyzing the role of Fe3+ and Fe2+ iron uptake systems in the ability of Photorhabdus to interact with its invertebrate hosts. Results We constructed targeted deletion mutants of exbD, feoABC and yfeABCD in P. luminescens TT01. The exbD mutant was predicted to be crippled in its ability to obtain Fe3+ and we show that this mutant does not grow well in iron-limited media. We also show that this mutant was avirulent to the insect but was unaffected in its symbiotic interaction with Heterorhabditis. Furthermore we show that a mutation in feoABC (encoding a predicted Fe2+ permease was unaffected in both virulence and symbiosis whilst the divalent cation transporter encoded by yfeABCD is required for virulence in the Tobacco Hornworm, Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera but not in the Greater Wax Moth, Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera. Moreover the Yfe transporter also appears to have a role during colonization of the IJ stage of the nematode. Conclusion In this study we show that iron uptake (via the TonB complex and the Yfe transporter is important for the virulence of P. luminescens to insect larvae. Moreover this study also reveals that the Yfe transporter appears to be involved in Mn2+-uptake during growth in the gut lumen of the IJ nematode. Therefore, the Yfe transporter in P. luminescens TT01 is important during colonization of both the insect and nematode and, moreover, the metal ion transported by this pathway is host-dependent.

  10. Common mycorrhizal networks and their effect on the bargaining power of the fungal partner in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücking, Heike; Mensah, Jerry A; Fellbaum, Carl R

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form mutualistic interactions with the majority of land plants, including some of the most important crop species. The fungus takes up nutrients from the soil, and transfers these nutrients to the mycorrhizal interface in the root, where these nutrients are exchanged against carbon from the host. AM fungi form extensive hyphal networks in the soil and connect with their network multiple host plants. These common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) play a critical role in the long-distance transport of nutrients through soil ecosystems and allow the exchange of signals between the interconnected plants. CMNs affect the survival, fitness, and competitiveness of the fungal and plant species that interact via these networks, but how the resource transport within these CMNs is controlled is largely unknown. We discuss the significance of CMNs for plant communities and for the bargaining power of the fungal partner in the AM symbiosis.

  11. Global distribution and vertical patterns of a prymnesiophyte-cyanobacteria obligate symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Ana M; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Raho, Nicolas; Blasco, Dolors; Vidal, Montserrat; Audic, Stéphane; de Vargas, Colomban; Latasa, Mikel; Acinas, Silvia G; Massana, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    A marine symbiosis has been recently discovered between prymnesiophyte species and the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium UCYN-A. At least two different UCYN-A phylotypes exist, the clade UCYN-A1 in symbiosis with an uncultured small prymnesiophyte and the clade UCYN-A2 in symbiosis with the larger Braarudosphaera bigelowii. We targeted the prymnesiophyte-UCYN-A1 symbiosis by double CARD-FISH (catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization) and analyzed its abundance in surface samples from the MALASPINA circumnavigation expedition. Our use of a specific probe for the prymnesiophyte partner allowed us to verify that this algal species virtually always carried the UCYN-A symbiont, indicating that the association was also obligate for the host. The prymnesiophyte-UCYN-A1 symbiosis was detected in all ocean basins, displaying a patchy distribution with abundances (up to 500 cells ml(-1)) that could vary orders of magnitude. Additional vertical profiles taken at the NE Atlantic showed that this symbiosis occupied the upper water column and disappeared towards the Deep Chlorophyll Maximum, where the biomass of the prymnesiophyte assemblage peaked. Moreover, sequences of both prymnesiophyte partners were searched within a large 18S rDNA metabarcoding data set from the Tara-Oceans expedition around the world. This sequence-based analysis supported the patchy distribution of the UCYN-A1 host observed by CARD-FISH and highlighted an unexpected homogeneous distribution (at low relative abundance) of B. bigelowii in the open ocean. Our results demonstrate that partners are always in symbiosis in nature and show contrasted ecological patterns of the two related lineages.

  12. Global distribution and vertical patterns of a prymnesiophyte–cyanobacteria obligate symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Ana M; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Raho, Nicolas; Blasco, Dolors; Vidal, Montserrat; Audic, Stéphane; de Vargas, Colomban; Latasa, Mikel; Acinas, Silvia G; Massana, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    A marine symbiosis has been recently discovered between prymnesiophyte species and the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium UCYN-A. At least two different UCYN-A phylotypes exist, the clade UCYN-A1 in symbiosis with an uncultured small prymnesiophyte and the clade UCYN-A2 in symbiosis with the larger Braarudosphaera bigelowii. We targeted the prymnesiophyte–UCYN-A1 symbiosis by double CARD-FISH (catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization) and analyzed its abundance in surface samples from the MALASPINA circumnavigation expedition. Our use of a specific probe for the prymnesiophyte partner allowed us to verify that this algal species virtually always carried the UCYN-A symbiont, indicating that the association was also obligate for the host. The prymnesiophyte–UCYN-A1 symbiosis was detected in all ocean basins, displaying a patchy distribution with abundances (up to 500 cells ml−1) that could vary orders of magnitude. Additional vertical profiles taken at the NE Atlantic showed that this symbiosis occupied the upper water column and disappeared towards the Deep Chlorophyll Maximum, where the biomass of the prymnesiophyte assemblage peaked. Moreover, sequences of both prymnesiophyte partners were searched within a large 18S rDNA metabarcoding data set from the Tara-Oceans expedition around the world. This sequence-based analysis supported the patchy distribution of the UCYN-A1 host observed by CARD-FISH and highlighted an unexpected homogeneous distribution (at low relative abundance) of B. bigelowii in the open ocean. Our results demonstrate that partners are always in symbiosis in nature and show contrasted ecological patterns of the two related lineages. PMID:26405830

  13. Mutations and chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlman, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    The genetic changes of mutations and chromosomal aberrations are discussed. The consequences of both depend not only on the type of genetic change produced but also on the type of cell that is affected and on the development stage of the organism. (C.F.)

  14. Cell wall remodeling in mycorrhizal symbiosis: a way towards biotrophism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls are deeply involved in the molecular talk between partners during plant and microbe interactions, and their role in mycorrhizae, i.e., the widespread symbiotic associations established between plant roots and soil fungi, has been investigated extensively. All mycorrhizal interactions achieve full symbiotic functionality through the development of an extensive contact surface between the plant and fungal cells, where signals and nutrients are exchanged. The exchange of molecules between the fungal and the plant cytoplasm takes place both through their plasma membranes and their cell walls; a functional compartment, known as the symbiotic interface, is thus defined. Among all the symbiotic interfaces, the complex intracellular interface of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has received a great deal of attention since its first description. Here, in fact, the host plasma membrane invaginates and proliferates around all the developing intracellular fungal structures, and cell wall material is laid down between this membrane and the fungal cell surface. By contrast, in ectomycorrhizae (ECM), where the fungus grows outside and between the root cells, plant and fungal cell walls are always in direct contact and form the interface between the two partners. The organization and composition of cell walls within the interface compartment is a topic that has attracted widespread attention, both in ecto- and endomycorrhizae. The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the current knowledge on this topic by integrating morphological observations, which have illustrated cell wall features during mycorrhizal interactions, with the current data produced by genomic and transcriptomic approaches.

  15. Synthetic biology approaches to engineering the nitrogen symbiosis in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Christian; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen is abundant in the earth's atmosphere but, unlike carbon, cannot be directly assimilated by plants. The limitation this places on plant productivity has been circumvented in contemporary agriculture through the production and application of chemical fertilizers. The chemical reduction of nitrogen for this purpose consumes large amounts of energy and the reactive nitrogen released into the environment as a result of fertilizer application leads to greenhouse gas emissions, as well as widespread eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems. The environmental impacts are intensified by injudicious use of fertilizers in many parts of the world. Simultaneously, limitations in the production and supply of chemical fertilizers in other regions are leading to low agricultural productivity and malnutrition. Nitrogen can be directly fixed from the atmosphere by some bacteria and Archaea, which possess the enzyme nitrogenase. Some plant species, most notably legumes, have evolved close symbiotic associations with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Engineering cereal crops with the capability to fix their own nitrogen could one day address the problems created by the over- and under-use of nitrogen fertilizers in agriculture. This could be achieved either by expression of a functional nitrogenase enzyme in the cells of the cereal crop or through transferring the capability to form a symbiotic association with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. While potentially transformative, these biotechnological approaches are challenging; however, with recent advances in synthetic biology they are viable long-term goals. This review discusses the possibility of these biotechnological solutions to the nitrogen problem, focusing on engineering the nitrogen symbiosis in cereals.

  16. Ant-plants and fungi: a new threeway symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defossez, Emmanuel; Selosse, Marc-André; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Mondolot, Laurence; Faccio, Antonella; Djieto-Lordon, Champlain; McKey, Doyle; Blatrix, Rumsaïs

    2009-06-01

    Symbioses between plants and fungi, fungi and ants, and ants and plants all play important roles in ecosystems. Symbioses involving all three partners appear to be rare. Here, we describe a novel tripartite symbiosis in which ants and a fungus inhabit domatia of an ant-plant, and present evidence that such interactions are widespread. We investigated 139 individuals of the African ant-plant Leonardoxa africana for occurrence of fungus. Behaviour of mutualist ants toward the fungus within domatia was observed using a video camera fitted with an endoscope. Fungi were identified by sequencing a fragment of their ribosomal DNA. Fungi were always present in domatia occupied by mutualist ants but never in domatia occupied by opportunistic or parasitic ants. Ants appear to favour the propagation, removal and maintenance of the fungus. Similar fungi were associated with other ant-plants in Cameroon. All belong to the ascomycete order Chaetothyriales; those from L. africana formed a monophyletic clade. These new plant-ant-fungus associations seem to be specific, as demonstrated within Leonardoxa and as suggested by fungal phyletic identities. Such tripartite associations are widespread in African ant-plants but have long been overlooked. Taking fungal partners into account will greatly enhance our understanding of symbiotic ant-plant mutualisms.

  17. Growth conditions determine the DNF2 requirement for symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi Berrabah

    Full Text Available Rhizobia and legumes are able to interact in a symbiotic way leading to the development of root nodules. Within nodules, rhizobia fix nitrogen for the benefit of the plant. These interactions are efficient because spectacularly high densities of nitrogen fixing rhizobia are maintained in the plant cells. DNF2, a Medicago truncatula gene has been described as required for nitrogen fixation, bacteroid's persistence and to prevent defense-like reactions in the nodules. This manuscript shows that a Rhizobium mutant unable to differentiate is not sufficient to trigger defense-like reactions in this organ. Furthermore, we show that the requirement of DNF2 for effective symbiosis can be overcome by permissive growth conditions. The dnf2 knockout mutants grown in vitro on agarose or Phytagel as gelling agents are able to produce nodules fixing nitrogen with the same efficiency as the wild-type. However, when agarose medium is supplemented with the plant defense elicitor ulvan, the dnf2 mutant recovers the fix- phenotype. Together, our data show that plant growth conditions impact the gene requirement for symbiotic nitrogen fixation and suggest that they influence the symbiotic suppression of defense reactions in nodules.

  18. Algal ancestor of land plants was preadapted for symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Radhakrishnan, Guru V; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Cheema, Jitender; Malbreil, Mathilde; Volkening, Jeremy D; Sekimoto, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Melkonian, Michael; Pokorny, Lisa; Rothfels, Carl J; Sederoff, Heike Winter; Stevenson, Dennis W; Surek, Barbara; Zhang, Yong; Sussman, Michael R; Dunand, Christophe; Morris, Richard J; Roux, Christophe; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-27

    Colonization of land by plants was a major transition on Earth, but the developmental and genetic innovations required for this transition remain unknown. Physiological studies and the fossil record strongly suggest that the ability of the first land plants to form symbiotic associations with beneficial fungi was one of these critical innovations. In angiosperms, genes required for the perception and transduction of diffusible fungal signals for root colonization and for nutrient exchange have been characterized. However, the origin of these genes and their potential correlation with land colonization remain elusive. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of 259 transcriptomes and 10 green algal and basal land plant genomes, coupled with the characterization of the evolutionary path leading to the appearance of a key regulator, a calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, showed that the symbiotic signaling pathway predated the first land plants. In contrast, downstream genes required for root colonization and their specific expression pattern probably appeared subsequent to the colonization of land. We conclude that the most recent common ancestor of extant land plants and green algae was preadapted for symbiotic associations. Subsequent improvement of this precursor stage in early land plants through rounds of gene duplication led to the acquisition of additional pathways and the ability to form a fully functional arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

  19. Diversity of Rhizobium-Phaseolus vulgaris symbiosis: Overview and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Romero, Esperanza

    2001-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) has become a cosmopolitan crop, but was originally domesticated in the Americas and has been grown in Latin America for several thousand years. Consequently an enormous diversity of bean nodulating bacteria have developed and in the centers of origin the predominant species in bean nodules is R. etli. In some areas of Latin America, inoculation, which normally promotes nodulation and nitrogen fixation is hampered by the prevalence of native strains. Many other species in addition to R. etli have been found in bean nodules in regions where bean has been introduced. Some of these species such as R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, R. gallicum bv. phaseoli and R. giardinii bv. phaseoli might have arisen by acquiring the phaseoli plasmid from R. etli. Others, like R. trap id, are well adapted to acid soils and high temperatures and are good inoculants for bean under these conditions. The large number of rhizobia species capable of nodulating bean supports that bean is a promiscuous host and a diversity of bean-rhizobia interactions exists. Large ranges of dinitrogen fixing capabilities have been documented among bean cultivars and commercial beans have the lowest values among legume crops. Knowledge on bean symbiosis is still incipient but could help to improve bean biological nitrogen fixation. (author)

  20. Paracatenula, an ancient symbiosis between thiotrophic Alphaproteobacteria and catenulid flatworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber-Vodicka, Harald Ronald; Dirks, Ulrich; Leisch, Nikolaus; Stoecker, Kilian; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Heindl, Niels Robert; Horn, Matthias; Lott, Christian; Loy, Alexander; Wagner, Michael; Ott, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Harnessing chemosynthetic symbionts is a recurring evolutionary strategy. Eukaryotes from six phyla as well as one archaeon have acquired chemoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. In contrast to this broad host diversity, known bacterial partners apparently belong to two classes of bacteria—the Gamma- and Epsilonproteobacteria. Here, we characterize the intracellular endosymbionts of the mouthless catenulid flatworm genus Paracatenula as chemoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria. The symbionts of Paracatenula galateia are provisionally classified as “Candidatus Riegeria galateiae” based on 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization together with functional gene and sulfur metabolite evidence. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis shows that all 16 Paracatenula species examined harbor host species-specific intracellular Candidatus Riegeria bacteria that form a monophyletic group within the order Rhodospirillales. Comparing host and symbiont phylogenies reveals strict cocladogenesis and points to vertical transmission of the symbionts. Between 33% and 50% of the body volume of the various worm species is composed of bacterial symbionts, by far the highest proportion among all known endosymbiotic associations between bacteria and metazoans. This symbiosis, which likely originated more than 500 Mya during the early evolution of flatworms, is the oldest known animal–chemoautotrophic bacteria association. The distant phylogenetic position of the symbionts compared with other mutualistic or parasitic Alphaproteobacteria promises to illuminate the common genetic predispositions that have allowed several members of this class to successfully colonize eukaryote cells. PMID:21709249

  1. Systematic screening for mutations in the 5{prime}-regulatory region of the human dopamine D{sub 1} receptor (DRD1) gene in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichon, S.; Noethen, M.M.; Stoeber, G. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1996-07-26

    A possible dysregulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric diseases. In the present study we systematically searched for the presence of mutations in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the dopamine D{sub 1} receptor (DRD1) gene. This region has previously been shown to contain a functional promoter. We investigated 119 unrelated individuals (including 36 schizophrenic patients, 38 bipolar affective patients, and 45 healthy controls) using single-strand conformation analysis (SSCA). Eleven overlapping PCR fragments covered 2,189 bp of DNA sequence. We identified six single base substitutions: -2218T/C, -2102C/A, -2030T/C, -1992G/A, -1251G/C, and -800T/C. None of the mutations was found to be located in regions which have important influence on the level of transcriptional activity. Allele frequencies were similar in patients and controls, indicating that genetic variation in the 5{prime}-regulatory region of the DRD1 gene is unlikely to play a frequent, major role in the genetic predisposition to either schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder. 31 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Severe fluoropyrimidine toxicity due to novel and rare DPYD missense mutations, deletion and genomic amplification affecting DPD activity and mRNA splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kuilenburg, André B P; Meijer, Judith; Maurer, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Genetic variations in DPD have emerged as predictive risk factors for severe fluoropyrimidine toxicity. Here, we report novel and rare genetic variants underlying DPD deficiency...... in 9 cancer patients presenting with severe fluoropyrimidine-associated toxicity. All patients possessed a strongly reduced DPD activity, ranging from 9 to 53% of controls. Analysis of the DPD gene (DPYD) showed the presence of 21 variable sites including 4 novel and 4 very rare aberrations: 3 missense...... of exon 4 immediately upstream of the mutated splice-donor site in the process of DPD pre-mRNA splicing. A lethal toxicity in two DPD patients suggests that fluoropyrimidines combined with other therapies such as radiotherapy might be particularly toxic for DPD deficient patients. Our study advocates...

  3. Identification and characterization of dwarf 62, a loss-of-function mutation in DLT/OsGRAS-32 affecting gibberellin metabolism in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenqiang; Wu, Jianguo; Weng, Shili; Zhang, Yujiang; Zhang, Dapeng; Shi, Chunhai

    2010-11-01

    A dwarf mutant, dwarf 62 (d62), was isolated from rice cultivar 93-11 by mutagenesis with γ-rays. Under normal growth conditions, the mutant had multiple abnormal phenotypes, such as dwarfism, wide and dark-green leaf blades, reduced tiller numbers, late and asynchronous heading, short roots, partial male sterility, etc. Genetic analysis indicated that the abnormal phenotypes were controlled by the recessive mutation of a single nuclear gene. Using molecular markers, the D62 gene was fine mapped in 131-kb region at the short arm of chromosome 6. Positional cloning of D62 gene revealed that it was the same locus as DLT/OsGRAS-32, which encodes a member of the GRAS family. In previous studies, the DLT/OsGRAS-32 is confirmed to play positive roles in brassinosteroid (BR) signaling. Sequence analysis showed that the d62 carried a 2-bp deletion in ORF region of D62 gene which led to a loss-of-function mutation. The function of D62 gene was confirmed by complementation experiment. RT-PCR analysis and promoter activity analysis showed that the D62 gene expressed in all tested tissues including roots, stems, leaves and panicles of rice plant. The d62 mutant exhibited decreased activity of α-amylase in endosperm and reduced content of endogenous GA(1). The expression levels of gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic genes including OsCPS1, OsKS1, OsKO1, OsKAO, OsGA20ox2/SD1 and OsGA2ox3 were significantly increased in d62 mutant. Briefly, these results demonstrated that the D62 (DLT/OsGRAS-32) not only participated in the regulation of BR signaling, but also influenced GA metabolism in rice.

  4. A common mutation in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene affects genomic DNA methylation through an interaction with folate status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Simonetta; Choi, Sang-Woon; Girelli, Domenico; Mason, Joel B.; Dolnikowski, Gregory G.; Bagley, Pamela J.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Jacques, Paul F.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.; Corrocher, Roberto; Selhub, Jacob

    2002-01-01

    DNA methylation, an essential epigenetic feature of DNA that modulates gene expression and genomic integrity, is catalyzed by methyltransferases that use the universal methyl donor S-adenosyl-l-methionine. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the synthesis of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-methylTHF), the methyl donor for synthesis of methionine from homocysteine and precursor of S-adenosyl-l-methionine. In the present study we sought to determine the effect of folate status on genomic DNA methylation with an emphasis on the interaction with the common C677T mutation in the MTHFR gene. A liquid chromatography/MS method for the analysis of nucleotide bases was used to assess genomic DNA methylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 105 subjects homozygous for this mutation (T/T) and 187 homozygous for the wild-type (C/C) MTHFR genotype. The results show that genomic DNA methylation directly correlates with folate status and inversely with plasma homocysteine (tHcy) levels (P < 0.01). T/T genotypes had a diminished level of DNA methylation compared with those with the C/C wild-type (32.23 vs.62.24 ng 5-methylcytosine/μg DNA, P < 0.0001). When analyzed according to folate status, however, only the T/T subjects with low levels of folate accounted for the diminished DNA methylation (P < 0.0001). Moreover, in T/T subjects DNA methylation status correlated with the methylated proportion of red blood cell folate and was inversely related to the formylated proportion of red blood cell folates (P < 0.03) that is known to be solely represented in those individuals. These results indicate that the MTHFR C677T polymorphism influences DNA methylation status through an interaction with folate status. PMID:11929966

  5. Preliminary Design of Industrial Symbiosis of Smes Using Material Flow Cost Accounting (MFCA) Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Rahayu Siwi Dwi; Astuti, Arieyanti Dwi; Hadiyanto

    2018-02-01

    Industrial symbiosis is a collaboration of several industries to share their necessities such material, energy, technology as well as waste management. As a part of industrial ecology, in principle, this system attempts to emulate ecosystem where waste of an organism is being used by another organism, therefore there is no waste in the nature. This system becomes an effort to optimize resources (material and energy) as well as minimize waste. Considerable, in a symbiosis incure material and energy flows among industries. Material and energy in an industry are known as cost carriers, thus flow analysis in this system can be conducted in perspective of material, energy and cost, or called as material flow cost accounting (MFCA) that is an economic and ecological appraisal approach. Previous researches shown that MFCA implementation could be used to evaluate an industry's environmental-related efficiency as well as in planning, business control and decision making. Moreover, the MFCA has been extended to assess environmental performance of SMEs Cluster or industrial symbiosis in SMEs Cluster, even to make preliminary design of an industrial symbiosis base on a major industry. This paper describes the use of MFCA to asses performance of SMEs industrial symbiosis and to improve the performance.

  6. Preliminary Design of Industrial Symbiosis of Smes Using Material Flow Cost Accounting (MFCA Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwi Dwi Astuti Rahayu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial symbiosis is a collaboration of several industries to share their necessities such material, energy, technology as well as waste management. As a part of industrial ecology, in principle, this system attempts to emulate ecosystem where waste of an organism is being used by another organism, therefore there is no waste in the nature. This system becomes an effort to optimize resources (material and energy as well as minimize waste. Considerable, in a symbiosis incure material and energy flows among industries. Material and energy in an industry are known as cost carriers, thus flow analysis in this system can be conducted in perspective of material, energy and cost, or called as material flow cost accounting (MFCA that is an economic and ecological appraisal approach. Previous researches shown that MFCA implementation could be used to evaluate an industry’s environmental-related efficiency as well as in planning, business control and decision making. Moreover, the MFCA has been extended to assess environmental performance of SMEs Cluster or industrial symbiosis in SMEs Cluster, even to make preliminary design of an industrial symbiosis base on a major industry. This paper describes the use of MFCA to asses performance of SMEs industrial symbiosis and to improve the performance.

  7. Two negative regulatory systems of root nodule symbiosis - how are symbiotic benefits and costs balanced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Hanna; Suzaki, Takuya

    2018-05-30

    Root nodule symbiosis is one of the best-characterized mutualistic relationships between plants-microbes symbiosis, where mainly leguminous species can obtain nitrogen sources fixed by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia through the formation of symbiotic organs root nodules. In order to drive this symbiotic process, plants need to provide carbon sources that should be used for their growth. Therefore, a balance between the benefits of obtaining nitrogen sources and the costs of losing carbon sources needs to be maintained during root nodule symbiosis. Plants have developed at least two negative regulatory systems of root nodule symbiosis. One strategy involves the regulation of nodule number in response to rhizobial infection. For this regulation, a systemic long-range signaling between roots and shoots called autoregulation of nodulation has a pivotal role. Another strategy involves the regulation of root nodule symbiosis in response to nitrate, the most abundant form of nitrogen nutrients in the soil. Recent studies indicate that a long-distance signaling is shared between the two strategies, where NIN and NRSYM1, two paralogous RWP-RK transcription factors, can activate the production of nodulation-related CLE peptides in response to different inputs. Here, we give an overview of such progress in our understanding of molecular mechanisms relevant to the control of the symbiotic balance, including their biological significance.

