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Sample records for mutated human androgen

  1. Mutated human androgen receptor gene detected in a prostatic cancer patient is also activated by estradiol

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    Elo, J.P.; Kvist, L.; Leinonen, K.; Isomaa, V. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Androgens are necessary for the development of prostatic cancer. The mechanisms by which the originally androgen-dependent prostatic cancer cells are relieved of the requirement to use androgen for their growth are largely unknown. The human prostatic cancer cell line LNCaP has been shown to contain a point mutation in the human androgen receptor gene (hAR), suggesting that changes in the hAR may contribute to the abnormal hormone response of prostatic cells. To search for point mutations in the hAR, we used single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and a polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing method to screen 23 prostatic cancer specimens from untreated patients, 6 prostatic cancer specimens from treated patients, and 11 benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens. One mutation was identified in DNA isolated from prostatic cancer tissue, and the mutation was also detected in the leukocyte DNA of the patient and his offspring. The mutation changed codon 726 in exon E from arginine to leucine and was a germ line mutation. The mutation we found in exon E of the hAR gene does not alter the ligand binding specificity of the AR, but the mutated receptor was activated by estradiol to a significantly greater extent than the wild-type receptor. The AR gene mutation described in this study might be one explanation for the altered biological activity of prostatic cancer. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Functional characterisation of a natural androgen receptor missense mutation (N771H) causing human androgen insensitivity syndrome.

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    Cai, J; Cai, L-Q; Hong, Y; Zhu, Y-S

    2012-05-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked disorder due to mutations of androgen receptor (AR) gene. Various AR mutations have been identified, and the characterisation of these mutations greatly facilitates our understanding of AR structure-function. In this study, we have analysed an AR missense mutation (N771H) identified in patients with AIS. Functional analysis of the mutant AR was performed by in vitro mutagenesis-cotransfection assays. Compared to the wild-type AR, the dose-response curve of dihydrotestosterone-induced transactivation activity in the mutant AR was greatly shifted to the right and significantly decreased. However, the maximal efficacy of transactivation activity in the mutant AR was similar to that of the wild type. Receptor binding assay indicated that the mutant AR had an approximately 2.5-fold lower binding affinity to dihydrotestosterone compared to the wild type. Western blot analysis showed that the size and the expression level of mutant AR in transfected cells were comparable to the wild type. These data underscore the importance of asparagine at amino acid position 771 of human AR in normal ligand binding and normal receptor function, and a mutation at this position results in androgen insensitivity in affected subjects.

  3. The impact of point mutations in the human androgen receptor: classification of mutations on the basis of transcriptional activity.

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    Colin W Hay

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor mediated signaling drives prostate cancer cell growth and survival. Mutations within the receptor occur infrequently in prostate cancer prior to hormonal therapy but become prevalent in incurable androgen independent and metastatic tumors. Despite the determining role played by the androgen receptor in all stages of prostate cancer progression, there is a conspicuous dearth of comparable data on the consequences of mutations. In order to remedy this omission, we have combined an expansive study of forty five mutations which are predominantly associated with high Gleason scores and metastatic tumors, and span the entire length of the receptor, with a literature review of the mutations under investigation. We report the discovery of a novel prevalent class of androgen receptor mutation that possesses loss of function at low levels of androgen yet transforms to a gain of function at physiological levels. Importantly, mutations introducing constitutive gain of function are uncommon, with the majority of mutations leading to either loss of function or no significant change from wild-type activity. Therefore, the widely accepted supposition that androgen receptor mutations in prostate cancer result in gain of function is appealing, but mistaken. In addition, the transcriptional outcome of some mutations is dependent upon the androgen receptor responsive element. We discuss the consequences of these findings and the role of androgen receptor mutations for prostate cancer progression and current treatment options.

  4. Androgen receptor mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.W. Jenster (Guido); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); J.A.G.M. van der Korput (J. A G M); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMale sexual differentiation and development proceed under direct control of androgens. Androgen action is mediated by the intracellular androgen receptor, which belongs to the superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors. At least three pathological situations are associated wit

  5. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism.

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    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents.

  6. Humanizing the Mouse Androgen Receptor to Study Polymorphisms and Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    generation of these lines, for testis, liver and kidney 6 RNA. Now that the lines have been backcrossed several additional generations to the C57BL/6...tract morphology when compared to wildtype littermates, and no significant differences were seen by microarray analysis of testis and kidney RNA...polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene modulates body fat mass and serum concentrations of leptin and insulin in men. Diabetologia 46:31-9 22

  7. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

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    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  8. Sequence of the intron/exon junctions of the coding region of the human androgen receptor gene and identification of a point mutation in a family with complete androgen insensitivity

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    Lubahn, D.B.; Simental, J.A.; Higgs, H.N.; Wilson, E.M.; French, F.S. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA)); Brown, T.R.; Migeon, C.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Androgens act through a receptor protein (AR) to mediate sex differentiation and development of the male phenotype. The authors have isolated the eight exons in the amino acid coding region of the AR gene from a human X chromosome library. Nucleotide sequences of the AR gene intron/exon boundaries were determined for use in designing synthetic oligonucleotide primers to bracket coding exons for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic DNA was amplified from 46, XY phenotypic female siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. AR binding affinity for dihydrotestosterone in the affected siblings was lower than in normal males, but the binding capacity was normal. Sequence analysis of amplified exons demonstrated within the AR steroid-binding domain (exon G) a single guanine to adenine mutation, resulting in replacement of valine with methionine at amino acid residue 866. As expected, the carrier mother had both normal and mutant AR genes. Thus, a single point mutation in the steroid-binding domain of the AR gene correlated with the expression of an AR protein ineffective in stimulating male sexual development.

  9. Analysis of Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations in female with infertility

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    Soyar Sari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background : Infertility is a multifactorial disease. Hormonal disorders and genetic factors are important in female infertility. Development and maturation of ovulation are depending on the molecular signaling pathways in response to androgens. Over hundreds of mutations leading to resistance gene function in androgen receptor (AR has been recorded. One of them is polymorphic region 5'UTR. Thus regarding to the role of androgen receptor in infertility, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between gene mutations AR and infertility in Iranian women Materials and Methods: In this study of 50 infertile women and 80 healthy women as a control, blood samples were taken. After extraction of DNA, PCR method was used to determine the AR gene mutations. Results: In the present study in '5UTR area at position +25 androgen receptor gene a T nucleotide deletion was observed. , therefore single nucleotide mutations did not change in the androgen receptor gene expression, so indicates the lack of communication between the AR gene mutations in the promoter region of 23 to 214+ in women with infertility. According to the results of this study are significant differences between the two groups of patients and healthy women was not found (P=0.5. Conclusion: Results indicated no correlation between mutations in the promoter region of 23 to 214+ AR genes in the population studied women with infertility

  10. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

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    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  11. Androgen receptor gene mutations in hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

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    Wallén, M J; Linja, M; Kaartinen, K; Schleutker, J; Visakorpi, T

    1999-12-01

    Prostate cancer is considered to be one of the most hormone-dependent human malignancies. As a key mediator of hormonal response, the androgen receptor (AR) is believed to have an important role in the progression of prostate cancer. Mutations in the coding region of the AR gene have been found in both untreated and hormone-refractory prostate cancer, but the frequency of such mutations at different stages of the disease is poorly documented and even contradictory results have been published. In the present study, the frequency of AR gene mutations was determined in 30 locally recurrent and two metastatic hormone-refractory prostate tumours using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), non-radioactive single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), and sequencing. The length of the polymorphic CAG repeat, which is inversely correlated with the ability of the AR to activate transcription, was also analysed as well as the GGC repeat. Twelve samples were known to contain an AR gene amplification. Altogether, one point mutation (Gly(674)-->Ala) and one microsatellite mutation (CAG(20)-->CAG(18)) were found, both in cancers containing the AR gene amplification. The mean lengths of the polymorphic CAG and GGC repeats were similar to those observed in the normal population. These results favour the view that mutations in the AR gene are rare in hormone-refractory prostate cancer and do not play an important role, at least, in local relapse. Instead, the amplification and consequent overexpression of the wild-type AR gene seem to be the most common alteration involving the AR in hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

  12. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

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    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  13. Functional analysis of a novel androgen receptor mutation, Q902K, in an individual with partial androgen insensitivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Umar (Arzu); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); N.M. Van (Mai); M. van Leeuwen (Marije); M.M.P.J. Verbiest (Michael); W.J. Kleijer (Wim); D. Dooijes (Dennis); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is caused by defects in the androgen receptor (AR) that render the AR partially or completely inactive. As a result, embryonic sex differentiation is impaired. Here, we describe a novel mutation in the AR found in a patient with par

  14. Promoter-dependent activity on androgen receptor N-terminal domain mutations in androgen insensitivity syndrome.

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    Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Davies, John; Mongan, Nigel P; Bunch, Trevor; Brown, Rosalind S; Audi, Laura; Watt, Kate; McEwan, Iain J; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations are associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Missense mutations identified in the AR-N-terminal domain (AR-NTD) are rare, and clinical phenotypes are typically mild. We investigated 7 missense mutations and 2 insertion/deletions located in the AR-NTD. This study aimed to elucidate the pathogenic role of AR-NTD mutants in AIS and to use this knowledge to further define AR-NTD function. AR-NTD mutations (Q120E, A159T, G216R, N235K, G248V, L272F, and P380R) were introduced into AR-expression plasmids. Stably expressing cell lines were established for del57L and ins58L. Transactivation was measured using luciferase reporter constructs under the control of GRE and Pem promoters. Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and partial proteolysis studies were performed for mutations which showed reduced activities by using a purified AR-AF1 protein. Pem-luciferase reporter activation was reduced for A159T, N235K, and G248V but not the GRE-luciferase reporter. Protein structure analysis detected no significant change in the AR-AF1 region for these mutations. Reduced cellular expression and transactivation activity were observed for ins58L. The mutations Q120E, G216R, L272F, P380R, and del57L showed small or no detectable changes in function. Thus, clinical and experimental analyses have identified novel AR-signalling defects associated with mutations in the structurally disordered AR-NTD domain in patients with AIS.

  15. L712V mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to severe loss of androgen function.

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    Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2013-12-11

    Inability to respond to the circulating androgens is named as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are the most common cause of AIS. A cause and effect relationship between some of these mutations and the AIS phenotype has been proven by in vitro studies. Several other mutations have been identified, but need to be functionally validated for pathogenicity. Screening of the AR mutations upon presumptive diagnosis of AIS is recommended. We analyzed a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) for mutations in the AR gene. Sequencing of the entire coding region revealed C>G mutation (CTT-GTT) at codon 712 (position according to the NCBI database) in exon 4 of the gene, resulting in replacement of leucine with valine in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. No incidence of this mutation was observed in 230 normal male individuals analyzed for comparison. In vitro androgen binding and transactivation assays using mutant clone showed approximately 71% loss of ligand binding and about 76% loss of transactivation function. We conclude that CAIS in this individual was due to L712V substitution in the androgen receptor protein.

  16. Identification of an AR mutation-negative class of androgen insensitivity by determining endogenous AR activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornig, N.C.; Ukat, M.; H.U. Schweikert (H.); O. Hiort (Olaf); Werner, R.; S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); M.L. Cools (Martine); I.A. Hughes (Ieuan A.); L. Audí (Laura); S.F. Ahmed (S. Faisal); Demiri, J.; Rodens, P.; Worch, L.; Wehner, G.; Kulle, A.E.; Dunstheimer, D.; Müller-Roßberg, E.; T. Reinehr (Thomas); Hadidi, A.T.; Eckstein, A.K.; Van Der Horst, C.; Seif, C.; R. Siebert (Reiner); O. Ammerpohl (Ole); P-M. Holterhus (Paul-Martin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractContext: Only approximately 85%of patients with a clinical diagnosis complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and less than 30%with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome can be explained by inactivating mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Objective: The objective of the study

  17. 完全型雄激素不敏感综合征雄激素受体基因突变的鉴定与分析%Identification of a novel frameshift mutation of human androgen receptor gene in a patient featuring complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢建红; 瞿京辉; 肖奇志; 周玉球

    2013-01-01

    目的 对l例完全型雄激素不敏感综合征(complete androgen insensitivity syndrome,CAIS)患者的雄激素受体(androgen receptor,AR)基因进行分析,寻找潜在的突变位点,并进一步分析其发病原因.方法 提取患者外周血全基因组DNA,扩增位于X染色体AR基因8个外显子及邻近外显子与内含子剪切位点DNA序列,对扩增产物直接进行DNA序列测定,与GenBank中的基因序列进行比对.结果 该患者AR基因在第6外显子核苷酸序列3507位点缺失一个碱基C而引起移码突变,致使在第808位密码子出现终止密码子(TGA)使得翻译提前终止形成截短的雄激素受体蛋白.该突变可能诱导雄激素受体结合能力发生功能上的变异,导致CAIS的发生.结论 AR基因第6外显子核苷酸序列3507位点缺失碱基C引起的移码突变是一种导致CAIS新的基因突变方式,该研究丰富了AR基因突变谱,为了解CAIS的发病机制提供了新的依据.%Objective To identify potential mutation of human androgen receptor (AR) gene in a patient with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS).Methods DNA sequences of 8 exons and exon/intron boundaries of the AR gene were amplified with PCR and directly sequenced.Results DNA sequencing revealed a frameshift mutation due to deletion of nucleotide C at position 3507 in exon 6,which gave rise to a stop codon resulting premature termination for translation.Conclusion A novel frameshift mutation in exon 6 of AR gene probably underlies the disease in our patient.

  18. The Long-Term Outcome of Boys With Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome and a Mutation in the Androgen Receptor Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas-herald, A.; Bertelloni, S.; Juul, A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In boys with suspected partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), systematic evidence that supports the long-term prognostic value of identifying a mutation in the androgen receptor gene (AR) is lacking. OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical characteristics and long-term outcomes....... RESULTS: The median ages at presentation and at the time of the study were 1 month (range, 1 day to 16 years) and 22 years (range, 16 to 52 years), respectively. Of the cohort, 29 men (56%) had 20 different AR mutations reported. At diagnosis, the median external masculinization scores were 7 and 6...

  19. Androgen receptor expression in human ovarian and uterine tissue of long term androgen-treated transsexual women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; T.D. Pache; F.J. Huikeshoven (Frans); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen receptor (AR) modulation in human uteri and ovaries of long term androgen-treated transsexual female patients was investigated. Androgen receptor expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in the ovaries of 11 and the endometria and myometria of six androgen-treated transsex

  20. Mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene cluster in two regions of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaul, M J; Marcelli, M; Zoppi, S; Wilson, C M; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J D

    1992-11-01

    We have analyzed the nucleotide sequence of the androgen receptor from 22 unrelated subjects with substitution mutations of the hormone-binding domain. Eleven had the phenotype of complete testicular feminization, four had incomplete testicular feminization, and seven had Reifenstein syndrome. The underlying functional defect in cultured skin fibroblasts included individuals with absent, qualitative, or quantitative defects in ligand binding. 19 of the 21 substitution mutations (90%) cluster in two regions that account for approximately 35% of the hormone-binding domain, namely, between amino acids 726 and 772 and between amino acids 826 and 864. The fact that one of these regions is homologous to a region of the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR-beta) which is a known cluster site for mutations that cause thyroid hormone resistance implies that this localization of mutations is not a coincidence. These regions of the androgen receptor may be of particular importance for the formation and function of the hormone-receptor complex.

  1. Novel mutations of androgen receptor: a possible mechanism of bicalutamide withdrawal syndrome.

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    Hara, Takahito; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Araki, Hideo; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Kusaka, Masami; Miyamoto, Masaomi

    2003-01-01

    Most prostate cancers (PCs) become resistant to combined androgen blockade therapy with surgical or medical castration and antiandrogens after several years. Some of these refractory PCs regress after discontinuation of antiandrogen administration [antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome (AWS)]. Although the molecular mechanisms of the AWS are not fully understood because of the lack of suitable experimental models, one hypothesis of the mechanism is mutation of androgen receptor (AR). However, bicalutamide, which has become the most prevalent pure antiandrogen, does not work as an agonist for any mutant AR detected thus far in PC. To elucidate the mechanisms of the AWS, we established and characterized novel LNCaP cell sublines, LNCaP-cxDs, which were generated in vitro by culturing androgen-dependent LNCaP-FGC human PC cells in androgen-depleted medium with bicalutamide to mimic the combined androgen blockade therapy. LNCaP-FGC cells did not grow at first, but they started to grow after 6-13 weeks of culture. Bicalutamide stimulated LNCaP-cxD cell growth and increased prostate-specific antigen secretion from LNCaP-cxD cells both in vitro and in vivo. Sequencing of AR transcripts revealed that the AR in LNCaP-cxD cells harbors a novel mutation in codon 741, TGG (tryptophan) to TGT (cysteine; W741C), or in codon 741, TGG to TTG (leucine; W741L), in the ligand-binding domain. Transactivation assays showed that bicalutamide worked as an agonist for both W741C and W741L mutant ARs. Importantly, another antiandrogen, hydroxyflutamide, worked as an antagonist for these mutant ARs. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that within only 6-13 weeks of in vitro exposure to bicalutamide, LNCaP-FGC cells, whose growth had initially been suppressed, came to use bicalutamide as an AR agonist via W741 AR mutation to survive. Our data strongly support the hypothesis that AR mutation is one possible mechanism of the AWS and suggest that flutamide might be effective as a second

  2. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiort, O. (Medizinische Universitaet zu Luebeck (Germany) Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)); Huang, Q. (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA (United States)); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. (Medizinische Universitaet zu Luebeck (Germany)); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. (Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)); Yandell, D.W. (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA (United States))(Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Androgen receptor signaling is required for androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Wanda V

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgens and androgen receptors (AR regulate normal prostate development and growth. They also are involved in pathological development of prostatic diseases, including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer (PCa. Antiandrogen therapy for PCa, in conjunction with chemical or surgical castration, offers initial positive responses and leads to massive prostate cell death. However, cancer cells later appear as androgen-independent PCa. To investigate the role of AR in prostate cell proliferation and survival, we introduced a vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA. This siRNA targeted 5'-untranslated region of AR mRNA for extended suppression of AR expression in androgen-sensitive human prostate LNCaP cells. Results The siRNA design successfully suppressed endogenous AR expression, as revealed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining in LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells did not proliferate in the absence of AR and underwent apoptosis, based on elevated phospho-Histone H2B expression and higher number of apoptotic body as compared to control cells. Conclusion We demonstrated that AR is vital for prostate cell proliferation and survival in this androgen-sensitive prostate cell line. These results further strengthen the hypothesis that AR can be a therapeutic target for treating androgen-sensitive stages of PCa. Unlike antiandorgens, however, siRNA targeting AR provides a direct inactivation of AR function through the suppression of AR protein expression.

  4. PAPSS2 Deficiency Causes Androgen Excess via Impaired DHEA Sulfation—In Vitro and in Vivo Studies in a Family Harboring Two Novel PAPSS2 Mutations

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    Oostdijk, Wilma; Idkowiak, Jan; Mueller, Jonathan W.; House, Philip J.; Taylor, Angela E.; O'Reilly, Michael W.; Hughes, Beverly A.; de Vries, Martine C.; Kant, Sarina G.; Santen, Gijs W. E.; Verkerk, Annemieke J. M. H.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Wit, Jan M.; Losekoot, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Context: PAPSS2 (PAPS synthase 2) provides the universal sulfate donor PAPS (3′-phospho-adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate) to all human sulfotransferases, including SULT2A1, responsible for sulfation of the crucial androgen precursor dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Impaired DHEA sulfation is thought to increase the conversion of DHEA toward active androgens, a proposition supported by the previous report of a girl with inactivating PAPSS2 mutations who presented with low serum DHEA sulfate and androgen excess, clinically manifesting with premature pubarche and early-onset polycystic ovary syndrome. Patients and Methods: We investigated a family harboring two novel PAPSS2 mutations, including two compound heterozygous brothers presenting with disproportionate short stature, low serum DHEA sulfate, but normal serum androgens. Patients and parents underwent a DHEA challenge test comprising frequent blood sampling and urine collection before and after 100 mg DHEA orally, with subsequent analysis of DHEA sulfation and androgen metabolism by mass spectrometry. The functional impact of the mutations was investigated in silico and in vitro. Results: We identified a novel PAPSS2 frameshift mutation, c.1371del, p.W462Cfs*3, resulting in complete disruption, and a novel missense mutation, c.809G>A, p.G270D, causing partial disruption of DHEA sulfation. Both patients and their mother, who was heterozygous for p.W462Cfs*3, showed increased 5α-reductase activity at baseline and significantly increased production of active androgens after DHEA intake. The mother had a history of oligomenorrhea and chronic anovulation that required clomiphene for ovulation induction. Conclusions: We provide direct in vivo evidence for the significant functional impact of mutant PAPSS2 on DHEA sulfation and androgen activation. Heterozygosity for PAPSS2 mutations can be associated with a phenotype resembling polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:25594860

  5. A large deletion/insertion-induced frameshift mutation of the androgen receptor gene in a family with a familial complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Peikuan; Ye, Yinghui; Wang, Yue; Lu, Lingping; Yong, Jing; Yu, Ping; Joseph, Kimani Kagunda; Jin, Fan; Qi, Ming

    2012-06-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder with a normal 46, XY karyotype caused by abnormality of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. One Chinese family consisting of the proband and 5 other members with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) was investigated. Mutation analysis by DNA sequencing on all 8 exons and flanking intron regions of the AR gene revealed a unique large deletion/insertion mutation in the family. A 287 bp deletion and 77 bp insertion (c.933_1219delins77) mutation at codon 312 resulted in a frameshift which caused a premature stop (p.Phe312Aspfs*7) of polypeptide formation. The proband's mother and grandmother were heterozygous for the mutant allele. The proband's father, uncle and grandfather have the normal allele. From the pedigree constructed from mutational analysis of the family, it is revealed that the probably pathogenic mutation comes from the maternal side.

  6. S578N mutation of the androgen receptor in an adolescent with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yuan; WANG De-fen; LI Xiao-ying; YANG Jun; WANG Wei

    2010-01-01

    @@ Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) was first described by the American gynecologist Morris in 1953 and was initially described in 82 patients.1 The syndrome was designated "testicular feminization syndrome" , because the testes produce hormones with estrogen-like actions.1 Clinical AIS manifestations include the appearance of normal female external genitalia without internal female genital organs. Other clinical manifestations include undescended testes, normal female breast development, and scant axillary and pubic hair. AIS is the most common condition that cancause male undermasculinisation.

  7. Activation of two mutant androgen receptors from human prostatic carcinoma by adrenal androgens and metabolic derivatives of testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culig, Z; Stober, J; Gast, A; Peterziel, H; Hobisch, A; Radmayr, C; Hittmair, A; Bartsch, G; Cato, A C; Klocker, H

    1996-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central regulatory role in prostatic carcinoma and is a target of androgen ablation therapy. Recent detection of mutant receptors in tumor specimens suggest a contribution of AR alterations to progression towards androgen independence. In a specimen derived from metastatic prostate cancer we have reported a point mutation in the AR gene that leads to a single amino acid exchange in the ligand binding domain of the receptor. Another amino acid exchange resulting from a point mutation was also identified 15 amino acids away from our mutation. This mutation was detected in the AR gene isolated from an organ-confined prostatic tumor. Here we report the functional characterization of the two mutant receptors in the presence of adrenal androgens and testosterone metabolites. These studies were performed by cotransfecting androgen-responsive reporter genes and either the wild-type or mutant AR expression vectors into receptor negative DU-145 and CV-1 cells. The indicator genes used consisted of the promoter of the androgen-inducible prostate-specific antigen gene or the C' Delta9 enhancer fragment from the promoter of the mouse sex-limited protein driving the expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene. Cotransfection-transactivation assays revealed that the adrenal androgen androstenedione and two products of testosterone metabolism, androsterone and androstandiol, induced reporter gene activity more efficiently in the presence of the mutant receptors than in the presence of the wild-type receptor. No difference between wild-type and mutant receptors was observed in the presence of the metabolite androstandione. The interaction of receptor-hormone complexes with target DNA was studied in vitro by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Dihydrotestosterone and the synthetic androgen mibolerone induced a faster migrating complex with all receptors, whereas the androgen metabolite androstandione induced this

  8. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. WilsonU.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  9. Functional analysis of novel androgen receptor mutations in a unique cohort of Indonesian patients with a disorder of sex development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Elfferich (Peter); A.Z. Juniarto (Achmad); H.J. Dubbink (Erik Jan); M.E. Royen (Martin); M. Molier; J.W. Hoogerbrugge (Jos); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); J. Trapman (Jan); A. Santosa; F.H. de Jong (Frank); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); S.M.H. Faradz (Sultana); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractMutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, rendering the AR protein partially or completely inactive, cause androgen insensitivity syndrome, which is a form of a 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD). We present 3 novel AR variants found in a cohort of Indonesian DSD patients: p.I60

  10. Differential effects of genistein on prostate cancer cells depend on mutational status of the androgen receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer M Mahmoud

    Full Text Available Blocking the androgen receptor (AR activity is the main goal of therapies for advanced prostate cancer (PCa. However, relapse with a more aggressive, hormone refractory PCa arises, which harbors restored AR activity. One mechanism of such reactivation occurs through acquisition of AR mutations that enable its activation by various steroidal and non-steroidal structures. Thus, natural and chemical compounds that contribute to inappropriate (androgen-independent activation of the AR become an area of intensive research. Here, we demonstrate that genistein, a soy phytoestrogen binds to both the wild and the Thr877Ala (T877A mutant types of AR competitively with androgen, nevertheless, it exerts a pleiotropic effect on PCa cell proliferation and AR activity depending on the mutational status of the AR. Genistein inhibited, in a dose-dependent way, cell proliferation and AR nuclear localization and expression in LAPC-4 cells that have wild AR. However, in LNCaP cells that express the T877A mutant AR, genistein induced a biphasic effect where physiological doses (0.5-5 µmol/L stimulated cell growth and increased AR expression and transcriptional activity, and higher doses induced inhibitory effects. Similar biphasic results were achieved in PC-3 cells transfected with AR mutants; T877A, W741C and H874Y. These findings suggest that genistein, at physiological concentrations, potentially act as an agonist and activate the mutant AR that can be present in advanced PCa after androgen ablation therapy.

  11. Differential effects of genistein on prostate cancer cells depend on mutational status of the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Abeer M; Zhu, Tian; Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Yang, Wancai; Saleem, Mohammad; Bosland, Maarten C

    2013-01-01

    Blocking the androgen receptor (AR) activity is the main goal of therapies for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). However, relapse with a more aggressive, hormone refractory PCa arises, which harbors restored AR activity. One mechanism of such reactivation occurs through acquisition of AR mutations that enable its activation by various steroidal and non-steroidal structures. Thus, natural and chemical compounds that contribute to inappropriate (androgen-independent) activation of the AR become an area of intensive research. Here, we demonstrate that genistein, a soy phytoestrogen binds to both the wild and the Thr877Ala (T877A) mutant types of AR competitively with androgen, nevertheless, it exerts a pleiotropic effect on PCa cell proliferation and AR activity depending on the mutational status of the AR. Genistein inhibited, in a dose-dependent way, cell proliferation and AR nuclear localization and expression in LAPC-4 cells that have wild AR. However, in LNCaP cells that express the T877A mutant AR, genistein induced a biphasic effect where physiological doses (0.5-5 µmol/L) stimulated cell growth and increased AR expression and transcriptional activity, and higher doses induced inhibitory effects. Similar biphasic results were achieved in PC-3 cells transfected with AR mutants; T877A, W741C and H874Y. These findings suggest that genistein, at physiological concentrations, potentially act as an agonist and activate the mutant AR that can be present in advanced PCa after androgen ablation therapy.

  12. Detection of androgen receptor in human prostatic adenoma by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demura, Takayoshi; Sakashita, Shigeo; Takamura, Takao; Kuroda, Kazuhide (Asahikawa Medical Coll., Hokkaido (Japan))

    1982-09-01

    We developed a new amplified method to detect the localization of androgen receptors within the human prostatic tissue specimens. The tissue sections were treated with 50 ..mu..l of 100 nM tritiated dihydrotestosterone (/sup 3/H-DHT). The binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to receptors was demonstrated as silver grains on the stained tissue sections. The binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was inhibited by additional non-radioactive DHT remarkably and by testosterone partially, but not affected by additional progesterone and 17..beta..-estradiol. No binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the bladder tissue was found. These results showed that the binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was a specific reaction of /sup 3/H-DHT and androgen receptor. Androgen receptors were seen in the nuclei and the cytoplasmas of glandular epithelial cells of prostate. However, stromal cells contained less abundant androgen receptors. The method reported here has several advantages in detecting the androgen receptor of the prostatic tissue in comparison with the radioreceptor assay and other histochemical methods. 1) The needle biopsied specimens are big enough to examine. 2) Morphological observations are also possible on the same specimen because the specimens are stained with hematoxylin simultaneously. Therefore, we can know the relative ratio of androgen receptor positive cells and negative cells. 3) Binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the receptor with this method may be more specific than other histochemical methods, since binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the receptor was inhibited by 200-fold excess of non-radioactive DHT. 4) Treatment of scintillator, fluorographic technique shortens the exposure periods. The exposure periods are approximately six to twelve times shorter than that of the conventional autoradiography.

  13. Mutations of androgen receptor gene in Brazilian patients with male pseudohermaphroditism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F. Cabral

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the identification of point mutations in the androgen receptor gene in five Brazilian patients with female assignment and behavior. The eight exons of the gene were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and analyzed for single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP to detect the mutations. Direct sequencing of the mutant PCR products demonstrated single transitions in three of these cases: G®A in case 1, within exon C, changing codon 615 from Arg to His; G®A in case 2, within exon E, changing codon 752 from Arg to Gln, and C®T in case 3, within exon B, but without amino acid change.

  14. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a novel splice donor site mutation and activation of a cryptic splice donor site in the androgen receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Joana B; Alvelos, Maria I; Bastos, Margarida; Carrilho, Francisco; Lemos, Manuel C

    2016-01-01

    The androgen insensitivity syndrome is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder characterized by resistance to the actions of androgens in an individual with a male karyotype. We evaluated a 34-year-old female with primary amenorrhea and a 46,XY karyotype, with normal secondary sex characteristics, absence of uterus and ovaries, intra-abdominal testis, and elevated testosterone levels. Sequence analysis of the androgen receptor (AR) gene revealed a novel splice donor site mutation in intron 4 (c.2173+2T>C). RT-PCR analysis showed that this mutation resulted in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site located in the second half of exon 4 and in the synthesis of a shorter mRNA transcript and an in-frame deletion of 41 amino acids. This novel mutation associated with a rare mechanism of abnormal splicing further expands the spectrum of mutations associated with the androgen insensitivity syndrome and may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in splicing defects.

  15. Androgen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Deeb, Asma

    2006-12-01

    Androgen resistance causes the androgen insensitivity syndrome in its variant forms and is a paradigm of clinical syndromes associated with hormone resistance. In its complete form, the syndrome causes XY sex reversal and a female phenotype. Partial resistance to androgens is a common cause of ambiguous genitalia of the newborn, but a similar phenotype may result from several other conditions, including defects in testis determination and androgen biosynthesis. The biological actions of androgens are mediated by a single intracellular androgen receptor encoded by a gene on the long arm of the X chromosome. Mutations in this gene result in varying degrees of androgen receptor dysfunction and phenotypes that often show poor concordance with the genotype. Functional characterization and three-dimensional modelling of novel mutant receptors has been informative in understanding the mechanism of androgen action. Management issues in syndromes of androgen insensitivity include decisions on sex assignment, timing of gonadectomy in relation to tumour risk, and genetic and psychological counselling.

  16. Rarity of DNA sequence alterations in the promoter region of the human androgen receptor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F. Cabral

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The human androgen receptor (AR gene promoter lies in a GC-rich region containing two principal sites of transcription initiation and a putative Sp1 protein-binding site, without typical "TATA" and "CAAT" boxes. It has been suggested that mutations within the 5'untranslated region (5'UTR may contribute to the development of prostate cancer by changing the rates of gene transcription and/or translation. In order to investigate this question, the aim of the present study was to search for the presence of mutations or polymorphisms at the AR-5'UTR in 92 prostate cancer patients, where histological diagnosis of adenocarcinoma was established in specimens obtained from transurethral resection or after prostatectomy. The AR-5'UTR was amplified by PCR from genomic DNA samples of the patients and of 100 healthy male blood donors, included as controls. Conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis was used for DNA sequence alteration screening. Only one band shift was detected in one individual from the blood donor group. Sequencing revealed a new single nucleotide deletion (T in the most conserved portion of the promoter region at position +36 downstream from the transcription initiation site I. Although the effect of this specific mutation remains unknown, its rarity reveals the high degree of sequence conservation of the human androgen promoter region. Moreover, the absence of detectable variation within the critical 5'UTR in prostate cancer patients indicates a low probability of its involvement in prostate cancer etiology.

  17. ANABOLIC-ANDROGENIC STEROID DEPENDENCE? INSIGHTS FROM ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Ruth I.

    2008-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, with negative health consequences. As a result, in 1991 testosterone and related AAS were declared controlled substances. However, the relative abuse and dependence liability of AAS have not been fully characterized. In humans, it is difficult to separate the direct psychoactive effects of AAS from reinforcement due to their systemic anabolic effects. Howev...

  18. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5'UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornig, Nadine C; de Beaufort, Carine; Denzer, Friederike; Cools, Martine; Wabitsch, Martin; Ukat, Martin; Kulle, Alexandra E; Schweikert, Hans-Udo; Werner, Ralf; Hiort, Olaf; Audi, Laura; Siebert, Reiner; Ammerpohl, Ole; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5'UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5'UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general.

  19. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5'UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine C Hornig

    Full Text Available A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF in the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR of the androgen receptor (AR gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5'UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5'UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general.

  20. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5’UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornig, Nadine C.; de Beaufort, Carine; Denzer, Friederike; Cools, Martine; Wabitsch, Martin; Ukat, Martin; Kulle, Alexandra E.; Schweikert, Hans-Udo; Werner, Ralf; Hiort, Olaf; Audi, Laura; Siebert, Reiner; Ammerpohl, Ole; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5’ untranslated region (5’-UTR) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5′UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5′UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general. PMID:27110943

  1. Targeting Androgen Receptor/Src Complex Impairs the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Fibrosarcoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriella Castoria; Pia Giovannelli; Marzia Di Donato; Ryo Hayashi; Claudio Arra; Ettore Appella; Ferdinando Auricchio; Antimo Migliaccio

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EXPERIMENTAL: FINDINGS: We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the...

  2. Identification of a Novel Androgen Receptor Mutation in a Family With Multiple Components Compatible With the Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottrup, Grete; Jørgensen, Anne; Nielsen, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Androgen signaling via the androgen receptor (AR) is essential for normal testis development and male reproductive functions. We describe a rare family with 3 males affected by a mild disorder of sex determination compatible with testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS), including subfertility......, cryptorchidism, hypospadias, and testicular cancer, caused by a novel AR mutation.Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the phenotype of the affected males, characterize functionally the novel AR mutation, and discuss the significance of partial androgen insufficiency in the pathogenesis of TDS...... analysis of the mutation in a gene-reporter assay showed a 50% reduction in AR-induced transcriptional activity. The affected males had elevated LH and T in accordance with decreased AR signaling. The histology and immunohistochemical profile of the testis tissue from the 2 patients with testicular cancer...

  3. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome is frequently due to premature stop codons in exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene: an international collaborative report of 13 new mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philibert, Pascal; Audran, Françoise; Pienkowski, Catherine; Morange, Isabelle; Kohler, Birgit; Flori, Elisabeth; Heinrich, Claudine; Dacou-Voutetakis, Catherine; Joseph, Marie-Geneviève; Guedj, Anne-Marie; Journel, Hubert; Hecart-Bruna, Annie-Claude; Khotchali, Ines; Ten, Svetlana; Bouchard, Philippe; Paris, Françoise; Sultan, Charles

    2010-07-01

    To confirm the clinical diagnosis of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) by molecular genetic analysis and to determine the prevalence of exon 1 mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) transactivation defects of a large series of CAIS patients. International retrospective study. University Hospital of Montpellier, Department of Hormonology. 105 patients with normal female external genitalia, bilateral intra-abdominal or inguinal testis, normal breast development, absent or sparse pubic hair, normal or high endogenous testosterone production, hypoplastic or absent wolffian structures, and 46,XY karyotype. Sequencing of the AR gene. Prevalence of AR exon 1 mutations. Over a 10-year period (1997 to 2007), we identified 78 AR gene mutations in 105 patients with CAIS; 21 of them were located in exon 1, and 13 of these were new mutations. We report 13 new mutations in the AR gene. All but one were stop codons, and the last was a splicing abnormality. The finding that 27% of the mutations in our cohort were localized in exon 1 versus 15% in previous works justifies the sequencing of this exon in patients with CAIS. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Septin mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  5. Are androgen steroids acting as pheromones in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pause, Bettina M

    2004-10-30

    In animals, chemosensory communication is successfully used to transmit behaviourally relevant information, e.g. information about sexual status, danger and social organisation. In many instances pheromones might have evolved from hormone-like substances. Consequently, a large number of studies have been carried out in humans, in order to investigate possible pheromonal properties of androgen steroids. Besides discussing the production and perception of androgen steroids, it will primarily be questioned whether their perception can alter mood and behaviour in humans. Therefore, a study has been carried out to investigate whether local preferences can be altered through androstenone exposure. It is shown that heterosexual women and homosexual men prefer seats sprayed with androstenone. However, as this effect is positively correlated with the sensitivity to androstenone, the effect might be due to a general olfactory attraction of low androstenone concentrations. In regard to the conflicting results of studies on putative human pheromones, it will finally be discussed whether the perceptual context and the individual learning history of the perceiver contribute significantly to a successful communication of pheromonal information.

  6. Mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene cluster in two regions of the gene.

    OpenAIRE

    McPhaul, M J; Marcelli, M; Zoppi, S; Wilson, C. M.; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    We have analyzed the nucleotide sequence of the androgen receptor from 22 unrelated subjects with substitution mutations of the hormone-binding domain. Eleven had the phenotype of complete testicular feminization, four had incomplete testicular feminization, and seven had Reifenstein syndrome. The underlying functional defect in cultured skin fibroblasts included individuals with absent, qualitative, or quantitative defects in ligand binding. 19 of the 21 substitution mutations (90%) cluster ...

  7. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome in sex-reversed XY female patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BALACHANDRAN SARANYA; GUNASEKARAN BHAVANI; BRINDHA ARUMUGAM; MEENA JAYASHANKAR; SATHIYAVEDU THYAGARAJAN SANTHIYA

    2016-12-01

    Molecular characterization of 23 cytogenetically confirmed XY females was attempted by screening coding regions of SRY and androgen receptor (AR) genes. Five of the index cases showed sequence variations in various exons of the AR gene: a deletion (n.1911delG) and substitutions n.1761G>A and n.1317C>T in exon 1; n.3510C>T transition in exon 6 and deletion mutation (n.3672delT) in exon 7. Four mutations identified here lead to the formation of truncated receptor protein, involving a substantial loss of AR functional domains which explains the phenotype in the subjects. The n.1761G>A substitution has been previously reported in cases with mild androgen insensitivity. Although the ligand-binding domain was considered as the mutational hot spot in AR gene, we report here 3/5 variations in the N-terminal domain emphasizing the significance of considering the N-terminal domain of AR as well for mutation screening. Our present observation also strengthens the role of AR gene and its direct association with AIS.

  8. Diversity in the androgen receptor CAG repeat has been shaped by a multistep mutational mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Diana; Pimenta, João; Wong, Virginia C N; Amorim, António; Martins, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) gene encodes a type of nuclear receptor that functions as a steroid-hormone activated transcription factor. In its coding region, AR includes a CAG repeat, which has been intensely studied due to the inverse correlation between repeat size and AR transcriptional activity. Several studies have reported different (CAG)n sizes associated with the risk of androgen-linked diseases. We aimed at clarifying the mechanisms on the origin of newly CAG sized alleles through a strategy involving the analysis of the associated haplotype diversity. We genotyped 374 control individuals of European and Asian ancestry, and reconstructed the haplotypes associated with the CAG repeat, defined by 10 SNPs and 6 flanking STRs. The most powerful SNPs to tag AR lineages are rs7061037-rs12012620 and rs34191540-rs6625187-rs2768578 in Europeans and Asians, respectively. In the most frequent AR lineage, (CAG)18 alleles seem to have been generated by a multistep mutation mechanism, most probably from longer alleles. We further noticed that the DXS1194-DXS1111 haplotype, in linkage disequilibrium with AR-(CAG)n expanded alleles responsible for spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), is rare among our controls; however, the haplotype strategy here described may be used to clarify the origin of expansions in other populations, as in future association studies.

  9. Anabolic-androgenic steroid dependence? Insights from animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ruth I

    2008-10-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, with negative health consequences. As a result, in 1991 testosterone and related AAS were declared controlled substances. However, the relative abuse and dependence liability of AAS have not been fully characterized. In humans, it is difficult to separate the direct psychoactive effects of AAS from reinforcement due to their systemic anabolic effects. However, using conditioned place preference and self-administration, studies in animals have demonstrated that AAS are reinforcing in a context where athletic performance is irrelevant. Furthermore, AAS share brain sites of action and neurotransmitter systems in common with other drugs of abuse. In particular, recent evidence links AAS with opioids. In humans, AAS abuse is associated with prescription opioid use. In animals, AAS overdose produces symptoms resembling opioid overdose, and AAS modify the activity of the endogenous opioid system.

  10. A Molecular Modeling Study of the Hydroxyflutamide Resistance Mechanism Induced by Androgen Receptor Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Li Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyflutamide (HF, an active metabolite of the first generation antiandrogen flutamide, was used in clinic to treat prostate cancer targeting androgen receptor (AR. However, a drug resistance problem appears after about one year’s treatment. AR T877A is the first mutation that was found to cause a resistance problem. Then W741C_T877A and F876L_T877A mutations were also reported to cause resistance to HF, while W741C and F876L single mutations cannot. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD simulations combined with the molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method have been carried out to analyze the interaction mechanism between HF and wild-type (WT/mutant ARs. The obtained results indicate that AR helix 12 (H12 plays a pivotal role in the resistance of HF. It can affect the coactivator binding site at the activation function 2 domain (AF2, surrounded by H3, H4, and H12. When H12 closes to the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD like a lid, the coactivator binding site can be formed to promote transcription. However, once H12 is opened to expose LBD, the coactivator binding site will be distorted, leading to invalid transcription. Moreover, per-residue free energy decomposition analyses indicate that N705, T877, and M895 are vital residues in the agonist/antagonist mechanism of HF.

  11. Aberrant splicing of androgenic receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Kuiper, G.G.J.M.; Faber, P.W.; van Rooij, H.C.J.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J.; Brinkmann, A.O. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Schweikert, H.U. (Univ. of Bonn (Germany)); Zegers, N.D. (Medical Biological Laboratory-Organization for Applied Scientific Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Hodgins, M.B. (Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1990-10-01

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symtpoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. The authors report a G {r arrow} T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46, XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely abolishes normal RNA splicing at the exon 4/intron 4 boundary and results in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site in exon 4, which leads to the deletion of 123 nucleotides from the mRNA. Translation of the mutant mRNA results in an androgen receptor protein {approx}5 kDa smaller than the wild type. This mutated androgen receptor protein was unable to bind androgens and unable to activate transcription of an androgen-regulated reporter gene construct. This mutation in the human androgen receptor gene demonstrates the importance of an intact steroid-binding domain for proper androgen receptor functioning in vivo.

  12. Position stand on androgen and human growth hormone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Kraemer, William J; Bhasin, Shalender; Storer, Thomas; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Haff, G Gregory; Willoughby, Darryn S; Rogol, Alan D

    2009-08-01

    Hoffman, JR, Kraemer, WJ, Bhasin, S, Storer, T, Ratamess, NA, Haff, GG, Willoughby, DS, and Rogol, AD. Position stand on Androgen and human growth hormone use. J Strength Cond Res 23(5): S1-S59, 2009-Perceived yet often misunderstood demands of a sport, overt benefits of anabolic drugs, and the inability to be offered any effective alternatives has fueled anabolic drug abuse despite any consequences. Motivational interactions with many situational demands including the desire for improved body image, sport performance, physical function, and body size influence and fuel such negative decisions. Positive countermeasures to deter the abuse of anabolic drugs are complex and yet unclear. Furthermore, anabolic drugs work and the optimized training and nutritional programs needed to cut into the magnitude of improvement mediated by drug abuse require more work, dedication, and preparation on the part of both athletes and coaches alike. Few shortcuts are available to the athlete who desires to train naturally. Historically, the NSCA has placed an emphasis on education to help athletes, coaches, and strength and conditioning professionals become more knowledgeable, highly skilled, and technically trained in their approach to exercise program design and implementation. Optimizing nutritional strategies are a vital interface to help cope with exercise and sport demands (). In addition, research-based supplements will also have to be acknowledged as a strategic set of tools (e.g., protein supplements before and after resistance exercise workout) that can be used in conjunction with optimized nutrition to allow more effective adaptation and recovery from exercise. Resistance exercise is the most effective anabolic form of exercise, and over the past 20 years, the research base for resistance exercise has just started to develop to a significant volume of work to help in the decision-making process in program design (). The interface with nutritional strategies has been less

  13. Development of an androgen reporter gene assay (AR-LUX) utilizing a human cell line with an endogenously regulated androgen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankvoort, B.M.G.; Groene, E.M. de; Meeteren-Kreikamp, A.P. van; Witkamp, R.F.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the work described in this report is to develop and characterize a cell-based androgen reporter assay. For this purpose, the androgen receptor (AR) expressing human breast cancer cell line T47D was stably transfected with a luciferase gene under transcriptional control of the PB-ARE-2 and

  14. Preserved fertility in a patient with gynecomastia associated with the p.Pro695Ser mutation in the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroli, Reginaldo J; Hiort, Olaf; Struve, Dagmar; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa T; Guerra-Júnior, Gil; Palandi de Mello, Maricilda; Werner, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is described as a dysfunction of the androgen receptor (AR) in 46,XY individuals, which can be associated with mutations in the AR gene or can be due to unknown mechanisms. Different mutations in AIS generally cause variable phenotypes that range from a complete hormone resistance to a mild form usually associated with male infertility. The purpose of this study was to search for mutations in the AR gene in a fertile man with gynecomastia and to evaluate the influence of the mutation on the AR transactivation ability. Sequencing of the AR gene revealed the p.Pro695Ser mutation. It is located within the AR ligand-binding domain. Bioinformatics analysis indicated a deleterious role, which was verified after testing transactivation activity and N-/C-terminal (N/C) interaction by in vitro expression of a reporter gene and 2-hybrid assays. p.Pro695Ser showed low levels of both transactivation activity and N/C interaction at low dihydrotestosterone (DHT) conditions. As the ligand concentration increased, both transactivation activity and N/C interaction also increased and reached normal levels. Therefore, this study provides functional insights for the p.Pro695Ser mutation described here for the first time in a patient with mild AIS. The expression profile of p.Pro695Ser not only correlates to the patient's phenotype, but also suggests that a high-dose DHT therapy may overcome the functional deficit of the mutant AR.

  15. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold D Love

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma (CaP are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1 highly expressed in prostate, 2 had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3 encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  16. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Harold D; Booton, S Erin; Boone, Braden E; Breyer, Joan P; Koyama, Tatsuki; Revelo, Monica P; Shappell, Scott B; Smith, Jeffrey R; Hayward, Simon W

    2009-12-21

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (CaP) are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ) human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1) highly expressed in prostate, 2) had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3) encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  17. Androgen receptor isoforms in human and rat prostate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-JieXIA; Gang-YaoHAO; Xiao-DaTANG

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the androgen receptor (AR) isoforms and its variability of expression in human and rat prostatic tissues. Methods: Human benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostatic cancer tissues were obtained from patients undergoing prostatectomy, and rat ventral prostate was incised 3 days after castration. Forty-one AR-positive BPH specimens, 3 prostatic cancer specimens, and 6 rat prostates were used. After processing at 4℃, the tissues were examined by means of high resolution isoelectric focusing (IEF) technique to determine their AR isoforms. Results:From the prostatic specimens, 3 types of AR isoforms were detected with pI values at 6.5, 6.0, and 5.3. In human BPH tissues, 15/41 (36.6%) specimens showed all the three types of isoforms, while 19/41 (46.3%) showed 2 isoforms at various combinations and 7/41(17.1%), 1 isoform. For the 3 prostatic cancer specimens, one showed 3 isoforms, one, 2 isoforms, and the other failed to show any isoform. All rat prostatic tissues showed 2 isoforms at different combinations. Binding of 3H-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to the isoforms was inhibited by the addition of 100-fold excess of DHT or testosterone, but not progesterone, oestradiol or diethylstilboestrol. Conclusion: AR isoforms are different in different patients. Although their genesis is not clear, the therapeutic implication of the present observation appears to be interesting, that may help clarifying the individual differences in the response to hormonal therapy.(Asian J Androl 2000 Dec;2:307-310)

  18. Androgen responsiveness of the new human endometrial cancer cell line MFE-296.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, R; Beck, S; Filmer, A; Hushmand Nia, A; Kunzmann, R; Koch, M; Slater, E P; Schulz, K D

    1994-04-01

    MFE-296 endometrial cancer cells express androgen receptors in vitro. These cells, which are tumorigenic in nude mice, are derived from a moderately differentiated human endometrial adenocarcinoma. They express vimentin and the cytokeratins 7, 8, 18, and 19. Karyotyping revealed near-tetraploidy for most of the cells. No marker chromosomes were observed. DNA analyses confirmed the genetic identity of the cell line and the patient from whom the cell line was derived. Proliferation of MFE-296 cells was inhibited by the progestin R5020 and the androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The inhibition of proliferation by DHT was antagonized by the antiandrogen Casodex, demonstrating the involvement of the androgen receptor. Androgen binding was determined at 22,000 binding sites per cell using a whole-cell assay (KD = 0.05 nM) and 30 fmol/mg protein with the dextran charcoal method; 7 fmol/mg protein of progesterone receptors were found, whereas estrogen receptors were below 5 fmol/mg protein. The androgen receptor was functionally intact, as demonstrated by transfection experiments with a reporter-gene construct, containing an androgen-responsive element. In MFE-296 cells the content of the androgen receptor was up-regulated by its own ligand.

  19. In human granulosa cells from small antral follicles, androgen receptor mRNA and androgen levels in follicular fluid correlate with FSH receptor mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. E.; Rasmussen, I. A.; Kristensen, Stine Gry

    2011-01-01

    concentrations of AMH, inhibin-B, progesterone and estradiol. Androgen Receptor mRNA expression in granulosa cells, and the FF content of androgens, both showed a highly significant positive association with to the expression of FSHR mRNA in granulosa cells. AR mRNA expression also correlated significantly...... with the expression of AMHR2, but did not correlate with any of the hormones in the FF. These data demonstrate an intimate association between AR expression in immature granulosa cells, and the expression of FSHR in normal small human antral follicles and between the FF levels of androgen and FSHR expression...

  20. Deoxyribonucleic acid-binding ability of androgen receptors in whole cells: implications for the actions of androgens and antiandrogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.W. Kuil (Cor); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn whole cells, the effects of several androgens and antiandrogens on the in the induction of DNA binding for the human wild-type androgen receptor (AR) and a mutant receptor ARL (LNCaP mutation; codon 868, Thr to Ala) were examined and related to the transc

  1. A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO THE DETECTION OF ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE-MUTATIONS AND PEDIGREE ANALYSIS IN FAMILIES WITH X-LINKED ANDROGEN INSENSITIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RISSTALPERS, C; HOOGENBOEZEM, T; SLEDDENS, HFBM; VERLEUNMOOIJMAN, MCT; DEGENHART, HJ; DROP, SLS; HALLEY, DJJ; Oosterwijk, Jan; HODGINS, MB; TRAPMAN, J; BRINKMANN, AO

    1994-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked disorder in which defects in the androgen receptor gene have prevented the normal development of both internal and external male structures in 46,XY individuals. This survey reports the analysis of 11 AIS subjects. The androgen receptor gene of th

  2. The Effect of F877L and T878A Mutations on Androgen Receptor Response to Enzalutamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prekovic, Stefan; van Royen, Martin E; Voet, Arnout R D; Geverts, Bart; Houtman, Rene; Melchers, Diana; Zhang, Kam Y J; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Smeets, Elien; Spans, Lien; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Joniau, Steven; Claessens, Frank; Helsen, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Treatment-induced mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor (AR) are known to change antagonists into agonists. Recently, the F877L mutation has been described to convert enzalutamide into an agonist. This mutation was seen to co-occur in the endogenous AR allele of LNCaP cells, next to the T878A mutation. Here, we studied the effects of enzalutamide on the F877L and T878A mutants, as well as the double-mutant AR (F877L/T878A). Molecular modeling revealed favorable structural changes in the double-mutant AR that lead to a decrease in steric clashes for enzalutamide. Ligand-binding assays confirmed that the F877L mutation leads to an increase in relative binding affinity for enzalutamide, but only the combination with the T878A mutation resulted in a strong agonistic activity. This correlated with changes in coregulator recruitment and chromatin interactions. Our data show that enzalutamide is only a very weak partial agonist of the AR F877L, and a strong partial agonist of the double-mutant AR. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1702-12. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Sexual dimorphism in human and canine spinal cord: role of early androgen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forger, N G; Breedlove, S M

    1986-10-01

    Onuf's nucleus, located in the sacral spinal cord of dogs, cats, and primates, innervates perineal muscles involved in copulatory behavior. A sexual dimorphism in Onuf's nucleus was found in humans and dogs: males have significantly more motoneurons in this nucleus than do females. Prenatal androgen treatment of female dogs eliminated the dimorphism. In the homologous nucleus in rats, a similar effect of androgen has been shown to involve sparing of motoneurons from cell death. These results establish a morphological sex difference in a human central nervous system region of known function; well-studied animal models suggest explanations of the development of this dimorphism.

  4. Castration induces up-regulation of intratumoral androgen biosynthesis and androgen receptor expression in an orthotopic VCaP human prostate cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuuttila, Matias; Yatkin, Emrah; Kallio, Jenny; Savolainen, Saija; Laajala, Teemu D; Aittokallio, Tero; Oksala, Riikka; Häkkinen, Merja; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Auriola, Seppo; Poutanen, Matti; Mäkelä, Sari

    2014-08-01

    Androgens are key factors involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and PCa growth can be suppressed by androgen deprivation therapy. In a considerable proportion of men receiving androgen deprivation therapy, however, PCa progresses to castration-resistant PCa (CRPC), making the development of efficient therapies challenging. We used an orthotopic VCaP human PCa xenograft model to study cellular and molecular changes in tumors after androgen deprivation therapy (castration). Tumor growth was monitored through weekly serum prostate-specific antigen measurements, and mice with recurrent tumors after castration were randomized to treatment groups. Serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations showed significant correlation with tumor volume. Castration-resistant tumors retained concentrations of intratumoral androgen (androstenedione, testosterone, and 5α-dihydrotestosterone) at levels similar to tumors growing in intact hosts. Accordingly, castration induced up-regulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis (CYP17A1, AKR1C3, and HSD17B6), as well as expression of full-length androgen receptor (AR) and AR splice variants (AR-V1 and AR-V7). Furthermore, AR target gene expression was maintained in castration-resistant xenografts. The AR antagonists enzalutamide (MDV3100) and ARN-509 suppressed PSA production of castration-resistant tumors, confirming the androgen dependency of these tumors. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that our VCaP xenograft model exhibits the key characteristics of clinical CRPC and thus provides a valuable tool for identifying druggable targets and for testing therapeutic strategies targeting AR signaling in CRPC.

  5. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, Gabriella; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the conservation of this process across divergent cancer

  6. Androgen-Dependent Regulation of Human MUC1 Mucin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Mitchell

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available MUC1 mucin is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoids. Our objective was to determine whether androgen receptor. (20AR activation regulates expression of MUC1. The following breast and prostatic cell lines were phenotyped and grouped according to AR and MUC1protein expression: 1 AR+MUCi + [DAR17+19. (20AR transfectants of DU-145, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-453, and T47D]; 2 AR-MUCi+ [DZeoi. (20AR- vector control, DU-145, BT20, MDA-MB231, and MCF7]; 3 AIR +MUCi -. (20LNCaP and LNCaP-r. Cell proliferation was determined using the MTT assay in the presence of synthetic androgen R1881, 0.1 pM to 1 µM. Cell surface MUC1expression was determined by flow cytometry in the presence or absence of oestradiol, medroxy progesterone acetate or R1881, with and without 4 hydroxy-flutamide. (204-OH, a nonsteroidal AR antagonist. The functional significance of MUC1expression was investigated with a cell-cell aggregation assay. Only AR+ MUC1 + cell lines showed a significant increase in MUC1expression with AR activation. (20P. (20range =.01 to .0001, reversed in the presence of 4-OHF. Cell proliferation was unaffected. Increased expression of MUC1was associated with a significant. (20P. (20range =.002 to .001 reduction in cell-cell adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first description of androgen-dependent regulation of MUC1mucin. This is also functionally associated with decreased cell-cell adhesion, a recognised feature of progressive malignancy. These findings have important implications for physiological and pathological processes.

  7. Development of an androgen reporter gene assay (AR-LUX) utilizing a human cell line with an endogenously regulated androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankvoort, B M; de Groene, E M; van Meeteren-Kreikamp, A P; Witkamp, R F; Rodenburg, R J; Aarts, J M

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the work described in this report is to develop and characterize a cell-based androgen reporter assay. For this purpose, the androgen receptor (AR) expressing human breast cancer cell line T47D was stably transfected with a luciferase gene under transcriptional control of the PB-ARE-2 androgen response element. The application of this cell line in an endogenous Androgen Receptor-mediated LUciferase eXpression assay (AR-LUX) was validated. An EC50 value of 86 pM was determined for the standard androgen R1881 with a detection limit of 46 pM. Other androgens like dihydrotestosterone, 17beta-trenbolone, and bolasterone also induced luciferase expression, while anti-androgens suppressed these responses. As expected, AR-mediated responses were also elicited by high concentrations of the steroids progesterone, 17beta-estradiol, d-aldosterone, and dexamethasone, with observed EC50 values 10 to 350,000 times higher than that for R1881. A unique feature of the AR-LUX assay is that effects on modulation of active endogenous AR-levels are reliably reflected in the luciferase induction response, as exemplified by vitamin D, all-trans-retinoic acid, epigallocatechin gallate, and forskolin. This feature is especially useful when assessing complex mixtures, e.g., environmental samples or natural compound libraries. From these data it is concluded that the AR-LUX assay is a reliable in vitro test system for the detection and quantification of AR-mediated biological effects. The 96-well plate format makes the assay particularly suitable for high-throughput screening.

  8. Arsenic trioxide enhances the radiation sensitivity of androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wen Chiu

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men. In the present study, LNCaP (androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cells and PC-3 cells (androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells were used to investigate the anti-cancer effects of ionizing radiation (IR combined with arsenic trioxide (ATO and to determine the underlying mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. We found that IR combined with ATO increases the therapeutic efficacy compared to individual treatments in LNCaP and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. In addition, combined treatment showed enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation compared to treatment with ATO or IR alone in PC-3 cells. Combined treatment induced autophagy and apoptosis in LNCaP cells, and mainly induced autophagy in PC-3 cells. The cell death that was induced by the combined treatment was primarily the result of inhibition of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, we found that the combined treatment of cells pre-treated with 3-MA resulted in a significant change in AO-positive cells and cytotoxicity. In an in vivo study, the combination treatment had anti-tumor growth effects. These novel findings suggest that combined treatment is a potential therapeutic strategy not only for androgen-dependent prostate cancer but also for androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  9. Androgen receptor functional analyses by high throughput imaging: determination of ligand, cell cycle, and mutation-specific effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Szafran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding how androgen receptor (AR function is modulated by exposure to steroids, growth factors or small molecules can have important mechanistic implications for AR-related disease therapies (e.g., prostate cancer, androgen insensitivity syndrome, AIS, and in the analysis of environmental endocrine disruptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the development of a high throughput (HT image-based assay that quantifies AR subcellular and subnuclear distribution, and transcriptional reporter gene activity on a cell-by-cell basis. Furthermore, simultaneous analysis of DNA content allowed determination of cell cycle position and permitted the analysis of cell cycle dependent changes in AR function in unsynchronized cell populations. Assay quality for EC50 coefficients of variation were 5-24%, with Z' values reaching 0.91. This was achieved by the selective analysis of cells expressing physiological levels of AR, important because minor over-expression resulted in elevated nuclear speckling and decreased transcriptional reporter gene activity. A small screen of AR-binding ligands, including known agonists, antagonists, and endocrine disruptors, demonstrated that nuclear translocation and nuclear "speckling" were linked with transcriptional output, and specific ligands were noted to differentially affect measurements for wild type versus mutant AR, suggesting differing mechanisms of action. HT imaging of patient-derived AIS mutations demonstrated a proof-of-principle personalized medicine approach to rapidly identify ligands capable of restoring multiple AR functions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HT imaging-based multiplex screening will provide a rapid, systems-level analysis of compounds/RNAi that may differentially affect wild type AR or clinically relevant AR mutations.

  10. The PPAR{gamma} ligand ciglitazone regulates androgen receptor activation differently in androgen-dependent versus androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Patrice E.; Lyles, Besstina E.; Stewart, LaMonica V., E-mail: lstewart@mmc.edu

    2010-12-10

    The androgen receptor (AR) regulates growth and progression of androgen-dependent as well as androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonists have been reported to reduce AR activation in androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To determine whether PPAR{gamma} ligands are equally effective at inhibiting AR activity in androgen-independent prostate cancer, we examined the effect of the PPAR{gamma} ligands ciglitazone and rosiglitazone on C4-2 cells, an androgen- independent derivative of the LNCaP cell line. Luciferase-based reporter assays and Western blot analysis demonstrated that PPAR{gamma} ligand reduced dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced increases in AR activity in LNCaP cells. However, in C4-2 cells, these compounds increased DHT-induced AR driven luciferase activity. In addition, ciglitazone did not significantly alter DHT-mediated increases in prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein or mRNA levels within C4-2 cells. siRNA-based experiments demonstrated that the ciglitazone-induced regulation of AR activity observed in C4-2 cells was dependent on the presence of PPAR{gamma}. Furthermore, overexpression of the AR corepressor cyclin D1 inhibited the ability of ciglitazone to induce AR luciferase activity in C4-2 cells. Thus, our data suggest that both PPAR{gamma} and cyclin D1 levels influence the ability of ciglitazone to differentially regulate AR signaling in androgen-independent C4-2 prostate cancer cells.

