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  1. Islamophobia and Arab and Muslim Women's Activism

    OpenAIRE

    Povey, Tara

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to compare women’s activism in Diaspora communities in Muslim majority countries, such as Iran, with some of the experiences of women activists in Western counties such as Australia. This is by no means a definitive account of Arab and Muslim women’s activism in either country but an attempt to raise some questions and provide a framework in order to understand some of the issues facing Arab and Muslim activists today. I believe that it is important to look at these...

  2. Muslim Feminist Agency and Arab American Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koegeler-Abdi, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Mohja Kahf’s novel the girl in the tangerine scarf highlights a broad spectrum of Muslim feminist agencies. In this essay I look at how her literary representations negotiate religious and feminist discourses in doing so. I further argue that her focus on empowerment through self......-defined spirituality and religion sets her novel apart within the canon of contemporary Arab American literature, as most other Arab American feminist narratives focus rather on reappropriations of orientalist Scheherazade figures to reclaim the transnational histories of Muslim women’s agency. The genre of the Arab...... to the intersectional specificity encountered by Muslim feminist writers who have to work within both Western Orientalisms and the disapproval of Muslim conservatives who denounce feminism as a Western import and refuse any critique of their own patriarchy. Kahf suggests a constant double critique and careful...

  3. Alcohol use among Arab Muslim adolescents: A mediation-moderation model of family, peer, and community factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseed, Rana; Khoury-Kassabri, Mona

    2018-01-01

    Alcohol use among Muslims has received scant research attention, and little is known about the factors that underlie Arab Muslim adolescents' use of alcohol. The data used in this study is based on a large and representative sample of 2,948 Arab Muslim students from Israel, aged 11-18. The results showed that almost 10% of the adolescents reported using alcohol. The findings indicated that greater exposure to community violence victimization increases the risk for adolescent affiliation with delinquent peers, which in turn increases the use of alcohol. Furthermore, it was found that positive parent-child communication serves as a protective factor that mitigates the negative impact of association with delinquent peers. Our study indicates that adolescent alcohol use might most effectively be addressed with a holistic approach. The study emphasizes the critical need to reduce violence in Arab neighborhoods and highlights the central role parenting plays in protecting children from involvement in alcohol use. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Islamophobia and Arab and Muslim Women's Activism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Povey

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to compare women’s activism in Diaspora communities in Muslim majority countries, such as Iran, with some of the experiences of women activists in Western counties such as Australia. This is by no means a definitive account of Arab and Muslim women’s activism in either country but an attempt to raise some questions and provide a framework in order to understand some of the issues facing Arab and Muslim activists today. I believe that it is important to look at these issues in a way that is contextualized in terms of the material circumstances in which women living in Diaspora communities find themselves. In doing so, I hope to reveal the complexity and dynamism of women’s activism and to take on critically, Orientalist, essentialist and racist arguments regarding the nature of Arab and Muslim women’s role in opposing war and neo-liberalism and in the struggle for gender equality. As Edward Said argues, exile forces us to “see things not simply as they are, but as they have come to be that way. Look at situations as contingent, not as inevitable, look at them as a series of historical choices made by men and women, facts of society made by human beings not as natural or God-given, therefore unchangeable, permanent, irreversible.”

  5. Using an Anti-Racist Education Strategy to Counter Prejudice against Arab and Muslim Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeTample, Darrell R.

    2016-01-01

    Most Americans misunderstand the terms "Arab" and "Muslim," while also casting Arabs and Muslims as threats to national security. These perceived threats have led to the justification of the oppression of Arab and Muslim Americans similar to other minority groups in the United States, as non-Arab and non-Muslim Americans have…

  6. self-criticism to Arab and Muslim intellectuals

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    Fachrizal Halim

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary Arab Thought: Studies in Post-1967 Arab Intellectual Historyis written as a self-criticism addressed to Arab and Muslim intellectuals, especially those who reside in the West. The Arab intellectuals or Muslims alike, who have received Western education and have decided to live in Western countries in the first half of twentieth century, have actually benefited from their modern secular education. The liberalization of U.S. immigration laws in 1965 for non-European immigrants has even enlarged the number of Arabs and Muslims who have trained in the best institutions in the U.S. By the dawn of the twentieth century, the number of Arab intellectuals who reside in the West is estimated to double, as the result of the emergence of a second generation. However, the large number of educated Arab people does not always fulfill the promise of transformation of the social conditions of the Arab World. Far from being ‘organic intellectuals’, to use Gramsci’s favorite term, who would transform Arab societies from imperialism and Western hegemony, and the impact of dependency on the so called ‘globalization,’ most Arab thinkers in the West as well as the elite in the Arab world have been party to Western capitalist interests which aim to control the Arab World. By no means denigrating the works of Isma‘il Raji al-Faruqi, Edward Said, Ghada Hashem Talhami, Halim Barakat, or the feminist Leila Ahmad, to mention some brilliant Arab intellectuals, most Arab thinkers in the West seem to have forgotten the social conditions of the Arab world that have been in acute crisis since the mid nineteenth century or from the time colonialism stepped into the Arab world. Pseudo modernization—to say that there has never been any modernization as it emerged from the middle class as in Europe, but was initiated mainly by the elites—has kept Arab intellectuals in the West completely in the dark and unable to offer radical solution to the crises of

  7. Death and Dying Anxiety among Elderly Arab Muslims in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaiza, Faisal; Ron, Pnina; Shoham, Meyrav; Gigini, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Death and dying anxiety were examined among elderly Arab Muslims in Israel. A total of 145 people aged 60 and over were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Nursing home residents reported higher death anxiety than others; women and uneducated participants reported greater levels of fear of death and dying than others. There were no…

  8. [Human cloning in Muslim and Arab law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldeeb Abu-Sahlieh, Sami A

    2009-01-01

    Cloning is a modern medical procedure that Muslim religious authorities treat en resorting to the general principles established by classical Muslim law based on the Koran and the Sunnah of Muhhamad as the messenger of God. In this regard, human beings are not capable of deciding what is or what is not lawful without resorting to divine norms. Cloning clashes with several principles. Firstly, the principle of the respect for life in relation to surpernumeraries, but Muslim authors are not in unanimous agreement on the determination of the moment at which life begins. Secondly, is the respect of progeny: cloning could only take place between a married couple. But even if these two principles are respected, cloning poses two major problems: the diversity of species expounded by the Koran and the Sunnah and a lack of interest. Which explains the quasi-unanimous opposition of Muslim writings regarding cloning.

  9. Autopsy in Islam and current practice in Arab Muslim countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Madadin; Kharoshah, Magdy A

    2014-03-01

    Autopsy, or post-mortem examination, is the dissection of a dead body. It is performed for many reasons. Attitudes toward dead bodies vary with religious beliefs and cultural and geographical backgrounds. We have carried out an extensive literature review to determine the Islamic view and current practice of Autopsy, in at least four Arab countries which published their experiences. Several research articles have studied the history of Islamic Autopsy as well as the current situation and legal debates about it. The overwhelming conclusion is that data is lacking. More must be published from Arabic Muslim countries and more research done to correct misconceptions. We also recommend more application of non-invasive Autopsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  10. Islam, medicine, and Arab-Muslim refugee health in America after 9/11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Serour, Gamal I

    2011-09-03

    Islam is the world's second largest religion, representing nearly a quarter of the global population. Here, we assess how Islam as a religious system shapes medical practice, and how Muslims view and experience medical care. Islam has generally encouraged the use of science and biomedicine for the alleviation of suffering, with Islamic authorities having a crucial supportive role. Muslim patients are encouraged to seek medical solutions to their health problems. For example, Muslim couples who are infertile throughout the world are permitted to use assisted reproductive technologies. We focus on the USA, assessing how Islamic attitudes toward medicine influence Muslims' engagement with the US health-care system. Nowadays, the Arab-Muslim population is one of the fastest growing ethnic-minority populations in the USA. However, since Sept 11, 2001, Arab-Muslim patients--and particularly the growing Iraqi refugee population--face huge challenges in seeking and receiving medical care, including care that is judged to be religiously appropriate. We assess some of the barriers to care--ie, poverty, language, and discrimination. Arab-Muslim patients' religious concerns also suggest the need for cultural competence and sensitivity on the part of health-care practitioners. Here, we emphasise how Islamic conventions might affect clinical care, and make recommendations to improve health-care access and services for Arab-Muslim refugees and immigrants, and Muslim patients in general. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Disordered eating & cultural diversity: a focus on Arab Muslim women in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinson, Marjorie C; Meir, Adi

    2014-04-01

    A dearth of data concerning eating problems among adult women from minority population groups leaves substantial knowledge gaps and constrains evidence-based interventions. To examine prevalence and predictors of disordered eating behaviors (DEB) among Arab Muslim women in Israel, whose eating behaviors have not been previously examined and to compare with second generation Israeli-born Jews of European heritage. Community-based study includes sub-samples of Arab Muslims and Israeli-born Jews. DEB is assessed with fourteen DSM-IV related symptoms. Hierarchical regressions examine influence of weight, self-criticism and psychological distress on DEB severity. Relatively high prevalence rates emerge for Muslims (27%) and Jews (20%), a nonsignificant difference. In contrast, regressions reveal substantially different predictor patterns. For Arab Muslims, weight has the strongest association; for Jews, weight is not significant while self-criticism is the strongest predictor. Explained variance also differs considerably: 45% for Muslims and 28% for Jews. Surprising similarities and distinct differences underscore complex patterns of eating disturbances across culturally diverse groups. Culturally sensitive interventions are warranted along with more illuminating explanatory paradigms than 'one size fits all.' Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Knowledge, perceptions and thoughts of stroke among Arab-Muslim Israelis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhaki, Michal; Koton, Silvia

    2014-02-01

    Age-adjusted stroke mortality rates in Israel are higher among Arabs compared with Jews; therefore, knowledge of stroke signs and prevention strategies is especially important in the Arab population. Data on stroke knowledge among Arabs in Israel are lacking. We aimed to examine knowledge, perceptions and thoughts of stroke among Arab-Muslim Israelis. A complementary mixed method design was used. Ninety-nine Arab Muslims living in Israel, older than 40 years, with no history of stroke, were personally interviewed. Knowledge of stroke was assessed using quantitative analysis by a semi-structured interview. Information on perceptions and thoughts evoked by stroke was analyzed using qualitative analysis by the constant comparative method. Rates of reported knowledge-related variables were presented. Mean (SD) age of participants was 50.1 (8.0) years, 52.5% were women. Most of the participants (84.8%) knew the causes of stroke but only 29.3% mentioned sudden weakness or paralysis in one side of the body as a warning sign and other warning signs were even less known. The main known risk factor was hypertension (43.3%). Although knowledge of stroke prevention was poor, 89% were interested in learning about stroke and its prevention. The qualitative findings showed that stroke evokes negative thoughts of mental and physical burden and is associated with death, disability, dependence and depression. Levels of stroke knowledge among Arab-Muslim Israelis are low to moderate. Healthcare professionals should assist high risk populations in controlling and treating risk factors in order to reduce mortality and disability following a stroke.

  13. Health beliefs, practice, and priorities for health care of Arab Muslims in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosef, Abdel Raheem Odeh

    2008-07-01

    The Arab Muslim population is one of the dramatically increasing minorities in the United States. In addition to other factors, religion and cultural background influence individuals' beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes toward health and illness. The author describes health beliefs and practices of the Arab Muslim population in the United States. That population is at an increased risk for several diseases and faces many barriers to accessing the American health care system. Some barriers, such as modesty, gender preference in healthcare providers, and illness causation misconceptions, arise out of their cultural beliefs and practices. Other barriers are related to the complexity of the health care system and the lack of culturally competent services within it. Nurses need to be aware of these religious and cultural factors to provide culturally competent health promotion services for this population. Nurses also need to integrate Islamic teachings into their interventions to provide appropriate care and to motivate healthy behaviors.

  14. Factors That Influence Israeli Muslim Arab Parents' Intention to Vaccinate Their Children Against Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Natan, Merav; Kabha, Samih; Yehia, Mamon; Hamza, Omar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore factors related to the intention of parents from the Muslim Arab ethnic minority in Israel to vaccinate their children against influenza, using the Health Belief Model (HBM). This study is a cross sectional quantitative study. A convenience sample of 200 parents of children aged 12 and younger completed a questionnaire based on the HBM. Perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers predicted 88% of parents' intention to vaccinate their children. Parents who vaccinated their children in the past year were younger and had fewer children. Community nurses and physicians were identified as important cues to action. The HBM components predicted a high percentage of parents' intention to vaccinate their children Interventions to raise vaccination coverage rates among children belonging to an ethnic minority of Israeli Muslim Arabs should begin on the micro level of the parent-health care professional encounter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quality of life in Arab Muslim cancer survivors following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: comparison with matched healthy group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaloul, Fawwaz; Brockopp, Dorothy Y; Andrykowski, Michael A; Hall, Lynne A; Al Nusairat, Taghreed S

    2015-07-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if quality of life (QOL) among Arab Muslim hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) survivors differs from that of a healthy matched comparison group and to examine the relationships of demographic and medical variables and perceived social support with post-HSCT QOL. HSCT survivors (n = 63) were recruited from the King Hussein Cancer Center outpatient clinic. A matched (age, gender, education), healthy comparison group (n = 63) was recruited through public advertisements. Participants completed the EORTC-30 QOL scale and the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey. Differences were found between the Arab Muslim HSCT survivor and healthy comparison groups for physical functioning (p Western HSCT survivors in the social and emotional QOL domains. Given growing numbers of Arab and Muslim cancer survivors in the USA and other Western countries, future research is warranted.

  16. The Traumatogenic Dynamics of Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Among Arab American, Muslim, and Refugee Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, Ibrahim A; Lewandowski, Linda; Ashby, Jeffrey S; Templin, Thomas; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Mohanesh, Jamal

    2014-07-01

    Understanding the dynamics of mental health stigma through existing frameworks, especially in minorities with higher stigma, is problematic. There is a need to reconceptualize stigma, particularly in highly traumatized groups. The current study examines the validity of a new development-based trauma framework that conceptualizes stigma as a type III chronic trauma that contributes to negative mental health effects. This framework proposes that public stigma is a unique chronic traumatic stress that mediates the effects of similar trauma types in mental health patients. To test this proposition, this study explores the relationships between internalized stigma of mental illness (ISMI), different trauma types, and posttrauma spectrum disorders. ISMI, posttraumatic stress disorder, other posttrauma spectrum disorders, and cumulative trauma measures were administered to a sample of 399 mental health patients that included Arab (82%), Muslim (84%), and refugee (31%), as well as American patients (18%). Age in the sample ranged from 18 to 76 years (M = 39.66, SD = 11.45), with 53.5% males. Hierarchical multiple regression, t tests, and path analyses were conducted. Results indicated that ISMI predicted posttraumatic stress disorder and other posttrauma spectrum disorders after controlling for cumulative trauma. ISMI was associated with other chronic collective identity traumas. While Arab Americans, Muslims, and refugees had higher ISMI scores than other Americans, the elevated chronic trauma levels of these groups were significant predictors of these differences. The results provide evidence to support ISMI traumatology model. Implications of the results for treating victims of ISMI, especially Arab Americans, Muslims and refugees are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Health beliefs and practices related to cancer screening among Arab Muslim women in an urban community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Khlood Faik

    2012-01-01

    In this exploratory study I investigated the participation status in breast and cervical cancer screening of a group of American immigrant Arab Muslim women (AMW). Perceived knowledge of and barriers to screening participation, relationships among demographic variables, health practice and beliefs, and self-reports of traditionalism and acculturation also are studied. Factors including religious and cultural beliefs, economic concerns, and modesty and embarrassment were considered. To reach the goals of Healthy People 2010 (HP 2010), an effective and meaningful educational initiative to raise awareness about breast and cervical cancer of AMW will require specific interventions consistent with their cultural and religious traditions.

  18. Arabic Language Teaching and Learning in Muslim Minority of West Papua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Suardi Wekke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Islamic boarding school which well-known as pesantren establishment reflects a process of transformation on religious level of education. Arabic language is the compulsory subject to gain the set of curriculum. Therefore, it is a need to explore the process of Arabic language teaching and learning in the Islamic school. This research was conducted in Sorong greater area of West Papua. In-depth interview and non-participant observation were employed in collecting data. Arabic language is the main subject to support others subject. Each semester, students need to complete a set of subject. Some activities extend the subject in many courses to enrich language skill and capacity. In addition, Muslim minority is the environment to challenge the region. Therefore, the schools constructed the special program in complementing the syllabus. There is additional program to complete in one year program. The combination between classroom activity and course program is the breakthrough to extend opportunity to learn not only in the classroom but also outside classroom. This article concludes that additional program was created to enhance students’ skill and language development through practices and non-formal courses.

  19. Arab Spring’: The Influence of the Muslim Brotherhood and Their Vision of Islamic Finance and State (abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidane Meriboute

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This chapter analyses the Muslim Brotherhood movement (Ikhwan al-muslimin in its various guises. Born in the interwar period, this global, proselytising Islamic movement underwent a veritable resurgence, even a resurrection, in Muslim countries from the 1980s onwards. Founded in 1928 by the Egyptian Hassan al-Banna (1906–1949, the recent ‘Arab Spring’ phenomenon has given it fresh momentum. Significantly, the Muslim Brotherhood movement has taken the reins of Egypt, the most populous state in the Arab world. Wherever this movement gains a foothold, it creates its own labour unions, associations of students, doctors and workers, Islamic banking institutions, and so forth. More specifically, the chapter examines the nature of the Islamic state and the key characteristics of the politico-religious doctrine of the Muslim Brotherhood and its various offshoot Islamist parties, both in the Maghreb and elsewhere. The author sheds light on the Muslim Brotherhood’s economic, social and financial vision through an examination of the various techniques they employ with respect to Islamic finance. While the Muslim financial model is driven by considerations of social justice (‘adala ijtima’iya and the rejection of usury (riba, it is nevertheless argued that its emphasis on profit maximisation renders this model’s vision essentially capitalist. The chapter thus calls for a refocusing and adaptation of the approach of Islamic banks in order to make their financing accessible for small projects undertaken by the disenfranchised.

  20. Holy anorexia: Eating disorders symptomatology and religiosity among Muslim women in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin; O'Hara, Lily; Tahboub-Schulte, Sabrina; Grey, Ian; Chowdhury, Nayeefa

    2017-12-05

    There is a substantial body of literature reporting a negative association between religiosity and psychiatric symptoms. In the context of eating disorders, however, this relationship appears to be reversed. The few studies exploring the relationship between religiosity and eating disorders have mostly focused on the Judeo-Christian religious traditions in Western nations. The present study examines this relationship among Muslim college women from the United Arab Emirates (UAE). All participants (N = 1069) independently completed the religious commitment inventory (RCI-10) and the eating attitudes test (EAT-26). As hypothesised, there was a positive association between religiosity and eating disorders symptoms. Furthermore, those scoring above the EAT-26 cut-off reported significantly greater levels of religiosity. These findings suggest that heightened religiosity among young Emirati women may represent a vulnerability factor for eating disorders. Preventative initiatives in the UAE should consider focusing on religiosity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Arab Families and Youth : a Century of War, Migration and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Arab Families and Youth : a Century of War, Migration and Displacement. The past century has witnessed disruptions in Middle Eastern politics, economics, religion and society that have taken their toll on Arab families and youth. Yet despite the centrality of family and youth in Arab society, there exists little scientific ...