  8. Differential spatio-temporal expression of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases regulates apocarotenoid fluxes during AM symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ráez, Juan A; Fernández, Iván; García, Juan M; Berrio, Estefanía; Bonfante, Paola; Walter, Michael H; Pozo, María J

    2015-01-01

    Apocarotenoids are a class of compounds that play important roles in nature. In recent years, a prominent role for these compounds in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has been shown. They are derived from carotenoids by the action of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) enzyme family. In the present study, using tomato as a model, the spatio-temporal expression pattern of the CCD genes during AM symbiosis establishment and functioning was investigated. In addition, the levels of the apocarotenoids strigolactones (SLs), C13 α-ionol and C14 mycorradicin (C13/C14) derivatives were analyzed. The results suggest an increase in SLs promoted by the presence of the AM fungus at the early stages of the interaction, which correlated with an induction of the SL biosynthesis gene SlCCD7. At later stages, induction of SlCCD7 and SlCCD1 expression in arbusculated cells promoted the production of C13/C14 apocarotenoid derivatives. We show here that the biosynthesis of apocarotenoids during AM symbiosis is finely regulated throughout the entire process at the gene expression level, and that CCD7 constitutes a key player in this regulation. Once the symbiosis is established, apocarotenoid flux would be turned towards the production of C13/C14 derivatives, thus reducing SL biosynthesis and maintaining a functional symbiosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutualism Persistence and Abandonment during the Evolution of the Mycorrhizal Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maherali, Hafiz; Oberle, Brad; Stevens, Peter F; Cornwell, William K; McGlinn, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    Mutualistic symbioses with mycorrhizal fungi are widespread in plants. The majority of plant species associate with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. By contrast, the minority associate with ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi, have abandoned the symbiosis and are nonmycorrhizal (NM), or engage in an intermediate, weakly AM symbiosis (AMNM). To understand the processes that maintain the mycorrhizal symbiosis or cause its loss, we reconstructed its evolution using a ∼3,000-species seed plant phylogeny integrated with mycorrhizal state information. Reconstruction indicated that the common ancestor of seed plants most likely associated with AM fungi and that the EM, NM, and AMNM states descended from the AM state. Direct transitions from the AM state to the EM and NM states were infrequent and generally irreversible, implying that natural selection or genetic constraint could promote stasis once a particular state evolved. However, the evolution of the NM state was more frequent via an indirect pathway through the AMNM state, suggesting that weakening of the AM symbiosis is a necessary precursor to mutualism abandonment. Nevertheless, reversions from the AMNM state back to the AM state were an order of magnitude more likely than transitions to the NM state, suggesting that natural selection favors the AM symbiosis over mutualism abandonment.

  10. DELLA proteins regulate expression of a subset of AM symbiosis-induced genes in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floss, Daniela S; Lévesque-Tremblay, Véronique; Park, Hee-Jin; Harrison, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of the vascular flowering plants form symbiotic associations with fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota through which both partners gain access to nutrients, either mineral nutrients in the case of the plant, or carbon, in the case of the fungus. (1) The association develops in the roots and requires substantial remodeling of the root cortical cells where branched fungal hyphae, called arbuscules, are housed in a new membrane-bound apoplastic compartment. (2) Nutrient exchange between the symbionts occurs over this interface and its development and maintenance is critical for symbiosis. Previously, we showed that DELLA proteins, which are well known as repressors of gibberellic acid signaling, also regulate development of AM symbiosis and are necessary to enable arbuscule development. (3) Furthermore, constitutive overexpression of a dominant DELLA protein (della1-Δ18) is sufficient to induce transcripts of several AM symbiosis-induced genes, even in the absence of the fungal symbiont. (4) Here we further extend this approach and identify AM symbiosis genes that respond transcriptionally to constitutive expression of a dominant DELLA protein and also genes that do respond to this treatment. Additionally, we demonstrate that DELLAs interact with REQUIRED FOR ARBUSCULE DEVELOPMENT 1 (RAD1) which further extends our knowledge of GRAS factor complexes that have the potential to regulate gene expression during AM symbiosis.

  11. Structural basis for regulation of rhizobial nodulation and symbiosis gene expression by the regulatory NolR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The symbiosis between rhizobial microbes and host plants involves the coordinated expression of multiple genes, which leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. As part of the transcriptional machinery for nodulation and symbiosis across a range of Rhizobium, NolR serves as a global regulatory...

  12. The mutation of carotenoids affects the energy transfer in LH2 light harvesting complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 601 at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weimin; Liu Yuan; Guo Lijun; Xu Chunhe; Qian Shixiong

    2006-01-01

    Energy transfer in two kinds of peripheral antenna complexes LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 601 was studied by absorption, fluorescence emission, time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy at room temperature. These two complexes are LH2 (RS601) and green carotenoid mutated LH2 (GM309). The obtained results demonstrate that: (a) compared with spheroidenes, which have ten carbon-carbon double bonds in native RS601, carotenoids in GM309 were identified as containing neurosporenes with nine carbon-carbon double bonds, which show a significant blue shift of ∼20 nm in the three absorption peaks because of the higher energy levels of neurosporene than those of spheroidene, (b) the higher energy levels of neurosporene in GM309 induce a lower B800 → B850 energy transfer rate and efficiency as compared to that in RS601 resulting from the relatively higher band gap between the donor of B800 and the bridge of the carotenoids (c) the same lifetime of the B850 excited singlet state is observed in these two LH2 complexes

  13. A mutation in the Arabidopsis HYL1 gene encoding a dsRNA binding protein affects responses to abscisic acid, auxin, and cytokinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.; Fedoroff, N.

    2000-01-01

    Both physiological and genetic evidence indicate interconnections among plant responses to different hormones. We describe a pleiotropic recessive Arabidopsis transposon insertion mutation, designated hyponastic leaves (hyl1), that alters the plant's responses to several hormones. The mutant is characterized by shorter stature, delayed flowering, leaf hyponasty, reduced fertility, decreased rate of root growth, and an altered root gravitropic response. It also exhibits less sensitivity to auxin and cytokinin and hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA). The auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid normalizes the mutant phenotype somewhat, whereas another auxin transport inhibitor, N-(1-naph-thyl)phthalamic acid, exacerbates the phenotype. The gene, designated HYL1, encodes a 419-amino acid protein that contains two double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding motifs, a nuclear localization motif, and a C-terminal repeat structure suggestive of a protein-protein interaction domain. We present evidence that the HYL1 gene is ABA-regulated and encodes a nuclear dsRNA binding protein. We hypothesize that the HYL1 protein is a regulatory protein functioning at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level.

  14. Arabidopsis thickvein mutation affects vein thickness and organ vascularization, and resides in a provascular cell-specific spermine synthase involved in vein definition and in polar auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Nicole K; Nelson, Timothy

    2005-06-01

    Polar auxin transport has been implicated in the induction of vascular tissue and in the definition of vein positions. Leaves treated with chemical inhibitors of polar auxin transport exhibited vascular phenotypes that include increased vein thickness and vascularization. We describe a recessive mutant, thickvein (tkv), which develops thicker veins in leaves and in inflorescence stems. The increased vein thickness is attributable to an increased number of vascular cells. Mutant plants have smaller leaves and shorter inflorescence stems, and this reduction in organ size and height is accompanied by an increase in organ vascularization, which appears to be attributable to an increase in the recruitment of cells into veins. Furthermore, although floral development is normal, auxin transport in the inflorescence stem is significantly reduced in the mutant, suggesting that the defect in auxin transport is responsible for the vascular phenotypes. In the primary root, the veins appear morphologically normal, but root growth in the tkv mutant is hypersensitive to exogenous cytokinin. The tkv mutation was found to reside in the ACL5 gene, which encodes a spermine synthase and whose expression is specific to provascular cells. We propose that ACL5/TKV is involved in vein definition (defining the boundaries between veins and nonvein regions) and in polar auxin transport, and that polyamines are involved in this process.

  15. Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapies by Metabolic Symbiosis in Renal Cell Carcinoma PDX Models and Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Jiménez-Valerio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiangiogenic drugs are used clinically for treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC as a standard first-line treatment. Nevertheless, these agents primarily serve to stabilize disease, and resistance eventually develops concomitant with progression. Here, we implicate metabolic symbiosis between tumor cells distal and proximal to remaining vessels as a mechanism of resistance to antiangiogenic therapies in patient-derived RCC orthoxenograft (PDX models and in clinical samples. This metabolic patterning is regulated by the mTOR pathway, and its inhibition effectively blocks metabolic symbiosis in PDX models. Clinically, patients treated with antiangiogenics consistently present with histologic signatures of metabolic symbiosis that are exacerbated in resistant tumors. Furthermore, the mTOR pathway is also associated in clinical samples, and its inhibition eliminates symbiotic patterning in patient samples. Overall, these data support a mechanism of resistance to antiangiogenics involving metabolic compartmentalization of tumor cells that can be inhibited by mTOR-targeted drugs.

  16. Eco-Evo-Devo: developmental symbiosis and developmental plasticity as evolutionary agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Scott F; Bosch, Thomas C G; Ledón-Rettig, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    The integration of research from developmental biology and ecology into evolutionary theory has given rise to a relatively new field, ecological evolutionary developmental biology (Eco-Evo-Devo). This field integrates and organizes concepts such as developmental symbiosis, developmental plasticity, genetic accommodation, extragenic inheritance and niche construction. This Review highlights the roles that developmental symbiosis and developmental plasticity have in evolution. Developmental symbiosis can generate particular organs, can produce selectable genetic variation for the entire animal, can provide mechanisms for reproductive isolation, and may have facilitated evolutionary transitions. Developmental plasticity is crucial for generating novel phenotypes, facilitating evolutionary transitions and altered ecosystem dynamics, and promoting adaptive variation through genetic accommodation and niche construction. In emphasizing such non-genomic mechanisms of selectable and heritable variation, Eco-Evo-Devo presents a new layer of evolutionary synthesis.

  17. Are common symbiosis genes required for endophytic rice-rhizobial interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Caiyan; Zhu, Hongyan

    2013-09-01

    Legume plants are able to establish root nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, called rhizobia. Recent studies revealed that the root nodule symbiosis has co-opted the signaling pathway that mediates the ancestral mycorrhizal symbiosis that occurs in most land plants. Despite being unable to induce nodulation, rhizobia have been shown to be able to infect and colonize the roots of non-legumes such as rice. One fascinating question is whether establishment of such associations requires the common symbiosis (Sym) genes that are essential for infection of plant cells by mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia in legumes. Here, we demonstrated that the common Sym genes are not required for endophytic colonization of rice roots by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia.

  18. Developing the anemone Aiptasia as a tractable model for cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis: the transcriptome of aposymbiotic A. pallida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Erik M; Burriesci, Matthew S; Pringle, John R

    2012-06-22

    Coral reefs are hotspots of oceanic biodiversity, forming the foundation of ecosystems that are important both ecologically and for their direct practical impacts on humans. Corals are declining globally due to a number of stressors, including rising sea-surface temperatures and pollution; such stresses can lead to a breakdown of the essential symbiotic relationship between the coral host and its endosymbiotic dinoflagellates, a process known as coral bleaching. Although the environmental stresses causing this breakdown are largely known, the cellular mechanisms of symbiosis establishment, maintenance, and breakdown are still largely obscure. Investigating the symbiosis using an experimentally tractable model organism, such as the small sea anemone Aiptasia, should improve our understanding of exactly how the environmental stressors affect coral survival and growth. We assembled the transcriptome of a clonal population of adult, aposymbiotic (dinoflagellate-free) Aiptasia pallida from ~208 million reads, yielding 58,018 contigs. We demonstrated that many of these contigs represent full-length or near-full-length transcripts that encode proteins similar to those from a diverse array of pathways in other organisms, including various metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, and neuropeptide precursors. The contigs were annotated by sequence similarity, assigned GO terms, and scanned for conserved protein domains. We analyzed the frequency and types of single-nucleotide variants and estimated the size of the Aiptasia genome to be ~421 Mb. The contigs and annotations are available through NCBI (Transcription Shotgun Assembly database, accession numbers JV077153-JV134524) and at http://pringlelab.stanford.edu/projects.html. The availability of an extensive transcriptome assembly for A. pallida will facilitate analyses of gene-expression changes, identification of proteins of interest, and other studies in this important emerging model system.

  19. Developing the anemone Aiptasia as a tractable model for cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis: the transcriptome of aposymbiotic A. pallida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert Erik M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral reefs are hotspots of oceanic biodiversity, forming the foundation of ecosystems that are important both ecologically and for their direct practical impacts on humans. Corals are declining globally due to a number of stressors, including rising sea-surface temperatures and pollution; such stresses can lead to a breakdown of the essential symbiotic relationship between the coral host and its endosymbiotic dinoflagellates, a process known as coral bleaching. Although the environmental stresses causing this breakdown are largely known, the cellular mechanisms of symbiosis establishment, maintenance, and breakdown are still largely obscure. Investigating the symbiosis using an experimentally tractable model organism, such as the small sea anemone Aiptasia, should improve our understanding of exactly how the environmental stressors affect coral survival and growth. Results We assembled the transcriptome of a clonal population of adult, aposymbiotic (dinoflagellate-free Aiptasia pallida from ~208 million reads, yielding 58,018 contigs. We demonstrated that many of these contigs represent full-length or near-full-length transcripts that encode proteins similar to those from a diverse array of pathways in other organisms, including various metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, and neuropeptide precursors. The contigs were annotated by sequence similarity, assigned GO terms, and scanned for conserved protein domains. We analyzed the frequency and types of single-nucleotide variants and estimated the size of the Aiptasia genome to be ~421 Mb. The contigs and annotations are available through NCBI (Transcription Shotgun Assembly database, accession numbers JV077153-JV134524 and at http://pringlelab.stanford.edu/projects.html. Conclusions The availability of an extensive transcriptome assembly for A. pallida will facilitate analyses of gene-expression changes, identification of proteins of interest, and other studies in this

  20. Identification and Quantification of Cause and Effects in Symbiosis of Corn with Arbuscular Mycorrehiza Fungus using Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jahan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering to necessity and importance of determining mycorrhizal symbiosis level and its effects on crop agroecological characteristics as well as other related factors affecting this relationship, beside, the lack of an assured method for this purpose, the present study designed based on new perspectives and insights for determining cause and effects relations, latent variables using structural equation modeling (SEM approach. A field experiment was conducted during 2 years. A split plots arrangement based on randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications was used. Treatments consisted four cropping systems (high, medium, and low input conventional as well as ecological system and four inoculations (mycorrhizae fungus: Glomus intraradices, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR: (Azospirillum brasilense, Azotobacter paspali, dual inoculation: (fungus plus bacteria, and no-inoculation (control, which were allocated to main plots and sub plots, respectively. At the first step, a confirmatory factor analyzing was conducted resulted to two distinguished factors, and then the variables which had the most loads (weight on one of these two factors were determined. At the second step, considering ecophysiological basis of crops growth and development, in order to continue analyzing, the first factor (including: leaf area index (LAI, root length colonization percent (RLCP, dry matter (DM, stem diameter (D, SPAD readings and the second factor (including: maximum photosynthesis (Amax, specific root length (SRL, canopy temperature (CT, plant height (H, soil respiration rate (SRR, variable chlorophyll fluorescence to maximum chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm, plant tissue phosphorus content (%P determined resource capture latent construct and resource utilization latent construct, respectively. Correlation coefficients, squared multiple correlation coefficients, covariance matrices, direct and indirect path coefficients were calculated

  1. Shared skeletal support in a coral-hydroid symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Pantos

    Full Text Available Hydroids form symbiotic relationships with a range of invertebrate hosts. Where they live with colonial invertebrates such as corals or bryozoans the hydroids may benefit from the physical support and protection of their host's hard exoskeleton, but how they interact with them is unknown. Electron microscopy was used to investigate the physical interactions between the colonial hydroid Zanclea margaritae and its reef-building coral host Acropora muricata. The hydroid tissues extend below the coral tissue surface sitting in direct contact with the host's skeleton. Although this arrangement provides the hydroid with protective support, it also presents problems of potential interference with the coral's growth processes and exposes the hydroid to overgrowth and smothering. Desmocytes located within the epidermal layer of the hydroid's perisarc-free hydrorhizae fasten it to the coral skeleton. The large apical surface area of the desmocyte and high bifurcation of the distal end within the mesoglea, as well as the clustering of desmocytes suggests that a very strong attachment between the hydroid and the coral skeleton. This is the first study to provide a detailed description of how symbiotic hydroids attach to their host's skeleton, utilising it for physical support. Results suggest that the loss of perisarc, a characteristic commonly associated with symbiosis, allows the hydroid to utilise desmocytes for attachment. The use of these anchoring structures provides a dynamic method of attachment, facilitating detachment from the coral skeleton during extension, thereby avoiding overgrowth and smothering enabling the hydroid to remain within the host colony for prolonged periods of time.

  2. Environmental law and nuclear law: a growing symbiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennerechts, S.

    2008-01-01

    This article is divided in two parts. The first part deals with the interrelationship between environmental law and nuclear law. It specifically addresses selective topics which the author considers as substantial proof that environmental law is in evidence in the nuclear field. These topics are access to nuclear information, public participation in nuclear decision-making and prevention and compensation of environmental damage caused by nuclear incidents. Environmental law will be considered in its narrow sense, meaning the law that seeks to protect nature such as soil, water, air and biodiversity. The position of the author is that the importance of environmental law for nuclear activities is increasing and may lead to a growing symbiosis with nuclear law. Environmental law and nuclear law share the same objectives: protection against mitigation of and compensation for damage to the environment. In the second part a specific problem that touches upon the extra-territorial effect of environmental legislation in the nuclear field will be examined. At the beginning of the 21. century, it can be expected that vendors of nuclear facilities will spare no efforts in trying to enter new markets all over the world. Countries with more developed environmental requirements on the construction of nuclear facilities by their national vendors in customer countries. This part of the article will analyse whether public international laws to the construction of nuclear facilities abroad. The author believes that there may well be a legal basis under customary international law justifying the application of national environmental law to the construction of nuclear facilities and the performance of work on nuclear facilities in foreign countries, but there would appear to be none permitting the enforcement of these laws in the absence of an agreement with the foreign country. (N.C.)

  3. CERBERUS and NSP1 of Lotus japonicus are common symbiosis genes that modulate arbuscular mycorrhiza development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Naoya; Tsuzuki, Syusaku; Suzaki, Takuya; Parniske, Martin; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2013-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis (AMS) and root nodule symbiosis (RNS) are mutualistic plant-microbe interactions that confer nutritional benefits to both partners. Leguminous plants possess a common genetic system for intracellular symbiosis with AM fungi and with rhizobia. Here we show that CERBERUS and NSP1, which respectively encode an E3 ubiquitin ligase and a GRAS transcriptional regulator and which have previously only been implicated in RNS, are involved in AM fungal infection in Lotus japonicus. Hyphal elongation along the longitudinal axis of the root was reduced in the cerberus mutant, giving rise to a lower colonization level. Knockout of NSP1 decreased the frequency of plants colonized by AM fungi or rhizobia. CERBERUS and NSP1 showed different patterns of expression in response to infection with symbiotic microbes. A low constitutive level of CERBERUS expression was observed in the root and an increased level of NSP1 expression was detected in arbuscule-containing cells. Induction of AM marker gene was triggered in both cerberus and nsp1 mutants by infection with symbiotic microbes; however, the mutants showed a weaker induction of marker gene expression than the wild type, mirroring their lower level of colonization. The common symbiosis genes are believed to act in an early signaling pathway for recognition of symbionts and for triggering early symbiotic responses. Our quantitative analysis of symbiotic phenotypes revealed developmental defects of the novel common symbiosis mutants in both symbioses, which demonstrates that common symbiosis mechanisms also contribute to a range of functions at later or different stages of symbiont infection.

  4. The effect of ectomycorrhizal fungi forming symbiosis with Pinus pinaster seedlings exposed to cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Nadine R.; Ramos, Miguel A.; Marques, Ana P.G.C.; Castro, Paula M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium is one of the most toxic heavy metals and its accumulation in the upper layers of forest soils affects plants, microorganisms and their interactions. Adequate strategies for the reforestation of metal contaminated sites are of vital importance. The aim of this work was to evaluate the response of Pinus pinaster seedlings to Cd exposure and to assess the effect of inoculation with two selected ectomycorrhizal fungi, Suillus bovinus and Rhizopogon roseolus on that response. Seedlings were exposed to soil contaminated at 15 and 30 mg Cd kg −1 . Shoot biomass of P. pinaster decreased ca. 36% when exposed to 15 mg Cd kg −1 . Overall, colonization by S. bovinus significantly enhanced shoot development up to 30% in contaminated soil while colonization by R. roseolus produced no significant effect at both Cd concentrations tested and significantly increased the level of Cd in the shoots at both Cd concentrations. Metal accumulation in the shoots and roots of non-inoculated and S. bovinus-inoculated seedlings increased at the higher Cd levels whereas R. roseolus-inoculated seedlings were not sensitive to Cd variation in the soil. The results from our research show that inoculation with ECM fungi has a significant impact on metal uptake and development of P. pinaster seedlings; the differential response induced by the two tested species highlights the importance of selecting the appropriate strains for nursery inoculation, and, as such, this biological tool ought to be considered in reforestation processes of heavy metal contaminated areas by woody species. - Highlights: ► Ectomycorrhizal fungi can aid the reforestation of heavy metal contaminated areas. ► Cd inhibited the growth of non-inoculated 6 months-old Pinus pinaster seedlings. ► Inoculation with Suillus bovinus enhanced P. pinaster growth in Cd contaminated soil. ► Mycorrhizal symbiosis influenced the accumulation of Cd in P. pinaster seedlings.

  5. A Legume TOR Protein Kinase Regulates Rhizobium Symbiosis and Is Essential for Infection and Nodule Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjareddy, Kalpana; Blanco, Lourdes; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Alvarado-Affantranger, Xóchitl; Quinto, Carmen; Sánchez, Federico; Lara, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase regulates metabolism, growth, and life span in yeast, animals, and plants in coordination with nutrient status and environmental conditions. The nutrient-dependent nature of TOR functionality makes this kinase a putative regulator of symbiotic associations involving nutrient acquisition. However, TOR's role in these processes remains to be understood. Here, we uncovered the role of TOR during the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium tropici (Rhizobium) symbiotic interaction. TOR was expressed in all tested bean tissues, with higher transcript levels in the root meristems and senesced nodules. We showed TOR promoter expression along the progressing infection thread and in the infected cells of mature nodules. Posttranscriptional gene silencing of TOR using RNA interference (RNAi) showed that this gene is involved in lateral root elongation and root cell organization and also alters the density, size, and number of root hairs. The suppression of TOR transcripts also affected infection thread progression and associated cortical cell divisions, resulting in a drastic reduction of nodule numbers. TOR-RNAi resulted in reduced reactive oxygen species accumulation and altered CyclinD1 and CyclinD3 expression, which are crucial factors for infection thread progression and nodule organogenesis. Enhanced expression of TOR-regulated ATG genes in TOR-RNAi roots suggested that TOR plays a role in the recognition of Rhizobium as a symbiont. Together, these data suggest that TOR plays a vital role in the establishment of root nodule symbiosis in the common bean. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. The effect of ectomycorrhizal fungi forming symbiosis with Pinus pinaster seedlings exposed to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Nadine R.; Ramos, Miguel A.; Marques, Ana P.G.C.; Castro, Paula M.L., E-mail: plcastro@esb.ucp.pt

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium is one of the most toxic heavy metals and its accumulation in the upper layers of forest soils affects plants, microorganisms and their interactions. Adequate strategies for the reforestation of metal contaminated sites are of vital importance. The aim of this work was to evaluate the response of Pinus pinaster seedlings to Cd exposure and to assess the effect of inoculation with two selected ectomycorrhizal fungi, Suillus bovinus and Rhizopogon roseolus on that response. Seedlings were exposed to soil contaminated at 15 and 30 mg Cd kg{sup -1}. Shoot biomass of P. pinaster decreased ca. 36% when exposed to 15 mg Cd kg{sup -1}. Overall, colonization by S. bovinus significantly enhanced shoot development up to 30% in contaminated soil while colonization by R. roseolus produced no significant effect at both Cd concentrations tested and significantly increased the level of Cd in the shoots at both Cd concentrations. Metal accumulation in the shoots and roots of non-inoculated and S. bovinus-inoculated seedlings increased at the higher Cd levels whereas R. roseolus-inoculated seedlings were not sensitive to Cd variation in the soil. The results from our research show that inoculation with ECM fungi has a significant impact on metal uptake and development of P. pinaster seedlings; the differential response induced by the two tested species highlights the importance of selecting the appropriate strains for nursery inoculation, and, as such, this biological tool ought to be considered in reforestation processes of heavy metal contaminated areas by woody species. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectomycorrhizal fungi can aid the reforestation of heavy metal contaminated areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd inhibited the growth of non-inoculated 6 months-old Pinus pinaster seedlings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inoculation with Suillus bovinus enhanced P. pinaster growth in Cd contaminated soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycorrhizal symbiosis

  7. Bacterial bioluminescence regulates expression of a host cryptochrome gene in the squid-Vibrio symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Peyer, Suzanne M; Whistler, Cheryl A; Apicella, Michael A; Goldman, William E; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2013-04-02

    The symbiosis between the squid Euprymna scolopes and its luminous symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, is characterized by daily transcriptional rhythms in both partners and daily fluctuations in symbiont luminescence. In this study, we sought to determine whether symbionts affect host transcriptional rhythms. We identified two transcripts in host tissues (E. scolopes cry1 [escry1] and escry2) that encode cryptochromes, proteins that influence circadian rhythms in other systems. Both genes cycled daily in the head of the squid, with a pattern similar to that of other animals, in which expression of certain cry genes is entrained by environmental light. In contrast, escry1 expression cycled in the symbiont-colonized light organ with 8-fold upregulation coincident with the rhythms of bacterial luminescence, which are offset from the day/night light regime. Colonization of the juvenile light organ by symbionts was required for induction of escry1 cycling. Further, analysis with a mutant strain defective in light production showed that symbiont luminescence is essential for cycling of escry1; this defect could be complemented by presentation of exogenous blue light. However, blue-light exposure alone did not induce cycling in nonsymbiotic animals, but addition of molecules of the symbiont cell envelope to light-exposed animals did recover significant cycling activity, showing that light acts in synergy with other symbiont features to induce cycling. While symbiont luminescence may be a character specific to rhythms of the squid-vibrio association, resident microbial partners could similarly influence well-documented daily rhythms in other systems, such as the mammalian gut.