  11. Structural Stereochemistry of Androstene Hormones Determines Interactions with Human Androgen, Estrogen, and Glucocorticoid Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Shaak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DHEA, 17α-AED, 17β-AED, and 17β-AET exhibit strong biological activity that has been attributed to androgenic, estrogenic, or antiglucocorticoid activity in vivo and in vitro. This study compared DHEA, 17α-AED, 17β-AED, and 17β-AET for their ability to activate the human AR, ER, and GR and determine the relative androgenicity, estrogenicity, and glucocorticoid activity. The results show that, at the receptor level, these androstene hormones are weak AR and even weaker ER activators. Direct androstene hormone activation of the human AR, ERα, and ERβ may not be essential for their biological function. Similarly, these hormones indirectly activated the human GR, only in the presence of high dexamethasone concentrations. These results underscore the major difference between androstene hormone interactions with these nuclear receptors and their biological effects.

  12. Androgen responsiveness to competition in humans: the role of cognitive variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira GA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gonçalo A Oliveira,1 Rui F Oliveira1,2 1Unidade de Investigação em Eco-Etologia, ISPA – Instituto Universitário, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Champalimaud Neuroscience Program, Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, Oeiras, Portugal Abstract: Although androgens are commonly seen as male sex hormones, it has been established over the years that in both sexes, androgens also respond to social challenges. To explain the socially driven changes in androgens, two theoretical models have been proposed: the biosocial model and the challenge hypothesis. These models are typically seen as partly overlapping; however, they generate different predictions that are clarified here. In humans, sports competition and nonmetabolic competitive tasks have been used in the laboratory setting, as a proxy for agonistic interactions in animals. The results reviewed here show that the testosterone (T response to competition in humans is highly variable – the studies present postcompetition T levels and changes in T that depend on the contest outcome and that cannot be predicted by the current theoretical models. These conflicting results bring to the foreground the importance of considering cognitive factors that could moderate the androgen response to competition. Among these variables, we elect cognitive appraisal and its components as a key candidate modulating factor. It is known that T also modulates the cognitive processes that are relevant to performance in competition. In this article, we reviewed the evidence arising from studies investigating the effect of administering exogenous T and compare those results with the findings from studies that measured endogenous T levels. Finally, we summarized the importance of also considering the interaction between androgens and other hormones, such as cortisol, when investigating the social modulation of T, as proposed by the dual-hormone hypothesis. Keywords: testosterone, challenge hypothesis, biosocial model, cognitive

  13. Expression of androgen-binding protein (ABP) in human cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schock, H W; Herbert, Z; Sigusch, H; Figulla, H R; Jirikowski, G F; Lotze, U

    2006-04-01

    Cardiomyocytes are known to be androgen targets. Changing systemic steroid levels are thought to be linked to various cardiac ailments, including dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The mode of action of gonadal steroid hormones on the human heart is unknown to date. In the present study, we used high-resolution immunocytochemistry on semithin sections (1 microm thick), IN SITU hybridization, and mass spectrometry to investigate the expression of androgen-binding protein (ABP) in human myocardial biopsies taken from male patients with DCM. We observed distinct cytoplasmic ABP immunoreactivity in a fraction of the myocytes. IN SITU hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotide probes revealed specific hybridization signals in these cells. A portion of the ABP-positive cells contained immunostaining for androgen receptor. With SELDI TOF mass spectrometry of affinity purified tissue extracts of human myocardium, we confirmed the presence of a 50 kDa protein similar to ABP. Our observations provide evidence of an intrinsic expression of ABP in human heart. ABP may be secreted from myocytes in a paracrine manner perhaps to influence the bioavailabity of gonadal steroids in myocardium.

  14. Effect of small molecules modulating androgen receptor (SARMs in human prostate cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tesei

    Full Text Available The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S-11 and (R-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R-9 and (S-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R-bicalutamide, also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R-9 was higher than that of (S-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S-11 and (R-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R-9 and (S-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC.

  15. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

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    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. EXPERIMENTAL: FINDINGS: We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas that express AR. CONCLUSION: This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines

  16. Urinary excretion rates of natural estrogens and androgens from humans, and their occurrence and fate in the environment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze-Hua; Kanjo, Yoshinori; Mizutani, Satoshi

    2009-09-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are pollutants with estrogenic or androgenic activities at very low concentrations and are emerging as a major concern for water quality. For sewage of municipal wastewater treatment plants in cities, one of the most important sources of EDCs are natural estrogens and natural androgens (NEAs) excreted from humans. Therefore, estrogenic/androgenic potencies or relative binding affinity of the NEAs were first outlined from different sources, and data of urinary excretion rates of NEAs were summarized. To evaluate their estrogenic activities, their excretion rates of estrogen equivalent (EEQ) or testosterone (T) equivalent (TEQ) were also calculated. Based on our summary, the total excretion rates of EEQ by estrone (E1), 17beta-estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3) only accounted for 66-82% of the total excretion rate of EEQ among four different groups, and the other corresponding natural estrogens contributed 18-34%, which meant that some of the other natural estrogens may also exist in wastewater with high estrogenic activities. Based on the contribution ratio of individual androgens to the total excretion rate of TEQ, five out of 12 natural androgens, T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), androsterone (AD), 5beta-androstanediol (beta-ADL), and androstenediol (ANL) were evaluated as the priority natural androgens, which may exist in wastewater with high androgenic activities. Published data on occurrence and fate of the NEAs including natural estrogen conjugates in the environment were also summarized here.

  17. Androgen receptor accelerates premature senescence of human dermal papilla cells in association with DNA damage.

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    Yi-Chien Yang

    Full Text Available The dermal papilla, located in the hair follicle, expresses androgen receptor and plays an important role in hair growth. Androgen/Androgen receptor actions have been implicated in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia, but the exact mechanism is not well known. Recent studies suggest that balding dermal papilla cells exhibit premature senescence, upregulation of p16(INK4a, and nuclear expression of DNA damage markers. To investigate whether androgen/AR signaling influences the premature senescence of dermal papilla cells, we first compared frontal scalp dermal papilla cells of androgenetic alopecia patients with matched normal controls and observed that premature senescence is more prominent in the dermal papilla cells of androgenetic alopecia patients. Exposure of androgen induced premature senescence in dermal papilla cells from non-balding frontal and transitional zone of balding scalp follicles but not in beard follicles. Overexpression of the AR promoted androgen-induced premature senescence in association with p16(INK4a upregulation, whereas knockdown of the androgen receptor diminished the effects of androgen. An analysis of γ-H2AX expression in response to androgen/androgen receptor signaling suggested that DNA damage contributes to androgen/androgen receptor-accelerated premature senescence. These results define androgen/androgen receptor signaling as an accelerator of premature senescence in dermal papilla cells and suggest that the androgen/androgen receptor-mediated DNA damage-p16(INK4a axis is a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia.

  18. Genotype versus phenotype in families with androgen insensitivity syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehmer, ALM; Bruggenwirth, H; Van Assendelft, C; Otten, BJ; Verleun-Mooijman, MCT; Niermeijer, MF; Brunner, HG; Rouwe, CW; Waelkens, JJ; Oostdijk, W; Kleijer, WJ; Van der Kwast, TH; De Vroede, MA; Drop, SLS

    2001-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome encompasses a wide range of phenotypes, which are caused by numerous different mutations in the AR gene. Detailed information on the genotype/ phenotype relationship in androgen insensitivity syndrome is important for sex assignment, treatment of androgen insensitivit

  19. Structural basis for androgen specificity and oestrogen synthesis in human aromatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Griswold, Jennifer; Erman, Mary; Pangborn, Walter; (HWMRI)

    2009-03-06

    Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the only enzyme in vertebrates known to catalyse the biosynthesis of all oestrogens from androgens. Aromatase inhibitors therefore constitute a frontline therapy for oestrogen-dependent breast cancer. In a three-step process, each step requiring 1 mol of O{sub 2}, 1 mol of NADPH, and coupling with its redox partner cytochrome P450 reductase, aromatase converts androstenedione, testosterone and 16{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone to oestrone, 17{beta}-oestradiol and 17{beta},16{alpha}-oestriol, respectively. The first two steps are C19-methyl hydroxylation steps, and the third involves the aromatization of the steroid A-ring, unique to aromatase. Whereas most P450s are not highly substrate selective, it is the hallmark androgenic specificity that sets aromatase apart. The structure of this enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane has remained unknown for decades, hindering elucidation of the biochemical mechanism. Here we present the crystal structure of human placental aromatase, the only natural mammalian, full-length P450 and P450 in hormone biosynthetic pathways to be crystallized so far. Unlike the active sites of many microsomal P450s that metabolize drugs and xenobiotics, aromatase has an androgen-specific cleft that binds the androstenedione molecule snugly. Hydrophobic and polar residues exquisitely complement the steroid backbone. The locations of catalytically important residues shed light on the reaction mechanism. The relative juxtaposition of the hydrophobic amino-terminal region and the opening to the catalytic cleft shows why membrane anchoring is necessary for the lipophilic substrates to gain access to the active site. The molecular basis for the enzyme's androgenic specificity and unique catalytic mechanism can be used for developing next-generation aromatase inhibitors.

  20. Endometase in Androgen-Repressed Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    M.; Kachman, M. T.; Wang, H. X.; Gong, S. Y.; Yan, F.; Hamler, R. L.; O’Neil, K. A.; Zhu, K.; Buchanan, N. S.; Barder , T. J. Two-dimensional liquid...F.; Subramanian, B.; Nakeff, A.; Barder , T. J.; Parus, S. J.; Lubman, D. M. A comparison of drug-treated and untreated HCT- 116 human colon

  1. 雄激素受体基因的表型异种突变%Phenotypic heterogeneity of mutations in androgen receptor gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Singh Rajender; Lalji Singh; Kumarasamy Thangaraj

    2007-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene has been extensively studied in diverse clinical conditions. In addition to the point mutations, trinucleotide repeat (CAG and GGN) length polymorphisms have been an additional subject of interest and controversy among geneticists. The polymorphic variations in triplet repeats have been associated with a number of disorders, but at the same time contradictory findings have also been reported. Further, studies on the same disorder in different populations have generated different results. Therefore, combined analysis or review of the published studies has been of much value to extract information on the significance of variations in the gene in various clinical conditions. AR genetics has been reviewed extensively but until now review articles have focused on individual clinical categories such as androgen insensitivity, male infertility, prostate cancer, and so on. We have made the first effort to review most the aspects of AR genetics. The impact of androgens in various disorders and polymorphic variations in the AR gene is the main focus of this review. Additionally, the correlations observed in various studies have been discussed in the light of in vitro evidences available for the effect of AR gene variations on the action of androgens.

  2. Frequent MAGE mutations in human melanoma.

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    Otavia L Caballero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer/testis (CT genes are expressed only in the germ line and certain tumors and are most frequently located on the X-chromosome (the CT-X genes. Amongst the best studied CT-X genes are those encoding several MAGE protein families. The function of MAGE proteins is not well understood, but several have been shown to potentially influence the tumorigenic phenotype. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook a mutational analysis of coding regions of four CT-X MAGE genes, MAGEA1, MAGEA4, MAGEC1, MAGEC2 and the ubiquitously expressed MAGEE1 in human melanoma samples. We first examined cell lines established from tumors and matching blood samples from 27 melanoma patients. We found that melanoma cell lines from 37% of patients contained at least one mutated MAGE gene. The frequency of mutations in the coding regions of individual MAGE genes varied from 3.7% for MAGEA1 and MAGEA4 to 14.8% for MAGEC2. We also examined 111 fresh melanoma samples collected from 86 patients. In this case, samples from 32% of the patients exhibited mutations in one or more MAGE genes with the frequency of mutations in individual MAGE genes ranging from 6% in MAGEA1 to 16% in MAGEC1. SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate for the first time that the MAGE gene family is frequently mutated in melanoma.

  3. Differential splicing of human androgen receptor pre-mRNA in X-linked reifenstein syndrome, because of a deletion involving a putative branch site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Verleun-Mooijman, M.C.T.; Blaeij, T.J.P. de; Brinkmann, A.O.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1994-04-01

    The analysis of the androgen receptor (AR) gene, mRNA, and protein in a subject with X-linked Reifenstein syndrome (partial androgen insensitivity) is reported. The presence of two mature AR transcripts in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient is established, and, by reverse transcriptase-PCR and RNase transcription analysis, the wild-type transcript and a transcript in which exon 3 sequences are absent without disruption of the translational reading frame are identified. Sequencing and hybridization analysis show a deletion of >6 kb in intron 2 of the human AR gene, starting 18 bp upstream of exon 3. The deletion includes the putative branch-point sequence (BPS) but not the acceptor splice site on the intron 2/exon 3 boundary. The deletion of the putative intron 2 BPS results in 90% inhibition of wild-type splicing. The mutant transcript encodes an AR protein lacking the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain. Western/immunoblotting analysis is used to show that the mutant AR protein is expressed in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient. The residual 10% wild-type transcript can be the result of the use of a cryptic BPS located 63 bp upstream of the intron 2/exon 3 boundary of the mutant AR gene. The mutated AR protein has no transcription-activating potential and does not influence the transactivating properties of the wild-type AR, as tested in cotransfection studies. It is concluded that the partial androgen-insensitivity syndrome of this patient is the consequence of the limited amount of wild-type AR protein expressed in androgen target cells, resulting from the deletion of the intron 2 putative BPS. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Douglas J

    2009-07-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few.

  5. What can animal research tell us about the link between androgens and social competition in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Trainor, Brian C; Marler, Catherine A

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between androgenic hormones, like testosterone (T), and aggression is extensively studied in human populations. Yet, while this work has illuminated a variety of principals regarding the behavioral and phenotypic effects of T, it is also hindered by inherent limitations of performing research on people. In these instances, animal research can be used to gain further insight into the complex mechanisms by which T influences aggression. Here, we explore recent studies on T and aggression in numerous vertebrate species, although we focus primarily on males and on a New World rodent called the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus). This species is highly territorial and monogamous, resembling the modern human social disposition. We review (i) how baseline and dynamic T levels predict and/or impact aggressive behavior and disposition; (ii) how factors related to social and physical context influence T and aggression; (iii) the reinforcing or "rewarding" aspects of aggressive behavior; and (iv) the function of T on aggression before and during a combative encounter. Included are areas that may need further research. We argue that animal studies investigating these topics fill in gaps to help paint a more complete picture of how androgenic steroids drive the output of aggressive behavior in all animals, including humans.

  6. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of t

  7. A Novel, Essential Control for Clonality Analysis with Human Androgen Receptor Gene Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Jeroen P.; Heuver, Leonie H.; van der Reijden, Bert A.; Raymakers, Reinier A.; de Witte, Theo; Jansen, Joop H.

    2002-01-01

    The most widely used technique for determining clonality based on X-chromosome inactivation is the human androgen receptor gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The reliability of this assay depends critically on the digestion of DNA before PCR with the methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme HpaII. We have developed a novel method for quantitatively monitoring the HpaII digestion in individual samples. Using real-time quantitative PCR we measured the efficiency of HpaII digestion by measuring the amplification of a gene that escapes X-chromosome inactivation (XE169) before and after digestion. This method was tested in blood samples from 30 individuals: 2 healthy donors and 28 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. We found a lack of XE169 DNA reduction after digestion in the granulocytes of two myelodysplastic syndrome patients leading to a false polyclonal X-chromosome inactivation pattern. In all other samples a significant reduction of XE169 DNA was observed after HpaII digestion. The median reduction was 220-fold, ranging from a 9.0-fold to a 57,000-fold reduction. Also paraffin-embedded malignant tissue was investigated from two samples of patients with mantle cell lymphoma and two samples of patients with colon carcinoma. In three of these cases inefficient HpaII digestion led to inaccurate X-chromosome inactivation pattern ratios. We conclude that monitoring the efficiency of the HpaII digestion in a human androgen receptor gene PCR setting is both necessary and feasible. PMID:12213708

  8. Androgen receptor isoforms in human prostatic cancer tissue and LNCaP cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Jie XIA; Xiao-Da TANG; Qing-Zheng MA

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the androgen receptor (AR) isoform expressions in human prostatic cancer tissue and LNCaP cell line. Methods: With high resolution isoelectric focusing (IEF) method we demonstrated the different expressions of AR isoforms in human prostatic cancer tissues and LNCaP cell line. Results: Data were obtained from three prostatic cancer specimens and the LNCaP cell line. Three types of AR isoforms were detected with pI values at 6.5,6.0, and 5.3. For the 3 prostatic cancer specimens, 1 sample showed all the three types of AR isoforms, the second specimen expressed at 6.5 and 6.0, and the third failed to show any type of isoforms. The LNCaP cell line expressed all the three AR isoforms. Binding of 3H-dihydrotestosterone (3H-DHT) to these three isoforms was inhibited by the addition ofl00-fold excess of DHT or testosterone, while not by progesterone, oestradiol and diethylstilboestrol. Conclusion: The expression of AR isofonns is different in different prostate cancer tissues, which may be related to the difference in the effect of anti-androgen therapy in different patients.

  9. Modelling mutational landscapes of human cancers in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Magali; Weninger, Annette; Ardin, Maude; Huskova, Hana; Castells, Xavier; Vallée, Maxime P.; McKay, James; Nedelko, Tatiana; Muehlbauer, Karl-Rudolf; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Alexander, John; Hazelwood, Lee; Byrnes, Graham; Hollstein, Monica; Zavadil, Jiri

    2014-03-01

    Experimental models that recapitulate mutational landscapes of human cancers are needed to decipher the rapidly expanding data on human somatic mutations. We demonstrate that mutation patterns in immortalised cell lines derived from primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exposed in vitro to carcinogens recapitulate key features of mutational signatures observed in human cancers. In experiments with several cancer-causing agents we obtained high genome-wide concordance between human tumour mutation data and in vitro data with respect to predominant substitution types, strand bias and sequence context. Moreover, we found signature mutations in well-studied human cancer driver genes. To explore endogenous mutagenesis, we used MEFs ectopically expressing activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and observed an excess of AID signature mutations in immortalised cell lines compared to their non-transgenic counterparts. MEF immortalisation is thus a simple and powerful strategy for modelling cancer mutation landscapes that facilitates the interpretation of human tumour genome-wide sequencing data.

  10. Human CMTM2/CKLFSF2 enhances the ligand-induced transactivation of the androgen receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU DaZhen; YIN CaiHua; ZHANG YingMei; TIAN LinJie; LI Ting; LI Dan; MA DaLong; GUO YingLu; WANG Ying

    2009-01-01

    CKLF (chemokine-like factor)-Iike MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link domain) transmembrane domain containing (CMTM) is a novel gene family. One member of this family, CMTM2, also named chemokine-like factor superfamily 2 (CKLFSF2), is expressed highly in the testis and moderately in the prostate, marrow and peripheral blood cells. However, the function of human CMTM2 remains unknown. Here, we found that CMTM2 was upregulated in 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated LNCaP cells. We investigated the relationship between CMTM2 and the androgen receptor. Our results showed that CMTM2 enhanced DHT-mediated androgen receptor (AR) transactiration and the expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA). We also observed that CMTM2 enhanced the AR protein level, which was reversed by silencing endogenous CMTM2 expression, which suggested that CMTM2 might play an important role in maintaining the AR protein level. We also found that CMTM2 suppressed Akt activation. A previous study showed that Akt could phosphorylate AR at Ser210 and Ser790 and lead to AR ubiquitylation and degradation as well as suppression of AR activity.Taken together, suppressing Akt activation and increasing the AR protein level might be one of the mechanisms for the CMTM2-mediated enhancement of AR transactivation.

  11. Androgenic biomarker prof|ling in human matrices and cell culture samples using high throughput, electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, John H; Titus, Mark A; Efstathiou, Eleni; Fetterly, Gerald J; Mohler, James L

    2014-05-01

    BACKGROUND. A high throughput, high pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with triple quadrupole mass spectral detection (LC/MS/MS) was validated for the measurement of 5 endogenous androgens in human plasma and serum and applied to various in vivo and in vitro study samples to pursue a better understanding of the interrelationship of the androgen axis, intracrine metabolism, and castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CaP). A Shimadzu HPLC system interfaced with a Sciex QTRAP 5500 mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization was used with in line column-switching. Samples were liquid/liquid extracted and chromatographed on a Luna C18(2) column at 60°C with a biphasic gradient using a 15-min run time. The method was validated for five androgens in human plasma and serum, and applied to four sets of samples. Plasma (n=188) and bone marrow aspirate (n=129) samples from patients with CaP, who received abiraterone acetate plus prednisone for up to 945 days(135 weeks), had undetectable androgens after 8 weeks of treatment. Plasma dehydroepiandrosterone(DHEA) concentrations were higher in African Americans than Caucasian Americans with newly diagnosed CaP. Analysis of prostate tumor tissue homogenates demonstrated reproducible testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) concentrations with a minimal sample size of 1.0–2.0 mg of tissue. Finally, cell pellet and media samples from the LNCaP C4-2 cell line showed conversion of T to DHT. The proposed LC/MS/MS method was validated for quantitation of five endogenous androgens in human plasma and serum, and effectively profiles androgens in clinical specimens and cell culture samples.

  12. Glucocorticoid-induced androgen inactivation by aldo-keto reductase 1C2 promotes adipogenesis in human preadipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Alain; Côté, Julie-Anne; Blouin, Karine; Nadeau, Mélanie; Pelletier, Mélissa; Marceau, Picard; Laberge, Philippe Y; Luu-The, Van; Tchernof, André

    2012-04-15

    Adipogenesis and lipid storage in human adipose tissue are inhibited by androgens such as DHT. Inactivation of DHT to 3α-diol is stimulated by glucocorticoids in human preadipocytes. We sought to characterize glucocorticoid-induced androgen inactivation in human preadipocytes and to establish its role in the antiadipogenic action of DHT. Subcutaneous and omental primary preadipocyte cultures were established from fat samples obtained in subjects undergoing abdominal surgeries. Inactivation of DHT to 3α/β-diol for 24 h was measured in dexamethasone- or vehicle-treated cells. Specific downregulation of aldo-keto reductase 1C (AKR1C) enzymes in human preadipocytes was achieved using RNA interference. In whole adipose tissue sample, cortisol production was positively correlated with androgen inactivation in both subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue (P adipose tissue of men and women (r = 0.24, n = 26, P effective in omental preadipocytes of obese men. The interplay between glucocorticoids and AKR1C2-dependent androgen inactivation may locally modulate adipogenesis and lipid accumulation in a depot-specific manner.

  13. Androgen-Sensitized Apoptosis of HPr-1AR Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Chen

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR signaling is crucial to the development and homeostasis of the prostate gland, and its dysregulation mediates common prostate pathologies. The mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells have been investigated in human and rodent adult prostate. However, the cellular stress response of human prostate epithelial cells is not well understood, though it is central to prostate health and pathology. Here, we report that androgen sensitizes HPr-1AR and RWPE-AR human prostate epithelial cells to cell stress agents and apoptotic cell death. Although 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment alone did not induce cell death, co-treatment of HPr-1AR cells with DHT and an apoptosis inducer, such as staurosporine (STS, TNFt, or hydrogen peroxide, synergistically increased cell death in comparison to treatment with each apoptosis inducer by itself. We found that the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer led to activation of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is supported by robust cleavage activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Further, the dramatic depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential that we observed upon co-treatment with DHT and STS is consistent with increased mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP in the pro-apoptotic mechanism. Interestingly, the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer was abolished by AR antagonists and inhibitors of transcription and protein synthesis, suggesting that AR mediates pro-apoptotic synergy through transcriptional regulation of MOMP genes. Expression analysis revealed that pro-apoptotic genes (BCL2L11/BIM and AIFM2 were DHT-induced, whereas pro-survival genes (BCL2L1/BCL-XL and MCL1 were DHT-repressed. Hence, we propose that the net effect of these AR-mediated expression changes shifts the balance of BCL2-family proteins

  14. Unusual specificity of the androgen receptor in the human prostate tumor cell line LNCaP: High affinity for progestagenic and estrogenic steroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Veldscholte (Jos); M.M. Voorhorst-Ogink (M.); J. Bolt-de Vries (Joan); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); J. Trapman (Jan); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAbstract LNCaP tumor cells, derived from a metastatic lesion of a human prostatic carcinoma, are androgen-sensitive in cell culture. Although increase in growth rate is observed with low doses of progestagens or estradiol, these cells contain exclusively androgen receptors. In the presen

  15. GENERATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR WITH SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Preparation of anti-human androgen receptor(hAR) monoclonal antibody (McAb). Methods: Four cells lines of hybridoma secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against AR were first established by fusion SP2/0 cell with spleen cell from BALB/c mice immunized with the coupling complex of hAR-KLH. Results: Paraffin-embedded sections of 45 prostate cancers were detected. There was an overall concordance of 91% using Immunohistochemistry between AR polyclonal antibody from Zymed and hAR-N McAb selfmade. Conclusion: The results show that the McAb obtained in this study would be a useful tool to detect the AR status in prostate cancer.

  16. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Mehmet; Liu, Yuanbo; Zhang, Zhentao; De Silva, Dinuka; Parker, Joel S; Earp, H Shelton; Whang, Young E

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  17. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karaca

    Full Text Available Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  18. Humanized Androgen Receptor Mice: A Genetic Model for Differential Response to Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    E.A., Vessella, R., Hess , D.L., Kalhorn, T.F., Higano, C.S., True, L.D., Nelson, P.S., 2008. Maintenance of intratumoral androgens in metastatic...androgen receptor-regulated TMPRSS2:ERG gene expression in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Cancer Res 2009;69(15):6027-32. [44] Hermans KG

  19. Identification of a new androgen receptor (AR) co-regulator BUD31 and related peptides to suppress wild-type and mutated AR-mediated prostate cancer growth via peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Wu, Po-Long; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lin, An-Chi; Ting, Huei-Ju; Pang, See-Tong; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Ma, Wen-Lung; Chen, Chung-Jung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-12-01

    Treatment with individual anti-androgens is associated with the development of hot-spot mutations in the androgen receptor (AR). Here, we found that anti-androgens-mt-ARs have similar binary structure to the 5α-dihydrotestosterone-wt-AR. Phage display revealed that these ARs bound to similar peptides, including BUD31, containing an Fxx(F/H/L/W/Y)Y motif cluster with Tyr in the +5 position. Structural analyses of the AR-LBD-BUD31 complex revealed formation of an extra hydrogen bond between the Tyr+5 residue of the peptide and the AR. Functional studies showed that BUD31-related peptides suppressed AR transactivation, interrupted AR N-C interaction, and suppressed AR-mediated cell growth. Combination of peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis may serve as a new strategy for developing anti-ARs that simultaneously suppress both wt and mutated AR function.

  20. Markov chain for estimating human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2015-12-01

    The Markov chain was proposed to estimate the human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern. One DNA sequence was taken randomly from 100 sequences in Genbank. The nucleotide transition matrix and mutation transition matrix were estimated from this sequence. We determined whether the states (mutation/normal) are recurrent or transient. The results showed that both of them are recurrent.

  1. Comparison of the effect of cortisol on aromatase activity and androgen metabolism in two human fibroblast cell lines derived from the same individual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, B; Brünner, N; Dombernowsky, P

    1990-01-01

    The effect of preincubation with cortisol on estrogen and androgen metabolism was investigated in human fibroblast monolayers grown from biopsies of genital and non-genital skin of the same person. The activity in the cells of aromatase, 5 alpha-reductase, 17 beta-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase.......5-1.0 x 10(-6) M in both cell lines. When preincubation with cortisol was omitted no estrogen synthesis was detected. The formation of androgen was not altered after preincubation with cortisol. Pronounced differences were found in estrogen and in androgen metabolism in the two cell lines suggesting...... a local regulation of the hormonal environment. The aromatase activity, which is low in many tissues could be stimulated by cortisol without altering the androgen metabolism was found to be a suitable system for investigations of the cellular interconversion of androgens and estrogens...

  2. The diverse and contrasting effects of using human prostate cancer cell lines to study androgen receptor roles in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Qiang Yu; Kuo-Pao Lai; Shu-Jie Xia; Hong-Chiang Chang; Chawnshang Chang; Shuyuan Yeh

    2009-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa).Androgen deprivation therapy is initially effective in blocking tumor growth,but it eventually leads to the hormonerefractory state.The detailed mechanisms of the conversion from androgen dependence to androgen independence remain unclear.Several PCa cell lines were established to study the role of AR in PCa,but the results were often inconsistent or contrasting in different cell lines,or in the same cell line grown under different conditions.The cellular and molecular alteration of epithelial cells and their microenvironments are complicated,and it is difficult to use a single cell line to address this important issue and also to study the pathophysiological effects of AR.In this paper,we summarize the different effects of AR on multiple cell lines and show the disadvantages of using a single human PCa cell line to study AR effects on PCa.We also discuss the advantages of widely used epithelium-stroma co-culture systems,xenograft mouse models,and genetically engineered PCa mouse models.The combination of in vitro cell line studies and in vivo mouse models might lead to more credible results and better strategies for the study of AR roles in PCa.

  3. Human RAG mutations: biochemistry and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kim, Min-Sung; Walter, Jolan E; Lee, Yu Nee

    2016-04-01

    The recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) and RAG2 proteins initiate the V(D)J recombination process, which ultimately enables the generation of T cells and B cells with a diversified repertoire of antigen-specific receptors. Mutations of the RAG genes in humans are associated with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes, ranging from severe combined immunodeficiency to autoimmunity. Recently, novel insights into the phenotypic diversity of this disease have been provided by resolving the crystal structure of the RAG complex, by developing novel assays to test recombination activity of the mutant RAG proteins and by characterizing the molecular and cellular basis of immune dysregulation in patients with RAG deficiency.

  4. Androgen deprivation of the PC-310 [correction of prohormone convertase-310] human prostate cancer model system induces neuroendocrine differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jongsma (Johan); M.H. Oomen; M.A. Noordzij (Marinus); W.M. van Weerden (Wytske); G.J. Martens; Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); F.H. Schröder (Fritz); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractNeuroendocrine (NE) cells are androgen-independent cells and secrete growth-modulating neuropeptides via a regulated secretory pathway (RSP). We studied NE differentiation after androgen withdrawal in the androgen-dependent prostate cancer xenograft PC-310.

  5. The fungus Cunninghamella elegans can produce human and equine metabolites of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydevik, Axel; Thevis, Mario; Krug, Oliver; Bondesson, Ulf; Hedeland, Mikael

    2013-05-01

    1. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a group of substances that have potential to be used as doping agents in sports. Being a relatively new group not available on the open market means that no reference materials are commercially available for the main metabolites. In the presented study, the in vitro metabolism of SARMs by the fungus Cunninghamella elegans has been investigated with the purpose of finding out if it can produce relevant human and equine metabolites. 2. Three different SARMs, S1, S4 and S24, were incubated for 5 days with C. elegans. The samples were analysed both with and without sample pretreatment using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry. 3. All the important phase I and some phase II metabolites from human and horse were formed by the fungus. They were formed through reactions such as hydroxylation, deacetylation, O-dephenylation, nitro-reduction, acetylation and sulfonation. 4. The study showed that the fungus produced relevant metabolites of the SARMs and thus can be used to mimic mammalian metabolism. Furthermore, it has the potential to be used for future production of reference material.

  6. Inhibition of human prostate cancer xenograft growth by 125I labeled triple-helin forming oligonucleotide directed against androgen receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; MA Yi; LU Han-ping; GAO Jin-hui; LIANG Chang-sheng; LIU Chang-zheng; ZOU Jun-tao; WANG Hua-qiao

    2008-01-01

    Background The failure of hormone treatment for advanced prostate cancer might be related to aberrant activation of the androgen receptor.We have shown that 125I labeled triple-helix forming oligonucleotide (TFO) against the androgen receptor gene inhibits androgen receptor expression and cell proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells in vitro.This study aimed at exploring the effects of the 125I-TFO on prostate tumor growth in vivo using a nude mouse xenograft model.Methods TFO was labeled with 125I by the iodogen method.Thirty-two nude mice bearing LNCaP xenograft tumors were randomized into 4 groups and were intratumorally injected with 125I-TFO,unlabeled TFO,Na125I and normal saline.Tumor size was measured weekly.The tumor growth inhibition rate (RI) was calculated by measurement of tumor weight.The expression of the androgen receptor gene was performed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical study.The prostate specific antigen (PSA) serum levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.The tumor cell apoptosis index (Al) was detected by TUNEL assay.Results Tumor measurements showed that tumor development was significantly inhibited by either 125I-TFO or TFO,with tumor RIs of 50.79% and 32.80% respectively.125I-TFO caused greater inhibition of androgen receptor expression and higher Als in tumor tissue than TFO.Both the tumor weight and the PSA serum levels in 125I-TFO treated mice ((0.93±0.15) g and (17.43±1.85) ng/ml,respectively) were significantly lower than those ((1.27±0.21) g and (28.25±3.41)ng/ml,respectively) in TFO treated mice (all P<0.05).Na125I did not significantly affect tumor growth and androgen receptor expression in tumor tissue.Conclusions The 125I-TFO can effectively inhibit androgen receptor expression and tumor growth of human prostate cancer xenografts in vivo.The inhibitory efficacy of 125I-TFO is more potent than that of TFO,providing a reference for future studies of antigen radiotherapy.

  7. Human Germline Mutation and the Erratic Evolutionary Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the chronology of human evolution relies on the “molecular clock” provided by the steady accumulation of substitutions on an evolutionary lineage. Recent analyses of human pedigrees have called this understanding into question by revealing unexpectedly low germline mutation rates, which imply that substitutions accrue more slowly than previously believed. Translating mutation rates estimated from pedigrees into substitution rates is not as straightforward as it may seem, however. We dissect the steps involved, emphasizing that dating evolutionary events requires not “a mutation rate” but a precise characterization of how mutations accumulate in development in males and females—knowledge that remains elusive. PMID:27760127

  8. Mutations in the human TWIST gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, K W; Zackai, E H; Stolle, C A

    2000-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a relatively common craniosynostosis disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. Mutations in the TWIST gene have been identified in patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. The TWIST gene product is a transcription factor with DNA binding and helix-loop-helix domains. Numerous missense and nonsense mutations cluster in the functional domains, without any apparent mutational hot spot. Two novel point mutations and one novel polymorphism are included in this review. Large deletions including the TWIST gene have been identified in some patients with learning disabilities or mental retardation, which are not typically part of the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Comprehensive studies in patients with the clinical diagnosis of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome have demonstrated a TWIST gene abnormality in about 80%, up to 37% of which may be large deletions [Johnson et al., 1998]. The gene deletions and numerous nonsense mutations are suggestive of haploinsufficiency as the disease-causing mechanism. No genotype phenotype correlation was apparent.

  9. Frequency of TERT promoter mutations in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, João; Almeida, Ana; Pópulo, Helena; Batista, Rui; Lyra, Joana; Pinto, Vasco; Coelho, Ricardo; Celestino, Ricardo; Prazeres, Hugo; Lima, Luis; Melo, Miguel; da Rocha, Adriana Gaspar; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patrícia; Castro, Ligia; Pardal, Fernando; Lopes, José Manuel; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Reis, Rui Manuel; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Lima, Jorge; Máximo, Valdemar; Soares, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Reactivation of telomerase has been implicated in human tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the presence of recurrent somatic mutations in the TERT promoter in cancers of the central nervous system (43%), bladder (59%), thyroid (follicular cell-derived, 10%) and skin (melanoma, 29%). In thyroid cancers, the presence of TERT promoter mutations (when occurring together with BRAF mutations) is significantly associated with higher TERT mRNA expression, and in glioblastoma we find a trend for increased telomerase expression in cases harbouring TERT promoter mutations. Both in thyroid cancers and glioblastoma, TERT promoter mutations are significantly associated with older age of the patients. Our results show that TERT promoter mutations are relatively frequent in specific types of human cancers, where they lead to enhanced expression of telomerase.

  10. The origins, determinants, and consequences of human mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendure, Jay; Akey, Joshua M

    2015-09-25

    Germline mutations are the principal cause of heritable disease and the ultimate source of evolutionary change. Similarly, somatic mutations are the primary cause of cancer and may contribute to the burden of human disease more broadly than previously appreciated. Here, we review recent insights into the rates, spectrum, and determinants of genomic mutations and how these parameters inform our understanding of both Mendelian and complex human diseases. We also consider models for conceptualizing mutational consequences and outline several key areas for future research, including the development of new technologies to access and quantify the full spectrum of mutations, as well as to better interpret the consequences of mutations with respect to molecular functionality, evolutionary fitness, and disease pathogenicity.

  11. Development of androgen- and estrogen-responsive bioassays, members of a panel of human cell line-based highly selective steroid-responsive bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneveld, Edwin; Jansen, Hendrina J; Riteco, Jacoba A C; Brouwer, Abraham; van der Burg, Bart

    2005-01-01

    We have established highly sensitive and specific androgen and estrogen reporter cell lines which we have named AR (androgen receptor) and ERalpha (estrogen receptor alpha) CALUX (Chemically Activated LUciferase eXpression), respectively. Both bioassays are member of a panel of CALUX reporter cell lines derived from the human U2-OS osteosarcoma cell line, all using highly selective reporter constructs based with a basal promoter element linked to multimerized response elements, allowing efficient and specific measurement of compounds interfering with androgen, estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoid receptors. The AR CALUX bioassay contains the human androgen receptor and a luciferase reporter construct containing three androgen-responsive elements coupled to a minimal TATA promoter. This cell line was characterized by its stable expression of AR protein, its highly selective response to low levels of different natural and synthetic androgens, and its insignificant response to other nuclear hormone receptor ligands such as estrogens, progestins, and glucocorticoids. The EC50 of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) was found to be 0.13 nM, consistent with the high affinity of this ligand to the human AR. Flutamide, cyproterone acetate, and the environmental contaminants vinclozolin, DDT, methoxychlor, its metabolite HPTE, and penta-BFR showed clear antagonistic activity in the AR CALUX bioassay, competitively inhibiting DHT-mediated transactivation. The established AR CALUX bioassay proved to excel in terms of easy cell line maintenance, high fold induction range (typical 30 times over solvent control), low minimal detection limit (3.6 pM), and high androgen selectivity. Potential applications such as testing the androgenic or estrogenic activity of pure chemicals and pharmaceuticals and complex mixtures (environmental, food, feed, and clinical) are discussed.

  12. Mutation at the Human D1S80 Minisatellite Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppareddi Balamurugan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the general biology of minisatellites. The purpose of this study is to examine repeat mutations from the D1S80 minisatellite locus by sequence analysis to elucidate the mutational process at this locus. This is a highly polymorphic minisatellite locus, located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. We have analyzed 90,000 human germline transmission events and found seven (7 mutations at this locus. The D1S80 alleles of the parentage trio, the child, mother, and the alleged father were sequenced and the origin of the mutation was determined. Using American Association of Blood Banks (AABB guidelines, we found a male mutation rate of 1.04×10-4 and a female mutation rate of 5.18×10-5 with an overall mutation rate of approximately 7.77×10-5. Also, in this study, we found that the identified mutations are in close proximity to the center of the repeat array rather than at the ends of the repeat array. Several studies have examined the mutational mechanisms of the minisatellites according to infinite allele model (IAM and the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM. In this study, we found that this locus fits into the one-step mutation model (SMM mechanism in six out of seven instances similar to STR loci.

  13. Disposition and metabolism of LY2452473, a selective androgen receptor modulator, in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ping; Rehmel, Jessica Fayer; Cassidy, Kenneth; Hadden, Chad; Campanale, Kristina; Patel, Nita; Johnson, Jason

    2012-12-01

    The disposition and metabolism of isopropyl N-[(2S)-7-cyano-4-(2-pyridylmethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-cyclopenta[b]indol-2-yl]carbamate (LY2452473; a selective androgen receptor modulator) in humans was characterized after a single 15-mg (100 μCi) oral dose of [¹⁴C]LY2452473 to six healthy male subjects. LY2452473 was absorbed rapidly (time to reach maximum plasma concentration for both LY2452473 and total radioactivity was 2-3 h) and cleared slowly (plasma terminal t(½) of 27 h for LY2452473 and 51 h for the total radioactivity). LY2452473 and metabolites S5 (acetylamine) and S12 (hydroxylation on the cyclopentene) were major circulating entities in plasma, accounting for approximately 42, 21, and 35% of the total radioactivity exposure, respectively, as calculated from relative area under the concentration versus time curves from zero to 48 h derived from the plasma radiochromatograms. The radioactive dose was almost completely recovered after 312 h with 47.9% of the dose eliminated in urine and 46.6% in feces. Minimal LY2452473 was detected in excreta, indicating that metabolic clearance was the main route of elimination. Multiple metabolic pathways were observed with no single metabolic pathway accounting for more than 30% of the dose in excreta. Metabolite S10 (a diol across the cyclopenta-indole linkage) was the largest excretory metabolite (approximately 14% of the dose). S10 displayed interesting chemical and chromatographic properties, undergoing conversion to the corresponding epoxide under acidic conditions and conversion back to the diol under neutral conditions. An in vitro phenotyping approach indicated that CYP3A4 was the largest contributor to LY2452473 depletion.

  14. Novel Nor-Homo- and Spiro-Oxetan- Steroids Target the Human Androgen Receptor and Act as Antiandrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Marie; Rabe, Sebastian; Hessenkemper, Wiebke; Roell, Daniela; Bartsch, Sophie; Kraft, Florian; Abraham, Tsion E; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; van Royen, Martin E; Giannis, Athanassios; Baniahmad, Aria

    2014-06-01

    The prostate adenocarcinoma is the cancer with the highest incidence for men in Western countries. Targeting the androgen receptor (AR) by antagonists is used as hormone therapy for prostate cancer (PCa), however, eventually therapy resistance occurs in most patients. In most of these cancer the AR signaling is active and thus AR remains an important drug target. Since many years we are characterizing novel chemical structural platforms to provide a broader possibility for compounds that bind to and act as AR antagonists. Here, we describe the chemical synthesis of a battery of novel steroidal derivatives as nor-homo-, spiro-oxolan- and spiro-oxetan- steroids. They modulate the transcriptional activity of the human AR. As AR antagonists, the spiro-oxetan- steroid derivatives seem to be the most potent steroid derivatives. They inhibit the transcriptional activity of both wild-type AR as well as the AR mutant T877A. In line with this, these compounds bind to the human AR and inhibit the proliferation of the human androgen-dependent growing PCa cell line LNCaP. Interestingly, the castration-resistant AR expressing human PC3-AR cells are also growth inhibited. On mechanistic level, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays with living cells indicate that the androgen-induced N/C terminal interaction of the AR is inhibited by the investigated compounds. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assays in living cells suggest a higher mobility of the AR in the cell nuclei in the presence of spiro-oxetan- steroidal antagonists. Together, these findings suggest that spiro-oxetan- steroids are very useful as a chemical platform for novel AR antagonists.

  15. Molecular mechanism of R-bicalutamide switching from androgen receptor antagonist to agonist induced by amino acid mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongli; Han, Rui; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Zheng, Lifang

    2016-12-01

    R-bicalutamide, a first generation antiandrogen, was used to treat prostate cancer for decades. Although it is very effective at the beginning, resistance appears after 2-3 years of treatment. Mutation of androgen receptor (AR) is considered a main reason for drug resistance. It is reported that AR W741C, W741L, W741C_T877A, T877A, F876L, F876L_T877A and L701H mutations can convert R-bicalutamide from AR antagonist to agonist, but the switching mechanisms are not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to analyze the interaction mechanisms between R-bicalutamide and wild type/mutant ARs. The results indicate that helix H12, which lies on the top of AR LBD like a cover, plays a vital role in R-bicalutamide binding. When interacting with AR, the B-ring of R-bicalutamide pushes H12 aside, distorting the coactivator binding site (AF2) resulting in the inactivation of transcription. Several residue mutations appear to enlarge the distance between the B-ring of R-bicalutamide and H12, reducing steric clash, which is conducive to a closed H12 conformation, leading to the formation of the coactivator binding site AF2 and increased transcription. Hydrogen bond and per-residue free energy decomposition analyses are also investigated to explore the interacting mechanisms, and M895 is found to be a key residue in the antagonist mechanism. The obtained molecular mechanisms will aid rational screening and design of novel AR antagonists, even to mutant AR.

  16. Single amino acid substitutions at 2 of 14 positions in an ultra-conserved region of the androgen receptor yield an androgen-binding domain that is reversibly thermolabile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliou, M.; Lumbroso, R.; Alvarado, C. [McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The stereochemistry of the androgen receptor (AR) that is responsible for androgen-specific binding and for its contribution to the transregulatory attributes of an androgen-receptor complex are unknown. Our objective is to define structure-function relations of the human AR by correlating germline missense mutations at its X-linked locus with its resultant misbehavior. Subjects with Arg773Cys have complete androgen insensitivity. We and several other laboratories have reported that their genital skin fibroblasts (GSF) have negligible androgen-binding activity at 37{degrees}. We have found that Phe763Leu also causes CAI, but with approximately 10 fmol/mg protein androgen-binding activity at 37{degrees} (R-deficient). Within COS-1 cells transfected with each mutant AR cDNA, Phe763Leu and Arg773Cys androgen-binding activities are reversibly thermolabile, by a factor of 2, at 37{degrees} versus 22{degrees}, only in the presence of androgen; in the absence of androgen they are thermostable at 37{degrees}. We have discovered that (for a reason yet unknown) the GSF from a third family with Arg773Cys (and no other coding sequence mutation) have 20-40 mol/mg protein of androgen-binding activity at 37{degrees} when measured with 3-6 nFM androgen. This activity reversibly doubles at 22{degrees}. The reversible thermolability of an AR with Arg773Cys (and probably with Phe763Leu) is demonstrable within GSF. Ligand-dependence of this thermolability implies that ligand induces these mutant AR to undergo a deviant conformational change in, or near, a 14-aa region that shares 90% identity/similarity with its closest receptor relatives.

  17. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; Calabrese, Peter; Tiemann-Boege, Irene; Shinde, Deepali Narendra; Yoon, Song-Ro; Gelfand, David; Bauer, Keith; Arnheim, Norman

    2007-09-01

    The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G) in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2) is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3) to >10(4) times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6)) the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model). This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp) carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation deleterious to an

  18. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Qin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2 is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3 to >10(4 times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6 the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model. This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation

  19. Androgen, estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in the human uterus during the menstrual cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, HJMM; Heineman, MJ; Theunissen, PHMH; de Jong, FH; Evers, JLH

    Cyclic changes in steroid receptor expression in endometrial cells are considered a reflection of its differential functions. Besides estrogen and progestogens, androgens have also been suggested to affect the biological function of the female reproductive tract. We investigated the distribution and

  20. The discovery of novel human androgen receptor antagonist chemotypes using a combined pharmacophore screening procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Arnout; Helsen, Christine; Zhang, Kam Y J; Claessens, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms involved in castration- and therapy-resistant prostate cancer has led to a renewed interest in androgen receptor (AR)-targeted therapeutics. Anti-androgens that block the activity of the AR therefore remain a valid therapeutic option. However, they must be more effective than, or display a distinct mechanism of action or binding mode from those of bicalutamide and hydroxyflutamide, which are currently in clinical use. For that reason, the second-generation anti-androgen MDV3100 was developed. MDV3100, however, shares its 4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl group with bicalutamide and hydroxyflutamide required for binding to the AR. In this work, we used a combined strategy to find new antagonist structures distinct from the 4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl group to avoid cross-resistance for these compounds and to find structures without agonist activity on mutant ARs (AR W741C and AR T877A). We found two novel chemotypes with AR-antagonistic activity (IC(50): 3-6 μM) by virtual screening and confirmed their biological activity in an androgen-responsive reporter assay. The design of our computational approach was validated by the observation of strongly decreased or absence of agonistic activity on the two mutant ARs. Further structural derivatization to optimize the potency of these compounds can render these chemotypes into very promising, alternative AR antagonists for prostate cancer therapy.

  1. The study of human mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neel, J.V.

    1992-01-01

    We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode.

  2. How much do we know about spontaneous human mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, J.F. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The much larger number of cell divisions between zygote and sperm than between zygote and egg, the increased age of fathers of children with new dominant mutations, and the greater evolution rate of pseudogenes on the Y chromosome than of those on autosomes all point to a much higher mutation rate in human males than in females, as first pointed out by Haldane in his classical study of X-linked hemophilia. The age of the father is the main factor determining the human spontaneous mutation rate, and probably the total mutation rate. The total mutation rate in Drosophila males of genes causing minor reduction in viability is at least 0.4 per sperm and may be considerably higher. The great mutation load implied by a rate of [approx] 1 per zygote can be greatly ameliorated by quasi-transition selection. Corresponding data are not available for the human population. The evolution rate of pseudogenes in primates suggests some 10[sup 2] new mutations per zygote. Presumably the overwhelming majority of these are neutral, but even the approximate fraction is not known. Statistical evidence in Drosophilia shows that mutations with minor effects cause about the same heterozygous impairment of fitness as those that are lethal when homozygous. The magnitude of heterozygous effect is such that almost all mutant genes are eliminated as heterozygotes before ever becoming homozygous. Although quantitative data in the human species are lacking, anecdotal information supports the conclusion that partial dominance is the rule here as well. This suggests that if the human mutation rate were increased or decreased, the effects would be spread over a period of 50-100 generations. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. TP53 mutations, expression and interaction networks in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Sun, Qingrong

    2017-01-03

    Although the associations of p53 dysfunction, p53 interaction networks and oncogenesis have been widely explored, a systematic analysis of TP53 mutations and its related interaction networks in various types of human cancers is lacking. Our study explored the associations of TP53 mutations, gene expression, clinical outcomes, and TP53 interaction networks across 33 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We show that TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in a number of cancers, and its mutations appear to be early events in cancer initiation. We identified genes potentially repressed by p53, and genes whose expression correlates significantly with TP53 expression. These gene products may be especially important nodes in p53 interaction networks in human cancers. This study shows that while TP53-truncating mutations often result in decreased TP53 expression, other non-truncating TP53 mutations result in increased TP53 expression in some cancers. Survival analyses in a number of cancers show that patients with TP53 mutations are more likely to have worse prognoses than TP53-wildtype patients, and that elevated TP53 expression often leads to poor clinical outcomes. We identified a set of candidate synthetic lethal (SL) genes for TP53, and validated some of these SL interactions using data from the Cancer Cell Line Project. These predicted SL genes are promising candidates for experimental validation and the development of personalized therapeutics for patients with TP53-mutated cancers.

  4. Multi-nucleotide de novo Mutations in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Besenbacher

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutation of the DNA molecule is one of the most fundamental processes in biology. In this study, we use 283 parent-offspring trios to estimate the rate of mutation for both single nucleotide variants (SNVs and short length variants (indels in humans and examine the mutation process. We found 17812 SNVs, corresponding to a mutation rate of 1.29 × 10-8 per position per generation (PPPG and 1282 indels corresponding to a rate of 9.29 × 10-10 PPPG. We estimate that around 3% of human de novo SNVs are part of a multi-nucleotide mutation (MNM, with 558 (3.1% of mutations positioned less than 20kb from another mutation in the same individual (median distance of 525bp. The rate of de novo mutations is greater in late replicating regions (p = 8.29 × 10-19 and nearer recombination events (p = 0.0038 than elsewhere in the genome.

  5. Functional characterization of human cancer-derived TRKB mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Geiger

    Full Text Available Cancer originates from cells that have acquired mutations in genes critical for controlling cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Often, tumors continue to depend on these so-called driver mutations, providing the rationale for targeted anticancer therapies. To date, large-scale sequencing analyses have revealed hundreds of mutations in human tumors. However, without their functional validation it remains unclear which mutations correspond to driver, or rather bystander, mutations and, therefore, whether the mutated gene represents a target for therapeutic intervention. In human colorectal tumors, the neurotrophic receptor TRKB has been found mutated on two different sites in its kinase domain (TRKB(T695I and TRKB(D751N. Another site, in the extracellular part of TRKB, is mutated in a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (TRKB(L138F. Lastly, our own analysis has identified one additional TRKB point mutation proximal to the kinase domain (TRKB(P507L in a human melanoma cell line. The functional consequences of all these point mutations, however, have so far remained elusive. Previously, we have shown that TRKB is a potent suppressor of anoikis and that TRKB-expressing cells form highly invasive and metastatic tumors in nude mice. To assess the functional consequences of these four TRKB mutations, we determined their potential to suppress anoikis and to form tumors in nude mice. Unexpectedly, both colon cancer-derived mutants, TRKB(T695I and TRKB(D751N, displayed reduced activity compared to that of wild-type TRKB. Consistently, upon stimulation with the TRKB ligand BDNF, these mutants were impaired in activating TRKB and its downstream effectors AKT and ERK. The two mutants derived from human tumor cell lines (TRKB(L138F and TRKB(P507L were functionally indistinguishable from wild-type TRKB in both in-vitro and in-vivo assays. In conclusion, we fail to detect any gain-of-function of four cancer-derived TRKB point mutations.

  6. Regulation of human androgen receptor by corepressors and signal transduction in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The thesis primarily addresses the role of transcriptional corepressor and signal transduction cascades in regulating androgen receptor (AR) activity. AR is a ligand-activated transcription factor and is important for the development of male phenotype. Malfunctioning of AR function has been implicated in the progression of the prostate cancer (CaP). Clinical management of the CaP most often involves the administration of anti-hormones (Cas, CPA) that bind to AR and turn it transcr...

  7. Humanized Androgen Receptor Mice: A Genetic Model for Differential Response to Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    have now been harvested. We anticipate successful completion of this project within the no-cost extension. Our new mouse model relies for...Plenary addresses at two conferences that described previous work from the lab and mentioned new studies supported by this grant: 09/22/2010...SB, Kwiek JJ, Aaronson D, Hancock M, Catling AD, et al. Androgen Receptor Phosphorylation. Regulation and identification of the phosphorylation

  8. New analytical methodologies for doping control – detection of anabolic androgenic steroids in human urine

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Dissertation submitted to Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia - Universidade Nova de Lisboa in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Biochemistry - Biotechnology) The use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) and other banned substances to enhance athletic performance has important health and social implications. The AAS are a major group included in the prohibited list of the world anti-doping agency (WADA) as well as of major sports authorities. This class...

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE IN VITRO METABOLISM OF SELECTIVE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR MODULATOR USING HUMAN, RAT, AND DOG LIVER ENZYME PREPARATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Wu, Zengru; Bohl, Casey E.; Yang, Jun; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Compound S4 [S-3-(4-acetylamino-phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide] is a novel nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator that demonstrates tissue-selective androgenic and anabolic effects. The purpose of this in vitro study was to identify the phase I metabolites, potential species differences in metabolism, and the cytochromes P450 (P450s) involved in the phase I metabolism of S4 using 14C-S4, recombinant P450s, and other liver enzyme preparations from human, rat, and dog. The major phase I metabolism pathways of S4 in humans were identified as deacetylation of the B-ring acetamide group, hydrolysis of the amide bond, reduction of the A-ring nitro group, and oxidation of the aromatic rings, with deacetylation being the predominant pathway observed with most of the enzyme preparations tested. Among the major human P450 enzymes tested, CYP3A4 appeared to be one of the major phase I enzymes that could be responsible for the phase I metabolism of S4 [Km = 16.1 μM, Vmax = 1.6 pmol/(pmol · min)] in humans and mainly catalyzed the deacetylation, hydrolysis, and oxidation of S4. In humans, the cytosolic enzymes mainly catalyzed the hydrolysis reaction, whereas the microsomal enzymes primarily catalyzed the deacetylation reactions. Similar phase I metabolic profiles were observed in rats and dogs as well, except that the amide bond hydrolysis seemed to occur more rapidly in rats. In summary, these results showed that the major phase I reaction of S4 in human, rat, and dog is acetamide group deacetylation. PMID:16272404

  10. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  11. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  12. Computer simulations of human interferon gamma mutated forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilkova, E.; Litov, L.; Petkov, P.; Petkov, P.; Markov, S.; Ilieva, N.

    2010-01-01

    In the general framework of the computer-aided drug design, the method of molecular-dynamics simulations is applied for investigation of the human interferon-gamma (hIFN-γ) binding to its two known ligands (its extracellular receptor and the heparin-derived oligosaccharides). A study of 100 mutated hIFN-γ forms is presented, the mutations encompassing residues 86-88. The structural changes are investigated by comparing the lengths of the α-helices, in which these residues are included, in the native hIFN-γ molecule and in the mutated forms. The most intriguing cases are examined in detail.

  13. Mutation of miRNA target sequences during human evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, Paul P; Vinther, Jeppe

    2008-01-01

    It has long-been hypothesized that changes in non-protein-coding genes and the regulatory sequences controlling expression could undergo positive selection. Here we identify 402 putative microRNA (miRNA) target sequences that have been mutated specifically in the human lineage and show that genes...... containing such deletions are more highly expressed than their mouse orthologs. Our findings indicate that some miRNA target mutations are fixed by positive selection and might have been involved in the evolution of human-specific traits.......It has long-been hypothesized that changes in non-protein-coding genes and the regulatory sequences controlling expression could undergo positive selection. Here we identify 402 putative microRNA (miRNA) target sequences that have been mutated specifically in the human lineage and show that genes...

  14. Update on androgenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorneycroft, I H

    1999-02-01

    The development of a new generation of progestins deemed less androgenic than their earlier counterparts has led to a number of misconceptions regarding their possible benefits in combination oral contraceptives. All combination oral contraceptives are beneficial for treating such androgenic conditions as acne and hirsutism. The only expressed androgenic effect of some first- and second-generation combined oral contraceptives are changes in plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels. However, the overall effect of today's low-dose oral contraceptives is largely lipid neutral, and human and monkey studies have shown that oral contraceptive use is associated with reduced, not increased, atherosclerosis rates. Myocardial infarction rates are not increased among oral contraceptive users, except among those who are heavy smokers.

  15. Human Papillomavirus 16E6 Oncogene Mutation in Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Sun; Xiao-qin Ha; Tong-de Lv; Chuan-ping Xing; Bin Liu; Xiao-zhe Cao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, after breast cancer. High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are considered to be the major causes of cervical cancer. HPV16 is the most common type of HR-HPVs and HPV16 E6 gene is one of the major oncogenes. Specific mutations are considered as dangerous factors causing CC. This study was designed to find mutations of HPV16 E6 and the relationship between the mutations and the happening of CC.Methods: The tissue DNA was extracted from 15 biopsies of CC. Part of HPV16 E6 gene (nucleotide 201-523) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the CC tissue DNA. The PCR fragments were sequenced and analyzed.Results: The result of PCR showed that the positive rate of HPV16 E6 was 93.33% (14/15). After sequencing and analyzing, in the 13 out of 14 PCR fragments, 4 maintained prototype (30.77%), 8 had a same 350G mutation (61.54%), and 1 had a 249G mutation (7.69%).Conclusion: This study suggest that there is a high infection rate of HPV in cervical cancer and most of the HPV16 E6 gene has mutations. Those mutations may have an association with the development of cervical cancer.

  16. Prospects for DNA methods to measure human heritable mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1985-06-14

    A workshop cosponsored by ICPEMC and the US Department of Energy was held in Alta, Utah, December 9-13, 1984 to examine the extent to which DNA-oriented methods might provide new approaches to the important but intractable problem of measuring mutation rates in control and exposed human populations. The workshop identified and analyzed six DNA methods for detection of human heritable mutation, including several created at the meeting, and concluded that none of the methods combine sufficient feasibility and efficiency to be recommended for general application. 8 refs.

  17. Detection of androgen receptor gene mutation in two pedigrees with an-drogen insensitivity syndrome%两个雄激素不敏感综合征家系中 AR基因突变检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    信艳萍; 吴庆华; 张毅; 史惠蓉

    2015-01-01

    目的:对两个疑似雄激素不敏感综合征( AIS)家系进行基因诊断和其他临床相关检查,旨在发现其致病基因并进行遗传咨询。方法:对两个AIS家系的先证者及相关成员行体格检查、染色体核型分析、内分泌检测及超声检查后,提取外周血全基因组DNA,扩增位于X染色体上AR基因的8个外显子,扩增产物测序后与基因库中正常人的序列进行比对,查找是否存在致病突变。结果:两个AIS家系的先证者均检测到AR基因突变,分别为c.2042T>C(p.681I>T)和c.1822C>T(p.608R>X),家系中女性携带者中检测出了上述位点的杂合突变。家系1先证者行腹腔镜性腺切除术后证实性腺为睾丸。结论:AR基因的p.681 I>T和p.608 R>X是两个AIS家系患者的致病性突变;对AR基因进行基因检测是46,XY性发育异常,特别是AIS有效的诊断方式。%Aim:Clinical and genetic tests were performed in two pedigrees suspected of androgen insensitivity syndrome ( AIS) to get the diagnosis and provide genetic counseling .Methods:Physical examination , karyotyping ,endocrinal tests and ultrasonography were performed in the probands and their relatives .Eight encoding exons of AR gene extracted from peripher-al blood were amplified by PCR .The products were compared with the normal gene sequences and further analyzed by direct DNA sequencing to find possible mutant gene .Results:Different mutations of AR gene were detected in both pedigrees , re-spectively, c.2042T>C(p.681I>T) and c.1822C>T(p.608R>X).Heterozygous double peaks at the same position were found in female carriers.In pedigree 1, the laparoscopic surgery was performed in the proband and the sex gland was con-firmed to be testis.Conclusion:These two types of mutation of AR gene may be the pathologic causes of AIS .Direct sequen-cing of AR gene is a rapid method to diagnose 46,XY disorder of sex development , especially for

  18. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotbaddini, Maryam; Powell, Joann B

    2015-07-06

    The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR) expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models.

  19. The AhR Ligand, TCDD, Regulates Androgen Receptor Activity Differently in Androgen-Sensitive versus Castration-Resistant Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghotbaddini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reported biological effects of TCDD include induction of drug metabolizing enzymes, wasting syndrome and tumor promotion. TCDD elicits most of its effects through binding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. TCDD induced degradation of AhR has been widely reported and requires ubiquitination of the protein. The rapid depletion of AhR following TCDD activation serves as a mechanism to modulate AhR mediated gene induction. In addition to inducing AhR degradation, TCDD has been reported to induce degradation of hormone receptors. The studies reported here, evaluate the effect of TCDD exposure on androgen receptor (AR expression and activity in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and castration-resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells. Our results show that TCDD exposure does not induce AhR or AR degradation in C4-2 cells. However, both AhR and AR are degraded in LNCaP cells following TCDD exposure. In addition, TCDD enhances AR phosphorylation and induces expression of AR responsive genes in LNCaP cells. Our data reveals that TCDD effect on AR expression and activity differs in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell models.