  2. THE MUSLIM FAMILY BETWEEN MYTHS AND SOCIAL IMPACT, SEEN TROUGH THE EYES OF A NON – MUSLIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRELA CRISTIANA NILĂ STRATONE

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is part of an extensive analysis of the social impact caused by the characteristics of the Muslim family in the Romanian and European society. Between the religious and the social demands, Muslim family manages all the harder to enroll in the course imposed by tradition. A great importance has the knowledge and the understanding of the intra and interfamilial behaviors, this one needs first to detect and to avoid the myths related to the Muslim family. Addressing and clarifying this issue lies in the center of the present study. He represents a necessity without which Muslim family life, the role of the woman and the man in this family can not be understood fully, given that their religion and their way of life tend to cover an area of increasingly greater psychosocial space both at European level and worldwide.

  3. The effects of happy Muslim family activities on reduction of domestic violence against Thai-Muslim spouses in Satun province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasetchai Laeheem

    2017-05-01

    The study found that before participation in the activities, significantly more subjects in the experimental group who participated in happy Muslim family activities had violent behaviors against their spouses than those in the control group who participated in normal community activities. However, after participating in the happy Muslim family activities, those in the experimental group used significantly less domestic violence against their spouses when compared with those in the control group.

  4. Religion and Relationships in Muslim Families: A Qualitative Examination of Devout Married Muslim Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alghafli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Since 11 September 2001, Islam has been the center of many debates, discussions, parodies and publications. Many Muslims feel that their religion has been portrayed unfairly in Western media. The topics that seem to generate the most criticism relate to gender roles and the treatment of women, both inside the home and in society. The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceived role of Islam on marital and familial relationships from an insider’s perspective and to present participants’ reflections on sensitive issues, including gender roles, women’s rights and marital unity. Content analysis of in-depth interviews of twenty diverse Shia and Sunni Muslim couples living in the U.S. (n = 40 yielded three emergent themes: (1 Islam as a way of life; (2 Islam as a unifying force; and (3 gender roles and the treatment of women. These data suggest that, as perceived by our religiously involved “insider” participants, Islam influences marriage relationships, unites families and (when understood and lived properly protects women from abuse and oppression.

  5. A Qualitative Study of the Integration of Arab Muslim Israelis Suffering from Mental Disorders into the Normative Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesser-Edelsburg, Anat; Shbat, Shbat

    2017-06-01

    This study focuses on the process of the integration of Arab Muslim Israelis suffering from mental disorders into the normative community, addressing perspectives of both people with mental disorders and the community. This qualitative-constructivist study seeks to understand the dynamics of face-to-face meetings by highlighting the participants' points of view. The main themes of the findings included stereotypes and prejudices, gender discrimination, and the effect of face-to-face meetings on integration of people with mental disorders (PMD) into the community. The findings support former studies about the integration of PMD into the normative community, but add a unique finding that females suffer from double discrimination: both as women in a conservative society and as PMD. The study findings indicate a perception of lack of self-efficacy of PMD as a key barrier preventing integration into the community, which also prevents community members and counselors from accepting them or treating them as equals. We recommend on a social marketing campaign to be undertaken with the Arab Muslim community to refute stigmas and prejudices, particulary with double gender discrimination suffered by women with mental disorders in the Muslim community and training of community center counselors who have contact with the PMD population.

  6. John Wheatley Award Talk: Promoting Under-Represented Physicists in Asian and Arab Countries and Muslim Women in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Sultana

    2013-04-01

    Physics fascinates people's minds regardless of their geographic location. Often the best students choose the challending profession of physics. Physicists in developing countries in Asia and Arab countries work mostly on their own with limited resources or external collaboration and some do extraordinarily well. However, these dedicated individuals need the support and interactive modalities with their fellow physicists, particularly from developed countries, for coherent and rapid advances in knowledge, discoveries and inventions. My main objective is to promote and motivate physics education and research in developing and Arab countries to a level of excellence commensurate with that at U.S. institutions, and to facilitate connection through the strong network of APS. I have developed a general STEM based program. Another focus of this initiative is the very weak community of Muslim women in science, who have have remained behind owing to surrounding circumstances. To encourage them in scientific professions, and to enable them to nurture their intellectuality, we have formed a network called the International Society of Muslim Women in Science. It now has 85 enthusiastic and aspiring members from 21 countries. I will discuss these and the special needs of the these under-represented scientists, and how APS might lend them its valuable support.

  7. Arab Families and Youth : a Century of War, Migration and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Yet despite the centrality of family and youth in Arab society, there exists little scientific ... The grant will support some 15 rigorous studies in Egypt, Lebanon and ... of use to scholars, policymakers, planners, nongovernmental organizations and ...

  8. Increased occurrence of anti-AQP4 seropositivity and unique HLA Class II associations with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), among Muslim Arabs in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Livnat; Mandel, Micha; Karussis, Dimitrios; Petrou, Panayiota; Miller, Keren; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Karni, Arnon; Paltiel, Ora; Israel, Shoshana; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi

    2016-04-15

    Previous studies have revealed different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO), further discriminating these two demyelinating pathological conditions. In worldwide analyses, NMO and opticospinal MS are represented at higher proportions among demyelinating conditions in African, East-Asian and Latin American populations. There are currently no data regarding the prevalence of NMO in Middle East Muslims. The population in Israel is diverse in many ways, and includes subpopulations, based on religion and ethnicity; some exhibit genetic homogeneity. In Israel, the incidence of MS is lower in the Muslim population than the Jewish population and Muslims carry different allele frequency distribution of HLA haplotypes. To evaluate the occurrence of anti-AQP4 seropositivity in the Israeli Muslim population among patients with central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating conditions; and to identify the HLA DR and DQ profiles of Muslim Arab Israeli patients with NMO spectrum of diseases (NMOSD). The prevalence of anti-AQP4 seropositivity was analyzed in 342 samples, obtained from patients with various CNS demyelinating conditions and in a validation set of 310 samples. HLA class II alleles (HLA-DRB1 and DQB1) were examined in DNA samples from 35 Israeli Muslim Arabs NMO patients and compared to available data from 74 Israeli Muslim controls. Our data reveal a significantly increased prevalence of anti-AQP4 seropositivity, indicative of NMOSD, in Muslim Arab Israeli patients with initial diagnosis of a CNS demyelinating syndrome. In this population, there was a positive association with the HLA-DRB1*04:04 and HLA-DRB1*10:01 alleles (p=0.03), and a strong negative association with the HLA-DRB1*07 and HLA-DQB1*02:02 alleles (p=0.003, p=0.002). Our findings indicate a possibly increased prevalence of NMOSD in Muslim Arabs in Israel with distinct (positive and negative) HLA associations. Further studies in patients with

  9. Arab Families and Youth : a Century of War, Migration and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project builds on two earlier phases of support to the Arab Families Working Group (AFWG) under projects 101270 and 102198. The grant will support some 15 rigorous studies in Egypt, Lebanon and Palestine and their diasporas on two key topics: the impact of war, violence, displacement and migration on families; ...

  10. Family, Religion, and Work among Arab American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazal Read, Jen'nan

    2004-01-01

    Using data from a national survey of 501 Arab American women, this study examines the extent to which family behavior mediates the influence of religion on women's labor force activity. Prior research on families has largely overlooked the role of religion in influencing women's labor force decisions, particularly at different stages of the life…

  11. RELIGION, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIAL CHANGE: REPRESENTATIONS OF MUSLIM WORLD IN ACADEMIC ANALYSES OF THE ROLE OF SOCIAL MEDIA IN THE ARAB SPRING

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    Adeela Arshad Ayaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deconstructs the dominant constructions and portrayals of the Muslim world in literature on social media and civic engagement in relation to the Arab Spring. A critical reading of literature on social media and ‘Arab Spring’ shows that analyses by Western scholars and commentators are still grounded in ‘modernist dualism’ and orientalist understandings. The article starts by tracing the history of technology to argue that analyses of social media’s educational and civic potential within the Western context in general, is continuation of arguments about earlier technologies in relation to societal development. However, when it comes to analyzing social media and civic engagement particularly in the Muslim world this tendency gets muddled with another well-established trend, that of Orientalism. The overall impact of this tendency results in restricting majority of arguments within the essentialists/determinists paradigm. Such analyses essentialize the technological aspects of social media as universal and constitute the West as civilized, democratic, multicultural, and progressive. On the other hand Muslim world is represented as uncivilized, undemocratic, uncultured, and chained in past traditions. Thus, there is a need for a nuanced understanding of the relationship between the social media and civic engagement in the Muslim world, which can be conceptualized by framing the issues within a postcolonial critique of neoliberal globalization. DOI: 10.15408/tjems.v1i2.1264

  12. Change and Variation in Family Religious Language Policy in a West African Muslim Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Leslie C.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines variation in family religious language policy in a Muslim community in West Africa. Taking an ethnographically grounded case study approach, I situate families' choices with regards to their children's religious (language) education within the larger linguistic, social, and cultural context, focusing on new influences on…

  13. Factor of Awareness in Searching and Sharing of Halal Food Product among Muslim Families in Malaysia

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    Yusoff Siti Zanariah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Information search activities are fundamental in information sharing, especially for the context of information confusion in the market for halal products. This research paper will focus on awareness factor in information searching and sharing of halal products in the Muslim families. Recently, the halal issue has become the hot topic as it involves community religious tenets. This study aims to enrich communications literature in terms of information seeking in halal food products. The sample of the research consisted of 340 Muslim families in Bangi, Selangor. The data are collected through questionnaire and analyzed using descriptive analysis and inferential analysis such as correlation. The result of the study revealed that awareness factor is significantly correlated with information seeking behavior among Muslim family.

  14. THE ASH’ARITE DOGMA: THE ROOT OF THE ARAB/MUSLIM ABSOLUTISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mabrook

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available There are three major categories upon which all of the world’s civilizations are established, namely, God, Man and World. The differentiation of worldly civilizations and the diversity of systems of knowledge are due to the way of drawing up the relation thereby the three categories are arranged. Some scholars assumed that these categories are communicated and totally correlated each other, in a way that each cannot be realized except in its connectivity to the others. While some others thought that the three categories should be separated and disconnected, in a way that each of the three is realized as an absolute and dominant one while the two others are marginal and dependent ones. Needless to say, while the first perception provokes the values of tolerance and the acceptance of the other, the second one motivates absolutism and the negation of the other. Unfortunately the Ash’arism, not only a dogma but —and more importantly— a stable and dominant way of thinking, is stimulated by the second perception based on an absolutism and the negation of the other. It departs from that historical fact that this paper argues that absolutism, manifested in political, religious and cultural aspects of nowadays Muslims life, can be related to the dominance ofAsh’arism all over the Muslim world.

  15. Associations among patient characteristics, health-related quality of life, and spiritual well-being among Arab Muslim cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazenby, Mark; Khatib, Jamal

    2012-12-01

    Despite Islam being the world's second largest religion and despite the fact that there are 22 Arabic-speaking nations representing North Africa and the Middle East, little is known about the relationship between spiritual well-being and health-related quality of life (HrQoL) for Arabic-speaking Muslims in treatment for cancer. The study's aim was to determine whether spiritual well-being is correlated with HrQoL and whether participants' age, sex, marital status, site of cancer, and stage of disease are related to spiritual well-being. Using a cross-sectional design, a total of 159 Arabic-speaking, study-eligible cancer patients who were in treatment at the King Hussein Cancer Center (KHCC), Amman, Jordan, completed three questionnaires: a demographic questionnaire; the Functional Assessment in Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G), which assesses the physical, social, functional, and emotional domains of HrQoL; and the Functional Assessment in Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being (FACIT-Sp). Physical well-being was negatively correlated with the FACIT-Sp for men, divorced, and stage IV disease. Social Well-being was positively correlated with the FACIT-Sp for ages 18-34 and 35-49 years; both sexes; married, never married, and divorced; breast, bone/sarcoma, and gastrointestinal cancers; and stages II-IV. Emotional Well-being was negatively correlated with the FACIT-Sp for ages 35-49; males; never married; and stages III and IV. Functional Well-being was positively correlated with the FACIT-Sp for ages 35-49 and 50-64; both sexes; married or never married; and stages II and III. Age and cancer site showed a positive relationship with spiritual well-being. The FACIT-Sp distinguishes between domains of HrQoL and patient characteristics. Further study on the unique contribution of the FACIT-Sp's Peace and Meaning subscales to HrQoL is needed.

  16. Decision-making on terminating pregnancy for Muslim Arab women pregnant with fetuses with congenital anomalies: maternal affect and doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesser-Edelsburg, Anat; Shahbari, Nour Abed Elhadi

    2017-04-04

    This study focused on decision-making on terminating pregnancy for Arab Muslim women in Israel who were pregnant with fetuses diagnosed with congenital anomalies. It examined the impact of the doctor-patient interaction on the women's decision, especially in light of social and religious pressures not to terminate under any circumstances. Our goal was to identify perceptions and attitudes of Muslim Arab women who choose to continue their pregnancy following the detection of congenital anomalies in prenatal tests. Specific objectives included (1) To examine the Muslim Arab women's perceptions on genetic testing, and ascertain the reasons for their decision to continue the pregnancy following the detection of a congenital anomaly in the fetus; and (2) To examine risk communication of gynecologists regarding genetic testing and abortions, and regarding the decision of continuing or terminating a pregnancy following detection of a congenital anomaly. The research framework used the constructivist classical qualitative method to understand the experience of women at high risk for congenital anomalies and their experience of how doctors communicate the risk. It showed that the emotional element is no less dominant than religious and social elements. The findings emphasized the disparities between doctors and women regarding emotional involvement (non-directive counselling). The women interviewees (N = 24) felt that this expressed insensitivity. As far as we know, the emotional component has not been raised in previous studies of Muslim women at high risk for congenital defects in their fetus, and therefore comprises a significant contribution of the present study. To mitigate gaps, doctors should take affect into consideration in their communication with patients. It is important for doctors to understand the emotional element in risk communication, both in how they respect women's emotions and in creating an emotional interaction between themselves and the women.

  17. The Melkites and the Muslims: The Qur’ān, Christology, and Arab Orthodoxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffith, Sidney H.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The earliest Chalcedonian writers to take notice of the religious ideas of the invading Arabs at the time of the Islamic conquest of the Middle East already highlighted what they viewed as wrong or confused notions about Christ on the part of the invaders. Then in the mid-eighth century, Arabic-speaking Chalcedonians in Syria/Palestine, whose adversaries would soon be calling them ‘Melkites’, were quoting the Qur’ān with a view to exploiting the probative potential of its language for apologetic purposes, especially in Christology. This article traces the continued focus on Christology and the Qur’ān in the development of Chalcedonian theology in Arabic in the works of the major writers in the early ‘Melkite’ tradition, suggesting that the ‘Melkite’ community’s engagement with the religious challenge of Islam over time issued in the emergence of a recognizeable Arab Christian Orthodoxy, which the term ‘Melkite’ came to designate.

    Durante la expansión del Islam por Oriente Medio, los primeros autores calcedonianos que tuvieron conocimiento de las ideas religiosas que los invasores árabes traían, pusieron de relieve ciertas nociones que ellos entendían como confusas o negativas sobre Cristo. A mediados del siglo VIII, los araboparlantes calcedonianos de Siria-Palestina (que pronto serían denominados «Melquitas» por sus adversarios, comenzaron a citar el Corán con la intención de explotar el potencial probatorio de la lengua para propósitos apologéticos, especialmente en Cristología. Este artículo rastrea ese enfoque en la Cristología y el Corán, que se mantiene de forma continuada en el desarrollo de la teología calcedoniana en lengua árabe, en los trabajos de los más importantes autores de la tradición melquita temprana. Este análisis nos hace pensar que ese «combate» de la comunidad melquita como reacción al desafío religioso del Islam, con el paso del tiempo, hace necesaria una ortodoxia

  18. Working with Arab American Families: Culturally Competent Practice for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haboush, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    Individuals of Arab descent residing within the United States currently number between 1.2 million and 3.9 million. These families are characterized by considerable diversity depending upon their nationality, religion, and extent of acculturation to both Western and Arab cultures. More recently, Arab families have immigrated to the United States…

  19. Factor Structure of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale: Cross-Cultural Comparisons Between Jordanian Arab and Malaysian Muslim University Students in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Ahmad S

    2016-03-01

    This study reported the differences in factor structure of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS) among Jordanian Arab and Malaysian Muslim participants and further examined its validity and reliability. A convenience sample of 553 Jordanian Arab and 183 Malaysian Malay Muslim university students was recruited from governmental universities in northern Jordan. The findings of this study revealed that this scale consists of two factors for the Jordanian Arab group, representing the "Religious Well-Being" and the "Existential Well-Being" subscales, and consists of three factors for the Malaysian group, representing the "Affiliation/Meaning and Purpose," "Positive Existential Well-Being/God Caring and Love," and "Alienation/Despair" subscales. In conclusion, the factor structure of the SWBS for both groups in this study was psychometrically sound with evidence of acceptable to good validity and reliability. Furthermore, this study supported the multidimensional nature of the SWBS and the earlier notion that ethnicity shapes responses to this scale. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Autopsy in Islam: Considerations for Deceased Muslims and Their Families Currently and in the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Mohammed Imran

    2016-03-01

    Religious beliefs and cultures have influenced treatment of dead bodies in different ways by nations throughout history, and attitudes toward the deceased individuals have changed across time and so has the role and mechanism of autopsy. Islam has been a part of Europe for a long time; therefore, we would like to emphasize the important issues for Muslims and their families regarding death, autopsy, and funeral and to describe international perspectives of Muslim autopsies. Muslims have expressed their views on autopsy publically and internationally, and there have been claims of violation of the deceased, delays in burial, and nonconsideration of their religious beliefs. In this article, we aim to increase awareness and understanding of doctors about the religious and ethical issues important to Muslims and their families, so that appropriate considerations may be made where possible with regard to respectful treatment of deceased loved ones to decrease tensions presently being faced. Forensic medicine doctors could assist by undertaking autopsy without delay, in a private room by those of the same sex, and covering parts of the body not being worked on at that time.

  1. Muslim and Hindu Women's public and private behaviors: gender, family, and communalized politics in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sonalde; Temsah, Gheda

    2014-12-01

    Prior research on fundamentalist religious movements has focused attention on the complicated relationship among gender, family, and religion. Using data from a nationally representative survey of 30,000 Hindu and Muslim women, this study compares the daily public and private behaviors of women in India to examine how gender and family norms are shaped in the context of communalized identity politics. Building on the theoretical framework of "doing gender," we argue that because communal identities are expressed through externally visible behaviors, greater religious differences are expected in external markers of gendered behaviors and family norms. Results indicate that Muslim women are more likely to engage in veiling and less likely to venture outside the home for recreation and employment. However, religious differences are absent when attention is directed at private behaviors, such as household decision-making power, gender segregation within households, and discrimination against daughters. Results underscore the multidimensionality of gender.

  2. Sacred practices in highly religious families: Christian, Jewish, Mormon, and Muslim perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Loren

    2004-06-01

    Quantitative research examining linkages between family relationships and religious experience has increased substantially in recent years. However, related qualitative research, including research that examines the processes and meanings behind recurring religion-family correlations, remains scant. To address this paucity, a racially diverse sample (N = 24) of married, highly religious Christian, Jewish, Mormon, and Muslim parents of school-aged children were interviewed regarding the importance of religious family interactions, rituals, and practices in their families. Mothers and fathers discussed several religious practices that were meaningful to them and explained why these practices were meaningful. Parents also identified costs and challenges associated with these practices. Interview data are presented in connection with three themes: (1) "practicing [and parenting] what you preach," (2) religious practices, family connection, and family communion, and (3) costs of family religious practices. The importance of family clinicians and researchers attending to the influence of religious practice in the lives of highly religious individuals and families is discussed.