  8. Evolutionary Dynamics of Nitrogen Fixation in the Legume–Rhizobia Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hironori; Aoki, Seishiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The stabilization of host–symbiont mutualism against the emergence of parasitic individuals is pivotal to the evolution of cooperation. One of the most famous symbioses occurs between legumes and their colonizing rhizobia, in which rhizobia extract nutrients (or benefits) from legume plants while supplying them with nitrogen resources produced by nitrogen fixation (or costs). Natural environments, however, are widely populated by ineffective rhizobia that extract benefits without paying costs and thus proliferate more efficiently than nitrogen-fixing cooperators. How and why this mutualism becomes stabilized and evolutionarily persists has been extensively discussed. To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of this symbiosis system, we construct a simple model based on the continuous snowdrift game with multiple interacting players. We investigate the model using adaptive dynamics and numerical simulations. We find that symbiotic evolution depends on the cost–benefit balance, and that cheaters widely emerge when the cost and benefit are similar in strength. In this scenario, the persistence of the symbiotic system is compatible with the presence of cheaters. This result suggests that the symbiotic relationship is robust to the emergence of cheaters, and may explain the prevalence of cheating rhizobia in nature. In addition, various stabilizing mechanisms, such as partner fidelity feedback, partner choice, and host sanction, can reinforce the symbiotic relationship by affecting the fitness of symbionts in various ways. This result suggests that the symbiotic relationship is cooperatively stabilized by various mechanisms. In addition, mixed nodule populations are thought to encourage cheater emergence, but our model predicts that, in certain situations, cheaters can disappear from such populations. These findings provide a theoretical basis of the evolutionary dynamics of legume–rhizobia symbioses, which is extendable to other single-host, multiple

  9. The Ecology of Technological Progress: How Symbiosis and Competition Affect the Growth of Technology Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnabuci, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    We show that the progress of technological knowledge is an inherently ecological process, wherein the growth rate of each technology domain depends on dynamics occurring in "other" technology domains. We identify two sources of ecological interdependence among technology domains. First, there are symbiotic interdependencies, implying…

  10. Rhizobial symbiosis effect on the growth, metal uptake, and antioxidant responses of Medicago lupulina under copper stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhaoyu; Mohamad, Osama Abdalla; Deng, Zhenshan; Liu, Xiaodong; Glick, Bernard R; Wei, Gehong

    2015-08-01

    The effects of rhizobial symbiosis on the growth, metal uptake, and antioxidant responses of Medicago lupulina in the presence of 200 mg kg(-1) Cu(2+) throughout different stages of symbiosis development were studied. The symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 induced an increase in plant growth and nitrogen content irrespective of the presence of Cu(2+). The total amount of Cu uptake of inoculated plants significantly increased by 34.0 and 120.4% in shoots and roots, respectively, compared with non-inoculated plants. However, although the rhizobial symbiosis promoted Cu accumulation both in shoots and roots, the increase in roots was much higher than in shoots, thus decreasing the translocation factor and helping Cu phytostabilization. The rate of lipid peroxidation was significantly decreased in both shoots and roots of inoculated vs. non-inoculated plants when measured either 8, 13, or 18 days post-inoculation. In comparison with non-inoculated plants, the activities of superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase of shoots of inoculated plants exposed to excess Cu were significantly elevated at different stages of symbiosis development; similar increases occurred in the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase of inoculated roots. The symbiosis with S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 also upregulated the corresponding genes involved in antioxidant responses in the plants treated with excess Cu. The results indicated that the rhizobial symbiosis with S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 not only enhanced plant growth and metal uptake but also improved the responses of plant antioxidant defense to excess Cu stress.

  11. Effect of mycorrhiza symbiosis on the Nacl salinity in Sorghum bicolor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to determine mycorrhizal symbiosis on the Nacl salinity tolerance in Sorghum bicolor (aspydfyd cultivar), an experiment with two factors was done in Damghan Islamic Azad University laboratory (Iran) in 2007. The first factor with two levels (mycorihizal and non-mycorihizal) and second factor with six levels Nacl ...

  12. Temperature shapes coral-algal symbiosis in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Haoya; Cai, Lin; Zhou, Guowei; Yuan, Tao; Zhang, Weipeng; Tian, Renmao; Huang, Hui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    With the increase in sea surface temperature (SST), scleractinian corals are exposed to bleaching threats but may possess certain flexibilities in terms of their associations with symbiotic algae. Previous studies have shown a close symbiosis between coral the and Symbiodinium; however, the spatial variation of the symbiosis and the attribution underlying are not well understood. In the present study, we examined coral-algal symbiosis in Galaxea fascicularis and Montipora spp. from three biogeographic regions across ~10° of latitude in the South China Sea. Analysis of similarities (ANOSIM) indicated a highly flexible coral-algal symbiosis in both G. fascicularis and Montipora spp. and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that temperature explained 83.2% and 60.1% of the explanatory subclade variations in G. fascicularis and Montipora spp., respectively, which suggested that temperature was the main environmental factor contributing to the diversity of Symbiodinium across the three regions. The geographic specificity of the Symbiodinium phylogeny was identified, revealing possible environmental selection across the three regions. These results suggest that scleractinian corals may have the ability to regulate Symbiodinium community structures under different temperatures and thus be able to adapt to gradual climate change. PMID:28084322

  13. A Literature Survey of Information Systems Facilitating the Identification of Industrial Symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Capelleveen, Guido Cornelis; Amrit, Chintan Amrit; Yazan, Devrim Murat; Otjacques, Benoit; Hitzelberger, Patrik; Naumann, Stefan; Wohlgemuth, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Industrial Symbiosis (IS) is an emerging business tool that is used by practitioners to engage cooperation among industries to reuse waste streams. The key to reveal IS opportunities for organizations is both connecting the supply and demand of various industries and providing technical knowledge on

  14. Impacts of domestication on the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis of 27 crop species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Robles, Nieves; Lehmann, Anika; Seco, Erica; Aroca, Ricardo; Rillig, Matthias C; Milla, Rubén

    2018-04-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is key to plant nutrition, and hence is potentially key in sustainable agriculture. Fertilization and other agricultural practices reduce soil AM fungi and root colonization. Such conditions might promote the evolution of low mycorrhizal responsive crops. Therefore, we ask if and how evolution under domestication has altered AM symbioses of crops. We measured the effect of domestication on mycorrhizal responsiveness across 27 crop species and their wild progenitors. Additionally, in a subset of 14 crops, we tested if domestication effects differed under contrasting phosphorus (P) availabilities. The response of AM symbiosis to domestication varied with P availability. On average, wild progenitors benefited from the AM symbiosis irrespective of P availability, while domesticated crops only profited under P-limited conditions. Magnitudes and directions of response were diverse among the 27 crops, and were unrelated to phylogenetic affinities or to the coordinated evolution with fine root traits. Our results indicate disruptions in the efficiency of the AM symbiosis linked to domestication. Under high fertilization, domestication could have altered the regulation of resource trafficking between AM fungi and associated plant hosts. Provided that crops are commonly raised under high fertilization, this result has important implications for sustainable agriculture. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Independent signalling cues underpin arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and large lateral root induction in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chai Hao; Choi, Jeongmin; Paszkowski, Uta

    2018-01-01

    Perception of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) triggers distinct plant signalling responses for parallel establishment of symbiosis and induction of lateral root formation. Rice receptor kinase CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (CERK1) and α/β-fold hydrolase DWARF14-LIKE (D14L) are involved in pre-symbiotic fungal perception. After 6 wk post-inoculation with Rhizophagus irregularis, root developmental responses, fungal colonization and transcriptional responses were monitored in two independent cerk1 null mutants; a deletion mutant lacking D14L, and with D14L complemented as well as their respective wild-type cultivars (cv Nipponbare and Nihonmasari). Here we show that although essential for symbiosis, D14L is dispensable for AMF-induced root architectural modulation, which conversely relies on CERK1. Our results demonstrate uncoupling of symbiosis and the symbiotic root developmental signalling during pre-symbiosis with CERK1 required for AMF-induced root architectural changes. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Effect of mycorrhiza symbiosis on the Nacl salinity in Sorghum bicolor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... Khajehzadeh, 1996). Mycorrhiza is a mutual symbiosis between thallus of some fungi and the root of organic plants. In nature, mycorrhiza is important in satisfying the needs of the plants for water and nutrition. Among the microorganisms living in the soil, arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi are especially important ...

  17. The role of online information-sharing platforms on the performance of industrial symbiosis networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraccascia, Luca; Yazan, Devrim Murat

    2018-01-01

    From technical perspective, an important condition for developing industrial symbiosis (IS) is the match between waste supply and demand. Such a match is hampered by lack of information among companies, i.e., demand (supply) for waste exists but firms producing (requiring) that waste are not aware

  18. Genomic analysis reveals key aspects of prokaryotic symbiosis in the phototrophic consortium "Chlorochromatium aggregatum"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhenfeng; Müller, Johannes; Li, Tao

    2013-01-01

    'Chlorochromatium aggregatum' is a phototrophic consortium, a symbiosis that may represent the highest degree of mutual interdependence between two unrelated bacteria not associated with a eukaryotic host. 'Chlorochromatium aggregatum' is a motile, barrel-shaped aggregate formed from a single cell...

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis induces strigolactone biosynthesis under drought and improves drought tolerance in lettuce and tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Lozano, J.M.; Aroca, R.; Zamarreno, A.M.; Molina, S.; Andreo Jimenez, B.; Porcel, R.; Garcia-Mina, J.M.; Ruyter-Spira, C.P.; Lopez-Raez, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis alleviates drought stress in plants. However, the intimate mechanisms involved, as well as its effect on the production of signalling molecules associated with the host plant–AM fungus interaction remains largely unknown. In the present work, the effects of

  20. The Haendeloe area in Norrkoeping, Sweden: Does it fit for Industrial Symbiosis development?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatefipour, Saeid; Baas, Leenard; Eklund, Mats (Div. of Environmental Technology and Management - Dept. of Management and Engineering, Linkoeping Univ., Linkoeping (Sweden)), e-mail: saeid.hatefipour@liu.se

    2011-06-15

    Today, sustainable cities/regions are playing an important role in sustainable development projects. The overall aim of the current paper is to demonstrate an Industrial Symbiosis development in the Haendeloe area of Norrkoeping city in the Oestergoetland county of Sweden. It is part of a research program called 'Sustainable Norrkoeping' focusing on developing links between the industrial and the urban part of the city. As analysis of the current situation is important for understanding the future development, the paper tries to map the current industrial symbiosis links and symbiotic network to identify potentials exist. To achieve this, paper gives a general view of how this area has been developed, constructed, and grown. The next stage is devoted to an inventory of different actors, stakeholders, and companies, their processes and relationships in the form of energy, materials and by-products exchanges, flows and streams into and out of the Haendeloe area considering the Haendeloe/Norrkoeping as system boundaries. In addition, by describing different tools, elements and approaches of industrial symbiosis and considering and applying two main key tools as industrial inventories and input/output matching the paper also tries to show that whether the already industrial activities formed inside the Haendeloe fits for an industrial symbiosis development

  1. Plant nodulation inducers enhance horizontal gene transfer of Azorhizobium caulinodans symbiosis island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jun; Wang, Hui; Wu, Ping; Li, Tao; Tang, Yu; Naseer, Nawar; Zheng, Huiming; Masson-Boivin, Catherine; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2016-11-29

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of genomic islands is a driving force of bacterial evolution. Many pathogens and symbionts use this mechanism to spread mobile genetic elements that carry genes important for interaction with their eukaryotic hosts. However, the role of the host in this process remains unclear. Here, we show that plant compounds inducing the nodulation process in the rhizobium-legume mutualistic symbiosis also enhance the transfer of symbiosis islands. We demonstrate that the symbiosis island of the Sesbania rostrata symbiont, Azorhizobium caulinodans, is an 87.6-kb integrative and conjugative element (ICE Ac ) that is able to excise, form a circular DNA, and conjugatively transfer to a specific site of gly-tRNA gene of other rhizobial genera, expanding their host range. The HGT frequency was significantly increased in the rhizosphere. An ICE Ac -located LysR-family transcriptional regulatory protein AhaR triggered the HGT process in response to plant flavonoids that induce the expression of nodulation genes through another LysR-type protein, NodD. Our study suggests that rhizobia may sense rhizosphere environments and transfer their symbiosis gene contents to other genera of rhizobia, thereby broadening rhizobial host-range specificity.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and methyl jasmonate avoid the inhibition of root hydraulic conductivity caused by drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Romera, Beatriz; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Zamarreño, Ángel María; García-Mina, José María; Aroca, Ricardo

    2016-02-01

    Hormonal regulation and symbiotic relationships provide benefits for plants to overcome stress conditions. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of exogenous methyl jasmonate (MeJA) application on root hydraulic conductivity (L) of Phaseolus vulgaris plants which established arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis under two water regimes (well-watered and drought conditions). The variation in endogenous contents of several hormones (MeJA, JA, abscisic acid (ABA), indol-3-acetic acid (IAA), salicylic acid (SA)) and the changes in aquaporin gene expression, protein abundance and phosphorylation state were analyzed. AM symbiosis decreased L under well-watered conditions, which was partially reverted by the MeJA treatment, apparently by a drop in root IAA contents. Also, AM symbiosis and MeJA prevented inhibition of L under drought conditions, most probably by a reduction in root SA contents. Additionally, the gene expression of two fungal aquaporins was upregulated under drought conditions, independently of the MeJA treatment. Plant aquaporin gene expression could not explain the behaviour of L. Conversely, evidence was found for the control of L by phosphorylation of aquaporins. Hence, MeJA addition modified the response of L to both AM symbiosis and drought, presumably by regulating the root contents of IAA and SA and the phosphorylation state of aquaporins.

  3. Positive Gene Regulation by a Natural Protective miRNA Enables Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzigou, Jean-Malo; Lauressergues, Dominique; André, Olivier; Gutjahr, Caroline; Guillotin, Bruno; Bécard, Guillaume; Combier, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-11

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis associates most plants with fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. The fungus penetrates into roots and forms within cortical cell branched structures called arbuscules for nutrient exchange. We discovered that miR171b has a mismatched cleavage site and is unable to downregulate the miR171 family target gene, LOM1 (LOST MERISTEMS 1). This mismatched cleavage site is conserved among plants that establish AM symbiosis, but not in non-mycotrophic plants. Unlike other members of the miR171 family, miR171b stimulates AM symbiosis and is expressed specifically in root cells that contain arbuscules. MiR171b protects LOM1 from negative regulation by other miR171 family members. These findings uncover a unique mechanism of positive post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by miRNAs and demonstrate its relevance for the establishment of AM symbiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Mutual Symbiosis between Inclusive Bi-Lingual Education and Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Beverly J.; Tong, Fuhui; Lara-Alecio, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors postulate a mutual symbiosis between multicultural and inclusive bi-lingual education. Combining bi-lingual and multicultural education to create a symbiotic relationship can stimulate reform in schools and can promote inclusive educational systems, thereby keeping native languages and cultures alive for minority…

  5. Mycorrhizal Symbiosis and Local Adaptation in Aster amellus: A Field Transplant Experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánková, Hana; Raabová, J.; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2014), s. 1-7, e93967 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/1486 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : mycorrhizal symbiosis * local adaptation * Aster amellus Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  6. Carbon availability triggers fungal nitrogen uptake and transport in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fellbaum, C.R.; Gachomo, E.W.; Beesetty, Y.; Choudhari, S.; Strahan, G.D.; Pfeffer, P.E.; Kiers, E.T.; Bücking, H.

    2012-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, formed between the majority of land plants and ubiquitous soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota, is responsible for massive nutrient transfer and global carbon sequestration. AM fungi take up nutrients from the soil and exchange them against

  7. Misconceptions on the application of biological market theory to the mycorrhizal symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, E.T.; West, S.A.; Wyatt, G.A.K.; Garner, A.; Bücking, H.; Werner, G.D.A.

    2016-01-01

    Letter to the Editor — The symbiosis between plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi has been described as a biological market based on evidence that plants supply more carbohydrates to fungal partners that provide more soil nutrients, and vice versa 1–4 . A recent paper by Walder and van der

  8. Dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in heavy metal phytoremediation: Meta-analytical and conceptual perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audet, Patrick [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie-Curie Street, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada)]. E-mail: paude086@uottawa.ca; Charest, Christiane [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 30 Marie-Curie Street, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada)]. E-mail: ccharest@science.uottawa.ca

    2007-06-15

    To estimate dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in heavy metal (HM) phytoremediation, we conducted a literature survey and correlated HM uptake and relative plant growth parameters from published data. After estimating AM feedback responses for these parameters at low and high soil-HM concentration intervals, we determined that the roles of AM symbiosis are characterized by (1) an increased HM phytoextraction via mycorrhizospheric 'Enhanced Uptake' at low soil-HM concentrations, and (2) a reduced HM bioavailability via AM fungal 'Metal-Binding' processes at high soil-HM levels, hence resulting in increased plant biomass and enhanced plant tolerance through HM stress-avoidance. We present two conceptual models which illustrate the important compromise between plant growth, plant HM uptake and HM tolerance, and further emphasize the importance of AM symbiosis in buffering the soil environment for plants under such stress conditions. - This meta-analysis has revealed a transition role of the AM symbiosis in phytoremediation shifting from 'Enhanced Uptake' to 'Metal-Binding' beyond critical soil-HM levels.

  9. Dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in heavy metal phytoremediation: Meta-analytical and conceptual perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audet, Patrick; Charest, Christiane

    2007-01-01

    To estimate dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in heavy metal (HM) phytoremediation, we conducted a literature survey and correlated HM uptake and relative plant growth parameters from published data. After estimating AM feedback responses for these parameters at low and high soil-HM concentration intervals, we determined that the roles of AM symbiosis are characterized by (1) an increased HM phytoextraction via mycorrhizospheric 'Enhanced Uptake' at low soil-HM concentrations, and (2) a reduced HM bioavailability via AM fungal 'Metal-Binding' processes at high soil-HM levels, hence resulting in increased plant biomass and enhanced plant tolerance through HM stress-avoidance. We present two conceptual models which illustrate the important compromise between plant growth, plant HM uptake and HM tolerance, and further emphasize the importance of AM symbiosis in buffering the soil environment for plants under such stress conditions. - This meta-analysis has revealed a transition role of the AM symbiosis in phytoremediation shifting from 'Enhanced Uptake' to 'Metal-Binding' beyond critical soil-HM levels

  10. Replicon-dependent differentiation of symbiosis-related genes in Sinorhizobium strains nodulating Glycine max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui Juan; Wang, En Tao; Zhang, Xing Xing; Li, Qin Qin; Zhang, Yan Ming; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin

    2014-02-01

    In order to investigate the genetic differentiation of Sinorhizobium strains nodulating Glycine max and related microevolutionary mechanisms, three housekeeping genes (SMc00019, truA, and thrA) and 16 symbiosis-related genes on the chromosome (7 genes), pSymA (6 genes), and pSymB (3 genes) were analyzed. Five distinct species were identified among the test strains by calculating the average nucleotide identity (ANI) of SMc00019-truA-thrA: Sinorhizobium fredii, Sinorhizobium sojae, Sinorhizobium sp. I, Sinorhizobium sp. II, and Sinorhizobium sp. III. These species assignments were also supported by population genetics and phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes and symbiosis-related genes on the chromosome and pSymB. Different levels of genetic differentiation were observed among these species or different replicons. S. sojae was the most divergent from the other test species and was characterized by its low intraspecies diversity and limited geographic distribution. Intergenic recombination dominated the evolution of 19 genes from different replicons. Intraspecies recombination happened frequently in housekeeping genes and symbiosis-related genes on the chromosome and pSymB, whereas pSymA genes showed a clear pattern of lateral-transfer events between different species. Moreover, pSymA genes were characterized by a lower level of polymorphism and recombination than those on the chromosome and pSymB. Taken together, genes from different replicons of rhizobia might be involved in the establishment of symbiosis with legumes, but these symbiosis-related genes might have evolved differently according to their corresponding replicons.

  11. Characterization of a mutation commonly associated with persistent stuttering: evidence for a founder mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyna, Alison; Drayna, Dennis; Kang, Changsoo

    2010-01-01

    Stuttering is a disorder which affects the fluency of speech. It has been shown to have high heritability, and has recently been linked to mutations in the GNPTAB gene. One such mutation, Glu1200Lys, has been repeatedly observed in unrelated families and individual cases. Eight unrelated individuals carrying this mutation were analyzed in an effort to distinguish whether these arise from repeated mutation at the same site, or whether they represent a founder mutation with a single origin. Results show that all 12 chromosomes carrying this mutation share a common haplotype in this region, indicating it is a founder mutation. Further analysis estimated the age of this allele to be ~572 generations. Construction of a cladogram tracing the mutation through our study sample also supports the founder mutation hypothesis. PMID:20944643

  12. The micro-RNA72c-APETALA2-1 node as a key regulator of the common bean-Rhizobium etli nitrogen fixation symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova-Franco, Bárbara; Íñiguez, Luis P; Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Alvarado-Affantranger, Xochitl; Leija, Alfonso; Fuentes, Sara I; Ramírez, Mario; Paul, Sujay; Reyes, José L; Girard, Lourdes; Hernández, Georgina

    2015-05-01

    Micro-RNAs are recognized as important posttranscriptional regulators in plants. The relevance of micro-RNAs as regulators of the legume-rhizobia nitrogen-fixing symbiosis is emerging. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the role of micro-RNA172 (miR172) and its conserved target APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factor in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium etli symbiosis. Our expression analysis revealed that mature miR172c increased upon rhizobial infection and continued increasing during nodule development, reaching its maximum in mature nodules and decaying in senescent nodules. The expression of AP2-1 target showed a negative correlation with miR172c expression. A drastic decrease in miR172c and high AP2-1 mRNA levels were observed in ineffective nodules. Phenotypic analysis of composite bean plants with transgenic roots overexpressing miR172c or a mutated AP2-1 insensitive to miR172c cleavage demonstrated the pivotal regulatory role of the miR172 node in the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis. Increased miR172 resulted in improved root growth, increased rhizobial infection, increased expression of early nodulation and autoregulation of nodulation genes, and improved nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In addition, these plants showed decreased sensitivity to nitrate inhibition of nodulation. Through transcriptome analysis, we identified 114 common bean genes that coexpressed with AP2-1 and proposed these as being targets for transcriptional activation by AP2-1. Several of these genes are related to nodule senescence, and we propose that they have to be silenced, through miR172c-induced AP2-1 cleavage, in active mature nodules. Our work sets the basis for exploring the miR172-mediated improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean, the most important grain legume for human consumption. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum Ferrous Iron Transporter FeoAB Is Required for Ferric Iron Utilization in Free Living Aerobic Cells and for Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankari, Siva; O'Brian, Mark R

    2016-07-22

    The bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 does not synthesize siderophores for iron utilization in aerobic environments, and the mechanism of iron uptake within symbiotic soybean root nodules is unknown. An mbfA bfr double mutant defective in iron export and storage activities cannot grow aerobically in very high iron medium. Here, we found that this phenotype was suppressed by loss of function mutations in the feoAB operon encoding ferrous (Fe(2+)) iron uptake proteins. Expression of the feoAB operon genes was elevated under iron limitation, but mutants defective in either gene were unable to grow aerobically over a wide external ferric (Fe(3+)) iron (FeCl3) concentration range. Thus, FeoAB accommodates iron acquisition under iron limited and iron replete conditions. Incorporation of radiolabel from either (55)Fe(2+) or (59)Fe(3+) into cells was severely defective in the feoA and feoB strains, suggesting Fe(3+) reduction to Fe(2+) prior to traversal across the cytoplasmic membrane by FeoAB. The feoA or feoB deletion strains elicited small, ineffective nodules on soybean roots, containing few bacteria and lacking nitrogen fixation activity. A feoA(E40K) mutant contained partial iron uptake activity in culture that supported normal growth and established an effective symbiosis. The feoA(E40K) strain had partial iron uptake activity in situ within nodules and in isolated cells, indicating that FeoAB is the iron transporter in symbiosis. We conclude that FeoAB supports iron acquisition under limited conditions of soil and in the iron-rich environment of a symbiotic nodule. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. The Arabidopsis arc5 and arc6 mutations differentially affect plastid morphology in pavement and guard cells in the leaf epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Makoto T; Yasuzawa, Mana; Kojo, Kei H; Niwa, Yasuo; Abe, Tomoko; Yoshida, Shigeo; Nakano, Takeshi; Itoh, Ryuuichi D

    2018-01-01

    of epidermal plastids, and indicate that dysfunctions in ARC5 and ARC6 differentially affect plastid replication among mesophyll cells, PCs, and GCs within a single leaf.