  20. Understanding what determines the frequency and pattern of human germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnheim, Norman; Calabrese, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Surprising findings about human germline mutation have come from applying new technologies to detect rare mutations in germline DNA, from analysing DNA sequence divergence between humans and closely related species, and from investigating human polymorphic variation. In this Review we discuss how these approaches affect our current understanding of the roles of sex, age, mutation hot spots, germline selection and genomic factors in determining human nucleotide substitution mutation patterns and frequencies. To enhance our understanding of mutation and disease, more extensive molecular data on the human germ line with regard to mutation origin, DNA repair, epigenetic status and the effect of newly arisen mutations on gamete development are needed.

  1. Suppression of rat and human androgen biosynthetic enzymes by apigenin: Possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiudi; Wang, Guimin; Li, Xiaoheng; Liu, Jianpeng; Hong, Tingting; Zhu, Qiqi; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Apigenin is a natural flavone. It has recently been used as a chemopreventive agent. It may also have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by inhibiting androgen production. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on the steroidogenesis of rat immature Leydig cells and some human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat immature Leydig cells were incubated for 3h with 100μM apigenin without (basal) or with 1ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and 20μM of the following steroid substrates: 22R-hydroxychloesterol (22R), pregnenolone (P5), progesterone (P4), and androstenedione (D4). The medium levels of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL), the primary androgen produced by rat immature Leydig cells, were measured. Apigenin significantly inhibited basal, 8BR, 22R, PREG, P4, and D4 stimulated DIOL production in rat immature Leydig cells. Further study showed that apigenin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase, and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 11.41±0.7, 8.98±0.10, and 9.37±0.07μM, respectively. Apigenin inhibited human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 2.17±0.04 and 1.31±0.09μM, respectively. Apigenin is a potent inhibitor of rat and human steroidogenic enzymes, being possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  2. Sex-dependent role of glucocorticoids and androgens in the pathophysiology of human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, R; Vicennati, V; Gambineri, A; Pagotto, U

    2008-12-01

    Obesity, particularly its abdominal phenotype, a harbinger of the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), is becoming one of the most significant public health problems worldwide. Among many other potential factors, derangement of multiple hormone systems have increasingly been considered for their potential importance in the pathophysiology of obesity and the metabolic syndrome, with particular reference to glucocorticoids and sex hormones. These systems have a fundamental and coordinating role in the physiology of intermediate metabolism and cardiovascular function, and in the response to acute and chronic stress challenge. Abdominal obesity is associated with a hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and impaired androgen balance, although these alterations differ according to sex. As there is also increasing evidence that there are many differences between the sexes in the susceptibility and development of obesity, T2D and CVDs, we support the hypothesis that alterations of the HPA axis and androgen balance may have an important function in this context. This is further supported by the fact that there are important differences between males and females in their ability to adapt to both internal and particularly to environmental (external) stressors. In addition, there is also evidence that, in both physiological and pathological conditions, a close cross talk exists between sex hormones and glucocorticoids at both neuroendocrine and peripheral level, again with different specificities according to sex.

  3. Reinforcing aspects of androgens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ruth I

    2004-11-15

    Are androgens reinforcing? Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, often with negative long-term health consequences. As a result, in 1991, testosterone was declared a controlled substance. Recently, Brower [K.J. Brower, Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence. Curr. Psychiatry Rep. 4 (2002) 377-387.] proposed a two-stage model of AAS dependence. Users initiate steroid use for their anabolic effects on muscle growth. With continued exposure, dependence on the psychoactive effects of AAS develops. However, it is difficult in humans to separate direct psychoactive effects of AAS from the user's psychological dependence on the anabolic effects of AAS. Thus, studies in laboratory animals are useful to explore androgen reinforcement. Testosterone induces a conditioned place preference in rats and mice, and is voluntarily consumed through oral, intravenous, and intracerebroventricular self-administration in hamsters. Active, gonad-intact male and female hamsters will deliver 1 microg/microl testosterone into the lateral ventricles. Indeed, some individuals self-administer testosterone intracerebroventricularly to the point of death. Male rats develop a conditioned place preference to testosterone injections into the nucleus accumbens, an effect blocked by dopamine receptor antagonists. These data suggest that androgen reinforcement is mediated by the brain. Moreover, testosterone appears to act through the mesolimbic dopamine system, a common substrate for drugs of abuse. Nonetheless, androgen reinforcement is not comparable to that of cocaine or heroin. Instead, testosterone resembles other mild reinforcers, such as caffeine, nicotine, or benzodiazepines. The potential for androgen addiction remains to be determined.

  4. Mutation induction in human lymphoid cells by energetic heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-10-01

    One of the concerns for extended space flight outside the magnetosphere is exposure to galactic cosmic radiation. In the series of studies presented herein, the mutagenic effectiveness of high energy heavy ions is examined using human B-lymphoblastoid cells across an LET range from 32keV/μm to 190 keV/μm. Mutations were scored for an autosomal locus, thymidine kinase (tk), and for an X-linked locus, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt). For each of the radiations studied, the autosomal locus is more sensitive to mutation induction than is the X-linked locus. When mutational yields are expressed in terms of particle fluence, the two loci respond quite differently across the range of LET. The action cross section for mutation induction peaks at 61 keV/μm for the tk locus and then declines for particles of higher LET, including Fe ions. For the hprt locus, the action cross section for mutation is maximal at 95 keV/μm but is relatively constant across the range from 61 keV/μm to 190 keV/gmm. The yields of hprt-deficient mutants obtained after HZE exposure to TK6 lymphoblasts may be compared directly with published data on the induction of hprt-deficient mutants in human neonatal fibroblasts exposed to similar ions. The action cross section for induction of hprt-deficient mutants by energetic Fe ions is more than 10-fold lower for lymphoblastoid cells than for fibroblasts.

  5. NF-κB and androgen receptor variant expression correlate with human BPH progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, David C; Strand, Douglas W; Love, Harold L;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common, chronic progressive disease. Inflammation is associated with prostatic enlargement and resistance to 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) therapy. Activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway is linked to both inflammation and ligand......-independent prostate cancer progression. METHODS: NF-κB activation and androgen receptor variant (AR-V) expression were quantified in transition zone tissue samples from patients with a wide range of AUASS from incidental BPH in patients treated for low grade, localized peripheral zone prostate cancer to advanced......-V expression as well as cellular growth and differentiation were assessed. RESULTS: Canonical NF-κB signaling was found to be upregulated in late versus early stage BPH, and to be strongly associated with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Elevated expression of AR-variant 7 (AR-V7), but not other AR...

  6. Inductores de lágrimas: andrógenos y gammaglobulinas humanas Tears inducers: androgens and human gammaglobulinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Nila Santos Lagresa

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Se comparan las respuestas terapéuticas en pacientes con diagnóstico de Síndrome de Sjögren que padecen de queratoconjuntivitis seca resistentes a los tratamientos tradicionales de lágrimas artificiales, lentes y otros, en dos grupos de pacientes de 18 y 32 casos con tratamientos de gammaglobulina humana: intacglobín (100 mg por kilo de peso cada 15 días por vía subcutánea interescapular por 3 meses y andrógenos de depósito (100 mg cada 15 días por vía im durante 3 meses. Se evaluaron los niveles de inmunoglobulinas IgG, IgA, IgM e IgE, recuento de células sanguíneas factor reumatoideo, proteína C reactiva y estudio microbiológico. Ambas terapéuticas muestran una mejoría estadísticamente significativa p Therapeutical responses are compared in patients diagnosed of Sjögren syndrome, presenting with keratoconjunctivitis sicca resistant to traditional treatments of artificial tears, lenses and others in two groups of patients (18 and 32 cases treated with human gammaglobulin: intacglobin (100 mg/body weight every 15 days in a intercapsular subcutaneos way for 3 months, and depot androgens (100 mg every 15 days in an intramuscular way for three months. Level of IgG, IgA, IgM, and IgE immunoglobulins, count of blood cells-rheumatoid factor, C-reactive protein, and microbiological study. Both treatments show an significant statistically improve p < 0,001 in results obtained in Shirmer I test, and in negative corneal injuries, assessed using slit lamp after fluorescein staining. We propose advantageous use of gammaglobulins because of contraindications on utilization of androgens.

  7. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A; Jenkins, Andrew; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2015-07-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases.

  8. The rate of spontaneous mutations in human myeloid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araten, David J., E-mail: david.araten@nyumc.org [Division of Hematology, Department of Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Healthcare System (United States); Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Krejci, Ondrej [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); DiTata, Kimberly [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Wunderlich, Mark [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sanders, Katie J.; Zamechek, Leah [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Mulloy, James C. [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We provide the first measurement of the mutation rate (μ) in human myeloid cells. • μ is measured to be 3.6–23 × 10{sup −7} per cell division. • The AML-ETO and MLL-AF9 fusions do not seem to increase μ. • Cooperating mutations in NRAS, FLT3 and p53 not seem to increase μ. • Hypermutability may be required to explain leukemogenesis. - Abstract: The mutation rate (μ) is likely to be a key parameter in leukemogenesis, but historically, it has been difficult to measure in humans. The PIG-A gene has some advantages for the detection of spontaneous mutations because it is X-linked, and therefore only one mutation is required to disrupt its function. Furthermore, the PIG-A-null phenotype is readily detected by flow cytometry. Using PIG-A, we have now provided the first in vitro measurement of μ in myeloid cells, using cultures of CD34+ cells that are transduced with either the AML-ETO or the MLL-AF9 fusion genes and expanded with cytokines. For the AML-ETO cultures, the median μ value was ∼9.4 × 10{sup −7} (range ∼3.6–23 × 10{sup −7}) per cell division. In contrast, few spontaneous mutations were observed in the MLL-AF9 cultures. Knockdown of p53 or introduction of mutant NRAS or FLT3 alleles did not have much of an effect on μ. Based on these data, we provide a model to predict whether hypermutability must occur in the process of leukemogenesis.

  9. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R; Göksenin, A Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F; Wheeler, David A

    2014-11-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication.

  10. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways.

  11. Synthesis of 17β-N-arylcarbamoylandrost-4-en-3-one derivatives and their anti-proliferative effect on human androgen-sensitive LNCaP cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Benítez, Francisco; Cabeza, Marisa; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Alvarez-Manrique, Berenice; Bratoeff, Eugene

    2016-10-04

    In this study, we report the synthesis and anti-proliferative effect of a set of eight androst-4-ene-3-one derivatives with different arylcarbamoyl groups at C-17. The novel compounds were prepared from commercially available 3β-hydroxy-5-pregnen-20-one and evaluated against the androgen-sensitive human prostate adenocarcinoma LNCaP cell line. The cancerous cells were exposed to 50 μM of each compound and the proliferating agent testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The most potent compounds from this assay were further tested against the androgen-insensitive PC3 cell line. We also demonstrate the activity of these compounds on rat peripheral blood mononuclear cells for comparison. Both 17β-N-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenylcarbamoyl]androst-4-ene-3-one (6f) and 17β-N-(1,3-thiazol-2-ylcarbamoyl)androst-4-ene-3-one (6g) exhibited a higher growth inhibitory effect than commercially available drugs finasteride, flutamide and ketoconazole on LNCaP cells in the presence and absence of androgens. In addition, 6f and 6g demonstrated high potency on PC3 cells suggesting an androgen-independent anti-proliferative effect. Moreover, the novel compounds showed a small effect on rat mononuclear cells, an indication of low toxicity.

  12. Androgen deprivation causes truncation of the C-terminal region of androgen receptor in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Naoki; Inoue, Kaoru; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Inui, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) acts as a ligand-dependent transcription factor, whereas mutant AR lacking the C-terminal ligand-binding domain functions in a ligand-independent manner. In the present study we report that the C-terminal truncated AR, which we named AR-NH1 (the N-terminal fragment of AR cleaved in the neighborhood of helix 1 of the ligand-binding domain), is produced in LNCaP prostatic carcinoma cells. The AR-NH1 of ~90 kDa was observed in an androgen-independent LNCaP subline and was further accumulated by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. MG132 treatment caused the accumulation of AR-NH1 even in parent LNCaP cells. AR-NH1 was produced in the absence of ligand or in the presence of the AR antagonist bicalutamide, whereas AR agonists suppressed its production. AR-NH1 was detected with different AR antibodies recognizing amino acid residues 1-20 and 300-316 and was also generated from exogenous AR. Both siRNA-mediated AR knockdown and treatment with a serine protease inhibitor (4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride) reduced AR-NH1 levels. According to the predicted cleavage site (between amino acid residues 660-685) and its nuclear localization, it is assumed that AR-NH1 functions as a constitutively active transcription factor. These data suggest that AR-NH1 is produced under hormone therapy and contributes to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer due to its ligand-independent transcriptional activity.

  13. Human heterochromatin protein 1 isoforms regulate androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsumi, Momoe; Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Takeuchi, Ario; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Inokuchi, Junichi; Song, Yoohyun; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji

    2013-06-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is critical for the tumorigenesis and development of prostate cancer, as well as the progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer. We previously showed that the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) β isoform plays a critical role in transactivation of AR signaling as an AR coactivator that promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation. However, the roles of other HP1 isoforms, HP1α and HP1γ, in AR expression and prostate cancer remain unclear. Here, we found that knockdown of HP1γ, but not HP1α, reduced AR expression and cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in LNCaP cells. Conversely, overexpression of full-length HP1α and its C-terminal deletion mutant increased AR expression and cell growth, whereas overexpression of HP1γ had no effect. Similarly, HP1α overexpression promoted 22Rv1 cell growth, whereas HP1γ knockdown reduced the proliferation of CxR cells, a castration-resistant LNCaP derivative. Taken together, HP1 isoforms distinctly augment AR signaling and cell growth in prostate cancer. Therefore, silencing of HP1β and HP1γ may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of prostate cancer.

  14. LINE-1 ORF-1p functions as a novel androgen receptor co-activator and promotes the growth of human prostatic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yinying; Feng, Fan; Yang, Yutao; Gao, Xudong; Cui, Jiajun; Zhang, Chuanfu; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Zhongxian; Qv, Jianhui; Wang, Chunping; Zeng, Zhen; Zhu, Yunfeng; Yang, Yongping

    2013-02-01

    Widespread interest in the mechanism of transcriptional regulation by the androgen receptor (AR) has been stimulated by the finding that AR signaling is critically important in the progression of human prostate cancers. Co-factors, the co-repressors, or the co-activators are responsible for the regulation of AR activation. The pro-oncogene human Long Interspersed Nucleotide acid Element-1 (LINE-1) encodes LINE-1 ORF-1p and plays important roles in the development and progression of several human carcinomas. In this study, the results showed that LINE-1 ORF-1p increased the AR transcriptional activity and in turn enhanced the expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the presence of R1881. A physical protein-protein interaction between the AR signaling and the LINE-1 ORF-1p was identified by the immunoprecipitation assays and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, LINE-1 ORF-1p would function as a novel AR positive co-regulator through modulating its cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to the androgen response element in the PSA gene promoter. Our date also showed that the LINE-1 ORF-1p promoted the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP (ligand dependent) and PC-3 (ligand independent) human prostatic carcinoma cells. By investigating a novel role of the LINE-1 ORF-1p in the androgen/androgen receptor signaling pathway regulation, our study identifies that LINE-1 ORF-1p may be a novel AR co-regulator and molecular target for human prostate carcinoma therapy.

  15. Mutations in LRRC50 Predispose Zebrafish and Humans to Seminomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basten, Sander G.; van Rooijen, Ellen; Stoop, Hans; Babala, Nikolina; Logister, Ive; Heath, Zachary G.; Jonges, Trudy N.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Voest, Emile E.; van Eeden, Freek J.; Medema, Rene H.; Ketting, René F.; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Looijenga, Leendert H. J.; Giles, Rachel H.

    2013-01-01

    Seminoma is a subclass of human testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT), the most frequently observed cancer in young men with a rising incidence. Here we describe the identification of a novel gene predisposing specifically to seminoma formation in a vertebrate model organism. Zebrafish carrying a heterozygous nonsense mutation in Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing protein 50 (lrrc50 also called dnaaf1), associated previously with ciliary function, are found to be highly susceptible to the formation of seminomas. Genotyping of these zebrafish tumors shows loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the wild-type lrrc50 allele in 44.4% of tumor samples, correlating with tumor progression. In humans we identified heterozygous germline LRRC50 mutations in two different pedigrees with a family history of seminomas, resulting in a nonsense Arg488* change and a missense Thr590Met change, which show reduced expression of the wild-type allele in seminomas. Zebrafish in vivo complementation studies indicate the Thr590Met to be a loss-of-function mutation. Moreover, we show that a pathogenic Gln307Glu change is significantly enriched in individuals with seminoma tumors (13% of our cohort). Together, our study introduces an animal model for seminoma and suggests LRRC50 to be a novel tumor suppressor implicated in human seminoma pathogenesis. PMID:23599692

  16. Structure of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human androgen receptor in complex with a selective modulator LGD2226

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Xiao-qin; Li, He; Liang, Kai-ni [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Miner, Jeffrey N.; Hong, Mei; Kallel, E. Adam; Oeveren, Arjan van; Zhi, Lin [Discovery Research, Ligand Pharmaceuticals Inc., 10275 Science Center Drive, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Jiang, Tao, E-mail: x-ray@sun5.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2006-11-01

    Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor in complex with LGD2226. The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible steroid hormone receptor that mediates androgen action, determining male sexual phenotypes and promoting spermatogenesis. As the androgens play a dominant role in male sexual development and function, steroidal androgen agonists have been used clinically for some years. However, there is a risk of potential side effects and most steroidal androgens cannot be dosed orally, which limits the use of these substances. 1,2-Dihydro-6-N,N-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-quinolinone (LGD2226) is a synthetic nonsteroidal ligand and a novel selective AR modulator. The crystal structure of the complex of LGD2226 with the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (AR LBD) at 2.1 Å was solved and compared with the structure of the AR LBD–R1881 complex. It is hoped that this will aid in further explaining the selectivity of LGD2226 observed in in vitro and in vivo assays and in developing more selective and effective therapeutic agents.

  17. Holes influence the mutation spectrum of human mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagran, Martha; Miller, John

    Mutations drive evolution and disease, showing highly non-random patterns of variant frequency vs. nucleotide position. We use computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)] to reveal sites of enhanced hole probability in selected regions of human mitochondrial DNA. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. The hole spectra are quantum mechanically computed using a two-stranded tight binding model of DNA. We observe significant correlation between spectra of hole probabilities and of genetic variation frequencies from the MITOMAP database. These results suggest that hole-enhanced mutation mechanisms exert a substantial, perhaps dominant, influence on mutation patterns in DNA. One example is where a trapped hole induces a hydrogen bond shift, known as tautomerization, which then triggers a base-pair mismatch during replication. Our results deepen overall understanding of sequence specific mutation rates, encompassing both hotspots and cold spots, which drive molecular evolution.

  18. Triangulation of the human, chimpanzee and Neanderthal genome sequences identifies potentially compensated mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guojie; Zhang,Pei; Krawczak, Michael; Ball, Edward V.; Mort, Matthew; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Cooper, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Triangulation of the human, chimpanzee and Neanderthal genome sequences with respect to 44,348 disease-causing or disease-associated missense mutations and 1,712 putative regulatory mutations listed in the Human Gene Mutation Database was employed to identify genetic variants that are apparently pathogenic in humans but which may represent a `compensated? wild-type state in at least one of the other two species. Of 122 such `potentially compensated mutations? (PCMs) identi...

  19. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Nicolás; Motos, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is a disorder caused by a mutation of the gene encoding the androgen receptor (AR; Xq11-q12). The prevalence of AIS has been estimated to be one case in every 20,000 to 64,000 newborn males for the complete syndrome (CAIS), and the prevalence is unknown for the partial syndrome (PAIS). The symptoms range from phenotypically normal males with impaired spermatogenesis to phenotypically normal women with primary amenorrhea. Various forms of ambiguous genitalia have been observed at birth. The diagnosis is confirmed by determining the exact mutation in the AR gene. PAIS individuals require precise diagnosis as early as possible so that the sex can be assigned, treatment can be recommended, and they can receive proper genetic counseling. After birth, differential diagnosis should be performed using other forms of abnormal sexual differentiation of primary amenorrhea. The treatment of AIS is based on reinforcement sexual identity, gonadectomy planning, and hormone replacement therapy. The prognosis for CAIS is good if the testicular tissue is removed at the appropriate time. For PAIS, the prognosis depends on the ambiguity of the genitalia and physical and psychosocial adjustment to the assigned sex.

  20. Membrane androgen receptor characteristics of human ZIP9 (SLC39A) zinc transporter in prostate cancer cells: Androgen-specific activation and involvement of an inhibitory G protein in zinc and MAP kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Peter; Pang, Yefei; Dong, Jing

    2017-05-15

    Characteristics of novel human membrane androgen receptor (mAR), ZIP9 (SLC39A9), were investigated in ZIP9-transfected PC-3 cells (PC3-ZIP9). Ligand blot analysis showed plasma membrane [(3)H]-T binding corresponds to the position of ZIP9 on Western blots which suggests ZIP9 can bind [(3)H]-T alone, without a protein partner. Progesterone antagonized testosterone actions, blocking increases in zinc, Erk phosphorylation and apoptosis, further evidence that ZIP9 is specifically activated by androgens. Pre-treatment with GTPγS and pertussis toxin decreased plasma membrane [(3)H]-T binding and blocked testosterone-induced increases in Erk phosphorylation and intracellular zinc, indicating ZIP9 is coupled to an inhibitory G protein (Gi) that mediates both MAP kinase and zinc signaling. Testosterone treatment of nuclei and mitochondria which express ZIP9 decreased their zinc contents, suggesting ZIP9 also regulates free zinc through releasing it from these intracellular organelles. The results show ZIP9 is a specific Gi coupled-mAR mediating testosterone-induced MAP kinase and zinc signaling in PC3-ZIP9 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Androgen receptor roles in spermatogenesis and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-08-01

    Androgens such as testosterone are steroid hormones essential for normal male reproductive development and function. Mutations of androgen receptors (AR) are often found in patients with disorders of male reproductive development, and milder mutations may be responsible for some cases of male infertility. Androgens exert their action through AR and its signalling in the testis is essential for spermatogenesis. AR is not expressed in the developing germ cell lineage so is thought to exert its effects through testicular Sertoli and peri-tubular myoid (PTM) cells. AR signalling in spermatogenesis has been investigated in rodent models where testosterone levels are chemically supressed or models with transgenic disruption of AR. These models have pinpointed the steps of spermatogenesis that require AR signalling, specifically maintenance of spermatogonial numbers, blood-testis barrier integrity, completion of meiosis, adhesion of spermatids and spermiation, together these studies detail the essential nature of androgens in the promotion of male fertility.

  2. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K.; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  3. Interactions of androgens, green tea catechins and the antiandrogen flutamide with the external glucose-binding site of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter GLUT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftalin, Richard J; Afzal, Iram; Cunningham, Philip; Halai, Mansur; Ross, Clare; Salleh, Naguib; Milligan, Stuart R

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of androgens, the antiandrogen flutamide and green tea catechins on glucose transport inhibition in human erythrocytes. These effects may relate to the antidiabetogenic effects of green tea. Testosterone, 4-androstene-3,17-dione, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA-3-acetate inhibit glucose exit from human erythrocytes with half-maximal inhibitions (Ki) of 39.2±8.9, 29.6±3.7, 48.1±10.2 and 4.8±0.98 μM, respectively. The antiandrogen flutamide competitively relieves these inhibitions and of phloretin. Dehydrotestosterone has no effect on glucose transport, indicating the differences between androgen interaction with GLUT1 and human androgen receptor (hAR). Green tea catechins also inhibit glucose exit from erythrocytes. Epicatechin 3-gallate (ECG) has a Ki ECG of 0.14±0.01 μM, and epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) has a Ki EGCG of 0.97±0.13 μM. Flutamide reverses these effects. Androgen-screening tests show that the green tea catechins do not act genomically. The high affinities of ECG and EGCG for GLUT1 indicate that this might be their physiological site of action. There are sequence homologies between GLUT1 and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of hAR containing the amino-acid triads Arg 126, Thr 30 and Asn 288, and Arg 126, Thr 30 and Asn 29, with similar 3D topology to the polar groups binding 3-keto and 17-β OH steroid groups in hAR LBD. These triads are appropriately sited for competitive inhibition of glucose import at the external opening of the hydrophilic pore traversing GLUT1. PMID:12970085

  4. Computational analysis of splicing errors and mutations in human transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfand Mikhail S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most retained introns found in human cDNAs generated by high-throughput sequencing projects seem to result from underspliced transcripts, and thus they capture intermediate steps of pre-mRNA splicing. On the other hand, mutations in splice sites cause exon skipping of the respective exon or activation of pre-existing cryptic sites. Both types of events reflect properties of the splicing mechanism. Results The retained introns were significantly shorter than constitutive ones, and skipped exons are shorter than exons with cryptic sites. Both donor and acceptor splice sites of retained introns were weaker than splice sites of constitutive introns. The authentic acceptor sites affected by mutations were significantly weaker in exons with activated cryptic sites than in skipped exons. The distance from a mutated splice site to the nearest equivalent site is significantly shorter in cases of activated cryptic sites compared to exon skipping events. The prevalence of retained introns within genes monotonically increased in the 5'-to-3' direction (more retained introns close to the 3'-end, consistent with the model of co-transcriptional splicing. The density of exonic splicing enhancers was higher, and the density of exonic splicing silencers lower in retained introns compared to constitutive ones and in exons with cryptic sites compared to skipped exons. Conclusion Thus the analysis of retained introns in human cDNA, exons skipped due to mutations in splice sites and exons with cryptic sites produced results consistent with the intron definition mechanism of splicing of short introns, co-transcriptional splicing, dependence of splicing efficiency on the splice site strength and the density of candidate exonic splicing enhancers and silencers. These results are consistent with other, recently published analyses.

  5. Beyond androgen deprivation: ancillary integrative strategies for targeting the androgen receptor addiction of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F; Hejazi, Jalal; Rastmanesh, Reza

    2014-09-01

    The large majority of clinical prostate cancers remain dependent on androgen receptor (AR) activity for proliferation even as they lose their responsiveness to androgen deprivation or antagonism. AR activity can be maintained in these circumstances by increased AR synthesis--often reflecting increased NF-κB activation; upregulation of signaling pathways that promote AR activity in the absence of androgens; and by emergence of AR mutations or splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain, which render the AR constitutively active. Drugs targeting the N-terminal transactivating domain of the AR, some of which are now in preclinical development, can be expected to inhibit the activity not only of unmutated ARs but also of the mutant forms and splice variants selected for by androgen deprivation. Concurrent measures that suppress AR synthesis or boost AR turnover could be expected to complement the efficacy of such drugs. A number of nutraceuticals that show efficacy in prostate cancer xenograft models--including polyphenols from pomegranate, grape seed, and green tea, the crucifera metabolite diindolylmethane, and the hormone melatonin--have the potential to suppress AR synthesis via downregulation of NF-κB activity; clinical doses of salicylate may have analogous efficacy. The proteasomal turnover of the AR is abetted by diets with a high ratio of long-chain omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids, which are beneficial in prostate cancer xenograft models; berberine and sulforaphane, by inhibiting AR's interaction with its chaperone Hsp90, likewise promote AR proteasomal degradation and retard growth of human prostate cancer in nude mice. Hinge region acetylation of the AR is required for optimal transactivational activity, and low micromolar concentrations of the catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can inhibit such acetylation--possibly explaining the ability of EGCG administration to suppress androgenic activity and cell proliferation in prostate cancer

  6. A germ-line-selective advantage rather than an increased mutation rate can explain some unexpectedly common human disease mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2008-07-22

    Two nucleotide substitutions in the human FGFR2 gene (C755G or C758G) are responsible for virtually all sporadic cases of Apert syndrome. This condition is 100-1,000 times more common than genomic mutation frequency data predict. Here, we report on the C758G de novo Apert syndrome mutation. Using data on older donors, we show that spontaneous mutations are not uniformly distributed throughout normal testes. Instead, we find foci where C758G mutation frequencies are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining tissue. We conclude this nucleotide site is not a mutation hot spot even after accounting for possible Luria-Delbruck "mutation jackpots." An alternative explanation for such foci involving positive selection acting on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonia experiencing the rare mutation could not be rejected. Further, the two youngest individuals studied (19 and 23 years old) had lower mutation frequencies and smaller foci at both mutation sites compared with the older individuals. This implies that the mutation frequency of foci increases as adults age, and thus selection could explain the paternal age effect for Apert syndrome and other genetic conditions. Our results, now including the analysis of two mutations in the same set of testes, suggest that positive selection can increase the relative frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying such mutations, although individuals who inherit them have reduced fitness. In addition, we compared the anatomical distribution of C758G mutation foci with both new and old data on the C755G mutation in the same testis and found their positions were not correlated with one another.

  7. Cardiac glycosides stimulate Ca2+ increases and apoptosis in androgen-independent, metastatic human prostate adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, D J; Lin, Y; Nutt, L K; Ozel, H Z; Newman, R A

    2000-07-15

    Cardiac glycosides are used clinically to increase contractile force in patients with cardiac disorders. Their mechanism of action is well established and involves inhibition of the plasma membrane Na+/K+-ATPase, leading to alterations in intracellular K+ and Ca(2+) levels. Here, we report that the cardiac glycosides oleandrin, ouabain, and digoxin induce apoptosis in androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell lines in vitro. Cell death was associated with early release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, followed by proteolytic processing of caspases 8 and 3. Oleandrin also promoted caspase activation, detected by cleavage poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and hydrolysis of a peptide substrate (DEVD-pNA). Comparison of the rates of apoptosis in poorly metastatic PC3 M-Pro4 and highly metastatic PC3 M-LN4 subclones demonstrated that cell death was delayed in the latter because of a delay in mitochondrial cytochrome c release. Single-cell imaging of intracellular Ca(2+) fluxes demonstrated that the proapoptotic effects of the cardiac glycosides were linked to their abilities to induce sustained Ca(2+) increases in the cells. Our results define a novel activity for cardiac glycosides that could prove relevant to the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.

  8. Discovery of small-molecule inhibitors selectively targeting the DNA-binding domain of the human androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huifang; Ban, Fuqiang; Dalal, Kush; Leblanc, Eric; Frewin, Kate; Ma, Dennis; Adomat, Hans; Rennie, Paul S; Cherkasov, Artem

    2014-08-14

    The human androgen receptor (AR) is considered as a master regulator in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). As resistance to clinically used anti-AR drugs remains a major challenge for the treatment of advanced PCa, there is a pressing need for new anti-AR therapeutic avenues. In this study, we identified a binding site on the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the receptor and utilized virtual screening to discover a set of micromolar hits for the target. Through further exploration of the most potent hit (1), a structural analogue (6) was identified demonstrating 10-fold improved anti-AR potency. Further optimization resulted in a more potent synthetic analogue (25) with anti-AR potency comparable to a newly FDA-approved drug Enzalutamide. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the developed inhibitors do interact with the intended target site. Importantly, the AR DBD inhibitors could effectively inhibit the growth of Enzalutamide-resistant cells as well as block the transcriptional activity of constitutively active AR splice variants, such as V7.

  9. Triangulation of the human, chimpanzee, and Neanderthal genome sequences identifies potentially compensated mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guojie; Pei, Zhang; Krawczak, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    Triangulation of the human, chimpanzee, and Neanderthal genome sequences with respect to 44,348 disease-causing or disease-associated missense mutations and 1,712 putative regulatory mutations listed in the Human Gene Mutation Database was employed to identify genetic variants that are apparently...

  10. Effects of 2,4-D and DCP on the DHT-induced androgenic action in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Young In; Dong, Mi-Sook

    2005-11-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and its metabolite 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) are used extensively in agriculture as herbicides, and are suspected of potential endocrine disruptor activity. In a previous study, we showed that these compounds exhibited synergistic androgenic effects by co-treatment with testosterone in the Hershberger assay. To elucidate the mechanisms of the synergistic effects of these compounds on the androgenicity of testosterone, the androgenic action of 2,4-D and DCP was characterized using a mammalian detection system in prostate cancer cell lines. In in vitro assay systems, while 2,4-D or DCP alone did not show androgenic activity, 2,4-D or DCP with 5alpha-dihydroxytestosterone (DHT) exhibited synergistic androgenic activities. Co-treatment of 10 nM 2,4-D or DCP with 10 nM DHT was shown to stimulate the cell proliferation by 1.6-fold, compared to 10 nM DHT alone. In addition, in transient transfection assays, androgen-induced transactivation was also increased to a maximum of 32-fold or 1.28-fold by co-treatment of 2,4-D or DCP with DHT, respectively. However, 2,4-D and DCP exerted no effects on either mRNA or protein levels of AR. In a competitive AR binding assay, 2,4-D and DCP inhibited androgen binding to AR, up to 50% at concentrations of approximately 0.5 microM for both compounds. The nuclear translocation of green fluorescent protein-AR fusion protein in the presence of DHT was promoted as the result of the addition of 2,4-D and DCP. Collectively, these results that 2,4-D and DCP enhanced DHT-induced AR transcriptional activity might be attributable, at least in part, to the promotion of AR nuclear translocation.

  11. G protein-coupled receptor mutations and human genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Miles D; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Percy, Maire E; Bichet, Daniel G; Cole, David E C

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes (GPCRs) disrupt GPCR function in a wide variety of human genetic diseases. In vitro strategies and animal models have been used to identify the molecular pathologies underlying naturally occurring GPCR mutations. Inactive, overactive, or constitutively active receptors have been identified that result in pathology. These receptor variants may alter ligand binding, G protein coupling, receptor desensitization and receptor recycling. Receptor systems discussed include rhodopsin, thyrotropin, parathyroid hormone, melanocortin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRHR), adrenocorticotropic hormone, vasopressin, endothelin-β, purinergic, and the G protein associated with asthma (GPRA or neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1)). The role of activating and inactivating calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) mutations is discussed in detail with respect to familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) and autosomal dominant hypocalemia (ADH). The CASR mutations have been associated with epilepsy. Diseases caused by the genetic disruption of GPCR functions are discussed in the context of their potential to be selectively targeted by drugs that rescue altered receptors. Examples of drugs developed as a result of targeting GPCRs mutated in disease include: calcimimetics and calcilytics, therapeutics targeting melanocortin receptors in obesity, interventions that alter GNRHR loss from the cell surface in idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and novel drugs that might rescue the P2RY12 receptor congenital bleeding phenotype. De-orphanization projects have identified novel disease-associated receptors, such as NPSR1 and GPR35. The identification of variants in these receptors provides genetic reagents useful in drug screens. Discussion of the variety of GPCRs that are disrupted in monogenic Mendelian disorders provides the basis for examining the significance of common

  12. Two cases of androgen insensitivity due to somatic mosaicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie J. Nokoff

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the androgen receptor (AR. The incidence of AIS is estimated to be 1 in 99,000. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS is characterized by a 46,XY karyotype with external genitalia that appear typically female and results from mutations that render the androgen receptor non-functional. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS results from partial loss of function mutations in AR. Rarely, PAIS results from somatic mosaicism for an AR mutation and not from a hypomorphic variant. We present two cases of PAIS due to somatic mosaicism, one caused by a novel nonsense mutation and one caused by a missense mutation previously reported in CAIS. Two patients with atypical genitalia presented to our multidisciplinary clinic for disorders of sex development and sequencing of AR was performed as part of the diagnostic evaluation. In case one, AR sequencing revealed mosaicism for a nonsense mutation, c.1331T > A; p.Leu444Ter. This mutation has not previously been reported, but is presumed to be pathogenic. In case two, AR sequencing revealed a mosaic missense mutation, c.2279 C > A; p.Ser760Tyr, which has previously been reported in CAIS but not in PAIS. Similar phenotypes may result from AR mutations that are present in a mosaic state with full loss of function or hypomorphic mutations that partially impair the function of the protein in either all tissues or in a mosaic state.

  13. MtDNA mutation pattern in tumors and human evolution are shaped by similar selective constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, Ilia; Livneh, Erez A; Rubin, Eitan; Mishmar, Dan

    2009-04-01

    Multiple human mutational landscapes of normal and cancer conditions are currently available. However, while the unique mutational patterns of tumors have been extensively studied, little attention has been paid to similarities between malignant and normal conditions. Here we compared the pattern of mutations in the mitochondrial genomes (mtDNAs) of cancer (98 sequences) and natural populations (2400 sequences). De novo mtDNA mutations in cancer preferentially colocalized with ancient variants in human phylogeny. A significant portion of the cancer mutations was organized in recurrent combinations (COMs), reaching a length of seven mutations, which also colocalized with ancient variants. Thus, by analyzing similarities rather than differences in patterns of mtDNA mutations in tumor and human evolution, we discovered evidence for similar selective constraints, suggesting a functional potential for these mutations.

  14. Human embryonic stem cells carrying mutations for severe genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumkin, Tsvia; Malcov, Mira; Telias, Michael; Gold, Veronica; Schwartz, Tamar; Azem, Foad; Amit, Ami; Yaron, Yuval; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2010-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) carrying specific mutations potentially provide a valuable tool for studying genetic disorders in humans. One preferable approach for obtaining these cell lines is by deriving them from affected preimplantation genetically diagnosed embryos. These unique cells are especially important for modeling human genetic disorders for which there are no adequate research models. They can be further used to gain new insights into developmentally regulated events that occur during human embryo development and that are responsible for the manifestation of genetically inherited disorders. They also have great value for the exploration of new therapeutic protocols, including gene-therapy-based treatments and disease-oriented drug screening and discovery. Here, we report the establishment of 15 different mutant human embryonic stem cell lines derived from genetically affected embryos, all donated by couples undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis in our in vitro fertilization unit. For further information regarding access to HESC lines from our repository, for research purposes, please email dalitb@tasmc.health.gov.il.

  15. Parkinson's disease-related LRRK2 G2019S mutation results from independent mutational events in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Suzanne; Patin, Etienne; Condroyer, Christel; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Lohmann, Ebba; Giladi, Nir; Bar-Shira, Anat; Belarbi, Soraya; Hecham, Nassima; Pollak, Pierre; Ouvrard-Hernandez, Anne-Marie; Bardien, Soraya; Carr, Jonathan; Benhassine, Traki; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Pirkevi, Caroline; Hamadouche, Tarik; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Basak, A Nazli; Hattori, Nobutaka; Dürr, Alexandra; Tazir, Meriem; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Brice, Alexis

    2010-05-15

    Mutations in the leucine-rich-repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been identified in families with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD) and in sporadic cases; the G2019S mutation is the single most frequent. Intriguingly, the frequency of this mutation in PD patients varies greatly among ethnic groups and geographic origins: it is present at Jewish origin, mostly from Eastern Europe, one was from Japan, one from Turkey and two were of mixed origins. We found the G2019S mutation on three different haplotypes. Network analyses of the three carrier haplotypes showed that G2019S arose independently at least twice in humans. In addition, the population distribution of the intra-allelic diversity of the most widespread carrier haplotype, together with estimations of the age of G2019S determined by two different methods, suggests that one of the founding G2019S mutational events occurred in the Near East at least 4000 years ago.

  16. Human α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) epithelial prostate stem cells express low levels of active androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Stuart C; Hepburn, Anastasia C; Wilson, Laura; Coffey, Kelly; Ryan-Munden, Claudia A; Pal, Deepali; Leung, Hing Y; Robson, Craig N; Heer, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are thought to be the cell of origin in malignant transformation in many tissues, but their role in human prostate carcinogenesis continues to be debated. One of the conflicts with this model is that cancer stem cells have been described to lack androgen receptor (AR) expression, which is of established importance in prostate cancer initiation and progression. We re-examined the expression patterns of AR within adult prostate epithelial differentiation using an optimised sensitive and specific approach examining transcript, protein and AR regulated gene expression. Highly enriched populations were isolated consisting of stem (α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE)), transiently amplifying (α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(-VE)) and terminally differentiated (α(2)β(1)(LOW) CD133(-VE)) cells. AR transcript and protein expression was confirmed in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) and CD133(-VE) progenitor cells. Flow cytometry confirmed that median (±SD) fraction of cells expressing AR were 77% (±6%) in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) stem cells and 68% (±12%) in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(-VE) transiently amplifying cells. However, 3-fold lower levels of total AR protein expression (peak and median immunofluorescence) were present in α(2)β(1)(HI) CD133(+VE) stem cells compared with differentiated cells. This finding was confirmed with dual immunostaining of prostate sections for AR and CD133, which again demonstrated low levels of AR within basal CD133(+VE) cells. Activity of the AR was confirmed in prostate progenitor cells by the expression of low levels of the AR regulated genes PSA, KLK2 and TMPRSS2. The confirmation of AR expression in prostate progenitor cells allows integration of the cancer stem cell theory with the established models of prostate cancer initiation based on a functional AR. Further study of specific AR functions in prostate stem and differentiated cells may highlight novel mechanisms of prostate homeostasis and insights into tumourigenesis.

  17. Androgen-stimulated UDP-glucose dehydrogenase expression limits prostate androgen availability without impacting hyaluronan levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qin; Galbenus, Robert; Raza, Ashraf; Cerny, Ronald L.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2009-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) oxidizes UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronate, an essential precursor for production of hyaluronan (HA), proteoglycans, and xenobiotic glucuronides. High levels of HA turnover in prostate cancer are correlated with aggressive progression. UGDH expression is high in the normal prostate even though HA accumulation is virtually undetectable. Thus, its normal role in the prostate may be to provide precursors for glucuronosyltransferase enzymes, which inactivate and solubilize androgens by glucuronidation. In this report, we quantified androgen dependence of UGDH, glucuronosyltransferase, and HA synthase expression. Androgen dependent and independent human prostate cancer cell lines were used to test the effects of UGDH manipulation on tumor cell growth, HA production and androgen glucuronidation. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) increased UGDH expression ≈2.5-fold in androgen dependent cells. However, upregulation of UGDH did not affect HA synthase expression or enhance HA production. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that DHT was converted to a glucuronide, DHT-G, at a six-fold higher level in androgen dependent cells relative to androgen independent cells. The increased solubilization and elimination of DHT corresponded to slower cellular growth kinetics, which could be reversed in androgen dependent cells by treatment with a UDP-glucuronate scavenger. Collectively, these results suggest that dysregulated expression of UGDH could promote the development of androgen independent tumor cell growth by increasing available levels of intracellular androgen. PMID:19244115

  18. Androgen inhibits the growth of carcinoma cell lines established from prostate cancer xenografts that escape androgen treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly-Pharaboz, Marie-Odile; Kalach, Jean-Jacques; Pharaboz, Julie; Chantepie, Jacqueline; Nicolas, Brigitte; Baille, Marie-Laurence; Ruffion, Alain; Benahmed, Mohamed; André, Jean

    2008-07-01

    Most prostate cancers escape endocrine therapy by diverse mechanisms. One of them might be growth repression by androgen. We reported that androgen represses the growth in culture of MOP cells (a sub-line of LNCaP cells) and that of MOP cell xenografts, although tumor growth becomes androgen-independent (AI). Here we explore whether AI tumors contain androgen-responsive cells. ME carcinoma cells were established from AI tumors. The responses to androgen were examined by cell counting, DAPI labeling, flow cytometry, PSA immunoassay and tumor size follow-up. Androgen receptors (AR) were analyzed by western blotting and DNA sequencing. The pattern of responses of these cells to androgen was compared to that of MOP cells and that of JAC cells established from LNCaP-like MOP cells. R1881, a synthetic androgen: (1) repressed the growth of all the six ME cell lines obtained, MOP and JAC cells, (2) augmented the secretion of PSA, (3) induced spectacular cell bubbling/fragmentation and (4) blocked the cell cycle and induced a modest increase of apoptosis. All the androgen-repressed cells expressed the same level of mutated AR as LNCaP cells. In nude mice, the growth of ME-2 cell xenografts displayed transient androgen repression similar to that of MOP cells. In culture neither fibroblasts nor extra-cellular matrix altered the effects of R1881 on cell proliferation. These results demonstrate that androgen-independent tumors contain androgen-responsive cells. The apparent discrepancy between the responses to androgen of tumors and those of carcinoma cells in culture suggests that microenvironmental factors contribute to the androgen responsiveness of tumor cells in vivo. These modifications, albeit unspecified, could be suitable targets for restoring the androgen responsiveness of AI tumors.

  19. RTTN Mutations Cause Primary Microcephaly and Primordial Dwarfism in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseldin, Hanan; Alazami, Anas M; Manning, Melanie; Hashem, Amal; Caluseiu, Oana; Tabarki, Brahim; Esplin, Edward; Schelley, Susan; Innes, A Micheil; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Lamont, Ryan; Majewski, Jacek; Bernier, Francois P; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-12-03

    Primary microcephaly is a developmental brain anomaly that results from defective proliferation of neuroprogenitors in the germinal periventricular zone. More than a dozen genes are known to be mutated in autosomal-recessive primary microcephaly in isolation or in association with a more generalized growth deficiency (microcephalic primordial dwarfism), but the genetic heterogeneity is probably more extensive. In a research protocol involving autozygome mapping and exome sequencing, we recruited a multiplex consanguineous family who is affected by severe microcephalic primordial dwarfism and tested negative on clinical exome sequencing. Two candidate autozygous intervals were identified, and the second round of exome sequencing revealed a single intronic variant therein (c.2885+8A>G [p.Ser963(∗)] in RTTN exon 23). RT-PCR confirmed that this change creates a cryptic splice donor and thus causes retention of the intervening 7 bp of the intron and leads to premature truncation. On the basis of this finding, we reanalyzed the exome file of a second consanguineous family affected by a similar phenotype and identified another homozygous change in RTTN as the likely causal mutation. Combined linkage analysis of the two families confirmed that RTTN maps to the only significant linkage peak. Finally, through international collaboration, a Canadian multiplex family affected by microcephalic primordial dwarfism and biallelic mutation of RTTN was identified. Our results expand the phenotype of RTTN-related disorders, hitherto limited to polymicrogyria, to include microcephalic primordial dwarfism with a complex brain phenotype involving simplified gyration. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Closely spaced multiple mutations as potential signatures of transient hypermutability in human genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Min; Férec, Claude; Cooper, David N

    2009-10-01

    Data from diverse organisms suggests that transient hypermutability is a general mutational mechanism with the potential to generate multiple synchronous mutations, a phenomenon probably best exemplified by closely spaced multiple mutations (CSMMs). Here we have attempted to extend the concept of transient hypermutability from somatic cells to the germline, using human inherited disease-causing multiple mutations as a model system. Employing stringent criteria for data inclusion, we have retrospectively identified numerous potential examples of pathogenic CSMMs that exhibit marked similarities to the CSMMs reported in other systems. These examples include (1) eight multiple mutations, each comprising three or more components within a sequence tract of mutation showers"; and (3) numerous highly informative "homocoordinate" mutations. Using the proportion of CpG substitution as a crude indicator of the relative likelihood of transient hypermutability, we present evidence to suggest that CSMMs comprising at least one pair of mutations separated by mutation screening.

  1. Mutations in inhibin and activin genes associated with human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelling, Andrew N

    2012-08-15

    Inhibins and activins are members of the transforming growth factor (TGFβ) superfamily, that includes the TGFβs, inhibins and activins, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and growth and differentiation factors (GDFs). The family members are expressed throughout the human body, and are involved in the regulation of a range of important functions. The precise regulation of the TGFβ pathways is critical, and mutations of individual molecules or even minor alterations of signalling will have a significant affect on function, that may lead to development of disease or predisposition to the development of disease. The inhibins and activins regulate aspects of the male and female reproductive system, therefore, it is not surprising that most of the diseases associated with abnormalities of the inhibin and activin genes are focused on reproductive disorders and reproductive cancers. In this review, I highlight the role of genetic variants in the development of conditions such as premature ovarian failure, pre-eclampsia, and various reproductive cancers. Given the recent advances in human genetic research, such as genome wide association studies and next generation sequencing, it is likely that inhibins and activins will be shown to play more important roles in a range of human genetic diseases in the future.

  2. Tissue-specific mutation accumulation in human adult stem cells during life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokzijl, Francis; de Ligt, Joep; Jager, Myrthe; Sasselli, Valentina; Roerink, Sophie; Sasaki, Nobuo; Huch, Meritxell; Boymans, Sander; Kuijk, Ewart; Prins, Pjotr; Nijman, Isaac J.; Martincorena, Inigo; Mokry, Michal; Wiegerinck, Caroline L.; Middendorp, Sabine; Sato, Toshiro; Schwank, Gerald; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Vries, Robert G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Stratton, Michael R.; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin; van Boxtel, Ruben

    2016-10-01

    The gradual accumulation of genetic mutations in human adult stem cells (ASCs) during life is associated with various age-related diseases, including cancer. Extreme variation in cancer risk across tissues was recently proposed to depend on the lifetime number of ASC divisions, owing to unavoidable random mutations that arise during DNA replication. However, the rates and patterns of mutations in normal ASCs remain unknown. Here we determine genome-wide mutation patterns in ASCs of the small intestine, colon and liver of human donors with ages ranging from 3 to 87 years by sequencing clonal organoid cultures derived from primary multipotent cells. Our results show that mutations accumulate steadily over time in all of the assessed tissue types, at a rate of approximately 40 novel mutations per year, despite the large variation in cancer incidence among these tissues. Liver ASCs, however, have different mutation spectra compared to those of the colon and small intestine. Mutational signature analysis reveals that this difference can be attributed to spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine residues in the colon and small intestine, probably reflecting their high ASC division rate. In liver, a signature with an as-yet-unknown underlying mechanism is predominant. Mutation spectra of driver genes in cancer show high similarity to the tissue-specific ASC mutation spectra, suggesting that intrinsic mutational processes in ASCs can initiate tumorigenesis. Notably, the inter-individual variation in mutation rate and spectra are low, suggesting tissue-specific activity of common mutational processes throughout life.

  3. Membrane androgen binding sites are preferentially expressed in human prostate carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delakas Dimitrios

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in males. Nevertheless, to this moment, there is no specific routine diagnostic marker to be used in clinical practice. Recently, the identification of a membrane testosterone binding site involved in the remodeling of actin cytoskeleton structures and PSA secretion, on LNCaP human prostate cancer cells has been reported. We have investigated whether this membrane testosterone binding component could be of value for the identification of prostate cancer. Methods Using a non-internalizable testosterone-BSA-FITC analog, proven to bind on membrane sites only in LNCaP cells, we have investigated the expression of membrane testosterone binding sites in a series of prostate carcinomas (n = 14, morphologically normal epithelia, taken from areas of the surgical specimens far from the location of the carcinomas (n = 8 and benign prostate hyperplasia epithelia (n = 10. Isolated epithelial cells were studied by flow cytometry, and touching preparations, after 10-min incubation. In addition, routine histological slides were assayed by confocal laser microscopy. Results We show that membrane testosterone binding sites are preferentially expressed in prostate carcinoma cells, while BPH and non-malignant epithelial cells show a low or absent binding. Conclusions Our results indicate that membrane testosterone receptors might be of use for the rapid routine identification of prostate cancer, representing a new diagnostic marker of the disease.

  4. Androgen receptor-dependent transactivation of growth arrest-specific gene 6 mediates inhibitory effects of testosterone on vascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Bo-Kyung; Akishita, Masahiro; Iijima, Katsuya; Ogawa, Sumito; Maemura, Koji; Yu, Jing; Takeyama, Kenichi; Kato, Shigeaki; Eto, Masato; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi

    2010-03-05

    Recent epidemiological studies have found that androgen deficiency is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease in men. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying the cardioprotective effects of androgens. Here we show the inhibitory effects of testosterone on vascular calcification and a critical role of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transactivation of growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), a key regulator of inorganic phosphate (P(i))-induced calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Testosterone and nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone inhibited P(i)-induced calcification of human aortic VSMC in a concentration-dependent manner. Androgen inhibited P(i)-induced VSMC apoptosis, an essential process for VSMC calcification. The effects on VSMC calcification were mediated by restoration of P(i)-induced down-regulation of Gas6 expression and a subsequent reduction of Akt phosphorylation. These effects of androgen were blocked by an AR antagonist, flutamide, but not by an estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780. We then explored the mechanistic role of the AR in Gas6 expression and found an abundant expression of AR predominantly in the nucleus of VSMC and two consensus ARE sequences in the Gas6 promoter region. Dihydrotestosterone stimulated Gas6 promoter activity, and this effect was abrogated by flutamide and by AR siRNA. Site-specific mutation revealed that the proximal ARE was essential for androgen-dependent transactivation of Gas6. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated ligand-dependent binding of the AR to the proximal ARE of Gas6. These results indicate that AR signaling directly regulates Gas6 transcription, which leads to inhibition of vascular calcification, and provides a mechanistic insight into the cardioprotective action of androgens.

  5. Androgenic and Estrogenic Response of Green Mussel Extracts from Singapore’s Coastal Environment Using a Human Cell-Based Bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayen, Stéphane; Gong, Yinhan; Chin, Hong Soon; Lee, Hian Kee; Leong, Yong Eu; Obbard, Jeffrey Philip

    2004-01-01

    In the last decade, evidence of endocrine disruption in biota exposed to environmental pollutants has raised serious concern. Human cell-based bioassays have been developed to evaluate induced androgenic and estrogenic activities of chemical compounds. However, bioassays have been sparsely applied to environmental samples. In this study we present data on sex hormone activities in the green mussel, Perna viridis, in Singapore’s coastal waters. P. viridis is a common bioindicator of marine contamination, and this study is a follow-up to an earlier investigation that reported the presence of sex hormone activities in seawater samples from Singapore’s coastal environment. Specimens were collected from eight locations around the Singapore coastline and analyzed for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals. Tissue extracts were then screened for activities on androgen receptors (ARs) and estrogen receptors (ER-α and ER-β) using a reporter gene bio-assay based on a HeLa human cell line. Mussel extracts alone did not exhibit AR activity, but in the presence of the reference androgenic hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT), activities were up to 340% higher than those observed for DHT alone. Peak activities were observed in locations adjacent to industrial and shipping activities. Estrogenic activities of the mussel extract both alone and in the presence of reference hormone were positive. Correlations were statistically investigated between sex hormone activities, levels of pollutants in the mussel tissues, and various biological parameters (specimen size, sex ratio, lipid and moisture content). Significant correlations exist between AR activities, in the presence of DHT, and total concentration of POPs (r = 0.725, p < 0.05). PMID:15531429

  6. Preliminary investigations into triazole derived androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altimari, Jarrad M; Niranjan, Birunthi; Risbridger, Gail P; Schweiker, Stephanie S; Lohning, Anna E; Henderson, Luke C

    2014-05-01

    A range of 1,4-substituted-1,2,3-N-phenyltriazoles were synthesized and evaluated as non-steroidal androgen receptor (AR) antagonists. The motivation for this study was to replace the N-phenyl amide portion of small molecule antiandrogens with a 1,2,3-triazole and determine effects, if any, on biological activity. The synthetic methodology presented herein is robust, high yielding and extremely rapid. Using this methodology a series of 17 N-aryl triazoles were synthesized from commercially available starting materials in less than 3h. After preliminary biological screening at 20 and 40 μM, the most promising three compounds were found to display IC50 values of 40-50 μM against androgen dependent (LNCaP) cells and serve as a starting point for further structure-activity investigations. All compounds in this work were the focus of an in silico study to dock the compounds into the human androgen receptor ligand binding domain (hARLBD) and compare their predicted binding affinity with known antiandrogens. A comparison of receptor-ligand interactions for the wild type and T877A mutant AR revealed two novel polar interactions. One with Q738 of the wild type site and the second with the mutated A877 residue.

  7. Ovarian and Adrenal Androgens and Their Link to High Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Levels: A Prospective Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Rodríguez-Gutiérrez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the association between human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG and hyperandrogenism was identified more than 40 years ago, relevant questions remain unanswered. Design and Methods. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal, and controlled study in 23 women with a diagnosis of a complete hydatidiform mole (HM. Results. All participants completed the study. Before HM evacuation mean hCG was markedly higher in the cases than in the control group (P≤0.001. Free testosterone (T and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S were found to be higher in the cases (2.78 ± 1.24 pg/mL and 231.50 ± 127.20 μ/dL when compared to the control group (1.50 ± 0.75 pg/mL and 133.59 ± 60.69 μ/dL (P=0.0001 and 0.001, respectively. There was a strong correlation between hCG and free T/total T/DHEA-S concentrations (r=0.78; P≤0.001, r=0.74;  P≤0.001, and r=0.71;  P≤0.001, respectively. In the cases group 48 hours after HM evacuation, hCG levels were found to be significantly lower when compared to initial levels (P=0.001 and free T and DHEA-S declined significantly (P=0.0002 and 0.009. Conclusion. Before uterus evacuation, hCG, free T, and DHEA-S levels were significantly higher when compared with controls finding a strong correlation between hCG and free T/DHEA-S levels. Forty-eight hours after HM treatment hCG levels declined and the difference was lost. A novel finding of our study is that in cases, besides free T, DHEA-S was also found to be significantly higher and both the ovaries and adrenal glands appear to be the sites of this androgen overproduction.

  8. Androgen-responsive gene database: integrated knowledge on androgen-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mei; Ma, Yunsheng; Chen, Congcong; Fu, Xuping; Yang, Shu; Li, Xia; Yu, Guohua; Mao, Yumin; Xie, Yi; Li, Yao

    2009-11-01

    Androgen signaling plays an important role in many biological processes. Androgen Responsive Gene Database (ARGDB) is devoted to providing integrated knowledge on androgen-controlled genes. Gene records were collected on the basis of PubMed literature collections. More than 6000 abstracts and 950 original publications were manually screened, leading to 1785 human genes, 993 mouse genes, and 583 rat genes finally included in the database. All the collected genes were experimentally proved to be regulated by androgen at the expression level or to contain androgen-responsive regions. For each gene important details of the androgen regulation experiments were collected from references, such as expression change, androgen-responsive sequence, response time, tissue/cell type, experimental method, ligand identity, and androgen amount, which will facilitate further evaluation by researchers. Furthermore, the database was integrated with multiple annotation resources, including National Center for Biotechnology Information, Gene Ontology, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway, to reveal the biological characteristics and significance of androgen-regulated genes. The ARGDB web site is mainly composed of the Browse, Search, Element Scan, and Submission modules. It is user friendly and freely accessible at http://argdb.fudan.edu.cn. Preliminary analysis of the collected data was performed. Many disease pathways, such as prostate carcinogenesis, were found to be enriched in androgen-regulated genes. The discovered androgen-response motifs were similar to those in previous reports. The analysis results are displayed in the web site. In conclusion, ARGDB provides a unified gateway to storage, retrieval, and update of information on androgen-regulated genes.

  9. Methods for the identification of mutations in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene using DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, S.L.C.; Dilella, A.G.

    1990-10-23

    This patent describes a method of detecting a mutation in a phenylalanine hydroxylase gene of human genomic DNA. Also described is an automated method of detecting PKU affected, PKU helerozgotes and normals in fetal to adult human samples.

  10. Regulation of progesterone-binding breast cyst protein GCDFP-24 secretion by estrogens and androgens in human breast cancer cells: a new marker of steroid action in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, J; Dauvois, S; Haagensen, D E; Lévesque, C; Mérand, Y; Labrie, F

    1990-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that androgens are potent inhibitors of breast cancer cell proliferation under both basal and estrogen-induced incubation conditions, while they suppress expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptors. To better understand the mechanisms responsible for the antagonism between androgens and estrogens in breast cancer and to obtain a new tumor marker for the actions of these two steroids, we have investigated the effects of androgens and estrogens on expression of the major protein found in human breast gross cystic disease fluid, namely GCDFP-24. This study was performed in ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. After a 9-day incubation period, physiological concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol stimulated proliferation of ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 cells by 2- to 3.5-fold while simultaneously exerting a marked 70-90% inhibition of GCDFP-24 secretion. The estrogenic effects on GCDFP-24 secretion and cell proliferation were both competitively blocked by simultaneous incubation with the new steroidal pure antiestrogen EM-139. On the other hand, a maximal concentration (10 nM) of the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone decreased by 50% the proliferation of ZR-75-1 cells; the half-maximal inhibitory effect was exerted at 0.01 nM. The androgen exerted a 3- to 4-fold stimulatory effect on GCDFP-24 secretion at an EC50 value of 0.01 nM. The effect of dihydrotestosterone on these parameters was competitively blocked by simultaneous incubation with the pure antiandrogen OH-flutamide. The present data show that the effects of estrogens and androgens in ZR-75-1 cells on GCDFP-24 secretion and cell growth are opposite. Similarly, in MCF-7 cells, estrogens stimulate cell growth, while GCDFP-24 secretion is inhibited. The present data also suggest that GCDFP-24 could well be a good biochemical marker for monitoring the response to androgenic and antiestrogenic compounds in the therapy of advanced breast cancer.

  11. Androgen receptors and hormone sensitivity of a human prostatic cancer cell line (PC-3) are modulated by natural beta-interferon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Sica (G.); G. Dell'Acqua (G.); F. Iacopino (F.); A. Fattorossi (A.); P. Marchetti (P.); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); M. Pavone-Macaluso (M.)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen recptors are expressed at a low level in the cell line PC-3, which does not respond to either androgens or antiandrogens. If these cells are exposed to natural beta-interferon (β-IFN) a reduction in cell growth and an increase in androgen receptors, evaluated by both biochemical

  12. Androgen receptors and hormone sensitivity of a human prostatic cancer cell line (PC-3) are modulated by natural beta-interferon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Sica (G.); G. Dell'Acqua (G.); F. Iacopino (F.); A. Fattorossi (A.); P. Marchetti (P.); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); M. Pavone-Macaluso (M.)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen recptors are expressed at a low level in the cell line PC-3, which does not respond to either androgens or antiandrogens. If these cells are exposed to natural beta-interferon (β-IFN) a reduction in cell growth and an increase in androgen receptors, evaluated by both biochemical

  13. Magnolol causes alterations in the cell cycle in androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro by affecting expression of key cell cycle regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Brendan T; McDougall, Luke; Catalli, Adriana; Hurta, Robert A R

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in the Western world, affects many men worldwide. This study investigated the effects of magnolol, a compound found in the roots and bark of the magnolia tree Magnolia officinalis, on the behavior of 2 androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC3, in vitro. Magnolol, in a 24-h exposure at 40 and 80 μM, was found to be cytotoxic to cells. Magnolol also affected cell cycle progression of DU145 and PC3 cells, resulting in alterations to the cell cycle and subsequently decreasing the proportion of cells entering the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. Magnolol inhibited the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins including cyclins A, B1, D1, and E, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. Protein expression levels of pRBp107 decreased and pRBp130 protein expression levels increased in response to magnolol exposure, whereas p16(INK4a), p21, and p27 protein expression levels were apparently unchanged post 24-h exposure. Magnolol exposure at 6 h did increase p27 protein expression levels. This study has demonstrated that magnolol can alter the behavior of androgen insensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro and suggests that magnolol may have potential as a novel anti-prostate cancer agent.