  3. The concept of milk kinship in Islam: issues raised when offering preterm infants of Muslim families donor human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khuffash, Afif; Unger, Sharon

    2012-05-01

    Research has documented health benefits associated with donor human milk (DHM). Offering DHM to people of the Muslim faith raises important religious concerns for these families. Knowledge of these beliefs and an understanding of the rationale for these beliefs enable the health care team to establish rapport and build a foundation of trust with patients and their families, thereby paving the way to developing a treatment plan that is in the best interest of the patients without compromising care. This article describes the issues and a rationale for them and provides physicians caring for preterm infants of Muslim families with information to facilitate advocating DHM to those families.

  4. Hanna David`s Book: The Gifted Arab Child In Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre KOMEK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it was examined Hanna David’s Book: The Gifted Arab Child in Israel. The book focuses on Arab gifted children living in Israel. In Israel three Arab groups are living: Muslim, Christian and Druze. This book contains 7 sections. First Section: A Brief History of Education of Arabs In The State of Israel, Second Section: Characteristics of the Arab Gifted Child in Israel, Third Section: Education of the Arab Gifted Child, Fourth Section: Enrichment Programs for the Gifted in the Arab Sector, Fifth section: Description of Various Kinds of Enrichment Program for the Arab Sector, Sixth section: A Minority within a Minority: Gifted Students in the Christian, Druze and Bedouin Sectors, Seventh Section: The talented Arab Girl: Between Tradition and Modernism. In this book, author gives some suggestions to reveal potential of Arab girls. Some of them are; family support, financial aid etc.

  5. Arab Americans with Disabilities and Their Families: A Culturally Appropriate Approach for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khateeb, Jamal M.; Al Hadidi, Muna S.; Al Khatib, Amal J.

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a brief introduction to Americans of Arab descent and a brief overview of Arab culture. Then, culturally appropriate counseling considerations related to family, attitudes toward disability, religion, communication, acculturation, help-seeking behaviors, and stereotypes are highlighted. In the last section, the authors provide…

  6. The stigma of mental illness in Arab families: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardas, L A; Simmons, L A

    2015-11-01

    The stigma of mental illness varies significantly from culture to culture and from person to person. To date, little is known about how mental illness stigma manifests within the Arab community. This study aimed at bringing clarity to the concept of 'mental illness stigma' as it applies to Arab families. Nursing's holistic and patient-centered approach is integral to helping Arab patients and their families appropriately incorporate individual values, beliefs, and cultural perspectives into treatment plans. This study establishes a scientific alert for professionals at all levels to avoid making false generalizations about a specific culture that are not based on specific research findings from that culture. Accessing mental health services is a critical step towards reducing the burden of mental illness. The stigma of mental illness is one of the most common reasons for not seeking mental health care leading to negative health consequences and undue suffering for many individuals and their families. Stigma is embedded in its social context. What may be considered acceptable in one society may be considered unacceptable and open to stigmatization in other societies. Arabs have a shared set of values, beliefs, and traditions that are substantially different from those of Westerners. Further, in most Arab countries, formal mental health resources are scarce and people with mental illness experience the compounded disadvantages of poverty and illness stigma. To date, little is known about how mental illness stigma manifests within the Arab community making it difficult to design and test interventions that support Arab individuals with mental illness and their families in treatment seeking and adherence. Using Rodger's concept analysis method, we examined how 'mental illness stigma' operates within an Arab context as a first step towards elucidating culturally competent approaches to treatment. This analysis provides a foundation for future work in the areas of mental

  7. Muslim and Hindu Women’s Public and Private Behaviors: Gender, Family and Communalized Politics in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sonalde; Temsah, Gheda

    2015-01-01

    Prior research on fundamentalist religious movements has focused attention on the complicated relationship between gender, family and religion. Using data from a nationally representative survey of 30,000 Hindu and Muslim women, this study compares the daily public and private behaviors of women in India to examine how gender and family norms are shaped in the context of communalized identity politics. Building on the theoretical framework of “doing gender”, it argues that because communal identities are expressed through externally visible behaviors, greater religious differences are expected in external markers of gendered behaviors and family norms. Results indicate that Muslim women are more likely to engage in veiling and less likely to venture outside the home for recreation and employment. However, religious differences are absent when attention is directed at private behaviors such as household decision making power, gender segregation within households, and discrimination against daughters. Results underscore the multidimensionality of gender. PMID:25143018

  8. Comparison of WIC benefit redemptions in Michigan indicates higher utilization among Arab American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooler, Jennifer; Gleason, Stacy F

    2014-01-01

    To assess Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) benefit use across Arab American, Hispanic, and non-Arab/non-Hispanic families participating in the Michigan WIC program using point-of-sale Electronic Benefits Transfer data. Cross-sectional analysis using administrative data obtained from the Michigan WIC program, which collects Arab American ethnicity in addition to Hispanic ethnicity and race. Michigan. Families participating in the Michigan WIC program in March, 2012 (n = 152,989). Families redeeming all WIC benefits. Bivariate frequencies and multivariate logistic regression model identified characteristics of families associated with full redemption of WIC food benefits. About 12% of WIC families fully redeemed their benefits in March, 2012. Compared with non-Arab/non-Hispanic families, Arab American WIC families were significantly more likely to use all of their monthly WIC benefits, even after controlling for family characteristics (adjusted odds ratio, 3.6; 95% confidence interval, 3.4-3.8). Rates of redemption for Hispanic families, however, were the same as for non-Arab/non-Hispanic families (adjusted odds ratio, 1.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.9-1.0). State WIC programs moving toward implementation of Electronic Benefits Transfer should consider ways to enhance systems that would allow for more opportunities to conduct targeted analyses of benefit use across participant subpopulations. Findings point to low overall WIC benefit use. Additional research is needed to explore methods to increase benefit use among all WIC populations, including whether specific factors may contribute to higher redemptions among ethnic minorities, and whether they can be translated to other subpopulations. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  9. Perception and coping with stigma of mental illness: Arab families' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalky, Heyam F

    2012-07-01

    Family stigma is well documented in the research literature; however, it has only been recently that efforts have been undertaken to discuss the perception of stigma as reported by Arab families of relatives with mental illness. This clinical paper aims to identify families' perception of stigma related to mental illness, and to compare Arab families' approaches with various aspects of caring from different countries. Further, this paper discusses, in-depth, specific areas related to families' perceptions of stigma: What impacts does stigma perception have on those families and on their relatives' care outcomes and what are coping strategies are used to handle stigma and its impacts in such countries? This paper emphasizes that chronic mental illness contributes the most to families' perception of stigma. In this study, Arab families perceived the experience of caring for a family member with a mental illness with fear, loss, embarrassment, and disgrace of family reputations. Further, secrecy, isolation, despair, and helplessness were reported the most among different family groups in Jordan and Morocco. This paper reminds us that cultural norms and beliefs shape family members' perception of coping and their ability to manage caring for relatives with mental illnesses. Thus, more studies are needed concerning coping and management strategies that are culturally relevant. This could eventually guide the establishment of stigma reduction initiatives and expand understanding of stigma from different cultural perspectives.

  10. Language Maintenance and Core Values among Second Generation Arabs in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Turjoman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This sociolinguistics study investigated the maintenance of the Arabic language among three migrant Arab Muslim families, who have been living in the USA for at least ten years, particularly among the children. Each family has children between the ages of 10 to 15 and they attend American public schools. Arabic is essential in the religious rituals of the Muslim society. Yet living in an English-speaking environment makes it challenging for these families to maintain fluency in Arabic and English. The families live in Muncie, Indiana where the only means of formal teaching of Arabic is through a Sunday school held in the Mosque and parental attempts to teach them at home. Data were collected by using semi-structured interviews and participant observation over a six-month period and analyzed according to Smolicz’s (1981 Core Value theory. The findings of the study indicated that all three families are aware of the challenges of maintaining the Arabic language and therefore emphasize the use of Arabic at home, to supplement the Arabic lessons in the Sunday school.

  11. Informational Support in Pediatric Oncology: Review of the Challenges Among Arab Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otmani, Naïma; Khattab, Mohammed

    2016-11-18

    Childhood cancer and its invasive treatment is a distressing life experience for the child and his family. Providing informational support is an essential part of community care, and defining parent's burden is an important part of this goal. However, providing such information can be particularly challenging in Arab countries where beliefs, traditions, religion, and socioeconomic factors influence parents' needs and their priorities of needs. This article presents a review of these specificities among Arab families. Implications of health-care providers are also discussed.

  12. Social Work Practice with Arab Families: The Implications of Spirituality vis-à-vis Islam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. Hall

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, spiritualism has become apparent as critical to social work practice with Arab families. Regrettably, research on Arab families today is all but non-existent.Their belief in Islam is the fastest growing form of spirituality in Central Asia. Social workers who do not acknowledge this fact will be at a severe disadvantage in their attempts to treat Arab clientele. It is not compulsory that practitioners endorse client belief systems or other aspects of their spirituality, but practitioners should acknowledge said systems as a critical point in the client’s frame of reference. In the interest of social justice, social workers are thus challenged to develop creative treatment strategies less confined to Western bias.

  13. Family resources for families of children with cerebral palsy in Jordan: psychometric properties of the Arabic-family resources scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasri, N A; Saleh, M; Dunst, C J

    2014-05-01

    Resource-based, family-centred practices are associated with better health, emotional, and social well-being of children with disabilities. The adequacy of resources available for families of children with disabilities in Middle Eastern countries has not been described adequately in part because of lack of measures that are culturally adapted to be used in Arabic countries. Therefore, this study aims to (1) to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Arabic-Family Resource Scale (A-FRS) on a sample of families of children cerebral palsy (CP); (2) examine the adequacy of family resources as perceived by parents of children with CP in Jordan; and (3) examine the influence of child and family demographic variables on how parents report resources available to their families. A cross-section design was applied. One-hundred fifteen parents of children with CP with mean age 4.6 years (SD = 4.4) and their parents participated in the study. Research assistants interviewed the participants to complete the A-FRS, and family and child demographic questionnaire, and determined the Gross Motor Function Classification System level of children. The principal axis factoring of the A-FRS yielded a six-factor solution that accounted for 67.39% of the variance and that is different than the factor structure reported by the developers of the FRS. Cronbach’s coefficient alpha of the total score of family resources was 0.86 indicating a good internal consistency and the test–retest reliability for the total scale score was r = 0.92 (P = 0.000) indicating excellent test–retest reliability. Child health and family income were significantly associated with the total score of the A-FRS. The A-FRS is a valid and reliable measure of family resources for Jordanian families of children with CP. Service providers are encouraged to use A-FRS with families to plan resource-based interventions in which family resources are mobilized to meet family needs.

  14. Treatment of personal status in jurisdictions of selected Arab states

    OpenAIRE

    Kopecký, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In my dissertation thesis I tried to explicate the fundamental institutes of Islamic family law, according to modern and contemporary legislation in a number of Arab states. The family law is fairly exhaustively treated in the sacred book of Muslims, in Koran, albeit in a number of scattered passages, mostly in suras from Medinese period. These passages are defined with more precision by the prestigeous method of the interpretation of Koran, with so called taj

  15. Intelligence and family marital structure: the case of adolescents from monogamous and polygamous families among Bedouin Arabs in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbedour, Salman; Bart, William M; Hektner, Joel

    2003-02-01

    The levels of intelligence among Bedouin Arab adolescents from monogamous and polygamous families living in the Negev region of Israel were examined. A shortened version of the Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM) test (S. Elbedour, T. J. Bouchard, & Y. Hur, 1997; J. Raven, J. C. Raven, & J. H. Court, 1998) was used to assess intelligence. There were no significant test score differences between adolescents from monogamous families and adolescents from polygamous families. In addition, participants with 2 mothers tended to have lower RPM scores than those with 3 or 4 mothers, and participants with related parents tended to have lower RPM scores than participants with unrelated parents. One major finding of this study is that polygamous family marital structures tended not to have deleterious effects on the Bedouin Arab adolescents' RPM test scores.

  16. CNGA3 mutations in two United Arab Emirates families with achromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Yachna; Kohl, Susanne; Traboulsi, Elias I

    2008-07-10

    ACHROMATOPSIA RESULTS FROM MUTATIONS IN ONE OF THREE GENES: cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, alpha-3 (CNGA3); cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, beta-3 (CNGB3); and guanine nucleotide-binding protein, alpha-transducing activity polypeptide 2 (GNAT2). We report the responsible mutations in two United Arab Emirates families who have this autosomal recessive disease. Clinical examinations were performed in seven patients from three nuclear families. Molecular genetic testing for common CNGA3 and CNGB3 mutations was undertaken using standard protocols. All patients were extremely light sensitive and had reduced visual acuity and no color perception. Fundus examinations did not show any visible abnormalities. After further pedigree analysis, two of the families were found to be linked through the paternal line. Two mutations in CNGA3 were identified: Arg283Trp and Gly397Val. Family A, the larger pedigree, had one branch in which two sisters and one brother were homozygous for the Gly397Val mutation and another branch in which a brother and sister were compound heterozygous for both aforenamed mutations. Family B, however, only had two brothers who were homozygous for the Arg283Trp mutation. Achromatopsia in these two United Arab Emirates families results from two different mutations in CNGA3. Two branches of the same pedigree had individuals with both homozygous and compound heterozygous disease, demonstrating a complex molecular pathology in this large family.

  17. "I Don't Want My Parents' Respect Going down the Drain": South Asian, Muslim Young Women Negotiating Family and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stride, Annette; Flintoff, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Young women's relationship with physical activity has been explored extensively, yet the focus is often upon young women who are White. This paper considers South Asian, Muslim young women's experiences of physical activity and how these are influenced by family. A "middle ground" feminist approach is used, drawing upon the work of Hill…

  18. Cross-cultural ageism: ageism and attitudes toward aging among Jews and Arabs in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Yoav S; Bodner, Ehud; Cohen-Fridel, Sara

    2013-01-01

    While it is generally agreed that traditional societies are more favorable toward their elders, research findings have been inconsistent. Accordingly, this study presents a cultural comparison between Jews and Arabs in Israel in attitudes toward older adults and personal views regarding one's own aging. It was assumed that Arabs would rate their culture as more tolerant toward older adults, would report spending more time with them, and express lower ageism and aging anxieties. We examined 154 native Israeli citizens, 86 Jewish and 68 Muslim Arabs, who completed measures of ageism, aging anxieties, and cultural views of older adults. Arabs rated their culture as more tolerant toward their elders, perceived older adults as significantly more contributing to society, and reported engaging in less avoiding behaviors toward them. Arabs also exhibited less general fears of growing old and concerns over one's physical appearance in old age. But it was interesting to note that Arab women reported higher scores of aging anxieties and ageist attitudes in comparison to Arab men, whereas no such differences were found among Jews. Our findings point that the cultural importance of elders for the Arab cohort transcends beyond Westernization processes which affect the Arab society in Israel, and reflect the demanding role of Arab women as primary caregivers for the elders in the family. Limitations and implications of the study are discussed.

  19. Cyberbullying Perpetration by Arab Youth: The Direct and Interactive Role of Individual, Family, and Neighborhood Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury-Kassabri, Mona; Mishna, Faye; Massarwi, Adeem Ahmad

    2016-07-01

    This study adopts a social-ecological/contextual perspective to explore Arab youth involvement in cyberbullying perpetration. We explored the association between individual (age, gender, and impulsivity), family (socioeconomic status and parental monitoring), and community (experiencing neighborhood violence) characteristics and cyberbullying perpetration. A moderation model exploring individual, family, and context interactions was tested. A sample of 3,178 Arab students in Grades 7 to 11 completed a structured, anonymous self-report questionnaire. The findings suggest that almost 14% of the participants have cyberbullied others during the last month. Adolescent boys with high impulsivity, low parental monitoring, and who experience a high level of violence in their neighborhood are at especially high risk of cyberbullying perpetration. Parental monitoring moderated the effects of impulsivity and experiencing neighborhood violence on adolescents' involvement in perpetrating cyberbullying. Furthermore, the results show that impulsive adolescents who experience high levels of neighborhood violence are at higher risk of cyberbullying perpetration than low impulsive children who experience the same levels of neighborhood violence. The results highlight the central role parenting plays in protecting their children from involvement in cyberbullying perpetration by buffering the effects of personal and situational risk factors.

  20. Neonatal familial Evans syndrome associated with joint hypermobility and mitral valve regurgitation in three siblings in a Saudi Arab family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Fathelrahman E.; AlBakrah, Mohameed S.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia in the absence of a known underlying cause led to the diagnosis of Evans syndrome in a 9 month old male. Subsequently, a similar diagnosis was made in two siblings (a 3 year old boy and a 1 day old girl). The 9 month old had a chronic course with exacerbations. He was treated with steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin and colchiccine with a variable response. He died of congestive heart failure at the age of 8 years. The brother's disease course was one of remission and exacerbation. With time, remissions were prolonged and paralleled an improvement in joint hypermobility. The sister died of sepsis after a chronic course with severe exacerbattions. Only two families with Evans syndrome have been reported in the English medical literature. In one report (in a Saudi Arab family), the disease was associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia. (author)

  1. Cancer Screening Among Patients Who Self-Identify as Muslim: Combining Self-Reported Data with Medical Records in a Family Practice Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofters, A K; Slater, M; Vahabi, M

    2018-02-01

    Cancer screening is a core component of family medicine but screening inequalities are well documented in Canada for foreign-born persons. Although people of Muslim faith and culture are the fastest growing immigrant population in Canada, there is little information in the literature about their cancer screening practices. Determining screening gaps could inform practice-based quality improvement initiatives. We conducted a retrospective chart review combining patient-level medical record data with self-reported religious affiliation to examine the relationship between religion and cancer screening in a large multi-site urban family practice. Religious affiliation was classified as Muslim, other affiliation, or atheist/no religious affiliation. 5311 patients were included in the study sample. Muslim patients were significantly less likely to prefer English for spoken communication than the other two groups, less likely to be Canadian-born, more likely to have a female family physician, and were over-represented in the lowest income quintile. Muslim women were most likely to be up-to-date on breast cancer screening (85.2 vs. 77.5 % for those with other religions vs. 69.5 % for those with no religious affiliation). There were no significant differences in cancer screening by physician sex. In this pilot study conducted within a primary care practice, we used self-reported data on religious affiliation to examine possible inequities in cancer screening and observed intriguing variations in screening by self-identified religious affiliation. Future efforts to collect and use similar patient-level data should incorporate non-official languages and intensively outreach to patients with less health system contact. Regardless, the family medicine context may be the ideal setting to collect and act on patient-level sociodemographic data such as religious affiliation.

  2. Role Salience, Social Support, and Work-Family Conflict among Jewish and Arab Female Teachers in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinamon, Rachel Gali

    2009-01-01

    Conceptualizing career development in a cultural and contextual framework, this study examined within-gender differences in role salience and work-family conflict (WFC) among 101 Jewish and 99 Arab female teachers (aged 23-64 years) from central Israel. The contribution of social support to women's conflict was also examined. Results highlighted…

  3. Determinants of family size in a Gulf Arab state: a comparison between two areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadeh, Randah R; Al-Roomi, Khaldoon; Masuadi, Emad

    2008-09-01

    The rapid economic transition in the Gulf Arab countries has resulted in marked changes in fertility and marriage patterns and a decrease in the number of children per family. Yet little is known about the determinants of family size in urban and less urban areas. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 450 Kuwaiti women aged 20-60 years who attended health care centres in Al Asima and Al Jahra governorates. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered through face-to-face interview which included variables on socio-demographic characteristics, family size, actual and ideal spacing, marriage related variables, health conditions and utilization of health services. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the factors that affect family size. The socio-economic indicators were significantly better in Al Asima, the capital, than in Al Jahra, a less urbanized area. On average, family size for the total sample was 5.97 +/- 0.114 with a larger size (6.27 +/- 0.242) in Al Jahra than in Al Asima (5.80 +/- 0.118) but without a significant difference. Al Jahra women reported a larger number of deliveries and past pregnancies but a lower usage of contraceptive measures. The total fertility rate was 3.65 in Al Asima, 3.84 in Al Jahra and 3.71 births per woman in the total population. Family size was inversely related to the educational level of women and their husbands. Currently employed women had a smaller family size (5.22 +/- 0.119) than the unemployed (6.81 +/- 0.187); p Families where the husband was the decision-maker on the number of children had a significantly larger family size (6.91 +/- 0.451) than families where the couple both participated in the decision (5.83 +/- 0.129; p = 0.032). The duration of marriage, ideal number of children, age of women at last delivery, number of rooms and the crowding index had significant positive effects on family size, whereas age at first delivery, duration between two consecutive pregnancies and

  4. Some Lexical Aspects of Cape Muslim Afrikaans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It looks at the role of the literary tradition of Arabic-. Afrikaans and the Islamic .... That these words continued to be used in Cape Muslim Afrikaans, in both sec- ular and religiOUS ...... In tenns of the Arabie dictionary. (Hans Wehr 1980: 68), ...