  15. Nitrogen recycling through the gut and the nitrogen economy of ruminants: an asynchronous symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, C K; Kristensen, N B

    2008-04-01

    The extensive development of the ruminant forestomach sets apart their N economy from that of nonruminants in a number of respects. Extensive pregastric fermentation alters the profile of protein reaching the small intestine, largely through the transformation of nitrogenous compounds into microbial protein. This process is fueled primarily by carbohydrate fermentation and includes extensive recycling of N between the body and gut lumen pools. Nitrogen recycling occurs via blood and gut lumen exchanges of urea and NH(3), as well as endogenous gut and secretory N entry into the gut lumen, and the subsequent digestion and absorption of microbial and endogenous protein. Factors controlling urea transfer to the gut from blood, including the contributions of urea transporters, remain equivocal. Ammonia produced by microbial degradation of urea and dietary and endogenous AA is utilized by microbial fermentation or absorbed and primarily converted to urea. Therefore, microbial growth and carbohydrate fermentation affect the extent of NH(3) absorption and urea N recycling and excretion. The extensive recycling of N to the rumen represents an evolutionary advantage of the ruminant in terms of absorbable protein supply during periods of dietary protein deficiency, or asynchronous carbohydrate and protein supply, but incurs a cost of greater N intakes, especially in terms of excess N excretion. Efforts to improve the efficiency of N utilization in ruminants by synchronizing fermentable energy and N availability have generally met with limited success with regards to production responses. In contrast, imposing asynchrony through oscillating dietary protein concentration, or infrequent supplementation, surprisingly has not negatively affected production responses unless the frequency of supplementation is less than once every 3 d. In some cases, oscillation of dietary protein concentration has improved N retention compared with animals fed an equal amount of dietary protein on

  16. Activity of the Recommended and Optimized Rates of Pyridate on Chickpea - Mesorhizobium mediterraneum Symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi PARSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Crop-rhizobium symbiosis can be influenced by leaching of herbicides which is unavoidable after their application. Due to an adjuvant which might help to develop the low-use-rate of herbicide, an experiment was carried out to compare the impact of the recommended rate (1200 g active ingredient ha-1 and the optimized rate (282.15 g active ingredient ha-1 of pyridate on the biological properties of eight chickpea cultivars inoculated with Mesorhizobium mediterraneum, grown in pots. Based on the required rate of herbicide to give 95% control of common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L. value, the efficacy of pyridate improved up to 3.87-fold by adding methylated rapeseed oil to spray solution. The ‘Desi’ cultivar had significantly higher nodulation than ‘Kabuli’ cultivar. In general, toxicity of the recommended rate was higher than the optimized rate. With the exception of root dry weight, all of the measured parameters were significantly affected by the recommended rate of pyridate in varying degrees. The symbiotic properties of chickpea cultivars were affected more than 10% at the recommended dose. The reduced nodulation ranged from 29% to 73% among cultivars exposed to pyridate at the recommended dose. The ‘Desi’ cultivar was more sensitive than the ‘Kabuli’ to the recommended rate of pyridate. We may conclude that effective low-use-rate of pyridate via applying of activator adjuvants should be noted.

  17. The bifunctional plant receptor, OsCERK1, regulates both chitin-triggered immunity and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kana; Kozaki, Toshinori; Kouzai, Yusuke; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Ishii, Kazuo; Asamizu, Erika; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Umehara, Yosuke; Miyamoto, Ayano; Kobae, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Kohki; Kaku, Hanae; Nishizawa, Yoko; Shibuya, Naoto; Nakagawa, Tomomi

    2014-11-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to threats from pathogenic microbes and thus developed an innate immune system to protect themselves. On the other hand, many plants also have the ability to establish endosymbiosis with beneficial microbes such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi or rhizobial bacteria, which improves the growth of host plants. How plants evolved these systems managing such opposite plant-microbe interactions is unclear. We show here that knockout (KO) mutants of OsCERK1, a rice receptor kinase essential for chitin signaling, were impaired not only for chitin-triggered defense responses but also for AM symbiosis, indicating the bifunctionality of OsCERK1 in defense and symbiosis. On the other hand, a KO mutant of OsCEBiP, which forms a receptor complex with OsCERK1 and is essential for chitin-triggered immunity, established mycorrhizal symbiosis normally. Therefore, OsCERK1 but not chitin-triggered immunity is required for AM symbiosis. Furthermore, experiments with chimeric receptors showed that the kinase domains of OsCERK1 and homologs from non-leguminous, mycorrhizal plants could trigger nodulation signaling in legume-rhizobium interactions as the kinase domain of Nod factor receptor1 (NFR1), which is essential for triggering the nodulation program in leguminous plants, did. Because leguminous plants are believed to have developed the rhizobial symbiosis on the basis of AM symbiosis, our results suggest that the symbiotic function of ancestral CERK1 in AM symbiosis enabled the molecular evolution to leguminous NFR1 and resulted in the establishment of legume-rhizobia symbiosis. These results also suggest that OsCERK1 and homologs serve as a molecular switch that activates defense or symbiotic responses depending on the infecting microbes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis mitigates the negative effects of salinity on durum wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraffia, Rosolino; Giambalvo, Dario; Frenda, Alfonso Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is generally considered to be effective in ameliorating the plant tolerance to salt stress. Unfortunately, the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in salinity stress alleviation by AM symbiosis is far from being complete. Thus, an experiment was performed by growing durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) plants under salt-stress conditions to evaluate the influence of AM symbiosis on both the plant growth and the regulation of a number of genes related to salt stress and nutrient uptake. Durum wheat plants were grown outdoors in pots in absence or in presence of salt stress and with or without AM fungi inoculation. The inoculum consisted of a mixture of spores of Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly Glomus intraradices) and Funneliformis mosseae (formerly G. mosseae). Results indicate that AM symbiosis can alleviate the detrimental effects of salt stress on the growth of durum wheat plants. In fact, under salt stress conditions mycorrhizal plants produced more aboveground and root biomass, had higher N uptake and aboveground N concentration, and showed greater stability of plasma membranes compared to non-mycorrhizal plants. Inoculation with AM fungi had no effect on the expression of the N transporter genes AMT1.1, AMT1.2, and NAR2.2, either under no-stress or salt stress conditions, probably due to the fact that plants were grown under optimal N conditions; on the contrary, NRT1.1 was always upregulated by AM symbiosis. Moreover, the level of expression of the drought stress-related genes AQP1, AQP4, PIP1, DREB5, and DHN15.3 observed in the mycorrhizal stressed plants was markedly lower than that observed in the non-mycorrhizal stressed plants and very close to that observed in the non-stressed plants. Our hypothesis is that, in the present study, AM symbiosis did not increase the plant tolerance to salt stress but instead generated a condition in which plants were subjected to a level of salt stress lower than that of non

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis mitigates the negative effects of salinity on durum wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fileccia, Veronica; Ruisi, Paolo; Ingraffia, Rosolino; Giambalvo, Dario; Frenda, Alfonso Salvatore; Martinelli, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is generally considered to be effective in ameliorating the plant tolerance to salt stress. Unfortunately, the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in salinity stress alleviation by AM symbiosis is far from being complete. Thus, an experiment was performed by growing durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) plants under salt-stress conditions to evaluate the influence of AM symbiosis on both the plant growth and the regulation of a number of genes related to salt stress and nutrient uptake. Durum wheat plants were grown outdoors in pots in absence or in presence of salt stress and with or without AM fungi inoculation. The inoculum consisted of a mixture of spores of Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly Glomus intraradices) and Funneliformis mosseae (formerly G. mosseae). Results indicate that AM symbiosis can alleviate the detrimental effects of salt stress on the growth of durum wheat plants. In fact, under salt stress conditions mycorrhizal plants produced more aboveground and root biomass, had higher N uptake and aboveground N concentration, and showed greater stability of plasma membranes compared to non-mycorrhizal plants. Inoculation with AM fungi had no effect on the expression of the N transporter genes AMT1.1, AMT1.2, and NAR2.2, either under no-stress or salt stress conditions, probably due to the fact that plants were grown under optimal N conditions; on the contrary, NRT1.1 was always upregulated by AM symbiosis. Moreover, the level of expression of the drought stress-related genes AQP1, AQP4, PIP1, DREB5, and DHN15.3 observed in the mycorrhizal stressed plants was markedly lower than that observed in the non-mycorrhizal stressed plants and very close to that observed in the non-stressed plants. Our hypothesis is that, in the present study, AM symbiosis did not increase the plant tolerance to salt stress but instead generated a condition in which plants were subjected to a level of salt stress lower than that of non

  20. Comprehensive development of industrial symbiosis for the response of greenhouse gases emission mitigation: Challenges and opportunities in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhe; Adams, Michelle; Cote, Raymond P.; Geng, Yong; Chen, Qinghua; Liu, Weili; Sun, Lu; Yu, Xiaoman

    2017-01-01

    Although not yet a global consensus, there is widespread agreement that climate change is the result of anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions. In order to respond to this issue, society has applied such strategies as clean energy development, improving industrial resource efficiency etc. Despite this, GHG emissions are still pursuing an upward trend. As the largest global GHG emitter, China faces a considerable challenge in responding to its agreed target of 40–45% GHG emission mitigation per unit gross domestic production (GDP) by 2020 as compared to 2005 levels. How to practically achieve this is still largely undecided. Comprehensive development of industrial symbiosis around nationwide is considered part of the solution. However, few researchers have studied how to actually implement a comprehensive development of industrial symbiosis for the purpose of GHG emission mitigation. This work intends to address this gap through highlighting the opportunities to develop such an approach for particular application to GHG emissions reduction in China. In addition, this study will also address the challenges ahead associated with the implementation of such a strategy, and outlines the where future research could be focused. Policy implications like establishing industrial symbiosis indicators associated with GHG emission mitigation are proposed. - Highlights: • Urgent issue of GHG mitigation and background of industrial symbiosis are introduced. • The challenges like lack of indicator, investigating methodologies and regional disparity are analyzed. • Opportunities for GHG mitigation through comprehensive development of industrial symbiosis are detailed. • Policy implications for responding GHG mitigation through industrial symbiosis are proposed.

  1. a photoreceptor gene mutation in an indigenous black african family

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MUTATION IN AN INDIGENOUS. BLACK AFRICAN FAMILY WITH. RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA. IDENTIFIED USING A RAPID. SCREENING APPROACH FOR. COMMON RHODOPSIN. MUTATIONS. JGreenberg, T Franz, R Goliath, R Ramesar. Hereditary retinal degenerations may be subdivided into those affecting ...

  2. Exploiting an ancient signalling machinery to enjoy a nitrogen fixing symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Rene; Lillo, Alessandra; Bisseling, Ton

    2012-08-01

    For almost a century now it has been speculated that a transfer of the largely legume-specific symbiosis with nitrogen fixing rhizobium would be profitable in agriculture [1,2]. Up to now such a step has not been achieved, despite intensive research in this era. Novel insights in the underlying signalling networks leading to intracellular accommodation of rhizobium as well as mycorrhizal fungi of the Glomeromycota order show extensive commonalities between both interactions. As mycorrhizae symbiosis can be established basically with most higher plant species it raises questions why is it only in a few taxonomic lineages that the underlying signalling network could be hijacked by rhizobium. Unravelling this will lead to insights that are essential to achieve an old dream. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Targeting Metabolic Symbiosis to Overcome Resistance to Anti-angiogenic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pisarsky

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the approval of several anti-angiogenic therapies, clinical results remain unsatisfactory, and transient benefits are followed by rapid tumor recurrence. Here, we demonstrate potent anti-angiogenic efficacy of the multi-kinase inhibitors nintedanib and sunitinib in a mouse model of breast cancer. However, after an initial regression, tumors resume growth in the absence of active tumor angiogenesis. Gene expression profiling of tumor cells reveals metabolic reprogramming toward anaerobic glycolysis. Indeed, combinatorial treatment with a glycolysis inhibitor (3PO efficiently inhibits tumor growth. Moreover, tumors establish metabolic symbiosis, illustrated by the differential expression of MCT1 and MCT4, monocarboxylate transporters active in lactate exchange in glycolytic tumors. Accordingly, genetic ablation of MCT4 expression overcomes adaptive resistance against anti-angiogenic therapy. Hence, targeting metabolic symbiosis may be an attractive avenue to avoid resistance development to anti-angiogenic therapy in patients.

  4. Phosphorus Acquisition Efficiency Related to Root Traits: Is Mycorrhizal Symbiosis a Key Factor to Wheat and Barley Cropping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Pedro; Borie, Fernando; Cornejo, Pablo; López-Ráez, Juan A.; López-García, Álvaro; Seguel, Alex

    2018-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) are major crops cultivated around the world, thus playing a crucial role on human diet. Remarkably, the growing human population requires a significant increase in agricultural production in order to feed everybody. In this context, phosphorus (P) management is a key factor as it is component of organic molecules such as nucleic acids, ATP and phospholipids, and it is the most abundant macronutrient in biomass after nitrogen (N), although being one of the scarcest elements in the lithosphere. In general, P fertilization has low efficiency, as only a fraction of the applied P is acquired by roots, leaving a substantial amount to be accumulated in soil as not readily available P. Breeding for P-efficient cultivars is a relatively low cost alternative and can be done through two mechanisms: i) improving P use efficiency (PUE), and/or ii) P acquisition efficiency (PAE). PUE is related to the internal allocation/mobilization of P, and is usually represented by the amount of P accumulated per biomass. PAE relies on roots ability to acquire P from the soil, and is commonly expressed as the relative difference of P acquired under low and high P availability conditions. In this review, plant adaptations related to improved PAE are described, with emphasis on arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which is generally accepted to enhance plant P acquisition. A state of the art (1980–2018) of AM growth responses and P uptake in wheat and barley is made to discuss about the commonly accepted growth promoting effect and P increased uptake by AM fungi and the contrasting evidence about the generally accepted lack of positive responses in both plant species. Finally, the mechanisms by which AM symbiosis can affect wheat and barley PAE are discussed, highlighting the importance of considering AM functional diversity on future studies and the necessity to improve PAE definition by considering the carbon trading between

  5. Transcriptome Analysis of Paraburkholderia phymatum under Nitrogen Starvation and during Symbiosis with Phaseolus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lardi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Paraburkholderia phymatum belongs to the β-subclass of proteobacteria. It has recently been shown to be able to nodulate and fix nitrogen in symbiosis with several mimosoid and papilionoid legumes. In contrast to the symbiosis of legumes with α-proteobacteria, very little is known about the molecular determinants underlying the successful establishment of this mutualistic relationship with β-proteobacteria. In this study, we performed an RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq analysis of free-living P. phymatum growing under nitrogen-replete and -limited conditions, the latter partially mimicking the situation in nitrogen-deprived soils. Among the genes upregulated under nitrogen limitation, we found genes involved in exopolysaccharides production and in motility, two traits relevant for plant root infection. Next, RNA-seq data of P. phymatum grown under free-living conditions and from symbiotic root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean were generated and compared. Among the genes highly upregulated during symbiosis, we identified—besides the nif gene cluster—an operon encoding a potential cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase (Bphy_3646-49. Bean root nodules induced by a cyoB mutant strain showed reduced nitrogenase and nitrogen fixation abilities, suggesting an important role of the cytochrome for respiration inside the nodule. The analysis of mutant strains for the RNA polymerase transcription factor RpoN (σ54 and its activator NifA indicated that—similar to the situation in α-rhizobia—P. phymatum RpoN and NifA are key regulators during symbiosis with P. vulgaris.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. S23321: Insights into Symbiosis Evolution in Soil Oligotrophs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Takashi; Tsukui, Takahiro; Maita, Hiroko; Okamoto, Shinobu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Saito, Akihiro; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Reiko; Shimomura, Yumi; Haruta, Shin; Morimoto, Sho; Wang, Yong; Sakai, Yoriko; Hattori, Masahira; Aizawa, Shin-ichi; Nagashima, Kenji V. P.; Masuda, Sachiko; Hattori, Tsutomu; Yamashita, Akifumi; Bao, Zhihua; Hayatsu, Masahito; Kajiya-Kanegae, Hiromi; Yoshinaga, Ikuo; Sakamoto, Kazunori; Toyota, Koki; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Anda, Mizue; Niwa, Rieko; Jung-Hwan, Park; Sameshima-Saito, Reiko; Tokuda, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Sumiko; Yamamoto, Syuji; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Akutsu, Tomoko; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Nakahira-Yanaka, Yuka; Hoshino, Yuko Takada; Hirakawa, Hideki; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Terasawa, Kimihiro; Itakura, Manabu; Sato, Shusei; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Sakakura, Natsuko; Kaminuma, Eli; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2012-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. S23321 is an oligotrophic bacterium isolated from paddy field soil. Although S23321 is phylogenetically close to Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110, a legume symbiont, it is unable to induce root nodules in siratro, a legume often used for testing Nod factor-dependent nodulation. The genome of S23321 is a single circular chromosome, 7,231,841 bp in length, with an average GC content of 64.3%. The genome contains 6,898 potential protein-encoding genes, one set of rRNA genes, and 45 tRNA genes. Comparison of the genome structure between S23321 and USDA110 showed strong colinearity; however, the symbiosis islands present in USDA110 were absent in S23321, whose genome lacked a chaperonin gene cluster (groELS3) for symbiosis regulation found in USDA110. A comparison of sequences around the tRNA-Val gene strongly suggested that S23321 contains an ancestral-type genome that precedes the acquisition of a symbiosis island by horizontal gene transfer. Although S23321 contains a nif (nitrogen fixation) gene cluster, the organization, homology, and phylogeny of the genes in this cluster were more similar to those of photosynthetic bradyrhizobia ORS278 and BTAi1 than to those on the symbiosis island of USDA110. In addition, we found genes encoding a complete photosynthetic system, many ABC transporters for amino acids and oligopeptides, two types (polar and lateral) of flagella, multiple respiratory chains, and a system for lignin monomer catabolism in the S23321 genome. These features suggest that S23321 is able to adapt to a wide range of environments, probably including low-nutrient conditions, with multiple survival strategies in soil and rhizosphere. PMID:22452844

  7. Symbiosis initiation in the bacterially luminous sea urchin cardinalfish Siphamia versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, P V; Gould, A L; Wittenrich, M L; Nakamura, M

    2012-09-01

    To determine how each new generation of the sea urchin cardinalfish Siphamia versicolor acquires the symbiotic luminous bacterium Photobacterium mandapamensis, and when in its development the S. versicolor initiates the symbiosis, procedures were established for rearing S. versicolor larvae in an aposymbiotic state. Under the conditions provided, larvae survived and developed for 28 days after their release from the mouths of males. Notochord flexion began at 8 days post release (dpr). By 28 dpr, squamation was evident and the caudal complex was complete. The light organ remained free of bacteria but increased in size and complexity during development of the larvae. Thus, aposymbiotic larvae of the fish can survive and develop for extended periods, major components of the luminescence system develop in the absence of the bacteria and the bacteria are not acquired directly from a parent, via the egg or during mouth brooding. Presentation of the symbiotic bacteria to aposymbiotic larvae at 8-10 dpr, but not earlier, led to initiation of the symbiosis. Upon colonization of the light organ, the bacterial population increased rapidly and cells forming the light-organ chambers exhibited a differentiated appearance. Therefore, the light organ apparently first becomes receptive to colonization after 1 week post-release development, the symbiosis is initiated by bacteria acquired from the environment and bacterial colonization induces morphological changes in the nascent light organ. The abilities to culture larvae of S. versicolor for extended periods and to initiate the symbiosis in aposymbiotic larvae are key steps in establishing the experimental tractability of this highly specific vertebrate and microbe mutualism. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  8. Mycorrhizal symbiosis induces plant carbon reallocation differently in C-3 and C-4 Panicum grasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, Veronika; Slavíková, Renata; Zemková, L.; Konvalinková, Tereza; Procházková, V.; Šťovíček, V.; Hršelová, Hana; Beskid, Olena; Hujslová, Martina; Gryndlerová, Hana; Gryndler, M.; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 425, 1-2 (2018), s. 441-456 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19191S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : C-13 labelling * Carbon (C) allocation * Mycorrhizal symbiosis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.052, year: 2016

  9. A STUDY ON THE SHAREHOLDERS’ BEHAVIOR OF LISTED COMPANIES BASED ON SYMBIOSIS THEORY: A RESEARCH FRAMEWORK

    OpenAIRE

    YANG Songling; LIU Tingli; CHEN Fang

    2014-01-01

    Research on shareholder’s behavior is a hot topic in recent years. Most researches are based on the theory of agency, which proposal that equity decentralization is the major way to solve the conflict problem between large shareholders and minority stockholders. Actually, major shareholder will never be eliminated. This paper introduces the symbiosis theory-ecology theory-to explain the motives and consequences of the behavior of different type shareholders in China’s from a new perspective. ...