  14. HUMAN MITOCHONDRIAL tRNA MUTATIONS IN MATERNALLY INHERITED DEAFNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jing; GONG Sha-sha; TANG Xiao-wen; ZHU Yi; GUAN Min-xin

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes have been shown to be associated with maternally inherited syn-dromic and non-syndromic deafness. Among those, mutations such as tRNALeu(UUR) 3243A>G associated with syndromic deafness are often present in heteroplasmy, and the non-syndromic deafness-associated tRNA mu-tations including tRNASer(UCN) 7445A>G are often in homoplasmy or in high levels of heteroplasmy. These tRNA mutations are the primary factors underlying the development of hearing loss. However, other tRNA mutations such as tRNAThr 15927G>A and tRNASer(UCN) 7444G>A are insufficient to produce a deafness phe-notype, but always act in synergy with the primary mitochondrial DNA mutations, and can modulate their phenotypic manifestation. These tRNA mutations may alter the structure and function of the corresponding mitochondrial tRNAs and cause failures in tRNAs metabolism. Thereby, the impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis and subsequent defects in respiration caused by these tRNA mutations, results in mitochon-drial dysfunctions and eventually leads to the development of hearing loss. Here, we summarized the deaf-ness-associated mitochondrial tRNA mutations and discussed the pathophysiology of these mitochondrial tRNA mutations, and we hope these data will provide a foundation for the early diagnosis, management, and treatment of maternally inherited deafness.

  15. Androgens and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderschueren, Dirk; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Boonen, Steven; Lindberg, Marie K; Bouillon, Roger; Ohlsson, Claes

    2004-06-01

    Loss of estrogens or androgens increases the rate of bone remodeling by removing restraining effects on osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and also causes a focal imbalance between resorption and formation by prolonging the lifespan of osteoclasts and shortening the lifespan of osteoblasts. Conversely, androgens, as well as estrogens, maintain cancellous bone mass and integrity, regardless of age or sex. Although androgens, via the androgen receptor (AR), and estrogens, via the estrogen receptors (ERs), can exert these effects, their relative contribution remains uncertain. Recent studies suggest that androgen action on cancellous bone depends on (local) aromatization of androgens into estrogens. However, at least in rodents, androgen action on cancellous bone can be directly mediated via AR activation, even in the absence of ERs. Androgens also increase cortical bone size via stimulation of both longitudinal and radial growth. First, androgens, like estrogens, have a biphasic effect on endochondral bone formation: at the start of puberty, sex steroids stimulate endochondral bone formation, whereas they induce epiphyseal closure at the end of puberty. Androgen action on the growth plate is, however, clearly mediated via aromatization in estrogens and interaction with ERalpha. Androgens increase radial growth, whereas estrogens decrease periosteal bone formation. This effect of androgens may be important because bone strength in males seems to be determined by relatively higher periosteal bone formation and, therefore, greater bone dimensions, relative to muscle mass at older age. Experiments in mice again suggest that both the AR and ERalpha pathways are involved in androgen action on radial bone growth. ERbeta may mediate growth-limiting effects of estrogens in the female but does not seem to be involved in the regulation of bone size in males. In conclusion, androgens may protect men against osteoporosis via maintenance of cancellous bone mass and

  16. Knock-in human FGFR3 achondroplasia mutation as a mouse model for human skeletal dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Ching; Song, I-Wen; Pai, Ya-Ju; Chen, Sheng-De; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2017-01-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common genetic dwarfism in human, is caused by a gain-of function mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Currently, there is no effective treatment for ACH. The development of an appropriate human-relevant model is important for testing potential therapeutic interventions before human clinical trials. Here, we have generated an ACH mouse model in which the endogenous mouse Fgfr3 gene was replaced with human FGFR3G380R (FGFR3ACH) cDNA, the most common mutation in human ACH. Heterozygous (FGFR3ACH/+) and homozygous (FGFR3ACH/ACH) mice expressing human FGFR3G380R recapitulate the phenotypes observed in ACH patients, including growth retardation, disproportionate shortening of the limbs, round head, mid-face hypoplasia at birth, and kyphosis progression during postnatal development. We also observed premature fusion of the cranial sutures and low bone density in newborn FGFR3G380R mice. The severity of the disease phenotypes corresponds to the copy number of activated FGFR3G380R, and the phenotypes become more pronounced during postnatal skeletal development. This mouse model offers a tool for assessing potential therapeutic approaches for skeletal dysplasias related to over-activation of human FGFR3, and for further studies of the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:28230213

  17. Androgen-mediated regulation of skeletal muscle protein balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Michael L; Steiner, Jennifer L; Gordon, Bradley S

    2017-02-22

    Androgens significantly alter muscle mass in part by shifting protein balance in favor of net protein accretion. During various atrophic conditions, the clinical impact of decreased production or bioavailability of androgens (termed hypogonadism) is important as a loss of muscle mass is intimately linked with survival outcome. While androgen replacement therapy increases muscle mass in part by restoring protein balance, this is not a comprehensive treatment option due to potential side effects. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which androgens alter protein balance is needed for the development of androgen-independent therapies. While the data in humans suggest androgens alter protein balance (both synthesis and breakdown) in the fasted metabolic state, a predominant molecular mechanism(s) behind this observation is still lacking. This failure is likely due in part to inconsistent experimental design between studies including failure to control nutrient/feeding status, the method of altering androgens, and the model systems utilized.

  18. Molecular cell biology of androgen receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Nigel C; Gardiner, Robert A; Hooper, John D; Johnson, David W; Gobe, Glenda C

    2010-06-01

    The classical action of androgen receptor (AR) is to regulate gene transcriptional processes via AR nuclear translocation, response element binding and recruitment of, or crosstalk with, transcription factors. AR also utilises non-classical, non-genomic mechanisms of signal transduction. These precede gene transcription or protein synthesis, and involve steroid-induced modulation of cytoplasmic or cell membrane-bound regulatory proteins. Despite many decades of investigation, the role of AR in gene regulation of cells and tissues remains only partially characterised. AR exerts most of its effects in sex hormone-dependent tissues of the body, but the receptor is also expressed in many tissues not previously thought to be androgen sensitive. Thus it is likely that a complex, more over-arching, role for AR exists. Each AR domain co-ordinates a multitude of individual and vital roles via a diverse array of interacting partner molecules that are necessary for cellular and tissue development and maintenance. Aberrant AR activity, promoted by mutations or binding partner misregulation, can present as many clinical manifestations including androgen insensitivity syndrome and prostate cancer. In the case of malignant prostate cancer, treatment generally revolves around androgen deprivation therapies designed to interfere with AR action and the androgen signalling axis. Androgen therapies for prostate cancer often fail, highlighting a real need for increased research into AR function.

  19. Androgen actions in mouse wound healing: Minimal in vivo effects of local antiandrogen delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwei; Simanainen, Ulla; Cheer, Kenny; Suarez, Francia G; Gao, Yan Ru; Li, Zhe; Handelsman, David; Maitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this work were to define the role of androgens in female wound healing and to develop and characterize a novel wound dressing with antiandrogens. Androgens retard wound healing in males, but their role in female wound healing has not been established. To understand androgen receptor (AR)-mediated androgen actions in male and female wound healing, we utilized the global AR knockout (ARKO) mouse model, with a mutated AR deleting the second zinc finger to disrupt DNA binding and transcriptional activation. AR inactivation enhanced wound healing rate in males by increasing re-epithelialization and collagen deposition even when wound contraction was eliminated. Cell proliferation and migration in ARKO male fibroblasts was significantly increased compared with wild-type (WT) fibroblasts. However, ARKO females showed a similar healing rate compared to WT females. To exploit local antiandrogen effects in wound healing, while minimizing off-target systemic effects, we developed a novel electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold wound dressing material for sustained local antiandrogen delivery. Using the antiandrogen hydroxyl flutamide (HF) at 1, 5, and 10 mg/mL in PCL scaffolds, controlled HF delivery over 21 days significantly enhanced in vitro cell proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts and human keratinocytes. HF-PCL scaffolds also promoted in vivo wound healing in mice compared with open wounds but not to PCL scaffolds. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  20. Analysis of in vivo somatic mutations in normal human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, P.K.; Sahota, A.; Boyadjiev, S.A. [Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have used the APRT locus located at 16q24.3 to study the nature of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in human T lymphocytes in vivo. T lymphocytes were isolated from blood from APRT (+/{minus}) obligated heterozygotes with known germline mutations. The cells were immediatley placed in culture medium containing 100 {mu}M 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) to select for drug-resistant clones ({minus}/{minus}) already present. These clones were first examined using polymorphic CA microsatellite repeat markers D16S303 and D16S305 that are distal and proximal to APRT, respectively. The retention of heterozygosity of these markers is suggestive of minor changes in the APRT gene, the exact nature of which were determined by DNA sequencing. Nineteen out of 70 DAP-resistant clones from one heterozygote showed APRT sequence changes. The loss of heterozygosity of markers D16S303 and D16S305 in the remaining clones suggests LOH involving multilocus chromosomal events. These clones were then sequentially typed using additional CA repeat markers proximal and distal to APRT. The extent of LOH in these clones was found to vary from <5 cM to almost the entire 16q arm. Preliminary results suggest that there are multiple sites along the chromosome from which LOH proceeds distally in these clones. Cytogenetic analysis of 10 clones suggested mitotic recombination in 9 and deletion in one. Studies are in progress to further characterize the molecular mechanisms of LOH.

  1. C-kit gene mutation in human gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Yong Hou; Ai-Hua Zheng; Tai-Ming Zhang; Wen-Zhong Hou; Jian Wang; Xiang Du; Xiong-Zeng Zhu; Yun-Shan Tan; Meng-Hong Sun; Yong-Kun Wei; Jian-Fang Xu; Shao-Hua Lu; Su-Jie A-Ke-Su; Yan-Nan Zhou; Feng Gao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the significance of c-kit gene mutation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST).METHODS: Fifty two cases of GIST and 28 cases of other tumors were examined. DNA samples were extracted from paraffin sections and fresh blocks. Exons 11, 9 and 13 of the c-kit gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced.RESULTS: Mutations of exon 11 were found in 14 of 25 malignant GISTs (56%), mutations of exon 11 of the c-kit gene were revealed in 2 of 19 borderline GISTs (10.5%),and no mutation was found in benign tumors. The mutation rate showed significant difference (X2=14.39, P<0.01)between malignant and benign GISTs. Most of mutations consisted of the in-frame deletion or replication from 3 to 48 bp in heterozygous and homozygous fashions, None of the mutations disrupted the downstream reading frame of the gene. Point mutations and frame deletions were most frequently observed at codons 550-560, but duplications were most concentrated at codons 570-585. No mutations of exons 9 and 13 were revealed in GISTs, Neither c-kit gene expression nor gene mutations were found in 3 leiomyomas, 8 leiomyosarcomas, 2 schwannomas, 2malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 2 intraabdominal fibromatoses, 2 malignant fibrous histiocytomas and 9 adenocarcinomas.CONCLUSION: C-kit gene mutations occur preferentially in malignant GISTs and might be a clinically useful adjunct marker in the evaluation of GISTs and can help to differentiate GISTs from other mesenchymal tumors of gastrointestinal tract, such as smooth muscle tumors,schwannomas, etc.

  2. Immunohistochemical detection of the androgen receptor with monoclonal antibody F39.4 in routinely processed, paraffin-embedded human tissues after microwave pre-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, P J; Brinkmann, A O; Boersma, W J; Van der Kwast, T H

    1994-08-01

    We describe the immunohistochemical detection of the human androgen receptor (AR) in routinely processed, paraffin-embedded tissue with the monoclonal antibody (MAb) F39.4. Deparaffinized sections were heated in a microwave oven for antigen retrieval. A panel of human male- and female-derived tissues was investigated. We observed a nuclear staining pattern consistent with previous results on frozen sections. Moreover, we studied the possibility of detecting AR in prolonged formalin-fixed tissue and in paraffin-embedded archival material. After prolonged fixation times or long-term storage of paraffin-embedded tissue, the staining intensity for the AR did not deteriorate. Blocking experiments with the specific synthetic peptides demonstrated the specificity of this technique. We conclude that this method is specific, allows retrospective AR studies, and offers optimally preserved morphology.

  3. An ancient founder mutation in PROKR2 impairs human reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avbelj Stefanija, Magdalena; Jeanpierre, Marc; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P; Young, Jacques; Quinton, Richard; Abreu, Ana Paula; Plummer, Lacey; Au, Margaret G; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Dwyer, Andrew A; Florez, Jose C; Cheetham, Timothy; Pearce, Simon H; Purushothaman, Radhika; Schinzel, Albert; Pugeat, Michel; Jacobson-Dickman, Elka E; Ten, Svetlana; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Gusella, James F; Dode, Catherine; Crowley, William F; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2012-10-01

    Congenital gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency manifests as absent or incomplete sexual maturation and infertility. Although the disease exhibits marked locus and allelic heterogeneity, with the causal mutations being both rare and private, one causal mutation in the prokineticin receptor, PROKR2 L173R, appears unusually prevalent among GnRH-deficient patients of diverse geographic and ethnic origins. To track the genetic ancestry of PROKR2 L173R, haplotype mapping was performed in 22 unrelated patients with GnRH deficiency carrying L173R and their 30 first-degree relatives. The mutation's age was estimated using a haplotype-decay model. Thirteen subjects were informative and in all of them the mutation was present on the same ~123 kb haplotype whose population frequency is ≤10%. Thus, PROKR2 L173R represents a founder mutation whose age is estimated at approximately 9000 years. Inheritance of PROKR2 L173R-associated GnRH deficiency was complex with highly variable penetrance among carriers, influenced by additional mutations in the other PROKR2 allele (recessive inheritance) or another gene (digenicity). The paradoxical identification of an ancient founder mutation that impairs reproduction has intriguing implications for the inheritance mechanisms of PROKR2 L173R-associated GnRH deficiency and for the relevant processes of evolutionary selection, including potential selective advantages of mutation carriers in genes affecting reproduction.

  4. Somatic mutation of immunoglobulin VH6 genes in human infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridings, J; Dinan, L; Williams, R; Roberton, D; Zola, H

    1998-01-01

    Infants respond to antigen by making antibody that is generally of low affinity for antigen. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, and selection of cells expressing mutations with improved affinity for antigen, are the molecular and cellular processes underlying the maturation of antibody affinity. We have reported previously that neonates and infants up to 2 months of age, including individuals undergoing strong immunological challenge, show very few mutated VH6 sequences, with low mutation frequencies in mutated sequences, and little evidence of selection. We have now examined immunoglobulin genes from healthy infants between 2 and 10 months old for mutation and evidence of selection. In this age group, the proportion of VH6 sequences which are mutated and the mutation frequency in mutated sequences increase with age. There is evidence of selection from 6 months old. These results indicate that the process of affinity maturation, which depends on cognate T–B cell interaction and functional germinal centres, is approaching maturity from 6 months old. PMID:9764600

  5. Androgen and prostatic stroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-JieNIU; Teng-XiangMA; IuZHANG; YongXU; Rui-FaHAN; GuangSUN

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of androgen on the proliferation,differentiation and regression of canine prostatic stromal cells in vivo and human stromal cells in vitro.Methods:Twenty-two dogs,including 15 normal prostate doge and 7 prostatic hyperplasia dogs,had their serum concentration of testosterone and estrodiol determined by radioimmunoassay before and after castration.The expression of androgen receptor(AR)and estrogen receptor(ER)in the prostate were analysed by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR before and after castration.Light microscopy,transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL assay were carried out successively before and after castration to evaluate the prostatic histomorphology.In vitro serum-free cell cultures from human prostatic stroma were established and exposed to dihydrotestosterone(DHT).The proliferation of the cell culture was detected by MTT assay.The expression of TGFβ bFGF,AR,and smooth muscle cell(SMC) specific proteins (myosin and/or smoothelin)were detected using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR.The differentiation from fibroblasts to smooth muscle cells was deduced by measuring the expression of SMC specific proteins.Results:Before castration,the serum concentrations of testosterone and estrodiol were not statistically different between normal and hyperplasia groups.Following castration,the serum concentration of testerone decreased rapidly in 2 days,and the concentration of estrodiol had no significant change compared with the pre-castration data.In the prostate,AR was presented in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the AR mRNA level was higher in hyperplasia than in normal prostate tissues(P<0.05).While ER predominantly existed in the prostate stromal cells and the ER mRNA had no difference between the hyperplasia and the normal group.Within the early phase of castration(

  6. Hydrogen sulfide represses androgen receptor transactivation by targeting at the second zinc finger module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kexin; Li, Shuangshuang; Wu, Lingyun; Lai, Christopher; Yang, Guangdong

    2014-07-25

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is indispensable for the development of prostate cancer from the initial androgen-dependent state to a later aggressive androgen-resistant state. This study examined the role of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), a novel gasotransmitter, in the regulation of AR signaling as well as its mediation in androgen-independent cell growth in prostate cancer cells. Here we found that H(2)S inhibits cell proliferation of both androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer cells (LNCaP-B), with more significance on the latter, which was established by long term treatment of parental LNCaP cells with bicalutamide. The expression of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), a major H(2)S producing enzyme in prostate tissue, was reduced in both human prostate cancer tissues and LNCaP-B cells. LNCaP-B cells were resistant to bicalutamide-induced cell growth inhibition, and CSE overexpression could rebuild the sensitivity of LNCaP-B cells to bicalutamide. H(2)S significantly repressed the expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and TMPRSS2, two AR-targeted genes. In addition, H(2)S inhibited AR binding with PSA promoter and androgen-responsive element (ARE) luciferase activity. We further found that AR is post-translationally modified by H(2)S through S-sulfhydration. Mutation of cysteine 611 and cysteine 614 in the second zinc finger module of AR-DNA binding domain diminished the effects of H(2)S on AR S-sulfhydration and AR dimerization. These data suggest that reduced CSE/H2S signaling contributes to antiandrogen-resistant status, and sufficient level of H(2)S is able to inhibit AR transactivation and treat castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  7. Vitamin D3 regulates the formation and degradation of gap junctions in androgen-responsive human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kelsey

    Full Text Available 1α-25(OH2 vitamin D3 (1-25D, an active hormonal form of Vitamin D3, is a well-known chemopreventive and pro-differentiating agent. It has been shown to inhibit the growth of several prostate cancer cell lines. Gap junctions, formed of proteins called connexins (Cx, are ensembles of cell-cell channels, which permit the exchange of small growth regulatory molecules between adjoining cells. Cell-cell communication mediated by gap junctional channels is an important homeostatic control mechanism for regulating cell growth and differentiation. We have investigated the effect of 1-25D on the formation and degradation of gap junctions in an androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, which expresses retrovirally-introduced Cx32. Connexin32 is expressed by the luminal and well-differentiated cells of normal prostate and prostate tumors. Our results document that 1-25D enhances the expression of Cx32 and its subsequent assembly into gap junctions. Our results further show that 1-25D prevents androgen-regulated degradation of Cx32, post-translationally, independent of androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling. Finally, our findings document that formation of gap junctions sensitizes Cx32-expressing LNCaP cells to the growth inhibitory effects of 1-25D and alters their morphology. These findings suggest that the growth-inhibitory effects of 1-25D in LNCaP cells may be related to its ability to modulate the assembly of Cx32 into gap junctions.

  8. Androgens and the skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, M K; Vandenput, L; Movèrare Skrtic, S; Vanderschueren, D; Boonen, S; Bouillon, R; Ohlsson, C

    2005-03-01

    Loss of estrogens or androgens causes bone loss by increasing the rate of bone remodeling, and also causes an imbalance between resorption and formation by prolonging the lifespan of osteoclasts and shortening the lifespan of osteoblasts. Conversely, treatment with androgens, as well as estrogens, maintains cancellous bone mass and integrity, regardless of age or sex. Both androgens, via the androgen receptor (AR), and estrogens, via the estrogen receptors (ERs) can exert these effects, but the relative contribution of these 2 pathways remains uncertain. Androgens, like estrogens, stimulate endochondral bone formation at the start of puberty, whereas they induce epiphyseal closure at the end of puberty, thus, they have a biphasic effect. Androgen action on the growth plate is, however, clearly mediated via aromatization into estrogens and interaction with ER alpha. Androgens increase, while estrogens decrease radial growth. This differential effect of the sex steroids may be important because bone strength in males seems to be determined by higher periosteal bone formation and, therefore, greater bone dimensions. Experiments in mice suggest that both the AR and ER alpha pathways are involved in androgen action on radial bone growth. ER beta may mediate growth-limiting effects of estrogens in the female but does not seem to be involved in the regulation of bone size in males. In conclusion, androgens may protect men against osteoporosis via maintenance of cancellous bone mass and expansion of cortical bone. This androgen action on bone is mediated by the AR and ER alpha.

  9. Pubertal androgenization and gonadal histology in two 46, XY adolescents with NR5A1 mutations and predominantly female phenotype at birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Cools (Martine); P. Hoebeke (Piet); K.P. Wolffenbuttel (Katja); J.A. Stoop (Hans); R. Hersmus (Remko); M. Barbaro (M.); A. Wedell; H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Most patients with NR5A1 (SF-1) mutations and poor virilization at birth are sex-assigned female and receive early gonadectomy. Although studies in pituitary-specific Sf-1 knockout mice suggest hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, little is known about endocrine function at puberty

  10. Androgens and women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, G P

    1998-01-01

    Androgenic disorders are those conditions in women characterized by excessive androgen action. They are the most common endocrinopathy of women, affecting from 10% to 20%. Signs are: persistent acne, hirsutism and androgenic alopecia, which is the female equivalent of male pattern baldness. A subgroup, those traditionally labeled as having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), additionally have anovulation, as well as menstrual abnormalities and, often, obesity. Although women with androgenic disorders usually present themselves for help with the skin or menstrual changes, there are other important implications regarding their health. Women with PCOS have varying degrees of insulin resistance, and an increased incidence of Type II diabetes mellitus, as well as unfavorable lipid patterns. The presence of these risk factors is suggested by upper segment obesity, darkening of the skin, and the other skin changes that make up acanthosis nigricans. Diagnosis involves measurement of circulating androgens (of which free testosterone is most important), together with prolactin and FSH when menstrual dysfunction is present. Many women with androgenic skin changes have normal serum androgen levels, suggesting increased end organ sensitivity to androgens. Others have hyperandrogenism (of ovarian or adrenal origin). Treatment is usually successful in controlling acne, reducing hirsutism and stabilizing, or partially reversing, androgenic alopecia. Pharmacological approaches involve suppressing androgen levels, for example, the use of an appropriate oral contraceptive, or antagonizing androgen action with several medications that have this activity. Unfortunately, most women with androgenic disorders are frustrated in their efforts to obtain medical help. Understanding androgenic disorders will enable the physician to significantly help the majority of women with these conditions.

  11. Functional interactions of the AF-2 activation domain core region of the human androgen receptor with the amino-terminal domain and with the transcriptional coactivator TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); P. Doesburg (Paul); K. Steketee (Karine); J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed a functional interaction between the amino-terminal domain and the carboxy-terminal, ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human androgen receptor (AR). In the present study, the AR subdomains involved in thi

  12. The IARC TP53 mutation database: a resource for studying the significance of TP53 mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Olivier

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is frequently inactivated by gene mutations in many types of human sporadic cancers, and inherited TP53 mutations predispose to a wide spectrum of early-onset tumors (Li-Fraumeni et Li-Fraumenilike Syndromes. All TP53 gene variations (somatic and germline mutations, as well as polymorphisms that are reported in the scientific literature or in SNP databases are compiled in the IARC TP53 Database. This database provides structured data and analysis tools to study mutation patterns in human cancers and cell-lines and to investigate the clinical impact of mutations. It contains annotations related to the clinical and pathological characteristics of tumors, as well as the demographics and carcinogen exposure of patients. The IARC TP53 web site (http://www-p53.iarc.fr/ provides a search interface for the core database and includes a comprehensive user guide, a slideshow on TP53 mutations in human cancer, protocols and references for sequencing TP53 gene, and links to relevant publications and bioinformatics databases. The database interface allows download of entire data sets and propose various tools for the selection, analysis and downloads of specific sets of data according to user's query.

    Recently, new annotations on the functional properties of mutant p53 proteins have been integrated in this database. Indeed, the most frequent TP53 alterations observed in cancers (75% are missense mutations that result in the production of a mutant protein that differ from the wildtype by one single amino-acid. The characterization of the biological activities of these mutant proteins is thus very important. Over the last ten years, a great amount of systematic data has been generated from experimental assays performed in

  13. The mutation rate of the human mtDNA deletion mtDNA4977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkar, R; Navidi, W; Tavaré, S; Dang, M H; Chomyn, A; Attardi, G; Cortopassi, G; Arnheim, N

    1996-10-01

    The human mitochondrial mutation mtDNA4977 is a 4,977-bp deletion that originates between two 13-bp direct repeats. We grew 220 colonies of cells, each from a single human cell. For each colony, we counted the number of cells and amplified the DNA by PCR to test for the presence of a deletion. To estimate the mutation fate, we used a model that describes the relationship between the mutation rate and the probability that a colony of a given size will contain no mutants, taking into account such factors as possible mitochondrial turnover and mistyping due to PCR error. We estimate that the mutation rate for mtDNA4977 in cultured human cells is 5.95 x 10(-8) per mitochondrial genome replication. This method can be applied to specific chromosomal, as well as mitochondrial, mutations.

  14. The mutation rate of the human mtDNA deletion mtDNA{sup 4977}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenkar, R. [Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, CO (United States); Navidi, W. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Tavare, S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The human mitochondrial mutation mtDNA{sup 4977} is a 4,977-bp deletion that originates between two 13-bp direct repeats. We grew 220 colonies of cells, each from a single human cell. For each colony, we counted the number of cells and amplified the DNA by PCR to test for the presence of a deletion. To estimate the mutation rate, we used a model that describes the relationship between the mutation rate and the probability that a colony of a given size will contain no mutants, taking into account such factors as possible mitochondrial turnover and mistyping due to PCR error. We estimate that the mutation rate for mtDNA{sup 4977} in cultured human cells is 5.95 x 10{sup {minus}8} per mitochondrial genome replication. This method can be applied to specific chromosomal, as well as mitochondrial, mutations. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Mutations of p53 gene exons 4-8 in human esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ya Li; Jin-Tian Tang; Li-Qun Jia; Pei-Wen Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the tumor suppressor gene p53 mutations in exon 4, esophageal cancer and adjacent noncancerous tissues.METHODS: We performed p53 (exons 4-8) gene mutation analysis on 24 surgically resected human esophageal cancer specimens by PCR, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and DNA sequencing. RESULTS: p53 gene mutations were detected in 9 of 22 (40.9%) esophageal cancer specimens and 10 of 17 (58.8%) adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Eight of sixteen (50.0%) point mutations detected were G-A transitions and 9 of 18 (50.0%) p53 gene mutations occurred in exon 4 in esophageal cancer specimens. Only 1 of 11 mutations detected was G-A transition and 4 of 11 (36.4%) p53 gene mutations occurred in exon 4 in adjacent non-cancerous tissues.CONCLUSION: Mutation of p53 gene in exon 4 may play an important role in development of esophageal cancer. The observation of p53 gene mutation in adjacent noncancerous tissues suggests that p53 gene mutation may be an early event in esophageal carcinogenesis. Some clinical factors, including age, sex, pre-operation therapy and location of tumors, do not influence p53 gene mutation rates.

  16. Induction of a mutant phenotype in human repair proficient cells after overexpression of a mutated human DNA repair gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B.G.M. Belt; M.F. van Oostenrijk; H. Odijk (Hanny); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractAntisense and mutated cDNA of the human excision repair gene ERCC-1 were overexpressed in repair efficient HeLa cells by means of an Epstein-Barr-virus derived CDNA expression vector. Whereas antisense RNA did not influence the survival of the transfected cells, a mutated cDNA generating

  17. Androgen-induced cell migration: role of androgen receptor/filamin A association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Androgen receptor (AR controls male morphogenesis, gametogenesis and prostate growth as well as development of prostate cancer. These findings support a role for AR in cell migration and invasiveness. However, the molecular mechanism involved in AR-mediated cell migration still remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mouse embryo NIH3T3 fibroblasts and highly metastatic human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells harbor low levels of transcriptionally incompetent AR. We now report that, through extra nuclear action, AR triggers migration of both cell types upon stimulation with physiological concentrations of the androgen R1881. We analyzed the initial events leading to androgen-induced cell migration and observed that challenging NIH3T3 cells with 10 nM R1881 rapidly induces interaction of AR with filamin A (FlnA at cytoskeleton. AR/FlnA complex recruits integrin beta 1, thus activating its dependent cascade. Silencing of AR, FlnA and integrin beta 1 shows that this ternary complex controls focal adhesion kinase (FAK, paxillin and Rac, thereby driving cell migration. FAK-null fibroblasts migrate poorly and Rac inhibition by EHT impairs motility of androgen-treated NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, FAK and Rac activation by androgens are independent of each other. Findings in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells strengthen the role of Rac in androgen signaling. The Rac inhibitor significantly impairs androgen-induced migration in these cells. A mutant AR, deleted of the sequence interacting with FlnA, fails to mediate FAK activation and paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation in androgen-stimulated cells, further reinforcing the role of AR/FlnA interaction in androgen-mediated motility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present report, for the first time, indicates that the extra nuclear AR/FlnA/integrin beta 1 complex is the key by which androgen activates signaling leading to cell migration. Assembly of this ternary complex may control organ development

  18. Mutation@A Glance : an integrative web application for analysing mutations from human genetic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijikata, A.; Raju, R.; Keerthikumar, S.; Ramabadran, S.; Balakrishnan, L.; Ramadoss, S.K.; Pandey, A.; Mohan, S.; Ohara, O.

    2010-01-01

    Although mutation analysis serves as a key part in making a definitive diagnosis about a genetic disease, it still remains a time-consuming step to interpret their biological implications through integration of various lines of archived information about genes in question. To expedite this evaluatio

  19. Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beernink, P; Barsky, D; Pesavento, B

    2006-01-11

    International genome sequencing projects have produced billions of nucleotides (letters) of DNA sequence data, including the complete genome sequences of 74 organisms. These genome sequences have created many new scientific opportunities, including the ability to identify sequence variations among individuals within a species. These genetic differences, which are known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are particularly important in understanding the genetic basis for disease susceptibility. Since the report of the complete human genome sequence, over two million human SNPs have been identified, including a large-scale comparison of an entire chromosome from twenty individuals. Of the protein coding SNPs (cSNPs), approximately half leads to a single amino acid change in the encoded protein (non-synonymous coding SNPs). Most of these changes are functionally silent, while the remainder negatively impact the protein and sometimes cause human disease. To date, over 550 SNPs have been found to cause single locus (monogenic) diseases and many others have been associated with polygenic diseases. SNPs have been linked to specific human diseases, including late-onset Parkinson disease, autism, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The ability to predict accurately the effects of these SNPs on protein function would represent a major advance toward understanding these diseases. To date several attempts have been made toward predicting the effects of such mutations. The most successful of these is a computational approach called ''Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant'' (SIFT). This method uses sequence conservation among many similar proteins to predict which residues in a protein are functionally important. However, this method suffers from several limitations. First, a query sequence must have a sufficient number of relatives to infer sequence conservation. Second, this method does not make use of or provide any information on protein structure, which

  20. Inositol Hexaphosphate Inhibits Growth and Induces G1 Arrest and Apoptotic Death of Androgen-Dependent Human Prostate Carcinoma LNCaP Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Chapla; Dhanalakshmi, Sivanandhan; Singh, Rana P; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer (PCA) is the most common invasive malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the US male population. One approach to control this malignancy is its preventive intervention by dietary agents. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6), a dietary constituent, has shown promising efficacy against various cancers; however, limited studies have been performed with IP6 against PCA. Here, we investigated the growth-inhibitory effect and associated mechanisms of IP6 in androgen-dependent human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. IP6 treatment of cells resulted in a strong growth inhibition and an increase in G1 cell population. In mechanistic studies, IP6 resulted in an increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27 levels, together with a decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and cyclin D1 protein levels. An increase in CDKI levels by IP6 also led to a concomitant increase in their interactions with CDK2 and CDK4, together with a strong decrease in the kinase activity of both CDKs. Downstream in CDKI-CDK-cyclin cascade, consistent with its inhibitory effect on CDK kinase activity, IP6 treatment of cells increased hypophosphorylated levels of retinoblastoma (Rb) with a decrease in Rb phosphorylation at serine 780, 807, and 811 sites, and caused a moderate to strong decrease in the levels of transcription factors E2F1, E2F4, and E2F5. In other studies, IP6 caused a dose- and a time-dependent apoptotic death of LNCaP cells, and a decrease in Bcl2 levels, causing a strong increase in Bax versus Bcl2 ratio, as well as an inhibition of constitutively active AKT phosphorylation. Taken together, these molecular alterations provide an insight into IP6-caused growth inhibition, G1 arrest, and apoptotic death of human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. Because early clinical PCA growth is an androgen-dependent response, the results of the present study employing androgen-dependent LNCaP cells suggest that IP6 has

  1. Chromosomal Instability, Aneuploidy, and Gene Mutations in Human Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Giaretti

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether in vivo specific gene mutations lead to chromosomal instability (CIN and aneuploidy or viceversa is so far not proven. We hypothesized that aneuploidy among human sporadic colorectal adenomas and KRAS2 and APC mutations were not independent. Additionally, we investigated if 1p34–36 deletions by dual target FISH were associated with aneuploidy. Among 116 adenomas, 29 were DNA aneuploid by flow cytometry (25% and 29 were KRAS2 mutated (25%. KRAS2 mutations were associated with aneuploidy (P=0.02. However, while G–C and G–T transversions were strongly associated with DNA aneuploidy (P=0.007, G–A transitions were not. Within a second series of 61 adenomas, we found, instead, that APC mutational status and aneuploidy by flow cytometry were not associated. However, a statistically significant association was found with specific APC mutations, i.e., occurring in the mutation cluster region (MCR, codons 1200–1500 or downstream (P=0.016. Finally, the correlation of 1p34–36 deletions with flow cytometric and FISH detected aneuploidy was also significant (P=0.01. Specific KRAS2 and APC mutations and loss of genes in the 1p34–36 region appear associated with aneuploidy suggesting that these events are not independent and may cooperate in inducing human sporadic colorectal adenomas. A cause effect relationship between gene mutations and aneuploidy remains, however, to be demonstrated.

  2. Rare mutations of the DMBT1 gene in human astrocytic gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Wolf; Mollenhauer, Jan; Stockhammer, Florian

    2002-01-01

    The Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 gene (DMBT1) has been proposed as a tumor suppressor gene candidate in human brain tumors, based on the observation of homozygous deletions affecting the DMBT1 region or part of the gene. In order to support this hypothesis, we performed a mutational analysis...... of the entire coding region of DMBT1, employing SSCP analysis and direct DNA sequencing in a series of 79 astrocytic gliomas. Five somatic mutations were detected. Two mutations, one of which resulted in an amino acid exchange, occurred in glioblastomas. One pilocytic astrocytoma carried two missense mutations...... and another pilocytic astrocytoma contained a somatic mutation, not affecting the presumed protein. In addition, 21 of the 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in this study have not been recognized previously. The data indicate, that small mutations are not a frequent finding in gliomas....

  3. Androgens in pregnancy: roles in parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makieva, Sofia; Saunders, Philippa T K; Norman, Jane E

    2014-01-01

    in myometrial relaxation via non-genomic, AR-independent pathways critical for the pregnancy reaching term. Understanding of the molecular events leading to myometrial relaxation is an important step towards development of novel targeted tocolytic drugs. The increase in androgen levels throughout gestation is likely to be important for establishment and maintenance of pregnancy and initiation of parturition. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms of androgen action on cervical remodelling and myometrial contractility is needed. The insights gained may facilitate the development of new therapeutic approaches to manage pregnancy complications such as preterm birth. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

  4. Seminal vesicles and urinary bladder as sites of aromatization of androgens in men, evidenced by a CYP19A1-driven luciferase reporter mouse and human tissue specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Leena; Rantakari, Pia; Sjögren, Klara; Salminen, Anu; Lauren, Eve; Kallio, Jenny; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina; Boström, Minna; Boström, Peter J; Pakarinen, Pirjo; Zhang, FuPing; Kujala, Paula; Ohlsson, Claes; Mäkelä, Sari; Poutanen, Matti

    2013-04-01

    The human CYP19A1 gene is expressed in various tissues by the use of tissue-specific promoters, whereas the rodent cyp19a1 gene is expressed mainly in the gonads and brain. We generated a transgenic mouse model containing a >100-kb 5' region of human CYP19A1 gene connected to a luciferase reporter gene. The luciferase activity in mouse tissues mimicked the CYP19A1 gene expression pattern in humans. Interestingly, the reporter gene activity was 16 and 160 times higher in the urinary bladder and seminal vesicles, respectively, as compared with the activity in the testis. Accordingly, CYP19A1 gene and P450arom protein expression was detected in those human tissues. Moreover, the data revealed that the expression of CYP19A1 gene is driven by promoters PII, I.4, and I.3 in the seminal vesicles, and by promoters PII and I.4 in the urinary bladder. Furthermore, the reporter gene expression in the seminal vesicles was androgen dependent: Castration decreased the expression ∼20 times, and testosterone treatment restored it to the level of an intact mouse. This reporter mouse model facilitates studies of tissue-specific regulation of the human CYP19A1 gene, and our data provide evidence for seminal vesicles as important sites for estrogen production in males.

  5. ETV6 mutations in early immature human T cell leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Haydu, J. Erika; Rigo, Isaura; Hadler, Michael; Tosello, Valeria; Della Gatta, Giusy; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Wiernik, Peter H.; Luger, Selina M.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Rue, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Early immature T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) account for ∼5–10% of pediatric T-ALLs and are associated with poor prognosis. However, the genetic defects that drive the biology of these tumors remain largely unknown. In this study, analysis of microarray gene expression signatures in adult T-ALL demonstrated a high prevalence of early immature leukemias and revealed a close relationship between these tumors and myeloid leukemias. Many adult immature T-ALLs harbored mutations in myeloid-specific oncogenes and tumor suppressors including IDH1, IDH2, DNMT3A, FLT3, and NRAS. Moreover, we identified ETV6 mutations as a novel genetic lesion uniquely present in immature adult T-ALL. Our results demonstrate that early immature adult T-ALL represents a heterogeneous category of leukemias characterized by the presence of overlapping myeloid and T-ALL characteristics, and highlight the potential role of ETV6 mutations in these tumors. PMID:22162831

  6. Do cell junction protein mutations cause an airway phenotype in mice or humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eugene H; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Zabner, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Cell junction proteins connect epithelial cells to each other and to the basement membrane. Genetic mutations of these proteins can cause alterations in some epithelia leading to varied phenotypes such as deafness, renal disease, skin disorders, and cancer. This review examines if genetic mutations in these proteins affect the function of lung airway epithelia. We review cell junction proteins with examples of disease mutation phenotypes in humans and in mouse knockout models. We also review which of these genes are expressed in airway epithelium by microarray expression profiling and immunocytochemistry. Last, we present a comprehensive literature review to find the lung phenotype when cell junction and adhesion genes are mutated or subject to targeted deletion. We found that in murine models, targeted deletion of cell junction and adhesion genes rarely result in a lung phenotype. Moreover, mutations in these genes in humans have no obvious lung phenotype. Our research suggests that simply because a cell junction or adhesion protein is expressed in an organ does not imply that it will exhibit a drastic phenotype when mutated. One explanation is that because a functioning lung is critical to survival, redundancy in the system is expected. Therefore mutations in a single gene might be compensated by a related function of a similar gene product. Further studies in human and animal models will help us understand the overlap in the function of cell junction gene products. Finally, it is possible that the human lung phenotype is subtle and has not yet been described.

  7. Similar patterns of clonally expanded somatic mtDNA mutations in the colon of heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice and ageing humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Holly L.; Stewart, James B.; Stamp, Craig; Zupanic, Anze; Kirkwood, Thomas B.L.; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Greaves, Laura C.

    2014-01-01

    Clonally expanded mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations resulting in focal respiratory chain deficiency in individual cells are proposed to contribute to the ageing of human tissues that depend on adult stem cells for self-renewal; however, the consequences of these mutations remain unclear. A good animal model is required to investigate this further; but it is unknown whether mechanisms for clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations, and the mutational spectra, are similar between species. Here we show that mice, heterozygous for a mutation disrupting the proof-reading activity of mtDNA polymerase (PolgA+/mut) resulting in an increased mtDNA mutation rate, accumulate clonally expanded mtDNA point mutations in their colonic crypts with age. This results in focal respiratory chain deficiency, and by 81 weeks of age these animals exhibit a similar level and pattern of respiratory chain deficiency to 70-year-old human subjects. Furthermore, like in humans, the mtDNA mutation spectrum appears random and there is an absence of selective constraints. Computer simulations show that a random genetic drift model of mtDNA clonal expansion can accurately model the data from the colonic crypts of wild-type, PolgA+/mut animals, and humans, providing evidence for a similar mechanism for clonal expansion of mtDNA point mutations between these mice and humans. PMID:24915468

  8. Complete-proteome mapping of human influenza A adaptive mutations: implications for human transmissibility of zoonotic strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivo Miotto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is widespread concern that H5N1 avian influenza A viruses will emerge as a pandemic threat, if they become capable of human-to-human (H2H transmission. Avian strains lack this capability, which suggests that it requires important adaptive mutations. We performed a large-scale comparative analysis of proteins from avian and human strains, to produce a catalogue of mutations associated with H2H transmissibility, and to detect their presence in avian isolates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We constructed a dataset of influenza A protein sequences from 92,343 public database records. Human and avian sequence subsets were compared, using a method based on mutual information, to identify characteristic sites where human isolates present conserved mutations. The resulting catalogue comprises 68 characteristic sites in eight internal proteins. Subtype variability prevented the identification of adaptive mutations in the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins. The high number of sites in the ribonucleoprotein complex suggests interdependence between mutations in multiple proteins. Characteristic sites are often clustered within known functional regions, suggesting their functional roles in cellular processes. By isolating and concatenating characteristic site residues, we defined adaptation signatures, which summarize the adaptive potential of specific isolates. Most adaptive mutations emerged within three decades after the 1918 pandemic, and have remained remarkably stable thereafter. Two lineages with stable internal protein constellations have circulated among humans without reassorting. On the contrary, H5N1 avian and swine viruses reassort frequently, causing both gains and losses of adaptive mutations. CONCLUSIONS: Human host adaptation appears to be complex and systemic, involving nearly all influenza proteins. Adaptation signatures suggest that the ability of H5N1 strains to infect humans is related to the presence of an

  9. Update of the human secretoglobin (SCGB gene superfamily and an example of 'evolutionary bloom' of androgen-binding protein genes within the mouse Scgb gene superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Brian C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The secretoglobins (SCGBs comprise a family of small, secreted proteins found in animals exclusively of mammalian lineage. There are 11 human SCGB genes and five pseudogenes. Interestingly, mice have 68 Scgb genes, four of which are highly orthologous to human SCGB genes; the remainder represent an 'evolutionary bloom' and make up a large gene family represented by only six counterparts in humans. SCGBs are found in high concentrations in many mammalian secretions, including fluids of the lung, lacrimal gland, salivary gland, prostate and uterus. Whereas the biological activities of most individual SCGBs have not been fully characterised, what already has been discovered suggests that this family has an important role in the modulation of inflammation, tissue repair and tumorigenesis. In mice, the large Scgb1b and Scgb2b gene families encode the androgen-binding proteins, which have been shown to play a role in mate selection. Although much has been learned about SCGBs in recent years, clearly more research remains to be done to allow a better understanding of the roles of these proteins in human health and disease. Such information is predicted to reveal valuable novel drug targets for the treatment of inflammation, as well as designing biomarkers that might identify tissue damage or cancer.

  10. A human CCT5 gene mutation causing distal neuropathy impairs hexadecamer assembly in an archaeal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wonki; Angileri, Francesca; Luo, Haibin; Lauria, Antonino; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Almerico, Anna Maria; Cappello, Francesco; de Macario, Everly Conway; Lednev, Igor K; Macario, Alberto J L; Robb, Frank T

    2014-10-27

    Chaperonins mediate protein folding in a cavity formed by multisubunit rings. The human CCT has eight non-identical subunits and the His147Arg mutation in one subunit, CCT5, causes neuropathy. Knowledge is scarce on the impact of this and other mutations upon the chaperone's structure and functions. To make progress, experimental models must be developed. We used an archaeal mutant homolog and demonstrated that the His147Arg mutant has impaired oligomeric assembly, ATPase activity, and defective protein homeostasis functions. These results establish for the first time that a human chaperonin gene defect can be reproduced and studied at the molecular level with an archaeal homolog. The major advantage of the system, consisting of rings with eight identical subunits, is that it amplifies the effects of a mutation as compared with the human counterpart, in which just one subunit per ring is defective. Therefore, the slight deficit of a non-lethal mutation can be detected and characterized.

  11. Nesprin-1 mutations in human and murine cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckelwartz, Megan J.; Kessler, Eric J.; Kim, Gene; DeWitt, Megan M.; Zhang, Yuan; Earley, Judy U.; Depreux, Frederic F.S.; Holaska, James; Mewborn, Stephanie K.; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in LMNA, the gene encoding the nuclear membrane proteins, lamins A and C, produce cardiac and muscle disease. In the heart, these autosomal dominant LMNA mutations lead to cardiomyopathy frequently associated with cardiac conduction system disease. Herein, we describe a patient with the R374H missense variant in nesprin-1α, a protein that binds lamin A/C. This individual developed dilated cardiomyopathy requiring cardiac transplantation. Fibroblasts from this individual had increased expression of nesprin-1α and lamins A and C, indicating changes in the nuclear membrane complex. We characterized mice lacking the carboxy-terminus of nesprin-1 since this model expresses nesprin-1 without its carboxy-terminal KASH domain. These Δ/Δ KASH mice have a normally assembled but dysfunctional nuclear membrane complex and provide a model for nesprin-1 mutations. We found that Δ/Δ KASH mice develop cardiomyopathy with associated cardiac conduction system disease. Older mutant animals were found to have elongated P wave duration, elevated atrial and ventricular effective refractory periods indicating conduction defects in the myocardium, and reduced fractional shortening. Cardiomyocyte nuclei were found to be elongated with reduced heterochromatin in the Δ/Δ KASH hearts. These findings mirror what has been described from lamin A/C gene mutations and reinforce the importance of an intact nuclear membrane complex for a normally functioning heart. PMID:19944109

  12. P53 MUTATIONS IN HUMAN LUNG-TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MILLER, CW; ASLO, A; KOK, K; YOKOTA, J; BUYS, CHCM; TERADA, M; KOEFFLER, HP; Simon, K.

    1992-01-01

    Mutation of one p53 allele and loss of the normal p53 allele [loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] occur in many tumors including lung cancers. These alterations apparently contribute to development of cancer by interfering with the tumor suppressor activity of p53. We directly sequenced amplified DNA in t

  13. Mutational History of a Human Cell Lineage from Somatic to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foad J Rouhani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of replicating the genetic code is fundamental. DNA repair mechanisms protect the fidelity of the genome ensuring a low error rate between generations. This sustains the similarity of individuals whilst providing a repertoire of variants for evolution. The mutation rate in the human genome has recently been measured to be 50-70 de novo single nucleotide variants (SNVs between generations. During development mutations accumulate in somatic cells so that an organism is a mosaic. However, variation within a tissue and between tissues has not been analysed. By reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, their genomes and the associated mutational history are captured. By sequencing the genomes of polyclonal and monoclonal somatic cells and derived iPSCs we have determined the mutation rates and show how the patterns change from a somatic lineage in vivo through to iPSCs. Somatic cells have a mutation rate of 14 SNVs per cell per generation while iPSCs exhibited a ten-fold lower rate. Analyses of mutational signatures suggested that deamination of methylated cytosine may be the major mutagenic source in vivo, whilst oxidative DNA damage becomes dominant in vitro. Our results provide insights for better understanding of mutational processes and lineage relationships between human somatic cells. Furthermore it provides a foundation for interpretation of elevated mutation rates and patterns in cancer.

  14. Mutational History of a Human Cell Lineage from Somatic to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foad J Rouhani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of replicating the genetic code is fundamental. DNA repair mechanisms protect the fidelity of the genome ensuring a low error rate between generations. This sustains the similarity of individuals whilst providing a repertoire of variants for evolution. The mutation rate in the human genome has recently been measured to be 50-70 de novo single nucleotide variants (SNVs between generations. During development mutations accumulate in somatic cells so that an organism is a mosaic. However, variation within a tissue and between tissues has not been analysed. By reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, their genomes and the associated mutational history are captured. By sequencing the genomes of polyclonal and monoclonal somatic cells and derived iPSCs we have determined the mutation rates and show how the patterns change from a somatic lineage in vivo through to iPSCs. Somatic cells have a mutation rate of 14 SNVs per cell per generation while iPSCs exhibited a ten-fold lower rate. Analyses of mutational signatures suggested that deamination of methylated cytosine may be the major mutagenic source in vivo, whilst oxidative DNA damage becomes dominant in vitro. Our results provide insights for better understanding of mutational processes and lineage relationships between human somatic cells. Furthermore it provides a foundation for interpretation of elevated mutation rates and patterns in cancer.

  15. The Human Gene Mutation Database: building a comprehensive mutation repository for clinical and molecular genetics, diagnostic testing and personalized genomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, Peter D; Mort, Matthew; Ball, Edward V; Shaw, Katy; Phillips, Andrew; Cooper, David N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD®) is a comprehensive collection of germline mutations in nuclear genes that underlie, or are associated with, human inherited disease. By June 2013, the database contained over 141,000 different lesions detected in over 5,700 different genes, with new mutation entries currently accumulating at a rate exceeding 10,000 per annum. HGMD was originally established in 1996 for the scientific study of mutational mechanisms in human genes. However, it has since acquired a much broader utility as a central unified disease-oriented mutation repository utilized by human molecular geneticists, genome scientists, molecular biologists, clinicians and genetic counsellors as well as by those specializing in biopharmaceuticals, bioinformatics and personalized genomics. The public version of HGMD (http://www.hgmd.org) is freely available to registered users from academic institutions/non-profit organizations whilst the subscription version (HGMD Professional) is available to academic, clinical and commercial users under license via BIOBASE GmbH.

  16. Loss of function mutation in LOX causes thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vivian S; Halabi, Carmen M; Hoffman, Erin P; Carmichael, Nikkola; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Lian, Christine G; Bierhals, Andrew J; Vuzman, Dana; Mecham, Robert P; Frank, Natasha Y; Stitziel, Nathan O

    2016-08-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) represent a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many individuals presenting with an inherited form of TAAD do not have causal mutations in the set of genes known to underlie disease. Using whole-genome sequencing in two first cousins with TAAD, we identified a missense mutation in the lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene (c.893T > G encoding p.Met298Arg) that cosegregated with disease in the family. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) genome engineering tools, we introduced the human mutation into the homologous position in the mouse genome, creating mice that were heterozygous and homozygous for the human allele. Mutant mice that were heterozygous for the human allele displayed disorganized ultrastructural properties of the aortic wall characterized by fragmented elastic lamellae, whereas mice homozygous for the human allele died shortly after parturition from ascending aortic aneurysm and spontaneous hemorrhage. These data suggest that a missense mutation in LOX is associated with aortic disease in humans, likely through insufficient cross-linking of elastin and collagen in the aortic wall. Mutation carriers may be predisposed to vascular diseases because of weakened vessel walls under stress conditions. LOX sequencing for clinical TAAD may identify additional mutation carriers in the future. Additional studies using our mouse model of LOX-associated TAAD have the potential to clarify the mechanism of disease and identify novel therapeutics specific to this genetic cause.

  17. Androgens and the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Bondy, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  18. The value of integrating pre-clinical data to predict nausea and vomiting risk in humans as illustrated by AZD3514, a novel androgen receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Claire; Ewart, Lorna; Muthas, Daniel; Deavall, Damian; Smith, Simon A; Clack, Glen; Newham, Pete

    2016-04-01

    Nausea and vomiting are components of a complex mechanism that signals food avoidance and protection of the body against the absorption of ingested toxins. This response can also be triggered by pharmaceuticals. Predicting clinical nausea and vomiting liability for pharmaceutical agents based on pre-clinical data can be problematic as no single animal model is a universal predictor. Moreover, efforts to improve models are hampered by the lack of translational animal and human data in the public domain. AZD3514 is a novel, orally-administered compound that inhibits androgen receptor signaling and down-regulates androgen receptor expression. Here we have explored the utility of integrating data from several pre-clinical models to predict nausea and vomiting in the clinic. Single and repeat doses of AZD3514 resulted in emesis, salivation and gastrointestinal disturbances in the dog, and inhibited gastric emptying in rats after a single dose. AZD3514, at clinically relevant exposures, induced dose-responsive "pica" behaviour in rats after single and multiple daily doses, and induced retching and vomiting behaviour in ferrets after a single dose. We compare these data with the clinical manifestation of nausea and vomiting encountered in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer receiving AZD3514. Our data reveal a striking relationship between the pre-clinical observations described and the experience of nausea and vomiting in the clinic. In conclusion, the emetic nature of AZD3514 was predicted across a range of pre-clinical models, and the approach presented provides a valuable framework for predicition of clinical nausea and vomiting.

  19. Androgen receptor or estrogen receptor-beta blockade alters DHEA-, DHT-, and E(2)-induced proliferation and PSA production in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Julia T; Liu, Xunxian; Allen, Jeffrey D; Le, Hanh; McFann, Kimberly K; Blackman, Marc R

    2007-08-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is an endogenous steroid that is metabolized to androgens and/or estrogens in the human prostate. DHEA levels decline with age, and use of DHEA supplements to retard the aging process is of unproved effectiveness and safety. LNCaP and LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells were used to determine whether DHEA-modulated proliferation and prostate specific antigen (PSA) production were mediated via the androgen receptor (AR) and/or ERbeta. Cells were treated with DHEA, DHT, or E(2) and antagonists to AR (Casodex-bicalutamide) or ER (ICI 182,780) or siRNA to the respective receptors. Proliferation was assessed by MTT assay and PSA mRNA and protein secretion were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA. Associations of AR and ERbeta were analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation studies and fluorescent confocal microscopy. DHEA-, T-, and E(2)-induced proliferation of LNCaP cells was blunted by Casodex but not by ICI treatment. In LNCaP cells, Casodex and ICI suppressed hormone-induced PSA production. In LAPC-4 cells, DHT-stimulated PSA mRNA was inhibited by Casodex and ICI, and the minimal stimulation by DHEA was inhibited by ICI. Use of siRNAs confirmed involvement of AR and ERbeta in hormone-induced PSA production while AR-ERbeta co-association was suggested by immunoprecipitation and nuclear co-localization. These findings support involvement of both AR and ERbeta in mediating DHEA-, DHT-, and E(2)-induced PSA expression in prostate cancer cells. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Par-3 partitioning defective 3 homolog (C. elegans and androgen-induced prostate proliferative shutoff associated protein genes are mutationally inactivated in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Igor

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene identification by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay inhibition (GINI has proven its usefulness in identifying mutant genes in cancer cell lines. An increase in transcription in response to NMD inhibition of a subset of genes is a major cause of false positives when genes are selected for sequencing analysis. To distinguish between mRNA accumulations caused by stress response-induced transcription and nonsense-containing mRNA stabilizations is a challenge in identifying mutant genes using GINI. Methods To identify potential tumor-suppressor genes mutated in prostate cancer cell lines, we applied a version of GINI that involves inhibition of NMD in two steps. In the first step, NMD is inhibited in duplicate tissue-culture plates. During this step, both the substrate for NMD and stress-response mRNA transcripts are accumulated in cells. In the second step, transcription is inhibited in both plates and NMD is inhibited in one plate and released in the second plate. Microarray analysis of gene-expression profiles in both plates after the second step detects only the differences in mRNA degradation but not in mRNA accumulation. Results Analyzing gene expression profile alterations in 22RV1 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells following NMD inhibition we selected candidates for sequencing analysis in both cell lines. Sequencing identified inactivating mutations in both alleles of the PARD3 and AS3 genes in the LNCaP and 22RV1 cells, respectively. Introduction of a wild-type PARD3 cDNA into the LNCaP cells resulted in a higher proliferation rate in tissue culture, a higher adhesion of LNCaP cells to the components of extracellular matrix and impaired the growth of the LNCaP cells in soft agar and in a three-dimensional cell-culture. Conclusion The mutational inactivation in a prostate cancer cell line of the PARD3 gene involved in asymmetric cell division and maintenance of cell-polarity suggests that the loss of cell-polarity contributes

  1. Man is not a big rat: concerns with traditional human risk assessment of phthalates based on their anti-androgenic effects observed in the rat foetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habert, René; Livera, Gabriel; Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates provide one of the most documented example evidencing how much we must be cautious when using the traditional paradigm based on extrapolation of experimental data from rodent studies for human health risk assessment of endocrine disruptors (EDs). Since foetal testis is known as one of the most sensitive targets of EDs, phthalate risk assessment is routinely based on the capacity of such compounds to decrease testosterone production by the testis or to impair masculinization in the rat during foetal life. In this paper, the well-established inhibiting effects of phthalates of the foetal Leydig cells function in the rat are briefly reviewed. Then, data obtained in humans and other species are carefully analysed. Already in January 2009, using the organotypic culture system named Fetal Testis Assay (FeTA) that we developed, we reported that phthalates might not affect testosterone production in human foetal testes. Several recent experimental studies using xenografts confirm the absence of detectable anti-androgenic effect of phthalates in the human foetal testes. Epidemiological studies led to contradictory results. Altogether, these findings suggest that phthalates effects on foetal Leydig cells are largely species-specific. Consequently, the phthalate threshold doses that disturb foetal steroidogenesis in rat testes and that are presently used to define the acceptable daily intake levels for human health protection must be questioned. This does not mean that phthalates are safe because these compounds have many deleterious effects upon germ cell development that may be common to the different studied species including human. More generally, the identification of common molecular, cellular or/and phenotypic targets in rat and human testes should precede the choice of the toxicological endpoint in rat to accurately assess the safety threshold of any ED in humans.

  2. Disease Model of GATA4 Mutation Reveals Transcription Factor Cooperativity in Human Cardiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Yen-Sin; Rivas, Renee N; Ribeiro, Alexandre J S; Srivas, Rohith; Rivera, Janell; Stone, Nicole R; Pratt, Karishma; Mohamed, Tamer M A; Fu, Ji-Dong; Spencer, C Ian; Tippens, Nathaniel D; Li, Molong; Narasimha, Anil; Radzinsky, Ethan; Moon-Grady, Anita J; Yu, Haiyuan; Pruitt, Beth L; Snyder, Michael P; Srivastava, Deepak

    2016-12-15

    Mutation of highly conserved residues in transcription factors may affect protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions, leading to gene network dysregulation and human disease. Human mutations in GATA4, a cardiogenic transcription factor, cause cardiac septal defects and cardiomyopathy. Here, iPS-derived cardiomyocytes from subjects with a heterozygous GATA4-G296S missense mutation showed impaired contractility, calcium handling, and metabolic activity. In human cardiomyocytes, GATA4 broadly co-occupied cardiac enhancers with TBX5, another transcription factor that causes septal defects when mutated. The GATA4-G296S mutation disrupted TBX5 recruitment, particularly to cardiac super-enhancers, concomitant with dysregulation of genes related to the phenotypic abnormalities, including cardiac septation. Conversely, the GATA4-G296S mutation led to failure of GATA4 and TBX5-mediated repression at non-cardiac genes and enhanced open chromatin states at endothelial/endocardial promoters. These results reveal how disease-causing missense mutations can disrupt transcriptional cooperativity, leading to aberrant chromatin states and cellular dysfunction, including those related to morphogenetic defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The spectrum of SWI/SNF mutations, ubiquitous in human cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hunter Shain

    Full Text Available SWI/SNF is a multi-subunit chromatin remodeling complex that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to reposition nucleosomes, thereby modulating gene expression. Accumulating evidence suggests that SWI/SNF functions as a tumor suppressor in some cancers. However, the spectrum of SWI/SNF mutations across human cancers has not been systematically investigated. Here, we mined whole-exome sequencing data from 24 published studies representing 669 cases from 18 neoplastic diagnoses. SWI/SNF mutations were widespread across diverse human cancers, with an excess of deleterious mutations, and an overall frequency approaching TP53 mutation. Mutations occurred most commonly in the SMARCA4 enzymatic subunit, and in subunits thought to confer functional specificity (ARID1A, ARID1B, PBRM1, and ARID2. SWI/SNF mutations were not mutually-exclusive of other mutated cancer genes, including TP53 and EZH2 (both previously linked to SWI/SNF. Our findings implicate SWI/SNF as an important but under-recognized tumor suppressor in diverse human cancers, and provide a key resource to guide future investigations.

  4. The humanδ2 glutamate receptor gene is not mutated in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinxiang Huang; Aiyu Lin; Haiyan Dong; Chaodong Wang

    2014-01-01

    The human glutamate receptor delta 2 gene (GRID2) shares 90%homology with the orthologous mouse gene. The mouse Grid2 gene is involved with functions of the cerebellum and sponta-neous mutation of Grid2 leads to a spinocerebellar ataxia-like phenotype. To investigate whether such mutations occur in humans, we screened for mutations in the coding sequence of GRID2 in 24 patients with familial or sporadic spinocerebellar ataxia and in 52 normal controls. We de-tected no point mutations or insertion/deletion mutations in the 16 exons of GRID2. However, a polymorphic 4 nucleotide deletion (IVS5-121_-118 GAGT) and two single nucleotide polymor-phisms (c.1251G>T and IVS14-63C>G) were identiifed. The frequency of these polymorphisms was similar between spinocerebellar ataxia patients and normal controls. These data indicate that spontaneous mutations do not occur in GRID2 and that the incidence of spinocerebellar ataxia in humans is not associated with GRID2 mutation or polymorphisms.