  5. Familial history, age and smoking are important risk factors for disc degeneration disease in Arabic pedigrees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livshits, Gregory; Cohen, Zvi; Higla, Orabi; Yakovenko, Konstantin

    2001-01-01

    The present study used computed tomography imaging to evaluate the extent and pattern of the intergenerational transmission of spinal disc degeneration disease (DDD) in complex pedigrees. Contribution of a number of the potential covariates was also studied using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis, as well as two types of complex segregation analysis models. Among 161 individuals studied, DDD was diagnosed in 60 individuals. The number of protruded discs varied from 1 to 4, mostly in lumbar or lumbosacral regions. The average age at onset of the disease was similar for both women (36.0 years) and men (34.8 years). The proportion of the individuals affected by the DDD status of their parents ranged from 10% in families of two healthy parents to 55.5% of two affected parents (p < 0.01). The results of the logistic regression analyses and complex segregation analysis were qualitatively the same: DDD status of parents, age and smoking were the main risk factors for disc herniation in the Arabic families we examined. All analyses showed a predominating role of the family history as a risk factor for DDD in offsprings. It showed, for example, four times higher risk at age 50 for individuals with two affected parents vs. those who have two non-affected parents. However, the results of models-fitting genetic analysis, did not confirm a monogenic Mendelian pattern of inheritance

  6. Religiosity of Muslim Adolescents from Single Parent Families Living in Government-Subsidised Settlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariza, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a phase of emotionl turmoil and stress. If not balanced with religious practice, it may cause adolescents to fall into moral and social problems such as breach of school discipline, delinquency, drug addiction and sexual permissiveness. Religiosity is one way for adolescents to deal with challenges in life thereby avoiding immoral activities. This is because religiosity may help to balance adolescent emotional, cognitive and social developments.The purpose of this study is to identify the behaviour and level of religiosity among 30 adolescents from single parents families who settle in government-subsidised area of residence, namely known as the Federal Land Development Authority (FELDA. The area is located in the state of Pahang, situated on the eastern part of Malaysia. These adolescents have been selected as research respondents. This research was conducted as a survey using questionnaire as the research instrument. It was constructed based on the guidelines of Islamic Practice Instrument (IPI (Fariza, 2012 and has already been verified in terms of its validity and reliability. The data analysis has adopted the method of descriptive statistics explained in table form. The research results have found that religiosity or religious behaviour that the adolescents most frequently abide by are staying away from gambling, having good thoughts and expectations of Allah, feeling awed and fear of Allah’s power (taqwa, staying away from fornication (zina and supplication (doa to Allah facing the direction of Qibla. The level of religiosity is medium for most adolescents. This factor explains why not many respondents are involved in moral and disciplinary problems at school. This research finds that generally, religiosity protects adolescents from being involved in immoral activities and other vices.

  7. Message from the Worldwide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mirza Masroor

    2008-07-01

    Abdus Salam was an Ahmadi Muslim from Pakistan, a renowned theoretical physicist who received the Nobel Prize in 1979 for his work in electroweak theory. Although he was the first Muslim Nobel Laureate, Pakistan's military dictator at that time could not admit that its brilliant scientist was a Muslim citizen. Dr Salam's entire award was devoted to the furtherance of education: he did not spend a penny on himself or his family...

  8. Paternal asthma is a predictor for childhood asthma in the consanguineous families from the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Maries; Zoubeidi, Taoufik; Al-Dhaheri, Sherina M; Al-Dhaheri, Aysha Ahmed; Al-Dhaheri, Afra A; Al-Kaabi, Fatima M; Al-Muhairi, Shamma J; Joseph, Jose

    2009-03-01

    Consanguinity is known to increase the burden of genetic disorders among offspring. However, the effect of consanguinity on a complex disorder like childhood asthma has not been studied previously. Therefore, we explored this relationship by studying the asthma prevalence in children between 6 and 14 years of age among the local Arab families of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) where consanguinity is known to be highly prevalent. A total of 1136 children from 295 families met our inclusion criteria. The prevalence of childhood asthma was higher among children in consanguineous families (43.3%) compared to non-consanguineous (22.6%, p consanguinity and the number of asthmatic children per family (p = 0.0002). Girls from consanguineous families had proportionately more asthma (42.9%, p consanguineous families increased asthma risk for both boys and girls (p = 0.021 for boys, p consanguineous families. The significant asthma predictors for girls from the consanguineous families were the degree of consanguinity and paternal asthma. The only predictor for boys was paternal asthma. These interesting observations merit further studies on both larger samples and in other consanguineous communities for confirmation.

  9. Novel mutations of MYO7A and USH1G in Israeli Arab families with Usher syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizel, Leah; Safieh, Christine; Shalev, Stavit A; Mezer, Eedy; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Chervinsky, Elena; Briscoe, Daniel; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the genetic basis for Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) in four consanguineous Israeli Arab families. Haplotype analysis for all known USH1 loci was performed in each family. In families for which haplotype analysis was inconclusive, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. For mutation analysis, specific primers were used to PCR amplify the coding exons of the MYO7A, USH1C, and USH1G genes including intron-exon boundaries. Mutation screening was performed with direct sequencing. A combination of haplotype analysis and genome-wide homozygosity mapping indicated linkage to the USH1B locus in two families, USH1C in one family and USH1G in another family. Sequence analysis of the relevant genes (MYO7A, USH1C, and USH1G) led to the identification of pathogenic mutations in all families. Two of the identified mutations are novel (c.1135-1147dup in MYO7A and c.206-207insC in USH1G). USH1 is a genetically heterogenous condition. Of the five USH1 genes identified to date, USH1C and USH1G are the rarest contributors to USH1 etiology worldwide. It is therefore interesting that two of the four Israeli Arab families reported here have mutations in these two genes. This finding further demonstrates the unique genetic structure of the Israeli population in general, and the Israeli Arab population in particular, which due to high rates of consanguinity segregates many rare autosomal recessive genetic conditions.

  10. Considerations for School Psychologists Working with Arab American Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Anisa N.

    2011-01-01

    There are an estimated three million Arab Americans in the United States, with 25% of the population under the age of 18. Given this significant population, it is likely that some school psychologists come across children from Arab backgrounds during their career. Many school psychologists, however, may not be aware of the unique cultural…

  11. Discrimination, religious and cultural factors, and Middle Eastern/Arab Americans' psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikizler, Ayse S; Szymanski, Dawn M

    2018-01-11

    We investigated (1) the moderating role of religiosity in the link between religious affiliation and ethnic discrimination and (2) the moderating roles of religiosity, ethnic identity, and family connectedness in the relations between ethnic discrimination and psychological distress. Our sample consisted of 122 (60% women, 40% men) Middle Eastern/Arab Americans (MEAAs), ranging in age from 18 to 82 years old, who completed an online survey. Muslim identification predicted discrimination for MEAAs with high but not low religiosity. Higher levels of discrimination, more family connectedness, the interaction of discrimination and religiosity, and the interaction of discrimination and family connectedness were unique predictors of psychological distress. Religiosity is a risk factor for experiencing ethnic discrimination among Muslim identified MEAAs. MEAAs who have high religiosity and low to moderate levels of family connectedness are vulnerable to psychological distress associated with ethnic discrimination. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. EKG analysis skills of family practice residents in the United Arab Emirates: a comparison with US data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, S; Reed, R

    2001-06-01

    Concern has been raised about the electrocardiogram (EKG) analysis skills of family practice residents in the United States. This study examined EKG analysis skills of family practice residents, medical students, interns, and general practitioners (GPs) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), a different environment. The measurement instrument was a set of 10 EKGs, used in a study of US family practice residents. Two of the EKGs were normal, and there were 14 clinical abnormalities in the remainder. There was no significant difference in the correct diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction between US family practice residents and UAE family practice residents, medical students, or GPs. Interns' diagnoses were significantly poorer. The mean score for correctly identifying acute myocardial infarction and both normal EKGs was not significantly different between groups: 2.50 medical students, 2.35 interns, 2.58 UAE family practice residents, 2.67 FD, and 2.55 US family practice residents. However, the US family practice resident mean score of 11.26 for all 16 clinical findings was significantly higher than any group in the UAE: 5.35 medical students, 5.87 interns, 6.08 UAE family practice residents, 5.69 family physicians. Difficulty in EKG interpretation transcends geographic boundaries, suggesting that new approaches to teaching these skills need to be explored. Improved EKG reading skills by family physicians are generally needed in both the United States and the UAE.

  13. Muhajir Penjana Interaksi dan Toleransi Beragama Saudara Baru-Muslim-Non-Muslim

    OpenAIRE

    Khadijah Mohd Khambali; Azarudin Awang; Suraya Sintang; Nur Farhana Abdul Rahman; Wan Adli Wan Ramli; Khairul Nizam Mat Karim

    2017-01-01

    New brothers, New Muslim and Mualaf are the terms that are often referred to as individuals who began to cultivate the religion of Islam. In the Malaysian context, in reality they are individuals who had embraced Islam for many years. This situation may affect the relation and integration in the community of Saudara Baru, Muslim origin and non-Muslim family members. Furthermore, it raises the issue of ethnic misunderstanding due to the issues that linger in the life of Saudara Bar...

  14. Association of adiponectin promoter variants with traits and clusters of metabolic syndrome in Arabs: family-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadjali, F; Al-Yahyaee, S; Hassan, M O; Albarwani, S; Bayoumi, R A

    2013-09-25

    Plasma levels of adiponectin are decreased in type 2 diabetes, obesity and hypertension. Our aim was to use a family-based analysis to identify the genetic variants of the adiponectin (ADIPOQ) gene that are associated with obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, among Arabs. We screened 328 Arabs in one large extended family for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of the ADIPOQ gene. Two common SNPs were detected: rs17300539 and rs266729. Evidences of association between traits related to the metabolic syndrome and the SNPs were studied by implementing quantitative genetic association analysis. Results showed that SNP rs266729 was significantly associated with body weight (p-value=0.001), waist circumference (p-value=0.037), BMI (p-value=0.015) and percentage of total body fat (p-value=0.003). Up to 4.1% of heritability of obesity traits was explained by the rs266729 locus. Further cross-sectional analysis showed that carriers of the G allele had significantly higher values of waist circumference, BMI and percentage of total body fat (p-values 0.014, 0.004 and 0.032, respectively). No association was detected between SNP rs266729 and other clusters of metabolic syndrome or their traits except for HOMA-IR and fasting plasma insulin levels, p-values 0.035 and 0.004, respectively. In contrast, both measured genotype and cross-sectional analysis failed to detect an association between the SNP rs17300539 with traits and clusters of metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, we showed family-based evidence of association of SNP rs266729 at ADIPOQ gene with traits defining obesity in Arab population. This is important for future prediction and prevention of obesity in population where obesity is in an increasing trend. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Muhajir Penjana Interaksi dan Toleransi Beragama Saudara Baru-Muslim-Non-Muslim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijah Mohd Khambali

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available New brothers, New Muslim and Mualaf are the terms that are often referred to as individuals who began to cultivate the religion of Islam. In the Malaysian context, in reality they are individuals who had embraced Islam for many years. This situation may affect the relation and integration in the community of Saudara Baru, Muslim origin and non-Muslim family members. Furthermore, it raises the issue of ethnic misunderstanding due to the issues that linger in the life of Saudara Baru since Saudara Baru in the context of Malaysia is more prominent as a generator in religious interaction among various ethnic groups in Malaysia. This study aims to see the experience of religious tolerance among Muhajir-Muslim-non-Muslim. Data was obtained using qualitative method which focussed on interviews with twenty Muhajir in Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia. The results highlighted the culture of tolerance among Muslim-non-Muslim-Muhajir in the diversity of living together. This relationship is demonstrated through effective relations, meetings and living together that form friendship, brotherhood and affinity across religious boundaries. This shows Muhajir play a role in fostering tolerance especially in relations between Muslims and non-Muslims in Malaysia.

  16. LIFE VALUES OF PERSONS IN CROSS-CULTURAL (ARAB - RUSSIAN AND MONOCULTURAL MARRIAGES AND THEIR REPRESENTATION IN FAMILY SPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Y Chebotareva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the empirical study, which has been conducted with the aim to analyze the differences in life and family values and their interactions between the spouses from cross-cultural and monocultural couples. The sample of the study consists of 330 persons, including 85 cross-cultural Arab - Russian couples (170 persons, living in Russia, and 80 monocultural couples (160 persons.The main methods were S. Schwartz’ “Value Survey”, “Test of Attitudes to Family Life” by Yu. Alyoshina, L. Gozman, & E. Dubovskaya, «Marital Role Expectations and Aspirations” by A.N. Volkova, “Marital Satisfaction Test” by V. Stolin, T. Romanova, & G. Butenko.It was revealed that the persons from cross-cultural and monocultural marriages have different life and family values hierarchies, besides, they realize their life values in family life differently. In cross-cultural marriages the spouses see the opportunities for their normative life goals realizing in the family, especially in its psychotherapeutic and parental spheres, as well as in social activity outside the family. But in their real day-to-day activities, they do not always manage to realize their life goals in the family sphere, probably because of the difficulties in interacting with their social environment, which can come from the fact that their families are more enclosed, which in turn leads to a decrease of marital satisfaction. In the cross-cultural spouses’ representations, the collectivist values are more related to family functioning, but individualistic values such as hedonism and power are perceived as incompatible with the successful functioning of the family.

  17. Women in management means women in power: implications for society, family and culture in the Arab world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-irani, L

    1995-01-01

    A May 1995 conference in Beirut on "The Arab Woman and Business Management" focused on the fact that women are relatively absent from decision-making positions in the public and private sectors in the Arab world. Conference participants also identified characteristics of Arab women who have successfully penetrated the ranks of management, discussed how to balance work and home life, and considered the potentially important role of women managers in the nonprofit sector. Recurring and interrelated themes of the conference addressed the fact that women who have become empowered at work will have increased self-confidence in every aspect of their lives. Also, women who have successfully managed a busy household are able to transfer these skills to the workplace. Women will increasingly demand access to the highest ranks of decision-making, but their culturally-shaped sense of themselves may ultimately hinder them from attaining positions currently reserved for men. Research has shown that women's conceptions of power are more egalitarian and cooperative than the competitiveness exhibited by men. Women may, therefore, offer an important approach to the rapidly changing world market which requires the cooperation of people from diverse backgrounds. Ultimately, it is women who define themselves (rather than accept an identity chosen by society, the family, or culture) who will progress the fastest and achieve the highest ranks in management. Women should neither passively wait to be handed power not allow men to define the nature and uses of power. Instead they must seize their own power and exercise it in their own ways.

  18. Cultural and Religious Educational Needs of Overseas Nurses Working in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yateem, Nabeel; AlYateem, Sami; Rossiter, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    A competent transcultural health care service has been identified as essential for the delivery of safe health care in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) and indeed internationally. Delivery of contextually informed educational programs to new employees forms an important component of achieving this requirement. Nurse educators have an essential role in identifying the cultural and religious knowledge needed by new employees and in designing programs to address these needs. The objective of this article was to explore the cultural and religious educational needs of overseas nurses working with Muslim patients in the KSA and the UAE as derived from the experience of nurses themselves. Written narratives from nurses employed to work primarily with Muslim nurses were analyzed using a qualitative descriptive methodology. In the UAE and the KSA context, and perhaps for nurses working with Muslim-Arabic patients worldwide, the culturally and religiously specific topics that need to be a component of preemployment education include the basic Islamic principles (5 daily prayers, Ramadan fasting, Zamzam water, and time management skills to accommodate religious practices within care); Kinship and Social Factors (family structure, gender-related issues, and social support system); and Basic Arabic language skills.

  19. "It's Every Family's Dream": Choice of a Medical Career Among the Arab Minority in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper-Giveon, Ariela; Keshet, Yael

    2016-10-01

    Application to medical studies and the choice of medicine as a career are influenced by many factors, some internal (academic ability, intellectual curiosity, interests) and some external (parental pressure, peer pressure, teacher and school expectations). Ethnicity plays a role in motivational orientation and belonging to an ethnic minority group may influence both internal and external motives and priorities in choosing medicine as a career. In this article, we present a qualitative study of the motives that impel Arab physicians in Israel to choose a medical career. As a theoretical framework, we apply self-determination theory (SDT) (Ryan and Deci in Am Psychol 55:68-78, 2000), consisting of three principal categories situated along a continuum: Amotivation, extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation. We show that extrinsic motivation is dominant among Arab physicians in Israel, demonstrating specifically the unique political context and cultural characteristics of Arab society in Israel. These findings, and the attention to the unique motivations of people from different ethnic minority groups who choose medical career, may increase the number of physicians from minority groups, a step known to decrease health gaps in multi-cultural contexts.

  20. The Roles of Family and Teacher Support in Moderating and Mediating Externalized and Internalized Outcomes of Exposure to Community Violence Among Arab and Jewish Adolescents in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Yahia, Muhammad M; Leshem, Becky; Guterman, Neil B

    2018-02-01

    The study examined family and teacher support as factors that can protect adolescents from internalized and externalized problems after exposure to community violence (ECV). Self-administered questionnaires were filled out by a sample of 1,832 Arab and Jewish Israeli high school students. The Arab adolescents reported significantly higher levels of community violence victimization, internalized problems, externalized problems, family support, and teacher support than the Jewish adolescents. The girls reported higher levels of internalized problems, and the boys reported higher levels of externalized problems. ECV predicted high levels of internalized and externalized problems, family support predicted low levels of internalized and externalized problems, and teacher support had no predictive role. Path analysis confirmed the significance of the relationships between ECV effects, support variables, and gender. The limitations of the study and implications of the findings for future research and for the development of family care and family intervention programs are discussed.