  10. Expression patterns of sterol transporters NPC1 and NPC2 in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Vincent; Priouzeau, Fabrice; Mertz, Marjolijn; Mondin, Magali; Pagnotta, Sophie; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Davy, Simon K; Sabourault, Cécile

    2017-10-01

    The symbiotic interaction between cnidarians (e.g., corals and sea anemones) and photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium is triggered by both host-symbiont recognition processes and metabolic exchange between the 2 partners. The molecular communication is crucial for homeostatic regulation of the symbiosis, both under normal conditions and during stresses that further lead to symbiosis collapse. It is therefore important to identify and fully characterise the key players of this intimate interaction at the symbiotic interface. In this study, we determined the cellular and subcellular localization and expression of the sterol-trafficking Niemann-Pick type C proteins (NPC1 and NPC2) in the symbiotic sea anemones Anemonia viridis and Aiptasia sp. We first established that NPC1 is localised within vesicles in host tissues and to the symbiosome membranes in several anthozoan species. We demonstrated that the canonical NPC2-a protein is mainly expressed in the epidermis, whereas the NPC2-d protein is closely associated with symbiosome membranes. Furthermore, we showed that the expression of the NPC2-d protein is correlated with symbiont presence in healthy symbiotic specimens. As npc2-d is a cnidarian-specific duplicated gene, we hypothesised that it probably arose from a subfunctionalisation process that might result in a gain of function and symbiosis adaptation in anthozoans. Niemann-Pick type C proteins may be key players in a functional symbiosis and be useful tools to study host-symbiont interactions in the anthozoan-dinoflagellate association. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Assess suitability of hydroaeroponic culture to establish tripartite symbiosis between different AMF species, beans, and rhizobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansa Jan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Like other species of the Phaseoleae tribe, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. has the potential to establish symbiosis with rhizobia and to fix the atmospheric dinitrogen (N2 for its N nutrition. Common bean has also the potential to establish symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF that improves the uptake of low mobile nutrients such as phosphorus, from the soil. Both rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbioses can act synergistically in benefits on plant. Results The tripartite symbiosis of common bean with rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF was assessed in hydroaeroponic culture with common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., by comparing the effects of three fungi spp. on growth, nodulation and mycorrhization of the roots under sufficient versus deficient P supplies, after transfer from initial sand culture. Although Glomus intraradices Schenck & Smith colonized intensely the roots of common bean in both sand and hydroaeroponic cultures, Gigaspora rosea Nicolson & Schenck only established well under sand culture conditions, and no root-colonization was found with Acaulospora mellea Spain & Schenck under either culture conditions. Interestingly, mycorrhization by Glomus was also obtained by contact with mycorrhized Stylosanthes guianensis (Aubl. sw in sand culture under deficient P before transfer into hydroaeroponic culture. The effect of bean genotype on both rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbioses with Glomus was subsequently assessed with the common bean recombinant inbreed line 7, 28, 83, 115 and 147, and the cultivar Flamingo. Significant differences among colonization and nodulation of the roots and growth among genotypes were found. Conclusion The hydroaeroponic culture is a valuable tool for further scrutinizing the physiological interactions and nutrient partitioning within the tripartite symbiosis.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide-regulated genes in the Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrio, Emilie; Marino, Daniel; Marmeys, Anthony; de Segonzac, Marion Dunoyer; Damiani, Isabelle; Genre, Andrea; Huguet, Stéphanie; Frendo, Pierre; Puppo, Alain; Pauly, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), play an important role in signalling in various cellular processes. The involvement of H(2)O(2) in the Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiotic interaction raises questions about its effect on gene expression. A transcriptome analysis was performed on inoculated roots of M. truncatula in which ROS production was inhibited with diphenylene iodonium (DPI). In total, 301 genes potentially regulated by ROS content were identified 2 d after inoculation. These genes included MtSpk1, which encodes a putative protein kinase and is induced by exogenous H(2)O(2) treatment. MtSpk1 gene expression was also induced by nodulation factor treatment. MtSpk1 transcription was observed in infected root hair cells, nodule primordia and the infection zone of mature nodules. Analysis with a fluorescent protein probe specific for H(2)O(2) showed that MtSpk1 expression and H(2)O(2) were similarly distributed in the nodule infection zone. Finally, the establishment of symbiosis was impaired by MtSpk1 downregulation with an artificial micro-RNA. Several genes regulated by H(2)O(2) during the establishment of rhizobial symbiosis were identified. The involvement of MtSpk1 in the establishment of the symbiosis is proposed. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Aspects of nitrogen and carbon interchange in the Azolla-Anabaena symbiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, G.A.; Kaplan, D.; Meeks, J.C.; Buzby, K.M.; Marsh, B.H.; Corbin, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The free-floating aquatic pteridophytes in the genus Azolla contain an N 2 -fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena azollae, as a symbiont. Six extant species usually are recognized. In each species the symbiotic Anabaena can provide the total N requirement of the association via N 2 fixation and the Azolla sporophytes are capable of prolific vegetative reproduction in the absence of a combined N source. While vegetative reproduction and growth is more common, sexual reproduction occurs and presumably provides a means for survival during unfavorable environmental conditions. Azolla is heterosporous, producing both megasporocarps and microsporocarps on the same plant. Species demarcation is based primarily upon the morphology of these structures. Anabaena filaments are partitioned into both types of sporocarps during their development. The endophyte within the megasporocarp provides an inoculum for the developing sporophyte, maintaining the symbiosis. This report is restricted to studies conducted with the vegetatively propagated Azolla caroliniana - Anabaena azollae symbiosis grown on medium without combined N. It focuses on recent approaches to further elucidate aspects of host-endophyte interaction and incorporates analyses of soluble amino acids and ammonium, assays of ammonia assimilating enzymes, the use of [ 13 N]N 2 and the analysis of soluble sugars as well as 14 CO 2 -pulse chase studies. For orientation purposes the results are preceded by a description of the symbiosis. 39 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  14. The Medicago truncatula GRAS protein RAD1 supports arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis and Phytophthora palmivora susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Thomas; Bonhomme, Maxime; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Gavrin, Aleksandr; Toulotte, Justine; Yang, Weibing; André, Olivier; Jacquet, Christophe; Schornack, Sebastian

    2017-12-16

    The roots of most land plants are colonized by symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi. To facilitate this symbiosis, plant genomes encode a set of genes required for microbial perception and accommodation. However, the extent to which infection by filamentous root pathogens also relies on some of these genes remains an open question. Here, we used genome-wide association mapping to identify genes contributing to colonization of Medicago truncatula roots by the pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora palmivora. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers most significantly associated with plant colonization response were identified upstream of RAD1, which encodes a GRAS transcription regulator first negatively implicated in root nodule symbiosis and recently identified as a positive regulator of AM symbiosis. RAD1 transcript levels are up-regulated both in response to AM fungus and, to a lower extent, in infected tissues by P. palmivora where its expression is restricted to root cortex cells proximal to pathogen hyphae. Reverse genetics showed that reduction of RAD1 transcript levels as well as a rad1 mutant are impaired in their full colonization by AM fungi as well as by P. palmivora. Thus, the importance of RAD1 extends beyond symbiotic interactions, suggesting a general involvement in M. truncatula microbe-induced root development and interactions with unrelated beneficial and detrimental filamentous microbes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Transport properties and regulatory roles of nitrogen in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aiqun; Gu, Mian; Wang, Shuangshuang; Chen, Jiadong; Xu, Guohua

    2018-02-01

    Many terrestrial plants can form root symbiosis with beneficial microorganisms for enhancing uptake of mineral nutrients or increasing fitness to adverse environmental challenges. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis that is formed by AM fungi and the roots of vascular flowering plants is the most widespread mutualistic associations in nature. As a typical endosymbiosis, AM interactions involves the differentiation of both symbionts to create novel symbiotic interfaces within the root cells, and requires a continuous nutrient exchange between the two partners. AM plants have two pathways for nutrient uptake, either direct uptake via the root hairs and root epidermis at the plant-soil interface, or indirectly through the AM fungal hyphae at the plant-fungus interface. Over the last few years, great progress has been made in deciphering the mechanisms underlying the AM-mediated modulation of nutrient uptake processes, and an increasing number of plant and fungal genes responsible for transporting nutrients from the soil or across the intraradical symbiotic interfaces have been identified and functionally characterized. Here, we summarize the recent advances in the nitrogen uptake, assimilation and translocation in the AM symbiosis, and also explore the current understanding of how the N status and interplay with C and P in modulating the development of AM associations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Forests trapped in nitrogen limitation--an ecological market perspective on ectomycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Oskar; Näsholm, Torgny; Högberg, Peter; Högberg, Mona N

    2014-07-01

    Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis is omnipresent in boreal forests, where it is assumed to benefit plant growth. However, experiments show inconsistent benefits for plants and volatility of individual partnerships, which calls for a re-evaluation of the presumed role of this symbiosis. We reconcile these inconsistencies by developing a model that demonstrates how mycorrhizal networking and market mechanisms shape the strategies of individual plants and fungi to promote symbiotic stability at the ecosystem level. The model predicts that plants switch abruptly from a mixed strategy with both mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal roots to a purely mycorrhizal strategy as soil nitrogen availability declines, in agreement with the frequency distribution of ectomycorrhizal colonization intensity across a wide-ranging data set. In line with observations in field-scale isotope labeling experiments, the model explains why ectomycorrhizal symbiosis does not alleviate plant nitrogen limitation. Instead, market mechanisms may generate self-stabilization of the mycorrhizal strategy via nitrogen depletion feedback, even if plant growth is ultimately reduced. We suggest that this feedback mechanism maintains the strong nitrogen limitation ubiquitous in boreal forests. The mechanism may also have the capacity to eliminate or even reverse the expected positive effect of rising CO2 on tree growth in strongly nitrogen-limited boreal forests. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Growth and flagellation of Vibrio fischeri during initiation of the sepiolid squid light organ symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, E G; Asato, L M

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri is maintained in the light-emitting organ of the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes. When the juvenile squid emerges from its egg it is symbiont-free and, because bioluminescence is part of an anti-predatory behavior, therefore must obtain a bacterial inoculum from the surrounding environment. We document here the kinetics of the process by which newly hatched juvenile squids become infected by symbiosis-competent V. fischeri. When placed in seawater containing as few as 240 colony-forming-units (CFU) per ml, the juvenile became detectably bioluminescent within a few hours. Colonization of the nascent light organ was initiated with as few as 1 to 10 bacteria, which rapidly began to grow at an exponential rate until they reached a population size of approximately 10(5) cells by 12 h after the initial infection. Subsequently, the number of bacteria in the established symbiosis was maintained essentially constant by a combination of both a > 20-fold reduction in bacterial growth rate, and an expulsion of excess bacteria into the surrounding seawater. While V. fischeri cells are normally flagellated and motile, these bacteria did not elaborate these appendages once the symbiosis was established; however, they quickly began to synthesize flagella when they were removed from the light organ environment. Thus, two important biological characteristics, growth rate and flagellation, were modulated during establishment of the association, perhaps as part of a coordinated series of symbiotic responses.

  18. Earthworms and their Nephridial Symbionts: Co-diversification and Maintenance of the Symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie Braad; Holmstrup, Martin; Davidson, Seana K.

    Earthworms harbor in their nephridia (excretory organs) symbiotic bacteria which densely colonize a specific part of the nephridia, called the ampulla [1]. The symbiosis is species-specific and the symbionts form their own monophyletic genus Verminephrobacter (β-proteobacteria) [2] and are vertic......,J. 1926. Z Morph Ökol Tiere, 6(3):588-624. [2] Schramm,A. et al. 2003. Environ Microbiol 5(9):804-809. [3] Davidson,S.K. & Stahl,D.A. 2006. Appl Environ Microbiol 72(1):769-775. [4] Pandazis,G. 1931. Zentralbl Bakteriol 120:440-453.......Earthworms harbor in their nephridia (excretory organs) symbiotic bacteria which densely colonize a specific part of the nephridia, called the ampulla [1]. The symbiosis is species-specific and the symbionts form their own monophyletic genus Verminephrobacter (β-proteobacteria) [2...... showed no significant differences in growth rate and fecundity between symbiotic and aposymbiotic worms. Thus the symbionts do not appear to have an effect on worm fitness, under growth conditions tested. The underlying functional and maintaining mechanisms of this symbiosis remain a conundrum. [1] Knop...

  19. Burkholderia bacteria infectiously induce the proto-farming symbiosis of Dictyostelium amoebae and food bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Susanne; Haselkorn, Tamara S; Bashir, Usman; Jimenez, Daniela; Brock, Debra A; Queller, David C; Strassmann, Joan E

    2015-09-08

    Symbiotic associations can allow an organism to acquire novel traits by accessing the genetic repertoire of its partner. In the Dictyostelium discoideum farming symbiosis, certain amoebas (termed "farmers") stably associate with bacterial partners. Farmers can suffer a reproductive cost but also gain beneficial capabilities, such as carriage of bacterial food (proto-farming) and defense against competitors. Farming status previously has been attributed to amoeba genotype, but the role of bacterial partners in its induction has not been examined. Here, we explore the role of bacterial associates in the initiation, maintenance, and phenotypic effects of the farming symbiosis. We demonstrate that two clades of farmer-associated Burkholderia isolates colonize D. discoideum nonfarmers and infectiously endow them with farmer-like characteristics, indicating that Burkholderia symbionts are a major driver of the farming phenomenon. Under food-rich conditions, Burkholderia-colonized amoebas produce fewer spores than uncolonized counterparts, with the severity of this reduction being dependent on the Burkholderia colonizer. However, the induction of food carriage by Burkholderia colonization may be considered a conditionally adaptive trait because it can confer an advantage to the amoeba host when grown in food-limiting conditions. We observed Burkholderia inside and outside colonized D. discoideum spores after fruiting body formation; this observation, together with the ability of Burkholderia to colonize new amoebas, suggests a mixed mode of symbiont transmission. These results change our understanding of the D. discoideum farming symbiosis by establishing that the bacterial partner, Burkholderia, is an important causative agent of the farming phenomenon.

  20. Forests trapped in nitrogen limitation – an ecological market perspective on ectomycorrhizal symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Oskar; Näsholm, Torgny; Högberg, Peter; Högberg, Mona N

    2014-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis is omnipresent in boreal forests, where it is assumed to benefit plant growth. However, experiments show inconsistent benefits for plants and volatility of individual partnerships, which calls for a re-evaluation of the presumed role of this symbiosis. We reconcile these inconsistencies by developing a model that demonstrates how mycorrhizal networking and market mechanisms shape the strategies of individual plants and fungi to promote symbiotic stability at the ecosystem level. The model predicts that plants switch abruptly from a mixed strategy with both mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal roots to a purely mycorrhizal strategy as soil nitrogen availability declines, in agreement with the frequency distribution of ectomycorrhizal colonization intensity across a wide-ranging data set. In line with observations in field-scale isotope labeling experiments, the model explains why ectomycorrhizal symbiosis does not alleviate plant nitrogen limitation. Instead, market mechanisms may generate self-stabilization of the mycorrhizal strategy via nitrogen depletion feedback, even if plant growth is ultimately reduced. We suggest that this feedback mechanism maintains the strong nitrogen limitation ubiquitous in boreal forests. The mechanism may also have the capacity to eliminate or even reverse the expected positive effect of rising CO2 on tree growth in strongly nitrogen-limited boreal forests. PMID:24824576

  1. Use of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by a bacteria–animal symbiosis from seagrass sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Thomas; Lavik, Gaute; Harder, Jens; Lott, Christian; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Summary The gutless marine worm O lavius algarvensis lives in symbiosis with chemosynthetic bacteria that provide nutrition by fixing carbon dioxide (CO 2) into biomass using reduced sulfur compounds as energy sources. A recent metaproteomic analysis of the O . algarvensis symbiosis indicated that carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H 2) might also be used as energy sources. We provide direct evidence that the O . algarvensis symbiosis consumes CO and H 2. Single cell imaging using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed that one of the symbionts, the γ3‐symbiont, uses the energy from CO oxidation to fix CO 2. Pore water analysis revealed considerable in‐situ concentrations of CO and H 2 in the O . algarvensis environment, Mediterranean seagrass sediments. Pore water H 2 concentrations (89–2147 nM) were up to two orders of magnitude higher than in seawater, and up to 36‐fold higher than previously known from shallow‐water marine sediments. Pore water CO concentrations (17–51 nM) were twice as high as in the overlying seawater (no literature data from other shallow‐water sediments are available for comparison). Ex‐situ incubation experiments showed that dead seagrass rhizomes produced large amounts of CO. CO production from decaying plant material could thus be a significant energy source for microbial primary production in seagrass sediments. PMID:26013766

  2. Development and Symbiosis Establishment in the Cnidarian Endosymbiosis Model Aiptasia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Madeline; Wolfowicz, Iliona; Voss, Philipp A; Hambleton, Elizabeth A; Guse, Annika

    2016-01-25

    Symbiosis between photosynthetic algae and heterotrophic organisms is widespread. One prominent example of high ecological relevance is the endosymbiosis between dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium and reef-building corals, which typically acquire symbionts anew each generation during larval stages. The tropical sea anemone Aiptasia sp. is a laboratory model system for this endosymbiosis and, similar to corals, produces non-symbiotic larvae that establish symbiosis by phagocytosing Symbiodinium from the environment into the endoderm. Here we generate the first overview of Aiptasia embryogenesis and larval development and establish in situ hybridization to analyze expression patterns of key early developmental regulators. Next, we quantify morphological changes in developing larvae and find a substantial enlargement of the gastric cavity over time. Symbiont acquisition starts soon after mouth formation and symbionts occupy a major portion of the host cell in which they reside. During the first 14 days of development, infection efficiency remains constant while in contrast, localization of phagocytosed symbionts changes, indicating that the occurrence of functional phagocytosing cells may be developmentally regulated. Taken together, here we provide the essential framework to further develop Aiptasia as a model system for the analysis of symbiosis establishment in cnidarian larvae at the molecular level.

  3. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Requires a Phosphate Transceptor in the Gigaspora margarita Fungal Symbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianan; Lin, Hui; Peng, Xiaowei; Xu, Congrui; Sun, Zhongfeng; Jiang, Kexin; Huang, Antian; Wu, Xiaohui; Tang, Nianwu; Salvioli, Alessandra; Bonfante, Paola; Zhao, Bin

    2016-12-05

    The majority of terrestrial vascular plants are capable of forming mutualistic associations with obligate biotrophic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota. This mutualistic symbiosis provides carbohydrates to the fungus, and reciprocally improves plant phosphate uptake. AM fungal transporters can acquire phosphate from the soil through the hyphal networks. Nevertheless, the precise functions of AM fungal phosphate transporters, and whether they act as sensors or as nutrient transporters, in fungal signal transduction remain unclear. Here, we report a high-affinity phosphate transporter GigmPT from Gigaspora margarita that is required for AM symbiosis. Host-induced gene silencing of GigmPT hampers the development of G. margarita during AM symbiosis. Most importantly, GigmPT functions as a phosphate transceptor in G. margarita regarding the activation of the phosphate signaling pathway as well as the protein kinase A signaling cascade. Using the substituted-cysteine accessibility method, we identified residues A 146 (in transmembrane domain [TMD] IV) and Val 357 (in TMD VIII) of GigmPT, both of which are critical for phosphate signaling and transport in yeast during growth induction. Collectively, our results provide significant insights into the molecular functions of a phosphate transceptor from the AM fungus G. margarita. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Modelling Spatial Interactions in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis using the Calculus of Wrapped Compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Calcagno

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM is the most wide-spread plant-fungus symbiosis on earth. Investigating this kind of symbiosis is considered one of the most promising ways to develop methods to nurture plants in more natural manners, avoiding the complex chemical productions used nowadays to produce artificial fertilizers. In previous work we used the Calculus of Wrapped Compartments (CWC to investigate different phases of the AM symbiosis. In this paper, we continue this line of research by modelling the colonisation of the plant root cells by the fungal hyphae spreading in the soil. This study requires the description of some spatial interaction. Although CWC has no explicit feature modelling a spatial geometry, the compartment labelling feature can be effectively exploited to define a discrete surface topology outlining the relevant sectors which determine the spatial properties of the system under consideration. Different situations and interesting spatial properties can be modelled and analysed in such a lightweight framework (which has not an explicit notion of geometry with coordinates and spatial metrics, thus exploiting the existing CWC simulation tool.

  5. A Legume TOR Protein Kinase Regulates Rhizobium Symbiosis and Is Essential for Infection and Nodule Development1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Lourdes; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase regulates metabolism, growth, and life span in yeast, animals, and plants in coordination with nutrient status and environmental conditions. The nutrient-dependent nature of TOR functionality makes this kinase a putative regulator of symbiotic associations involving nutrient acquisition. However, TOR’s role in these processes remains to be understood. Here, we uncovered the role of TOR during the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium tropici (Rhizobium) symbiotic interaction. TOR was expressed in all tested bean tissues, with higher transcript levels in the root meristems and senesced nodules. We showed TOR promoter expression along the progressing infection thread and in the infected cells of mature nodules. Posttranscriptional gene silencing of TOR using RNA interference (RNAi) showed that this gene is involved in lateral root elongation and root cell organization and also alters the density, size, and number of root hairs. The suppression of TOR transcripts also affected infection thread progression and associated cortical cell divisions, resulting in a drastic reduction of nodule numbers. TOR-RNAi resulted in reduced reactive oxygen species accumulation and altered CyclinD1 and CyclinD3 expression, which are crucial factors for infection thread progression and nodule organogenesis. Enhanced expression of TOR-regulated ATG genes in TOR-RNAi roots suggested that TOR plays a role in the recognition of Rhizobium as a symbiont. Together, these data suggest that TOR plays a vital role in the establishment of root nodule symbiosis in the common bean. PMID:27698253

  6. Rare beneficial mutations can halt Muller's ratchet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balick, Daniel; Goyal, Sidhartha; Jerison, Elizabeth; Neher, Richard; Shraiman, Boris; Desai, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In viral, bacterial, and other asexual populations, the vast majority of non-neutral mutations are deleterious. This motivates the application of models without beneficial mutations. Here we show that the presence of surprisingly few compensatory mutations halts fitness decay in these models. Production of deleterious mutations is balanced by purifying selection, stabilizing the fitness distribution. However, stochastic vanishing of fitness classes can lead to slow fitness decay (i.e. Muller's ratchet). For weakly deleterious mutations, production overwhelms purification, rapidly decreasing population fitness. We show that when beneficial mutations are introduced, a stable steady state emerges in the form of a dynamic mutation-selection balance. We argue this state is generic for all mutation rates and population sizes, and is reached as an end state as genomes become saturated by either beneficial or deleterious mutations. Assuming all mutations have the same magnitude selective effect, we calculate the fraction of beneficial mutations necessary to maintain the dynamic balance. This may explain the unexpected maintenance of asexual genomes, as in mitochondria, in the presence of selection. This will affect in the statistics of genetic diversity in these populations.

  7. Mutation breeding in jute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshua, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Mutagenic studies in jute in general dealt with the morphological abnormalities of the M 1 generation in great detail. Of late, induction of a wide spectrum of viable mutations have been reported in different varieties of both the species. Mutations affecting several traits of agronomic importance such as, plant height, time of flowering, fibre yield and quality, resistance to pests and diseases are also available. Cytological analysis of a large collection of induced mutants resulted in the isolation of seven trisomics in an olitorius variety. Several anatomical parameters which are the components of fibre yield, have also received attention. Some mutants with completely altered morphology were used for interpreting the evolution of leaf shape in Tiliaceas and related families. A capsularis variety developed using mutation breeding technique has been released for cultivation. Several others, including derivatives of inter-mutant hybridization have been found to perform well at different locations in the All India Coordinated Trials. Presently, chemical mutagenesis and induction of mutants of physiological significance are receiving considerable attention. The induced variability is being used in genetic and linkage studies. (author)

  8. BOOKLET TO INSTITUTO PEDAGOGICO NACIONAL TEACHERS ABOUT SYMBIOSIS AND PROCESSES ON BIOTECHNOLOGY: THE BIOFERTILIZER Rhizobium sp IN Phaseolus vulgaris WITH ALTERNATIVE TO SYMBIOSIS FOR Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Camila Quevedo Rubiano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the thesis carried out in the research group of Biotechnology Teaching in Colombia, with the aim of providing teachers of Biology of Instituto Pedagogico Nacional a booklet that can strengthen the teaching of biotechnology processes using Rhizobium sp reduction of chemical fertilizers and symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris.   The booklet contains a proposal of practical activities that enable teachers of this institution to use spaces like the farm, enabling to teach biotechnology related to agronomy. Therefore, for this project was considered two Biological and Pedagogical approaches, the first is within the analytical empirical paradigm in the process of microbiological characterization of Rhizobium and their Biofertilizing ability in beans; and the teaching approach within the design of a booklet that includes the findings of this study as a contribution to the reduction of chemical fertilizers school farm. In order to have a complete analysis of the work it was subjected to quantitative and qualitative methods.   This biotech practice is included in the booklet showing in bioassays that bacteria has biofertilizer without inhibiting potential symbiosis, and that research and teaching biological concepts from scientific expertise can be promoted in Biology class for students to understand its context in a significant way, to be used in different levels of education; also it is a teaching strategy.

  9. A symbiosis-dedicated SYNTAXIN OF PLANTS 13II isoform controls the formation of a stable host-microbe interface in symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Rik; Hontelez, Jan; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Wen, Jiangqi; Bisseling, Ton; Limpens, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and rhizobium bacteria are accommodated in specialized membrane compartments that form a host-microbe interface. To better understand how these interfaces are made, we studied the regulation of exocytosis during interface formation. We used a phylogenetic approach to identify target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptors (t-SNAREs) that are dedicated to symbiosis and used cell-specific expression analysis together with protein localization to identify t-SNAREs that are present on the host-microbe interface in Medicago truncatula. We investigated the role of these t-SNAREs during the formation of a host-microbe interface. We showed that multiple syntaxins are present on the peri-arbuscular membrane. From these, we identified SYNTAXIN OF PLANTS 13II (SYP13II) as a t-SNARE that is essential for the formation of a stable symbiotic interface in both AM and rhizobium symbiosis. In most dicot plants, the SYP13II transcript is alternatively spliced, resulting in two isoforms, SYP13IIα and SYP13IIβ. These splice-forms differentially mark functional and degrading arbuscule branches. Our results show that vesicle traffic to the symbiotic interface is specialized and required for its maintenance. Alternative splicing of SYP13II allows plants to replace a t-SNARE involved in traffic to the plasma membrane with a t-SNARE that is more stringent in its localization to functional arbuscules. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Experimental evolution and the dynamics of genomic mutation rate modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynes, Y; Sniegowski, P D

    2014-11-01

    Because genes that affect mutation rates are themselves subject to mutation, mutation rates can be influenced by natural selection and other evolutionary forces. The population genetics of mutation rate modifier alleles has been a subject of theoretical interest for many decades. Here, we review experimental contributions to our understanding of mutation rate modifier dynamics. Numerous evolution experiments have shown that mutator alleles (modifiers that elevate the genomic mutation rate) can readily rise to high frequencies via genetic hitchhiking in non-recombining microbial populations. Whereas these results certainly provide an explanatory framework for observations of sporadically high mutation rates in pathogenic microbes and in cancer lineages, it is nonetheless true that most natural populations have very low mutation rates. This raises the interesting question of how mutator hitchhiking is suppressed or its phenotypic effect reversed in natural populations. Very little experimental work has addressed this question; with this in mind, we identify some promising areas for future experimental investigation.