  5. 雄激素受体基因动态突变及线粒体基因分析诊断Kennedy病1例报告%A case report on Kennedy' s disease diagnosed by dynamic mutation of androgen receptor gene and mitochondrial gene analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁晓瑜; 勾晨雨

    2013-01-01

    目的 通过对一例肌肉活检提示线粒体肌病的患者进行雄激素受体基因(androgen receptor gene,AR)进行动态突变分析和全线粒体(mtDNA)基因扫描明确诊断.方法 使用PCR方法分析患者雄激素受体(androgen receptor gene,AR)基因的CAG重复序列数,使用Touch Down PCR方法分析患者全线粒体基因突变.结果 该患者雄激素受体基因第一个外显子(Xqll-12)上存在46个三核普酸(CAG)重复,确诊Kennedy病.全线粒体(mtDNA)基因分析未显示线粒体疾病的相关致病突变.结论 AR基因CAG动态突变分析和全mtDNA基因扫描是KD与线粒体脑肌病鉴别诊断或KD并发线粒体脑肌病诊断的重要依据.%Objective To diagnose a patient Kennedy' s disease,who was considered as mitochondrial myopathy by dynamic mutation of androgen receptor gene (AR) and mitochondrial gene analysis.Methods Dynamic mutation of AR gene was analyzed by PCR and sequencing,and mtDNA gene was analyzed by touch down PCR and sequencing.Results trinucleotide repeats of CAG were up to 46,and no pathological mutation of mtDNA was found.Conclusion Dynamic mutation analysis of AR gene and mitochondrial gene analysis are indispensable in diagnosing Kennedy' s disease.

  6. Methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites near the polymorphic CAG repeat in the human androgen-receptor gene correlates with X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.C.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Moseley, A.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Belmont, J.W. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The human androgen-receptor gene (HUMARA; GenBank) contains a highly polymorphic trinucleotide repeat in the first exon. The authors have found that the methylation of HpaII and HhaI sites less than 100 pb away from this polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) correlates with X inactivation. The close proximity of the restriction-enzyme sites to the STR allows the development of a PCR assay that distinguishes between the maternal and paternal alleles and identifies their methylation status. The accuracy of this assay was tested on (a) DNA from hamster/human hybrid cell lines containing either an active or inactive human X chromosome; (b) DNA from normal males and females; and (c) DNA from females showing nonrandom patterns of X inactivation. Data obtained using this assay correlated substantially with those obtained using the PGK, HPRT, and M27[beta] probes, which detect X inactivation patterns by Southern blot analysis. In order to demonstrate one application of this assay, the authors examined X inactivation patterns in the B lymphocytes of potential and obligate carriers of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Hereditary hearing loss: from human mutation to mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Danielle R; Avraham, Karen B

    2011-11-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of hereditary hearing loss is thus far represented by hundreds of genes encoding a large variety of proteins. Mutations in these genes have been discovered for patients with different modes of inheritance and types of hearing loss, ranging from syndromic to non-syndromic and mild to profound. In many cases, the mechanisms whereby the mutations lead to hearing loss have been partly elucidated using cell culture systems and mouse and other animal models. The discovery of the genes has completely changed the practice of genetic counseling in this area, providing potential diagnosis in many cases that can be coupled with clinical phenotypes and offer predictive information for families. In this review we provide three examples of gene discovery in families with hereditary hearing loss, all associated with elucidation of some of the mechanisms leading to hair cell degeneration and pathology of deafness.

  8. Stilbene induced inhibition of androgen receptor dimerization: implications for AR and ARΔLBD-signalling in human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Streicher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is often characterized by an increase of C-terminally truncated, constitutively active androgen receptor (AR variants. Due to the absence of a ligand binding domain located in the AR-C-terminus, these receptor variants (also termed ARΔLBD are unable to respond to all classical forms of endocrine treatments like surgical/chemical castration and/or application of anti-androgens. METHODOLOGY: In this study we tested the effects of the naturally occurring stilbene resveratrol (RSV and (E-4-(2, 6-Difluorostyryl-N, N-dimethylaniline, a fluorinated dialkylaminostilbene (FIDAS on AR- and ARΔLBD in prostate cancer cells. The ability of the compounds to modulate transcriptional activity of AR and the ARΔLBD-variant Q640X was shown by reporter gene assays. Expression of endogenous AR and ARΔLBD mRNA and protein levels were determined by qRT-PCR and Western Blot. Nuclear translocation of AR-molecules was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. AR and ARΔLBD/Q640X homo-/heterodimer formation was assessed by mammalian two hybrid assays. Biological activity of both compounds in vivo was demonstrated using a chick chorioallantoic membrane xenograft assay. RESULTS: The stilbenes RSV and FIDAS were able to significantly diminish AR and Q640X-signalling. Successful inhibition of the Q640X suggests that RSV and FIDAS are not interfering with the AR-ligand binding domain like all currently available anti-hormonal drugs. Repression of AR and Q640X-signalling by RSV and FIDAS in prostate cancer cells was caused by an inhibition of the AR and/or Q640X-dimerization. Although systemic bioavailability of both stilbenes is very low, both compounds were also able to downregulate tumor growth and AR-signalling in vivo. CONCLUSION: RSV and FIDAS are able to inhibit the dimerization of AR and ARΔLBD molecules suggesting that stilbenes might serve as lead compounds for a novel generation of AR-inhibitors.

  9. No evidence for oncogenic mutations in the adrenocorticotropin receptor gene in human adrenocortical neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latronico, A.C.; Reincke, M.; Mendonca, B.B. [National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    The mechanism(s) of tumorigenesis for the majority of adrenocortical neoplasms remain unknown. G-Protein-coupled receptors were recently proposed as candidate protooncogenes. That activating mutations of this class of receptors might be important for tumor induction or progression of endocrine neoplasms was strengthened by the recent identification of such mutations in hyperfunctioning thyroid adenomas. To examine whether the ACTH receptor (ACTH-R) gene could be an oncogene in human adrenocortical tumors, we amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced the entire exon of the ACTH-R gene in 25 adrenocortical tumors (17 adenomas and 8 carcinomas) and 2 adrenocortical cancer cell lines. We found no missense point mutations or even silent polymorphisms in any of the tumors and cell lines studied. We conclude that activating mutations of the ACTH-R gene do not represent a frequent mechanism of human adrenocortical tumorigenesis. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Bad bones, absent smell, selfish testes: the pleiotropic consequences of human FGF receptor mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2005-04-01

    The discovery in 1994 that highly specific mutations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor 3 caused the most common form of human short-limbed dwarfism, achondroplasia, heralded a new era in FGF receptor (FGFR) biology. A decade later, the purpose of this review is to survey how the study of humans with FGFR mutations continues to provide insights into FGFR function in health and disease, and the clinical applications of these findings. Amongst the most interesting recent discoveries have been the description of novel phenotypes associated with FGFR1 and FGFR3 mutations; identification of fundamental differences in the cellular mechanisms of mutant FGFR2 and FGFR3 action; and the direct identification of FGFR2 and FGFR3 mutations in sperm. These clinical observations illustrate the pleiotropism of FGFR action and fuel ongoing efforts to understand the rich biology and pathophysiology of the FGF signalling system.

  11. Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: A Rare Case of Disorder of Sex Development

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonsa Pizzo; Antonio Simone Laganà; Irene Borrielli; Nella Dugo

    2013-01-01

    Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS) could be considered as a disease that causes resistance to androgens actions, influencing both the morphogenesis and differentiation of the body structures, and systems in which this hormone exerts its effects. It depends on an X-linked mutations in the Androgen Receptor (AR) gene that express a variety of phenotypes ranging from male infertility to completely normal female external genitalia. The clinical phenotypes of AIS could vary and be classified in...

  12. Mutation analysis of the MCHR1 gene in human obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermter, Anne-Kathrin; Reichwald, Kathrin; Büch, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The importance of the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system for regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight has been demonstrated in rodents. We analysed the human MCH receptor 1 gene (MCHR1) with respect to human obesity....

  13. Further evidence for elevated human minisatellite mutation rate in Belarus eight years after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubrova, Yuri E.; Buard, Jerome; Jeffreys, Alec J. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Adrian Building, University Road, Leicester (United Kingdom); Nesterov, Valeri N.; Krouchinsky, Nicolay G.; Ostapenko, Vladislav A. [Research Institute for Radiation Medicine, Mogilev (Belarus); Vergnaud, Gilles; Giraudeau, Fabienne [Laboratoire de Recherche en Genetique des Especes, Institut de Biologie, Nantes (France)

    1997-11-28

    Analysis of germline mutation rate at human minisatellites among children born in areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus heavily polluted after the Chernobyl accident has been extended, both by recruiting more families from the affected region and by using five additional minisatellite probes, including multi-locus probe 33.6 and four hypervariable single-locus probes. These additional data confirmed a twofold higher mutation rate in exposed families compared with non-irradiated families from the United Kingdom. An elevated rate was seen at all three independent sets of minisatellites (detected separately by multi-locus probes 33.15, 33.6 and six single-locus probes), indicating a generalised increase in minisatellite germline mutation rate in the Belarus families. Within the Belarus cohort, mutation rate was significantly greater in families with higher parental radiation dose estimated for chronic external and internal exposure to caesium-137, consistent with radiation induction of germline mutation. The spectra of mutation seen in the unexposed and exposed families were indistinguishable, suggesting that increased mutation observed over multiple loci arises indirectly by some mechanism that enhances spontaneous minisatellite mutation.

  14. Empirical evaluation reveals best fit of a logistic mutation model for human Y-chromosomal microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochens, Arne; Caliebe, Amke; Rösler, Uwe; Krawczak, Michael

    2011-12-01

    The rate of microsatellite mutation is dependent upon both the allele length and the repeat motif, but the exact nature of this relationship is still unknown. We analyzed data on the inheritance of human Y-chromosomal microsatellites in father-son duos, taken from 24 published reports and comprising 15,285 directly observable meioses. At the six microsatellites analyzed (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, and DYS393), a total of 162 mutations were observed. For each locus, we employed a maximum-likelihood approach to evaluate one of several single-step mutation models on the basis of the data. For five of the six loci considered, a novel logistic mutation model was found to provide the best fit according to Akaike's information criterion. This implies that the mutation probability at the loci increases (nonlinearly) with allele length at a rate that differs between upward and downward mutations. For DYS392, the best fit was provided by a linear model in which upward and downward mutation probabilities increase equally with allele length. This is the first study to empirically compare different microsatellite mutation models in a locus-specific fashion.

  15. The Arctic Alzheimer mutation enhances sensitivity to toxic stress in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Nilsberth, Camilla; Stenh, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    The E693G (Arctic) mutation of the amyloid precursor protein was recently found to lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Swedish family. In the present study, we report that the Arctic mutation decreases cell viability in human neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability, as measured by the MTT...... their secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein. The enhanced sensitivity to toxic stress in cells with the Arctic mutation most likely contributes to the pathogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease....

  16. The Arctic Alzheimer mutation enhances sensitivity to toxic stress in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Nilsberth, Camilla; Stenh, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    The E693G (Arctic) mutation of the amyloid precursor protein was recently found to lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Swedish family. In the present study, we report that the Arctic mutation decreases cell viability in human neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability, as measured by the MTT...... their secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein. The enhanced sensitivity to toxic stress in cells with the Arctic mutation most likely contributes to the pathogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease....

  17. Androgen therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvat, Jacques

    2003-11-01

    The physiological role of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulphate (DHEAS) is poorly understood. It depends in a large part on their transformation into testosterone and estradiol. The capacity of DHEA as a neurosteroid, the recent discovery of putative specific DHEA receptors on endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, the steady decrease of DHEA production from the 40s on, together with certain human epidemiologic data as well as various beneficial effects of DHA supplementation in rodents have suggested the possibility that this steroid is involved in cognitive and memory, metabolic and vascular, immune and sexual functions and in their aging. However, epidemiologic studies are conflicting, and no well-designed clinical trials have definitely substantiated the role of DHEA in these functions in humans, or the utility and safety of DHEA supplementation. However, beneficial effects seem plausible in women with several conditions according to the results of double-blind placebo-controlled trials: the dose of 30 to 50 mg seems beneficial to the mood, sense of well being and sexual desire and activity of women with adrenal insufficiency. The only long-term trial of supplementation devoted to women over 60 reported significant increases in bone mineral density and, in the 70-79-year-old subgroup, in sexual desire, arousal, activity and satisfaction. The dose of 200 mg also proved to decrease disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus. Lastly, high DHEA doses have improved mood in various groups of patients of any age and gender with depressive symptoms. The use of DHEA therapy may also be discussed in women of any age when a trial of androgen supplementation seems justified because of the existence of an inhibited sexual desire or a sexual arousal disorder associated with documented androgen deficiency. The rather weak conversion of DHEA into testosterone protects from the risk of overdosing associated with testosterone preparations. However, it must

  18. Pyridine analogues of curcumin exhibit high activity for inhibiting CWR-22Rv1 human prostate cancer cell growth and androgen receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHOU, DAI-YING; ZHAO, SU-QING; DU, ZHI-YUN; ZHENG, XI; ZHANG, KUN

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations required for curcumin to exert its anticancer activity (IC50, 20 µM) are difficult to achieve in the blood plasma of patients, due to the low bioavailability of the compound. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to the development of curcumin analogues that exhibit stronger anticancer activity and a lower IC50 than curcumin. The present study investigated twelve pyridine analogues of curcumin, labeled as groups AN, BN, EN and FN, to determine their effects in CWR-22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells. The inhibitory effects of these compounds on testosterone (TT)-induced androgen receptor (AR) activity was determined by performing an AR-linked luciferase assay and by TT-induced expression of prostate-specific antigen. The results of the current study suggested that the FN group of analogues had the strongest inhibitory effect of growth on CWR-22Rv1 cultured cells, and were the most potent inhibitor of AR activity compared with curcumin, and the AN, BN and EN analogues. Thus, the results of the present study indicate the inhibition of the AR pathways as a potential mechanism for the anticancer effect of curcumin analogues in human prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, curcumin analogues with pyridine as a distal ring and tetrahydrothiopyran-4-one as a linker may be good candidates for the development of novel drugs for the treatment of prostate cancer, by targeting the AR signaling pathway. PMID:27313760

  19. Human teratogens and genetic phenocopies. Understanding pathogenesis through human genes mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassina, Matteo; Cagnoli, Giulia A; Zuccarello, Daniela; Di Gianantonio, Elena; Clementi, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to teratogenic drugs during pregnancy is associated with a wide range of embryo-fetal anomalies and sometimes results in recurrent and recognizable patterns of malformations; however, the comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of drug-induced birth defects is difficult, since teratogenesis is a multifactorial process which is always the result of a complex interaction between several environmental factors and the genetic background of both the mother and the fetus. Animal models have been extensively used to assess the teratogenic potential of pharmacological agents and to study their teratogenic mechanisms; however, a still open issue concerns how the information gained through animal models can be translated to humans. Instead, significant information can be obtained by the identification and analysis of human genetic syndromes characterized by clinical features overlapping with those observed in drug-induced embryopathies. Until now, genetic phenocopies have been reported for the embryopathies/fetopathies associated with prenatal exposure to warfarin, leflunomide, mycophenolate mofetil, fluconazole, thalidomide and ACE inhibitors. In most cases, genetic phenocopies are caused by mutations in genes encoding for the main targets of teratogens or for proteins belonging to the same molecular pathways. The aim of this paper is to review the proposed teratogenic mechanisms of these drugs, by the analysis of human monogenic disorders and their molecular pathogenesis.

  20. Reproducible Analysis of Post-Translational Modifications in Proteomes--Application to Human Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Holehouse

    Full Text Available Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs are an important aspect of protein regulation. The number of PTMs discovered within the human proteome, and other proteomes, has been rapidly expanding in recent years. As a consequence of the rate in which new PTMs are identified, analysis done in one year may result in different conclusions when repeated in subsequent years. Among the various functional questions pertaining to PTMs, one important relationship to address is the interplay between modifications and mutations. Specifically, because the linear sequence surrounding a modification site often determines molecular recognition, it is hypothesized that mutations near sites of PTMs may be more likely to result in a detrimental effect on protein function, resulting in the development of disease.We wrote an application programming interface (API to make analysis of ProteomeScout, a comprehensive database of PTMs and protein information, easy and reproducible. We used this API to analyze the relationship between PTMs and human mutations associated with disease (based on the 'Clinical Significance' annotation from dbSNP. Proteins containing pathogenic mutations demonstrated a significant study bias which was controlled for by analyzing only well-studied proteins, based on their having at least one pathogenic mutation. We found that pathogenic mutations are significantly more likely to lie within eight amino acids of a phosphoserine, phosphotyrosine or ubiquitination site when compared to mutations in general, based on a Fisher's Exact test. Despite the skew of pathogenic mutations occurring on positively charged arginines, we could not account for this relationship based only on residue type. Finally, we hypothesize a potential mechanism for a pathogenic mutation on RAF1, based on its proximity to a phosphorylation site, which represents a subtle regulation difference that may explain why its biochemical effect has failed to be uncovered

  1. Functional recurrent mutations in the human mitochondrial phylogeny: dual roles in evolution and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Liron; Zhidkov, Ilia; Gurman, Yotam; Hawlena, Hadas; Mishmar, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Mutations frequently reoccur in the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). However, it is unclear whether recurrent mtDNA nodal mutations (RNMs), that is, recurrent mutations in stems of unrelated phylogenetic nodes, are functional and hence selectively constrained. To answer this question, we performed comprehensive parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses of 9,868 publicly available whole human mtDNAs revealing 1,606 single nodal mutations (SNMs) and 679 RNMs. We then evaluated the potential functionality of synonymous, nonsynonymous and RNA SNMs and RNMs. For synonymous mutations, we have implemented the Codon Adaptation Index. For nonsynonymous mutations, we assessed evolutionary conservation, and employed previously described pathogenicity score assessment tools. For RNA genes' mutations, we designed a bioinformatic tool which compiled evolutionary conservation and potential effect on RNA structure. While comparing the functionality scores of nonsynonymous and RNA SNMs and RNMs with those of disease-causing mtDNA mutations, we found significant difference (P < 0.001). However, 24 RNMs and 67 SNMs had comparable values with disease-causing mutations reflecting their potential function thus being the best candidates to participate in adaptive events of unrelated lineages. Strikingly, some functional RNMs occurred in unrelated mtDNA lineages that independently altered susceptibility to the same diseases, thus suggesting common functionality. To our knowledge, this is the most comprehensive analysis of selective signatures in the mtDNA not only within proteins but also within RNA genes. For the first time, we discover virtually all positively selected RNMs in our phylogeny while emphasizing their dual role in past evolutionary events and in disease today.

  2. Emerging targets in human lymphoma: targeting the MYD88 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang JQ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available James Q Wang,* Yogesh S Jeelall,* Keisuke Horikawa* Department of Immunology, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia *All authors contributed equally to this manuscript Abstract: B cell neoplasms co-opt the molecular machinery of normal B cells for their survival. Technological advances in cancer genomics has significantly contributed to uncovering the root cause of aggressive lymphomas, revealing a previously unknown link between TLR signaling and B cell neoplasm. Recurrent oncogenic mutations in MYD88 have been found in 39% of the activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC DLBCL. Interestingly, 29% of ABC DLBCL have a single amino acid substitution of proline for the leucine at position 265 (L265P, and the exact same variant has also been identified in a number of lymphoid malignancies. The MYD88 L265P variant was recently identified in 90% of Wadenstrom's macroglobulinemia patients. These recent developments warrant the need for novel diagnostic tools as well as targeted therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the physiological functions of MYD88 and focus on its role in B cell lymphomas, evaluating the potential for targeting oncogenic MYD88 in lymphoma. Keywords: MYD88, L265P mutation, lymphoma, targeted therapy

  3. Inositol Hexaphosphate Inhibits Growth and Induces G1 Arrest and Apoptotic Death of Androgen-Dependent Human Prostate Carcinoma LNCaP Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapla Agarwal

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCA is the most common invasive malignancy and the second leading cause of cancerrelated deaths in the US male population. One approach to control this malignancy is its preventive intervention by dietary agents. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6, a dietary constituent, has shown promising efficacy against various cancers; however, limited studies have been performed with IP6 against PCA. Here, we investigated the growth-inhibitory effect and associated mechanisms of IP6 in androgen-dependent human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. IP6 treatment of cells resulted in a strong growth inhibition and an increase in G1 cell population. In mechanistic studies, IP6 resulted in an increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs Cipi/p21 and Kip1/p27 levels, together with a decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK 4 and cyclin D1 protein levels. An increase in CDKI levels by IP6 also led to a concomitant increase in their interactions with CDK2 and CDK4, together with a strong decrease in the kinase activity of both CDKs. Downstream in CDKI-CDK-cyclin cascade, consistent with its inhibitory effect on CDK kinase activity, IP6 treatment of cells increased hypophosphorylated levels of retinoblastoma (Rb with a decrease in Rb phosphorylation at serine 780, 807, and 811 sites, and caused a moderate to strong decrease in the levels of transcription factors E2F1, E2F4, and E2F5. In other studies, IP6 caused a dose- and a time-dependent apoptotic death of LNCaP cells, and a decrease in Bcl2 levels, causing a strong increase in Bax versus Bcl2 ratio, as well as an inhibition of constitutively active AKT phosphorylation. Taken together, these molecular alterations provide an insight into IP6-caused growth inhibition, G1 arrest, and apoptotic death of human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. Because early clinical PCA growth is an androgen-dependent response, the results of the present study employing androgendependent LNCaP cells suggest that IP6 has

  4. Calibrating the Human Mutation Rate via Ancestral Recombination Density in Diploid Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Lipson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The human mutation rate is an essential parameter for studying the evolution of our species, interpreting present-day genetic variation, and understanding the incidence of genetic disease. Nevertheless, our current estimates of the rate are uncertain. Most notably, recent approaches based on counting de novo mutations in family pedigrees have yielded significantly smaller values than classical methods based on sequence divergence. Here, we propose a new method that uses the fine-scale human recombination map to calibrate the rate of accumulation of mutations. By comparing local heterozygosity levels in diploid genomes to the genetic distance scale over which these levels change, we are able to estimate a long-term mutation rate averaged over hundreds or thousands of generations. We infer a rate of 1.61 ± 0.13 × 10-8 mutations per base per generation, which falls in between phylogenetic and pedigree-based estimates, and we suggest possible mechanisms to reconcile our estimate with previous studies. Our results support intermediate-age divergences among human populations and between humans and other great apes.

  5. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a unique mutation in CCS, the human copper chaperone to superoxide dismutase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huppke, Peter; Brendel, Cornelia; Korenke, Georg Christoph

    2012-01-01

    support the pathogenicity of the mutation. Expression of CCS was reduced and binding of CCS to SOD1 impaired. As a result, this mutation causes reduced SOD1 activity and may impair other mechanisms important for normal Cu homeostasis. CCS-Arg163Trp represents the primary example of a human mutation...... chaperone mutations have been described to date. We describe a child from a consanguineous family who inherited homozygous mutations in the SLC33A1, encoding an acetyl CoA transporter, and in CCS, encoding the Cu chaperone for superoxide dismutase. The CCS mutation, p.Arg163Trp, predicts substitution...

  6. The mouse rumpshaker mutation of the proteolipid protein in human X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, H.; Hoffman, E.P.; Matise, T.C. [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by slowly progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower extremities. We have recently genetically analyzed the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family reported by Johnston and McKusick in 1962. We employed a fluorescent multiplex CA repeat strategy using a 22 locus, 10 cM framework map of the human X chromosome and localized the gene within a 36 cM region of Xq2l.3-q24 which includes the PLP locus. Saugier-Veber et al. recently reported a point mutation (His139Tyr) in exon 3B of the PLP gene in an X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family (SPG2). This family shows no optic atrophy, in contrast to the family we have studied. This data showed that SPG2 and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease were allelic disorders. We investigated the PLP gene as a candidate gene for the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family using SSCP and direct sequencing methods. We found a point mutation (T to C) in exon 4 of affected males which alters the amino-acid (Ile to Thr) at residue 186. This change was absent in the unaffected males of the family and in 40 unrelated control females (80 X chromosomes). Surprisingly, this mutation is identical to the mutation previously identified in the rumpshaker mouse model. The complete homology between both the mouse and human PLP sequence, and the mouse rumpshaker mutation and human spastic paraplegia mutation in our family, permit direct parallels to be drawn with regards to pathophysiology. Our data indicates that the well-documented and striking clinical differences between Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is due to the specific effect of different mutations of the human PLP gene on oligodendrocyte differentiation and development and on later myelin production and maintenance.

  7. Therapeutic androgen receptor ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, George F.; Sui, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, the concept of tissue-selective nuclear receptor ligands has emerged. This concept has come to fruition with estrogens, with the successful marketing of drugs such as raloxifene. The discovery of raloxifene and other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) has raised the possibility of generating selective compounds for other pathways, including androgens (that is, selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs).

  8. Male mutation bias and possible long-term effects of human activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Samuel; Wedekind, Claus

    2010-10-01

    The ability of a population to adapt to changing environments depends critically on the amount and kind of genetic variability it possesses. Mutations are an important source of new genetic variability and may lead to new adaptations, especially if the population size is large. Mutation rates are extremely variable between and within species, and males usually have higher mutation rates as a result of elevated rates of male germ cell division. This male bias affects the overall mutation rate. We examined the factors that influence male mutation bias, and focused on the effects of classical life-history parameters, such as the average age at reproduction and elevated rates of sperm production in response to sexual selection and sperm competition. We argue that human-induced changes in age at reproduction or in sexual selection will affect male mutation biases and hence overall mutation rates. Depending on the effective population size, these changes are likely to influence the long-term persistence of a population.

  9. Molecular basis of hereditary fructose intolerance: mutations and polymorphisms in the human aldolase B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolan, D R

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the human aldolase B gene that result in hereditary fructose intolerance have been characterized extensively. Although the majority of subjects have been from northern Europe, subjects from other geographical regions and ethnic groups have been identified. At present 21 mutations have been reported; 15 of these are single base substitutions, resulting in nine amino acid replacements, four nonsense codons, and two putative splicing defects. Two large deletions, two four-base deletions, a single-base deletion, and a seven-base deletion/one-base insertion have been found. This last mutation leads to a defect in splicing and it is likely that one of the small deletions does as well. Regions of the enzyme where mutations have been observed recurrently are encoded by exons 5 and 9. Indeed, the three most common mutations are found in these exons. Two of these prevalent HFI mutations arose from a common ancestor and spread throughout the population by genetic drift. This finding was based on linkage to two sequence polymorphisms, which are among very few informative polymorphic markers that have been identified within the aldolase B gene. Because of the prevalence of a few HFI alleles, and the recent advances in molecular methods for identifying and screening for mutation, the diagnosis of HFI by molecular screening methods should become routine. These molecular diagnostic methods will be extremely beneficial for this often difficult to diagnose and sometimes fatal disease.

  10. Human mobility networks and persistence of rapidly mutating pathogens

    CERN Document Server

    Aleta, Alberto; Meloni, Sandro; Poletto, Chiara; Colizza, Vittoria; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly mutating pathogens may be able to persist in the population and reach an endemic equilibrium by escaping hosts' acquired immunity. For such diseases, multiple biological, environmental and population-level mechanisms determine the dynamics of the outbreak, including pathogen's epidemiological traits (e.g. transmissibility, infectious period and duration of immunity), seasonality, interaction with other circulating strains and hosts' mixing and spatial fragmentation. Here, we study a susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible model on a metapopulation where individuals are distributed in subpopulations connected via a network of mobility flows. Through extensive numerical simulations, we explore the phase space of pathogen's persistence and map the dynamical regimes of the pathogen following emergence. Our results show that spatial fragmentation and mobility play a key role in the persistence of the disease whose maximum is reached at intermediate mobility values. We describe the occurrence of differen...

  11. Identification of a Novel GJA8 (Cx50) Point Mutation Causes Human Dominant Congenital Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiang-Lian; Zhang, Yilan; Wu, Yaming; Lv, Jineng; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary cataracts are clinically and genetically heterogeneous lens diseases that cause a significant proportion of visual impairment and blindness in children. Human cataracts have been linked with mutations in two genes, GJA3 and GJA8, respectively. To identify the causative mutation in a family with hereditary cataracts, family members were screened for mutations by PCR for both genes. Sequencing the coding regions of GJA8, coding for connexin 50, revealed a C > A transversion at nucleotide 264, which caused p.P88T mutation. To dissect the molecular consequences of this mutation, plasmids carrying wild-type and mutant mouse ORFs of Gja8 were generated and ectopically expressed in HEK293 cells and human lens epithelial cells, respectively. The recombinant proteins were assessed by confocal microscopy and Western blotting. The results demonstrate that the molecular consequences of the p.P88T mutation in GJA8 include changes in connexin 50 protein localization patterns, accumulation of mutant protein, and increased cell growth.

  12. Do androgens control the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG, {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 11}C-acetate in human prostate cancer cell lines?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emonds, Kimy M.; Nuyts, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Swinnen, Johannes V.; Vanderhoydonc, Frank [K.U. Leuven, Laboratory for Experimental Medicine and Endocrinology, Department of Experimental Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Weerden, Wytske M. van [Erasmus University Rotterdam, Department of Experimental Urology, Josephine Nefkens Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of androgen ablation therapy in different prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines - reflecting different stages of the disease - on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 11}C-acetate uptake. Uptake experiments were performed in androgen-sensitive (LNCaP, PC346C) and independent cell lines (22Rv1, PC346DCC, PC-3) as well as in a benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH-1) cell line. Tracer uptake was assessed under androgen ablation. Results of the cancer cell lines were normalized to those of BPH-1. To evaluate the effect of androgen on the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG, {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 11}C-acetate in PCa cell lines, 10{sup -8}M R1881, 10{sup -10}M R1881, the combination of 10{sup -10}M R1881 plus 10{sup -6}M Casodex or 10{sup -6}M Casodex alone were added in parallel cell cultures 1 day before uptake experiments. Uptake in androgen-supplemented cell cultures was compared to the uptake under androgen deprivation. Uptake was corrected for cell number using protein content. Compared to BPH-1, a higher {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was observed only in PC346C cells, whereas a higher {sup 11}C-choline and markedly increased {sup 11}C-acetate uptake was seen in all cancer cell lines. Androgens significantly modulated the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in LNCaP, PC346C and 22Rv1 cells, and of {sup 11}C-choline in the PC346C and 22Rv1 cell line. No androgenic effect on {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was observed in PC-3 and PC346DCC cells. {sup 11}C-Acetate uptake was independent of androgen status in all PCa cell lines studied. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in PCa cell lines showed the highest variability and strongest androgen effect, suggesting its poor potential for metabolic imaging of advanced PCa. In contrast to {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 11}C-choline, {sup 11}C-acetate uptake was unaffected by androgens and thus {sup 11}C-acetate seems best for monitoring PCa progression. (orig.)

  13. Chromatin remodeling by the CHD7 protein is impaired by mutations that cause human developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouazoune, Karim; Kingston, Robert E

    2012-11-20

    Mutations in the CHD7 gene cause human developmental disorders including CHARGE syndrome. Genetic studies in model organisms have further established CHD7 as a central regulator of vertebrate development. Functional analysis of the CHD7 protein has been hampered by its large size. We used a dual-tag system to purify intact recombinant CHD7 protein and found that it is an ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling factor. Biochemical analyses indicate that CHD7 has characteristics distinct from SWI/SNF- and ISWI-type remodelers. Further investigations show that CHD7 patient mutations have consequences that range from subtle to complete inactivation of remodeling activity, and that mutations leading to protein truncations upstream of amino acid 1899 of CHD7 are likely to cause a hypomorphic phenotype for remodeling. We propose that nucleosome remodeling is a key function for CHD7 during developmental processes and provide a molecular basis for predicting the impact of disease mutations on that function.

  14. Analysis of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene mutation in corneal dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨; 孙旭光; 任慧媛; 董冰; 王智群; 孙秀英

    2004-01-01

    Background Corneal dystrophy is a group of inherited blinding diseases of the cornea. This study was to identify the mutations of the keratoepithelin (KE) gene for proper diagnosis of corneal dystrophy. Methods Three families with corneal dystrophy were analysed. Thirteen individuals at risk for corneal dystrophy in family A, the proband and her son in family B, and the proband in family C were examined after their blood samples were obtained. Mutation screening of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene (BIGH3 gene) was performed. Results Five individuals in family A were found by clinical evaluation to be affected with granular corneal dystrophy and carried the BIGH3 mutation W555R. However, both probands in families B and C, also diagnosed with granular corneal dystrophy, harboured the BIGH3 mutation R124H. Conclusion Molecular genetic analysis can improve accurate diagnosis of corneal dystrophy.

  15. Seven mutations in the human insulin gene linked to permanent neonatal/infancy-onset diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Carlo; Porzio, Ottavia; Liu, Ming;

    2008-01-01

    Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) is a rare disorder usually presenting within 6 months of birth. Although several genes have been linked to this disorder, in almost half the cases documented in Italy, the genetic cause remains unknown. Because the Akita mouse bearing a mutation...... in the Ins2 gene exhibits PNDM associated with pancreatic beta cell apoptosis, we sequenced the human insulin gene in PNDM subjects with unidentified mutations. We discovered 7 heterozygous mutations in 10 unrelated probands. In 8 of these patients, insulin secretion was detectable at diabetes onset...... of endoplasmic reticulum stress, and with increased apoptosis. Similarly transfected INS-1E insulinoma cells had diminished viability compared with those expressing WT proinsulin. In conclusion, we find that mutations in the insulin gene that promote proinsulin misfolding may cause PNDM....

  16. Simultaneous ionization and analysis of 84 anabolic androgenic steroids in human urine using liquid chromatography-silver ion coordination ionspray/triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Hee; Cha, Eun-Ju; Lee, Kang Mi; Kim, Ho Jun; Kwon, Oh-Seung; Lee, Jaeick

    2014-01-01

    Metal ion coordination ionspray (M(+) CIS) ionization is a powerful technique to enhance ionization efficiency and sensitivity. In this study, we developed and validated an analytical method for simultaneous ionization and analysis of 84 anabolic androgenic steroids (65 exogenous and 19 endogenous) using liquid chromatography-silver ion coordination ionspray/triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-Ag(+) CIS/MS/MS). The concentrations of silver ions and organic solvents have been optimized to increase the amount of silver ion coordinated complexes. A combination of 25 μM of silver ions and methanol showed the best sensitivity. The validation results showed the intra- (0.8-9.2%) and inter-day (2.5-14.9%) precisions, limits of detection (0.0005-5.0 ng/mL), and matrix effect (71.8-100.3%) for the screening analysis. No significant ion suppression was observed. In addition, this method was successfully applied to analysis of positive samples from suspected abusers and useful for the detection of the trace levels of anabolic steroids in human urine samples.

  17. Kuguacin J, a triterpeniod from Momordica charantia leaf, modulates the progression of androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, PC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchakarn, Pornsiri; Suzuki, Shugo; Ogawa, Kumiko; Pompimon, Wilart; Takahashi, Satoru; Asamoto, Makoto; Limtrakul, Pornngarm; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we focused on the in vitro effects of Kuguacin J (KuJ), a purified component of bitter melon (Momordica charantia) leaf extract (BMLE), on the androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line PC3 and the in vivo effect of dietary BMLE on prostate carcinogenesis using a PC3-xenograph model. KuJ exerted a strong growth-inhibitory effect on PC3 cells. Growth inhibition was mainly through G1-arrest: KuJ markedly decreased the levels of cyclins (D1 and E), cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk2 and Cdk4) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Interestingly, KuJ also dramatically decreased the levels of survivin expressed by PC3 cells. In addition, KuJ exerted anti-invasive effects on PC3 cells, significantly inhibiting migration and invasion: KuJ inhibited secretion of the active forms of MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA by PC3 cells. In addition, KuJ treatment significantly decreased the expression of membrane type 1-MMP (MT1-MMP) by PC3 cells. In vivo, 1% and 5% BMLE in the diet resulted in 63% and 57% inhibition of PC3 xenograft growth without adverse effect on host body weight. Our results suggest that KuJ is a promising new candidate chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic mutation analysis of human gastric adenocarcinomas using ion torrent sequencing platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Xu

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the one of the major causes of cancer-related death, especially in Asia. Gastric adenocarcinoma, the most common type of gastric cancer, is heterogeneous and its incidence and cause varies widely with geographical regions, gender, ethnicity, and diet. Since unique mutations have been observed in individual human cancer samples, identification and characterization of the molecular alterations underlying individual gastric adenocarcinomas is a critical step for developing more effective, personalized therapies. Until recently, identifying genetic mutations on an individual basis by DNA sequencing remained a daunting task. Recent advances in new next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, such as the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent sequencing platform, makes DNA sequencing cheaper, faster, and more reliable. In this study, we aim to identify genetic mutations in the genes which are targeted by drugs in clinical use or are under development in individual human gastric adenocarcinoma samples using Ion Torrent sequencing. We sequenced 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes in 238 human gastric adenocarcinoma samples using the Ion Torrent Ampliseq Cancer Panel. The sequencing analysis revealed a high occurrence of mutations along the TP53 locus (9.7% in our sample set. Thus, this study indicates the utility of a cost and time efficient tool such as Ion Torrent sequencing to screen cancer mutations for the development of personalized cancer therapy.

  19. Mitochondrial Mutations are Associated with Atherosclerotic Lesions in the Human Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A. Sobenin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations of the human mitochondrial genome can be a possible determinant of atherosclerosis. To test this possibility, forty mitochondrial mutations were analyzed in the present study in order to see which of these mutations might be associated with atherosclerosis. Ten mitochondrial mutations belonging to mitochondrial genes MT-RNR1 (rRNA 12S; MT-TL1 (tRNA-Leu, recognizes UUR; MT-TL2 (tRNA-Leu, recognizes CUN; MT-ND1, MT-ND2, MT-ND5, and MT-ND6 (subunits 1, 2, 5, and 6, respectively, of NADH dehydrogenase; and MT-CYB (cytochrome b were potentially associated with atherosclerosis. From 29% (2 of 7 aortic samples upto 86% (6 of 7 aortic samples of aortic samples had a significant difference between atherosclerotic plaques and unaffected tissue, with the respect to the level of heteroplasmy for each mutation. Further, the homogenates of affected and normal intimae of 22 aortas were compared to reveal the average level of heteroplasmy for the above-mentioned 10 mutations. For five mutations, the mean level of heteroplasmy was significantly different in atherosclerotic intimal homogenates in comparison with the unaffected tissue. These mutations were A1555G, C3256T, T3336C, G13513A, and G15059A. Thus, it was demonstrated that at least five mitochondrial mutations occurring in MT-RNR1, MT-TL1, MT-ND2, MT-ND5, and MT-CYB genes are associated with atherosclerosis.

  20. The influence of genomic context on mutation patterns in the human genome inferred from rare variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaibley, Valerie M; Zawistowski, Matthew; Wegmann, Daniel; Ehm, Margaret G; Nelson, Matthew R; St Jean, Pamela L; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Novembre, John; Zöllner, Sebastian; Li, Jun Z

    2013-12-01

    Understanding patterns of spontaneous mutations is of fundamental interest in studies of human genome evolution and genetic disease. Here, we used extremely rare variants in humans to model the molecular spectrum of single-nucleotide mutations. Compared to common variants in humans and human-chimpanzee fixed differences (substitutions), rare variants, on average, arose more recently in the human lineage and are less affected by the potentially confounding effects of natural selection, population demographic history, and biased gene conversion. We analyzed variants obtained from a population-based sequencing study of 202 genes in >14,000 individuals. We observed considerable variability in the per-gene mutation rate, which was correlated with local GC content, but not recombination rate. Using >20,000 variants with a derived allele frequency ≤ 10(-4), we examined the effect of local GC content and recombination rate on individual variant subtypes and performed comparisons with common variants and substitutions. The influence of local GC content on rare variants differed from that on common variants or substitutions, and the differences varied by variant subtype. Furthermore, recombination rate and recombination hotspots have little effect on rare variants of any subtype, yet both have a relatively strong impact on multiple variant subtypes in common variants and substitutions. This observation is consistent with the effect of biased gene conversion or selection-dependent processes. Our results highlight the distinct biases inherent in the initial mutation patterns and subsequent evolutionary processes that affect segregating variants.

  1. Can robots patch-clamp as well as humans? Characterization of a novel sodium channel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estacion, M; Choi, J S; Eastman, E M; Lin, Z; Li, Y; Tyrrell, L; Yang, Y; Dib-Hajj, S D; Waxman, S G

    2010-06-01

    Ion channel missense mutations cause disorders of excitability by changing channel biophysical properties. As an increasing number of new naturally occurring mutations have been identified, and the number of other mutations produced by molecular approaches such as in situ mutagenesis has increased, the need for functional analysis by patch-clamp has become rate limiting. Here we compare a patch-clamp robot using planar-chip technology with human patch-clamp in a functional assessment of a previously undescribed Nav1.7 sodium channel mutation, S211P, which causes erythromelalgia. This robotic patch-clamp device can increase throughput (the number of cells analysed per day) by 3- to 10-fold. Both modes of analysis show that the mutation hyperpolarizes activation voltage dependence (8 mV by manual profiling, 11 mV by robotic profiling), alters steady-state fast inactivation so that it requires an additional Boltzmann function for a second fraction of total current (approximately 20% manual, approximately 40% robotic), and enhances slow inactivation (hyperpolarizing shift--15 mV by human,--13 mV robotic). Manual patch-clamping demonstrated slower deactivation and enhanced (approximately 2-fold) ramp response for the mutant channel while robotic recording did not, possibly due to increased temperature and reduced signal-to-noise ratio on the robotic platform. If robotic profiling is used to screen ion channel mutations, we recommend that each measurement or protocol be validated by initial comparison to manual recording. With this caveat, we suggest that, if results are interpreted cautiously, robotic patch-clamp can be used with supervision and subsequent confirmation from human physiologists to facilitate the initial profiling of a variety of electrophysiological parameters of ion channel mutations.

  2. Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: A Rare Case of Disorder of Sex Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonsa Pizzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS could be considered as a disease that causes resistance to androgens actions, influencing both the morphogenesis and differentiation of the body structures, and systems in which this hormone exerts its effects. It depends on an X-linked mutations in the Androgen Receptor (AR gene that express a variety of phenotypes ranging from male infertility to completely normal female external genitalia. The clinical phenotypes of AIS could vary and be classified into three categories, as complete (CAIS, partial (PAIS, and mild (MAIS forms, according to the severity of androgen resistance. We will describe a case of CAIS in a 16-year-old patient.

  3. Mutations in LRRC50 predispose zebrafish and humans to seminomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, S.G.; Davis, E.E.; Gillis, A.J.; van Rooijen, E.; Stoop, H.; Babala, N.; Logister, I.; Heath, Z.G.; Jonges, T.N.; Katsanis, N.; Voest, E.E.; van Eeden, F.J.; Medema, R.H.; Ketting, R.F.; Schulte-Merker, S.; Looijenga, L.H.; Giles, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    Seminoma is a subclass of human testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT), the most frequently observed cancer in young men with a rising incidence. Here we describe the identification of a novel gene predisposing specifically to seminoma formation in a vertebrate model organism. Zebrafish carrying a

  4. Human APOBEC3 induced mutation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 contributes to adaptation and evolution in natural infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human APOBEC3 proteins are cytidine deaminases that contribute broadly to innate immunity through the control of exogenous retrovirus replication and endogenous retroelement retrotransposition. As an intrinsic antiretroviral defense mechanism, APOBEC3 proteins induce extensive guanosine-to-adenosine (G-to-A mutagenesis and inhibit synthesis of nascent human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1 cDNA. Human APOBEC3 proteins have additionally been proposed to induce infrequent, potentially non-lethal G-to-A mutations that make subtle contributions to sequence diversification of the viral genome and adaptation though acquisition of beneficial mutations. Using single-cycle HIV-1 infections in culture and highly parallel DNA sequencing, we defined trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H. We then compared these APOBEC3 editing contexts with the patterns of G-to-A mutations in HIV-1 DNA in cells obtained sequentially from ten patients with primary HIV-1 infection. Viral substitutions were highest in the preferred trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for the APOBEC3 deaminases. Consistent with the effects of immune selection, amino acid changes accumulated at the APOBEC3 editing contexts located within human leukocyte antigen (HLA-appropriate epitopes that are known or predicted to enable peptide binding. Thus, APOBEC3 activity may induce mutations that influence the genetic diversity and adaptation of the HIV-1 population in natural infection.

  5. A truncating mutation of HDAC2 in human cancers confers resistance to histone deacetylase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropero, S; Fraga, MF; Ballestar, E;

    2006-01-01

    Disruption of histone acetylation patterns is a common feature of cancer cells, but very little is known about its genetic basis. We have identified truncating mutations in one of the primary human histone deacetylases, HDAC2, in sporadic carcinomas with microsatellite instability and in tumors a...

  6. Data of the molecular dynamics simulations of mutations in the human connexin46 docking interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Schadzek

    2016-06-01

    The data described here are related to the research article entitled “The cataract related mutation N188T in human connexin46 (hCx46 revealed a critical role for residue N188 in the docking process of gap junction channels” (Schadzek et al., 2015 [1].

  7. Visualizing the origins of selfish de novo mutations in individual seminiferous tubules of human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Geoffrey J; McGowan, Simon J; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Verrill, Clare; Goriely, Anne; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2016-03-01

    De novo point mutations arise predominantly in the male germline and increase in frequency with age, but it has not previously been possible to locate specific, identifiable mutations directly within the seminiferous tubules of human testes. Using microdissection of tubules exhibiting altered expression of the spermatogonial markers MAGEA4, FGFR3, and phospho-AKT, whole genome amplification, and DNA sequencing, we establish an in situ strategy for discovery and analysis of pathogenic de novo mutations. In 14 testes from men aged 39-90 y, we identified 11 distinct gain-of-function mutations in five genes (fibroblast growth factor receptors FGFR2 and FGFR3, tyrosine phosphatase PTPN11, and RAS oncogene homologs HRAS and KRAS) from 16 of 22 tubules analyzed; all mutations have known associations with severe diseases, ranging from congenital or perinatal lethal disorders to somatically acquired cancers. These results support proposed selfish selection of spermatogonial mutations affecting growth factor receptor-RAS signaling, highlight its prevalence in older men, and enable direct visualization of the microscopic anatomy of elongated mutant clones.

  8. Mutations in the Motile Cilia Gene DNAAF1 Are Associated with Neural Tube Defects in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyue Miao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are severe malformations of the central nervous system caused by complex genetic and environmental factors. Among genes involved in NTD, cilia-related genes have been well defined and found to be essential for the completion of neural tube closure (NTC. We have carried out next-generation sequencing on target genes in 373 NTDs and 222 healthy controls, and discovered eight disease-specific rare mutations in cilia-related gene DNAAF1. DNAAF1 plays a central role in cytoplasmic preassembly of distinct dynein-arm complexes, and is expressed in some key tissues involved in neural system development, such as neural tube, floor plate, embryonic node, and brain ependyma epithelial cells in zebrafish and mouse. Therefore, we evaluated the expression and functions of mutations in DNAAF1 in transfected cells to analyze the potential correlation of these mutants to NTDs in humans. One rare frameshift mutation (p.Gln341Argfs*10 resulted in significantly diminished DNAAF1 protein expression, compared to the wild type. Another mutation, p.Lys231Gln, disrupted cytoplasmic preassembly of the dynein-arm complexes in cellular assay. Furthermore, results from NanoString assay on mRNA from NTD samples indicated that DNAAF1 mutants altered the expression level of NTC-related genes. Altogether, these findings suggest that the rare mutations in DNAAF1 may contribute to the susceptibility for NTDs in humans.

  9. Mutations in the paralogous human alpha-globin genes yielding identical hemoglobin variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradkhani, Kamran; Préhu, Claude; Old, John; Henderson, Shirley; Balamitsa, Vera; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Poon, Man-Chiu; Chui, David H K; Wajcman, Henri; Patrinos, George P

    2009-06-01

    The human alpha-globin genes are paralogues, sharing a high degree of DNA sequence similarity and producing an identical alpha-globin chain. Over half of the alpha-globin structural variants reported to date are only characterized at the amino acid level. It is likely that a fraction of these variants, with phenotypes differing from one observation to another, may be due to the same mutation but on a different alpha-globin gene. There have been very few previous examples of hemoglobin variants that can be found at both HBA1 and HBA2 genes. Here, we report the results of a systematic multicenter study in a large multiethnic population to identify such variants and to analyze their differences from a functional and evolutionary perspective. We identified 14 different Hb variants resulting from identical mutations on either one of the two human alpha-globin paralogue genes. We also showed that the average percentage of hemoglobin variants due to a HBA2 gene mutation (alpha2) is higher than the percentage of hemoglobin variants due to the same HBA1 gene mutation (alpha1) and that the alpha2/alpha1 ratio varied between variants. These alpha-globin chain variants have most likely occurred via recurrent mutations, gene conversion events, or both. Based on these data, we propose a nomenclature for hemoglobin variants that fall into this category.

  10. Promoting Cas9 degradation reduces mosaic mutations in non-human primate embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhuchi; Yang, Weili; Yan, Sen; Yin, An; Gao, Jinquan; Liu, Xudong; Zheng, Yinghui; Zheng, Jiezhao; Li, Zhujun; Yang, Su; Li, Shihua; Guo, Xiangyu; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful new tool for genome editing, but this technique creates mosaic mutations that affect the efficiency and precision of its ability to edit the genome. Reducing mosaic mutations is particularly important for gene therapy and precision genome editing. Although the mechanisms underlying the CRSIPR/Cas9-mediated mosaic mutations remain elusive, the prolonged expression and activity of Cas9 in embryos could contribute to mosaicism in DNA mutations. Here we report that tagging Cas9 with ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation signals can facilitate the degradation of Cas9 in non-human primate embryos. Using embryo-splitting approach, we found that shortening the half-life of Cas9 in fertilized zygotes reduces mosaic mutations and increases its ability to modify genomes in non-human primate embryos. Also, injection of modified Cas9 in one-cell embryos leads to live monkeys with the targeted gene modifications. Our findings suggest that modifying Cas9 activity can be an effective strategy to enhance precision genome editing. PMID:28155910

  11. Parkin Mutations Reduce the Complexity of Neuronal Processes in iPSC-derived Human Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yong; Jiang, Houbo; Hu, Zhixing; Fan, Kevin; Wang, Jun; Janoschka, Stephen; Wang, Xiaomin; Ge, Shaoyu; Feng, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons and non-DA neurons in many parts of the brain. Mutations of parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that strongly binds to microtubules, are the most frequent cause of recessively inherited Parkinson’s disease. The lack of robust PD phenotype in parkin knockout mice suggests a unique vulnerability of human neurons to parkin mutations. Here, we show that the complexity of neuronal processes as measured by total neurite length, number of terminals, number of branch points and Sholl analysis, was greatly reduced in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived TH+ or TH− neurons from PD patients with parkin mutations. Consistent with these, microtubule stability was significantly decreased by parkin mutations in iPSC-derived neurons. Overexpression of parkin, but not its PD-linked mutant nor GFP, restored the complexity of neuronal processes and the stability of microtubules. Consistent with these, the microtubule-depolymerizing agent colchicine mimicked the effect of parkin mutations by decreasing neurite length and complexity in control neurons while the microtubule-stabilizing drug taxol mimicked the effect of parkin overexpression by enhancing the morphology of parkin-deficient neurons. The results suggest that parkin maintains the morphological complexity of human neurons by stabilizing microtubules. PMID:25332110

  12. A Computational Protein Phenotype Prediction Approach to Analyze the Deleterious Mutations of Human MED12 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaganapalli, Babajan; Mohammed, Kaleemuddin; Khan, Imran Ali; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu; Shaik, Noor Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Genetic mutations in MED12, a subunit of Mediator complex are seen in a broad spectrum of human diseases. However, the underlying basis of how these pathogenic mutations elicit protein phenotype changes in terms of 3D structure, stability and protein binding sites remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the structural and functional impacts of MED12 mutations, using computational methods as an alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. The MED12 gene mutations details and their corresponding clinical associations were collected from different databases and by text-mining. Initially, diverse computational approaches were applied to categorize the different classes of mutations based on their deleterious impact to MED12. Then, protein structures for wild and mutant types built by integrative modeling were analyzed for structural divergence, solvent accessibility, stability, and functional interaction deformities. Finally, this study was able to identify that genetic mutations mapped to exon-2 region, highly conserved LCEWAV and Catenin domains induce biochemically severe amino acid changes which alters the protein phenotype as well as the stability of MED12-CYCC interactions. To better understand the deleterious nature of FS-IDs and Indels, this study asserts the utility of computational screening based on their propensity towards non-sense mediated decay. Current study findings may help to narrow down the number of MED12 mutations to be screened for mediator complex dysfunction associated genetic diseases. This study supports computational methods as a primary filter to verify the plausible impact of pathogenic mutations based on the perspective of evolution, expression and phenotype of proteins. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2023-2035, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Parkinson's disease-related LRRK2 G2019S mutation results from independent mutational events in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    7 pages; International audience; Mutations in the leucine-rich-repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been identified in families with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD) and in sporadic cases; the G2019S mutation is the single most frequent. Intriguingly, the frequency of this mutation in PD patients varies greatly among ethnic groups and geographic origins: it is present at

  14. Prediction of phenotypes of missense mutations in human proteins from biological assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiong; Xu, Qifang; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2013-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent variation in the human genome. Nonsynonymous SNPs that lead to missense mutations can be neutral or deleterious, and several computational methods have been presented that predict the phenotype of human missense mutations. These methods use sequence-based and structure-based features in various combinations, relying on different statistical distributions of these features for deleterious and neutral mutations. One structure-based feature that has not been studied significantly is the accessible surface area within biologically relevant oligomeric assemblies. These assemblies are different from the crystallographic asymmetric unit for more than half of X-ray crystal structures. We find that mutations in the core of proteins or in the interfaces in biological assemblies are significantly more likely to be disease-associated than those on the surface of the biological assemblies. For structures with more than one protein in the biological assembly (whether the same sequence or different), we find the accessible surface area from biological assemblies provides a statistically significant improvement in prediction over the accessible surface area of monomers from protein crystal structures (P = 6e-5). When adding this information to sequence-based features such as the difference between wildtype and mutant position-specific profile scores, the improvement from biological assemblies is statistically significant but much smaller (P = 0.018). Combining this information with sequence-based features in a support vector machine leads to 82% accuracy on a balanced dataset of 50% disease-associated mutations from SwissVar and 50% neutral mutations from human/primate sequence differences in orthologous proteins.

  15. Functional analysis of human mutations in homeodomain transcription factor PITX3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokina Elena

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homeodomain-containing transcription factor PITX3 was shown to be essential for normal eye development in vertebrates. Human patients with point mutations in PITX3 demonstrate congenital cataracts along with anterior segment defects in some cases when one allele is affected and microphthalmia with brain malformations when both copies are mutated. The functional consequences of these human mutations remain unknown. Results We studied the PITX3 mutant proteins S13N and G219fs to determine the type and severity of functional defects. Our results demonstrate alterations in DNA-binding profiles and/or transactivation activities and suggest a partial loss-of-function in both mutants with the G219fs form being more severely affected. No anomalies in cellular distribution and no dominant-negative effects were discovered for these mutants. Interestingly, the impairment of the G219fs activity varied between different ocular cell lines. Conclusion The G219fs mutation was found in multiple families affected with congenital cataracts along with anterior segment malformations in many members. Our data suggest that the presence/severity of anterior segment defects in families affected with G219fs may be determined by secondary factors that are expressed in the developing anterior segment structures and may modify the effect(s of this mutation. The S13N mutant showed only minor alteration of transactivation ability and DNA binding pattern and may represent a rare polymorphism in the PITX3 gene. A possible contribution of this mutation to human disease needs to be further investigated.

  16. Identification and characterization of the minimal androgen-regulated kidney-specific kidney androgen-regulated protein gene promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The kidney androgen-regulated protein (Kap) gene is tissue specific and regulated by androgen in mouse kidney proximal tubule cells (PTCs). In the present study, we aimed to identify the minimal PTC-specific androgen-regulated Kap promoter and analyze its androgen response elements (AREs).Adeletion series of the Kap1542 promoter/luciferase constructs were assayed in opossum kidney (OK) PTCs in the presence or absence of 15 nM dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Kap 1542 and Kap637 had low activity and no androgen induction; Kap224 had a basal activity that was 4- to 5-fold higher than that of Kap 1542, but was only sfightly induced by DHT. Kap 147 had a basal activity that was 2- to 3-fold higher than that of Kap 1542 and was induced by DHT 4- to 6-fold. Kap77 abol-ished basal promoter activity but was still induced by DHT. Results showed that, in vitro, Kap147 was a minimal androgen-regulated promoter. Transient transfection in different cells demonstrated that Kap147 specifically initi-ated reporter gene expression in PTCs. Sequence analysis revealed two potential AREs located at positions -124 and -39 of Kap147. Mutational assays showed that only the ARE at -124 was involved in androgen response in OK cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay also verified -124 ARE bound specifically to androgen receptor. In conclusion, we defined the minimal Kap 147 promoter that may be a good model for the study of kidney PTC-specific expression and molecular mechanisms that lead to an androgen-specific responsiveness in vivo.

  17. Comparative active-site mutation study of human and Caenorhabditis elegans thymidine kinase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Tine; Uhlin, Ulla; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    The first step for the intracellular retention of several anticancer or antiviral nucleoside analogues is the addition of a phosphate group catalysed by a deoxyribonucleoside kinase such as thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Recently, human TK1 (HuTK1) has been crystallized and characterized using different...... surrounding the substrate base. In CeTK1, some of these mutations led to increased activity with deoxycytidine and deoxyguanosine, two unusual substrates for TK1-like kinases. In HuTK1, mutation of T163 to S resulted in a kinase with a 140-fold lower K(m) for the antiviral nucleoside analogue 3'-azido-3...

  18. Evidence for recent, population-specific evolution of the human mutation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kelley

    2015-03-17

    As humans dispersed out of Africa they adapted to new environmental challenges, including changes in exposure to mutagenic solar radiation. Humans in temperate latitudes have acquired light skin that is relatively transparent to UV light, and some evidence suggests that their DNA damage response pathways have also experienced local adaptation. This raises the possibility that different populations have experienced different selective pressures affecting genome integrity. Here, I present evidence that the rate of a particular mutation type has recently increased in the European population, rising in frequency by 50% during the 40,000-80,000 y since Europeans began diverging from Asians. A comparison of SNPs private to Africa, Asia, and Europe in the 1000 Genomes data reveals that private European variation is enriched for the transition 5'-TCC-3' → 5'-TTC-3'. Although it is not clear whether UV played a causal role in changing the European mutational spectrum, 5'-TCC-3' → 5'-TTC-3' is known to be the most common somatic mutation present in melanoma skin cancers, as well as the mutation most frequently induced in vitro by UV. Regardless of its causality, this change indicates that DNA replication fidelity has not remained stable even since the origin of modern humans and might have changed numerous times during our recent evolutionary history.

  19. Molecular effects of novel mutations in Hesx1/HESX1 associated with human pituitary disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brickman, J M; Clements, M; Tyrell, R

    2001-01-01

    resulting in a single amino acid substitution, Arg160Cys (R160C), is associated with a heritable form of the human condition of septo-optic dysplasia (SOD). We have examined the phenotype of affected members in this pedigree in more detail and demonstrate for the first time a genetic basis for midline...... defects associated with an undescended or ectopic posterior pituitary. A similar structural pituitary abnormality was observed in a second patient heterozygous for another mutation in HESX1, Ser170Leu (S170L). Association of S170L with a pituitary phenotype may be a direct consequence of the HESX1...... mutation since S170L is also associated with a dominant familial form of pituitary disease. However, a third mutation in HESX1, Asn125Ser (N125S), occurs at a high frequency in the Afro-Caribbean population and may therefore reflect a population-specific polymorphism. To investigate the molecular basis...

  20. Catalytic deficiency of human aldolase B in hereditary fructose intolerance caused by a common missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, N C; Tolan, D R; Cox, T M

    1988-06-17

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a human autosomal recessive disease caused by a deficiency of aldolase B that results in an inability to metabolize fructose and related sugars. We report here the first identification of a molecular lesion in the aldolase B gene of an affected individual whose defective protein has previously been characterized. The mutation is a G----C transversion in exon 5 that creates a new recognition site for the restriction enzyme Ahall and results in an amino acid substitution (Ala----Pro) at position 149 of the protein within a region critical for substrate binding. Utilizing this novel restriction site and the polymerase chain reaction, the patient was shown to be homozygous for the mutation. Three other HFI patients from pedigrees unrelated to this individual were found to have the same mutation: two were homozygous and one was heterozygous. We suggest that this genetic lesion is a prevailing cause of hereditary fructose intolerance.

  1. Gene regulation and chromatin organization: relevance of cohesin mutations to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrin, Erwan; Kaiser, Frank J; Wendt, Kerstin S

    2016-04-01

    Consistent with the diverse roles of the cohesin complex in chromosome biology, mutations in genes encoding cohesin and its regulators are found in different types of cancer and in developmental disorders such as Cornelia de Lange Syndrome. It is so far considered that the defects caused by these mutations result from altered function of cohesin in regulating gene expression during development. Chromatin conformation analyses have established the importance of cohesin for the architecture of developmental gene clusters and in vivo studies in mouse and zebrafish demonstrated how cohesin defects lead to gene misregulation and to malformations similar to the related human syndromes. Here we present our current knowledge on cohesin's involvement in gene expression, highlighting molecular and mechanistic consequences of pathogenic mutations in the Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

  2. Somatic Mutations in the Notch, NF-KB, PIK3CA, and Hedgehog Pathways in Human Breast Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, Xiang; Wood, Laura; Lindman, Monica; Jones, Sian,; Buckhaults, Phillip; Polyak, Kornelia; Sukumar, Saraswati; Carter, Hannah; Kim, Dewey; Karchin, Rachel; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Exome sequencing of human breast cancers has revealed a substantial number of candidate cancer genes with recurring but infrequent somatic mutations. To determine more accurately their mutation prevalence, we performed a mutation analysis of 36 novel candidate cancer genes in 96 human breast cancers. Somatic mutations with potential impact on protein function were observed in the genes ADAM12, CENTB1, CENTG1, DIP2C, GLI1, GRIN2D, HDLBP, IKBKB, KPNA5, NFKB1, NOTCH1, and OTOF. These findings st...