  1. Muslims in Pre- and Post-9/11 Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abu Shahid Abdullah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Muslims have never ceased to be important for the West and have been depicted in vilifying and stereotypical manners in western literature and films. However, after the tragic event of 9/11, a dramatic change has been observed in the world’s focus towards Muslims. Although stereotypes and discriminatory actions were nothing new to Muslims, the post-9/11 backlash was absolutely terrible and heartbreaking. People have started to consider Muslims either terrorists or sympathetic to terrorists, and they have been suspected and distrusted. Lots of books, articles and films have depicted Muslims in a derogatory and extreme manner. Pre-9/11 Hollywood movies True Lies and The Siege explicitly show the stereotypical attitude of the West to Muslims while post-9/11 novels like The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Mohsin Hamid and Once in a Promised Land by Laila Halaby depict the plight and predicament of Muslims in America. The article aims to depict the stereotypical, vilifying and antagonistic attitudes of the West to Arabs and Muslims in both pre- and post- 9/11 era. It also aims to prove that the depiction is highly motivated by the media, western authorities and the West’s desire for social, cultural and political dominance over the East. Keywords: Orientalism, Others, Terrorism, Media

  2. What Has Happened to Arabs? Identity and Face Management Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Zidjaly, Najma

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I draw on contemporary theorizing on the concept of face (e.g., Ting-Toomey 1994, 2004; Tracy 2008) and research on Islamic and Arabic cultures and linguistic strategies (e.g., Beeman 1986; Hegland 1998; Wilce 2005; Al Zidjaly 2006) to explore the role that the Internet plays in enabling Muslim Arabs to manage or save their…

  3. Education for Multiculturalism among Arab Youth in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Asbah, Khaled

    2018-01-01

    Education for multiculturalism, founded on liberal-democratic values, is a frequent topic of educational discourse that has not been ignored by Muslim Arab schools in Israel. In general, Arab society is undergoing change processes, in transition from a traditional to a modern society; traditional values are challenged, engendering social crises.…

  4. Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis of Hemodynamic Parameters Under Mental and Physical Stress in Extended Omani Arab Pedigrees : The Oman Family Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Mohammed O.; Jaju, Deepali; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Bayoumi, Riad A.; Albarwani, Sulayma; Al-Yahyaee, Saeed; Aslani, Afshin; Snieder, Harold; Lopez-Alvarenga, Juan C.; Al-Anqoudi, Zahir M.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.

    Background: We performed a genome-wide scan in a homogeneous Arab population to identify genomic regions linked to blood pressure (BP) and its intermediate phenotypes during mental and physical stress tests. Methods: The Oman Family Study subjects (N = 1277) were recruited from five extended

  5. ADOPTION IN SHARI'A LAW, ITS IMPACT ON THE MUSLIM MINORITY IN ISRAEL, AND THE THERAPIST-PATIENT RELATIONSHIP WHEN PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERVENTION IS NECESSARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gith, Emad

    2014-10-01

    Adoption is an act of kindness and an expression of the most exalted of human morality. It fulfills the needs of both the adoptive parents and the adopted child. Muslim religious law has rejected the concept of adoption as it exists in the western world and presents several alternatives including personal liability, declaration of guardianship, bestowing a gift and leaving a last will and testament. Nevertheless, over the past 20 years, the Arab-Muslim population in Israel has developed a certain acceptance of the more typical concept of adoption and the willingness to accept the civil legislation that is applied in domestic courts in Israel. This gradual integration into Israeli society as well as the very act of adoption, which remains controversial, often creates the need for treatment, consultation and guidance for the adoptive family and the adopted child. The traditional, collective characteristics of the Arab-Muslim society have a significant impact on the child's emotional state and behavior and, of course, effect the adoptive family's social standing as well. In such situations, it is imperative to discuss the interaction and the often difficult and complex relationship that develops between the therapist or counselor and the patient.

  6. Muslims, Home Education and Risk in British Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Martin; Bhopal, Kalwant

    2018-01-01

    The number of families who choose to home educate has significantly increased in the last decade. This article explores the experiences of British Muslims who home educate using data from a larger study exploring the views of a diverse range of families. Drawing on the work of Beck, we discuss how 'risk' is understood in relation to Muslim home…

  7. Naxos disease in an Arab family is not caused by the Pk2157del2 mutation; evidance for exclusion of the plakoglobin gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuhmann, M.; El-Harith, A.; Bukhari, Iqbal A.

    2004-01-01

    Nax os disease is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma, woolly hair and cardiomyopathy. This study aims to determine whether Naxos disease in a Saudi Arab family is caused by the Pk2157del2 mutation that was identified in Greek families from Naxos Island where the disease had originally been described. This study was undertaken at King Fahad Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, and the Medical University of Hannover, in the spring of 2003. Naxos disease has been encountered in a 2-year-old girl and her 30-year-old aunt of a Saudi Arab family. Deoxyribonucleic acid samples of this family were analyzed by polymerase chain-reaction (PCR) amplification of the respective region of the plakoglobin gene, and direct nucleotide sequencing of the PCR-products. Segregation analysis was performed employing the newly detected IVS11+22G/A polymorphism. Molecular genetic analysis of the DNA sample of the child diagnosed with Naxos disease showed absence of the Pk2157del2 mutation. In addition, the segregation analysis revealed heterozygosity for IVS11+22G/A in the affected girl. Absence of the Pk2157del2 frameshift in the affected child proved that Naxos disease in this Saudi Arab family is not caused by the same mutation that was identified in the Greek families. Furthermore, heterozygosity for the IVS11+22G/A polymorphism provided evidence for exclusion of the plakoglobin gene in this consanguineous family. (author)

  8. Empowering Muslim Women Though Executive Coaching & Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadila Grine

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role and effect of executive coaching and mentoring on the empowerment of Muslim women and enhancing their levels of contribution. It further substantiates the manner in which executive coaching can accommodate both the nature and needs of Muslim women while further unleashing her respective talents, creativity and skills. The study further highlights the role and significance of coaching in spheres relevant to family, as well as social and career development. This study highlights the use of the strategic technique for personal and leadership development set to explore talents, leaders and implicit abilities. Moreover, it exhibits the flexibility of self-coaching and its appropriateness for Muslim women, especially concerning self-development, which in turn influences social and institutional development. This inquiry highlights a number of practical results which emphasizes the viability and efficacy of executive coaching on personal and institutional levels as far as the making of better world for Muslim women is concerned.

  9. Adult physical inactivity prevalence in the Muslim world: Analysis of 38 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, David

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity surveillance informs policy and treatment options toward meeting the World Health Organization's (WHO) goal of a 10% reduction in its prevalence by 2025. We currently do not know the aggregate prevalence for Muslim-majority countries, many of which have extremely high rates of comorbidities associated with physical inactivity. Based on data for 163, 556 persons in 38 Muslim countries that were collected by the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, unweighted and weighted physical inactivity prevalence estimates were calculated. I used two-proportion Z tests to determine gender and ethnic differences within the sample and between the sample and 94 non-Muslim countries and odds ratios to determine the magnitude of significant differences. Total physical inactivity prevalence was 32.3% (95% CI: 31.9, 32.7). Prevalence among males and females was 28.8% and 35.5%, respectively. Prevalence among non-Arabs and Arabs was 28.6% and 43.7%, respectively. Females and Arabs were more likely physically inactive than their respective counterparts [OR = 1.36 (1.33, 1.39) and OR = 1.94 (1.90, 1.98)]. Muslim countries were more likely physically inactive [OR = 1.23 (1.22, 1.25)] than non-Muslim ones, which was primarily due to the influence of Arabs [OR = 2.01 (1.97, 2.04)], and in particular female Arabs [OR = 2.22 (2.17, 2.27)]. Physical inactivity prevalence in the Muslim world is higher than non-Muslim countries and the difference is primarily due to higher rates among Arabs.

  10. Contraception and Sexual and Reproductive Awareness Among Ghanaian Muslim Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibrail Bin Yusuf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ghana, a lower-middle income country that is still grappling with fertility and birth rates, initiated family planning for the youth decades ago. This mainly targeted deprived communities, and the Muslim youth were also exposed to contraception. However, contraception awareness among the Muslim youth has had difficulties and repercussions. Against the social and economic challenges facing the Ghanaian Muslim youth, this article evaluates their awareness about contraception focusing on the issues and their ramification with the aim of identifying prospects for development. The findings reveal that awareness is high but not in a positive sense as the general patronage among couples is low, while among the unmarried, the awareness has negatively affected their morality. Among the issues, there is a disconnection between service providers and the community while some Muslims think that contraception can reduce the Muslim population and is un-Islamic. It was argued that contraception is permitted for Muslims provided there is ethical justification and that in view of the social and economic challenges, including school dropouts and Muslim child migration due to the poverty of parents, the Muslim youth must plan their childbirth. Hence, it was recommended that government must tackle the problem of education in Muslim communities. The Ulama should also dialogue with the service providers to create trust between the health providers and the Muslims.

  11. Muslim education in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Pietkiewicz-Pareek

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Madrasa education is a very important part of the History of Muslim education and Islamic studies in India. As many as 25 per cent of Muslim children in the 6-14 year age group have either never attended school or have dropped out, so madrasa school is the only choice for them.

  12. Socio-political aspects of mental health practice with Arabs in the Israeli context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Krenawi, Alean

    2005-01-01

    Since the 1948 establishment of the Israeli state, an event described by Arab peoples as "Al-Nakbah" (catastrophe), the Arab minority in Israel has experienced oppression, trauma and social exclusion; they feel defeated, disempowered and poorer. There are huge gaps in quality of life between Arab and Jewish Israelis. Such social inequities, as well as other issues such as polygamy, have been identified as risk factors for psychological distress. This situation puts the Israeli Arab, like other post-colonial peoples, in an attitude of ambivalence towards modern mental health services. On the one hand, certain forms of intervention, particularly medicinal, may improve peoples' lives. On the other, mental health services, as part of the colonial process, continue to present limited cultural sensitivity towards Arab peoples. A cultural gap leading to mistrust is a given when a non-Arab mental health provider comes into contact with an Arab client. Religious beliefs, the importance of the family and the stigma attached to mental health problems have substantial influence on the Arab's perception and reaction toward mental health problems and their treatment. The expression of conflict and negative feelings are not well accepted within Arab culture. For this reason, mental illness is often denied and kept away from professional help or expressed as a physical illness. There is also a difficulty for a male being treated by a female and for the individual to ask for help outside his family or community. Arab Muslims also generally have a tendency to resign themselves to God's care and thus may neglect or deny symptoms. Another tendency is the preference for using traditional healers and folk medicine. Other problems in mental health work are the passive attitude of the patient and the degree of authority vested in the therapist. To facilitate bridging this cultural gap, the therapist's first task is that of educating him/her self about the religious, cultural and national

  13. Health beliefs and practices among Arab women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kridli, Suha Al-Oballi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the healthcare beliefs and practices of Arab American women, specifically those regarding menstruation, pregnancy, childbirth, and family planning. The information in this paper is derived from the author's experience as a researcher, as an Arab healthcare provider, and from the literature. Guidelines for nurses who provide care to Arab American women are also presented.

  14. Attitudes of Arabic- and Non-Arabic Speaking Parents Toward the Importance of Learning Arabic in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Al Alili

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To promote Arabic teaching, researchers examined attitudes and expectations of parents regarding the importance of their children's Arabic study. In four states Researchers surveyed 238 Arabic-speaking and 128 non-Arabic speaking parents of children at urban and suburban schools offering Arabic as part of their mainstream programs. Most parents demonstrated positive attitudes toward language learning. They involved and encouraged their children's Arabic study and involved themselves in it. Arabic-speaking parents believed Arabic important for their children to maintain communication and affinity with family; preserve culture, religion, and traditions; maintain cultural heritage in the United States; and maintain moral and professional values. Non-Arabic speaking parents expressed similar reasons. However, Arabic-speaking parents recognized a wider variety of benefits to learning Arabic. Researchers concluded that parental attitudes toward language learning have great impact on children's learning process, but noted a discrepancy between the attitudes and expectations of Arabic- versus non-Arabic-speaking parents regarding learning Arabic.

  15. Familial predictors of childhood shyness: a study of the United Arab Emirates population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, V; Ghubash, R; Salem, M O; Sabri, S

    2005-01-01

    Phobic anxiety disorders generally breed true. In this regard, family studies have suggested an association between childhood shyness and maternal social phobia. In this study, the relationship between childhood shyness and maternal social anxiety was examined. 203 5-year-old children from an Arabian Gulf community and their mothers were evaluated. The children were assessed in stage 1 using the shyness scale of Stevenson-Hinde and Glover and the Preschool Behavior Checklist (PBCL), while mothers completed the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. In the second stage, blind clinical interviews were carried out to ascertain the diagnosis of psychiatric diagnoses, if any, using DSM-IV criteria. 27% of the children were identified as shy using the shyness scale of Stevenson-Hinde and Glover and 19% scored above the cutoff for behavioral disturbance on the PBCL. Child shyness was associated with female gender and maternal social anxiety as indicated by scores on the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, while an inverse relationship was noted with behavioral disturbance. The odds of the child having a high shyness score was increased if the mother had social anxiety (odds ratio = 2.14) and the child lived in a family that was 'not socially active' (odds ratio = 1.42). Our initial findings suggest that there may be a complex interaction between maternal social anxiety and family sociability in childhood shyness. Prospective longitudinal work is indicated. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Relationship of family caregiver burden with quality of care and psychopathology in a sample of Arab subjects with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Muhammad A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the burden experienced by families of people with schizophrenia has long been recognized as one of the most important consequences of the disorder, there are no reports from the Arab world. Following the example of the five - nation European (EPSILON study, we explored the following research question: How does the relationship between domains of caregiving (as in the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire - IEQ-EU and caregiver psychic distress on the one hand, and caregiver's/patient's socio-demographics, clinical features and indices of quality of care, on the other hand, compare with the pattern in the literature? Method Consecutive family caregivers of outpatients with schizophrenia were interviewed with the IEQ-EU. Patients were interviewed with measures of needs for care, service satisfaction, quality of life (QOL and psychopathology. Results There were 121 caregivers (66.1% men, aged 39.8. The IEQ domain scores (total: 46.9; tension: 13.4; supervision: 7.9; worrying: 12.9; and urging: 16.4 were in the middle of the range for the EU data. In regression analyses, higher burden subscale scores were variously associated with caregiver lower level of education, patient's female gender and younger age, as well as patient's lower subjective QOL and needs for hospital care, and not involving the patient in outdoor activities. Disruptive behavior was the greatest determinant of global rating of burden. Conclusion Our results indicate that, despite differences in service set-up and culture, the IEQ-EU can be used in Kuwait as it has been used in the western world, to describe the pattern of scores on the dimensions of caregiving. Differences with the international data reflect peculiarities of culture and type of service. Despite generous national social welfare provisions, experience of burden was the norm and was significantly associated with patient's disruptive behavior. The results underscore the need for provision

  17. The healthcare experiences of Arab Israeli women in a reformed healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnekave, Eldad; Gross, Revital

    2004-07-01

    Arab Israeli women are subject to unique social stresses deriving from their status as part of an ethno-political minority and from their position as women in a patriarchal community. Collectively, their health profiles rate poorly in comparison to Jewish Israeli women or to women in the vast majority of developed countries. To examine the experiences of Arab Israeli women in the contemporary Israeli healthcare system, following implementation of the National Health Insurance Law (NHIL). The study combined quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. A telephone survey utilizing a structured questionnaire was conducted during August-September 1998 among a random national sample of 849 women, with a response rate of 83%. Between the months of January and July of 2000, qualitative data was attained via participant-observation, long and short semi-structured interviews, and focus groups in one large Muslim Arab Israeli village. Arab Israeli women in the national survey reported poorer self-assessed health, lower rates of care by a woman primary care physician, lower satisfaction ratings for primary care physicians and more frequently foregoing medical care than did native or immigrant Jewish Israeli women. Three major factors contributing to Arab Israeli women's healthcare experiences were elucidated by the qualitative study: (1) the threat of physical and social exposure (2) difficulties in communicating with male physicians and (3) the stifling effect of family politics and surveillance on healthcare. We discuss our findings in relation to structural changes associated with the recent reform of the Israeli health care system. We conclude by suggesting policy measures for better adapting primary care services to the needs of Arab Israeli women, and note the relevance to other systems that aim to provide service to cultural and ethno-political minorities, in which healthcare delivery is shaped by unique local circumstances.

  18. Pilot Study: Survey Tools for Assessing Parenting Styles and Family Contributors to the Development of Obesity in Arab Children Ages 6 to 12 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tami, Suzan H; Reed, Debra B; Trejos, Elizabeth; Boylan, Mallory; Wang, Shu

    2015-11-05

    Our pilot study was conducted to test the reliability of the Caregiver's Feeding Styles Questionnaire (CFSQ) and the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity Assessment (FNPA) in a sample of Arab mothers. Twenty-five Arab mothers completed the CFSQ, FNPA, and the Participant Background Survey for the first administration. After 1-2 weeks, participants completed the CFSQ and the FNPA for the second administration. The two administrations of the surveys allowed for test/retest reliability of the CFSQ and the FNPA and to measure the internal consistency of the two surveys. Pearson's correlation between the first and second administrations or the 19-item scale (demandingness) and the 7-item scale (responsiveness) of the CFSQ were .95 and .86, respectively. As for the FNPA, Pearson's correlation was .80. The estimated reliabilities (Cronbach's alpha) of the CFSQ increased from .86 for the first administration to .93 for the second administration. However, the estimated reliabilities of the FNPA slightly increased from .58 for first administration to .59 for the second administration. In our pilot study of Arab mothers, the CFSQ and FNPA were shown to be promising in terms of reliability and content validity.

  19. The Language of the Nation: The Rise of Arabic among Jews and Christians (1900–1950)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murre-van den Berg, H.L.

    2016-01-01

    This essay explores the ways in which in the period following the First World War, non-Muslim communities participated in the establishment of Modern Standard Arabic as the foremost symbol of the new states that replaced the Arab provinces of the Ottoman Empire. A comparison of the sociolinguistic

  20. The Muslim Problematic: Muslims, State Schools and Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Shamim

    2016-01-01

    Muslims are folk-devils that mark the ubiquitous moral panic. For some, the idea of the "Muslim problematic" signifies a long and worrying trend of creeping "Islamification" of state schools. For others, the discourse of the "Muslim problematic" reflects the ongoing racial patholigisation of Britain's minoritised…

  1. Family support is associated with success in achieving weight loss in a group lifestyle intervention for diabetes prevention in Arab Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Nicole R; Brown, Morton B; Herman, William H; Jaber, Linda A

    2011-01-01

    We have recently shown the feasibility of a community-based, culturally-specific, Diabetes Prevention Program-adapted, goal-oriented group lifestyle intervention targeting weight loss in Arab Americans. The objective of this study was to examine factors associated with weight-loss goal attainment at 24-weeks of the lifestyle intervention. We assessed the relationship among demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral measures and the attainment of > or =7% decrease of initial body weight among 71 lifestyle intervention participants. Weight loss goal of > or = 7% of body weight was achieved by 44% of study participants. Demographic and psychosocial factors were not associated with weight loss. Individuals attaining the weight loss goal were more likely to have family support during the core curriculum sessions (70% vs 30%; P=.0023). Decrease in body weight was positively correlated with attendance at sessions (r=.46; P=.0016) and physical activity minutes (r=.66; Pwomen; these trends were similar but not significant in men. Family support was an important predictor of attainment of the weight loss goal. Family-centered lifestyle interventions are likely to succeed in curtailing the rising epidemic of diabetes in the Arab-American Community.

  2. Gender bias in Islamic textbooks for Muslim children in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwardi Suwardi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Textbook has a strong influence on the formation of children’s attitudes and value system. Therefore, Islamic textbooks as the main learning source for Muslim children in Indonesia need to consider the gender equality. This is very important to note, because feminists often view that Islam contains teachings of gender inequality. Islam places men in the higher position, while women are placed in the lower position. For example, men can be imam for women in prayer, but women cannot be imam for men. It is easier for children to learn textbook material presented in pictures. Therefore, the pictures presented in Islamic textbooks ideally do not contain gender bias. So, a research is needed to know if there is gender bias in the pictures presented in Islamic textbooks taught to Muslim children in Indonesia. To prove it, a literary research is conducted on the Islamic textbooks taught to the first grade Muslim student of Islamic Elementary School/ Madrasah Ibtidaiyah (MI in Indonesia which includes pictures in their teaching materials. Islamic textbooks studied in the research include Fikih, Akidah Akhlak, and Arabic textbooks. The results of this study conclude that the pictures presented in Islamic textbooks taught in Muslim children in Indonesia contain gender bias. The man favor pictures are more than those of woman favor. Based on the conclusion, this study recommends an improvement of pictures presented in Islamic textbooks taught to Muslim children in Indonesia.