  11. Nitric Oxide Mediates Biofilm Formation and Symbiosis in Silicibacter sp. Strain TrichCH4B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Minxi; Smith, Brian C; Marletta, Michael A

    2015-05-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important signaling role in all domains of life. Many bacteria contain a heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) protein that selectively binds NO. These H-NOX proteins often act as sensors that regulate histidine kinase (HK) activity, forming part of a bacterial two-component signaling system that also involves one or more response regulators. In several organisms, NO binding to the H-NOX protein governs bacterial biofilm formation; however, the source of NO exposure for these bacteria is unknown. In mammals, NO is generated by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and signals through binding the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. Recently, several bacterial NOS proteins have also been reported, but the corresponding bacteria do not also encode an H-NOX protein. Here, we report the first characterization of a bacterium that encodes both a NOS and H-NOX, thus resembling the mammalian system capable of both synthesizing and sensing NO. We characterized the NO signaling pathway of the marine alphaproteobacterium Silicibacter sp. strain TrichCH4B, determining that the NOS is activated by an algal symbiont, Trichodesmium erythraeum. NO signaling through a histidine kinase-response regulator two-component signaling pathway results in increased concentrations of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate, a key bacterial second messenger molecule that controls cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. Silicibacter sp. TrichCH4B biofilm formation, activated by T. erythraeum, may be an important mechanism for symbiosis between the two organisms, revealing that NO plays a previously unknown key role in bacterial communication and symbiosis. Bacterial nitric oxide (NO) signaling via heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) proteins regulates biofilm formation, playing an important role in protecting bacteria from oxidative stress and other environmental stresses. Biofilms are also an important part of symbiosis, allowing the organism to remain in a

  12. Biodiversity: molecular biological domains, symbiosis and kingdom origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.

    1992-01-01

    The number of extant species of organisms is estimated to be from fewer than 3 to more than 30 x 10(6) (May, 1992). Molecular biology, comparative genetics and ultrastructural analyses provide new insights into evolutionary relationships between these species, including increasingly precise ideas of how species and higher taxa have evolved from common ancestors. Accumulation of random mutations and large macromolecular sequence change in all organisms since the Proterozoic Eon has been importantly supplemented by acquisition of inherited genomes ('symbiogenesis'). Karyotypic alterations (polyploidization and karyotypic fissioning) have been added to these other mechanisms of species origin in plants and animals during the Phanerozoic Eon. The new evolution concepts (coupled with current rapid rates of species extinction and ignorance of the extent of biodiversity) prompted this analysis of the field of systematic biology and its role in the reorganization of extant species into higher taxa. Two superkingdoms (= Domains: Prokaryotae and Eukaryotae) and five kingdoms (Monera = Procaryotae or Bacteria; Protoctista: algae, amoebae, ciliates, foraminifera, oomycetes, slime molds, etc.; Mychota: 'true' fungi; Plantae: one phylum (division) of bryophytes and nine phyla of tracheophytes; and Animalia) are recognized. Two subkingdoms comprise the monera: the great diverse lineages are Archaebacteria and Eubacteria. The criteria for classification using molecular, ultrastructural and genetic data for this scheme are mentioned. For the first time since the nineteenth century, logical, technical definitions for each group are given with their time of appearance as inferred from the fossil record in the primary scientific literature. This classification scheme, which most closely reflects the evolutionary history, molecular biology, genetics and ultrastructure of extant life, requires changes in social organization of biologists, many of whom as botanists and zoologists, still

  13. First Description of Sulphur-Oxidizing Bacterial Symbiosis in a Cnidarian (Medusozoa Living in Sulphidic Shallow-Water Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Abouna

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of thioautotrophic bacterial symbiosis in the giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila, there has been great impetus to investigate such partnerships in other invertebrates. In this study, we present the occurrence of a sulphur-oxidizing symbiosis in a metazoan belonging to the phylum Cnidaria in which this event has never been described previously.Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM observations and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXs analysis, were employed to unveil the presence of prokaryotes population bearing elemental sulphur granules, growing on the body surface of the metazoan. Phylogenetic assessments were also undertaken to identify this invertebrate and microorganisms in thiotrophic symbiosis. Our results showed the occurrence of a thiotrophic symbiosis in a cnidarian identified as Cladonema sp.This is the first report describing the occurrence of a sulphur-oxidizing symbiosis in a cnidarian. Furthermore, of the two adult morphologies, the polyp and medusa, this mutualistic association was found restricted to the polyp form of Cladonema sp.

  14. The impact of domestication and crop improvement on arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in cereals: insights from genetics and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Ruairidh J H; Ramírez-Flores, M Rosario; Olalde-Portugal, Víctor; Paszkowski, Uta

    2018-04-15

    Contents Summary I. Introduction II. Recruitment of plant metabolites and hormones as signals in AM symbiosis III. Phytohormones are regulators of AM symbiosis and targets of plant breeding IV. Variations in host response to AM symbiosis V. Outlook Acknowledgements References SUMMARY: Cereals (rice, maize, wheat, sorghum and the millets) provide over 50% of the world's caloric intake, a value that rises to > 80% in developing countries. Since domestication, cereals have been under artificial selection, largely directed towards higher yield. Throughout this process, cereals have maintained their capacity to interact with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, beneficial symbionts that associate with the roots of most terrestrial plants. It has been hypothesized that the shift from the wild to cultivation, and above all the last c. 50 years of intensive breeding for high-input farming systems, has reduced the capacity of the major cereal crops to gain full benefit from AM interactions. Recent studies have shed further light on the molecular basis of establishment and functioning of AM symbiosis in cereals, providing insight into where the breeding process might have had an impact. Classic phytohormones, targets of artificial selection during the generation of Green Revolution semi-dwarf varieties, have emerged as important regulators of AM symbiosis. Although there is still much to be learnt about the mechanistic basis of variation in symbiotic outcome, these advances are providing an insight into the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza in agronomic systems. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Structural basis for regulation of rhizobial nodulation and symbiosis gene expression by the regulatory protein NolR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon Goo; Krishnan, Hari B; Jez, Joseph M

    2014-04-29

    The symbiosis between rhizobial microbes and host plants involves the coordinated expression of multiple genes, which leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. As part of the transcriptional machinery for nodulation and symbiosis across a range of Rhizobium, NolR serves as a global regulatory protein. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structures of NolR in the unliganded form and complexed with two different 22-base pair (bp) double-stranded operator sequences (oligos AT and AA). Structural and biochemical analysis of NolR reveals protein-DNA interactions with an asymmetric operator site and defines a mechanism for conformational switching of a key residue (Gln56) to accommodate variation in target DNA sequences from diverse rhizobial genes for nodulation and symbiosis. This conformational switching alters the energetic contributions to DNA binding without changes in affinity for the target sequence. Two possible models for the role of NolR in the regulation of different nodulation and symbiosis genes are proposed. To our knowledge, these studies provide the first structural insight on the regulation of genes involved in the agriculturally and ecologically important symbiosis of microbes and plants that leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation.

  16. First Description of Sulphur-Oxidizing Bacterial Symbiosis in a Cnidarian (Medusozoa) Living in Sulphidic Shallow-Water Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouna, Sylvie; Gonzalez-Rizzo, Silvina; Grimonprez, Adrien; Gros, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of thioautotrophic bacterial symbiosis in the giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila, there has been great impetus to investigate such partnerships in other invertebrates. In this study, we present the occurrence of a sulphur-oxidizing symbiosis in a metazoan belonging to the phylum Cnidaria in which this event has never been described previously. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) observations and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXs) analysis, were employed to unveil the presence of prokaryotes population bearing elemental sulphur granules, growing on the body surface of the metazoan. Phylogenetic assessments were also undertaken to identify this invertebrate and microorganisms in thiotrophic symbiosis. Our results showed the occurrence of a thiotrophic symbiosis in a cnidarian identified as Cladonema sp. This is the first report describing the occurrence of a sulphur-oxidizing symbiosis in a cnidarian. Furthermore, of the two adult morphologies, the polyp and medusa, this mutualistic association was found restricted to the polyp form of Cladonema sp.

  17. A NIN-LIKE PROTEIN mediates nitrate-induced control of root nodule symbiosis in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Hanna; Tanaka, Sachiko; Handa, Yoshihiro; Ito, Momoyo; Sakamoto, Yuki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Betsuyaku, Shigeyuki; Miura, Kenji; Soyano, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Suzaki, Takuya

    2018-02-05

    Legumes and rhizobia establish symbiosis in root nodules. To balance the gains and costs associated with the symbiosis, plants have developed two strategies for adapting to nitrogen availability in the soil: plants can regulate nodule number and/or stop the development or function of nodules. Although the former is accounted for by autoregulation of nodulation, a form of systemic long-range signaling, the latter strategy remains largely enigmatic. Here, we show that the Lotus japonicus NITRATE UNRESPONSIVE SYMBIOSIS 1 (NRSYM1) gene encoding a NIN-LIKE PROTEIN transcription factor acts as a key regulator in the nitrate-induced pleiotropic control of root nodule symbiosis. NRSYM1 accumulates in the nucleus in response to nitrate and directly regulates the production of CLE-RS2, a root-derived mobile peptide that acts as a negative regulator of nodule number. Our data provide the genetic basis for how plants respond to the nitrogen environment and control symbiosis to achieve proper plant growth.

  18. Genome evolution in an ancient bacteria-ant symbiosis: parallel gene loss among Blochmannia spanning the origin of the ant tribe Camponotini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Williams

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stable associations between bacterial endosymbionts and insect hosts provide opportunities to explore genome evolution in the context of established mutualisms and assess the roles of selection and genetic drift across host lineages and habitats. Blochmannia, obligate endosymbionts of ants of the tribe Camponotini, have coevolved with their ant hosts for ∼40 MY. To investigate early events in Blochmannia genome evolution across this ant host tribe, we sequenced Blochmannia from two divergent host lineages, Colobopsis obliquus and Polyrhachis turneri, and compared them with four published genomes from Blochmannia of Camponotus sensu stricto. Reconstructed gene content of the last common ancestor (LCA of these six Blochmannia genomes is reduced (690 protein coding genes, consistent with rapid gene loss soon after establishment of the symbiosis. Differential gene loss among Blochmannia lineages has affected cellular functions and metabolic pathways, including DNA replication and repair, vitamin biosynthesis and membrane proteins. Blochmannia of P. turneri (i.e., B. turneri encodes an intact DnaA chromosomal replication initiation protein, demonstrating that loss of dnaA was not essential for establishment of the symbiosis. Based on gene content, B. obliquus and B. turneri are unable to provision hosts with riboflavin. Of the six sequenced Blochmannia, B. obliquus is the earliest diverging lineage (i.e., the sister group of other Blochmannia sampled and encodes the fewest protein-coding genes and the most pseudogenes. We identified 55 genes involved in parallel gene loss, including glutamine synthetase, which may participate in nitrogen recycling. Pathways for biosynthesis of coenzyme A, terpenoids and riboflavin were lost in multiple lineages, suggesting relaxed selection on the pathway after inactivation of one component. Analysis of Illumina read datasets did not detect evidence of plasmids encoding missing functions, nor the presence of

  19. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Alleviates Diesel Toxicity on Melilotus albus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Ortega, H. A.; Alarcon, A.; Ferrera-Cerrato, R.; Zavaleta-Mancera, H. A.

    2009-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) affect plant growth and development by limiting water absorption and nutrient availability. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been demonstrated to increase plant tolerance of grass species to PH, but the performance of AMF on legume species during phytorremediation of PH-contaminated soils has been scarcely understood. Thus, this research evaluated the effects of AMF on tolerance and growth of Melilotus albus in a diesel-contaminated soil. (Author)

  20. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Alleviates Diesel Toxicity on Melilotus albus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Ortega, H. A.; Alarcon, A.; Ferrera-Cerrato, R.; Zavaleta-Mancera, H. A.

    2009-07-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) affect plant growth and development by limiting water absorption and nutrient availability. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been demonstrated to increase plant tolerance of grass species to PH, but the performance of AMF on legume species during phytorremediation of PH-contaminated soils has been scarcely understood. Thus, this research evaluated the effects of AMF on tolerance and growth of Melilotus albus in a diesel-contaminated soil. (Author)

  1. Native arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis alters foliar bacterial community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poosakkannu, Anbu; Nissinen, Riitta; Kytöviita, Minna-Maarit

    2017-11-01

    The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on plant-associated microbes are poorly known. We tested the hypothesis that colonization by an AM fungus affects microbial species richness and microbial community composition of host plant tissues. We grew the grass, Deschampsia flexuosa in a greenhouse with or without the native AM fungus, Claroideoglomus etunicatum. We divided clonally produced tillers into two parts: one inoculated with AM fungus spores and one without AM fungus inoculation (non-mycorrhizal, NM). We characterized bacterial (16S rRNA gene) and fungal communities (internal transcribed spacer region) in surface-sterilized leaf and root plant compartments. AM fungus inoculation did not affect microbial species richness or diversity indices in leaves or roots, but the AM fungus inoculation significantly affected bacterial community composition in leaves. A total of three OTUs in leaves belonging to the phylum Firmicutes positively responded to the presence of the AM fungus in roots. Another six OTUs belonging to the Proteobacteria (Alpha, Beta, and Gamma) and Bacteroidetes were significantly more abundant in NM plants when compared to AM fungus-inoculated plants. Further, there was a significant correlation between plant dry weight and leaf microbial community compositional shift. Also, there was a significant correlation between leaf bacterial community compositional shift and foliar nitrogen content changes due to AM fungus inoculation. The results suggest that AM fungus colonization in roots has a profound effect on plant physiology that is reflected in leaf bacterial community composition.

  2. Transcriptomic dissection of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285 in symbiosis with Aeschynomene spp. inducing different bacteroid morphotypes with contrasted symbiotic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamouche, Florian; Gully, Djamel; Chaumeret, Anaïs; Nouwen, Nico; Verly, Camille; Pierre, Olivier; Sciallano, Coline; Fardoux, Joël; Jeudy, Christian; Szücs, Attila; Mondy, Samuel; Salon, Christophe; Nagy, István; Kereszt, Attila; Dessaux, Yves; Giraud, Eric; Mergaert, Peter; Alunni, Benoit

    2018-06-19

    To circumvent the paucity of nitrogen sources in the soil legume plants establish a symbiotic interaction with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria called rhizobia. During symbiosis, the plants form root organs called nodules, where bacteria are housed intracellularly and become active nitrogen fixers known as bacteroids. Depending on their host plant, bacteroids can adopt different morphotypes, being either unmodified (U), elongated (E) or spherical (S). E- and S-type bacteroids undergo a terminal differentiation leading to irreversible morphological changes and DNA endoreduplication. Previous studies suggest that differentiated bacteroids display an increased symbiotic efficiency (E>U and S>U). In this study, we used a combination of Aeschynomene species inducing E- or S-type bacteroids in symbiosis with Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS285 to show that S-type bacteroids present a better symbiotic efficiency than E-type bacteroids. We performed a transcriptomic analysis on E- and S-type bacteroids formed by Aeschynomene afraspera and Aeschynomene indica nodules and identified the bacterial functions activated in bacteroids and specific to each bacteroid type. Extending the expression analysis in E- and S-type bacteroids in other Aeschynomene species by qRT-PCR on selected genes from the transcriptome analysis narrowed down the set of bacteroid morphotype-specific genes. Functional analysis of a selected subset of 31 bacteroid-induced or morphotype-specific genes revealed no symbiotic phenotypes in the mutants. This highlights the robustness of the symbiotic program but could also indicate that the bacterial response to the plant environment is partially anticipatory or even maladaptive. Our analysis confirms the correlation between differentiation and efficiency of the bacteroids and provides a framework for the identification of bacterial functions that affect the efficiency of bacteroids. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Society for Applied

  3. The lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide of Burkholderia plays a critical role in maintaining a proper gut symbiosis with the bean bug Riptortus pedestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Jang, Ho Am; Kim, Min Seon; Cho, Jae Hyun; Lee, Junbeom; Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Sturiale, Luisa; Silipo, Alba; Molinaro, Antonio; Lee, Bok Luel

    2017-11-24

    Lipopolysaccharide, the outer cell-wall component of Gram-negative bacteria, has been shown to be important for symbiotic associations. We recently reported that the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen of Burkholderia enhances the initial colonization of the midgut of the bean bug, Riptortus pedestris However, the midgut-colonizing Burkholderia symbionts lack the O-antigen but display the core oligosaccharide on the cell surface. In this study, we investigated the role of the core oligosaccharide, which directly interacts with the host midgut, in the Riptortus-Burkholderia symbiosis. To this end, we generated the core oligosaccharide mutant strains, Δ wabS , Δ wabO , Δ waaF, and Δ waaC, and determined the chemical structures of their oligosaccharides, which exhibited different compositions. The symbiotic properties of these mutant strains were compared with those of the wild-type and O-antigen-deficient Δ wbiG strains. Upon introduction into Riptortus via the oral route, the core oligosaccharide mutant strains exhibited different rates of colonization of the insect midgut. The symbiont titers in fifth-instar insects revealed significantly reduced population sizes of the inner core oligosaccharide mutant strains Δ waaF and Δ waaC These two strains also negatively affected host growth rate and fitness. Furthermore, R. pedestris individuals colonized with the Δ waaF and Δ waaC strains were vulnerable to septic bacterial challenge, similar to insects without a Burkholderia symbiont. Taken together, these results suggest that the core oligosaccharide from Burkholderia symbionts plays a critical role in maintaining a proper symbiont population and in supporting the beneficial effects of the symbiont on its host in the Riptortus-Burkholderia symbiosis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Selenium hyperaccumulation by Astragalus (Fabaceae) does not inhibit root nodule symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Elan R; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; Fakra, Sirine C; Paschke, Mark W

    2012-12-01

    A survey of the root-nodule symbiosis in Astragalus and its interaction with selenium (Se) has not been conducted before. Such studies can provide insight into how edaphic conditions modify symbiotic interactions and influence partner coevolution. In this paper plant-organ Se concentration ([Se]) was investigated to assess potential Se exposure to endophytes. • Selenium distribution and molecular speciation of root nodules from Se-hyperaccumulators Astragalus bisulcatus, A. praelongus, and A. racemosus was determined by Se K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. A series of greenhouse experiments were conducted to characterize the response of root-nodule symbiosis in Se-hyperaccumulators and nonhyperaccumulators. • Nodules in three Se-hyperaccumulators (Astragalus crotalariae, A. praelongus, and A. preussii) are reported for the first time. Leaves, flowers, and fruits from Se-hyperaccumulators were routinely above the hyperaccumulator threshold (1,000 µg Se g(-1) DW), but root samples rarely contained that amount, and nodules never exceeded 110 µg Se g(-1) DW. Nodules from A. bisulcatus, A. praelongus, and A. racemosus had Se throughout, with a majority stored in C-Se-C form. Finally, an evaluation of nodulation in Se-hyperaccumulators and nonhyperaccumulators indicated that there was no nodulation inhibition because of plant Se tolerance. Rather, we found that in Se-hyperaccumulators higher levels of Se treatment (up to 100 µM Se) corresponded with higher nodule counts, indicating a potential role for dinitrogen fixation in Se-hyperaccumulation. The effect was not found in nonhyperaccumulators. • As the evolution of Se hyperaccumulation in Astragalus developed, root-nodule symbiosis may have played an integral role.

  5. The plasma membrane proteome of Medicago truncatula roots as modified by arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, Achref; Recorbet, Ghislaine; Lemaître-Guillier, Christelle; Mounier, Arnaud; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Wipf, Daniel; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane

    2018-01-01

    In arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) roots, the plasma membrane (PM) of the host plant is involved in all developmental stages of the symbiotic interaction, from initial recognition to intracellular accommodation of intra-radical hyphae and arbuscules. Although the role of the PM as the agent for cellular morphogenesis and nutrient exchange is especially accentuated in endosymbiosis, very little is known regarding the PM protein composition of mycorrhizal roots. To obtain a global overview at the proteome level of the host PM proteins as modified by symbiosis, we performed a comparative protein profiling of PM fractions from Medicago truncatula roots either inoculated or not with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. PM proteins were isolated from root microsomes using an optimized discontinuous sucrose gradient; their subsequent analysis by liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (MS) identified 674 proteins. Cross-species sequence homology searches combined with MS-based quantification clearly confirmed enrichment in PM-associated proteins and depletion of major microsomal contaminants. Changes in protein amounts between the PM proteomes of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots were monitored further by spectral counting. This workflow identified a set of 82 mycorrhiza-responsive proteins that provided insights into the plant PM response to mycorrhizal symbiosis. Among them, the association of one third of the mycorrhiza-responsive proteins with detergent-resistant membranes pointed at partitioning to PM microdomains. The PM-associated proteins responsive to mycorrhization also supported host plant control of sugar uptake to limit fungal colonization, and lipid turnover events in the PM fraction of symbiotic roots. Because of the depletion upon symbiosis of proteins mediating the replacement of phospholipids by phosphorus-free lipids in the plasmalemma, we propose a role of phosphate nutrition in the PM composition of mycorrhizal roots.

  6. Metabolic complementarity and genomics of the dual bacterial symbiosis of sharpshooters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongying Wu

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutualistic intracellular symbiosis between bacteria and insects is a widespread phenomenon that has contributed to the global success of insects. The symbionts, by provisioning nutrients lacking from diets, allow various insects to occupy or dominate ecological niches that might otherwise be unavailable. One such insect is the glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca coagulata, which feeds on xylem fluid, a diet exceptionally poor in organic nutrients. Phylogenetic studies based on rRNA have shown two types of bacterial symbionts to be coevolving with sharpshooters: the gamma-proteobacterium Baumannia cicadellinicola and the Bacteroidetes species Sulcia muelleri. We report here the sequencing and analysis of the 686,192-base pair genome of B. cicadellinicola and approximately 150 kilobase pairs of the small genome of S. muelleri, both isolated from H. coagulata. Our study, which to our knowledge is the first genomic analysis of an obligate symbiosis involving multiple partners, suggests striking complementarity in the biosynthetic capabilities of the two symbionts: B. cicadellinicola devotes a substantial portion of its genome to the biosynthesis of vitamins and cofactors required by animals and lacks most amino acid biosynthetic pathways, whereas S. muelleri apparently produces most or all of the essential amino acids needed by its host. This finding, along with other results of our genome analysis, suggests the existence of metabolic codependency among the two unrelated endosymbionts and their insect host. This dual symbiosis provides a model case for studying correlated genome evolution and genome reduction involving multiple organisms in an intimate, obligate mutualistic relationship. In addition, our analysis provides insight for the first time into the differences in symbionts between insects (e.g., aphids that feed on phloem versus those like H. coagulata that feed on xylem. Finally, the genomes of these two symbionts provide potential

  7. Symbiosis induces widespread changes in the proteome of the model cnidarian Aiptasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Clinton A; Ameismeier, Michael F; Peng, Lifeng; Weis, Virginia M; Grossman, Arthur R; Davy, Simon K

    2016-07-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are metabolically founded on the mutualism between corals and photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. The glass anemone Aiptasia sp. has become a tractable model for this symbiosis, and recent advances in genetic information have enabled the use of mass spectrometry-based proteomics in this model. We utilized label-free liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry to analyze the effects of symbiosis on the proteomes of symbiotic and aposymbiotic Aiptasia. We identified and obtained relative quantification of more than 3,300 proteins in 1,578 protein clusters, with 81 protein clusters showing significantly different expression between symbiotic states. Symbiotic anemones showed significantly higher expression of proteins involved in lipid storage and transport, nitrogen transport and cycling, intracellular trafficking, endocytosis and inorganic carbon transport. These changes reflect shifts in host metabolism and nutrient reserves due to increased nutritional exchange with the symbionts, as well as mechanisms for supplying inorganic nutrients to the algae. Aposymbiotic anemones exhibited increased expression of multiple systems responsible for mediating reactive oxygen stress, suggesting that the host derives direct or indirect protection from oxidative stress while in symbiosis. Aposymbiotic anemones also increased their expression of an array of proteases and chitinases, indicating a metabolic shift from autotrophy to heterotrophy. These results provide a comprehensive Aiptasia proteome with more direct relative quantification of protein abundance than transcriptomic methods. The extension of "omics" techniques to this model system will allow more powerful studies of coral physiology, ecosystem function, and the effects of biotic and abiotic stress on the coral-dinoflagellate mutualism. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Metabolic Coevolution in the Bacterial Symbiosis of Whiteflies and Related Plant Sap-Feeding Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jun-Bo; Chen, Wenbo; Hasegawa, Daniel K; Simmons, Alvin M; Wintermantel, William M; Ling, Kai-Shu; Fei, Zhangjun; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Douglas, Angela E

    2015-09-15

    Genomic decay is a common feature of intracellular bacteria that have entered into symbiosis with plant sap-feeding insects. This study of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci and two bacteria (Portiera aleyrodidarum and Hamiltonella defensa) cohoused in each host cell investigated whether the decay of Portiera metabolism genes is complemented by host and Hamiltonella genes, and compared the metabolic traits of the whitefly symbiosis with other sap-feeding insects (aphids, psyllids, and mealybugs). Parallel genomic and transcriptomic analysis revealed that the host genome contributes multiple metabolic reactions that complement or duplicate Portiera function, and that Hamiltonella may contribute multiple cofactors and one essential amino acid, lysine. Homologs of the Bemisia metabolism genes of insect origin have also been implicated in essential amino acid synthesis in other sap-feeding insect hosts, indicative of parallel coevolution of shared metabolic pathways across multiple symbioses. Further metabolism genes coded in the Bemisia genome are of bacterial origin, but phylogenetically distinct from Portiera, Hamiltonella and horizontally transferred genes identified in other sap-feeding insects. Overall, 75% of the metabolism genes of bacterial origin are functionally unique to one symbiosis, indicating that the evolutionary history of metabolic integration in these symbioses is strongly contingent on the pattern of horizontally acquired genes. Our analysis, further, shows that bacteria with genomic decay enable host acquisition of complex metabolic pathways by multiple independent horizontal gene transfers from exogenous bacteria. Specifically, each horizontally acquired gene can function with other genes in the pathway coded by the symbiont, while facilitating the decay of the symbiont gene coding the same reaction. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. An antimicrobial peptide essential for bacterial survival in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsoo; Chen, Yuhui; Xi, Jiejun; Waters, Christopher; Chen, Rujin; Wang, Dong

    2015-12-08

    In the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia, the bacteria are engulfed by a plant cell membrane to become intracellular organelles. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, internalization and differentiation of Sinorhizobium (also known as Ensifer) meliloti is a prerequisite for nitrogen fixation. The host mechanisms that ensure the long-term survival of differentiating intracellular bacteria (bacteroids) in this unusual association are unclear. The M. truncatula defective nitrogen fixation4 (dnf4) mutant is unable to form a productive symbiosis, even though late symbiotic marker genes are expressed in mutant nodules. We discovered that in the dnf4 mutant, bacteroids can apparently differentiate, but they fail to persist within host cells in the process. We found that the DNF4 gene encodes NCR211, a member of the family of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides. The phenotype of dnf4 suggests that NCR211 acts to promote the intracellular survival of differentiating bacteroids. The greatest expression of DNF4 was observed in the nodule interzone II-III, where bacteroids undergo differentiation. A translational fusion of DNF4 with GFP localizes to the peribacteroid space, and synthetic NCR211 prevents free-living S. meliloti from forming colonies, in contrast to mock controls, suggesting that DNF4 may interact with bacteroids directly or indirectly for its function. Our findings indicate that a successful symbiosis requires host effectors that not only induce bacterial differentiation, but also that maintain intracellular bacteroids during the host-symbiont interaction. The discovery of NCR211 peptides that maintain bacterial survival inside host cells has important implications for improving legume crops.