  3. Visualising androgen receptor activity in male and female mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Alwyn Dart

    Full Text Available Androgens, required for normal development and fertility of males and females, have vital roles in the reproductive tract, brain, cardiovascular system, smooth muscle and bone. Androgens function via the androgen receptor (AR, a ligand-dependent transcription factor. To assay and localise AR activity in vivo we generated the transgenic "ARE-Luc" mouse, expressing a luciferase reporter gene under the control of activated endogenous AR. In vivo imaging of androgen-mediated luciferase activity revealed several strongly expressing tissues in the male mouse as expected and also in certain female tissues. In males the testes, prostate, seminal vesicles and bone marrow all showed high AR activity. In females, strong activity was seen in the ovaries, uterus, omentum tissue and mammary glands. In both sexes AR expression and activity was also found in salivary glands, the eye (and associated glands, adipose tissue, spleen and, notably, regions of the brain. Luciferase protein expression was found in the same cell layers as androgen receptor expression. Additionally, mouse AR expression and activity correlated well with AR expression in human tissues. The anti-androgen bicalutamide reduced luciferase signal in all tissues. Our model demonstrates that androgens can act in these tissues directly via AR, rather than exclusively via androgen aromatisation to estrogens and activation of the estrogen receptor. Additionally, it visually demonstrates the fundamental importance of AR signalling outside the normal role in the reproductive organs. This model represents an important tool for physiological and developmental analysis of androgen signalling, and for characterization of known and novel androgenic or antiandrogenic compounds.

  4. Mutations in the p53 gene occur in diverse human tumour types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, J M; Baker, S J; Preisinger, A C; Jessup, J M; Hostetter, R; Cleary, K; Bigner, S H; Davidson, N; Baylin, S; Devilee, P

    1989-12-01

    The p53 gene has been a constant source of fascination since its discovery nearly a decade ago. Originally considered to be an oncogene, several convergent lines of research have indicated that the wild-type gene product actually functions as a tumour suppressor gene. For example, expression of the neoplastic phenotype is inhibited, rather than promoted, when rat cells are transfected with the murine wild-type p53 gene together with mutant p53 genes and/or other oncogenes. Moreover, in human tumours, the short arm of chromosome 17 is often deleted. In colorectal cancers, the smallest common region of deletion is centred at 17p13.1; this region harbours the p53 gene, and in two tumours examined in detail, the remaining (non-deleted) p53 alleles were found to contain mutations. This result was provocative because allelic deletion coupled with mutation of the remaining allele is a theoretical hallmark of tumour-suppressor genes. In the present report, we have attempted to determine the generality of this observation; that is, whether tumours with allelic deletions of chromosome 17p contain mutant p53 genes in the allele that is retained. Our results suggest that (1) most tumours with such allelic deletions contain p53 point mutations resulting in amino-acid substitutions, (2) such mutations are not confined to tumours with allelic deletion, but also occur in at least some tumours that have retained both parental 17p alleles, and (3) p53 gene mutations are clustered in four 'hot-spots' which exactly coincide with the four most highly conserved regions of the gene. These results suggest that p53 mutations play a role in the development of many common human malignancies.

  5. Keratin Gene Mutations in Disorders of Human Skin and its Appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Syed, Deeba N.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Liovic, Mirjana; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Keratins, the major structural protein of all epithelia, are a diverse group of cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins that form intermediate filament networks, providing structural support to keratinocytes that maintain the integrity of the skin. Expression of keratin genes is usually regulated by differentiation of the epidermal cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Amongst the 54 known functional keratin genes in humans, about 21 different genes including hair and hair follicle-specific keratins have been associated with diverse hereditary disorders. The exact phenotype of each disease mostly reflects the spatial level of expression and types of the mutated keratin genes, the positions of the mutations as well as their consequences at sub-cellular levels. The identification of specific mutations in keratin disorders is the basis of our understanding that lead to reclassification, improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, prenatal testing and genetic counseling in severe cutaneous keratin genodermatoses. A disturbance in cutaneous keratins as a result of mutation(s) in the gene(s) that encode keratin intermediate filaments (KIF) causes keratinocytes and cutaneous tissue fragility, accounting for a large number of genetic disorders in human skin and its appendages. These diseases are characterized by a loss of structural integrity in keratinocytes expressing mutated keratins in vivo, often manifested as keratinocytes fragility (cytolysis), intra-epidermal blistering, hyperkeratosis, and keratin filament aggregation in severely affected tissues. Examples include epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), keratinopathic ichthyosis (KPI), pachyonychia congenital (PC), monilethrix, steatocystoma multiplex and ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS). These keratins also have been identified to have roles in cell growth, apoptosis, tissue polarity, wound healing and tissue remodeling. PMID:21176769

  6. Associations between mutations and a VNTR in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goltsov, A.A.; Eisensmith, R.C.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Konecki, D.S.; Lichter-Konecki, U.

    1992-09-01

    The HindIII RFLP in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene is caused by the presence of an AT-rich (70%) minisatellite region. This region contains various multiples of 30-bp tandem repeats and is located 3 kb downstream of the final exon of the gene. PCR-mediated amplification of this region from haplotyped PAH chromosomes indicates that the previously reported 4.0-kb HindIII allele contains three of these repeats, while the 4.4-kb HindIII allele contains 12 of these repeats. The 4.2-kb HindIII fragment can contain six, seven, eight, or nine copies of this repeat. These variations permit more detailed analysis of mutant haplotypes 1, 5, 6, and, possibly, others. Kindred analysis in phenylketonuria families demonstrates Mendelian segregation of these VNTR alleles, as well as associations between theses alleles and certain PAH mutations. The R261Q mutation, associated with haplotype 1, is associated almost exclusively with an allele containing eight repeats; the R408W mutation, when occurring on a haplotype 1 background, may also be associated with the eight-repeat VNTR allele. Other PAH mutations associated with haplotype 1, R252W and P281L, do not appear to segregate with specific VNTR alleles. The IVS-10 mutation, when associated with haplotype 6, is associated exclusively with an allele containing seven repeats. The combined use of this VNTR system and the existing RFLP haplotype system will increase the performance of prenatal diagnostic tests based on haplotype analysis. In addition, this VNTR may prove useful in studies concerning the origins and distributions of PAH mutations in different human populations. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Effects of low testosterone levels and of adrenal androgens on growth of prostate tumor models in nude mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. van Weerden (Wytske); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan); A. van Kreuningen (A.); E.P.C.M. Moerings (Ellis); F.H. de Jong (Frank); F.H. Schröder (Fritz)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Two transplantable, androgen dependent prostate tumor models of human origin, PC-82 and PC-EW, were used to study the effect of low androgen levels and adrenal androgens on prostate tumor cell proliferation. Tumor load of the PC-82 and PC-EW tumors could be maintained cons

  8. Disheveled hair and ear (Dhe, a spontaneous mouse Lmna mutation modeling human laminopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Odgren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigations of naturally-occurring mutations in animal models provide important insights and valuable disease models. Lamins A and C, along with lamin B, are type V intermediate filament proteins which constitute the proteinaceous boundary of the nucleus. LMNA mutations in humans cause a wide range of phenotypes, collectively termed laminopathies. To identify the mutation and investigate the phenotype of a spontaneous, semi-dominant mutation that we have named Disheveled hair and ear (Dhe, which causes a sparse coat and small external ears in heterozygotes and lethality in homozygotes by postnatal day 10. FINDINGS: Genetic mapping identified a point mutation in the Lmna gene, causing a single amino acid change, L52R, in the coiled coil rod domain of lamin A and C proteins. Cranial sutures in Dhe/+ mice failed to close. Gene expression for collagen types I and III in sutures was deficient. Skulls were small and disproportionate. Skeletons of Dhe/+ mice were hypomineralized and total body fat was deficient in males. In homozygotes, skin and oral mucosae were dysplastic and ulcerated. Nuclear morphometry of cultured cells revealed gene dose-dependent blebbing and wrinkling. CONCLUSION: Dhe mice should provide a useful new model for investigations of the pathogenesis of laminopathies.

  9. AB036. Analysis of human mitochondrial genome mutations of Vietnamese patients tentatively diagnosed with encephalomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghia, Phan Tuan; Thai, Trinh Hong; Hue, Truong Thi; Van Minh, Nguyen; Khanh, Phung Bao; Hiep, Tran Duc; Anh, Tran Kieu; Loan, Nguyen Thi Hong; Van, Nguyen Thi Hong; Anh, Pham Van; Hung, Cao Vu; Anh, Le Ngoc

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondrial genome consists of 16,569 bp, and replicates independently from the nuclear genome. Mutations in mitochondrial genome are usually causative factors of various metabolic disorders, especially those of encephalomyopathy. DNA analysis is the most reliable method for detection of mitochondrial genome mutations, and accordingly an excellent diagnostic tool for mitochondrial mutation-related diseases. In this study, 19 different mitochondrial genome mutations including A3243G, A3251G, T3271C and T3291C (MELAS); A8344G, T8356C and G8363A (MERRF); G3460A, G11778A and T14484C (LHON); T8993G/C and T9176G (Leigh); A1555G (deafness) and A4225G, G4298A, T10010C, T14727C, T14728C, T14709C (encephalomyopathy in general) were analyzed using PCR-RFLP in combination with DNA sequencing. In addition, a real-time PCR method using locked nucleic acid (LNA) Taqman probe was set up for heteroplasmy determination. Screening of 283 tentatively diagnosed encephalomyopathy patients revealed 7 cases of A3243G, 1 case of G11778A, 1 case of A1555G, 1 case of A4225G, 1 case G4298A, and 1 case of 6 bp (ACTCCT/CTCCTA) deletion. Using the LNA Taqman probe real-time PCR, the heteroplasmy of some point mutations was determined and the results support a potential relationship between heteroplasmy level and severity of the disease.

  10. Cellular and molecular effects for mutation induction in normal human cells irradiated with accelerated neon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kato, Takeshi; Yatagai, Fumio; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-02-22

    We investigated the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of mutation induction on the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in normal human fibroblast-like cells irradiated with accelerated neon-ion beams. The cells were irradiated with neon-ion beams at various LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/microm. Neon-ion beams were accelerated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. Mutation induction at the HPRT locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine-resistant clones. The mutation spectrum of the deletion pattern of exons of mutants was analyzed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The dose-response curves increased steeply up to 0.5 Gy and leveled off or decreased between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, compared to the response to (137)Cs gamma-rays. The mutation frequency increased up to 105 keV/microm and then there was a downward trend with increasing LET values. The deletion pattern of exons was non-specific. About 75-100% of the mutants produced using LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/mum showed all or partial deletions of exons, while among gamma-ray-induced mutants 30% showed no deletions, 30% partial deletions and 40% complete deletions. These results suggested that the dose-response curves of neon-ion-induced mutations were dependent upon LET values, but the deletion pattern of DNA was not.

  11. Mutation screening in the human epsilon-globin gene using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Menounos, Panagiotis G; Kolonelou, Christina; Patrinos, George P

    2006-02-01

    The human epsilon-globin gene is necessary for primitive human erythropoiesis in the yolk sac. Herein we report a non-radioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) approach to screen the human epsilon-globin gene and its regulatory regions for possible mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in normal adult subjects, in order to determine those genomic regions, which are not necessary for its proper regulation and function. We identified no sequence variations apart from the expected 5'epsilon /HincII polymorphism in the fragments analyzed, suggesting that genomic alterations in the epsilon-globin gene are most likely incompatible with normal erythropoiesis and proper embryonic development.

  12. Ovarian and Adrenal Androgens and Their Link to High Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Levels: A Prospective Controlled Study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background. Although the association between human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and hyperandrogenism was identified more than 40 years ago, relevant questions remain unanswered. Design and Methods. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal, and controlled study in 23 women with a diagnosis of a complete hydatidiform mole (HM). Results. All participants completed the study. Before HM evacuation mean hCG was markedly higher in the cases than in the control group (P ≤ 0.001). Free testosterone (T...

  13. The role of the prokineticin 2 pathway in human reproduction: evidence from the study of human and murine gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Cecilia; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Dwyer, Andrew A; Au, Margaret G; Sidis, Yisrael; Kaiser, Ursula B; Seminara, Stephanie B; Pitteloud, Nelly; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Crowley, William F

    2011-04-01

    A widely dispersed network of hypothalamic GnRH neurons controls the reproductive axis in mammals. Genetic investigation of the human disease model of isolated GnRH deficiency has revealed several key genes crucial for GnRH neuronal ontogeny and GnRH secretion. Among these genes, prokineticin 2 (PROK2), and PROK2 receptor (PROKR2) have recently emerged as critical regulators of reproduction in both mice and humans. Both prok2- and prokr2-deficient mice recapitulate the human Kallmann syndrome phenotype. Additionally, PROK2 and PROKR2 mutations are seen in humans with Kallmann syndrome, thus implicating this pathway in GnRH neuronal migration. However, PROK2/PROKR2 mutations are also seen in normosmic GnRH deficiency, suggesting a role for the prokineticin signaling system in GnRH biology that is beyond neuronal migration. This observation is particularly surprising because mature GnRH neurons do not express PROKR2. Moreover, mutations in both PROK2 and PROKR2 are predominantly detected in the heterozygous state with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity frequently seen within and across pedigrees. In some of these pedigrees, a "second hit" or oligogenicity has been documented. Besides reproduction, a pleiotropic physiological role for PROK2 is now recognized, including regulation of pain perception, circadian rhythms, hematopoiesis, and immune response. Therefore, further detailed clinical studies of patients with PROK2/PROKR2 mutations will help to map the broader biological role of the PROK2/PROKR2 pathway and identify other interacting genes/proteins that mediate its molecular effects in humans.

  14. Mutational analysis of the human mitochondrial genome branches into the realm of bacterial genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, N. [Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This is shaping up as a vintage year for studies of the genetics and evolution of the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). In a theoretical and experimental tour de force, Shenkar et al. (1996), on pages 772-780 of this issue, derive the mutation rate of the 4,977-bp (or {open_quotes}common{close_quotes}) deletion in the human mtDNA through refinement and extension of fluctuation analysis, a technique that was first used >50 years ago. Shenkar et al., in essence, have solved or bypassed many of the difficulties that are inherent in the application of fluctuation analysis to human mitochondrial gene mutations. Their study is important for two principal reasons. In the first place, high levels of this deletion cause a variety of pathological disorders, including Kearns-Sayre syndrome and chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Their current report, therefore, is a major step in the elucidation of the molecular genetic pathogenesis of this group of mitochondrial disorders. For example, it now may be feasible to analyze the effects of selection on transmission and segregation of this deletion and, perhaps, other mtDNA mutations as well. Second, and at a broader level, the approach of Shenkar et al. should find widespread applicability to the study of other mtDNA mutations. It has been recognized for several years that mammalian mtDNA mutates much more rapidly than nuclear DNA, a phenomenon with potentially profound evolutionary implications. It is exciting and useful, both experimentally and theoretically, that this {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} approach can be used for {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} applications. 56 refs.

  15. Mutation and Expression of the DCC Gene in Human Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kohno

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 18q is frequently deleted in lung cancers, a common region of 18q deletions was mapped to chromosome 18g21. Since the DCC candidate tumor suppressor gene has been mapped in this region, mutation and expression of the DCC gene were examined in 46 lung cancer cell lines, consisting of 14 small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs and 32 non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs, to elucidate the pathogenetic significance of DCC alterations in human lung carcinogenesis. A heterozygous missense mutation was detected in a NSCLC cell line, Ma26, while homozygous deletion was not detected in any of the cell lines. The DCC gene was expressed in 11 (24% of the 46 cell lines, the incidence of DCC expression was significantly higher in SCLCs (7/14, 50% than in NSCLCs (4/32, 13% (P = .01, Fisher's exact test. Therefore, genetic alterations of DCC are infrequent; however, the levels of DCC expression vary among lung cancer cells, in particular, between SCLCs and NSCLCs. The present result does not implicate DCC as a specific mutational target of 18q deletions in human lung cancer; however, it suggests that DCC is a potential target of inactivation by genetic defects including intron or promoter mutations and/or epigenetic alterations. The present result also suggests that DCC expression is associated with some properties of SCLCs, such as a neuroendocrine (NE feature.

  16. Distance from sub-Saharan Africa predicts mutational load in diverse human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Brenna M; Botigué, Laura R; Peischl, Stephan; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Lipatov, Mikhail; Maples, Brian K; Martin, Alicia R; Musharoff, Shaila; Cann, Howard; Snyder, Michael P; Excoffier, Laurent; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-01-26

    The Out-of-Africa (OOA) dispersal ∼ 50,000 y ago is characterized by a series of founder events as modern humans expanded into multiple continents. Population genetics theory predicts an increase of mutational load in populations undergoing serial founder effects during range expansions. To test this hypothesis, we have sequenced full genomes and high-coverage exomes from seven geographically divergent human populations from Namibia, Congo, Algeria, Pakistan, Cambodia, Siberia, and Mexico. We find that individual genomes vary modestly in the overall number of predicted deleterious alleles. We show via spatially explicit simulations that the observed distribution of deleterious allele frequencies is consistent with the OOA dispersal, particularly under a model where deleterious mutations are recessive. We conclude that there is a strong signal of purifying selection at conserved genomic positions within Africa, but that many predicted deleterious mutations have evolved as if they were neutral during the expansion out of Africa. Under a model where selection is inversely related to dominance, we show that OOA populations are likely to have a higher mutation load due to increased allele frequencies of nearly neutral variants that are recessive or partially recessive.

  17. Distinct Contributions of Replication and Transcription to Mutation Rate Variation of Human Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2012-03-23

    Here, we evaluate the contribution of two major biological processes—DNA replication and transcription—to mutation rate variation in human genomes. Based on analysis of the public human tissue transcriptomics data, high-resolution replicating map of Hela cells and dbSNP data, we present significant correlations between expression breadth, replication time in local regions and SNP density. SNP density of tissue-specific (TS) genes is significantly higher than that of housekeeping (HK) genes. TS genes tend to locate in late-replicating genomic regions and genes in such regions have a higher SNP density compared to those in early-replication regions. In addition, SNP density is found to be positively correlated with expression level among HK genes. We conclude that the process of DNA replication generates stronger mutational pressure than transcription-associated biological processes do, resulting in an increase of mutation rate in TS genes while having weaker effects on HK genes. In contrast, transcription-associated processes are mainly responsible for the accumulation of mutations in highly-expressed HK genes.

  18. Cloning, mapping and mutation analysis of human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA; Jiahui; (夏家辉); ZHENG; Duo; (郑多),; TANG; Dongsheng; (唐冬生); DAI; Heping; (戴和平); PAN; Qian; (潘乾); LONG; Zhigao; (龙志高); LIAO; Xiaodong; (廖晓东)

    2001-01-01

    By homologous EST searching and nested PCR a new human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5 was identified. GJB5 was genetically mapped to human chromosome 1p33-p35 by FISH. RT-PCR revealed that it was expressed in skin, placenta and fetal skin. DNA sequencing of GJB5 was carried out in 142 patients with sensorineural hearing impairment and probands of 36 families with genetic diseases, including erythrokeratodermia (5 families), Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (13), ptosis (4), and retinitis pigmentosa and deafness (14). Two missense mutations (686A→G, H229R; 25C→T, L9F) were detected in two sensorineural hearing impairment families. A heterologous deletion of 18 bp within intron was found in 3 families with heredity hearing impairment, and in one of the 3 families, a missense mutation (R265P) was identified also. But the deletion and missense mutation seemed not segregating with hearing impairment in the family. No abnormal mRNA or mRNA expression was detected in deletion carriers by RT-PCR analysis in skin tissue. Mutation analysis in 199 unaffected individuals revealed that two of them were carriers with the same 18 bp deletion.

  19. Cloning, mapping and mutation analysis of human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By homologous EST searching and nested PCR a new human gene GJB5encoding gap junction protein b-5 was identified. GJB5 was genetically mapped to human chromosome 1p33-p35 by FISH. RT-PCR revealed that it was expressed in skin, placenta and fetal skin. DNA sequencing of GJB5 was carried out in 142 patients with sensorineural hearing impairment and probands of 36 families with genetic diseases, including erythrokeratodermia (5 families), Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (13), ptosis (4), and retinitis pigmentosa and deafness (14). Two missense mutations (686A→G, H229R; 25C→T, L9F) were detected in two sensorineural hearing impairment families. A heterologous deletion of 18 bp within intron was found in 3 families with heredity hearing impairment, and in one of the 3 families, a missense mutation (R265P) was identified also. But the deletion and missense mutation seemed not segregating with hearing impairment in the family. No abnormal mRNA or mRNA expression was detected in deletion carriers by RT-PCR analysis in skin tissue. Mutation analysis in 199 unaffected individuals revealed that two of them were carriers with the same 18 bp deletion.

  20. Molecular basis of essential fructosuria: molecular cloning and mutational analysis of human ketohexokinase (fructokinase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonthron, D T; Brady, N; Donaldson, I A; Steinmann, B

    1994-09-01

    Essential fructosuria is one of the oldest known inborn errors of metabolism. It is a benign condition which is believed to result from deficiency of hepatic fructokinase (ketohexokinase, KHK, E.C.2.7.1.3). This enzyme catalyses the first step of metabolism of dietary fructose, conversion of fructose to fructose-1-phosphate. Despite the early recognition of this disorder, the primary structure of human KHK and the molecular basis of essential fructosuria have not been previously defined. In this report, the isolation and sequencing of full-length cDNA clones encoding human ketohexokinase are described. Alternative mRNA species and alternative KHK isozymes are produced by alternative polyadenylation and splicing of the KHK gene. The KHK proteins show a high level of sequence conservation relative to rat KHK. Direct evidence that mutation of the KHK structural gene is the cause of essential fructosuria was also obtained. In a well-characterized family, in which three of eight siblings have fructosuria, all affected individuals are compound heterozygotes for two mutations Gly40Arg and Ala43Thr. Both mutations result from G-->A transitions, and each alters the same conserved region of the KHK protein. Neither mutation was seen in a sample of 52 unrelated control individuals. An additional conservative amino acid change (Val49IIe) was present on the KHK allele bearing Ala43Thr.

  1. Identifying photoreceptors in blind eyes caused by RPE65 mutations: Prerequisite for human gene therapy success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Sumaroka, Alexander; Schwartz, Sharon B; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; Traboulsi, Elias I; Heon, Elise; Pittler, Steven J; Milam, Ann H; Maguire, Albert M; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Stone, Edwin M; Bennett, Jean

    2005-04-26

    Mutations in RPE65, a gene essential to normal operation of the visual (retinoid) cycle, cause the childhood blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Retinal gene therapy restores vision to blind canine and murine models of LCA. Gene therapy in blind humans with LCA from RPE65 mutations may also have potential for success but only if the retinal photoreceptor layer is intact, as in the early-disease stage-treated animals. Here, we use high-resolution in vivo microscopy to quantify photoreceptor layer thickness in the human disease to define the relationship of retinal structure to vision and determine the potential for gene therapy success. The normally cone photoreceptor-rich central retina and rod-rich regions were studied. Despite severely reduced cone vision, many RPE65-mutant retinas had near-normal central microstructure. Absent rod vision was associated with a detectable but thinned photoreceptor layer. We asked whether abnormally thinned RPE65-mutant retina with photoreceptor loss would respond to treatment. Gene therapy in Rpe65(-/-) mice at advanced-disease stages, a more faithful mimic of the humans we studied, showed success but only in animals with better-preserved photoreceptor structure. The results indicate that identifying and then targeting retinal locations with retained photoreceptors will be a prerequisite for successful gene therapy in humans with RPE65 mutations and in other retinal degenerative disorders now moving from proof-of-concept studies toward clinical trials.

  2. The F309S mutation increases factor VIII secretion in human cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daianne Maciely Carvalho Fantacini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: The capacity of a human cell line to secrete recombinant factor VIII with a F309S point mutation was investigated, as was the effect of the addition of chemical chaperones (betaine and sodium-4-phenylbutyrate on the secretion of factor VIII. METHODS: This work used a vector with a F309S mutation in the A1 domain to investigate FVIII production in the HEK 293 human cell line. Factor VIII activity was measured by chromogenic assay. Furthermore, the effects of chemical drugs on the culture were evaluated. RESULTS: The addition of the F309S mutation to a previously described FVIII variant increased FVIII secretion by 4.5 fold. Moreover, the addition of betaine or sodium-4-phenylbutyrate increased the secretion rate of FVIIIΔB proteins in HEK 293 cells, but the same effect was not seen for FVIIIΔB-F309S indicating that all the recombinant protein produced had been efficiently secreted. CONCLUSION: Bioengineering factor VIII expressed in human cells may lead to an efficient production of recombinant factor VIII and contribute toward low-cost coagulation factor replacement therapy for hemophilia A. FVIII-F309S produced in human cells can be effective in vivo.

  3. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sindhu Sharma, Kuldeep Singh, Sanjay Dhar*,Yudhvir Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) present at several differentiation from genetic defects to endorgan resistance thereby producing gender dilema dispelled by sex hormones signature.It is quite traumaticfor the patients and family of the affected baby. Extreme sensitivity and awareness on the part of thecaring doctor is necessary for early diagnosis of case of AIS &for successful outcome.

  4. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu Sharma, Kuldeep Singh, Sanjay Dhar*,Yudhvir Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS present at several differentiation from genetic defects to endorgan resistance thereby producing gender dilema dispelled by sex hormones signature.It is quite traumaticfor the patients and family of the affected baby. Extreme sensitivity and awareness on the part of thecaring doctor is necessary for early diagnosis of case of AIS &for successful outcome.

  5. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001180.htm Androgen insensitivity syndrome To use the ... a condition in which the opening of the urethra is on the underside of the penis, instead of ... they can develop cancer, just like any undescended testicle. Estrogen replacement is ...

  6. Larger trinucleotide repeat size in the androgen receptor gene of infertile men with extremely severe oligozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrizio, P; Leonard, D G; Chen, K L; Hernandez-Ayup, S; Trounson, A O

    2001-01-01

    Androgens are significant regulators of human spermatogenesis. Their action is mediated through the androgen receptor (AR), which binds to the androgen responsive element on DNA and regulates gene transcription. Men become infertile with spinobulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy disease) caused by a trinucleotide repeat expansion, > or = 40 CAG repeats, in the AR gene located on the X chromosome. In this prospective study, we investigated whether the variable size, larger repeats, of this trinucleotide could alter AR function and result in impaired spermatogenesis. A total of 69 infertile men were studied. Clinical and laboratory analysis showed idiopathic, nonobstructive azoospermia in 16 men, extremely severe oligozoospermia in 27 men (PCR) amplification across the AR repeat region. Accurate size determination of the PCR product using an ABI 373 DNA sequencer allowed precise calculation of CAG repeat sizes. The AR gene was not analyzed for other types of mutations. The difference in CAG repeat size between infertile men and proven fertile controls was statistically significant, P = .03. Patients with extremely severe oligozoospermia had significantly longer CAG repeat tracts (mean, 25.4 +/- 4.0; P = .0005; range 20-39) than controls (mean, 22 +/- 2.8; range 12-30) or patients with severe oligozoospermia (mean, 22.2 +/- 2.3; range 18-26). None of the 26 infertile men with sperm counts CAG repeats compared with 6 out of 45 controls (13%; P = .06). This study suggests that some men with severe impairment of spermatogenesis have longer trinucleotide repeats in the AR gene. Although direct evidence is missing, lower affinity between androgen and the AR protein or decreased AR protein availability with longer repeats could be responsible for a diminished androgen effect on spermatogenesis. Two of the patients in the extremely severe oligozoospermia group had 35 and 39 CAG repeats, respectively (normal range is 11 to 33). Although not yet considered a mutation, longer

  7. Fast and sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assay for seven androgenic and progestagenic steroids in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Huhtinen, Kaisa; Poutanen, Matti; Auriola, Seppo

    2011-11-01

    A fast and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the quantitative analysis of seven steroid hormones in 150 μl of human serum was developed and validated. The following compounds were included: 17α-hydroxypregnenolone, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone, pregnenolone, and progesterone. Individual stable isotope-labeled analogues were used as internal standards. Sample preparation was performed by liquid-liquid extraction, followed by oxime derivatization to improve the ionization efficiency of the analytes. In contrast to the common derivatization-based methods, the reaction was incorporated into the sample preparation process and the only additional step due to the derivatization was a short heating of the autosampler vials before the sample injection. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a reversed-phase column using a methanol-water gradient. For the analyte detection, a triple quadrupole instrument with electrospray ionization was used. Total run time was 7.0 min and the lower limits of quantification were in the range of 0.03-0.34 nM (0.01-0.10 ng/ml), depending on the analyte. The method was validated using human serum samples from both sexes and applied for the serum steroid profiling of endometriosis patients.

  8. Structural Insight into Processive Human Mitochondrial DNA Synthesis and Disease-Related Polymerase Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Sam; Kennedy, W. Dexter; Yin, Y. Whitney; (Texas)

    2010-09-07

    Human mitochondrial DNA polymerase (Pol {gamma}) is the sole replicase in mitochondria. Pol {gamma} is vulnerable to nonselective antiretroviral drugs and is increasingly associated with mutations found in patients with mitochondriopathies. We determined crystal structures of the human heterotrimeric Pol {gamma} holoenzyme and, separately, a variant of its processivity factor, Pol {gamma}B. The holoenzyme structure reveals an unexpected assembly of the mitochondrial DNA replicase where the catalytic subunit Pol {gamma}A interacts with its processivity factor primarily via a domain that is absent in all other DNA polymerases. This domain provides a structural module for supporting both the intrinsic processivity of the catalytic subunit alone and the enhanced processivity of holoenzyme. The Pol {gamma} structure also provides a context for interpreting the phenotypes of disease-related mutations in the polymerase and establishes a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of toxicity of anti-retroviral drugs targeting HIV reverse transcriptase.

  9. Chromatin remodeling by the CHD7 protein is impaired by mutations that cause human developmental disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bouazoune, Karim; Kingston, Robert Edward

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the CHD7 gene cause human developmental disorders including CHARGE syndrome. Genetic studies in model organisms have further established CHD7 as a central regulator of vertebrate development. Functional analysis of the CHD7 protein has been hampered by its large size. We used a dual-tag system to purify intact recombinant CHD7 protein and found that it is an ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling factor. Biochemical analyses indicate that CHD7 has characteristics distinct from SWI/S...

  10. Diphtheria toxin resistance in human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts in the in vivo somatic cell mutation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomkins, D.J.; Wei, L.; Laurie, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been shown that circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes can be used for the enumeration of 6-thioguanine-resistant cells that presumably arise by mutation in vivo. This somatic cell mutation test has been studied in lymphocytes from human populations exposed to known mutagens and/or carcinogens. The sensitivity of the test could be further enhanced by including other gene markers, since there is evidence for locus-specific differences in response to mutagens. Resistance to diphtheria toxin (Dip/sup r/) seemed like a potential marker to incorporate into the test because the mutation acts codominantly, can readily be selected in human diploid fibroblasts and Chinese hamster cells with no evidence for cell density or cross-feeding effects, and can be assayed for in nondividing cells by measuring protein synthesis inhibition. Blood samples were collected from seven individuals, and fresh, cryopreserved, or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes were tested for continued DNA synthesis (TH-thymidine, autoradiography) or protein synthesis (TVS-methionine, scintillation counting). Both fresh and cryopreserved lymphocytes, stimulated to divide with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), continued to synthesize DNA in the presence of high doses of diphtheria toxin (DT). Similarly, both dividing (PHA-stimulated) and nondividing fresh lymphocytes carried on significant levels of protein synthesis even 68 hr after exposure to 100 flocculating units (LF)/ml DT. The results suggest that human T and B lymphocytes may not be as sensitive to DT protein synthesis inhibition as human fibroblast and Chinese hamster cells. For this reason, Dip/sup r/ may not be a suitable marker for the somatic cell mutation test.

  11. Insights into the mutation-induced HHH syndrome from modeling human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Fang Wang

    Full Text Available Human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 is reported in coupling with the hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH syndrome, which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. For in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the disease, it is crucially important to acquire the 3D structure of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1. Since no such structure is available in the current protein structure database, we have developed it via computational approaches based on the recent NMR structure of human mitochondrial uncoupling protein (Berardi MJ, Chou JJ, et al. Nature 2011, 476:109-113. Subsequently, we docked the ligand L-ornithine into the computational structure to search for the favorable binding mode. It was observed that the binding interaction for the most favorable binding mode is featured by six remarkable hydrogen bonds between the receptor and ligand, and that the most favorable binding mode shared the same ligand-binding site with most of the homologous mitochondrial carriers from different organisms, implying that the ligand-binding sites are quite conservative in the mitochondrial carriers family although their sequences similarity is very low with 20% or so. Moreover, according to our structural analysis, the relationship between the disease-causing mutations of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 and the HHH syndrome can be classified into the following three categories: (i the mutation occurs in the pseudo-repeat regions so as to change the region of the protein closer to the mitochondrial matrix; (ii the mutation is directly affecting the substrate binding pocket so as to reduce the substrate binding affinity; (iii the mutation is located in the structural region closer to the intermembrane space that can significantly break the salt bridge networks of the protein. These findings may provide useful insights for in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the HHH syndrome and

  12. Insights into the mutation-induced HHH syndrome from modeling human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 is reported in coupling with the hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome, which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. For in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the disease, it is crucially important to acquire the 3D structure of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1. Since no such structure is available in the current protein structure database, we have developed it via computational approaches based on the recent NMR structure of human mitochondrial uncoupling protein (Berardi MJ, Chou JJ, et al. Nature 2011, 476:109-113). Subsequently, we docked the ligand L-ornithine into the computational structure to search for the favorable binding mode. It was observed that the binding interaction for the most favorable binding mode is featured by six remarkable hydrogen bonds between the receptor and ligand, and that the most favorable binding mode shared the same ligand-binding site with most of the homologous mitochondrial carriers from different organisms, implying that the ligand-binding sites are quite conservative in the mitochondrial carriers family although their sequences similarity is very low with 20% or so. Moreover, according to our structural analysis, the relationship between the disease-causing mutations of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 and the HHH syndrome can be classified into the following three categories: (i) the mutation occurs in the pseudo-repeat regions so as to change the region of the protein closer to the mitochondrial matrix; (ii) the mutation is directly affecting the substrate binding pocket so as to reduce the substrate binding affinity; (iii) the mutation is located in the structural region closer to the intermembrane space that can significantly break the salt bridge networks of the protein. These findings may provide useful insights for in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the HHH syndrome and developing effective

  13. Mutations in the Na-Cl cotransporter reduce blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, D N; Simon, D B; Nelson-Williams, C; Farhi, A; Finberg, K; Burleson, L; Gill, J R; Lifton, R P

    2001-06-01

    The relationship between salt homeostasis and blood pressure has remained difficult to establish from epidemiological studies of the general population. Recently, mendelian forms of hypertension have demonstrated that mutations that increase renal salt balance lead to higher blood pressure, suggesting that mutations that decrease the net salt balance might have the converse effect. Gitelman's syndrome, caused by loss of function mutations in the Na-Cl cotransporter of the distal convoluted tubule (NCCT), features inherited hypokalemic alkalosis with so-called "normal" blood pressure. We hypothesized that the mild salt wasting of Gitelman's syndrome results in reduced blood pressure and protection from hypertension. We have formally addressed this question through the study of 199 members of a large Amish kindred with Gitelman's syndrome. Through genetic testing, family members were identified as inheriting 0 (n=60), 1 (n=113), or 2 (n=26) mutations in NCCT, permitting an unbiased assessment of the clinical consequences of inheriting these mutations by comparison of the phenotypes of relatives with contrasting genotypes. The results demonstrate high penetrance of hypokalemic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia, and hypocalciuria in patients inheriting 2 mutant NCCT alleles. In addition, the NCCT genotype was a significant predictor of blood pressure, with homozygous mutant family members having significantly lower age- and gender-adjusted systolic and diastolic blood pressures than those of their wild-type relatives. Moreover, both homozygote and heterozygote subjects had significantly higher 24-hour urinary Na(+) than did wild-type subjects, reflecting a self-selected higher salt intake. Finally, heterozygous children, but not adults, had significantly lower blood pressures than those of the wild-type relatives. These findings provide formal demonstration that inherited mutations that impair renal salt handling lower blood pressure in humans.

  14. Leveraging Distant Relatedness to Quantify Human Mutation and Gene-Conversion Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Pier Francesco; Francioli, Laurent C; Wilton, Peter R; Genovese, Giulio; Gusev, Alexander; Finucane, Hilary K; Sankararaman, Sriram; Sunyaev, Shamil R; de Bakker, Paul I W; Wakeley, John; Pe'er, Itsik; Price, Alkes L

    2015-12-01

    The rate at which human genomes mutate is a central biological parameter that has many implications for our ability to understand demographic and evolutionary phenomena. We present a method for inferring mutation and gene-conversion rates by using the number of sequence differences observed in identical-by-descent (IBD) segments together with a reconstructed model of recent population-size history. This approach is robust to, and can quantify, the presence of substantial genotyping error, as validated in coalescent simulations. We applied the method to 498 trio-phased sequenced Dutch individuals and inferred a point mutation rate of 1.66 × 10(-8) per base per generation and a rate of 1.26 × 10(-9) for conversion as 5.99 × 10(-6). We found that recombination does not have observable mutagenic effects after gene conversion is accounted for and that local gene-conversion rates reflect recombination rates. We detected a strong enrichment of recent deleterious variation among mismatching variants found within IBD regions and observed summary statistics of local sharing of IBD segments to closely match previously proposed metrics of background selection; however, we found no significant effects of selection on our mutation-rate estimates. We detected no evidence of strong variation of mutation rates in a number of genomic annotations obtained from several recent studies. Our analysis suggests that a mutation-rate estimate higher than that reported by recent pedigree-based studies should be adopted in the context of DNA-based demographic reconstruction.

  15. Novel Polymerase Gene Mutations for Human Adaptation in Clinical Isolates of Avian H5N1 Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuha; Kawashita, Norihito; Daidoji, Tomo; Ibrahim, Madiha S; El-Gendy, Emad M; Takagi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Nakaya, Takaaki; Shioda, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Yohei

    2016-04-01

    A major determinant in the change of the avian influenza virus host range to humans is the E627K substitution in the PB2 polymerase protein. However, the polymerase activity of avian influenza viruses with a single PB2-E627K mutation is still lower than that of seasonal human influenza viruses, implying that avian viruses require polymerase mutations in addition to PB2-627K for human adaptation. Here, we used a database search of H5N1 clade 2.2.1 virus sequences with the PB2-627K mutation to identify other polymerase adaptation mutations that have been selected in infected patients. Several of the mutations identified acted cooperatively with PB2-627K to increase viral growth in human airway epithelial cells and mouse lungs. These mutations were in multiple domains of the polymerase complex other than the PB2-627 domain, highlighting a complicated avian-to-human adaptation pathway of avian influenza viruses. Thus, H5N1 viruses could rapidly acquire multiple polymerase mutations that function cooperatively with PB2-627K in infected patients for optimal human adaptation.

  16. The Impact of Environmental and Endogenous Damage on Somatic Mutation Load in Human Skin Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Natalie; Chan, Kin; Grimm, Sara A.; Dai, Shuangshuang; Fargo, David C.; Kaufmann, William K.; Taylor, Jack A.; Lee, Eunjung; Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Park, Peter J.; Schurman, Shepherd H.; Malc, Ewa P.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of somatic changes, due to environmental and endogenous lesions, in the human genome is associated with aging and cancer. Understanding the impacts of these processes on mutagenesis is fundamental to understanding the etiology, and improving the prognosis and prevention of cancers and other genetic diseases. Previous methods relying on either the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, or sequencing of single-cell genomes were inherently error-prone and did not allow independent validation of the mutations. In the current study we eliminated these potential sources of error by high coverage genome sequencing of single-cell derived clonal fibroblast lineages, obtained after minimal propagation in culture, prepared from skin biopsies of two healthy adult humans. We report here accurate measurement of genome-wide magnitude and spectra of mutations accrued in skin fibroblasts of healthy adult humans. We found that every cell contains at least one chromosomal rearrangement and 600–13,000 base substitutions. The spectra and correlation of base substitutions with epigenomic features resemble many cancers. Moreover, because biopsies were taken from body parts differing by sun exposure, we can delineate the precise contributions of environmental and endogenous factors to the accrual of genetic changes within the same individual. We show here that UV-induced and endogenous DNA damage can have a comparable impact on the somatic mutation loads in skin fibroblasts. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01087307 PMID:27788131

  17. The Impact of Environmental and Endogenous Damage on Somatic Mutation Load in Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Saini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of somatic changes, due to environmental and endogenous lesions, in the human genome is associated with aging and cancer. Understanding the impacts of these processes on mutagenesis is fundamental to understanding the etiology, and improving the prognosis and prevention of cancers and other genetic diseases. Previous methods relying on either the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, or sequencing of single-cell genomes were inherently error-prone and did not allow independent validation of the mutations. In the current study we eliminated these potential sources of error by high coverage genome sequencing of single-cell derived clonal fibroblast lineages, obtained after minimal propagation in culture, prepared from skin biopsies of two healthy adult humans. We report here accurate measurement of genome-wide magnitude and spectra of mutations accrued in skin fibroblasts of healthy adult humans. We found that every cell contains at least one chromosomal rearrangement and 600–13,000 base substitutions. The spectra and correlation of base substitutions with epigenomic features resemble many cancers. Moreover, because biopsies were taken from body parts differing by sun exposure, we can delineate the precise contributions of environmental and endogenous factors to the accrual of genetic changes within the same individual. We show here that UV-induced and endogenous DNA damage can have a comparable impact on the somatic mutation loads in skin fibroblasts. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01087307.

  18. The Impact of Environmental and Endogenous Damage on Somatic Mutation Load in Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Natalie; Roberts, Steven A; Klimczak, Leszek J; Chan, Kin; Grimm, Sara A; Dai, Shuangshuang; Fargo, David C; Boyer, Jayne C; Kaufmann, William K; Taylor, Jack A; Lee, Eunjung; Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Park, Peter J; Schurman, Shepherd H; Malc, Ewa P; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Gordenin, Dmitry A

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of somatic changes, due to environmental and endogenous lesions, in the human genome is associated with aging and cancer. Understanding the impacts of these processes on mutagenesis is fundamental to understanding the etiology, and improving the prognosis and prevention of cancers and other genetic diseases. Previous methods relying on either the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, or sequencing of single-cell genomes were inherently error-prone and did not allow independent validation of the mutations. In the current study we eliminated these potential sources of error by high coverage genome sequencing of single-cell derived clonal fibroblast lineages, obtained after minimal propagation in culture, prepared from skin biopsies of two healthy adult humans. We report here accurate measurement of genome-wide magnitude and spectra of mutations accrued in skin fibroblasts of healthy adult humans. We found that every cell contains at least one chromosomal rearrangement and 600–13,000 base substitutions. The spectra and correlation of base substitutions with epigenomic features resemble many cancers. Moreover, because biopsies were taken from body parts differing by sun exposure, we can delineate the precise contributions of environmental and endogenous factors to the accrual of genetic changes within the same individual. We show here that UV-induced and endogenous DNA damage can have a comparable impact on the somatic mutation loads in skin fibroblasts. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01087307.

  19. Large-scale inference of the point mutational spectrum in human segmental duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rognes Torbjørn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent segmental duplications are relatively large (≥ 1 kb genomic regions of high sequence identity (≥ 90%. They cover approximately 4–5% of the human genome and play important roles in gene evolution and genomic disease. The DNA sequence differences between copies of a segmental duplication represent the result of various mutational events over time, since any two duplication copies originated from the same ancestral DNA sequence. Based on this fact, we have developed a computational scheme for inference of point mutational events in human segmental duplications, which we collectively term duplication-inferred mutations (DIMs. We have characterized these nucleotide substitutions by comparing them with high-quality SNPs from dbSNP, both in terms of sequence context and frequency of substitution types. Results Overall, DIMs show a lower ratio of transitions relative to transversions than SNPs, although this ratio approaches that of SNPs when considering DIMs within most recent duplications. Our findings indicate that DIMs and SNPs in general are caused by similar mutational mechanisms, with some deviances at the CpG dinucleotide. Furthermore, we discover a large number of reference SNPs that coincide with computationally inferred DIMs. The latter reflects how sequence variation in duplicated sequences can be misinterpreted as ordinary allelic variation. Conclusion In summary, we show how DNA sequence analysis of segmental duplications can provide a genome-wide mutational spectrum that mirrors recent genome evolution. The inferred set of nucleotide substitutions represents a valuable complement to SNPs for the analysis of genetic variation and point mutagenesis.

  20. TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus status of oral squamous cell carcinomas in young adult patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Rietbergen, M.M.; Buijze, M.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Bloemena, E.; Brakenhoff, R.H.; Leemans, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the molecular carcinogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in young adult patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus (HPV) status of OSCC in patients, younger than 45 years. Methods TP53 mutations w

  1. A novel LQT3 mutation implicates the human cardiac sodium channel domain IVS6 in inactivation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, WA; Bezzina, CR; van Tintelen, JP; Hoorntje, TM; Mannens, MMAM; Wilde, AAM; Jongsma, HJ; Rook, MB

    2003-01-01

    The Long QT3 syndrome is associated with mutations in the cardiac sodium channel gene SCN5A. Objective: The aim of the present study was the identification and functional characterization of a mutation in a family with the long QT3 syndrome. Methods: The human cardiac sodium channel gene SCN5A was s

  2. Isolation of human Leydig cell mesenchymal precursors from patients with the androgen insensitivity syndrome: testosterone production and response to human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemes, H; Cigorraga, S; Bergadá, C; Schteingart, H; Rey, R; Pellizzari, E

    1992-05-01

    Mature Leydig cells, the main source of testicular testosterone in mammals, arise from immature mesenchymal precursors through an LH-dependent differentiation process. In order to study the steroidogenic potential of these precursors, undifferentiated mesenchymal cells were obtained from the testicular interstitium of two patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. After double digestion with collagenase and separation of the suspensions in a Percoll density gradient, the cells were cultured in Ham's F12 medium: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (1:1) supplemented with antibiotics, transferrin, insulin, hydrocortisone, and vitamin E with or without 1 IU of hCG/ml. At 11 days in culture, samples were removed for morphological characterization and determination of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity (3 beta-HSD). Testosterone concentration was determined by RIA in the culture medium at different intervals. Cultured cells were mesenchymal in appearance, elongated in shape, with numerous processes running in different directions. No mature Leydig cells were present. In basal conditions, the percentages of 3 beta-HSD-positive cells at 11 days on patients 1 and 2 were 33% and 28%, respectively, and the testosterone concentrations in the culture media were 4.8 and 8.4 ng.10(6) cells.24 h, respectively. In cultures stimulated with hCG, there was an increase of histochemical reactivity (47% and 42% in patients 1 and 2, respectively) and in the amount of testosterone secreted (10.2 and 12.0 ng.10(6) cells, respectively). Electron microscopic studies of cultures grown in the absence of hCG demonstrated a homogenous population of poorly differentiated, fibroblastic-type mesenchymal cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Exome-wide Mutation Profile in Benzo[a]pyrene-derived Post-stasis and Immortal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severson, Paul L.; Vrba, Lukas; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations are known to drive cancer progression and certain tumors have mutation signatures that reflect exposures to environmental carcinogens. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) has a known mutation signature and has proven capable of inducing changes to DNA sequence that drives normal pre-stasis human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) past a first tumor suppressor barrier (stasis) and towards immortality. We analyzed normal, pre-stasis HMEC, three independent BaP-derived post-stasis HMEC strains (184Aa, 184Be, 184Ce) and two of their immortal derivatives(184A1 and 184BE1) by whole exome sequencing. The independent post-stasis strains exhibited between 93 and 233 BaP-induced mutations in exons. Seventy percent of the mutations were C:G>A:T transversions, consistent with the known mutation spectrum of BaP. Mutations predicted to impact protein function occurred in several known and putative cancer drivers including p16, PLCG1, MED12, TAF1 in 184Aa; PIK3CG, HSP90AB1, WHSC1L1, LCP1 in 184Be and FANCA, LPP in 184Ce. Biological processes that typically harbor cancer driver mutations such as cell cycle, regulation of cell death and proliferation, RNA processing, chromatin modification and DNA repair were found to have mutations predicted to impact function in each of the post-stasis strains. Spontaneously immortalized HMEC lines derived from two of the BaP-derived post-stasis strains shared greater than 95% of their BaP-induced mutations with their precursor cells. These immortal HMEC had 10 or fewer additional point mutations relative to their post-stasis precursors, but acquired chromosomal anomalies during immortalization that arose independent of BaP. The results of this study indicate that acute exposures of HMEC to high dose BaP recapitulate mutation patterns of human tumors and can induce mutations in a number of cancer driver genes. PMID:25435355

  4. Labda-8(17),12,14-trien-19-oic acid contained in fruits of Cupressus sempervirens suppresses benign prostatic hyperplasia in rat and in vitro human models through inhibition of androgen and STAT-3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Vishal; Kumar, Rajeev; Khan, Mohammad F; Singh, Anil K; Sharma, Rolee; Arya, Kamal R; Maikhuri, J P; Dalela, Diwakar; Maurya, Rakesh; Gupta, Gopal

    2014-08-01

    Fruit extract of Cupressus sempervirens (CS), which is used traditionally to treat Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)-like urinary symptoms in patients, was scientifically validated for anti-BPH activity. The ethanolic fruit extract of CS inhibited proliferation of human BPH-stromal cells and the activity was localized to its chloroform-soluble, diterpene-rich fraction. Eight major diterpenes isolated from this fraction exhibited moderate to potent activity and the most active diterpene (labda-8(17),12,14-trien-19-oic acid) exhibited an IC50 of 37.5 μM (antiproliferative activity against human BPH-stromal cells). It significantly inhibited activation (phosphorylation) of Stat-3 in BPH-stromal cells and prevented transactivation of androgen sensitive KLK3/PSA and TMPRSS2 genes in LNCaP cells. Labda-8(17),12,14-trien-19-oic acid-rich CS fraction prevented prostatic hyperplasia in rat model and caused TUNEL labeling of stromal cells with lower expressions of IGF-I, TGF-ß and PCNA, and bcl-2/bax ratio. Human BPH tissues exhibited precise lowering of stromal component after incubation in labda-8(17),12,14-trien-19-oic acid, ex vivo. We conclude that labda-8(17),12,14-trien-19-oic acid contained in CS exhibits anti-BPH activity through inhibition of stromal proliferation and suppression of androgen action in the prostate, presenting a unique lead structure for further optimization of anti-BPH activity.

  5. Antiandrogens Act as Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators at the Proteome Level in Prostate Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Greg N.; Gamble, Simon C.; Hough, Michael A.; Begum, Shajna; Dart, D. Alwyn; Odontiadis, Michael; Powell, Sue M.; Fioretti, Flavia M.; Bryan, Rosie A.; Waxman, Jonathan; Wait, Robin; Bevan, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for prostate cancer include antiandrogens, inhibitory ligands of the androgen receptor, which repress androgen-stimulated growth. These include the selective androgen receptor modulators cyproterone acetate and hydroxyflutamide and the complete antagonist bicalutamide. Their activity is partly dictated by the presence of androgen receptor mutations, which are commonly detected in patients who relapse while receiving antiandrogens, i.e. in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. To characterize the early proteomic response to these antiandrogens we used the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line, which harbors the androgen receptor mutation most commonly detected in castrate-resistant tumors (T877A), analyzing alterations in the proteome, and comparing these to the effect of these therapeutics upon androgen receptor activity and cell proliferation. The majority are regulated post-transcriptionally, possibly via nongenomic androgen receptor signaling. Differences detected between the exposure groups demonstrate subtle changes in the biological response to each specific ligand, suggesting a spectrum of agonistic and antagonistic effects dependent on the ligand used. Analysis of the crystal structures of the AR in the presence of cyproterone acetate, hydroxyflutamide, and DHT identified important differences in the orientation of key residues located in the AF-2 and BF-3 protein interaction surfaces. This further implies that although there is commonality in the growth responses between androgens and those antiandrogens that stimulate growth in the presence of a mutation, there may also be influential differences in the growth pathways stimulated by the different ligands. This therefore has implications for prostate cancer treatment because tumors may respond differently dependent upon which mutation is present and which ligand is activating growth, also for the design of selective androgen receptor modulators, which aim to elicit differential proteomic

  6. Antiandrogens act as selective androgen receptor modulators at the proteome level in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Greg N; Gamble, Simon C; Hough, Michael A; Begum, Shajna; Dart, D Alwyn; Odontiadis, Michael; Powell, Sue M; Fioretti, Flavia M; Bryan, Rosie A; Waxman, Jonathan; Wait, Robin; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2015-05-01

    Current therapies for prostate cancer include antiandrogens, inhibitory ligands of the androgen receptor, which repress androgen-stimulated growth. These include the selective androgen receptor modulators cyproterone acetate and hydroxyflutamide and the complete antagonist bicalutamide. Their activity is partly dictated by the presence of androgen receptor mutations, which are commonly detected in patients who relapse while receiving antiandrogens, i.e. in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. To characterize the early proteomic response to these antiandrogens we used the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line, which harbors the androgen receptor mutation most commonly detected in castrate-resistant tumors (T877A), analyzing alterations in the proteome, and comparing these to the effect of these therapeutics upon androgen receptor activity and cell proliferation. The majority are regulated post-transcriptionally, possibly via nongenomic androgen receptor signaling. Differences detected between the exposure groups demonstrate subtle changes in the biological response to each specific ligand, suggesting a spectrum of agonistic and antagonistic effects dependent on the ligand used. Analysis of the crystal structures of the AR in the presence of cyproterone acetate, hydroxyflutamide, and DHT identified important differences in the orientation of key residues located in the AF-2 and BF-3 protein interaction surfaces. This further implies that although there is commonality in the growth responses between androgens and those antiandrogens that stimulate growth in the presence of a mutation, there may also be influential differences in the growth pathways stimulated by the different ligands. This therefore has implications for prostate cancer treatment because tumors may respond differently dependent upon which mutation is present and which ligand is activating growth, also for the design of selective androgen receptor modulators, which aim to elicit differential proteomic

  7. Screening for exogenous androgen anabolic steroids in human hair by liquid chromatography/orbitrap-high resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strano-Rossi, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.stranorossi@rm.unicatt.it [Institute of Legal Medicine, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, L.go F. Vito, 1, 00168 Rome (Italy); Castrignanò, Erika; Anzillotti, Luca; Odoardi, Sara; De-Giorgio, Fabio [Institute of Legal Medicine, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, L.go F. Vito, 1, 00168 Rome (Italy); Bermejo, Ana [Institute of Legal Medicine, University of Santiago de Compostela, Av S. Francisco s/n, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pascali, Vincenzo L. [Institute of Legal Medicine, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, L.go F. Vito, 1, 00168 Rome (Italy)

    2013-09-02

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LC–HRMS screening method for the detection of a variety of anabolics in hair. •Detection of unmetabolized anabolic steroids and their esters in hair matrix by simple keratin pretreatment. •Identification of target compounds by retention time, accurate mass and isotopic cluster. •Quantitative determination of detected compounds. •Possibility to a retrospective re-analysis of the acquired datafile in case a further analyte is to be screened. -- Abstract: A method for the screening of various anabolic steroids and their esters in human hair, based on liquid-chromatography–high resolution mass spectrometry using an Exactive benchtop Orbitrap mass spectrometer, has been set up and validated. This method involved methanolic incubation of 30 mg of hair and analysis of the relevant extract in HPLC using a C18 column. The mass detector, with nominal resolving power of 100,000, operated in full scan mode in APCI under positive ionization mode. Analytes were identified by exact mass, correspondence of isotopic cluster and retention times. The limits of detection obtained varied from 10 to 50 pg mg{sup −1}, and limits of quantitation were 0.5 ng mg{sup −1} for all compounds. The method was linear for all analytes in the ranges from the LOQ to 6 ng mg{sup −1}, giving correlation coefficients >0.99 for all analytes. Also accuracy (intended as %E) and repeatability (%CV) were always lower than 15%. Specificity was assessed by analysing ten blank samples and fifteen samples from polidrug abusers. This method was applied to a real-life case, resulting in the identification of testosterone undecanoate in the hair of a suspect. The analyte identity was confirmed by the analysis of its in-source fragmentation and comparison to a certified standard. Thanks to the scan acquisition, this method also enables retrospective re-analysis of the acquired datafile in case a further analyte needs to be screened.

  8. One and the same androgen for all? towards designer androgens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LouisJGGooren; NhuThanhNguyen

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of designer oestrogens as a treatment medality in hormone replacement in women has invited to consider the concept of compounds with selective androgenic effects for male honnone replacement therapy. The full spectrum of the actions of testosterone may not be necessary of even undesired for certain indications for testosterone treatment, To define for what indications certain androgenic properties are desired and undesired more insight in basic androgen (patho)physiology is required. There is convincing evidence that aromatization of androgenic compounds to nestrogens might be an advantage for maintenance of bone mass and it might also mitigate negative effects of androgens on bichemical parameters of cardiovascular risks: the potentially negative effects of oestmgens on prostate pathology in ageing men needs further elucidation. While the role of dihydro-testosterone (DHT) for the male sexual differentiation and for pubertal sexual maturation is evident, its role in mature and ageing males seems less significant or may even be harmful. It is, however, of note that a negative effect of DHT on prostate pathophysiolog~ is certainly not proven.For male contraception a progestational agent with strong androgenic properties might be an asset. For most of the androgenic actions the critical levels of androgens are not well established. The latter is relevant since the large amount of androgen molecules required for its biological actions (as compared to oestrogens) is an impediment in androgen replacement medalities. There may be room for more biopotent androgens since delivery of large amounts of androgen molecules to the circulation poses problems fur treatment modalities. ( Asian J Andro11999 Jun; 1:21 -28)

  9. Mutation analysis of novel human liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Liao; Tsai-Ping Li; Mu-Jun Zhao; Jing Zhao; Hai Song; Pascal Pineau; Agnès Marchio; Anne Dejean; Pierre Tiollais; Hong-Yang Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To find the point mutations meaningful for inactivationof liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene (LPTS) gene,a human novel liver-related putative tumor suppressor geneand telomerase inhibitor in hepatocellular carcinoma.METHODS: The entire coding sequence of LPTS genewas examined for mutations by single strand conformationpolymorphism (SSCP) assay and PCR products directsequencing in 56 liver cancer cell lines, 7 ovarian cancerand 7 head & neck tumor cell lines and 70 pairs of HCCtissues samples. The cDNA fragment coding for the mostfrequent mutant protein was subcloned into GST fusionexpression vector. The product was expressed in E. coliand purified by glutathione-agarose column. Telomericrepeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays wereperformed to study the effect of point mutation totelomerase inhibitory activity.RESULTS: SSCP gels showed the abnormal shifting bandsand DNA sequencing found that there were 5 differentmutations and/or polymorphisms in 12 tumor cell lineslocated at exon2, exon5 and exon7. The main alterationswere A(778)A/G and A(880)T in exon7. The change in siteof 778 could not be found in HCC tissue samples, while themutation in position 880 was seen in 7 (10 %) cases. Themutation in the site of 880 had no effect on telomeraseinhibitory activity.CONCLUSION: Alterations identified in this study arepolymorphisms of LPTS gene. LPTS mutations occur in HCCbut are infrequent and of little effect on the telomeraseinhibitory function of the protein. Epigenetics, such asmethylation, acetylation, may play the key role in inactivationof LPTS.

  10. Seven mutations in the human insulin gene linked to permanent neonatal/infancy-onset diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Carlo; Porzio, Ottavia; Liu, Ming; Massa, Ornella; Vasta, Mario; Salardi, Silvana; Beccaria, Luciano; Monciotti, Carla; Toni, Sonia; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Federici, Luca; Pesavento, Roberta; Cadario, Francesco; Federici, Giorgio; Ghirri, Paolo; Arvan, Peter; Iafusco, Dario; Barbetti, Fabrizio

    2008-06-01

    Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) is a rare disorder usually presenting within 6 months of birth. Although several genes have been linked to this disorder, in almost half the cases documented in Italy, the genetic cause remains unknown. Because the Akita mouse bearing a mutation in the Ins2 gene exhibits PNDM associated with pancreatic beta cell apoptosis, we sequenced the human insulin gene in PNDM subjects with unidentified mutations. We discovered 7 heterozygous mutations in 10 unrelated probands. In 8 of these patients, insulin secretion was detectable at diabetes onset, but rapidly declined over time. When these mutant proinsulins were expressed in HEK293 cells, we observed defects in insulin protein folding and secretion. In these experiments, expression of the mutant proinsulins was also associated with increased Grp78 protein expression and XBP1 mRNA splicing, 2 markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress, and with increased apoptosis. Similarly transfected INS-1E insulinoma cells had diminished viability compared with those expressing WT proinsulin. In conclusion, we find that mutations in the insulin gene that promote proinsulin misfolding may cause PNDM.