  3. The influence of Facebook in the holiday decision making of Muslim women in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Imran

    2017-01-01

    Muslim consumer segment now represents the Fourth ‘Billion’ segment after China, India, and women overall in all around the world. Muslim population is increasing faster than the other segments in the UK. Muslim women play a significant role in family decision-making. Yet, researchers have neglected this segment. On the other hand, internet plays a vital role in decision-making and likewise, social media is influencing the family decision-making. Furthermore, women have an influential role at...

  4. Discrimination against Muslim American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroian, Karen J.

    2012-01-01

    Although there is ample evidence of discrimination toward Muslim Americans in general, there is limited information specific to Muslim American adolescents. The few existing studies specific to this age group suggest that Muslim American adolescents encounter much discrimination from teachers, school administrators, and classmates. This…

  5. ISLAM IN THE NON-MUSLIM AREAS OF NORTHERN NIGERIA, c

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QUADRI Y A

    the result of the marriage of pre-Islam painting arts and Muslim aesthetic ideals. The .... painting, that the development of the Arab (the oriental) miniature school began ..... Figure 5. a) Farshchian M.Go free oh bird, 1989; b) Morning star, 1988.

  6. Arab American College Students' Physical Activity and Body Composition: Reconciling Middle East-West Differences Using the Socioecological Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, David

    2011-01-01

    In this study, I conducted focus group interviews with 21 Arab American college students (9 men, 12 women; 9 Muslims, 12 non-Muslims), who were selected for extreme manifestation of religiosity or acculturation, to explore their beliefs and attitudes toward socioecological (SE) factors that facilitated and hindered their individual physical…

  7. The ʿAjamization of Islam in Ethiopia through esoteric textual manifestations in two collections of Ethiopian Arabic manuscripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez-Lopez, Adday

    2017-01-01

    Arabic letters -as a materialization of the ‘chosen language’ of the Revelation and its esoteric facet- have been employed for the creation of magical amulets in different Muslim communities. Esotericism was accepted by Islam in the Ethiopian Muslim communities and the analyis of the esoteric mat...

  8. Muslims at the Australian periphery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Briskman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overt expression of anti-Muslim sentiment is a relatively new phenomenon in Australia. It builds upon racism embedded in history, “clash of civilisations” ideologies and constructs of border-terrorism. Denigration of Muslims, commonly termed Islamophobia, is overtly evident in the official sphere, media reporting and increasing popular rejection of Islamic amenities such as schools and mosques. Connected but more insidious is the Islamophobia of the ‘white savior rescue’ movement, in which Muslim men and Islam are positioned as perpetrators of oppression and harm toward Muslim women, requiring non-Muslim intervention. Varied forms of Islamophobia and their impacts are discussed.

  9. Muslimness and prayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram

    2014-01-01

    and processes of becoming. The act of prayer (salat) is used as a point of departure in understanding how it is possible to position oneself as a Muslim in regard to secular and religious discourses present in school and society. The analysis shows how religiosity is intrinsically linked to subjectivity...

  10. The use of the Arabic script in northern Mozambique | Bonate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Northern Mozambican Muslim population has been using the Arabic script for writing in KiSwahili and local African languages for centuries. Even today, many people continue using this script in private correspondence. Despite the abundance of the documents in this script that are housed at the Mozambique Historical ...

  11. Jamaah kraton: the Muslim new agers from Pekalongan

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    Noor Aida

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to know Muslim New Age identity, how theNew Age practitioners identify themselves as Muslim and apply religiosity, attitudeand expression in their personal and social life. This research discussesabout the religious experiences perceived by those practitioners of ShamballaMulti Dimension Healing.It was a qualitative research using analytical descriptive method, in which theresearcher tried to describe the Muslim New Agers identity by explaining theirritual and their perception about their religion and tradition. The location of thisresearch was in Pekalongan, because it is a good example to describe how NewAge impact to religion and tradition by describing how some Arabian MoslemPekalongan conducted some New Age activities.The research finding shows that Jamaah Kraton from Pekalongan feel comfortablewith New Age because of two main reasons: the fascinating teaching andthe charismatic leader. Moreover, they able to negotiate their religious identityproblem by passing over and mixed all religion’s teaching which has no contrarywith their main religion and tradition, Islam and Arab tradition. If they find anycontradiction (in common definition of other Muslim, they will not feel that theyconduct heresy, and the comfort ability they had picturing of a ‘merger and crossover’,‘a creation of a mixed cultures and’ and ‘syncretism’. Di Indonesia, terutama sejak awal 1990-an, kita menyaksikan penuhnya tempatkajian tasawuf dan maraknya buku-buku tentang ini. Bahkan fenomena bangkitnyaspiritualitas ini sudah pula memasuki kalangan profesional dan bisnis, berkatkehadiran KH Abdullah Gymnastiar (Aa Gym dengan Manajemen Qolbu, atau M.Arifin Ilham dengan gerakan zikir, atau Ary Ginandjar dengan pelatihan ESQ.Teknik reiki dan meditasi modern seperti Anand Asram dan Brahma Kumarisjuga digemari di kalangan kaum muda dan paruh baya, tidak terkecuali denganReiki Shamballa yang tergolong baru di Indonesia, juga

  12. Reflection on teaching effective social work practice for working with Muslim communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Khaja

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In many academic departments like social work, psychology, and psychiatry there is a growing consensus that teachers need to instruct students to be culturally competent especially if they are going to be effective helpers with diverse populations. Multicultural instructional counseling methods are imperative if we are to ensure that our students of counseling are well prepared to work with diverse families, particularly those from Muslim backgrounds. In this narrative the author writes about the challenges of teaching non-Muslim students effective counseling techniques with Muslim families. Culturally innovative teaching methods are illustrated to facilitate students’ learning how to be effective counselors with Muslim communities.

  13. TREN PEMIKIRAN INTELEKTUAL MUSLIM KONTEMPORER DI TIMUR TENGAH PASCA-DIFITISME 1967

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoyo Yoyo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is an effort to make a clear map on contemporary Muslim intellectuals in the Middle East after the Arab defeat in 1967. The Six-Day War took place in June 1967 was a disaster for the Arab world. It ended the ideology of Pan-Arab nationalism and encouraged the rise of four compating self-criticism ideologies: Marxism, Liberalism, Fundamentalism and Nationalism. The four ideologies have their own particular responses and solutions to the Arab crisis. The result of this research shows that Islamic fundamentalism is still the strongest ideology compared to the secular ideologies. The Arab Spring in 2011 proved the fact and paved a way for the Islmists to become dominant in the political arena, as recently shown in Egypt. The other Islamist militant groups, such as Jama’ah Islamiyyah are now more free to promote the implementation of Islamic syari’ah.

  14. Colonial Legacy, Women's Rights and Gender-Educational Inequality in the Arab World with Particular Reference to Egypt and Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megahed, Nagwa; Lack, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    One aspect of the call for democracy in the recent Arab region uprisings is the issue of women's rights and gender equality. Three cultural and ideological forces have continued to shape the gender discourse in Arab Muslim-majority societies. They are: "Islamic" teaching and local traditions concerning women's roles in a given society;…

  15. Understanding the Muslim Brotherhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Ramos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Zahid. The Muslim Brotherhood and Egypt's Succession Crisis: The Politics of Liberalisation and Reform in the Middle East. London; New York: I. B. Tauris [2010] 2012. Carrie Rosefsky Wickham. The Muslim Brotherhood: Evolution of an Islamist Movement. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013. Hazem Kandil. Inside the Brotherhood. Cambridge: Policy Press, 2015. The status of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt presently is, at best, tenuous. Accordingly, some questions that are pertinent for today and tomorrow include: Is this movement in Egypt that at one point attained a pinnacle of success beyond its members' wildest dreams alive and well? If not, can the movement in Egypt still make a comeback? The three books selected for review offer insights on these and other related questions from different points of view. Of particular interest are the following topics that all three books develop directly or indirectly: (1 history of the movement; (2 the spiritual or religious objectives of the movement vis a vis the political objectives of the movement; (3 the conflict between the Brotherhood leadership and its youthful reformist membership in the organization; and, (4 how these topics were interrelated in the days before and after the fall of Morsi. The three texts cover the historical context of the secular revolution of 2011 from three overlapping temporal vantage points. Zahid covers the Muslim Brotherhood up to 2011; Wickham covers the Brotherhood to the period just after its ascension to power, but before its fall; and, Kandil covers the Brotherhood through its fall from power to the immediate aftermath thereof.

  16. Pen- Name in Persian and Arabic Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Khodayar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Pen-name (Takhalloss is one of the main features of Persian poetry. It has been a matter of concern among many of Persian language geography poets in the orient at least up to the Mashrouteh era. Pen-name has been promoted among the other Muslim nations throuph Persian poetry. Although it is not as famous in the Arab nations as in the Persian speaking nations, it is known as “Alqab-o-shoara” among the Arab nations and, through this way, it has affected the poetrical wealth of the Arabic poets.   The Present paper, using description-analystic approach, compares the pen-names of Persian and Arabic poets under the title of “pen-names” and investigates their features in both cultures. The main research question is: What are the similarities and differences of poetic-names, in Persian and Arabic poets in terms of the type of name, position and importance? The results showed that Pseudonym by its amazing expansion in Persian poetry has also influenced Arabic poetry. In addition to the factors affecting in the choice of pen-names (like pseudonym, pen-name, nickname..., sometimes such external factors as events, commends, community benefactors and climate, as well as internal factors including the poets’ inner beliefs are associated too. .

  17. School-Family Partnership for Coexistence (SFPC) in the City of Acre: Promoting Arab and Jewish Parents' Role as Facilitators of Children's Literacy Development and as Agents of Coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelniker, Tamar; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    A two-year (1998-2000) School-Family Partnership for Coexistence (SFPC) programme was implemented in Acre, a mixed Jewish-Arab city in Israel, to promote parents' role as facilitators of their children literacy development and to empower parents to advance coexistence and inter-group relations. The SFPC program was part of a five-year (1995-2000)…

  18. Seeking Help in Domestic Violence Among Muslim Women in Muslim-Majority and Non-Muslim-Majority Countries: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrouz, Rojan; Crisp, Beth R; Taket, Ann

    2018-01-01

    Women from different backgrounds and cultures are at risk of domestic violence. Disclosing the abusive experience and seeking help is not straightforward and easy and might be a complicated and long-term process. Muslim women, like other groups of women, may face various barriers to disclose abusive relationships and for seeking help. Some of the barriers may be common for the majority of Muslim women in different contexts, while others might be related to women's situations and the wider society they live. To identify these barriers and make recommendations for future studies, this article reviews related papers conducted in both Muslim-majority and non-Muslim-majority countries. A critical systematic review of the literature was conducted for identifying Muslim women's barriers in disclosing abuse and seeking help. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. The main identified barriers are discussed into under four themes: social context, family context, individual factors, and expectations of service providers. Although the researchers tried to investigate various barriers in seeking help, many of them have not focused on structural obstacles. Besides, in many Muslim-majority countries, the issue has not been explored. Therefore, the results of the current article will not apply to those countries. Recommendation for future research comprises more qualitative research compatible with the women's cultures and backgrounds in different societies, focusing more on structural and cultural factors to explore and find women's barriers to seek help.

  19. Religion and the Unmaking of Prejudice toward Muslims: Evidence from a Large National Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, John H.; Troughton, Geoffrey; Sibley, Chris G.; Bulbulia, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    In the West, anti-Muslim sentiments are widespread. It has been theorized that inter-religious tensions fuel anti-Muslim prejudice, yet previous attempts to isolate sectarian motives have been inconclusive. Factors contributing to ambiguous results are: (1) failures to assess and adjust for multi-level denomination effects; (2) inattention to demographic covariates; (3) inadequate methods for comparing anti-Muslim prejudice relative to other minority group prejudices; and (4) ad hoc theories for the mechanisms that underpin prejudice and tolerance. Here we investigate anti-Muslim prejudice using a large national sample of non-Muslim New Zealanders (N = 13,955) who responded to the 2013 New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study. We address previous shortcomings by: (1) building Bayesian multivariate, multi-level regression models with denominations modeled as random effects; (2) including high-resolution demographic information that adjusts for factors known to influence prejudice; (3) simultaneously evaluating the relative strength of anti-Muslim prejudice by comparing it to anti-Arab prejudice and anti-immigrant prejudice within the same statistical model; and (4) testing predictions derived from the Evolutionary Lag Theory of religious prejudice and tolerance. This theory predicts that in countries such as New Zealand, with historically low levels of conflict, religion will tend to increase tolerance generally, and extend to minority religious groups. Results show that anti-Muslim and anti-Arab sentiments are confounded, widespread, and substantially higher than anti-immigrant sentiments. In support of the theory, the intensity of religious commitments was associated with a general increase in tolerance toward minority groups, including a poorly tolerated religious minority group: Muslims. Results clarify religion’s power to enhance tolerance in peaceful societies that are nevertheless afflicted by prejudice. PMID:26959976

  20. Religion and the Unmaking of Prejudice toward Muslims: Evidence from a Large National Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, John H; Troughton, Geoffrey; Sibley, Chris G; Bulbulia, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    In the West, anti-Muslim sentiments are widespread. It has been theorized that inter-religious tensions fuel anti-Muslim prejudice, yet previous attempts to isolate sectarian motives have been inconclusive. Factors contributing to ambiguous results are: (1) failures to assess and adjust for multi-level denomination effects; (2) inattention to demographic covariates; (3) inadequate methods for comparing anti-Muslim prejudice relative to other minority group prejudices; and (4) ad hoc theories for the mechanisms that underpin prejudice and tolerance. Here we investigate anti-Muslim prejudice using a large national sample of non-Muslim New Zealanders (N = 13,955) who responded to the 2013 New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study. We address previous shortcomings by: (1) building Bayesian multivariate, multi-level regression models with denominations modeled as random effects; (2) including high-resolution demographic information that adjusts for factors known to influence prejudice; (3) simultaneously evaluating the relative strength of anti-Muslim prejudice by comparing it to anti-Arab prejudice and anti-immigrant prejudice within the same statistical model; and (4) testing predictions derived from the Evolutionary Lag Theory of religious prejudice and tolerance. This theory predicts that in countries such as New Zealand, with historically low levels of conflict, religion will tend to increase tolerance generally, and extend to minority religious groups. Results show that anti-Muslim and anti-Arab sentiments are confounded, widespread, and substantially higher than anti-immigrant sentiments. In support of the theory, the intensity of religious commitments was associated with a general increase in tolerance toward minority groups, including a poorly tolerated religious minority group: Muslims. Results clarify religion's power to enhance tolerance in peaceful societies that are nevertheless afflicted by prejudice.

  1. Predictors of Delayed Healthcare Seeking Among American Muslim Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Milkie; Azmat, Alia; Radejko, Tala; Padela, Aasim I

    2016-06-01

    Delayed care seeking is associated with adverse health outcomes. For Muslim women, delayed care seeking might include religion-related motivations, such as a preference for female clinicians, concerns about preserving modesty, and fatalistic beliefs. Our study assesses associations between religion-related factors and delayed care seeking due to a perceived lack of female clinicians. Surveys were distributed to Muslim women attending mosque and community events in Chicago. Survey items included measures of religiosity, religious fatalism, discrimination, modesty, and alternative medicine utilization and worship practices. The outcome measure asked for levels of agreement to the statement "I have delayed seeking medical care when no woman doctor is available to see me." Two hundred fifty-four women completed the survey with nearly equal numbers of African Americans (26%), Arab Americans (33%), and South Asians (33%). Fifty-three percent reported delays in care seeking due to a perceived lack of female clinicians. In multivariate analysis adjusting for sociodemographic factors, higher religiosity (odds ratio [OR] = 5.2, p 20 years (OR = 0.22, p American Muslim women reported delays in care seeking due to a perceived lack of female clinicians. Women with higher levels of modesty and self-rated religiosity had higher odds of delaying care. Women who had lived in the United States for longer durations had lower odds of delaying care. Our research highlights the need for gender-concordant providers and culturally sensitive care for American Muslims.

  2. SUMBANGAN BAHASA ARAB TERHADAP BAHASA INDONESIA DALAM PERSPEKTIF PENGEMBANGAN BAHASA DAN BUDAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajudin Nur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the Arabic contributions to the Bahasa Indonesia in the perspective of language and culture developments. The data are taken from Big Indonesian Dictionary (KBBI. Based on the analysis done shows that there are three important aspects of the Arabic contribution to the Bahasa Indonesia, namely vocabulary enrichment, grammar system, and cultural development. In the aspect of vocabulary enrichment, approximately 2.336 Arabic vocabularies have moved into Bahasa Indonesia. In the aspect of grammar, the Arabic grammatical system is used in the grammatical system of Bahasa Indonesian such as gender formation and formation of word that shows the meaning of nature. In the cultural aspect, the Arabic language also contribute to the development of Indonesian culture, such as the use of proper names in Arabic by the Indonesian Muslims, religious institutions, and state. Moreover, the Arabic terms are also used in everyday expressions, literature, and in the constitutional system of the Republic of Indonesia.

  3. Commitment among Arab Adolescents in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Adital Tirosh; Azaiza, Faisal

    1998-01-01

    Examines 662 Arab adolescents' commitments to their own self-development, family, Arab people, and village along with the order in which these commitments are structured. Reveals that the two prevalent patterns of adolescent commitment, individualistic and collectivistic, demonstrate the adolescents' struggle with these value systems and the…

  4. Caring for patients of diverse religious traditions: Islam, a way of life for Muslims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklancie, Margaret A

    2007-06-01

    You have been a nurse for many years, yet you have never cared for a patient who practices Islam until now. You are assigned to a Muslim family for a home visit. What aspects about Muslim beliefs and way of life might be helpful to know before your visit?

  5. Prevalence and correlates of adult overweight in the Muslim world: analysis of 46 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, D

    2015-04-01

    The primary objectives of the study were to calculate overweight prevalence (body mass index ≥ 25.0) and simple correlations between 10 demographic, social welfare and behavioural variables and overweight prevalence for Muslim countries (populations >50% Muslim; N = 46). Overweight data for a country's total, male and female populations were extracted from the World Health Organization's (WHO) STEPwise country reports and relevant publications. Country-level data for potential correlates were extracted from multiple sources: Central Intelligence Agency (literacy), Gallup Poll (religiosity), United Nations (agricultural employment, food supply, gender inequality, human development), World Bank (automobile ownership, Internet, labour force) and WHO (physical inactivity). The overall, male and female overweight prevalence was 37.4, 33.0 and 42.1%, respectively. Prevalence estimates significantly differed by economic classification, gender and ethnicity. Middle- and upper income countries were 1.54-7.76 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.49-8.07) times more likely overweight than low-income countries, females were 1.48 (CI: 1.45-1.50) times more likely overweight than males and Arab countries were 2.92 (CI: 2.86-2.97) times more likely overweight than non-Arab countries. All 10 of the potential correlates were significantly associated with overweight for at least one permutation (total, economic classification, gender, ethnicity). The greater percentage of poorer countries among non-Arab Muslim countries, which compared with Arab countries have not as rapidly been transformed by globalization, nutrition transition and urbanization, may partially explain prevalence differences. Evaluation of correlational data generally followed associations seen in non-Muslim countries but more complex analysis of subnational data is needed. Arab women are a particularly vulnerable subgroup and governments should act within religious and cultural parameters to provide

  6. Internal Conflicts in Muslim Societies

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    Ashiq Ali Shah

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of psychological theories and the social dynamics of the society help identify salient attributes and processes relevant to conflict among Muslims. The psychodynamic concept of personality and frustration-aggression hypothesis account for the socialization practices in the Muslim societies, emotional instability, unfavorable evaluation of those holding a different viewpoint and venting out one's aggression on the weaker. The tendency of the Muslims to praise their sect/tribe/religious group leads to a groupthink situation that polarizes intergroup relationships. The acts of categorization in group and out group, as postulated by the social identity theory, contribute towards the distorted perception of each other. The Islamic notions of brotherhood, unity and ethnic identity as means of personal identification and social interaction seems to have been forgotten by the Muslims. Though the Western social-psychological constructs are helpful in understanding the causes of conflict among Muslims, they are not germane to Muslim societies. The group belongingness and group favouritism is not necessarily a tool of discrimination and conflict but is an essential component of one's survival in a collectivist society. The Western theories also do not address the economic and political circumstances responsible for the multitude of conflicts among Muslims.