  10. Achieving carbon emission reduction through industrial and urban symbiosis: A case of Kawasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Huijuan; Ohnishi, Satoshi; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Geng, Yong; Fujii, Minoru; Dong, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Industry and fossil fuel combustion are the main sources for urban carbon emissions. Most studies focus on energy consumption emission reduction and energy efficiency improvement. Material saving is also important for carbon emission reduction from a lifecycle perspective. IS (Industrial symbiosis) and U r S (urban symbiosis) have been effective since both of them encourage byproduct exchange. However, quantitative carbon emission reduction evaluation on applying them is still lacking. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to fill such a gap through a case study in Kawasaki Eco-town, Japan. A hybrid LCA model was employed to evaluate to the lifecycle carbon footprint. The results show that lifecycle carbon footprints with and without IS and U r S were 26.66 Mt CO 2 e and 30.92 Mt CO 2 e, respectively. The carbon emission efficiency was improved by 13.77% with the implementation of IS and U r S. The carbon emission reduction was mainly from “iron and steel” industry, cement industry and “paper making” industry, with figures of 2.76 Mt CO 2 e, 1.16 Mt CO 2 e and 0.34 Mt CO 2 e, respectively. Reuse of scrape steel, blast furnace slag and waste paper are all effective measures for promoting carbon emission reductions. Finally, policy implications on how to further promote IS and U r S are presented. - Highlights: • We evaluate carbon emission reduction of industrial and urban symbiosis (IS/U r S). • Hybrid LCA model was used to evaluate lifecycle carbon footprint. • Carbon emission efficiency was improved by 13.77% after applying IS/U r S. • The importance of U r S in responding carbon reduction was addressed in the paper

  11. Induced mutation in the improvement of beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, R.L.; Murty, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    A program on mutational rectification was undertaken in 1978 utilizing gamma radiation, as seed treatment for three local cultivars of compea, Vigna unguiculata plus one cultivar of mungbean, Vigna radiata. The selection criteria were compact plant type with determinate habit, early maturity, resistance to Macrophomina and high yield. The selected material now in M 7 generation, selection being made in M 2 for plant type. In subsequent generations selections were made for resistance to Macrophomina, stability of plant type, uniform pod filling, seed size, good nodulation, synchronous flowering and productivity under close spacing conditions. Simultaneous studies on root development were made at seedling stage. In mungbean, emphasis on non-shattering was made. Finally 12 mutants were selected in M 5 , with uniformity for the cited characters and higher yields than the parental material, ranging from 20 to 110% superior yield in some mutants and sowing dates. Multilocation trials are being conducted to test the wide adaptability of these mutants. Chemical mutagenesis using sodium azide with and without gamma radiation was also used. From these trials nonnodulating mutants were recovered. These materials are being multiplied to be used in basic studies of the Rhizobium - legume symbiosis. Ecophysiological studies of the promising mutants have been carried out under different sowing dates at 45 day intervals. These results are of wide interest in studies of tropical adaptation of grain legumes, on which very few reports are available so far. These results are discussed with particular reference to yield and its stability for the cropping system in Venezuela. (author)

  12. Design for Sustainability of Industrial Symbiosis based on Emergy and Multi-objective Particle Swarm Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Liang, Hanwei; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    approach for supporting decision-making in the design for the sustainability with the implementation of industrial symbiosis in chemical complex. Through incorporating the emergy theory, the model is formulated as a multi-objective approach that can optimize both the economic benefit and sustainable...... performance of the integrated industrial system. A set of emergy based evaluation index are designed. Multi-objective Particle Swarm Algorithm is proposed to solve the model, and the decision-makers are allowed to choose the suitable solutions form the Pareto solutions. An illustrative case has been studied...

  13. Mycorrhizal symbiosis increases growth, reproduction and recruitment of Abutilon theophrasti Medic. in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Margot R; Koide, Roger T; Shumway, Durland L

    1993-05-01

    We examined in the field the effect of the vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorhizal symbiosis on the reproductive success of Abutilon theophrasti Medic., an early successional annual member of the Malvaceae. Mycorrhizal infection greatly enhanced vegetative growth, and flower, fruit and seed production, resulting in significantly greater recruitment the following year. In addition, the seeds produced by mycorrhizal plants were significantly larger and contained significantly more phosphorus than seeds from non-mycorrhizal plants, an effect which may improve offspring vigor. Infection by mycorrhizal fungi may thus contribute to the overall fitness of a host plant and strongly influence long-term plant population dynamics.

  14. Ancient symbiosis confers desiccation resistance to stored grain pest beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engl, Tobias; Eberl, Nadia; Gorse, Carla; Krüger, Theresa; Schmidt, Thorsten H P; Plarre, Rudy; Adler, Cornel; Kaltenpoth, Martin

    2017-11-08

    Microbial symbionts of insects provide a range of ecological traits to their hosts that are beneficial in the context of biotic interactions. However, little is known about insect symbiont-mediated adaptation to the abiotic environment, for example, temperature and humidity. Here, we report on an ancient clade of intracellular, bacteriome-located Bacteroidetes symbionts that are associated with grain and wood pest beetles of the phylogenetically distant families Silvanidae and Bostrichidae. In the saw-toothed grain beetle Oryzaephilus surinamensis, we demonstrate that the symbionts affect cuticle thickness, melanization and hydrocarbon profile, enhancing desiccation resistance and thereby strongly improving fitness under dry conditions. Together with earlier observations on symbiont contributions to cuticle biosynthesis in weevils, our findings indicate that convergent acquisitions of bacterial mutualists represented key adaptations enabling diverse pest beetle groups to survive and proliferate under the low ambient humidity that characterizes dry grain storage facilities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Towards preventative eco-industrial development: an industrial and urban symbiosis case in one typical industrial city in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Liang; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Dai, Ming

    2016-01-01

    situation. In order to investigate the eco-benefits of eco-industrial development in China, this study focused on an industrial and urban symbiosis case of Guiyang city in which process synergy, municipal solid wastes recycling and waste energy utilization were incorporated in this typical industrial city...... policy implications to address the barriers of promoting industrial and urban symbiosis were proposed. This study is critical for future industrial and urban planning policy making and shed a light on innovative eco-industrial development in China....

  16. POLE somatic mutations in advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Joana; Pinto, Carla; Pinto, Diana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Silva, Romina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Veiga, Isabel; Santos, Catarina; Santos, Rui; Cabreira, Verónica; Lopes, Paula; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2017-12-01

    Despite all the knowledge already gathered, the picture of somatic genetic changes in colorectal tumorigenesis is far from complete. Recently, germline and somatic mutations in the exonuclease domain of polymerase epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) gene have been reported in a small subset of microsatellite-stable and hypermutated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), affecting the proofreading activity of the enzyme and leading to misincorporation of bases during DNA replication. To evaluate the role of POLE mutations in colorectal carcinogenesis, namely in advanced CRC, we searched for somatic mutations by Sanger sequencing in tumor DNA samples from 307 cases. Microsatellite instability and mutation analyses of a panel of oncogenes were performed in the tumors harboring POLE mutations. Three heterozygous mutations were found in two tumors, the c.857C>G, p.Pro286Arg, the c.901G>A, p.Asp301Asn, and the c.1376C>T, p.Ser459Phe. Of the POLE-mutated CRCs, one tumor was microsatellite-stable and the other had low microsatellite instability, whereas KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were found in one tumor each. We conclude that POLE somatic mutations exist but are rare in advanced CRC, with further larger studies being necessary to evaluate its biological and clinical implications. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Epilepsy caused by CDKL5 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrén, Maija; Gaily, Eija; Tengström, Carola; Lähdetie, Jaana; Archer, Hayley; Ala-Mello, Sirpa

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been identified in female patients with early onset epileptic encephalopathy and severe mental retardation with a Rett-like phenotype. Subsequently CDKL5 mutations were shown to be associated with more diverse phenotypes including mild epilepsy and autism without epilepsy. Furthermore, CDKL5 mutations were found in patients with Angelman-like phenotype. The severity of epilepsy associated with CDKL5 mutations was recently shown to correlate with the type of CDKL5 mutations and epilepsy was identified to involve three distinct sequential stages. Here, we describe the phenotype of a severe form of neurodevelopmental disease in a female patient with a de novo nonsense mutation of the CDKL5 gene c.175C > T (p.R59X) affecting the catalytic domain of CDKL5 protein. Mutations in the CDKL5 gene are less common in males and can be associated with a genomic deletion as found in our male patient with a deletion of 0.3 Mb at Xp22.13 including the CDKL5 gene. We review phenotypes associated with CDKL5 mutations and examine putative relationships between the clinical epilepsy phenotype and the type of the mutation in the CDKL5 gene. © 2010 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Symbiosis of Executive and Selective Attention in Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André eVandierendonck

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion of working memory was introduced to account for the usage of short-term memory resources by other cognitive tasks such as reasoning, mental arithmetic, language comprehension, and many others. This collaboration between memory and other cognitive tasks can only be achieved by a dedicated working memory system that controls task coordination. To that end, working memory models include executive control. Nevertheless, other attention control systems may be involved in coordination of memory and cognitive tasks calling on memory resources. The present paper briefly reviews the evidence concerning the role of selective attention in working memory activities. A model is proposed in which selective attention control is directly linked to the executive control part of the working memory system. The model assumes that apart from storage of declarative information, the system also includes an executive working memory module that represents the current task set. Control processes are automatically triggered when particular conditions in these modules are met.. As each task set represents the parameter settings and the actions needed to achieve the task goal, it will depend on the specific settings and actions whether selective attention control will have to be shared among the active tasks. Only when such sharing is required, task performance will be affected by the capacity limits of the control system involved.

  19. A mutation in the HLA-B*2705-restricted NP383-391 epitope affects the human influenza A virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.M. Berkhoff (Eufemia); A.C.M. Boon (Adrianus); N.J. Nieuwkoop; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); K. Sintnicolaas (Krijn); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractViruses can exploit a variety of strategies to evade immune surveillance by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), including the acquisition of mutations in or adjacent to CTL epitopes. Recently, an amino acid substitution (R384G) in an HLA-B*2705-restricted CTL epitope in the influenza A virus

  20. Functional significance of genetically different symbiotic algae Symbiodinium in a coral reef symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loram, J E; Trapido-Rosenthal, H G; Douglas, A E

    2007-11-01

    The giant sea anemone Condylactis gigantea associates with members of two clades of the dinoflagellate alga Symbiodinium, either singly or in mixed infection, as revealed by clade-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction of large subunit ribosomal DNA. To explore the functional significance of this molecular variation, the fate of photosynthetically fixed carbon was investigated by (14)C radiotracer experiments. Symbioses with algae of clades A and B released ca. 30-40% of fixed carbon to the animal tissues. Incorporation into the lipid fraction and the low molecular weight fraction dominated by amino acids was significantly higher in symbioses with algae of clade A than of clade B, suggesting that the genetically different algae in C. gigantea are not functionally equivalent. Symbioses with mixed infections yielded intermediate values, such that this functional trait of the symbiosis can be predicted from the traits of the contributing algae. Coral and sea anemone symbioses with Symbiodinium break down at elevated temperature, a process known as 'coral bleaching'. The functional response of the C. gigantea symbiosis to heat stress varied between the algae of clades A and B, with particularly depressed incorporation of photosynthetic carbon into lipid of the clade B algae, which are more susceptible to high temperature than the algae of clade A. This study provides a first exploration of how the core symbiotic function of photosynthate transfer to the host varies with the genotype of Symbiodinium, an algal symbiont which underpins corals and, hence, coral reef ecosystems.

  1. Design for sustainability of industrial symbiosis based on emergy and multi-objective particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Liang, Hanwei; Dong, Liang; Sun, Lu; Gao, Zhiqiu

    2016-08-15

    Industrial symbiosis provides novel and practical pathway to the design for the sustainability. Decision support tool for its verification is necessary for practitioners and policy makers, while to date, quantitative research is limited. The objective of this work is to present an innovative approach for supporting decision-making in the design for the sustainability with the implementation of industrial symbiosis in chemical complex. Through incorporating the emergy theory, the model is formulated as a multi-objective approach that can optimize both the economic benefit and sustainable performance of the integrated industrial system. A set of emergy based evaluation index are designed. Multi-objective Particle Swarm Algorithm is proposed to solve the model, and the decision-makers are allowed to choose the suitable solutions form the Pareto solutions. An illustrative case has been studied by the proposed method, a few of compromises between high profitability and high sustainability can be obtained for the decision-makers/stakeholders to make decision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Integrated metabolism in sponge-microbe symbiosis revealed by genome-centered metatranscriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Díez-Vives, Cristina; Batani, Giampiero; Esteves, Ana Is; Jahn, Martin T; Thomas, Torsten

    2017-07-01

    Despite an increased understanding of functions in sponge microbiomes, the interactions among the symbionts and between symbionts and host are not well characterized. Here we reconstructed the metabolic interactions within the sponge Cymbastela concentrica microbiome in the context of functional features of symbiotic diatoms and the host. Three genome bins (CcPhy, CcNi and CcThau) were recovered from metagenomic data of C. concentrica, belonging to the proteobacterial family Phyllobacteriaceae, the Nitrospira genus and the thaumarchaeal order Nitrosopumilales. Gene expression was estimated by mapping C. concentrica metatranscriptomic reads. Our analyses indicated that CcPhy is heterotrophic, while CcNi and CcThau are chemolithoautotrophs. CcPhy expressed many transporters for the acquisition of dissolved organic compounds, likely available through the sponge's filtration activity and symbiotic carbon fixation. Coupled nitrification by CcThau and CcNi was reconstructed, supported by the observed close proximity of the cells in fluorescence in situ hybridization. CcPhy facultative anaerobic respiration and assimilation by diatoms may consume the resulting nitrate. Transcriptional analysis of diatom and sponge functions indicated that these organisms are likely sources of organic compounds, for example, creatine/creatinine and dissolved organic carbon, for other members of the symbiosis. Our results suggest that organic nitrogen compounds, for example, creatine, creatinine, urea and cyanate, fuel the nitrogen cycle within the sponge. This study provides an unprecedented view of the metabolic interactions within sponge-microbe symbiosis, bridging the gap between cell- and community-level knowledge.

  3. REVIEW: Symbiosis between the Giant Clams (Bivalvia: Cardiidae and Zooxanthellae (Dinophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UDHI EKO HERNAWAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant clams are the largest bivalves in the world that maintain a mutual relationship with zooxanthellae. Individual giant clam can harbor heterogeneous zooxanthellae, at least four taxa in genus Symbiodinium. The Symbiodinium lives in the zooxanthellal tubular system, a tube structure arising from one of the diverticular duct of the clam’s stomach. Since the numbers of zooxanthellae is the one of some significant factors contributing to the clams growth and survival, the giant clams need to adjust the number of zooxanthellae for physiological reason with unclear mechanism. The important role of the symbiotic relationship to the clams can be seen on the survival, growth and nutrition of the clams. There are at least two significant factors determining the symbiosis, i.e. water temperature in related with level of light intensities and ammonium-phosphate rate. Some topic is still unclear, i.e. the determination of species in genus Symbiodinium, the mechanism for adjusting the population numbers of the algae and what kind of environmental factors determining the symbiosis. Thereby further research is still needed to clarify those missing.

  4. A Nostoc punctiforme sugar transporter necessary to establish a Cyanobacterium-plant symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Martin; Picossi, Silvia; Campbell, Elsie L; Meeks, John C; Flores, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    In cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium has low photosynthetic activity and is supplemented by sugars provided by the plant partner. Which sugars and cyanobacterial sugar uptake mechanism(s) are involved in the symbiosis, however, is unknown. Mutants of the symbiotically competent, facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme were constructed bearing a neomycin resistance gene cassette replacing genes in a putative sugar transport gene cluster. Results of transport activity assays using (14)C-labeled fructose and glucose and tests of heterotrophic growth with these sugars enabled the identification of an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter for fructose (Frt), a major facilitator permease for glucose (GlcP), and a porin needed for the optimal uptake of both fructose and glucose. Analysis of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in strains of N. punctiforme bearing frt::gfp fusions showed high expression in vegetative cells and akinetes, variable expression in hormogonia, and no expression in heterocysts. The symbiotic efficiency of N. punctiforme sugar transport mutants was investigated by testing their ability to infect a nonvascular plant partner, the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. Strains that were specifically unable to transport glucose did not infect the plant. These results imply a role for GlcP in establishing symbiosis under the conditions used in this work.

  5. Fungal symbiosis and precipitation alter traits and dune building by the ecosystem engineer, Ammophila breviligulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Sarah M; Bell-Dereske, Lukas; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2015-04-01

    Ecosystem engineer species influence their community and ecosystem by creating or altering the physical structure of habitats. The function of ecosystem engineers is variable and can depend on both abiotic and biotic factors. Here we make use of a primary successional system to evaluate the direct and interactive effects of climate change (precipitation) and fungal endophyte symbiosis on population traits and ecosystem function of the ecosystem engineering grass species, Ammophila breviligulata. We manipulated endophyte presence in A. breviligulata in combination with rain-out shelters and rainfall additions in a factorial field experiment established in 2010 on Lake Michigan sand dunes. We monitored plant traits, survival, growth, and sexual reproduction of A. breviligulata from 2010-2013, and quantified ecosystem engineering as the sand accumulation rate. Presence of the endophyte in A. breviligulata increased vegetative growth by up to 19%, and reduced sexual reproduction by up to 46% across all precipitation treatments. Precipitation was a less significant factor than endophyte colonization for A. breviligulata growth. Reduced precipitation increased average leaf number per tiller but had no other effects on plant traits. Changes in A. breviligulata traits corresponded to increases in sand accumulation in plots with the endophyte as well as in plots with reduced precipitation. Sand accumulation is a key ecosystem function in these primary successional habitats, and so microbial symbiosis in this ecosystem engineer could lead to direct effects on the value of these dune habitats for humans.

  6. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Modulates Antioxidant Response and Ion Distribution in Salt-Stressed Elaeagnus angustifolia Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Elaeagnus angustifolia L. is a drought-resistant species. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is considered to be a bio-ameliorator of saline soils that can improve salinity tolerance in plants. The present study investigated the effects of inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis on the biomass, antioxidant enzyme activities, and root, stem, and leaf ion accumulation of E. angustifolia seedlings grown during salt stress conditions. Salt-stressed mycorrhizal seedlings produced greater root, stem, and leaf biomass than the uninoculated stressed seedlings. In addition, the seedlings colonized by R. irregularis showed notably higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX in the leaves of the mycorrhizal seedlings in response to salinity compared to those of the non-mycorrhizal seedlings. Mycorrhizal seedlings not only significantly increased their ability to acquire K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, but also maintained higher K+:Na+ ratios in the leaves and lower Ca2+:Mg2+ ratios than non-mycorrhizal seedlings during salt stress. These results suggest that the salt tolerance of E. angustifolia seedlings could be enhanced by R. irregularis. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis could be a promising method to restore and utilize salt-alkaline land in northern China.

  7. Does plant immunity have a central role in the legume rhizobium symbiosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin eToth

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants are exposed to many different microbes in their habitat. These microbes may be benign or pathogenic, but in some cases they are beneficial. The rhizosphere provides an especially rich palette for colonization by beneficial (associative and symbiotic microorganisms, which raises the question as to how roots can distinguish such ‘friends’ from possible ‘foes’ (i.e., pathogens. Plants possess an innate immunity system that can recognize pathogens, through an arsenal of protein receptors. These receptors include receptor-like kinases (RLK and receptor-like proteins (RLP located at the plasma membrane, as well as intracellular receptors (so called NBS-LRR proteins or R proteins that recognize molecules released by microbes into the plant cell. The key rhizobial, symbiotic signaling molecule (called Nod factor is perceived by the host legume plant using LysM-domain containing RLKs. Perception of the symbiotic Nod factor triggers signaling cascades leading to bacterial infection and accommodation of the symbiont in a newly formed root organ, the nodule, resulting in a nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbiosis (RNS. The net result of this symbiosis is the intracellular colonization of the plant with thousands of bacteria; a process that seems to occur in spite of the immune ability of plants to prevent pathogen infection. In this review, we discuss the potential of the invading rhizobial symbiont to actively avoid this innate immunity response, as well as specific examples of where the plant immune response may modulate rhizobial infection and host range.

  8. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Modulates Antioxidant Response and Ion Distribution in Salt-Stressed Elaeagnus angustifolia Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei; Sui, Xin; Fan, Xiao-Xu; Jia, Ting-Ting; Song, Fu-Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Elaeagnus angustifolia L. is a drought-resistant species. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is considered to be a bio-ameliorator of saline soils that can improve salinity tolerance in plants. The present study investigated the effects of inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis on the biomass, antioxidant enzyme activities, and root, stem, and leaf ion accumulation of E. angustifolia seedlings grown during salt stress conditions. Salt-stressed mycorrhizal seedlings produced greater root, stem, and leaf biomass than the uninoculated stressed seedlings. In addition, the seedlings colonized by R. irregularis showed notably higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in the leaves of the mycorrhizal seedlings in response to salinity compared to those of the non-mycorrhizal seedlings. Mycorrhizal seedlings not only significantly increased their ability to acquire K + , Ca 2+ , and Mg 2+ , but also maintained higher K + :Na + ratios in the leaves and lower Ca 2+ :Mg 2+ ratios than non-mycorrhizal seedlings during salt stress. These results suggest that the salt tolerance of E. angustifolia seedlings could be enhanced by R. irregularis. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis could be a promising method to restore and utilize salt-alkaline land in northern China.

  9. Cleaning symbiosis as an evolutionary game: To cheat or not to cheat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin; Vickery

    1995-07-07

    Cleaning symbiosis is an apparently mutualistic relationship, occurring in diverse taxa, in which cleaners remove ectoparasites from the body of their clients. Here its evolution is explored with a simple game theory model in which both participants play against each other using either honest or cheating strategies. Honest clients pose for cleaners and have their ectoparasites removed, cheating clients eat the cleaners. Honest cleaners eat their clients' ectoparasites, cheating cleaners feed mainly on client tissues. The conditions that favour either strategy are obtained when the game is resolved: (i) the cost of being cleaned by a cheat and the proportion of cheats in the cleaner population determine the relative value of honesty in clients, and (ii) the advantages of being an honest cleaner depend on the relative fitness value of ectoparasites as food versus client tissues. A scenario for the origin of the cleaning symbiosis can also be derived from the model, in which the specialization of both participants need not be simultaneous. The model is based on the relationship between specialized cleaner fish and their client fish on coral reefs, but its conclusions are used in an examination of other cleaning associations. Copyright 1995 Academic Press Limited

  10. Symbiosis-Based Alternative Learning Multi-Swarm Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ben; Huang, Huali; Tan, Lijing; Duan, Qiqi

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the ideas from the mutual cooperation of symbiosis in natural ecosystem, this paper proposes a new variant of PSO, named Symbiosis-based Alternative Learning Multi-swarm Particle Swarm Optimization (SALMPSO). A learning probability to select one exemplar out of the center positions, the local best position, and the historical best position including the experience of internal and external multiple swarms, is used to keep the diversity of the population. Two different levels of social interaction within and between multiple swarms are proposed. In the search process, particles not only exchange social experience with others that are from their own sub-swarms, but also are influenced by the experience of particles from other fellow sub-swarms. According to the different exemplars and learning strategy, this model is instantiated as four variants of SALMPSO and a set of 15 test functions are conducted to compare with some variants of PSO including 10, 30 and 50 dimensions, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the alternative learning strategy in each SALMPSO version can exhibit better performance in terms of the convergence speed and optimal values on most multimodal functions in our simulation.