  11. Human TUBB3 mutations perturb microtubule dynamics, kinesin interactions, and axon guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischfield, Max A.; Baris, Hagit N.; Wu, Chen; Rudolph, Guenther; Van Maldergem, Lionel; He, Wei; Chan, Wai-Man; Andrews, Caroline; Demer, Joseph L.; Robertson, Richard L.; Mackey, David A.; Ruddle, Jonathan B.; Bird, Thomas D.; Gottlob, Irene; Pieh, Christina; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Hunter, David G.; Soul, Janet S.; Newlin, Anna; Sabol, Louise J.; Doherty, Edward J.; de Uzcátegui, Clara E.; de Uzcátegui, Nicolas; Collins, Mary Louise Z.; Sener, Emin C.; Wabbels, Bettina; Hellebrand, Heide; Meitinger, Thomas; de Berardinis, Teresa; Magli, Adriano; Schiavi, Costantino; Pastore-Trossello, Marco; Koc, Feray; Wong, Agnes M.; Levin, Alex V.; Geraghty, Michael T.; Descartes, Maria; Flaherty, Maree; Jamieson, Robyn V.; Møller, H. U.; Meuthen, Ingo; Callen, David F.; Kerwin, Janet; Lindsay, Susan; Meindl, Alfons; Gupta, Mohan L.; Pellman, David; Engle, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    We report that eight heterozygous missense mutations in TUBB3, encoding the neuron-specific β-tubulin isotype III, result in a spectrum of human nervous system disorders we now call the TUBB3 syndromes. Each mutation causes the ocular motility disorder CFEOM3, whereas some also result in intellectual and behavioral impairments, facial paralysis, and/or later-onset axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Neuroimaging reveals a spectrum of abnormalities including hypoplasia of oculomotor nerves, and dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, anterior commissure, and corticospinal tracts. A knock-in disease mouse model reveals axon guidance defects without evidence of cortical cell migration abnormalities. We show the disease-associated mutations can impair tubulin heterodimer formation in vitro, although folded mutant heterodimers can still polymerize into microtubules. Modeling each mutation in yeast tubulin demonstrates that all alter dynamic instability whereas a subset disrupts the interaction of microtubules with kinesin motors. These findings demonstrate normal TUBB3 is required for axon guidance and maintenance in mammals. PMID:20074521

  12. Comparison of mitochondrial mutation spectra in ageing human colonic epithelium and disease: absence of evidence for purifying selection in somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greaves, L.C.; Elson, J.L.; Nooteboom, M.; Grady, J.P.; Taylor, G.A.; Taylor, R.W.; Mathers, J.C.; Kirkwood, T.B.; Turnbull, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Human ageing has been predicted to be caused by the accumulation of molecular damage in cells and tissues. Somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been documented in a number of ageing tissues and have been shown to be associated with cellular mitochondrial dysfunction. It is unknown whethe

  13. Identification of FGFR4-activating mutations in human rhabdomyosarcomas that promote metastasis in xenotransplanted models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James G; Cheuk, Adam T; Tsang, Patricia S; Chung, Joon-Yong; Song, Young K; Desai, Krupa; Yu, Yanlin; Chen, Qing-Rong; Shah, Kushal; Youngblood, Victoria; Fang, Jun; Kim, Su Young; Yeung, Choh; Helman, Lee J; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Ngo, Vu; Staudt, Louis M; Wei, Jun S; Khanna, Chand; Catchpoole, Daniel; Qualman, Stephen J; Hewitt, Stephen M; Merlino, Glenn; Chanock, Stephen J; Khan, Javed

    2009-11-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a childhood cancer originating from skeletal muscle, and patient survival is poor in the presence of metastatic disease. Few determinants that regulate metastasis development have been identified. The receptor tyrosine kinase FGFR4 is highly expressed in RMS tissue, suggesting a role in tumorigenesis, although its functional importance has not been defined. Here, we report the identification of mutations in FGFR4 in human RMS tumors that lead to its activation and present evidence that it functions as an oncogene in RMS. Higher FGFR4 expression in RMS tumors was associated with advanced-stage cancer and poor survival, while FGFR4 knockdown in a human RMS cell line reduced tumor growth and experimental lung metastases when the cells were transplanted into mice. Moreover, 6 FGFR4 tyrosine kinase domain mutations were found among 7 of 94 (7.5%) primary human RMS tumors. The mutants K535 and E550 increased autophosphorylation, Stat3 signaling, tumor proliferation, and metastatic potential when expressed in a murine RMS cell line. These mutants also transformed NIH 3T3 cells and led to an enhanced metastatic phenotype. Finally, murine RMS cell lines expressing the K535 and E550 FGFR4 mutants were substantially more susceptible to apoptosis in the presence of a pharmacologic FGFR inhibitor than the control cell lines expressing the empty vector or wild-type FGFR4. Together, our results demonstrate that mutationally activated FGFR4 acts as an oncogene, and these are what we believe to be the first known mutations in a receptor tyrosine kinase in RMS. These findings support the potential therapeutic targeting of FGFR4 in RMS.

  14. Androgen receptor and histone lysine demethylases in ovine placenta.

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    Ellane R Cleys

    Full Text Available Sex steroid hormones regulate developmental programming in many tissues, including programming gene expression during prenatal development. While estradiol is known to regulate placentation, little is known about the role of testosterone and androgen signaling in placental development despite the fact that testosterone rises in maternal circulation during pregnancy and in placenta-induced pregnancy disorders. We investigated the role of testosterone in placental gene expression, and focused on androgen receptor (AR. Prenatal androgenization decreased global DNA methylation in gestational day 90 placentomes, and increased placental expression of AR as well as genes involved in epigenetic regulation, angiogenesis, and growth. As AR complexes with histone lysine demethylases (KDMs to regulate AR target genes in human cancers, we also investigated if the same mechanism is present in the ovine placenta. AR co-immunoprecipitated with KDM1A and KDM4D in sheep placentomes, and AR-KDM1A complexes were recruited to a half-site for androgen response element (ARE in the promoter region of VEGFA. Androgenized ewes also had increased cotyledonary VEGFA. Finally, in human first trimester placental samples KDM1A and KDM4D immunolocalized to the syncytiotrophoblast, with nuclear KDM1A and KDM4D immunostaining also present in the villous stroma. In conclusion, placental androgen signaling, possibly through AR-KDM complex recruitment to AREs, regulates placental VEGFA expression. AR and KDMs are also present in first trimester human placenta. Androgens appear to be an important regulator of trophoblast differentiation and placental development, and aberrant androgen signaling may contribute to the development of placental disorders.

  15. Papillorenal syndrome-causing missense mutations in PAX2/Pax2 result in hypomorphic alleles in mouse and human.

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    Ramakrishna P Alur

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Papillorenal syndrome (PRS, also known as renal-coloboma syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by potentially-blinding congenital optic nerve excavation and congenital kidney abnormalities. Many patients with PRS have mutations in the paired box transcription factor gene, PAX2. Although most mutations in PAX2 are predicted to result in complete loss of one allele's function, three missense mutations have been reported, raising the possibility that more subtle alterations in PAX2 function may be disease-causing. To date, the molecular behaviors of these mutations have not been explored. We describe a novel mouse model of PRS due to a missense mutation in a highly-conserved threonine residue in the paired domain of Pax2 (p.T74A that recapitulates the ocular and kidney findings of patients. This mutation is in the Pax2 paired domain at the same location as two human missense mutations. We show that all three missense mutations disrupt potentially critical hydrogen bonds in atomic models and result in reduced Pax2 transactivation, but do not affect nuclear localization, steady state mRNA levels, or the ability of Pax2 to bind its DNA consensus sequence. Moreover, these mutations show reduced steady-state levels of Pax2 protein in vitro and (for p.T74A in vivo, likely by reducing protein stability. These results suggest that hypomorphic alleles of PAX2/Pax2 can lead to significant disease in humans and mice.

  16. Metabolic syndrome, androgens, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with increases in androgen levels. In men, reductions in androgen levels are associated with inflammation, and androgen supplements reduce inflammation. In women, increases in androgens are associated with increases in inflammatory cytokines, and reducing androgens reduces inflammation. This review discusses the possibility that the effects of androgens on metabolic syndrome and its sequelae may differ between males and females.

  17. Mutations in CERS3 cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans.

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    Franz P W Radner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI is a rare genetic disorder of the skin characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body. In this study we report four patients from three consanguineous Tunisian families with skin, eye, heart, and skeletal anomalies, who harbor a homozygous contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 15q26.3. Genome-wide SNP-genotyping revealed a homozygous region in all affected individuals, including the same microdeletion that partially affects two coding genes (ADAMTS17, CERS3 and abolishes a sequence for a long non-coding RNA (FLJ42289. Whereas mutations in ADAMTS17 have recently been identified in autosomal recessive Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome in humans and dogs presenting with ophthalmologic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities, no disease associations have been described for CERS3 (ceramide synthase 3 and FLJ42289 so far. However, analysis of additional patients with non-syndromic ARCI revealed a splice site mutation in CERS3 indicating that a defect in ceramide synthesis is causative for the present skin phenotype of our patients. Functional analysis of patient skin and in vitro differentiated keratinocytes demonstrated that mutations in CERS3 lead to a disturbed sphingolipid profile with reduced levels of epidermis-specific very long-chain ceramides that interferes with epidermal differentiation. Taken together, these data present a novel pathway involved in ARCI development and, moreover, provide the first evidence that CERS3 plays an essential role in human sphingolipid metabolism for the maintenance of epidermal lipid homeostasis.

  18. Mutations in CERS3 cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans.

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    Franz P W Radner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI is a rare genetic disorder of the skin characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body. In this study we report four patients from three consanguineous Tunisian families with skin, eye, heart, and skeletal anomalies, who harbor a homozygous contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 15q26.3. Genome-wide SNP-genotyping revealed a homozygous region in all affected individuals, including the same microdeletion that partially affects two coding genes (ADAMTS17, CERS3 and abolishes a sequence for a long non-coding RNA (FLJ42289. Whereas mutations in ADAMTS17 have recently been identified in autosomal recessive Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome in humans and dogs presenting with ophthalmologic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities, no disease associations have been described for CERS3 (ceramide synthase 3 and FLJ42289 so far. However, analysis of additional patients with non-syndromic ARCI revealed a splice site mutation in CERS3 indicating that a defect in ceramide synthesis is causative for the present skin phenotype of our patients. Functional analysis of patient skin and in vitro differentiated keratinocytes demonstrated that mutations in CERS3 lead to a disturbed sphingolipid profile with reduced levels of epidermis-specific very long-chain ceramides that interferes with epidermal differentiation. Taken together, these data present a novel pathway involved in ARCI development and, moreover, provide the first evidence that CERS3 plays an essential role in human sphingolipid metabolism for the maintenance of epidermal lipid homeostasis.

  19. Mutations Associated with Functional Disorder of Xanthine Oxidoreductase and Hereditary Xanthinuria in Humans

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    Takeshi Nishino

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR catalyzes the conversion of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid with concomitant reduction of either NAD+ or O2. The enzyme is a target of drugs to treat hyperuricemia, gout and reactive oxygen-related diseases. Human diseases associated with genetically determined dysfunction of XOR are termed xanthinuria, because of the excretion of xanthine in urine. Xanthinuria is classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Type I xanthinuria involves XOR deficiency due to genetic defect of XOR, whereas type II xanthinuria involves dual deficiency of XOR and aldehyde oxidase (AO, a molybdoflavo enzyme similar to XOR due to genetic defect in the molybdenum cofactor sulfurase. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency is associated with triple deficiency of XOR, AO and sulfite oxidase, due to defective synthesis of molybdopterin, which is a precursor of molybdenum cofactor for all three enzymes. The present review focuses on mutation or chemical modification studies of mammalian XOR, as well as on XOR mutations identified in humans, aimed at understanding the reaction mechanism of XOR and the relevance of mutated XORs as models to estimate the possible side effects of clinical application of XOR inhibitors.

  20. Grape seed extract induces anoikis and caspase-mediated apoptosis in human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells: possible role of ataxia telangiectasia mutated-p53 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manjinder; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2006-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cancer diagnosed in elderly males in the Western world. Epidemiologic studies suggest that dietary modifications could be an effective approach in reducing various cancers, including prostate cancer, and accordingly cancer-preventive efficacy of dietary nutrients has gained increased attention in recent years. We have recently shown that grape seed extract (GSE) inhibits growth and induces apoptotic death of advanced human prostate cancer DU145 cells in culture and xenograft. Because prostate cancer is initially an androgen-dependent malignancy, here we used LNCaP human prostate cancer cells as a model to assess GSE efficacy and associated mechanisms. GSE treatment of cells led to their detachment within 12 hours, as occurs in anoikis, and caused a significant decrease in live cells mostly due to their apoptotic death. GSE-induced anoikis and apoptosis were accompanied by a strong decrease in focal adhesion kinase levels, but an increase in caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage; however, GSE caused both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis as evidenced by cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor release into cytosol. Additional studies revealed that GSE causes DNA damage-induced activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase and Chk2, as well as p53 Ser(15) phosphorylation and its translocation to mitochondria, suggesting this to be an additional mechanism for apoptosis induction. GSE-induced apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, and cell death were attenuated by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine and involved reactive oxygen species generation. Together, these results show GSE effects in LNCaP cells and suggest additional in vivo efficacy studies in prostate cancer animal models.

  1. Can a few non-coding mutations make a human brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Lucía F; Pollard, Katherine S

    2015-10-01

    The recent finding that the human version of a neurodevelopmental enhancer of the Wnt receptor Frizzled 8 (FZD8) gene alters neural progenitor cell cycle timing and brain size is a step forward to understanding human brain evolution. The human brain is distinctive in terms of its cognitive abilities as well as its susceptibility to neurological disease. Identifying which of the millions of genomic changes that occurred during human evolution led to these and other uniquely human traits is extremely challenging. Recent studies have demonstrated that many of the fastest evolving regions of the human genome function as gene regulatory enhancers during embryonic development and that the human-specific mutations in them might alter expression patterns. However, elucidating molecular and cellular effects of sequence or expression pattern changes is a major obstacle to discovering the genetic bases of the evolution of our species. There is much work to do before human-specific genetic and genomic changes are linked to complex human traits. © 2015 The Authors. BioEssays Published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  2. ANDROGEN INSENSITIVITY SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Kanan; Sonali

    2014-01-01

    The condition is inherited as X - linked recessive gene 1 . The underlying pathology is the inability of end organs to respond to androgens. These cases are phenotypically and psychologically female with adequate breast development , normal external genitalia , a vagina with variable depth , absent /sparse pubic hair and axillary hair. The exact incidence in India is not known but the reported incidence is 1 in 2 , 000 to 1 in 62 ,400 worldwi...

  3. Novel Mutations in the Transcriptional Activator Domain of the Human TBX20 in Patients with Atrial Septal Defect

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    Irma Eloisa Monroy-Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The relevance of TBX20 gene in heart development has been demonstrated in many animal models, but there are few works that try to elucidate the effect of TBX20 mutations in human congenital heart diseases. In these studies, all missense mutations associated with atrial septal defect (ASD were found in the DNA-binding T-box domain, none in the transcriptional activator domain. Methods. We search for TBX20 mutations in a group of patients with ASD or ventricular septal defect (VSD using the High Resolution Melting (HRM method and DNA sequencing. Results. We report three missense mutations (Y309D, T370O, and M395R within the transcriptional activator domain of human TBX20 that were associated with ASD. Conclusions. This is the first association of TBX20 transcriptional activator domain missense mutations with ASD. These findings could have implications for diagnosis, genetic screening, and patient follow-up.

  4. Mutation rates of TGFBR2 and ACVR2 coding microsatellites in human cells with defective DNA mismatch repair.

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    Heekyung Chung

    Full Text Available Microsatellite instability promotes colonic tumorigenesis through generating frameshift mutations at coding microsatellites of tumor suppressor genes, such as TGFBR2 and ACVR2. As a consequence, signaling through these TGFbeta family receptors is abrogated in DNA Mismatch repair (MMR-deficient tumors. How these mutations occur in real time and mutational rates of these human coding sequences have not previously been studied. We utilized cell lines with different MMR deficiencies (hMLH1-/-, hMSH6-/-, hMSH3-/-, and MMR-proficient to determine mutation rates. Plasmids were constructed in which exon 3 of TGFBR2 and exon 10 of ACVR2 were cloned +1 bp out of frame, immediately after the translation initiation codon of an enhanced GFP (EGFP gene, allowing a -1 bp frameshift mutation to drive EGFP expression. Mutation-resistant plasmids were constructed by interrupting the coding microsatellite sequences, preventing frameshift mutation. Stable cell lines were established containing portions of TGFBR2 and ACVR2, and nonfluorescent cells were sorted, cultured for 7-35 days, and harvested for flow cytometric mutation detection and DNA sequencing at specific time points. DNA sequencing revealed a -1 bp frameshift mutation (A9 in TGFBR2 and A7 in ACVR2 in the fluorescent cells. Two distinct fluorescent populations, M1 (dim, representing heteroduplexes and M2 (bright, representing full mutants were identified, with the M2 fraction accumulating over time. hMLH1 deficiency revealed 11 (5.91 x 10(-4 and 15 (2.18 x 10(-4 times higher mutation rates for the TGFBR2 and ACVR2 microsatellites compared to hMSH6 deficiency, respectively. The mutation rate of the TGFBR2 microsatellite was approximately 3 times higher in both hMLH1 and hMSH6 deficiencies than the ACVR2 microsatellite. The -1 bp frameshift mutation rates of TGFBR2 and ACVR2 microsatellite sequences are dependent upon the human MMR background.

  5. Screening for mutations in human alpha-globin genes by nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism

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    Jorge S.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Point mutations and small insertions or deletions in the human alpha-globin genes may produce alpha-chain structural variants and alpha-thalassemia. Mutations can be detected either by direct DNA sequencing or by screening methods, which select the mutated exon for sequencing. Although small (about 1 kb, 3 exons and 2 introns, the alpha-globin genes are duplicate (alpha2 and alpha1 and highy G-C rich, which makes them difficult to denature, reducing sequencing efficiency and causing frequent artifacts. We modified some conditions for PCR and electrophoresis in order to detect mutations in these genes employing nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP. Primers previously described by other authors for radioactive SSCP and phast-SSCP plus denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were here combined and the resultant fragments (6 new besides 6 original per alpha-gene submitted to silver staining SSCP. Nine structural and one thalassemic mutations were tested, under different conditions including two electrophoretic apparatus (PhastSystem(TM and GenePhor(TM, Amersham Biosciences, different polyacrylamide gel concentrations, run temperatures and denaturing agents, and entire and restriction enzyme cut fragments. One hundred percent of sensitivity was achieved with four of the new fragments formed, using the PhastSystem(TM and 20% gels at 15ºC, without the need of restriction enzymes. This nonradioactive PCR-SSCP approach showed to be simple, rapid and sensitive, reducing the costs involved in frequent sequencing repetitions and increasing the reliability of the results. It can be especially useful for laboratories which do not have an automated sequencer.

  6. Signs of positive selection of somatic mutations in human cancers detected by EST sequence analysis

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    Rogozin Igor B

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinogenesis typically involves multiple somatic mutations in caretaker (DNA repair and gatekeeper (tumor suppressors and oncogenes genes. Analysis of mutation spectra of the tumor suppressor that is most commonly mutated in human cancers, p53, unexpectedly suggested that somatic evolution of the p53 gene during tumorigenesis is dominated by positive selection for gain of function. This conclusion is supported by accumulating experimental evidence of evolution of new functions of p53 in tumors. These findings prompted a genome-wide analysis of possible positive selection during tumor evolution. Methods A comprehensive analysis of probable somatic mutations in the sequences of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs from malignant tumors and normal tissues was performed in order to access the prevalence of positive selection in cancer evolution. For each EST, the numbers of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions were calculated. In order to identify genes with a signature of positive selection in cancers, these numbers were compared to: i expected numbers and ii the numbers for the respective genes in the ESTs from normal tissues. Results We identified 112 genes with a signature of positive selection in cancers, i.e., a significantly elevated ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions, in tumors as compared to 37 such genes in an approximately equal-sized EST collection from normal tissues. A substantial fraction of the tumor-specific positive-selection candidates have experimentally demonstrated or strongly predicted links to cancer. Conclusion The results of EST analysis should be interpreted with extreme caution given the noise introduced by sequencing errors and undetected polymorphisms. Furthermore, an inherent limitation of EST analysis is that multiple mutations amenable to statistical analysis can be detected only in relatively highly expressed genes. Nevertheless, the present results suggest that positive

  7. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

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    Tančić-Gajić Milina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS belongs to disorders of sex development, resulting from complete or partial resistance to the biological actions of androgens in persons who are genetically males (XY with normally developed testes and age-appropriate for males of serum testosterone concentration. Case Outline. A 21-year-old female patient was admitted at our Clinic further evaluation and treatment of testicular feminization syndrome, which was diagnosed at the age of 16 years. The patient had never menstruated. On physical examination, her external genitalia and breast development appeared as completely normal feminine structures but pubic and axillary hair was absent. Cytogenetic analysis showed a 46 XY karyotype. The values of sex hormones were as in adult males. The multisliced computed tomography (MSCT showed structures on both sides of the pelvic region, suggestive of testes. Bilateral orchiectomy was performed. Hormone replacement therapy was prescribed after gonadectomy. Vaginal dilatation was advised to avoid dyspareunia. Conclusion. The diagnosis of complete androgen insensitivity is based on clinical findigs, hormonal analysis karyotype, visualization methods and genetic analysis. Bilateral gonadectomy is generally recommended in early adulthood to avoid the risk of testicular malignancy. Vaginal length may be short requiring dilatation in an effort to avoid dyspareunia. Vaginal surgery is rarely indicated for the creation of a functional vagina. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175067

  8. Waardenburg syndrome type 2 caused by mutations in the human microphthalmia (MITF) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassabehji, M; Newton, V E; Read, A P

    1994-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) is a dominantly inherited syndrome of hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances. We recently mapped a WS2 gene to chromosome 3p12.3-p14.1 and proposed as a candidate gene MITF, the human homologue of the mouse microphthalmia (mi) gene. This encodes a putative basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor expressed in adult skin and in embryonic retina, otic vesicle and hair follicles. Mice carrying mi mutations show reduced pigmentation of the eyes and coat, and with some alleles, microphthalmia, hearing loss, osteopetrosis and mast cell defects. Here we show that affected individuals in two WS2 families have mutations affecting splice sites in the MITF gene.

  9. AZD3514, an oral selective androgen receptor down-regulator in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer - Results of two parallel first-in-human phase I studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omlin, A.; Jones, R. J.; Van Der Noll, R.; Satoh, T.; Niwakawa, M.; Smith, S. A.; Graham, J.; Ong, M.; Finkelman, R. D.; Schellens, J. H M; Zivi, A.; Crespo, M.; Riisnaes, R.; Nava-Rodrigues, D.; Malone, M. D.; Dive, C.; Sloane, R.; Moore, D.; Alumkal, J. J.; Dymond, A.; Dickinson, P. A.; Ranson, M.; Clack, G.; De Bono, J.; Elliott, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: AZD3514 is a first-in-class, orally bio-available, androgen-dependent and -independent androgen receptor inhibitor and selective androgen-receptor down-regulator (SARD). Methods: In study 1 and 2, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients (pts) were initially recruited into a

  10. Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii) did not affect cell viability despite increased androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen gene expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, P; Cardenas, H; Orihuela, P A

    2016-10-01

    We examined whether aqueous extract of Lepidium meyenii (red Maca) could inhibit growth, potentiate apoptotic activity of two anticancer drugs Taxol and 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) or change mRNA expression for the androgen target genes, androgen receptor (Ar) and prostate-specific antigen (Psa) in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Red Maca aqueous extract at 0, 10, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml was added to LNCaP cells, and viability was evaluated by the MTS assay at 24 or 48 hr after treatment. Furthermore, LNCaP cells were treated with 80 μg/ml of red Maca plus Taxol or 2ME 5 μM and viability was assessed 48 hr later. Finally, LNCaP cells were treated with red Maca 0, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml, and 12 hr later, mRNA level for Ar or Psa was assessed by real-time PCR. Treatment with red Maca did not affect viability of LNCaP cells. Apoptotic activity induced by Taxol and 2ME in LNCaP cells was not altered with red Maca treatment. Relative expression of the mRNA for Ar and Psa increased with red Maca 20 and 40 μg/ml, but not at 80 μg/ml. We conclude that red Maca aqueous extract does not have toxic effects, but stimulates androgen signalling in LNCaP cells.

  11. Major enzymes controlling the androgenic pressure in the developing lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Yves; Provost, Pierre R

    2013-09-01

    A sex difference is observed in the incidence and morbidity of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) of the neonate and in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The involvement of androgens is well evidenced in RDS and it is suspected in BPD. Interestingly, the developing lung is not an inert tissue just exposed to circulating androgens, but is rather an active androgen metabolizing tissue, expressing enzymes involved in both androgen synthesis and inactivation. The present review focuses on the major enzymes involved in androgen metabolism within the developing lung. Testosterone synthesis and inactivation by AKR1C3/Akr1c6 (human/mouse 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) type 5) and HSD17B2 (17β-HSD type 2), respectively, play an important role in the developing lung. Akr1c14 (3α-HSD) shows a strong increase in expression according to developmental time. The canalicular stage of lung development corresponding to the surge of surfactant lipid synthesis, which is linked to RDS, as well as saccularization/alveolarization, which are linked to BPD, are covered by this review for the mouse and human species. The androgen metabolizing enzymes expressed within the developing lung can become potential pharmaceutical targets in the objective of accelerating lung maturation by specific treatments. The classic deleterious effects of androgens on lung maturation and the surge of surfactant synthesis in males are well known. Conversely, androgens also have positive impacts on the development of both male and female lungs. Steroidogenic enzymes are key regulators of these positive effects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'CSR 2013'.

  12. Mutations in the human melanocortin-4 receptor gene associated with severe familial obesity disrupts receptor function through multiple molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Giles S H; Lank, Emma J; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Keogh, Julia; Challis, Benjamin G; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    Mutations in the melanocortin-4 receptor gene (MC4R) represent the commonest monogenic cause of human obesity. However, information regarding the precise effects of such mutations on receptor function is very limited. We examined the functional properties of 12 different mutations in human MC4R that result in severe, familial, early-onset obesity. Of the nine missense mutants studied, four were completely unable to generate cAMP in response to ligand and five were partially impaired. Four showed evidence of impaired cell surface expression and six of reduced binding affinity for ligand. One mutation in the C-terminal tail, I316S, showed reduced affinity for alpha-MSH but retained normal affinity for the antagonist AgRP. None of the mutations inhibited signaling through co-transfected wild-type receptors. Thus, in the most comprehensive study to date of the functional properties of naturally occurring MC4R mutations we have (1) established that defective expression on the cell surface is a common mechanism impairing receptor function, (2) identified mutations which specifically affect ligand binding affinity thus aiding the definition of receptor structure-function relationships, (3) provided evidence against the notion that these receptor mutants act as dominant-negatives, and (4) identified a potentially novel molecular mechanism of receptor dysfunction whereby a mutation alters the relative affinities of a receptor for its natural agonist versus antagonist.

  13. Cross-comparison of the genome sequences from human, chimpanzee, Neanderthal and a Denisovan hominin identifies novel potentially compensated mutations

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    Zhang Guojie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The recent publication of the draft genome sequences of the Neanderthal and a ~50,000-year-old archaic hominin from Denisova Cave in southern Siberia has ushered in a new age in molecular archaeology. We previously cross-compared the human, chimpanzee and Neanderthal genome sequences with respect to a set of disease-causing/disease-associated missense and regulatory mutations (Human Gene Mutation Database and succeeded in identifying genetic variants which, although apparently pathogenic in humans, may represent a 'compensated' wild-type state in at least one of the other two species. Here, in an attempt to identify further 'potentially compensated mutations' (PCMs of interest, we have compared our dataset of disease-causing/disease-associated mutations with their corresponding nucleotide positions in the Denisovan hominin, Neanderthal and chimpanzee genomes. Of the 15 human putatively disease-causing mutations that were found to be compensated in chimpanzee, Denisovan or Neanderthal, only a solitary F5 variant (Val1736Met was specific to the Denisovan. In humans, this missense mutation is associated with activated protein C resistance and an increased risk of thromboembolism and recurrent miscarriage. It is unclear at this juncture whether this variant was indeed a PCM in the Denisovan or whether it could instead have been associated with disease in this ancient hominin.

  14. Cross-comparison of the genome sequences from human, chimpanzee, Neanderthal and a Denisovan hominin identifies novel potentially compensated mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojie; Pei, Zhang; Ball, Edward V; Mort, Matthew; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Cooper, David N

    2011-07-01

    The recent publication of the draft genome sequences of the Neanderthal and a ∼50,000-year-old archaic hominin from Denisova Cave in southern Siberia has ushered in a new age in molecular archaeology. We previously cross-compared the human, chimpanzee and Neanderthal genome sequences with respect to a set of disease-causing/disease-associated missense and regulatory mutations (Human Gene Mutation Database) and succeeded in identifying genetic variants which, although apparently pathogenic in humans, may represent a 'compensated' wild-type state in at least one of the other two species. Here, in an attempt to identify further 'potentially compensated mutations' (PCMs) of interest, we have compared our dataset of disease-causing/disease-associated mutations with their corresponding nucleotide positions in the Denisovan hominin, Neanderthal and chimpanzee genomes. Of the 15 human putatively disease-causing mutations that were found to be compensated in chimpanzee, Denisovan or Neanderthal, only a solitary F5 variant (Val1736Met) was specific to the Denisovan. In humans, this missense mutation is associated with activated protein C resistance and an increased risk of thromboembolism and recurrent miscarriage. It is unclear at this juncture whether this variant was indeed a PCM in the Denisovan or whether it could instead have been associated with disease in this ancient hominin.

  15. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria due to a mutation in GATA1: the first trans-acting mutation causative for a human porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John D; Steensma, David P; Pulsipher, Michael A; Spangrude, Gerald J; Kushner, James P

    2007-03-15

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), an autosomal recessive disorder, is due to mutations of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS). Deficiency of UROS results in excess uroporphyrin I, which causes photosensitization. We evaluated a 3-year-old boy with CEP. A hypochromic, microcytic anemia was present from birth, and platelet counts averaged 70 x 10(9)/L (70,000/microL). Erythrocyte UROS activity was 21% of controls. Red cell morphology and globin chain labeling studies were compatible with beta-thalassemia. Hb electrophoresis revealed 36.3% A, 2.4% A(2), 59.5% F, and 1.8% of an unidentified peak. No UROS or alpha- and beta-globin mutations were found in the child or the parents. The molecular basis of the phenotype proved to be a mutation of GATA1, an X-linked transcription factor common to globin genes and heme biosynthetic enzymes in erythrocytes. A mutation at codon 216 in the child and on one allele of his mother changed arginine to tryptophan (R216W). This is the first report of a human porphyria due to a mutation in a trans-acting factor and the first association of CEP with thalassemia and thrombocytopenia. The Hb F level of 59.5% suggests a role for GATA-1 in globin switching. A bone marrow allograft corrected both the porphyria and the thalassemia.

  16. Genetics of androgen metabolism in women with infertility and hypoandrogenism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohat-Tal, Aya; Sen, Aritro; Barad, David H; Kushnir, Vitaly; Gleicher, Norbert

    2015-07-01

    Hypoandrogenism in women with low functional ovarian reserve (LFOR, defined as an abnormally low number of small growing follicles) adversely affects fertility. The androgen precursor dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is increasingly used to supplement treatment protocols in women with LFOR undergoing in vitro fertilization. Due to differences in androgen metabolism, however, responses to DHEA supplementation vary between patients. In addition to overall declines in steroidogenic capacity with advancing age, genetic factors, which result in altered expression or enzymatic function of key steroidogenic proteins or their upstream regulators, might further exacerbate variations in the conversion of DHEA to testosterone. In this Review, we discuss in vitro studies and animal models of polymorphisms and gene mutations that affect the conversion of DHEA to testosterone and attempt to elucidate how these variations affect female hormone profiles. We also discuss treatment options that modulate levels of testosterone by targeting the expression of steroidogenic genes. Common variants in genes encoding DHEA sulphotransferase, aromatase, steroid 5α-reductase, androgen receptor, sex-hormone binding globulin, fragile X mental retardation protein and breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein have been implicated in androgen metabolism and, therefore, can affect levels of androgens in women. Short of screening for all potential genetic variants, hormonal assessments of patients with low testosterone levels after DHEA supplementation facilitate identification of underlying genetic defects. The genetic predisposition of patients can then be used to design individualized fertility treatments.

  17. Comparison of Nuclear Accumulation of p53 Protein with Mutations in the p53 Gene of Human Breast Cancer Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萱仪; 查小明; 武正炎; 范萍

    2001-01-01

    Objective The objective was to compare nuclear accumulation of p53 protein with mutations in the p53 gene on the tissues of human breast cancer. Methods Fifty-four invasive ductal carcinomas of breast were analyzed by the method of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) silver stain and strep-avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (SABC) immunohistochemistry. Results A statistically significant association between the presence of p53 gene mutation and nuclear accumulation of p53 protein was found (P<0.01). 22 tumors that demonstrated p53 gene mutations showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein, while only 9 (28%) showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein in 32 tumors without p53 gene mutations. Both p53 mutation protein and p53 gene mutations were prevalent in steroid and progesterone receptors negative tumors (P<0.05). A statistically significant association was found between the nuclear accumulation of p53 protein and lymph node invasion (P<0.05), and between p53 gene mutations and lymph node invasion (P<0.05). p53 abnormalities might be associated with an aggressive phenotype in breast cancer. Conclusion The immunohistochemical detection of nuclear p53 protein accumulation is highly associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer tissues, and that this method is useful for rapid screening of p53 abnormalities. However, in order to avoid false positive reaction, the p53 gene mutations should be determined in cases slightly positive for p53 nuclear protein.

  18. Functional assessment of human coding mutations affecting skin pigmentation using zebrafish.

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    Zurab R Tsetskhladze

    Full Text Available A major challenge in personalized medicine is the lack of a standard way to define the functional significance of the numerous nonsynonymous, single nucleotide coding variants that are present in each human individual. To begin to address this problem, we have used pigmentation as a model polygenic trait, three common human polymorphisms thought to influence pigmentation, and the zebrafish as a model system. The approach is based on the rescue of embryonic zebrafish mutant phenotypes by "humanized" zebrafish orthologous mRNA. Two hypomorphic polymorphisms, L374F in SLC45A2, and A111T in SLC24A5, have been linked to lighter skin color in Europeans. The phenotypic effect of a second coding polymorphism in SLC45A2, E272K, is unclear. None of these polymorphisms had been tested in the context of a model organism. We have confirmed that zebrafish albino fish are mutant in slc45a2; wild-type slc45a2 mRNA rescued the albino mutant phenotype. Introduction of the L374F polymorphism into albino or the A111T polymorphism into slc24a5 (golden abolished mRNA rescue of the respective mutant phenotypes, consistent with their known contributions to European skin color. In contrast, the E272K polymorphism had no effect on phenotypic rescue. The experimental conclusion that E272K is unlikely to affect pigmentation is consistent with a lack of correlation between this polymorphism and quantitatively measured skin color in 59 East Asian humans. A survey of mutations causing human oculocutaneous albinism yielded 257 missense mutations, 82% of which are theoretically testable in zebrafish. The developed approach may be extended to other model systems and may potentially contribute to our understanding the functional relationships between DNA sequence variation, human biology, and disease.

  19. Short Tandem Repeats in Human Exons: A Target for Disease Mutations

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    Villesen Palle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years it has been demonstrated that structural variations, such as indels (insertions and deletions, are common throughout the genome, but the implications of structural variations are still not clearly understood. Long tandem repeats (e.g. microsatellites or simple repeats are known to be hypermutable (indel-rich, but are rare in exons and only occasionally associated with diseases. Here we focus on short (imperfect tandem repeats (STRs which fall below the radar of conventional tandem repeat detection, and investigate whether STRs are targets for disease-related mutations in human exons. In particular, we test whether they share the hypermutability of the longer tandem repeats and whether disease-related genes have a higher STR content than non-disease-related genes. Results We show that validated human indels are extremely common in STR regions compared to non-STR regions. In contrast to longer tandem repeats, our definition of STRs found them to be present in exons of most known human genes (92%, 99% of all STR sequences in exons are shorter than 33 base pairs and 62% of all STR sequences are imperfect repeats. We also demonstrate that STRs are significantly overrepresented in disease-related genes in both human and mouse. These results are preserved when we limit the analysis to STRs outside known longer tandem repeats. Conclusion Based on our findings we conclude that STRs represent hypermutable regions in the human genome that are linked to human disease. In addition, STRs constitute an obvious target when screening for rare mutations, because of the relatively low amount of STRs in exons (1,973,844 bp and the limited length of STR regions.

  20. Can a few non‐coding mutations make a human brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Lucía F.

    2015-01-01

    The recent finding that the human version of a neurodevelopmental enhancer of the Wnt receptor Frizzled 8 (FZD8) gene alters neural progenitor cell cycle timing and brain size is a step forward to understanding human brain evolution. The human brain is distinctive in terms of its cognitive abilities as well as its susceptibility to neurological disease. Identifying which of the millions of genomic changes that occurred during human evolution led to these and other uniquely human traits is extremely challenging. Recent studies have demonstrated that many of the fastest evolving regions of the human genome function as gene regulatory enhancers during embryonic development and that the human‐specific mutations in them might alter expression patterns. However, elucidating molecular and cellular effects of sequence or expression pattern changes is a major obstacle to discovering the genetic bases of the evolution of our species. There is much work to do before human‐specific genetic and genomic changes are linked to complex human traits. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:26350501

  1. Mutation dependance of the mitochondrial DNA copy number in the first stages of human embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnot, Sophie; Samuels, David C; Hesters, Laetitia; Frydman, Nelly; Gigarel, Nadine; Burlet, Philippe; Kerbrat, Violaine; Lamazou, Frédéric; Frydman, René; Benachi, Alexandra; Feingold, Josué; Rotig, Agnes; Munnich, Arnold; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Steffann, Julie

    2013-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content is thought to remain stable over the preimplantation period of human embryogenesis that is, therefore, suggested to be entirely dependent on ooplasm mtDNA capital. We have explored the impact of two disease-causing mutations [m.3243A>G myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like syndrome (MELAS) and m.8344A>G myoclonic epilepsy associated with ragged-red fibers (MERRF)] on mtDNA amounts in human oocytes and day 4-5 preimplantation embryos. The mtDNA amount was stable in MERRF and control materials, whereas gradually increasing from the germinal vesicle of oogenesis to the blastocyst stage of embryogenesis in MELAS cells, MELAS embryos carrying ∼3-fold higher mtDNA amount than control embryos (P = 0.0003). A correlation between mtDNA copy numbers and mutant loads was observed in MELAS embryos (R(2) = 0.42, P < 0.0013), suggestive of a compensation for the respiratory chain defect resulting from high mutation levels. These results suggest that mtDNA can replicate in early embryos and emphasize the need for sufficient amount of wild-type mtDNA to sustain embryonic development in humans.

  2. Mutations in the dopamine beta-hydroxylase gene are associated with human norepinephrine deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chun-Hyung; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Cubells, Joseph F.; Cho, Sonhae; Biaggioni, Italo; Cohen, Bruce M.; Robertson, David; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2002-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE), a key neurotransmitter of the central and peripheral nervous systems, is synthesized by dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that catalyzes oxidation of dopamine (DA) to NE. NE deficiency is a congenital disorder of unknown etiology, in which affected patients suffer profound autonomic failure. Biochemical features of the syndrome include undetectable tissue and circulating levels of NE and epinephrine, elevated levels of DA, and undetectable levels of DBH. Here, we report identification of seven novel variants including four potentially pathogenic mutations in the human DBH gene (OMIM 223360) from analysis of two unrelated patients and their families. Both patients are compound heterozygotes for variants affecting expression of DBH protein. Each carries one copy of a T-->C transversion in the splice donor site of DBH intron 1, creating a premature stop codon. In patient 1, there is a missense mutation in DBH exon 2. Patient 2 carries missense mutations in exons 1 and 6 residing in cis. We propose that NE deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from heterogeneous molecular lesions at DBH. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Modeling Pathogenic Mutations of Human Twinkle in Drosophila Suggests an Apoptosis Role in Response to Mitochondrial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Martinez, Alvaro; Calleja, Manuel; Peralta, Susana; Matsushima, Yuichi; Hernandez-Sierra, Rosana; Whitworth, Alexander J.; Kaguni, Laurie S.; Garesse, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    The human gene C10orf2 encodes the mitochondrial replicative DNA helicase Twinkle, mutations of which are responsible for a significant fraction of cases of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO), a human mitochondrial disease caused by defects in intergenomic communication. We report the analysis of orthologous mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) helicase gene, d-mtDNA helicase. Increased expression of wild type d-mtDNA helicase using the UAS-GAL4 system leads to an increase in mtDNA copy number throughout adult life without any noteworthy phenotype, whereas overexpression of d-mtDNA helicase containing the K388A mutation in the helicase active site results in a severe depletion of mtDNA and a lethal phenotype. Overexpression of two d-mtDNA helicase variants equivalent to two human adPEO mutations shows differential effects. The A442P mutation exhibits a dominant negative effect similar to that of the active site mutant. In contrast, overexpression of d-mtDNA helicase containing the W441C mutation results in a slight decrease in mtDNA copy number during the third instar larval stage, and a moderate decrease in life span in the adult population. Overexpression of d-mtDNA helicase containing either the K388A or A442P mutations causes a mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defect that significantly reduces cell proliferation. The mitochondrial impairment caused by these mutations promotes apoptosis, arguing that mitochondria regulate programmed cell death in Drosophila. Our study of d-mtDNA helicase overexpression provides a tractable Drosophila model for understanding the cellular and molecular effects of human adPEO mutations. PMID:22952820

  4. Mutations of LRTOMT, a fusion gene with alternative reading frames, cause nonsyndromic deafness in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zubair M.; Masmoudi, Saber; Kalay, Ersan; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Mosrati, Mohamed Ali; Collin, Rob W. J.; Riazuddin, Saima; Hmani-Aifa, Mounira; Venselaar, Hanka; Kawar, Mayya N; Abdelaziz, Tlili; van der Zwaag, Bert; Khan, Shahid Y.; Ayadi, Leila; Riazuddin, S. Amer

    2008-01-01

    Many proteins necessary for sound transduction have been discovered through positional cloning of genes that cause deafness 1–3 . In this study, we report that mutations of LRTOMT are associated with profound non-syndromic hearing loss at the DFNB63 locus on human chromosome 11q13.3-q13.4. LRTOMT has two alternative reading frames and encodes two different proteins, LRTOMT1 and LRTOMT2, that are detected by Western blot analyses. LRTOMT2 is a putative methyltransferase. During evolution, nove...

  5. Human exposure to carcinogenic heterocyclic amines and their mutational fingerprints in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, M; Wakabayashi, K; Ushijima, T; Toyota, M; Totsuka, Y; Sugimura, T

    1996-01-01

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are mutagens/carcinogens to which humans are exposed on almost a daily basis. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhlP) is the most abundant of the various carcinogenic HCAs (present at a level of 0.56 to 69.2 ng/g of cooked meat or fish), with 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MelQx) following it at 0.64 to 6.44 ng/g. HCAs have been found in the urine of healthy people who consume ordinary diets, while patients receiving parenteral alimentation lack, for example, PhlP and MelQx in their urine. Based on the concentrations of PhlP and MelQx in urine samples from 10 healthy volunteers, daily intake of MelQx in Japanese was calculated to be 0.3 to 3.9 micrograms/person, while that of PhlP was 0.005 to 0 micrograms. The Japanese consume more MelQx than Americans, whereas Japanese intake of PhlP was about one-third that of Americans. MelQx-DNA adducts have also detected in Japanese Kidney, colon, and rectum samples using the 32P-postlabeling method followed by identification using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis; the levels were 0.18, 1.8, and 1.4 per 10(9) nucleotides, respectively. In addition, we elucidated the mutational fingerprints of Phlp by analyzing Apc mutations in rat colon cancers induced by this carcinogen. Four of eight tumors had a total of five mutations in the Apc gene, four of which featured a guanine deletion from 5'-GTGGGAT-3' sequences. This specific mutation spectrum may be used as a fingerprint of PhlP in evaluating its risk potential for human colon carcinogenesis. Mutations were not found in similar 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline-induced colon lesions. Microsatellite instability was detected in both colon and mammary tumors induced by PhlP. The mechanisms involved in this development of microsatellite instability in PhlP. The mechanisms involved in this development of microsatellite instability in PhlP-induced cancers remain to be elucidated. Images Figure 1

  6. Restricted 12p Amplification and RAS Mutation in Human Germ Cell Tumors of the Adult Testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Helene; Mostert, Marijke C.; Pompe, Kirsten; Zafarana, Gaetano; van Oorschot, Monique; van Gurp, Ruud J. H. L. M.; Gillis, Ad J. M.; Stoop, Hans; Beverloo, Berna; Oosterhuis, J. Wolter; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Looijenga, Leendert H. J.

    2000-01-01

    Human testicular germ-cell tumors of young adults (TGCTs), both seminomas and nonseminomas, are characterized by 12p overrepresentation, mostly as isochromosomes, of which the biological and clinical significance is still unclear. A limited number of TGCTs has been identified with an additional high-level amplification of a restricted region of 12p including the K-RAS proto-oncogene. Here we show that the incidence of these restricted 12p amplifications is ∼8% in primary TGCTs. Within a single cell formation of i(12p) and restricted 12p amplification is mutually exclusive. The borders of the amplicons cluster in short regions, and the amplicon was never found in the adjacent carcinoma in situ cells. Seminomas with the restricted 12p amplification virtually lacked apoptosis and the tumor cells showed prolonged in vitro survival like seminoma cells with a mutated RAS gene. However, no differences in proliferation index between these different groups of seminomas were found. Although patients with a seminoma containing a homogeneous restricted 12p amplification presented at a significantly younger age than those lacking it, the presence of a restricted 12p amplification/RAS mutation did not predict the stage of the disease at clinical presentation and the treatment response of primary seminomas. In 55 primary and metastatic tumors from 44 different patients who failed cisplatinum-based chemotherapy, the restricted 12p amplification and RAS mutations had the same incidence as in the consecutive series of responding patients. These data support the model that gain of 12p in TGCTs is related to invasive growth. It allows tumor cells, in particular those showing characteristics of early germ cells (ie, the seminoma cells), to survive outside their specific microenvironment. Overexpression of certain genes on 12p probably inhibits apoptosis in these tumor cells. However, the copy numbers of the restricted amplification of 12p and K-RAS mutations do not predict response

  7. Androgen receptor gene polymorphism in zebra species

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    Hideyuki Ito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor genes (AR have been found to have associations with reproductive development, behavioral traits, and disorders in humans. However, the influence of similar genetic effects on the behavior of other animals is scarce. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ in 44 Grevy's zebras, 23 plains zebras, and three mountain zebras, and compared them with those of domesticated horses. We observed polymorphism among zebra species and between zebra and horse. As androgens such as testosterone influence aggressiveness, AR polymorphism among equid species may be associated with differences in levels of aggression and tameness. Our findings indicate that it would be useful to conduct further studies focusing on the potential association between AR and personality traits, and to understand domestication of equid species.

  8. Canine and human visual cortex intact and responsive despite early retinal blindness from RPE65 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Geoffrey K; Komáromy, András M; Cideciyan, Artur V; Brainard, David H; Aleman, Tomas S; Roman, Alejandro J; Avants, Brian B; Gee, James C; Korczykowski, Marc; Hauswirth, William W; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2007-06-01

    RPE65 is an essential molecule in the retinoid-visual cycle, and RPE65 gene mutations cause the congenital human blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Somatic gene therapy delivered to the retina of blind dogs with an RPE65 mutation dramatically restores retinal physiology and has sparked international interest in human treatment trials for this incurable disease. An unanswered question is how the visual cortex responds after prolonged sensory deprivation from retinal dysfunction. We therefore studied the cortex of RPE65-mutant dogs before and after retinal gene therapy. Then, we inquired whether there is visual pathway integrity and responsivity in adult humans with LCA due to RPE65 mutations (RPE65-LCA). RPE65-mutant dogs were studied with fMRI. Prior to therapy, retinal and subcortical responses to light were markedly diminished, and there were minimal cortical responses within the primary visual areas of the lateral gyrus (activation amplitude mean +/- standard deviation [SD] = 0.07% +/- 0.06% and volume = 1.3 +/- 0.6 cm(3)). Following therapy, retinal and subcortical response restoration was accompanied by increased amplitude (0.18% +/- 0.06%) and volume (8.2 +/- 0.8 cm(3)) of activation within the lateral gyrus (p LCA patients (ages 18-23 y) were studied with structural magnetic resonance imaging. Optic nerve diameter (3.2 +/- 0.5 mm) was within the normal range (3.2 +/- 0.3 mm), and occipital cortical white matter density as judged by voxel-based morphometry was slightly but significantly altered (1.3 SD below control average, p = 0.005). Functional magnetic resonance imaging in human RPE65-LCA patients revealed cortical responses with a markedly diminished activation volume (8.8 +/- 1.2 cm(3)) compared to controls (29.7 +/- 8.3 cm(3), p gene therapy in the canine model of RPE65-LCA. Human RPE65-LCA patients have preserved visual pathway anatomy and detectable cortical activation despite limited visual experience. Taken together, the results

  9. Androgens in women are essentially made from DHEA in each peripheral tissue according to intracrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrie, Fernand; Martel, Céline; Bélanger, Alain; Pelletier, Georges

    2017-04-01

    The objective is to review how the cell-specific amounts of intracellular androgens are all made in women from circulating dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in each peripheral tissue, independently from the rest of the body. Following 500 million years of evolution, approximately three dozen cell-specific intracrine enzymes have been engineered in human peripheral tissues whereby the inactive sex steroid precursor DHEA mainly of adrenal origin is transformed into the appropriate minute intracellular amounts of androgens. These intracellular androgens are inactivated in the same cells, with no biologically significant release of active androgens in the circulation. The best estimate is that approximately 50% as much androgens are synthesized in women, compared to men of the same age. The problem with DHEA, however, the exclusive source of androgens in women of all ages, is that DHEA secretion has already decreased by an average of 60% at time of menopause and continues to decrease thereafter. The human-specific and highly sophisticated mechanisms of intracrinology permit each cell to control androgen availability according to its own needs independently from the remaining of the body. Such a mechanism is completely different from classical endocrinology well understood in men where testosterone of testicular origin is transported through the blood and has indiscriminate access to the androgen receptor (AR) in all AR-containing cells of the body. In men, both the endocrine and intracrine mechanisms are in operation while, in women, only the intracrine mechanisms responsible for intracellular formation from DHEA provide androgens.

  10. Mutations in the human naked cuticle homolog NKD1 found in colorectal cancer alter Wnt/Dvl/beta-catenin signaling.

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    Jianhui Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutation of Wnt signal antagonists Apc or Axin activates beta-catenin signaling in many cancers including the majority of human colorectal adenocarcinomas. The phenotype of apc or axin mutation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is strikingly similar to that caused by mutation in the segment-polarity gene, naked cuticle (nkd. Nkd inhibits Wnt signaling by binding to the Dishevelled (Dsh/Dvl family of scaffold proteins that link Wnt receptor activation to beta-catenin accumulation and TCF-dependent transcription, but human NKD genes have yet to be directly implicated in cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identify for the first time mutations in NKD1--one of two human nkd homologs--in a subset of DNA mismatch repair-deficient colorectal tumors that are not known to harbor mutations in other Wnt-pathway genes. The mutant Nkd1 proteins are defective at inhibiting Wnt signaling; in addition, the mutant Nkd1 proteins stabilize beta-catenin and promote cell proliferation, in part due to a reduced ability of each mutant Nkd1 protein to bind and destabilize Dvl proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data raise the hypothesis that specific NKD1 mutations promote Wnt-dependent tumorigenesis in a subset of DNA mismatch-repair-deficient colorectal adenocarcinomas and possibly other Wnt-signal driven human cancers.

  11. Female adipocyte androgen synthesis and the effects of insulin

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    David Cadagan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders characterized by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, and its presence can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease significantly. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased circulating androgen levels in women, which may originate from the ovaries and adrenal glands. Adipocytes are also able to synthesise steroid hormones, and this output has been hypothesised to increase with elevated insulin plasma concentrations. However, the contribution of the adipocytes to the circulating androgen levels in women with metabolic syndrome is limited and the effects of insulin are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of steroid precursors and synthetic enzymes in human adipocyte biopsies as markers of possible adipocyte androgen synthesis. We examined pre and mature adipocytes taken from tissue biopsies of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of participating women from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, of the Royal Derby Hospital. The results showed the potential for localised adipocyte androgen synthesis through the presence of the androgen precursor progesterone, as well as the steroid-converting enzyme 17α-hydroxylase. Furthermore, we found the controlled secretion of androstenedione in vitro and that insulin treatment caused levels to increase. Continued examination of a localised source of androgen production is therefore of clinical relevance due to its influence on adipocyte metabolism, its negative impact on female steroidogenic homeostasis, and the possible aggravation this may have when associated to obesity and obesity related metabolic abnormalities such as hyperinsulinaemia.

  12. A novel mutation of p.F32I in GJA8 in human dominant congenital cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Feng-Tao; Yang, Fa-Yu; Yang, Ye-Qin; Ge, Xiang-Lian; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Liu; Yu, Xin-Ping; Gu, Feng; Zhu, Yi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify a causative mutation in a three-generation family with autosomal dominant congenital total cataract and dissect the molecular consequence of the identified mutation. METHODS Clinical and ophthalmological examinations were performed on the affected and unaffected family members. Mutation were screened in recruited family members by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the two reported genes (CRYAA and GJA8) which were linked to human total cataracts and direct sequencing of the PCR product. The molecular consequences of the identified mutation was dissected. The plasmids carrying wild-type and mutant mouse ORF of Gja8, coding for connexin 50 (Cx50), were generated and ectopic expressed in 293 cells. Recombinant protein expression and cellular localization of recombinated Cx50 were assessed by confocal microscopy. RESULTS Clinical and ophthalmological examinations were performed on the affected and unaffected family members. Mutation were screened in recruited family members by PCR of the two reported genes (CRYAA and GJA8) which were linked to human total cataracts and direct sequencing of the PCR product. The molecular consequences of the identified mutation was dissected. The plasmids carrying wild-type and mutant mouse ORF of Gja8, coding for Cx50, were generated and ectopic expressed in 293 cells. Recombinant protein expression and cellular localization of recombinated Cx50 were assessed by confocal microscopy. CONCLUSION This study has identified a novel cataract mutation in GJA8, which adds a novel mutation to the existing spectrum of Cx50 mutations with cataract. The molecular consequences of p.F32I mutation in GJA8 exclude instability and the mislocalization of mutant Cx50 protein. PMID:27990357

  13. On the sequence-directed nature of human gene mutation: the role of genomic architecture and the local DNA sequence environment in mediating gene mutations underlying human inherited disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David N; Bacolla, Albino; Férec, Claude; Vasquez, Karen M; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Chen, Jian-Min

    2011-10-01

    Different types of human gene mutation may vary in size, from structural variants (SVs) to single base-pair substitutions, but what they all have in common is that their nature, size and location are often determined either by specific characteristics of the local DNA sequence environment or by higher order features of the genomic architecture. The human genome is now recognized to contain "pervasive architectural flaws" in that certain DNA sequences are inherently mutation prone by virtue of their base composition, sequence repetitivity and/or epigenetic modification. Here, we explore how the nature, location and frequency of different types of mutation causing inherited disease are shaped in large part, and often in remarkably predictable ways, by the local DNA sequence environment. The mutability of a given gene or genomic region may also be influenced indirectly by a variety of noncanonical (non-B) secondary structures whose formation is facilitated by the underlying DNA sequence. Since these non-B DNA structures can interfere with subsequent DNA replication and repair and may serve to increase mutation frequencies in generalized fashion (i.e., both in the context of subtle mutations and SVs), they have the potential to serve as a unifying concept in studies of mutational mechanisms underlying human inherited disease. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Evolution of the rapidly mutating human salivary agglutinin gene (DMBT1) and population subsistence strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polley, Shamik; Louzada, Sandra; Forni, Diego; Sironi, Manuela; Balaskas, Theodosius; Hains, David S; Yang, Fengtang; Hollox, Edward J

    2015-04-21

    The dietary change resulting from the domestication of plant and animal species and development of agriculture at different locations across the world was one of the most significant changes in human evolution. An increase in dietary carbohydrates caused an increase in dental caries following the development of agriculture, mediated by the cariogenic oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans. Salivary agglutinin [SAG, encoded by the deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) gene] is an innate immune receptor glycoprotein that binds a variety of bacteria and viruses, and mediates attachment of S. mutans to hydroxyapatite on the surface of the tooth. In this study we show that multiallelic copy number variation (CNV) within DMBT1 is extensive across all populations and is predicted to result in between 7-20 scavenger-receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains within each SAG molecule. Direct observation of de novo mutation in multigeneration families suggests these CNVs have a very high mutation rate for a protein-coding locus, with a mutation rate of up to 5% per gamete. Given that the SRCR domains bind S. mutans and hydroxyapatite in the tooth, we investigated the association of sequence diversity at the SAG-binding gene of S. mutans, and DMBT1 CNV. Furthermore, we show that DMBT1 CNV is also associated with a history of agriculture across global populations, suggesting that dietary change as a result of agriculture has shaped the pattern of CNV at DMBT1, and that the DMBT1-S. mutans interaction is a promising model of host-pathogen-culture coevolution in humans.

  15. Synthesis of esters of androgens with unsaturated fatty acids for androgen requiring therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, F; Garofalo, A; Aloisi, A M; Lamponi, S; Magnani, A; Petroni, A

    2013-06-01

    Androgens' metabolism and activity are gaining a more and more important role in human physiology particularly referring to aging and to neurodegenerative diseases. Androgen treatment is often required for long-lasting disorders. In order to improve their duration and effects, androgens can be administered as esters of carboxylic acids. The novelty of our research is the use of esters of androgens with specific unsaturated fatty acids, in order to reduce possible side effects particularly related to chronic pathologies with altered lipid homeostasis such as X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and cardiovascular disorders. Thus the esters of the main androgenic substances testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and their metabolite 5α-androstan-3α,17β-diol were chemically obtained by coupling with different unsaturated fatty acids. To this aim, fatty acids with various degree of unsaturation and belonging to different series were selected. Specifically, oleic acid (18:1, n-9), linoleic acid (18:2, n-6), and the n-3 fatty acids, α-linolenic acid (18:3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) were used obtaining corresponding esters with acceptable yields and good degree of purity. All the synthesized compounds were tested for their cytotoxic activities in mouse NIH3T3 and human astrocyte cell lines. The esters demonstrated good tolerability and no in vitro cytotoxic effect in both cell cultures. After these promising preliminary results, the esters will be suitable for in vivo studies in order to ascertain their pharmacokinetic characteristics and their biological effects.

  16. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis M1592V mutation modifies activation in human skeletal muscle Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, C V; Neely, A; Velasco-Loyden, G; Palma, V; Kukuljan, M

    1999-01-01

    Mutations in the human skeletal muscle Na+ channel underlie the autosomal dominant disease hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HPP). Muscle fibers from affected individuals exhibit sustained Na+ currents thought to depolarize the sarcolemma and thus inactivate normal Na+ channels. We expressed human wild-type or M1592V mutant alpha-subunits with the beta1-subunit in Xenopus laevis oocytes and recorded Na+ currents using two-electrode and cut-open oocyte voltage-clamp techniques. The most prominent functional difference between M1592V mutant and wild-type channels is a 5- to 10-mV shift in the hyperpolarized direction of the steady-state activation curve. The shift in the activation curve for the mutant results in a larger overlap with the inactivation curve than that observed for wild-type channels. Accordingly, the current through M1592V channels displays a larger noninactivating component than does that through wild-type channels at membrane potentials near -40 mV. The functional properties of the M1592V mutant resemble those of the previously characterized HPP T704M mutant. Both clinically similar phenotypes arise from mutations located at a distance from the putative voltage sensor of the channel.

  17. Disruption of dopamine neuron activity pattern regulation through selective expression of a human KCNN3 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soden, Marta E; Jones, Graham L; Sanford, Christina A; Chung, Amanda S; Güler, Ali D; Chavkin, Charles; Luján, Rafael; Zweifel, Larry S

    2013-11-20

    The calcium-activated small conductance potassium channel SK3 plays an essential role in the regulation of dopamine neuron activity patterns. Here we demonstrate that expression of a human disease-related SK3 mutation (hSK3Δ) in dopamine neurons of mice disrupts the balance between tonic and phasic dopamine neuron activity. Expression of hSK3Δ suppressed endogenous SK currents, reducing coupling between SK channels and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and increasing permissiveness for burst firing. Consistent with enhanced excitability of dopamine neurons, hSK3Δ increased evoked calcium signals in dopamine neurons in vivo and potentiated evoked dopamine release. Specific expression of hSK3Δ led to deficits in attention and sensory gating and heightened sensitivity to a psychomimetic drug. Sensory-motor alterations and psychomimetic sensitivity were recapitulated in a mouse model of transient, reversible dopamine neuron activation. These results demonstrate the cell-autonomous effects of a human ion channel mutation on dopamine neuron physiology and the impact of activity pattern disruption on behavior.

  18. Comparing the DNA hypermethylome with gene mutations in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornel E Schuebel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a transcriptome-wide approach to identify genes affected by promoter CpG island DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing in colorectal cancer. By screening cell lines and validating tumor-specific hypermethylation in a panel of primary human colorectal cancer samples, we estimate that nearly 5% or more of all known genes may be promoter methylated in an individual tumor. When directly compared to gene mutations, we find larger numbers of genes hypermethylated in individual tumors, and a higher frequency of hypermethylation within individual genes harboring either genetic or epigenetic changes. Thus, to enumerate the full spectrum of alterations in the human cancer genome, and to facilitate the most efficacious grouping of tumors to identify cancer biomarkers and tailor therapeutic approaches, both genetic and epigenetic screens should be undertaken.

  19. Impairment of immunity to Candida and Mycobacterium in humans with bi-allelic RORC mutations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halwani, Rabih; Ma, Cindy S.; Wong, Natalie; Soudais, Claire; Henderson, Lauren A.; Marzouqa, Hiyam; Shamma, Jamal; Gonzalez, Marcela; Martinez-Barricarte, Rubén; Okada, Chizuru; Avery, Danielle T.; Latorre, Daniela; Deswarte, Caroline; Jabot-Hanin, Fabienne; Torrado, Egidio; Fountain, Jeffrey; Belkadi, Aziz; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Migaud, Mélanie; Arlehamn, Cecilia S. Lindestam; Sette, Alessandro; Breton, Sylvain; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Moshous, Despina; Hambleton, Sophie; Latour, Sylvain; Arkwright, Peter D.; Picard, Capucine; Lantz, Olivier; Engelhard, Dan; Kobayashi, Masao; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Human inborn errors of immunity mediated by the cytokines interleukin (IL)-17A/F underlie mucocutaneous candidiasis, whereas inborn errors of interferon (IFN)-γ immunity underlie mycobacterial disease. We report the discovery of bi-allelic RORC loss-of-function mutations in seven individuals from three kindreds of different ethnic origins with both candidiasis and mycobacteriosis. The lack of functional RORγ and RORγT isoforms resulted in the absence of IL-17A/F-producing T cells in these individuals, probably accounting for their chronic candidiasis. Unexpectedly, leukocytes from RORγ- and RORγT-deficient individuals also displayed an impaired IFN-γ response to Mycobacterium. This principally reflected profoundly defective IFN-γ production by circulating γδ T cells and CD4+CCR6+ CXCR3+ αβ T cells. In humans, both mucocutaneous immunity to Candida and systemic immunity to Mycobacterium require RORγ, or RORγT, or both. PMID:26160376

  20. Dual-color bioluminescent bioreporter for forensic analysis: evidence of androgenic and anti-androgenic activity of illicit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevenini, Luca; Michelini, Elisa; D'Elia, Marcello; Guardigli, Massimo; Roda, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Bioassays represent promising complementary techniques to conventional analytical approaches used in doping analysis to detect illicit drugs like anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). The fact that all AAS share a common mechanism of action via the human androgen receptor (hAR) enables the use of bioassays, relying on the activation of hAR as antidoping screening tools. Previously, we developed a dual-color bioreporter based on yeast cells engineered to express hAR and androgen response elements driving the expression of the bioluminescent (BL) reporter protein Photinus pyralis luciferase. A second reporter protein, the red-emitting luciferase PpyRE8, was introduced in the bioreporter as internal viability control. Here, we report the first forensic application of a straightforward, accurate, and cost-effective bioassay, relying on spectral resolution of the two BL signals, in 96-microwell format. The bioreporter responds to dihydrotestosterone as reference androgen in a concentration-dependent manner from 0.08 to 1,000 nM with intra- and inter-assay variation coefficients of 11.4 % and 13.1 %, respectively. We also demonstrated the suitability of this dual-color bioreporter to assess (anti)-androgenic activity of pure AAS, mixtures of AAS, and other illicit drugs provided by the Scientific Police. Significant anti-androgenic activity was observed in samples labeled as marijuana and hashish, containing Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol as major constituent.