  7. Psychosocial impact of perinatal loss among Muslim women

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    Sutan Rosnah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women of reproductive age are vulnerable to psychosocial problems, but these have remained largely unexplored in Muslim women in developing countries. The aim of this study was to explore and describe psychosocial impact and social support following perinatal loss among Muslim women. Methods A qualitative study was conducted in a specialist centre among Muslim mothers who had experienced perinatal loss. Purposive sampling to achieve maximum variation among Muslims in relation to age, parity and previous perinatal death was used. Data was collected by focus group discussion and in-depth unstructured interview until the saturation point met. Sixteen mothers who had recent perinatal loss of wanted pregnancy, had received antenatal follow up from public or private health clinics, and had delivery in our centre participated for the study. All of them had experienced psychological difficulties including feelings of confusion, emptiness and anxiety over facing another pregnancy. Results Two out of sixteen showed anger and one felt guilt. They reported experiencing a lack of communication and privacy in the hospital during the period of grief. Family members and friends play an important role in providing support. The majority agreed that the decision makers were husbands and families instead of themselves. The respondents felt that repetitive reminder of whatever happened was a test from God improved their sense of self-worth. They appreciated this reminder especially when it came from husband, family or friends closed to them. Conclusion Muslim mothers who had experienced perinatal loss showed some level of adverse psychosocial impact which affected their feelings. Husbands and family members were the main decision makers for Muslim women. Health care providers should provide psychosocial support during antenatal, delivery and postnatal care. On-going support involving husband should be available where needed.

  8. Some Correlates of the Arab Character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moracco, John

    1983-01-01

    Describes cultural correlates of the Arab character in terms of family patterns, international relations, and implications for therapists and other human service personnel. Discusses the Bedouin influence and religious values and suggests that cultural stereotypes may restrict true understanding. (JAC)

  9. Milk banks through the lens of Muslim scholars: one text in two contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Mohammed

    2012-03-01

    When Muslims thought of establishing milk banks, religious reservations were raised. These reservations were based on the concept that women's milk creates 'milk kinship' believed to impede marriage in Islamic Law. This type of kinship is, however, a distinctive phenomenon of Arab tradition and relatively unknown in Western cultures. This article is a pioneer study which fathoms out the contemporary discussions of Muslim scholars on this issue. The main focus here is a religious guideline (fatwa) issued in 1983, referred to in this article as 'one text', by the Egyptian scholar Yūsuf al-Qaradāwī who saw no religious problem in establishing or using these banks. After a number of introductory remarks on the 'Western' phenomenon of milk banks and the 'Islamic' phenomenon of 'milk kinship', this article analyses the fatwa of al-Qaradāwī 'one text' and investigates the 'two contexts' in which this fatwa was discussed, namely, the context of the Muslim world and that of Muslim minorities living in the West. The first context led to rejecting the fatwa and refusing to introduce the milk banking system in the Muslim world. The second context led to accepting this system and thus allowing Muslims living in the West to donate and receive milk from these banks. Besides its relevance to specialists in the fields of Islamic studies, anthropology and medical ethics, this article will also be helpful to physicians and nurses who deal with patients of Islamic background. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Substance Use in Muslim Culture: Social and Generational Changes in Acceptance and Practice in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauseth, Kira B; Skalisky, Jordan; Clark, Noël E; Kaffer, Ray

    2016-08-01

    Through narrative analysis, this paper explores the changes in acceptance of and response to substance use in Muslim culture by evaluating data collected in qualitative interviews in Jordan in 2013. What is known and unknown about substance use in Muslim culture throughout the Arab world from previous research findings provides a foundation from which to explore new perspectives and compare themes between younger and older generations in Jordan. Trends of social change and behavioral expression influenced by dramatic political and social upheaval in the Arab world in the last 5 years will also be evaluated for the way in which they may be influencing both substance use and its acceptance among young adults in this population. Recommendations for future research and work in this area are also provided based on these findings.

  11. Technology in Muslim Moral Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Ebrahim

    2016-04-01

    The article explores the place, role and status of technology in Muslim moral philosophy. Invoking early Muslim encounters with technology the author makes the case why technology is already deeply embedded in contemporary Muslim bioethical thinking. Due to an absence of the philosophical grounding there remains some ambivalence as to why technology is essential to Muslim ethical thinking. Countering the techno-pessimists, the author makes a case in favor of compositional thinking, namely that our thinking itself is altered by our tools and our environment. Compositional thinking opposes the representational mode of thinking that creates a dichotomy between nature versus culture, and technology versus nature. One should, however, anticipate an environment in which technology would be beneficial and not be viewed as potentially harmful.

  12. Politics of modern muslim subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Dietrich; Petersen, Marie Juul; Sparre, Sara Lei

    Examining modern Muslim identity constructions, the authors introduce a novel analytical framework to Islamic Studies, drawing on theories of successive modernities, sociology of religion, and poststructuralist approaches to modern subjectivity, as well as the results of extensive fieldwork...

  13. Production Systems for the Muslim Goat's Meat Market

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    per capita consumption of mutton is five kg and the sheep meat ... A market segment for goat's meat has been identified in the growing Muslim .... basis of studies at two farms; one located in the fjord and the other in .... But in most cases the differences are small as ..... behaviour of Korean American Families in. California.

  14. The Arabic Natural Language Processing: Introduction and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boukhatem Nadera

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Arabic is a Semitic language spoken by more than 330 million people as a native language, in an area extending from the Arabian/Persian Gulf in the East to the Atlantic Ocean in the West. Moreover, it is the language in which 1.4 billion Muslims around the world perform their daily prayers. Over the last few years, Arabic natural language processing (ANLP has gained increasing importance, and several state of the art systems have been developed for a wide range of applications.

  15. Muslim patients' expectations and attitudes about Ramadan fasting during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Alina; Hammoud, Maya

    2016-03-01

    To investigate Muslim women's attitudes concerning Ramadan fasting during pregnancy and determine how healthcare providers can better serve this population. A cross-sectional study targeted Muslim patients with active obstetric records within the University of Michigan Health System who received care at clinics in metro Detroit (MI, USA) during Ramadan in 2013. Patients aged 18-50 years were approached between July 7 and August 15, and asked to complete a written survey on perceptions of fasting, influences on decision making, and healthcare expectations. Among the 37 women who completed the survey, 26 (70%) did not fast in their current or most recent pregnancy during Ramadan. Overall, 23 (62%) women believed that fasting was harmful to themselves, their fetus, or both. Seven (19%) women reported consulting others about fasting during pregnancy, with the most influential individuals being Muslim scholars, followed by family/relatives and healthcare providers. The most important characteristics desired in a physician included being respectful of Islamic beliefs and possessing knowledge about Ramadan. Most women chose not to fast during pregnancy. Although few consulted healthcare providers, pregnant Muslim women valued their opinions. Healthcare providers need to educate themselves about which topics to discuss with Muslim patients to provide care on an individual basis. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding Muslim patients: cross-cultural dental hygiene care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, M L; Darby, M; Tolle, S

    2013-05-01

    Healthcare providers who understand the basic pillars of Islamic beliefs and common religious practices can apply these concepts, anticipate the needs of the Muslim patient and family, and attract Muslim patients to the practice. Cross cultural knowledge can motivate dental hygienists to adopt culturally acceptable behaviors, strengthen patient-provider relationships and optimize therapeutic outcomes. Trends in Muslim population growth, Islamic history and beliefs, modesty practices, healthcare beliefs, contraception, childbearing, childrearing, pilgrimage, dietary practices, dental care considerations and communication are explained. This paper reviews traditional Muslim beliefs and practices regarding lifestyle, customs, healthcare and religion as derived from the literature and study abroad experiences. Recommendations are offered on how to blend western healthcare with Islamic practices when making introductions, appointments, eye contact, and selecting a practitioner. The significance of fasting and how dental hygiene care can invalidate the fast are also discussed. The ultimate goal is for practitioners to be culturally competent in providing care to Muslim patients, while keeping in mind that beliefs and practices can vary widely within a culture. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. An untold story: The important contributions of Muslim scholars for the understanding of human anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Malak A; Ziermann, Janine M; Diogo, Rui

    2017-06-01

    It is usually assumed that Galen is one of the fathers of anatomy and that between the Corpus Galenicum and the Renaissance there was no major advance in anatomical knowledge. However, it is also consensually accepted that Muslim scholars had the intellectual leadership from the 8th/9th to 13th centuries, and that they made remarkable progresses in numerous scientific fields including medicine. So, how is it possible that they did not contribute to advance human anatomy during that period? According to the dominant view, Muslim scholars exclusively had a passive role: their transmission of knowledge from the Greeks to the West. Here, we summarize, for the first time in a single paper, the studies of major Muslim scholars that published on human anatomy before Vesalius. This summary is based on analyses of original Arabic texts and of more recent publications by anatomists and historians, and on comparisons between the descriptions provided by Galen and by these Muslim scholars. We show that Arabic speakers and Persians made important advances in human anatomy well before Vesalius. The most notable exception concerns the muscular system: strikingly, there were apparently neither advances made by Muslims nor by Westerners for more than 1000 years. Unbiased discussions of these and other related issues, and particularly of the mainly untold story about the major contributions of Muslim scholars to anatomy, are crucial to our knowledge of the history of anatomy, biology and sciences, and also of our way of thinking, biases, and prejudices. Anat Rec, 300:986-1008, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Orthographic Competence among Multilingual School Children: Writing Moroccan Arabic in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weth, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents children's writing in their vernacular family language, Moroccan Arabic. It first provides some background to the family and school literacies of nine-year-old children of Moroccan Arabic (MA) background growing up in France with French literacy practices at school and Written Arabic literacy practices in the home. The paper…

  19. Computer-Based Communication and Cyberbullying Involvement in the Sample of Arab Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Tali; Olenik-Shemesh, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    The use of the internet among teenagers has increased in recent years and nearly 92% of all teenagers in Israel surf the internet. This study examined the characteristics of involvement in cyberbullying among 114 adolescents in the Muslim Arab sector, and its relationships with emotional aspects. The students completed questionnaires regarding…

  20. A Threat Enfleshed: Muslim College Students Situate Their Identities amidst Portrayals of Muslim Violence and Terror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arshad Imtiaz

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the raced representations of the "Muslim Other" and how these representations engaged the lived realities and found footing in how Muslim youth understood their identities. Utilizing qualitative life history interviews with 24 Muslim undergraduates, I examine student talk addressing the construction of the Muslim in…

  1. Health, Jinn, and the Muslim Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böttcher, Annabelle

    2019-01-01

    Collective volume of contributions to workshop "Health, Jinn and the Muslim Body" on 17 May 2018......Collective volume of contributions to workshop "Health, Jinn and the Muslim Body" on 17 May 2018...

  2. Syllabus Development Studies in Turkey and in the World for Teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language - Some Suggestion for Teaching Arabic in Primary Schools in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat ÖZCAN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Arabic in Turkey and in the world is rising in the last years because of some developments in Middle East. Beside this, Arabic is the language o f Holy Quran and hadiths. As it is known the non - Arab, Muslims need to learn this language in order to understand their religion. After all, of these needs, some countries opened some courses for teaching Arabic. In addition , people started to write some new materials for teaching Arabic in these courses as a foreign language. In Turkey, there are Arabic lessons in intermediate, middle and high school periods. The Education Ministry is publishing syllabus for these lessons. A s Turkey, some countries are teaching Arabic as a foreign language in their schools. In this paper, we tried to analyze the similarities and differences between the syllabuses of these countries and Turkey for teaching Arabic as a foreign language. At the end of the analyze we suggested some suggestions for teaching Arabic in primary schools in Turkey.

  3. Extent of alcohol prohibition in civil policy in Muslim majority countries: the impact of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Basma; Thow, Anne-Marie; Day, Carolyn A; Conigrave, Katherine M

    2016-10-01

    Many policies have been introduced to reduce alcohol harm in different countries. However, Muslim majority countries (MMCs), where the major religion (Islam) prohibits alcohol consumption, have less well-developed civil alcohol policies. Overall, MMCs have low prevalence of alcohol consumption, although recently most MMCs have been undergoing transition, which has sometimes increased pressure for alcohol availability and impacted on social practices, alcohol policies and broader public health. Globalization, the influence of the global alcohol industry, recent governmental transition or political instability and the presence of immigrants from non-Muslim countries can all affect civil alcohol policy. In this context, consumption overall has increased compared with two decades ago. This paper presents an overview of current civil alcohol policy, with regard to the presence or absence of alcohol prohibition, and provides an insight into the legal availability of alcohol in MMCs and the challenges facing policymakers. English, Arabic and Persian language sources were examined, using PubMed, government websites for each country and the World Health Organization (WHO). Some of the challenges MMCs may face in developing alcohol policies are explored, including the need to interact with the global economy and the potential influence of the alcohol industry. Muslim majority countries have adopted a range of civil alcohol policies in recent decades. There is a pressing need for better data and to support Muslim majority countries in alcohol policy development. Lessons from Muslim majority countries can help to inform other parts of the world. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Muslims or Immigrants? The Institutionalisation of Islam in Spain (1860-1992

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    Sol Tarrés

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Beginning with a review of historical developments in the not-so-distant past, such as the Treaty of Wad-Ras (1860 and the Spanish protectorate in Morocco (1912-1956, this article analyses the process of organising, structuring and institutionalising Muslim individuals and communities in Spain between 1900 and 1992. In order to do this, it examines the organisational hallmarks of the Muslim communities in North Africa (Ceuta and Melilla; underlines the role of education in the process of making these communities visible during the protectorate and the Franco dictatorship; and analyses the religious visibility achieved through the register of associations and the creation of Spanish Muslim associations. All this led to a process that culminated in the signing of the Cooperation Agreement in 1992 between the State and the Muslim community. Although a historical continuum of settlement models past and present of the Arab and/or Muslim community in Spain cannot be established, it is concluded that this contact has in fact modified certain institutional and social parameters, provided community organisation structures prior to the current ones and left physical evidence that remains in use (such as mosques and cemeteries.

  5. Muslim women and interracial intimacies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on media debates about interracial and interethnic marriage practices. In 2012, Danish immigrants and descendants, especially Muslim women, were accused of harming the integration processes as they were not marrying ethnically Danish men. Through analysis of newspaper articles...... and Internet debates the article shows how Muslim women became excluded from the national community in these debates. Drawing upon previous debates about interracial/ethnic relationships, the article illustrates how the contemporary criticism mirrors historical criticism of sexuality. Moreover, the 2012 debate...

  6. Use of the Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC-20) to evaluate health service delivery for children with cerebral palsy and their families in Jordan: validation of Arabic-translated version (AR-MPOC-20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M; Almasri, N A

    2014-09-01

    Family-centred service (FCS) is widely accepted now as best practice in paediatric rehabilitation. The Measure of Processes of Care-20 items set (MPOC-20) is a valid and reliable self-report measure of parents' perceptions of the extent to which health services are family-centred. Arabic-translated and validated version of the MPOC-20 (AR-MPOC-20) is used to examine Jordanian families' perception of service providers' caregiving behaviours as they receive rehabilitation services for their children with cerebral palsy (CP). Parents of 114 children with CP who are receiving services at different settings in Jordan were interviewed using the AR-MPOC-20. Participating children aged 4.1 ± 4.4 years, 53.5% were males. Children varied across gross motor functional classification system (GMFCS). Parents were mostly mothers (76.3%), with at least high school education (71.9%). Factor analyses of the AR-MPOC-20 yielded a five-factor solution with items loaded differently from the original measure. All items correlated best and significantly with their own Arabic scale score (rs: 0.91-0.26, P services. Service providers are encouraged to apply FCS in paediatric rehabilitation, and giving more attention to effective communication and information exchange with families. AR-MPOC-20 is recommended for use for program evaluation.

  7. The Enactment of Constituent Power in the Arab World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asem Khalil

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Most modern states have adopted written and rigid constitutions. The existence of a constitution presupposes a constituent power, distinguished from other constituted powers, created by the constitution itself, and a constituent power presupposes the ability of a society to develop its capacity to act as a collective, in order to gain (or regain an active role in the organization of the lives of individuals and their social relationships with one another. For Pan-Arabism defenders, the (Arab nation exists as a cohesive group with its own unique characteristics, deriving from a common language, history and traditions. The ethnic concept of nation initially helped to justify an Arab revolution against other Muslims, but it was unable to distinguish individual Arab peoples or justify territorial Arab states. It was unavoidable then to switch to narrower concept of nation that covers citizens within defined state borders and living under the same laws. Despite the reference to the principle of popular sovereignty in most Arab Constitutions and the increasing attachment to territorially-defined states, there exists wide popular discontent with Arab regimes that continue to legitimize their authority based on Arab or Islamic nationalist discourses. Constitutions may fill the gap of legitimacy crisis in contemporary Arab States. They are a necessary tool for the nation to express its will but also for the individuals and communities within the state to protect themselves from the nation itself and from its expression, the state. Accordingly, there shall be red lines where the people, or their representatives, shall not transgress. Those red lines may be enumerated in a text, with particular legal inviolability that will be difficult (almost impossible to amend without joining a general consensus, that is not the equivalent to unanimity (difficult to obtain nor majority (easy to realize.

  8. An essay on the Muslim Gap. Religiosity and the political system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin

    The paper analyzes 3 main trends: (t1) The economic development in the Muslim world is slower than in the rest of the world. (t2) The world grows increasingly democratic due to rising incomes, but this trend does not affect the Muslim world. (t3) The world grows increasingly secular due to rising......-Western countries, though at a lower level. Further, it is demonstrated that Muslims deviate as to religiosity, family life values and as to the preference for religion in politics....

  9. Health assessment of the Arab American community in southwest Brooklyn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsour, Linda; Tong, Virginia S; Jaber, Omar; Talbi, Mohammed; Julliard, Kell

    2010-12-01

    Data on Arab American health is lacking nationwide. This survey of the Arab American community in southwest Brooklyn assessed perceptions of health status, needs, behaviors, and access to services. Bilingual interviewers administered a structured survey to community members in public gathering places. Of 353 surveyed, 43% were men and 57% women, most spoke Arabic and were Muslim, and most had moved to the U.S. after 1990. One quarter were unemployed. Over 50% reported household incomes below federal poverty level. Nearly 30% had no health insurance. 58% reported choosing their health care venue based on language considerations. 43% reported problems in getting health care, including ability to pay, language barriers, and immigration. 42% of men, and 8% of women reported current smoking. Almost half of respondents never exercised. Rates of poverty, lack of health insurance, and smoking in men are cause for concern and were high even for immigrant groups.