  11. Symbiosis theory-directed green synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their application in infected wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lu Wen,1 Pei Zeng,1 Liping Zhang,1 Wenli Huang,1 Hui Wang,2 Gang Chen1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, 2School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: In this study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs were synthesized for the first time using an antibacterial endophytic fungus of Chinese medicinal herb Orchidantha chinensis, which has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities. The AgNPs were analyzed by various characterization techniques to reveal their morphology, chemical composition, and stability. Also, the relationship between Chinese medicinal herbs, endophytic fungi, and the property of AgNPs was investigated for the first time. Interestingly, an experiment performed in this study revealed the proteins produced by the endophytic fungus to be capped on the nanoparticles, which led to an increase in the stability of spherical and polydispersed AgNPs with low aggregation for over 6 months. More importantly, further study demonstrated that the AgNPs possessed superior antibacterial activity and effectively promoted wound healing. Altogether, the biosynthesis of active AgNPs using the endophytic fungus from Chinese medicinal herb based on the symbiosis theory is simple, eco-friendly, and promising. Keywords: silver nanoparticles, Orchidantha chinensis, endophytic fungi, symbiosis theory, wound healing

  12. Intracellular Catalytic Domain of Symbiosis Receptor Kinase Hyperactivates Spontaneous Nodulation in Absence of Rhizobia1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sudip; Dutta, Ayan; Bhattacharya, Avisek; DasGupta, Maitrayee

    2014-01-01

    Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK), a member of the Nod factor signaling pathway, is indispensible for both nodule organogenesis and intracellular colonization of symbionts in rhizobia-legume symbiosis. Here, we show that the intracellular kinase domain of a SYMRK (SYMRK-kd) but not its inactive or full-length version leads to hyperactivation of the nodule organogenic program in Medicago truncatula TR25 (symrk knockout mutant) in the absence of rhizobia. Spontaneous nodulation in TR25/SYMRK-kd was 6-fold higher than rhizobia-induced nodulation in TR25/SYMRK roots. The merged clusters of spontaneous nodules indicated that TR25 roots in the presence of SYMRK-kd have overcome the control over both nodule numbers and their spatial position. In the presence of rhizobia, SYMRK-kd could rescue the epidermal infection processes in TR25, but colonization of symbionts in the nodule interior was significantly compromised. In summary, ligand-independent deregulated activation of SYMRK hyperactivates nodule organogenesis in the absence of rhizobia, but its ectodomain is required for proper symbiont colonization. PMID:25304318

  13. A Transient Exposure to Symbiosis-Competent Bacteria Induces Light Organ Morphogenesis in the Host Squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doino, J A; McFall-Ngai, M J

    1995-12-01

    Recent studies of the symbiotic association between the Hawaiian sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes and the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri have shown that colonization of juvenile squid with symbiosis-competent bacteria induces morphogenetic changes of the light organ. These changes occur over a 4-day period and include cell death and tissue regression of the external ciliated epithelium. In the absence of bacterial colonization, morphogenesis does not occur. To determine whether the bacteria must be present throughout the morphogenetic process, we used the antibiotic chloramphenicol to clear the light organ of bacteria at various times during the initial colonization. We provide evidence in this study that a transient, 12-hour exposure to symbiosis-competent bacteria is necessary and sufficient to induce tissue regression in the light organ over the next several days. Further, we show that successful entrance into the light organ is necessary to induce morphogenesis, suggesting that induction results from bacterial interaction with internal crypt cells and not with the external ciliated epithelium. Finally, no difference in development was observed when the light organ was colonized by a mutant strain of V. fischeri that did not produce autoinducer, a potential light organ morphogen.

  14. The genome of Aiptasia, a sea anemone model for coral symbiosis

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgarten, Sebastian

    2015-08-31

    The most diverse marine ecosystems, coral reefs, depend upon a functional symbiosis between a cnidarian animal host (the coral) and intracellular photosynthetic dinoflagellate algae. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this endosymbiosis are not well understood, in part because of the difficulties of experimental work with corals. The small sea anemone Aiptasia provides a tractable laboratory model for investigating these mechanisms. Here we report on the assembly and analysis of the Aiptasia genome, which will provide a foundation for future studies and has revealed several features that may be key to understanding the evolution and function of the endosymbiosis. These features include genomic rearrangements and taxonomically restricted genes that may be functionally related to the symbiosis, aspects of host dependence on alga-derived nutrients, a novel and expanded cnidarian-specific family of putative pattern-recognition receptors that might be involved in the animal–algal interactions, and extensive lineage-specific horizontal gene transfer. Extensive integration of genes of prokaryotic origin, including genes for antimicrobial peptides, presumably reflects an intimate association of the animal–algal pair also with its prokaryotic microbiome.

  15. Experimental evidence of a symbiosis between red-cockaded woodpeckers and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusino, Michelle A; Lindner, Daniel L; Banik, Mark T; Rose, Kevin R; Walters, Jeffrey R

    2016-03-30

    Primary cavity excavators, such as woodpeckers, are ecosystem engineers in many systems. Associations between cavity excavators and fungi have long been hypothesized to facilitate cavity excavation, but these relationships have not been experimentally verified. Fungi may help excavators by softening wood, while excavators may facilitate fungal dispersal. Here we demonstrate that excavators facilitate fungal dispersal and thus we report the first experimental evidence of a symbiosis between fungi and a cavity excavator, the red-cockaded woodpecker (RCW,Picoides borealis). Swab samples of birds showed that RCWs carry fungal communities similar to those found in their completed excavations. A 26-month field experiment using human-made aseptically drilled excavations in live trees, half of which were inaccessible to RCWs, demonstrated that RCWs directly alter fungal colonization and community composition. Experimental excavations that were accessible to RCWs contained fungal communities similar to natural RCW excavations, whereas inaccessible experimental excavations contained significantly different fungal communities. Our work demonstrates a complex symbiosis between cavity excavators and communities of fungi, with implications for forest ecology, wildlife management, and conservation. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. The Role of Plant Innate Immunity in the Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yangrong; Halane, Morgan K; Gassmann, Walter; Stacey, Gary

    2017-04-28

    A classic view of the evolution of mutualism is that it derives from a pathogenic relationship that attenuated over time to a situation in which both partners can benefit. If this is the case for rhizobia, then one might uncover features of the symbiosis that reflect this earlier pathogenic state. For example, as with plant pathogens, it is now generally assumed that rhizobia actively suppress the host immune response to allow infection and symbiosis establishment. Likewise, the host has retained mechanisms to control the nutrient supply to the symbionts and the number of nodules so that they do not become too burdensome. The open question is whether such events are strictly ancillary to the central symbiotic nodulation factor signaling pathway or are essential for rhizobial host infection. Subsequent to these early infection events, plant immune responses can also be induced inside nodules and likely play a role in, for example, nodule senescence. Thus, a balanced regulation of innate immunity is likely required throughout rhizobial infection, symbiotic establishment, and maintenance. In this review, we discuss the significance of plant immune responses in the regulation of symbiotic associations with rhizobia, as well as rhizobial evasion of the host immune system.

  17. Medicago sativa--Sinorhizobium meliloti Symbiosis Promotes the Bioaccumulation of Zinc in Nodulated Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zribi, Kais; Nouairi, Issam; Slama, Ines; Talbi-Zribi, Ons; Mhadhbi, Haythem

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated effects of Zn supply on germination, growth, inorganic solutes (Zn, Ca, Fe, and Mg) partitioning and nodulation of Medicago sativa This plant was cultivated with and without Zn (2 mM). Treatments were plants without (control) and with Zn tolerant strain (S532), Zn intolerant strain (S112) and 2 mM urea nitrogen fertilisation. Results showed that M. sativa germinates at rates of 50% at 2 mM Zn. For plants given nitrogen fertilisation, Zn increased plant biomass production. When grown with symbionts, Zn supply had no effect on nodulation. Moreover, plants with S112 showed a decrease of shoot and roots biomasses. However, in symbiosis with S532, an increase of roots biomass was observed. Plants in symbiosis with S. meliloti accumulated more Zn in their roots than nitrogen fertilised plants. Zn supply results in an increase of Ca concentration in roots of fertilised nitrogen plants. However, under Zn supply, Fe concentration decreased in roots and increased in nodules of plants with S112. Zn supply showed contrasting effects on Mg concentrations for plants with nitrogen fertilisation (increase) and plants with S112 (decrease). The capacity of M. sativa to accumulate Zn in their nodulated roots encouraged its use in phytostabilisation processes.

  18. Sea turtle symbiosis facilitates social monogamy in oceanic crabs via refuge size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Joseph B; Gil, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    The capacity for resource monopolization by individuals often dictates the size and composition of animal groups, and ultimately, the adoption of mating strategies. For refuge-dwelling animals, the ability (or inability) of individuals to monopolize refuges should depend on the relative size of the refuge. In theory, groups should be larger and more inclusive when refuges are large, and smaller and more exclusive when refuges are small, regardless of refuge type. We test this prediction by comparing the size and composition of groups of oceanic crabs (Planes minutus) living on plastic flotsam and loggerhead sea turtles. We found that (i) surface area of refuges (barnacle colonies on flotsam and supracaudal space on turtles) is a better predictor of crab number than total surface area and (ii) flotsam and turtles with similar refuge surface area host a similar number (1-2) and composition (adult male-female pairs) of crabs. These results indicate that group size and composition of refuge-dwelling animals are modulated by refuge size and the capacity for refuge monopolization. Moreover, these results suggest that sea turtle symbiosis facilitates social monogamy in oceanic crabs, providing insights into how symbiosis can promote specific mating strategies. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Expression of phenazine biosynthetic genes during the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis of Glomus intraradices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionicia Gloria León-Martínez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To explore the molecular mechanisms that prevail during the establishment of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis involving the genus Glomus, we transcriptionally analysed spores of Glomus intraradices BE3 during early hyphal growth. Among 458 transcripts initially identified as being expressed at presymbiotic stages, 20% of sequences had homology to previously characterized eukaryotic genes, 30% were homologous to fungal coding sequences, and 9% showed homology to previously characterized bacterial genes. Among them, GintPbr1a encodes a homolog to Phenazine Biosynthesis Regulator (Pbr of Burkholderia cenocepacia, an pleiotropic regulatory protein that activates phenazine production through transcriptional activation of the protein D isochorismatase biosynthetic enzyme phzD (Ramos et al., 2010. Whereas GintPbr1a is expressed during the presymbiotic phase, the G. intraradices BE3 homolog of phzD (BGintphzD is transcriptionally active at the time of the establishment of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. DNA from isolated bacterial cultures found in spores of G. intraradices BE3 confirmed that both BGintPbr1a and BGintphzD are present in the genome of its potential endosymbionts. Taken together, our results indicate that spores of G. intraradices BE3 express bacterial phenazine biosynthetic genes at the onset of the fungal-plant symbiotic interaction.

  20. Seletion of arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal fungi for efficient symbiosis with Acacia mangium willd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Augusto Robles Angelini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acacia mangium forms two kinds of mycorrhizal symbiosis, a arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMFs type and another with ectomycorrhizal fungi (fECTOs. The present study aimed to select different AMFs species and fECTOs isolates for effective symbiosis with A. mangium, which provide seedlings well colonized, nodulated and developed. Experiments were conducted in a greenhouse at Embrapa Agrobiology, one for AMF species selection and another for fECTOs, using a randomized block design with five replicates. Treatments were species AMFs (Acaulospora laevis, Acaulospora morrowiae, Entrophospora colombiana, Entrophospora contigua, Gigaspora margarita, Glomus clarum, Scutellospora calospora, Scutellospora heterogama, Scutellospora gilmorei and Scutellospora pellucida or fECTOs isolated (UFSC Pt116; UFSC Pt24; UFSC Pt193; O 64–ITA6; UFSC Pt187 and O 40–ORS 7870. The AMFs species that promoted greater vegetative growth, mycorrhizal colonization and more effective symbioses were S. calospora, S. heterogama, S. gilmorei e A. morrowiae. The fECTOs not demonstrated effectiveness in promoting growth, but the isolate O64-ITA6 (Pisolithus tinctorius provided greater colonization. Seedlings of A. mangium have high responsiveness to inoculation with AMFs and depends on high root colonization, between 40 and 80%, to obtain relevant benefits from symbiose over nodule formation and growth.

  1. An integrated functional approach to dissect systemic responses in maize to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Nina; Schmitz, Jessica; Polatajko, Aleksandra; Schlüter, Urte; Fahnenstich, Holger; Witt, Sandra; Fernie, Alisdair R; Uroic, Kalle; Scholz, Uwe; Sonnewald, Uwe; Bucher, Marcel

    2015-08-01

    Most terrestrial plants benefit from the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) mainly under nutrient-limited conditions. Here the crop plant Zea mays was grown with and without AMF in a bi-compartmented system separating plant and phosphate (Pi) source by a hyphae-permeable membrane. Thus, Pi was preferentially taken up via the mycorrhizal Pi uptake pathway while other nutrients were ubiquitously available. To study systemic effects of mycorrhizal Pi uptake on leaf status, leaves of these plants that display an increased biomass in the presence of AMF were subjected to simultaneous ionomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses. We observed robust changes of the leaf elemental composition, that is, increase of P, S and Zn and decrease of Mn, Co and Li concentration in mycorrhizal plants. Although changes in anthocyanin and lipid metabolism point to an improved P status, a global increase in C versus N metabolism highlights the redistribution of metabolic pools including carbohydrates and amino acids. Strikingly, an induction of systemic defence gene expression and concomitant accumulation of secondary metabolites such as the terpenoids alpha- and beta-amyrin suggest priming of mycorrhizal maize leaves as a mycorrhiza-specific response. This work emphasizes the importance of AM symbiosis for the physiological status of plant leaves and could lead to strategies for optimized breeding of crop species with high growth potential. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Knowing your friends and foes--plant receptor-like kinases as initiators of symbiosis or defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Petutsching, Elena Kristin; Ried, Martina Katharina; Lipka, Volker; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Robatzek, Silke; Parniske, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The decision between defence and symbiosis signalling in plants involves alternative and modular plasma membrane-localized receptor complexes. A critical step in their activation is ligand-induced homo- or hetero-oligomerization of leucine-rich repeat (LRR)- and/or lysin motif (LysM) receptor-like kinases (RLKs). In defence signalling, receptor complexes form upon binding of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), including the bacterial flagellin-derived peptide flg22, or chitin. Similar mechanisms are likely to operate during the perception of microbial symbiont-derived (lipo)-chitooligosaccharides. The structurally related chitin-oligomer ligands chitooctaose and chitotetraose trigger defence and symbiosis signalling, respectively, and their discrimination involves closely related, if not identical, LysM-RLKs. This illustrates the demand for and the challenges imposed on decision mechanisms that ensure appropriate signal initiation. Appropriate signalling critically depends on abundance and localization of RLKs at the cell surface. This is regulated by internalization, which also provides a mechanism for the removal of activated signalling RLKs. Abundance of the malectin-like domain (MLD)-LRR-RLK Symbiosis Receptor-like Kinase (SYMRK) is additionally controlled by cleavage of its modular ectodomain, which generates a truncated and rapidly degraded RLK fragment. This review explores LRR- and LysM-mediated signalling, the involvement of MLD-LRR-RLKs in symbiosis and defence, and the role of endocytosis in RLK function. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Non-nodulated bacterial leaf symbiosis promotes the evolutionary success of its host plants in the coffee family (Rubiaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verstraete, Brecht; Janssens, Steven; Rønsted, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Every plant species on Earth interacts in some way or another with microorganisms and it is well known that certain forms of symbiosis between different organisms can drive evolution. Within some clades of Rubiaceae (coffee family), a specific plant-bacteria interaction exists in which non...

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of night warming on physiological traits of Medicago truncatula L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yajun; Wu, Songlin; Sun, Yuqing; Li, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Caiyan; Lin, Ge; Chen, Baodong

    2015-02-01

    Elevated night temperature, one of the main climate warming scenarios, can have profound effects on plant growth and metabolism. However, little attention has been paid to the potential role of mycorrhizal associations in plant responses to night warming, although it is well known that symbiotic fungi can protect host plants against various environmental stresses. In the present study, physiological traits of Medicago truncatula L. in association with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis were investigated under simulated night warming. A constant increase in night temperature of 1.53 °C significantly reduced plant shoot and root biomass, flower and seed number, leaf sugar concentration, and shoot Zn and root P concentrations. However, the AM association essentially mitigated these negative effects of night warming by improving plant growth, especially through increased root biomass, root to shoot ratio, and shoot Zn and root P concentrations. A significant interaction was observed between R. irregularis inoculation and night warming in influencing both root sucrose concentration and expression of sucrose synthase (SusS) genes, suggesting that AM symbiosis and increased night temperature jointly regulated plant sugar metabolism. Night warming stimulated AM fungal colonization but did not influence arbuscule abundance, symbiosis-related plant or fungal gene expression, or growth of extraradical mycelium, indicating little effect of night warming on the development or functioning of AM symbiosis. These findings highlight the importance of mycorrhizal symbiosis in assisting plant resilience to climate warming.

  5. Menthol-induced bleaching rapidly and effectively provides experimental aposymbiotic sea anemones (Aiptasia sp.) for symbiosis investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Jennifer L; Sproles, Ashley E; Oakley, Clinton A; Grossman, Arthur R; Weis, Virginia M; Davy, Simon K

    2016-02-01

    Experimental manipulation of the symbiosis between cnidarians and photosynthetic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp.) is crucial to advancing the understanding of the cellular mechanisms involved in host-symbiont interactions, and overall coral reef ecology. The anemone Aiptasia sp. is a model for cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, and notably it can be rendered aposymbiotic (i.e. dinoflagellate-free) and re-infected with a range of Symbiodinium types. Various methods exist for generating aposymbiotic hosts; however, they can be hugely time consuming and not wholly effective. Here, we optimise a method using menthol for production of aposymbiotic Aiptasia. The menthol treatment produced aposymbiotic hosts within just 4 weeks (97-100% symbiont loss), and the condition was maintained long after treatment when anemones were held under a standard light:dark cycle. The ability of Aiptasia to form a stable symbiosis appeared to be unaffected by menthol exposure, as demonstrated by successful re-establishment of the symbiosis when anemones were experimentally re-infected. Furthermore, there was no significant impact on photosynthetic or respiratory performance of re-infected anemones. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Induced mutations - a tool in plant research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings include 34 papers and 18 brief descriptions of poster presentations in the following areas as they are affected by induced mutations: advancement of genetics, plant evolution, plant physiology, plant parasites, plant symbioses, in vitro culture, gene ecology and plant breeding. Only a relatively small number of papers are of direct nuclear interest essentially in view of the mutations being induced by ionizing radiations. The papers of nuclear interest have been entered as separate and individual items of input

  7. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in human tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    LI, HUI; HONG, ZE-HUI

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria play significant roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation and apoptosis. The dysfunction of mitochondria is correlated with the origin and progression of tumors; thus, mutations in the mitochondrial genome that affect mitochondrial function may be one of the causal factors of tumorigenesis. Although the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in carcinogenesis has been investigated extensively by various approaches, the conclusions remain controversial to ...

  8. Factor V Leiden mutation in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susan Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Normal maternal adaptation to pregnancy significantly increases the risk for thrombus formation. Inherited thrombophilias further increase risk for deep venous thrombosis and adverse outcome in pregnancy. Factor V Leiden mutation is the most common inherited thrombophilia, occurring in approximately 5% of the White and 1% of the Black populations. Nurses should be knowledgeable about screening for and diagnosis of factor V Leiden mutation, risk reduction counseling, recommended care of the affected patient, and implications of anticoagulant therapy during the perinatal period.

  9. Comparative functional analysis of two fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) mutations affecting the same residue (R254W and R254Q) in isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koika, Vasiliki; Varnavas, Petros; Valavani, Helen; Sidis, Yisrael; Plummer, Lacey; Dwyer, Andrew; Quinton, Richard; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christine; Pitteloud, Nelly; Sertedaki, Amalia; Dacou-Voutetakis, Catherine; Georgopoulos, Neoklis A

    2013-03-01

    FGFR1 mutations have been identified in both Kallmann syndrome and normosmic HH (nIHH). To date, few mutations in the FGFR1 gene have been structurally or functionally characterized in vitro to identify molecular mechanisms that contribute to the disease pathogenesis. We attempted to define the in vitro functionality of two FGFR1 mutants (R254W and R254Q), resulting from two different amino acid substitutions of the same residue, and to correlate the in vitro findings to the patient phenotypes. Two unrelated GnRH deficient probands were found to harbor mutations in FGFR1 (R254W and R254Q). Mutant signaling activity and expression levels were evaluated in vitro and compared to a wild type (WT) receptor. Signaling activity was determined by a FGF2/FGFR1 dependent transcription reporter assay. Receptor total expression levels were assessed by Western blot and cell surface expression was measured by a radiolabeled antibody binding assay. The R254W maximal receptor signaling capacity was reduced by 45% (p<0.01) while R254Q activity was not different from WT. However, both mutants displayed diminished total protein expression levels (40 and 30% reduction relative to WT, respectively), while protein maturation was unaffected. Accordingly, cell surface expression levels of the mutant receptors were also significantly reduced (35% p<0.01 and 15% p<0.05, respectively). The p.R254W and p.R254Q are both loss-of-function mutations as demonstrated by their reduced overall and cell surface expression levels suggesting a deleterious effect on receptor folding and stability. It appears that a tryptophan substitution at R254 is more disruptive to receptor structure than the more conserved glutamine substitution. No clear correlation between the severity of in vitro loss-of-function and phenotypic presentation could be assigned. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of a symbiosis-specific gene in Symbiodinium type A1 associated with coral, nudibranch and giant clam larvae

    KAUST Repository

    Mies, M.

    2017-05-24

    Symbiodinium are responsible for the majority of primary production in coral reefs and found in a mutualistic symbiosis with multiple animal phyla. However, little is known about the molecular signals involved in the establishment of this symbiosis and whether it initiates during host larval development. To address this question, we monitored the expression of a putative symbiosis-specific gene (H+-ATPase) in Symbiodinium A1 ex hospite and in association with larvae of a scleractinian coral (Mussismilia hispida), a nudibranch (Berghia stephanieae) and a giant clam (Tridacna crocea). We acquired broodstock for each host, induced spawning and cultured the larvae. Symbiodinium cells were offered and larval samples taken for each host during the first 72 h after symbiont addition. In addition, control samples including free-living Symbiodinium and broodstock tissue containing symbionts for each host were collected. RNA extraction and RT-PCR were performed and amplified products cloned and sequenced. Our results show that H+-ATPase was expressed in Symbiodinium associated with coral and giant clam larvae, but not with nudibranch larvae, which digested the symbionts. Broodstock tissue for coral and giant clam also expressed H+-ATPase, but not the nudibranch tissue sample. Our results of the expression of H+-ATPase as a marker gene suggest that symbiosis between Symbiodinium and M. hispida and T. crocea is established during host larval development. Conversely, in the case of B. stephanieae larvae, evidence does not support a mutualistic relationship. Our study supports the utilization of H+-ATPase expression as a marker for assessing Symbiodinium-invertebrate relationships with applications for the differentiation of symbiotic and non-symbiotic associations. At the same time, insights from a single marker gene approach are limited and future studies should direct the identification of additional symbiosis-specific genes, ideally from both symbiont and host.

  11. Perturabation of nodular operation under salt and water deficit stress in rhizobium common bean symbiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harzalli Jebara, Salwa

    2006-01-01

    This work aims at the search for markers of tolerance to the osmotic stress and nodular efficiency of symbiosis Haricot Rhizobium. Thus, after having fixed the best period of hydroponic culture, we showed that a severe salt treatment generated an inhibition of the parameters of growth and nodulation. These inhibitions are accompanied by an inhibition of the enzymatic activities: ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT), but an activation of peroxidase (POX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), suggesting that these two antioxydants can be biochemical markers of the tolerance to salinity. To check the validity