  1. The role of human demographic history in determining the distribution and frequency of transferase-deficient galactosaemia mutations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flanagan, J M

    2010-02-01

    Classical or transferase-deficient galactosaemia is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by mutation in the human Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene. Of some 170 causative mutations reported, fewer than 10% are observed in more than one geographic region or ethnic group. To better understand the population history of the common GALT mutations, we have established a haplotyping system for the GALT locus incorporating eight single nucleotide polymorphisms and three short tandem repeat markers. We analysed haplotypes associated with the three most frequent GALT gene mutations, Q188R, K285N and Duarte-2 (D2), and estimated their age. Haplotype diversity, in conjunction with measures of genetic diversity and of linkage disequilibrium, indicated that Q188R and K285N are European mutations. The Q188R mutation arose in central Europe within the last 20 000 years, with its observed east-west cline of increasing relative allele frequency possibly being due to population expansion during the re-colonization of Europe by Homo sapiens in the Mesolithic age. K285N was found to be a younger mutation that originated in Eastern Europe and is probably more geographically restricted as it arose after all major European population expansions. The D2 variant was found to be an ancient mutation that originated before the expansion of Homo sapiens out of Africa.

  2. Two mutational hotspots in the interleukin-2 receptor {gamma} chain gene causing human X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, A.E.; Puck, J.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Buckley, R.H. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Human severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immunity, is most commonly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene for interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor {gamma} chain (IL2RG). For mutational analysis of IL2RG in males with SCID, SSCP screening was followed by DNA sequencing. Of 40 IL2RG mutations found in unrelated SCID patients, 6 were point mutations at the CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 690-691, encoding amino acid R226. This residue lies in the extracellular domain of the protein in a region not previously recognized to be significantly conserved in the cytokine receptor gene family, 11 amino acids upstream from the highly conserved WSXWS motif. Three additional instances of mutation at another CpG dinucleotide at cDNA 879 produced a premature termination signal in the intracellular domain of IL2RG, resulting in loss of the SH2-homologous intracellular domain known to be essential for signaling from the IL-2 receptor complex. Mutations at these two hotspots constitute >20% of the X-linked SCID mutations found by our group and a similar proportion of all reported IL2RG mutations. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A new highly androgen specific yeast biosensor, enabling optimisation of (Q)SAR model approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Lommerse, J.P.M.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Fernandes, E.A.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2008-01-01

    Recently we constructed recombinant yeast cells that express the human androgen receptor (hAR) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP), the latter in response to androgens. When exposed to 17ß-testosterone, the concentration where half-maximal activation is reached (EC50) was 50 nM. Rel

  4. Albinism-causing mutations in recombinant human tyrosinase alter intrinsic enzymatic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika B Dolinska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrosinase (TYR catalyzes the rate-limiting, first step in melanin production and its gene (TYR is mutated in many cases of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1, an autosomal recessive cause of childhood blindness. Patients with reduced TYR activity are classified as OCA1B; some OCA1B mutations are temperature-sensitive. Therapeutic research for OCA1 has been hampered, in part, by the absence of purified, active, recombinant wild-type and mutant human enzymes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The intra-melanosomal domain of human tyrosinase (residues 19-469 and two OCA1B related temperature-sensitive mutants, R422Q and R422W were expressed in insect cells and produced in T. ni larvae. The short trans-membrane fragment was deleted to avoid potential protein insolubility, while preserving all other functional features of the enzymes. Purified tyrosinase was obtained with a yield of >1 mg per 10 g of larval biomass. The protein was a monomeric glycoenzyme with maximum enzyme activity at 37°C and neutral pH. The two purified mutants when compared to the wild-type protein were less active and temperature sensitive. These differences are associated with conformational perturbations in secondary structure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The intramelanosomal domains of recombinant wild-type and mutant human tyrosinases are soluble monomeric glycoproteins with activities which mirror their in vivo function. This advance allows for the structure - function analyses of different mutant TYR proteins and correlation with their corresponding human phenotypes; it also provides an important tool to discover drugs that may improve tyrosinase activity and treat OCA1.

  5. Analysis of the molecular networks in androgen dependent and independent prostate cancer revealed fragile and robust subsystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Tasseff

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy is currently the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. Unfortunately, in nearly all cases, androgen ablation fails to permanently arrest cancer progression. As androgens like testosterone are withdrawn, prostate cancer cells lose their androgen sensitivity and begin to proliferate without hormone growth factors. In this study, we constructed and analyzed a mathematical model of the integration between hormone growth factor signaling, androgen receptor activation, and the expression of cyclin D and Prostate-Specific Antigen in human LNCaP prostate adenocarcinoma cells. The objective of the study was to investigate which signaling systems were important in the loss of androgen dependence. The model was formulated as a set of ordinary differential equations which described 212 species and 384 interactions, including both the mRNA and protein levels for key species. An ensemble approach was chosen to constrain model parameters and to estimate the impact of parametric uncertainty on model predictions. Model parameters were identified using 14 steady-state and dynamic LNCaP data sets taken from literature sources. Alterations in the rate of Prostatic Acid Phosphatase expression was sufficient to capture varying levels of androgen dependence. Analysis of the model provided insight into the importance of network components as a function of androgen dependence. The importance of androgen receptor availability and the MAPK/Akt signaling axes was independent of androgen status. Interestingly, androgen receptor availability was important even in androgen-independent LNCaP cells. Translation became progressively more important in androgen-independent LNCaP cells. Further analysis suggested a positive synergy between the MAPK and Akt signaling axes and the translation of key proliferative markers like cyclin D in androgen-independent cells. Taken together, the results support the targeting of both the Akt and MAPK

  6. ANDROGEN LEVELS IN PREECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Valadan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. Several independent investigators have demonstrated the association of androgens with hypertension. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether maternal levels of sex hormones, especially testosterone, are higher in patients with preeclampsia than in matched normotensive control subjects. Serum levels of testosterone, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S and estradiol were measured in 60 subjects in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy with documented preeclampsia (including 30 cases of mild and 30 cases of severe preeclampsia and 60 healthy normotensive women with similar maternal and gestational ages and body mass index (BMI and neonatal sex. All subjects were primigravid with singleton pregnancies. Cases of polycystic ovary (PCO, diabetes, chronic hypertension and chronic systemic diseases such as lupus and patients using steroid hormones and anti-hypertensive drugs were excluded. Levels of testosterone, DHEA-S and estradiol were not higher in primigravid women with preeclampsia than in normotensive women with similar gestational and maternal ages, BMI and neonatal sex. There were no significant differences in sex hormones measured between groups of mild and severe preeclampsia and normotensive women. There were also no significant differences in sex hormone levels according to neonatal sex. These findings are against the hypothesis of mediating or amplifying role of high androgen levels in pathophysiology of preeclampsia.

  7. Mutations in AAC2, equivalent to human adPEO-associated ANT1 mutations, lead to defective oxidative phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and affect mitochondrial DNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanesi, Flavia; Palmieri, Luigi; Scarcia, Pasquale; Lodi, Tiziana; Donnini, Claudia; Limongelli, Anna; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo; Ferrero, Iliana; Viola, Anna Maria

    2004-05-01

    Autosomal dominant and recessive forms of progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO and arPEO) are mitochondrial disorders characterized by the presence of multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA in affected tissues. Four adPEO-associated missense mutations have been identified in the ANT1 gene. In order to investigate their functional consequences on cellular physiology, we introduced three of them at equivalent positions in AAC2, the yeast orthologue of human ANT1. We demonstrate here that expression of the equivalent mutations in aac2-defective haploid strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in (a) a marked growth defect on non-fermentable carbon sources, and (b) a concurrent reduction of the amount of mitochondrial cytochromes, cytochrome c oxidase activity and cellular respiration. The efficiency of ATP and ADP transport was variably affected by the different AAC2 mutations. However, irrespective of the absolute level of activity, the AAC2 pathogenic mutants showed a significant defect in ADP versus ATP transport compared with wild-type AAC2. In order to study whether a dominant phenotype, as in humans, could be observed, the aac2 mutant alleles were also inserted in combination with the endogenous wild-type AAC2 gene. The heteroallelic strains behaved as recessive for oxidative growth and petite-negative phenotype. In contrast, reduction in cytochrome content and increased mtDNA instability appeared to behave as dominant traits in heteroallelic strains. Our results indicate that S. cerevisiae is a suitable in vivo model to study the pathogenicity of the human ANT1 mutations and the pathophysiology leading to impairment of oxidative phosphorylation and damage of mtDNA integrity, as found in adPEO.

  8. The carcinogenic air pollutant 3-nitrobenzanthrone induces GC to TA transversion mutations in human p53 sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vom Brocke, Jochen; Krais, Annette; Whibley, Catherine; Hollstein, Monica C; Schmeiser, Heinz H

    2009-01-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a potent mutagen and a suspected human carcinogen present in particulate matter of diesel exhaust and ambient air pollution. Employing an assay with human p53 knock-in (Hupki) murine embryonic fibroblasts (HUFs), we examined p53 mutations induced by 3-NBA and its active metabolite, N-hydroxy-3-aminobenzanthrone (N-OH-3-ABA). Twenty-nine immortalized cultures (cell lines) from 89 HUF primary cultures exposed at passage 1 for 5 days to 2 microM 3-NBA harboured 22 different mutations in the human DNA-binding domain sequence of the Hupki p53 tumour suppressor gene. The most frequently observed mutation was GC to TA transversion (46%), corroborating previous mutation studies with 3-NBA, and consistent with the presence of persistent 3-NBA-guanosine adducts found in DNA of exposed rodents. Six of the transversions found solely in 3-NBA-treated HUFs have not been detected thus far in untreated HUFs, but have been found repeatedly in human lung tumours. (32)P-post-labelling adduct analysis of DNA from HUF cells treated with 2 microM 3-NBA for 5 days showed a pattern similar to that found in vivo, indicating the metabolic competence of HUF cells to metabolize 3-NBA to electrophilic intermediates. Total DNA binding was 160 +/- 56 per 10(7) normal nucleotides with N(2)-guanosine being the major adduct. In contrast, identical treatment with N-OH-3-ABA resulted in a 100-fold lower level of specific DNA adducts and no carcinogen-specific mutation pattern in the Hupki assay. This indicates that the level of DNA adduct formation by the mutagen is critical to obtain specific mutation spectra in the assay. Our results are consistent with previous experiments in Muta Mouse and are compatible with the possibility that diesel exhaust exposure contributes to mutation load in humans and to lung cancer risk.

  9. Androgen effects on adipose tissue architecture and function in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamov, Oleg; White, Ashley E; Carroll, Julie M; Bethea, Cynthia L; Reddy, Arubala; Slayden, Ov; O'Rourke, Robert W; Roberts, Charles T

    2012-07-01

    The differential association of hypoandrogenism in men and hyperandrogenism in women with insulin resistance and obesity suggests that androgens may exert sex-specific effects on adipose and other tissues, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Moreover, recent studies also suggest that rodents and humans may respond differently to androgen imbalance. To achieve better insight into clinically relevant sex-specific mechanisms of androgen action, we used nonhuman primates to investigate the direct effects of gonadectomy and hormone replacement on white adipose tissue. We also employed a novel ex vivo approach that provides a convenient framework for understanding of adipose tissue physiology under a controlled tissue culture environment. In vivo androgen deprivation of males did not result in overt obesity or insulin resistance but did induce the appearance of very small, multilocular white adipocytes. Testosterone replacement restored normal cell size and a unilocular phenotype and stimulated adipogenic gene transcription and improved insulin sensitivity of male adipose tissue. Ex vivo studies demonstrated sex-specific effects of androgens on adipocyte function. Female adipose tissue treated with androgens displayed elevated basal but reduced insulin-dependent fatty acid uptake. Androgen-stimulated basal uptake was greater in adipose tissue of ovariectomized females than in adipose tissue of intact females and ovariectomized females replaced with estrogen and progesterone in vivo. Collectively, these data demonstrate that androgens are essential for normal adipogenesis in males and can impair essential adipocyte functions in females, thus strengthening the experimental basis for sex-specific effects of androgens in adipose tissue.

  10. Microarray analysis of prostate cancer progression to reduced androgen dependence: studies in unique models contrasts early and late molecular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotnak, F M; She, Yuhong; Khokhar, Nushmia Z; Hayes, Paula; Gerald, William; Scher, Howard I

    2004-11-01

    Three unique variants of the CWR22 human prostate cancer xenograft model (CWR22LD1, LD2, and LD3) with a decrease in dependence on androgens were selected under noncastrate conditions, i.e., by outgrowth after transplantation into male NCR (AT) nu mice without testosterone supplementation. These variants were unable to grow in castrated male mice. For comparison, a second set of variants with even less dependence on androgens (castrate-resistant) were derived following outgrowth from CWR22 (CWR22Rv1 and RC) or CWRLD1 (CWR22RS) after transplantion in castrated male mice. The androgen receptor (AR) gene in the CWR22LD variants was transcriptionally active and was neither mutated nor significantly overexpressed compared to CWR22. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis showed distinctly different profiles of dysregulated gene expression among the CWR22LD variants. Groups of only 26-41 genes were dysregulated greater than threefold with a different proportion of up versus downregulated genes in each variant. Only one of the castrate-resistant variants (CWR22Rv1) had a highly overexpressed AR gene but AR in this variant and the two other castrate-resistant variants, CWR22 RS and RC, was not mutated beyond that seen in CWR22. In contrast to the CWR22LD variants, a total of 342, 295, and 222 genes were dysregulated at least threefold in CWR22Rv1, CWR22RS, and CWR22RC, respectively, differing as well in the proportion of up versus downregulated genes. Many of the genes dysregulated in CWR22LD1, LD2, and LD3 were further dysregulated in CWR22Rv1, RC, or RS. The most downregulated gene was microseminoprotein beta (MSPB). Along with cyclin D1, the most upregulated gene by an order of magnitude compared to other upregulated genes was hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) (scatter factor). These results suggest that the onset in the loss of androgen dependence in CWR22 proceeds through multiple pathways and does not require any direct change in the status of AR. However, upregulation of

  11. Altered heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 caused by mutations in human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland); Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E. [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutations in POR identified from patients lead to reduced HO-1 activities. {yields} POR mutation Y181D affecting FMN binding results in total loss of HO-1 activity. {yields} POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F, lost 50-70% activity. {yields} Mutations in FAD binding domain, R457H, Y459H and V492E lost all HO-1 activity. {yields} POR polymorphisms P228L, R316W, G413S, A503V and G504R have normal activity. -- Abstract: Human heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) carries out heme catabolism supported by electrons supplied from the NADPH through NADPH P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Previously we have shown that mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of mutations in POR on HO-1 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified HO-1 to measure heme degradation in a coupled assay using biliverdin reductase. Here we show that mutations in POR found in patients may reduce HO-1 activity, potentially influencing heme catabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had total loss of HO-1 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 50-70% activity. The POR variants P228L, R316W and G413S, A503V and G504R identified as polymorphs had close to WT activity. Loss of HO-1 activity may result in increased oxidative neurotoxicity, anemia, growth retardation and iron deposition. Further examination of patients affected with POR deficiency will be required to assess the metabolic effects of reduced HO-1 activity in affected individuals.

  12. Assessing the pathogenic potential of human Nephronophthisis disease-associated NPHP-4 missense mutations in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masyukova, Svetlana V; Winkelbauer, Marlene E; Williams, Corey L; Pieczynski, Jay N; Yoder, Bradley K

    2011-08-01

    A spectrum of complex oligogenic disorders called the ciliopathies have been connected to dysfunction of cilia. Among the ciliopathies are Nephronophthisis (NPHP), characterized by cystic kidney disease and retinal degeneration, and Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS), a gestational lethal condition with skeletal abnormalities, cystic kidneys and CNS malformation. Mutations in multiple genes have been identified in NPHP and MKS patients, and an unexpected finding has been that mutations within the same gene can cause either disorder. Further, there is minimal genotype-phenotype correlation and despite recessive inheritance, numerous patients were identified as having a single heterozygous mutation. This has made it difficult to determine the significance of these mutations on disease pathogenesis and led to the hypothesis that clinical presentation in an individual will be determined by genetic interactions between mutations in multiple cilia-related genes. Here we utilize Caenorhabditis elegans and cilia-associated behavioral and morphologic assays to evaluate the pathogenic potential of eight previously reported human NPHP4 missense mutations. We assess the impact of these mutations on C. elegans NPHP-4 function, localization and evaluate potential interactions with mutations in MKS complex genes, mksr-2 and mksr-1. Six out of eight nphp-4 mutations analyzed alter ciliary function, and three of these modify the severity of the phenotypes caused by disruption of mksr-2 and mksr-1. Collectively, our studies demonstrate the utility of C. elegans as a tool to assess the pathogenicity of mutations in ciliopathy genes and provide insights into the complex genetic interactions contributing to the diversity of phenotypes associated with cilia disorders.

  13. In vivo modulation of androgen receptor by androgens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V·L·Kumar; V·Kumar

    2002-01-01

    Aim:To study the effect of androgen and antiandrogen on the level of androgen receptor(AR)mRNA.Methods:The totalRNA was extracted from the prostate and analyzed by slot blot analysis,The blots were hybrid-ized with ARcDNA probe and 1Aprobe(internal control)and autoradionraphy was performed.The intensity of signal was measured with a densitometer and the ratio of AR RNAand1ARNAwas calculated.Results:Androgenic deprivation produced by castration decreased the weight of the prostate and increased the levels of ARmRNA.Treatment of the castrated rats with testostrone increased the weight of prostate and decreased the levels of ARmRNA.Treatment of normal rats with flutamide decreased the weight of the gland and increased the levels of AR mRNA.Conclusion:Androgens produce proliferative effect on the prostate and negatively regulate the AR transcription.

  14. Androgens regulate Hedgehog signalling and proliferation in androgen-dependent prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirab, Nanor; Terry, Stéphane; Giton, Frank; Caradec, Josselin; Chimingqi, Mihelaiti; Moutereau, Stéphane; Vacherot, Francis; de la Taille, Alexandre; Kouyoumdjian, Jean-Claude; Loric, Sylvain

    2012-09-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen sensitive in its development and progression to metastatic disease. Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation is important in the initiation and growth of various carcinomas including PCa. We and others have observed aberrations of Hh pathway during the progression of PCa to the castration-resistant state. The involvement of androgen signalling in Hh pathway activation, however, remains largely elusive. Here we investigate the direct role of androgen signalling on Hh pathway. We examined the effect of Dihydrosterone (DHT), antiandrogen, bicalutamide, and Hh pathway inhibitor, KAAD-cyclopamine in four human prostate cell lines (two cancerous: LNCaP, VCaP, and two normal: PNT2 and PNT2-ARm which harbours a mutant version of androgen receptor (AR) that is commonly found in LNCaP). Cell proliferation as well as Hh pathway members (SHH, IHH, DHH, GLI, PTCH) mRNA expression levels were assessed. We showed that KAAD-cyclopamine decreased cell proliferation of DHT-stimulated LNCaP, VCaP and PNT2-ARm cells. SHH expression was found to be downregulated by DHT in all AR posititve cells. The negative effect of DHT on SHH expression was counteracted when cells were treated by bicalutamide. Importantly, KAAD-cyclopamine treatment seemed to inhibit AR activity. Moreover, bicalutamide as well as KAAD-cyclopamine treatments induced GLI and PTCH expression in VCaP and PNT2-ARm. Our results suggest that Hh pathway activity can be regulated by androgen signalling. Specifically, we show that the DHT-induced inhibition of Hh pathway is AR dependent. The mutual interaction between these two pathways might be important in the regulation of cell proliferation in PCa.

  15. Androgens increase survival of adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus by an androgen receptor-dependent mechanism in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamson, D K; Wainwright, S R; Taylor, J R; Jones, B A; Watson, N V; Galea, L A M

    2013-09-01

    Gonadal steroids are potent regulators of adult neurogenesis. We previously reported that androgens, such as testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), but not estradiol, increased the survival of new neurons in the dentate gyrus of the male rat. These results suggest androgens regulate hippocampal neurogenesis via the androgen receptor (AR). To test this supposition, we examined the role of ARs in hippocampal neurogenesis using 2 different approaches. In experiment 1, we examined neurogenesis in male rats insensitive to androgens due to a naturally occurring mutation in the gene encoding the AR (termed testicular feminization mutation) compared with wild-type males. In experiment 2, we injected the AR antagonist, flutamide, into castrated male rats and compared neurogenesis levels in the dentate gyrus of DHT and oil-treated controls. In experiment 1, chronic T increased hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type males but not in androgen-insensitive testicular feminization mutation males. In experiment 2, DHT increased hippocampal neurogenesis via cell survival, an effect that was blocked by concurrent treatment with flutamide. DHT, however, did not affect cell proliferation. Interestingly, cells expressing doublecortin, a marker of immature neurons, did not colabel with ARs in the dentate gyrus, but ARs were robustly expressed in other regions of the hippocampus. Together these studies provide complementary evidence that androgens regulate adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus via the AR but at a site other than the dentate gyrus. Understanding where in the brain androgens act to increase the survival of new neurons in the adult brain may have implications for neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Bone stroma-derived cells change coregulators recruitment to androgen receptor and decrease cell proliferation in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagran, Marcelo A; Gutierrez-Castro, Francisco A; Pantoja, Diego F; Alarcon, Jose C; Fariña, Macarena A; Amigo, Romina F; Muñoz-Godoy, Natalia A; Pinilla, Mabel G; Peña, Eduardo A; Gonzalez-Chavarria, Ivan; Toledo, Jorge R; Rivas, Coralia I; Vera, Juan C; McNerney, Eileen M; Onate, Sergio A

    2015-11-27

    Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were used to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Two rare human mitofusin 2 mutations alter mitochondrial dynamics and induce retinal and cardiac pathology in Drosophila.

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    William H Eschenbacher

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial fusion is essential to organelle homeostasis and organ health. Inexplicably, loss of function mutations of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2 specifically affect neurological tissue, causing Charcot Marie Tooth syndrome (CMT and atypical optic atrophy. As CMT-linked Mfn2 mutations are predominantly within the GTPase domain, we postulated that Mfn2 mutations in other functional domains might affect non-neurological tissues. Here, we defined in vitro and in vivo consequences of rare human mutations in the poorly characterized Mfn2 HR1 domain. Human exome sequencing data identified 4 rare non-synonymous Mfn2 HR1 domain mutations, two bioinformatically predicted as damaging. Recombinant expression of these (Mfn2 M393I and R400Q in Mfn2-null murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs revealed incomplete rescue of characteristic mitochondrial fragmentation, compared to wild-type human Mfn2 (hMfn2; Mfn2 400Q uniquely induced mitochondrial fragmentation in normal MEFs. To compare Mfn2 mutation effects in neurological and non-neurological tissues in vivo, hMfn2 and the two mutants were expressed in Drosophila eyes or heart tubes made deficient in endogenous fly mitofusin (dMfn through organ-specific RNAi expression. The two mutants induced similar Drosophila eye phenotypes: small eyes and an inability to rescue the eye pathology induced by suppression of dMfn. In contrast, Mfn2 400Q induced more severe cardiomyocyte mitochondrial fragmentation and cardiac phenotypes than Mfn2 393I, including heart tube dilation, depressed fractional shortening, and progressively impaired negative geotaxis. These data reveal a central functional role for Mfn2 HR1 domains, describe organ-specific effects of two Mfn2 HR1 mutations, and strongly support prospective studies of Mfn2 400Q in heritable human heart disease of unknown genetic etiology.

  18. Inhibitory effects of a novel Val to Thr mutation on the distal heme of human catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Boeglin, William E; Brash, Alan R

    2014-11-01

    True catalases efficiently breakdown hydrogen peroxide, whereas the catalase-related enzyme allene oxide synthase (cAOS) is completely unreactive and instead metabolizes a fatty acid hydroperoxide. In cAOS a Thr residue adjacent to the distal His restrains reaction with H2O2 (Tosha et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281:12610; De Luna et al. (2013) J. Phys. Chem. B 117: 14635) and its mutation to the consensus Val of true catalases permits the interaction. Here we investigated the effects of the reciprocal experiment in which the Val74 of human catalase is mutated to Thr, Ser, Met, Pro, or Ala. The Val74Thr substitution decreased catalatic activity by 3.5-fold and peroxidatic activity by 3-fold. Substitution with Ser had similar negative effects (5- and 3-fold decreases). Met decreased catalatic activity 2-fold and eliminated peroxidatic activity altogether, whereas the Val74Ala substitution was well tolerated. (The Val74Pro protein lacked heme). We conclude that the conserved Val74 of true catalases helps optimize catalysis. There are rare substitutions of Val74 with Ala, Met, or Pro, but not with Ser of Thr, possibly due their hydrogen bonding affecting the conformation of His75, the essential distal heme residue for activity in catalases.

  19. An Insertion Mutation That Distorts Antibody Binding Site Architecture Enhances Function of a Human Antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Jens C.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Smith, Patricia B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Crowe, Jr., James E. (Vanderbilt); (Scripps); (CDC)

    2011-09-02

    The structural and functional significance of somatic insertions and deletions in antibody chains is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a naturally occurring three-amino-acid insertion within the influenza virus-specific human monoclonal antibody 2D1 heavy-chain variable region reconfigures the antibody-combining site and contributes to its high potency against the 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses. The insertion arose through a series of events, including a somatic point mutation in a predicted hot-spot motif, introduction of a new hot-spot motif, a molecular duplication due to polymerase slippage, a deletion due to misalignment, and additional somatic point mutations. Atomic resolution structures of the wild-type antibody and a variant in which the insertion was removed revealed that the three-amino-acid insertion near the base of heavy-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) H2 resulted in a bulge in that loop. This enlarged CDR H2 loop impinges on adjacent regions, causing distortion of the CDR H1 architecture and its displacement away from the antigen-combining site. Removal of the insertion restores the canonical structure of CDR H1 and CDR H2, but binding, neutralization activity, and in vivo activity were reduced markedly because of steric conflict of CDR H1 with the hemagglutinin antigen.

  20. Effect of mutations mimicking phosphorylation on the structure and properties of human 14-3-3zeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Chernik, Ivan S; Seit-Nebi, Alim S; Pivovarova, Anastasia V; Levitsky, Dmitrii I; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2008-09-15

    Effect of mutations mimicking phosphorylation on the structure of human 14-3-3zeta protein was analyzed by different methods. Mutation S58E increased intrinsic Trp fluorescence and binding of bis-ANS to 14-3-3. At low protein concentration mutation S58E increased the probability of dissociation of dimeric 14-3-3 and its susceptibility to proteolysis. Mutation S184E slightly increased Stokes radius and thermal stability of 14-3-3. Mutation T232E induced only small increase of Stokes radius and sedimentation coefficient that probably reflect the changes in the size or shape of 14-3-3. At low protein concentration the triple mutant S58E/S184E/T232E tended to dissociate, whereas at high concentration its properties were comparable with those of the wild type protein. The triple mutant was highly susceptible to proteolysis. Thus, mutation mimicking phosphorylation of Ser58 destabilized, whereas mutation of Ser184 induced stabilization of 14-3-3zeta structure.

  1. Point mutations in the murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene: Animalmodels for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aponte, Jennifer [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sega, Gary A [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Dhar, Madhu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Withrow, Catherine [ORNL; Carpenter, D A [ORNL; Rinchik, Eugene M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Culiat, Cymbeline T [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL

    2001-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease associated with point mutations in the human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) gene that disrupt tyrosine catabolism. An acute form of HT1 results in death during the first months of life because of hepatic failure, whereas a chronic form leads to gradual development of liver disease often accompanied by renal dysfunction, childhood rickets, neurological crisis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mice homozygous for certain chromosome 7 deletions of the albino Tyr; c locus that also include Fah die perinatally as a result of liver dysfunction and exhibit a complex syndrome characterized by structural abnormalities and alterations in gene expression in the liver and kidney. Here we report that two independent, postnatally lethal mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and mapped near Tyr are alleles of Fah. The Fah6287SB allele is a missense mutation in exon 6, and Fah5961SB is a splice mutation causing loss of exon 7, a subsequent frameshift in the resulting mRNA, and a severe reduction of Fah mRNA levels. Increased levels of the diagnostic metabolite succinylacetone in the urine of the Fah6287SB and Fah5961SB mutants indicate that these mutations cause a decrease in Fah enzymatic activity. Thus, the neonatal phenotype present in both mutants is due to a deficiency in Fah caused by a point mutation, and we propose Fah5961SB and Fah6287SB as mouse models for acute and chronic forms of human HT1, respectively.

  2. Cataract-causing mutation of human connexin 46 impairs gap junction, but increases hemichannel function and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ren

    Full Text Available Connexin channels play a critical role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis and transparency of the lens. Mutations in connexin genes are linked to congenital cataracts in humans. The G143R missense mutation on connexin (Cx 46 was recently reported to be associated with congenital Coppock cataracts. Here, we showed that the G143R mutation decreased Cx46 gap junctional coupling in a dominant negative manner; however, it significantly increased gap junctional plaques. The G143R mutant also increased hemichannel activity, inversely correlated with the level of Cx46 protein on the cell surface. The interaction between cytoplasmic loop domain and C-terminus has been shown to be involved in gating of connexin channels. Interestingly, the G143R mutation enhanced the interaction between intracellular loop and Cx46. Furthermore, this mutation decreased cell viability and the resistance of the cells to oxidative stress, primarily due to the increased hemichannel function. Together, these results suggest that mutation of this highly conserved residue on the cytoplasmic loop domain of Cx46 enhances its interaction with the C-terminus, resulting in a reduction of gap junction channel function, but increased hemichannel function. This combination leads to the development of human congenital cataracts.

  3. PIK3CA and TP53 gene mutations in human breast cancer tumors frequently detected by ion torrent DNA sequencing.

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    Xusheng Bai

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide. While specific genetic mutations have been linked to 5-10% of breast cancer cases, other environmental and epigenetic factors influence the development and progression of the cancer. Since unique mutations patterns have been observed in individual cancer samples, identification and characterization of the distinctive breast cancer molecular profile is needed to develop more effective target therapies. Until recently, identifying genetic cancer mutations via personalized DNA sequencing was impractical and expensive. The recent technological advancements in next-generation DNA sequencing, such as the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent sequencing platform, has made DNA sequencing cost and time effective with more reliable results. Using the Ion Torrent Ampliseq Cancer Panel, we sequenced 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes to identify genetic mutations in 105 human breast cancer samples. The sequencing analysis revealed missense mutations in PIK3CA, and TP53 genes in the breast cancer samples of various histologic types. Thus, this study demonstrates the necessity of sequencing individual human cancers in order to develop personalized drugs or combination therapies to effectively target individual, breast cancer-specific mutations.

  4. In vitro metabolism studies on the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) LG121071 and its implementation into human doping controls using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Andre; Krug, Oliver; Vincenti, Marco; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    LG121071 is a member of the tetrahydroquinolinone-based class of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) drug candidates. These nonsteroidal compounds are supposed to act as full anabolic agents with reduced androgenic properties. As SARMs provide an alternative to anabolic androgenic steroids, they represent an emerging class of potential doping substances abused by athletes for illicit performance enhancement. According to the World Anti-Doping Agency's regulations, SARMs are banned substances and part of the Prohibited List since 2008. In consideration of the increasing number of adverse analytical findings in doping controls caused by SARMs abuse, potential drug candidates such as LG121071 have been proactively investigated to enable a timely integration into routine testing procedures even though clinical trials are not yet complete. In the present approach, the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of LG121071 was characterized by means of electrospray ionization-high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry, MS(n), and isotope labeling experiments. Interestingly, the even-electron precursor ion [M + H](+) at m/z 297 was found to produce a radical cation at m/z 268 under CID conditions, violating the even-electron rule that commonly applies. For doping control purposes, metabolites were generated in vitro and a detection method for urine samples based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was established. The overall metabolic conversion of LG121071 was modest, yielding primarily mono-, bis- and trishydroxylated species. Notable, however, was the identification of a glucuronic acid conjugate of the intact drug, attributed to an N-glucuronide structure. The sample preparation procedure included the enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronides prior to liquid-liquid extraction, allowing intact LG121071 to be measured, as well as the corresponding phase-I metabolites. The method was characterized concerning inter alia lower limit of detection (0

  5. Generation of KCL025 research grade human embryonic stem cell line carrying a mutation in NF1 gene

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    Heema Hewitson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The KCL025 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from an embryo donated for research that carried an autosomal dominant mutation in the NF1 gene encoding neurofibromin (c.3739–3742 ΔTTTG. Mutations in this gene have been linked to neurofibromatosis type 1, juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and Watson syndrome. The ICM was isolated using laser microsurgery and plated on γ-irradiated human foreskin fibroblasts. Both the derivation and cell line propagation were performed in an animal product-free environment. Pluripotent state and differentiation potential were confirmed by in vitro assays.

  6. Mutations of the p53 gene in human functional adrenal neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiu-Ru Lin; Yau-Jiunn Lee; Juei-Hsiung Tsai [Kaohsiung Medical College, Taiwan (China)

    1994-02-01

    To clarify gene alterations in functional human adrenal tumors, the authors performed molecular analysis for p53 abnormalities in 23 cases with adrenal neoplasms. The immunohistochemical study with anti-p53 monoclonal antibody pAb1801 demonstrated that 10 of 23 (43.5%) cases overexpressed p53 protein in the tumor cells. Using a polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism study, 5 of 6 (83.3%) pheochromocytoma tissues (1 malignant and 5 benign) and 11 of 15 (73.3%) adrenocortical adenomas (2 with Cushing`s syndrome and 13 with primary aldosteronism, all benign) showed an apparent electrophoretic mobility shift between the tumor and its paired adjacent normal adrenal tissue. Such differences were detected in exon 4 (12 cases), exon 5 (2 cases), and exon 7 (3 cases). The types of these mutations in exon 4 were a substitution from threonine (ACC) to isoleucine (ATC) at codon 102 in 5 cases, from glutamine (CAG) to histidine (CAC) at codon 104 in 1 case, from glycine (GGG) to alanine (CGG) at codon 117 in 1 case, from glutamate (GAG) to glutamine (CAG) at codon 68 in 1 case, and single base changes resulting in a premature stop codon at codon 100 in 2 cases. A 2-basepair deletion at codon 175 in exon 5 resulting in a frame shift was identified in 1 case. A single point mutation was identified, resulting in the substitution of glutamine (CAG) for arginine (CGG) at codon 248 of exon 7 in 1 case. A single basepair deletion at codon 249 resulted in a frame shift in 2 cases. There was 1 case with malignant pheochromocytoma that combined a single point mutation in exon 4 and a single base deletion in exon 7. Only 2 of 23 cases showed a loss of a normal allele encoding in the p53 gene. Northern blot analysis with 1.8-kilobase p53 cDNA revealed that p53 mRNA was overexpressed in 6 cases. The results indicate that high frequencies of p53 gene mutation, especially in exon 4, exist in functional adrenal tumors. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Canine and human visual cortex intact and responsive despite early retinal blindness from RPE65 mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey K Aguirre

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RPE65 is an essential molecule in the retinoid-visual cycle, and RPE65 gene mutations cause the congenital human blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA. Somatic gene therapy delivered to the retina of blind dogs with an RPE65 mutation dramatically restores retinal physiology and has sparked international interest in human treatment trials for this incurable disease. An unanswered question is how the visual cortex responds after prolonged sensory deprivation from retinal dysfunction. We therefore studied the cortex of RPE65-mutant dogs before and after retinal gene therapy. Then, we inquired whether there is visual pathway integrity and responsivity in adult humans with LCA due to RPE65 mutations (RPE65-LCA. METHODS AND FINDINGS: RPE65-mutant dogs were studied with fMRI. Prior to therapy, retinal and subcortical responses to light were markedly diminished, and there were minimal cortical responses within the primary visual areas of the lateral gyrus (activation amplitude mean +/- standard deviation [SD] = 0.07% +/- 0.06% and volume = 1.3 +/- 0.6 cm(3. Following therapy, retinal and subcortical response restoration was accompanied by increased amplitude (0.18% +/- 0.06% and volume (8.2 +/- 0.8 cm(3 of activation within the lateral gyrus (p < 0.005 for both. Cortical recovery occurred rapidly (within a month of treatment and was persistent (as long as 2.5 y after treatment. Recovery was present even when treatment was provided as late as 1-4 y of age. Human RPE65-LCA patients (ages 18-23 y were studied with structural magnetic resonance imaging. Optic nerve diameter (3.2 +/- 0.5 mm was within the normal range (3.2 +/- 0.3 mm, and occipital cortical white matter density as judged by voxel-based morphometry was slightly but significantly altered (1.3 SD below control average, p = 0.005. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in human RPE65-LCA patients revealed cortical responses with a markedly diminished activation volume (8

  8. Impact of circulating cholesterol levels on growth and intratumoral androgen concentration of prostate tumors.

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    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second most common cancer in men. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT leads to tumor involution and reduction of tumor burden. However, tumors eventually reemerge that have overcome the absence of gonadal androgens, termed castration resistant PCa (CRPC. Theories underlying the development of CRPC include androgen receptor (AR mutation allowing for promiscuous activation by non-androgens, AR amplification and overexpression leading to hypersensitivity to low androgen levels, and/or tumoral uptake and conversion of adrenally derived androgens. More recently it has been proposed that prostate tumor cells synthesize their own androgens through de novo steroidogenesis, which involves the step-wise synthesis of androgens from cholesterol. Using the in vivo LNCaP PCa xenograft model, previous data from our group demonstrated that a hypercholesterolemia diet potentiates prostatic tumor growth via induction of angiogenesis. Using this same model we now demonstrate that circulating cholesterol levels are significantly associated with tumor size (R = 0.3957, p = 0.0049 and intratumoral levels of testosterone (R = 0.41, p = 0.0023 in LNCaP tumors grown in hormonally intact mice. We demonstrate tumoral expression of cholesterol uptake genes as well as the spectrum of steroidogenic enzymes necessary for androgen biosynthesis from cholesterol. Moreover, we show that circulating cholesterol levels are directly correlated with tumoral expression of CYP17A, the critical enzyme required for de novo synthesis of androgens from cholesterol (R = 0.4073, p = 0.025 Since hypercholesterolemia does not raise circulating androgen levels and the adrenal gland of the mouse synthesizes minimal androgens, this study provides evidence that hypercholesterolemia increases intratumoral de novo steroidogenesis. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that cholesterol-fueled intratumoral androgen synthesis may accelerate the

  9. Kinetic Results for Mutations of Conserved Residues H304 and R309 of Human Sulfite Oxidase Point to Mechanistic Complexities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Amanda C.; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Arnold, Anna R.; Tollin, Gordon; Enemark, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Several point mutations in the gene of human sulfite oxidase (hSO) result in isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency, an inherited metabolic disorder. Three conserved residues (H304, R309, K322) are hydrogen bonded to the phosphate group of the molybdenum cofactor, and the R309H and K322R mutations are responsible for isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency. The kinetic effects of the K322R mutation have been previously reported (Rajapakshe et al. 2012, Chem. Biodiversity 9, 1621-1634); here we investigate several mutants of H304 and R309 by steady-state kinetics, laser flash photolysis studies of intramolecular electron transfer (IET), and spectroelectrochemistry. An unexpected result is that all of the mutants show decreased rates of IET but increased steady-state rates of catalysis. However, in all cases the rate of IET is greater than the overall turnover rate, showing that IET is not the rate determining step for any of the mutations. PMID:24968320

  10. ANDROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN POSTMENOPAUSE

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    Helena Meden Vrtovec

    2008-12-01

    Scientific studies and clinical experiences have not provided until now the answers to thequestion: »Whom to treat, when, why and for how long should androgens be used for HRTin postmenopausal women?«

  11. Identification of two different point mutations associated with the fluoride-resistant phenotype for human butyrylcholinesterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, C.P.; McGuire, M.C.; Adkins, S.; Van Der Spek, A.F.L.; La Du, B.N. (Univ.of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Bartels, C.F.; Lockridge, O. (Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States) Eppley Institute, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)); Lubrano, T.; Rubinstein, H.M. (Veterans Administration Hospital, Hines, IL (United States) Loyola Univ. Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL (United States)); Lightstone, H. (Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    The fluoride variant of human butyrylcholinesterase owes its name to the observation that it is resistant to inhibition by 0.050 mM sodium fluoride in the in vitro assay. Individuals who are heterozygous for the fluoride and atypical alleles experience about 30 min of apnea, rather than the usual 3-5 min, after receiving succinyldicholine. Earlier the authors reported that the atypical variant has a nucleotide substitution which changes Asp 70 to Gly. In the present work they have identified two different point mutations associated with the fluoride-resistant phentotype. Fluoride-1 has a nucleotide substitution which changes Thr 243 to Met (ACG to ATG). Fluoride-2 has a substitution which changes Gly 390 to Val (GGT to GTT). These results were obtained by DNA sequence analysis of the butyrylcholinesterase gene after amplification by PCR. The subjects for these analyses were 4 patients and 21 family members. 36 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Water-Restructuring Mutations Can Reverse the Thermodynamic Signature of Ligand Binding to Human Carbonic Anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jerome M; Kang, Kyungtae; Sastry, Madhavi; Sherman, Woody; Sankaran, Banumathi; Zwart, Peter H; Whitesides, George M

    2017-03-27

    This study uses mutants of human carbonic anhydrase (HCAII) to examine how changes in the organization of water within a binding pocket can alter the thermodynamics of protein-ligand association. Results from calorimetric, crystallographic, and theoretical analyses suggest that most mutations strengthen networks of water-mediated hydrogen bonds and reduce binding affinity by increasing the enthalpic cost and, to a lesser extent, the entropic benefit of rearranging those networks during binding. The organization of water within a binding pocket can thus determine whether the hydrophobic interactions in which it engages are enthalpy-driven or entropy-driven. Our findings highlight a possible asymmetry in protein-ligand association by suggesting that, within the confines of the binding pocket of HCAII, binding events associated with enthalpically favorable rearrangements of water are stronger than those associated with entropically favorable ones. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. POC1A truncation mutation causes a ciliopathy in humans characterized by primordial dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Shamseldin, Hanan E; Noche, Ramil R; Sunker, Asma; Alshammari, Muneera J; Al-Sheddi, Tarfa; Adly, Nouran; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Megason, Sean G; Al-Husain, Muneera; Al-Mohanna, Futwan; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2012-08-10

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a phenotype characterized by profound growth retardation that is prenatal in onset. Significant strides have been made in the last few years toward improved understanding of the molecular underpinning of the limited growth that characterizes the embryonic and postnatal development of PD individuals. These include impaired mitotic mechanics, abnormal IGF2 expression, perturbed DNA-damage response, defective spliceosomal machinery, and abnormal replication licensing. In three families affected by a distinct form of PD, we identified a founder truncating mutation in POC1A. This gene is one of two vertebrate paralogs of POC1, which encodes one of the most abundant proteins in the Chlamydomonas centriole proteome. Cells derived from the index individual have abnormal mitotic mechanics with multipolar spindles, in addition to clearly impaired ciliogenesis. siRNA knockdown of POC1A in fibroblast cells recapitulates this ciliogenesis defect. Our findings highlight a human ciliopathy syndrome caused by deficiency of a major centriolar protein.

  14. Mutations of LRTOMT, a fusion gene with alternative reading frames, cause nonsyndromic deafness in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zubair M; Masmoudi, Saber; Kalay, Ersan; Belyantseva, Inna A; Mosrati, Mohamed Ali; Collin, Rob W J; Riazuddin, Saima; Hmani-Aifa, Mounira; Venselaar, Hanka; Kawar, Mayya N; Tlili, Abdelaziz; van der Zwaag, Bert; Khan, Shahid Y; Ayadi, Leila; Riazuddin, S Amer; Morell, Robert J; Griffith, Andrew J; Charfedine, Ilhem; Caylan, Refik; Oostrik, Jaap; Karaguzel, Ahmet; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B; Ayadi, Hammadi; Kremer, Hannie

    2008-11-01

    Many proteins necessary for sound transduction have been identified through positional cloning of genes that cause deafness. We report here that mutations of LRTOMT are associated with profound nonsyndromic hearing loss at the DFNB63 locus on human chromosome 11q13.3-q13.4. LRTOMT has two alternative reading frames and encodes two different proteins, LRTOMT1 and LRTOMT2, detected by protein blot analyses. LRTOMT2 is a putative methyltransferase. During evolution, new transcripts can arise through partial or complete coalescence of genes. We provide evidence that in the primate lineage LRTOMT evolved from the fusion of two neighboring ancestral genes, which exist as separate genes (Lrrc51 and Tomt) in rodents.

  15. Systematic structure-function analysis of androgen receptor Leu 701 mutants explains the properties of the prostate cancer mutant L701H

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. van de Wijngaart (Dennis); M. Molier; S.J. Lusher (Scott); R. Hersmus (Remko); G.W. Jenster (Guido); J. Trapman (Hans); H.J. Dubbink (Erik Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOne mechanism of prostate tumors for escape from androgen ablation therapies is mutation of the androgen receptor (AR). Weinvestigated the unique properties of theARL701H mutant, which is strongly stimulated by cortisol, by a systematic structure-function analysis. Most amino acid substi

  16. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley R Lewis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or 'primary' cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400. While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8. GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC protein 4 (DRC4 where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR to generate one of these human missense

  17. Functional characterization of newly-discovered mutations in human SR-BI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Sahoo, Daisy

    2012-01-01

    In rodents, SR-BI has been firmly established as a physiologically relevant HDL receptor that mediates removal of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE). However, its role in human lipoprotein metabolism is less defined. Recently, two unique point mutations in human SR-BI - S112F or T175A - were identified in subjects with high HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. We hypothesized that mutation of these conserved residues would compromise the cholesterol-transport functions of SR-BI. To test this hypothesis, S112F- and T175A-SR-BI were generated by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell surface expression was confirmed for both mutant receptors in COS-7 cells upon transient transfection, albeit at lower levels for T175A-SR-BI. Both mutant receptors displayed defective HDL binding, selective uptake of HDL-CE and release of free cholesterol (FC) from cells to HDL. Mutant receptors were also unable to re-organize plasma membrane pools of FC. While these impaired functions were independent of receptor oligomerization, inability of T175A-SR-BI to mediate cholesterol-transport functions could be related to altered N-linked glycosylation status. In conclusion, high HDL-C levels observed in carriers of S112F- or T175A-SR-BI mutant receptors are consistent with the inability of these SR-BI receptors to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-CE, and suggest that increased plasma HDL concentrations in these settings may not be associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

  18. Effect of Saw Palmetto Supplements on Androgen-Sensitive LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Cell Number and Syrian Hamster Flank Organ Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander B. Opoku-Acheampong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Saw palmetto supplements (SPS are commonly consumed by men with prostate cancer. We investigated whether SPS fatty acids and phytosterols concentrations determine their growth-inhibitory action in androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells and hamster flank organs. High long-chain fatty acids-low phytosterols (HLLP SPS ≥ 750 nM with testosterone significantly increased and ≥500 nM with dihydrotestosterone significantly decreased LNCaP cell number. High long-chain fatty acids-high phytosterols (HLHP SPS ≥ 500 nM with dihydrotestosterone and high medium-chain fatty acids-low phytosterols (HMLP SPS ≥ 750 nM or with androgens significantly decreased LNCaP cell number (n=3; p<0.05. Five- to six-week-old, castrated male Syrian hamsters were randomized to control (n=4, HLLP, HLHP, and HMLP SPS (n=6 groups. Testosterone or dihydrotestosterone was applied topically daily for 21 days to the right flank organ; the left flank organ was treated with ethanol and served as the control. Thirty minutes later, SPS or ethanol was applied to each flank organ in treatment and control groups, respectively. SPS treatments caused a notable but nonsignificant reduction in the difference between left and right flank organ growth in testosterone-treated SPS groups compared to the control. The same level of inhibition was not seen in dihydrotestosterone-treated SPS groups (p<0.05. Results may suggest that SPS inhibit 5α-reductase thereby preventing hamster flank organ growth.

  19. Generation and Characterization of a Transgenic Mouse Carrying a Functional Human β -Globin Gene with the IVSI-6 Thalassemia Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breveglieri, Giulia; Mancini, Irene; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Lampronti, Ilaria; Salvatori, Francesca; Fabbri, Enrica; Zuccato, Cristina; Cosenza, Lucia C; Montagner, Giulia; Borgatti, Monica; Altruda, Fiorella; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Carandina, Gianni; Rubini, Michele; Aiello, Vincenzo; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto; Finotti, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models that carry mutations causing thalassemia represent a suitable tool to test in vivo new mutation-specific therapeutic approaches. Transgenic mice carrying the β-globin IVSI-6 mutation (the most frequent in Middle-Eastern regions and recurrent in Italy and Greece) are, at present, not available. We report the production and characterization of a transgenic mouse line (TG-β-IVSI-6) carrying the IVSI-6 thalassemia point mutation within the human β-globin gene. In the TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse (a) the transgenic integration region is located in mouse chromosome 7; (b) the expression of the transgene is tissue specific; (c) as expected, normally spliced human β-globin mRNA is produced, giving rise to β-globin production and formation of a human-mouse tetrameric chimeric hemoglobin (mu) α-globin2/(hu) β-globin2 and, more importantly, (d) the aberrant β-globin-IVSI-6 RNAs are present in blood cells. The TG-β-IVSI-6 mouse reproduces the molecular features of IVSI-6 β-thalassemia and might be used as an in vivo model to characterize the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the cryptic sites responsible for the generation of aberrantly spliced β-globin RNA sequences, caused by the IVSI-6 mutation. These experiments are expected to be crucial for the development of a personalized therapy for β-thalassemia.

  20. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kairong; Turner, Ashley N; Chen, Min; Brosius, Stephanie N; Schoeb, Trenton R; Messiaen, Ludwine M; Bedwell, David M; Zinn, Kurt R; Anastasaki, Corina; Gutmann, David H; Korf, Bruce R; Kesterson, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681*) and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg). The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1(Arg681*) and missense NF1(Gly848Arg) mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1(Gly848Arg) mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1(Arg681*) mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1(Arg681*) allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf1(4F/Arg681*); DhhCre) display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1.

  1. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairong Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681* and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg. The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1Arg681* and missense NF1Gly848Arg mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1Gly848Arg mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1Arg681* mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1Arg681* allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf14F/Arg681*; DhhCre display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1.

  2. Keratin gene mutations in disorders of human skin and its appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A; Syed, Deeba N; Adhami, Vaqar M; Liovic, Mirjana; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-04-15

    Keratins, the major structural protein of all epithelia are a diverse group of cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins that form intermediate filament networks, providing structural support to keratinocytes that maintain the integrity of the skin. Expression of keratin genes is usually regulated by differentiation of the epidermal cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Amongst the 54 known functional keratin genes in humans, about 22 different genes including, the cornea, hair and hair follicle-specific keratins have been implicated in a wide range of hereditary diseases. The exact phenotype of each disease usually reflects the spatial expression level and the types of mutated keratin genes, the location of the mutations and their consequences at sub-cellular levels as well as other epigenetic and/or environmental factors. The identification of specific pathogenic mutations in keratin disorders formed the basis of our understanding that led to re-classification, improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, prenatal testing and genetic counseling in severe keratin genodermatoses. Molecular defects in cutaneous keratin genes encoding for keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) causes keratinocytes and tissue-specific fragility, accounting for a large number of genetic disorders in human skin and its appendages. These diseases are characterized by keratinocytes fragility (cytolysis), intra-epidermal blistering, hyperkeratosis, and keratin filament aggregation in severely affected tissues. Examples include epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS; K5, K14), keratinopathic ichthyosis (KPI; K1, K2, K10) i.e. epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI; K1, K10) and ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS; K2), pachyonychia congenita (PC; K6a, K6b, K16, K17), epidermolytic palmo-plantar keratoderma (EPPK; K9, (K1)), monilethrix (K81, K83, K86), ectodermal dysplasia (ED; K85) and steatocystoma multiplex. These keratins also have been identified to have roles in apoptosis, cell proliferation

  3. Neural Activation During Mental Rotation in Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome : The Influence of Sex Hormones and Sex Chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemmen, Judy; Veltman, Dick J; Hoekzema, Elseline; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Dessens, Arianne B; Bakker, J.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones, androgens in particular, are hypothesized to play a key role in the sexual differentiation of the human brain. However, possible direct effects of the sex chromosomes, that is, XX or XY, have not been well studied in humans. Individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CA

  4. Camptothecin disrupts androgen receptor signaling and suppresses prostate cancer cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shicheng, E-mail: liusc59@yahoo.co.jp [Research and Development Department, Nipro Patch Co., Ltd., 8-1, Minamisakae-cho, Kasukabe, Saitama 344-0057 (Japan); Yuan, Yiming [Department of Geriatrics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Okumura, Yutaka; Shinkai, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Hitoshi [Research and Development Department, Nipro Patch Co., Ltd., 8-1, Minamisakae-cho, Kasukabe, Saitama 344-0057 (Japan)

    2010-04-02

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the main therapeutic target for treatment of metastatic prostate cancers. The present study demonstrates that the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin selectively inhibits androgen-responsive growth of prostate cancer cells. Camptothecin strikingly inhibited mutated and wild-type AR protein expression in LNCaP and PC-3/AR cells. This inhibition coincided with decreased androgen-mediated AR phosphorylation at Ser{sup 81} and reduced androgen-mediated AR transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, camptothecin disrupted the association between AR and heat shock protein 90 and impeded binding of the synthetic androgen [{sup 3}H]R1881 to AR in LNCaP cells. Camptothecin also blocked androgen-induced AR nuclear translocation, leading to downregulation of the AR target gene PSA. In addition to decreasing the intracellular and secreted prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, camptothecin markedly inhibited androgen-stimulated PSA promoter activity. Collectively, our data reveal that camptothecin not only serves as a traditional genotoxic agent but, by virtue of its ability to target and disrupt AR, may also be a novel candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  5. BAY 1024767 blocks androgen receptor mutants found in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Tatsuo; Lejeune, Pascale; Köhr, Silke; Neuhaus, Roland; Faus, Hortensia; Gelato, Kathy A; Busemann, Matthias; Cleve, Arwed; Lücking, Ulrich; von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Mumberg, Dominik; Jung, Klaus; Stephan, Carsten; Haendler, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations arise in patients developing resistance to hormone deprivation therapies. Here we describe BAY 1024767, a thiohydantoin derivative with strong antagonistic activity against nine AR variants with mutations located in the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD), and against wild-type AR. Antagonism was maintained, though reduced, at increased androgen levels. Anti-tumor efficacy was evidenced in vivo in the KuCaP-1 prostate cancer model which bears the W741C bicalutamide resistance mutation and in the syngeneic prostate cancer rat model Dunning R3327-G. The prevalence of six selected AR mutations was determined in plasma DNA originating from 100 resistant patients and found to be at least 12%. Altogether the results show BAY 1024767 to be a strong antagonist for several AR mutants linked to therapy resistance, which opens the door for next-generation compounds that can benefit patients based on their mutation profile.

  6. The androgen receptor in hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Lei Mao; Zhi-Qi Zhu; Charlie Degui Chen

    2009-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer is responsive to hormone therapy that interferes with androgen receptor (AR) signalling.However,the effect is short-lived,as nearly all tumours progress to a hormone-refractory (HR) state,a lethal stage of the disease.Intuitively,the AR should not be involved because hormone therapy that blocks or reduces AR activity is not effective in treating HR turnouts.However,there is still a consensus that AR plays an essential role in HR prostate cancer (HRPC) because AR signalling is still functional in HR tumours.AR signalling can be activated in HR turnouts through several mechanisms.First,activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways can sensitize the AR to castrate levels of androgens.Also,mutations in the AR can change AR ligand specificity,thereby allowing it to be activated by non-steroids or anti-androgens.Finally,overexpression of the wild-type AR sensitizes itself to low concentrations of androgens.Therefore,drugs targeting AR signalling could still be effective in treating HRPC.

  7. Simultaneous DNA and RNA mapping of somatic mitochondrial mutations across diverse human cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Radhakrishnan, Sabarinathan;

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of e...

  8. Simultaneous DNA and RNA mapping of somatic mitochondrial mutations across diverse human cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Radhakrishnan, Sabarinathan

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of e...

  9. Role of androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HiroyoshiSuzuki; HaruoIto

    1999-01-01

    The growth of prostate cancer is sensitive to androgen, and hormonal therapy has been used for treatment of ad-vanced cancer. About 80 % of prostate cancers initially respond to hormonal therapy, howcrver, more than half of the re-sponders gradtmlly become resistant to this therapy. Changes in tumors from an androgen-responsive to an androgen-unre-sponsive state have been widely discussed. Since androgen action is mediated by androgen receptor (AR), abnonnalitiesof AR is believed to play an important role of the loss of androgen responsiveness in prostate cancer. "Ilais article focusedon the role of AR in the progression of prostate cancer.

  10. The AQP2 mutation V71M causes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in humans but does not impair the function of a bacterial homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Noreen; Kümmerer, Nadine; Hobernik, Dominika; Schneider, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Several point mutations have been identified in human aquaporins, but their effects on the function of the respective aquaporins are mostly enigmatic. We analyzed the impact of the aquaporin 2 mutation V71M, which causes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in humans, on aquaporin structure and activity, using the bacterial aquaglyceroporin GlpF as a model. Importantly, the sequence and structure around the V71M mutation is highly conserved between aquaporin 2 and GlpF. The V71M mutation neither impairs substrate flux nor oligomerization of the aquaglyceroporin. Therefore, the human aquaporin 2 mutant V71M is most likely active, but cellular trafficking is probably impaired.

  11. Monogenic mutations differentially impact the quantity and quality of T follicular helper cells in human primary immunodeficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cindy S; Wong, Natalie; Rao, Geetha; Avery, Danielle T; Torpy, James; Hambridge, Thomas; Bustamante, Jacinta; Okada, Satoshi; Stoddard, Jennifer L; Deenick, Elissa K; Pelham, Simon J; Payne, Katherine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Puel, Anne; Kobayashi, Masao; Arkwright, Peter D; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Baghdadi, Jamila El; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Mansouri, Davood; Bousfiha, Aziz; Blincoe, Annaliesse K; French, Martyn A; Hsu, Peter; Campbell, Dianne E.; Stormon, Michael O; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Smart, Joanne M; Fulcher, David A; Cook, Matthew C; Phan, Tri G; Stepensky, Polina; Boztug, Kaan; Kansu, Aydan; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Baumann, Ulrich; Beier, Rita; Roscioli, Tony; Ziegler, John B; Gray, Paul; Picard, Capucine; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Holland, Steven M; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Uzel, Gulbu; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-01-01

    Background T follicular helper (Tfh) cells underpin T-cell dependent humoral immunity and the success of most vaccines. Tfh cells also contribute to human immune disorders such as autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and malignancy. Understanding the molecular requirements for the generation and function of Tfh cells will provide strategies for targeting these cells to modulate their behavior in the setting of these immunological abnormalities. Objective To determine the signaling pathways and cellular interactions required for the development and function of Tfh cells in humans. Methods Human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) resulting from monogenic mutations provide a unique opportunity to assess the requirement for particular molecules in regulating human lymphocyte function. Circulating Tfh (cTfh) cell subsets, memory B cells and serum Ig levels were quantified and functionally assessed in healthy controls as well as patients with PIDs resulting from mutations in STAT3, STAT1, TYK2, IL21, IL21R, IL10R, IFNGR1/2, IL12RB1, CD40LG, NEMO, ICOS or BTK. Results Loss-of function (LOF) mutations in STAT3, IL10R, CD40LG, NEMO, ICOS or BTK reduced cTfh frequencies. STAT3, IL21/R LOF and STAT1 gain-of function mutations skewed cTfh differentiation towards a phenotype characterized by over-expression of IFNγ and programmed death -1 (PD-1). IFNγ inhibited cTfh function in vitro and in vivo, corroborated by hypergammaglobulinemia in patients with IFNGR1/2, STAT1 and IL12RB1 LOF mutations. Conclusion Specific mutations impact the quantity and quality of cTfh cells, highlighting the need to assess Tfh cells in patients by multiple criteria, including phenotype and function. Furthermore, IFNγ functions in vivo to restrain Tfh-induced B cell differentiation. These findings shed new light on Tfh biology and the integrated signaling pathways required for their generation, maintenance and effector function, and explain compromised humoral immunity in some PIDs. PMID:26162572

  12. Human papillomavirus type 16 and TP53 mutation in oral cancer: matched analysis of the IARC multicenter study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dai, M; Clifford, GM; Calvez, F le; Castellsague, X; Snijders, P.J.F.; Pawlita, M; Herrero, R; Hainaut, P; Franceschi, S

    2004-01-01

    TP53 mutations were analyzed in 35 human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA-positive cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx and in 35 HPV DNA-negative cancers matched by subsite, country, sex, age, and tobacco and alcohol consumption. Wild-type TP53 was found more frequently in cancer specimens tha

  13. Clonal expansion of early to mid-life mitochondrial DNA point mutations drives mitochondrial dysfunction during human ageing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greaves, L.C.; Nooteboom, M.; Elson, J.L.; Tuppen, H.A.; Taylor, G.A.; Commane, D.M.; Arasaradnam, R.P.; Khrapko, K.; Taylor, R.W.; Kirkwood, T.B.; Mathers, J.C.; Turnbull, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related decline in the integrity of mitochondria is an important contributor to the human ageing process. In a number of ageing stem cell populations, this decline in mitochondrial function is due to clonal expansion of individual mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations within single cells. Ho

  14. Aberrant E2F activation by polyglutamine expansion of androgen receptor in SBMA neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Ito, Saya; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Murata, Takuya; Furutani, Takashi; Shirode, Yuko; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Kimura, Shuhei; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sally; Lim, Jinseon; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Kouzmenko, Alexander P; Aigaki, Toshiro; Tabata, Tetsuya; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-03-10

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat (polyQ) expansion within the human androgen receptor (AR). Unlike other neurodegenerative diseases caused by abnormal polyQ expansion, the onset of SBMA depends on androgen binding to mutant human polyQ-AR proteins. This is also observed in Drosophila eyes ectopically expressing the polyQ-AR mutants. We have genetically screened mediators of androgen-induced neurodegeneration caused by polyQ-AR mutants in Drosophila eyes. We identified Rbf (Retinoblastoma-family protein), the Drosophila homologue of human Rb (Retinoblastoma protein), as a neuroprotective factor. Androgen-dependent association of Rbf or Rb wi