  10. Opposing effects of the HLA-DRB1*0301-DQB1*0201 haplotype on the risk for multiple sclerosis in diverse Arab populations in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, G; Paperna, T; Avidan, N; Lejbkowicz, I; Oksenberg, J R; Wang, J; Brautbar, C; Israel, S; Miller, A

    2010-07-01

    Different multiple sclerosis (MS) prevalence rates were reported for Muslim and Christian Arabs in Israel. In this study, we evaluated whether associations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes with MS may contribute to this prevalence difference. DNA samples from Israeli Arab MS patients (n=109) and controls (n=132) were typed for HLA class I (HLA-A, -B and -C) and II (HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1) genes. Global comparisons of HLA allele frequencies revealed significant differences between Christians and Muslims; therefore, case-control analyses were stratified by religious affiliation. Disease characteristics of Muslim and Christian Arab MS patients were similar to those reported for European populations. Opposing association signals with MS were observed for alleles composing the DRB1*0301-DQB1*0201 haplotype: positive association of the HLA-DRB1*0301 allele in Muslims (P(Bonferroni)=0.004, odds ratio (OR)=3.07), and negative association in Christian Arabs (P(Bonferroni)=0.01, OR=0.12), with similar results obtained for HLA-DQB1*0201. HLA-B*52 was negatively associated with MS only in Muslims (P(Bonferroni)=0.01, OR=0.03). The study presents for the first time a high-resolution HLA gene analysis in clinically well-characterized Arab populations with MS, and shows the population-specific contribution of the DRB1*0301-DQB1*0201 haplotype to disease susceptibility.

  11. The association of perceived abuse and discrimination after September 11, 2001, with psychological distress, level of happiness, and health status among Arab Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Heisler, Michele

    2010-02-01

    We assessed the prevalence of perceived abuse and discrimination among Arab American adults after September 11, 2001, and associations between abuse or discrimination and psychological distress, level of happiness, and health status. We gathered data from a face-to-face survey administered in 2003 to a representative, population-based sample of Arab American adults residing in the greater Detroit area. Overall, 25% of the respondents reported post-September 11 personal or familial abuse, and 15% reported that they personally had a bad experience related to their ethnicity, with higher rates among Muslims than Christians. After adjustment for socioeconomic and demographic factors, perceived post-September 11 abuse was associated with higher levels of psychological distress, lower levels of happiness, and worse health status. Personal bad experiences related to ethnicity were associated with increased psychological distress and reduced happiness. Perceptions of not being respected within US society and greater reported effects of September 11 with respect to personal security and safety were associated with higher levels of psychological distress. Perceived post-September 11 abuse and discrimination were associated with increased psychological distress, reduced levels of happiness, and worse health status in our sample. Community-based, culturally sensitive partnerships should be established to assess and meet the health needs of Arab Americans.

  12. The impact of acculturation and religious identification on perceived discrimination for Arab/Middle Eastern Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Germine H

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the impact of acculturation, ethnic identity, and religious affiliation on perceived discrimination for persons of Arab and Middle Eastern descent. Two aspects of acculturation (ethnic society immersion and dominant society immersion), religious affiliation, and ethnic identity were measured using a final sample of 177 individuals of Arab or Middle Eastern descent. Results indicated that Arab/Middle Eastern Americans who reported lower levels of dominant society immersion tended to report higher levels of discrimination. Furthermore, Muslims reported a higher level of discrimination than Christians but this finding was moderated by level of acculturation. Specifically, Muslims who reported a high level of dominant society immersion experienced the most discrimination, whereas Christians who reported a high level of dominant society immersion reported less discrimination. Study implications are discussed. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Family Functioning, Social Opportunities and Health as Predictors of Stress in Families of Children with Developmental Disability in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukmak, Samir J.; Aburezeq, Ibtehal M.

    2012-01-01

    A significant number of individuals all over the world experience various types of developmental disabilities. Families of these individuals are likely to be impacted by these disabilities in different ways. This research examines the UAE parents' adaptation and stress to the developmental disabilities that their children have as well as examines…

  14. A comparative study of family functioning, health, and mental health awareness and utilization among female Bedouin-Arabs from recognized and unrecognized villages in the Negev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Krenawi, Alean; Graham, John R

    2006-02-01

    A good portion of geography is contested by the Israeli state and the country's Bedouin-Arab population. There are two categories of Bedouin villages: those areas that are "officially" recognized by the state and those that are not. In this article we determine utilization and awareness of health and mental health services among 376 Bedouin-Arab women in recognized and unrecognized villages in the Negev. Although there are differences between them, primary health care (PHC) services usually are available within recognized villages, accessible to those from unrecognized villages, and tend to precipitate user satisfaction. We conclude with various suggestions for improving health service delivery and making PHC and mental health delivery more accessible. Through this article we intend to help mental health practitioners on two levels: the policy level, regarding the design of mental health services for societies in transition, such as the Bedouin Arab, and the practical level by helping practitioners better appreciate the psychosocial status of women in Bedouin-Arab societies and the factors associated with Bedouin-Arab PHC utilization.

  15. Lesley Hazleton's Book "The First Muslim-The Story of Muhammad”: a Critical Review(Urdu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muḥammad Islam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Allah sent his prophets for the guidance of the Human beings. Prophet Muḥammad (SAW was the last of them. In the short span of only twenty three years, he changed the scenario of the world through the teachings of Islam. Apart from countless Muslims, the Non Muslim scholars also wrote about his life. Lesley Hazleton is a Non Muslims scholar wrote "The First Muslim-The Story of Muhammad". This book is divided into three parts; 1 The Orphan, 2 Exile & 3 The Leader. She expressed her views about the Prophet in her book openly. Many times she praises the prophet (SAW for his achievements but like her successors, she criticizes his life. Sometimes she criticizes the family (forefathers of the prophet, sometimes, in soft words criticizes the family life and polygamy of the Prophet (SAW. This research paper discusses her approach to the life of the Prophet (Seerah in the light of her book.

  16. Understanding and Approaching Muslim Visibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    2011-01-01

    Within Western nation-states such as Denmark, Islamic identities are often seen as inherently and divergently visible, an aspect that some argue is detrimental to the secular nation-state. From a research perspective, one way to nuance this position is by focusing on groups of 'invisible' Muslims...

  17. Yearbook of Muslims in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The work is the second of an annual series. It consist of three parts covering the year 2009. The first part contains systematically presented data about Muslims in 46 countries of western and central Europe. Part two comprises five research articles which analyse issues that have been significant...

  18. Yearbook of Muslims in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Schøler; Akgönül, Samim; Alibašic, Ahmet

    The work is the first of an annual series. It consist of three parts covering the yeat 2008. The first part contains systematically presented data about Muslims in 37 countries of western and central Europe. Part two comprises five research articles which analyse issues that have been significant...

  19. Arabs in America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐长贵

    2004-01-01

    In the eyes of many people in the United States, Arab-Americans are an invisible part of the population. Though Arab-Americans as a community have made great contributions to American society in the fields from literature to politics to medicine, many Americans know very little about Americans of Arab descent(血统).

  20. Turkey and the Muslim Brotherhood: Crossing Roads in Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulut Gurpinar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Relations between Turkey and the Syrian Muslim Brotherhood (SMB have gained momentum in the light of post-Arab revolt developments. This study aims to present the historical background of the relationship between SMB and AKP and effects of this relationship on foreign policy. For the analytical discussion on the relationship between AKP and SMB integration to ‘particular’ recent foreign policies of Turkey, first of all, it will be examined how the SMB is perceived in Turkey in social and political arenas. Thus, the socio-political dimensions of the process in which the SMB came to the fore and began to be known in Turkey will be explored along with its position in foreign policy during the Justice and Development Party (JDP government and the Syrian crisis.

  1. Gender Jihad: Muslim Women, Islamic Jurisprudence, and Women's Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie P. Mejia

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Muslim women's rights have been a topic of discussion and debate over the past few decades, and with a good reason. Islamic Law (Shariah is considered by many as patriarchal and particularly oppressive to women, and yet there are also others-Muslim women-who have rigorously defended their religion by claiming that Islam is the guarantor par excellence of women's rights. A big question begs to be answered: is Islam particularly oppressive to women?The Qur'an has addressed women's issues fourteen hundred years ago by creating certain reforms to improve the status of women; however, these reforms do not seem to be practiced in Muslim societies today.1 How is this so? I contend that Islam, as revealed to Muhammad, is not oppressive to women; rather, its interpretation, in so far as it is enacted in the family laws and everyday living, is patriarchal and hence needs to be examined.2 The goal of this work is to discuss what the Qur'an says about certain problems which gravely affect Muslim women, specifically: 1. gender equality 2. polygamy 3. divorce and the concept of nushuz

  2. Padua's Muslim: on the new Italian Islamic identities

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    Agustina Adela Zaros

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The proposed text reflects on the Muslim community and families in Padua including interviews in order to individuate the practices of the transmission of beliefs within the family and the continuity of the group. Mainly from the development of three main points: religious socialization, community representation as umma, according to the mandate of Give to Islam as well of the dichotomy we Muslims / they Christians discourses. Finally, the meanings of identities governed by ethnicity and / or religion and new generations with current debates and struggles identified as new collective identities. That is, the reinterpretation allows the emergence of a new collective identity that makes use of practices that are in tension with the host society emerging like a political force.

  3. L’enseignement de la culture arabe et islamique dans le département de Soaw, province de Bulkiemde, Burkina Faso

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    Adama Ouedraogo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Arab and Islamic culture is made available to students in several venues. In the Soaw district, there are, on the one hand, the Coranic school which was introduced back in the 16th century by Yarse Muslims, and, on the other hand, the medersa which was founded as late as 2001. Both systems teach Arab and Islamic culture. The difference between the two, however, is that the objective of the former is not to teach Arabic, but to transmit religious knowledge; it does not help learners to find jobs after the completion of their studies. The medersa, on the other hand, teaches how to read and write Arabic with a view to engage in a professional activity. In other words, the Coranic school teaches only religion, and Arabic is translated into and explained in the vernacular teaching language. The medersa teaches religion, Arabic, French and a number of scientific disciplines, which are explained either in Arabic or in French.

  4. Presiden Non-Muslim dalam Komunitas Masyarakat Muslim

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    Mary Silvita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the notion of state and leadership according to the contemporary Islamic thought. To be more precise, the paper asks whether it is possible for a non-Muslim to be the president of the majority Muslim country. To answer this, the paper will dwell into the problem of citizenship both in classical and modern Islamic thought by taking into account the political and social situation that shapes this thought. The paper maintains that many Muslims—both in the past and at the present—fail to offer a proper discourse on statehood and leadership in Islamic perspective. The mainstream discourse on this issue—the paper argues—is that which keeps in a good balance the notion of religiosity and citizenship. The rightwing Muslims will provide a textual understanding of the problem, while the left-wing will otherwise offer a secular interpretation of it. This paper will try to keep the two in a balance, and present a fair understanding of what the Qur'an and the Sunnah say about the problem at hand.

  5. Muslim Schools in Secular Societies: Persistence or Resistance!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saeeda

    2012-01-01

    Muslim schools are a growing phenomenon across the world. Muslim diaspora resulting from multiple factors including political, religious and economic enhanced the need among Muslims to maintain and develop their faith identity. Marginalisation of Muslims, in whatever forms and for whatever reasons, particularly in Muslim minority and/or secular…

  6. Religious values and healthcare accommodations: voices from the American Muslim community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Gunter, Katie; Killawi, Amal; Heisler, Michele

    2012-06-01

    Minority populations receive a lower quality healthcare in part due to the inadequate assessment of, and cultural adaptations to meet, their culturally informed healthcare needs. The seven million American Muslims, while ethnically and racially diverse, share religiously informed healthcare values that influence their expectations of healthcare. There is limited empirical research on this community's preferences for cultural modifications in healthcare delivery. Identify healthcare accommodations requested by American Muslims. Using community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods, we partnered with four community organizations in the Greater Detroit area to design and conduct thirteen focus groups at area mosques serving African American, Arab American, and South Asian American Muslims. Qualitative content analysis utilized a framework team-based approach. Participants reported stigmatization within the healthcare system and voiced the need for culturally competent healthcare providers. In addition, they identified three key healthcare accommodations to address Muslim sensitivities: the provision of (1) gender-concordant care, (2) halal food and (3) a neutral prayer space. Gender concordance was requested based on Islamic conceptions of modesty and privacy. Halal food was deemed to be health-promoting and therefore integral to the healing process. Lastly, a neutral prayer space was requested to ensure security and privacy during worship. This study informs efforts to deliver high-quality healthcare to American Muslims in several ways. We note three specific healthcare accommodations requested by this community and the religious values underlying these requests. Healthcare systems can further cultural sensitivity, engender trust, and improve the healthcare experiences of American Muslims by understanding and then attempting to accommodate these values as much as possible.

  7. A Reception of Muslim Images in Magazines: British Residents View the Identities of Muslim Women

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    Mat Rahim Ainurliza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of multi-ethnic Britain, the major concern lies in the diversity and complexity of Muslims living in the West, which somehow is misrepresented in the western media as a frozen, static population, fixed in time and space. This misrepresentation dominates mainstream media through the hegemony of western superiority. The operation and role of Muslim media organisations are still underresearched yet potentially constitute an integral part of accommodating the minority population within the wider society. This paper discusses on the reception of images published in two British Muslim magazines by taking views from Muslims and non-Muslims into account. The results show that both groups recognize the identities of British Muslims via visual representations in the Muslim media and that the representations challenge the mainstream images of Muslims.

  8. Cultural Competence in Counseling the Muslim Patient: Implications for Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassool, G Hussein

    2015-10-01

    Given the rapidly growing population of Muslims in Western societies, it is imperative to develop a better understanding of the mental health needs and concerns of this community. Muslim religious beliefs have an impact on the mental health of individuals, families and communities. The lack of understanding of the interplay between religious influences on health or sickness behaviors can have a significant effect upon the delivery of nursing practice. The Muslim community is experiencing social exclusion (social exclusion correlates with mental health problems) related to their cultural and religious identity. In addition, the emergence of radical extremism and the resulting media coverage have magnified this problem. Misunderstanding the worldview of the patient can lead to ethical dilemmas, practice problems, and problems in communication. Often, Muslim individuals are stigmatized and families are rejected and isolated for their association with mental health problems, addiction and suicide. There are indicators that Muslims experience mental ill health, but that they either are unidentified by mainstream mental health services or present late to the services. The aims of the paper are to examine the religious and cultural influences on mental health beliefs of Muslims, and provide an understanding of mental health problems, and its implications in counseling and spiritual interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sexuality and Sexual Rights in Muslim Societies

    OpenAIRE

    Liz Ercevik Amado

    2009-01-01

    In August 2008, the Coalition for Sexual and Bodily Rights in Muslim Societies (CSBR) organized the CSBR Sexuality Institute, the first international Institute on sexuality and sexual rights in Muslim societies in Malaysia. Liz Amado presents how the Institute expanded the discourse, knowledge and thinking around sexuality in Muslim societies, as well as providing a unique space for the much needed exchange of information and experience among sexual rights advocates. Development (2009) 52, 59...

  10. Associations Between Religion-Related Factors and Breast Cancer Screening Among American Muslims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I.; Murrar, Sohad; Adviento, Brigid; Liao, Chuanhong; Hosseinian, Zahra; Peek, Monica; Curlin, Farr

    2015-01-01

    American Muslims have low rates of mammography utilization, and research suggests that religious values influence their health-seeking behaviors. We assessed associations between religion-related factors and breast cancer screening in this population. A diverse group of Muslim women were recruited from mosques and Muslim organization sites in Greater Chicago to self-administer a survey incorporating measures of fatalism, religiosity, discrimination, and Islamic modesty. 254 surveys were collected of which 240 met age inclusion criteria (40 years of age or older). Of the 240, 72 respondents were Arab, 71 South Asian, 59 African American, and 38 identified with another ethnicity. 77 % of respondents had at least one mammogram in their lifetime, yet 37 % had not obtained mammography within the past 2 years. In multivariate models, positive religious coping, and perceived religious discrimination in healthcare were negatively associated with having a mammogram in the past 2 years, while having a PCP was positively associated. Ever having a mammogram was positively associated with increasing age and years of US residency, and knowing someone with breast cancer. Promoting biennial mammography among American Muslims may require addressing ideas about religious coping and combating perceived religious discrimination through tailored interventions. PMID:24700026

  11. Associations between religion-related factors and breast cancer screening among American Muslims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Murrar, Sohad; Adviento, Brigid; Liao, Chuanhong; Hosseinian, Zahra; Peek, Monica; Curlin, Farr

    2015-06-01

    American Muslims have low rates of mammography utilization, and research suggests that religious values influence their health-seeking behaviors. We assessed associations between religion-related factors and breast cancer screening in this population. A diverse group of Muslim women were recruited from mosques and Muslim organization sites in Greater Chicago to self-administer a survey incorporating measures of fatalism, religiosity, discrimination, and Islamic modesty. 254 surveys were collected of which 240 met age inclusion criteria (40 years of age or older). Of the 240, 72 respondents were Arab, 71 South Asian, 59 African American, and 38 identified with another ethnicity. 77% of respondents had at least one mammogram in their lifetime, yet 37% had not obtained mammography within the past 2 years. In multivariate models, positive religious coping, and perceived religious discrimination in healthcare were negatively associated with having a mammogram in the past 2 years, while having a PCP was positively associated. Ever having a mammogram was positively associated with increasing age and years of US residency, and knowing someone with breast cancer. Promoting biennial mammography among American Muslims may require addressing ideas about religious coping and combating perceived religious discrimination through tailored interventions.

  12. Relationships between Islamic religiosity and attitude toward deceased organ donation among American Muslims: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Zaganjor, Hatidza

    2014-06-27

    Religion-rooted beliefs and values are often cited as barriers to organ donation among Muslims. Yet how Islamic religiosity relates to organ donation attitude among Muslims is less studied. Using a community based participatory research approach, we recruited adults from mosque communities to self-administer a questionnaire assessing levels of Islamic religiosity, attitude toward deceased organ donation, and sociodemographic descriptors. Of the 97 respondents, there were nearly equal numbers of men and women. Over a third were Arab American (n=36), and nearly a quarter were either South Asian (n=23) or African American (n=25). Respondents viewing difficulties in life as punishment from God had a decreased odds of believing deceased organ donation to be justified (OR 0.85, PArab Muslims were more likely to believe deceased organ donation to be justified than South Asian or African Americans (OR 7.06, PAmerican health-care system, were not significantly associated with attitude toward deceased organ donation. Higher levels of intrinsic religiosity or adherence to Islamic ethics do not appear to associate with negative attitudes toward deceased organ donation. Negative religious coping appears, however, to be related to lower rates of believing deceased organ donation to be justified. Future studies with larger samples that incorporate additional measures of religiosity can further clarify relationships between religiosity and organ donation attitude among Muslim communities.

  13. Toward Understanding Arab Women's Cultural Landscapes

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    Akram Shalghin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The cultural representation of women in the Arab world is a complex issue due to the sensitivity surrounding their status in the region. We are confronted with many ways in which women are misrepresented and distorted.  There are false claims used by male dominated culture(s in the Arab world about women and their intellectual and physical capabilities. Indeed, Arab women are often prevented from representing themselves.  When they are present, they are conceptualized as serving a decorative purpose. When women are given platforms from which they may speak, they are expected to reiterate male discourses.The paper focuses on the cultural and political marginalization and misrepresentation of Arab women and describes a number of cultural biases against women in Arabic-speaking societies. Based on culturally constructed misconceptions, Arab women are effaced and excluded from decision-making processes both politically, where they are subjugated and denied a social voice in the public sphere in favour of male-dominated discourses, and within the private sphere of the family where they are subordinate to male relatives.

  14. Barriers to higher education: commonalities and contrasts in the experiences of Hindu and Muslim young women in urban Bengaluru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Biswamitra; Jeffery, Patricia; Nakkeeran, N

    2017-03-04

    Gender inequalities in educational attainment have attracted considerable attention and this article aims to contribute to our understanding of young women's access to higher education. The article is based on our in-depth interviews with 26 Hindu and Muslim young women attending colleges in urban Bengaluru (formerly Bangalore), south India, and explores the barriers they confronted in fulfilling their aspirations. We highlight the similarities amongst the young women, as well as the distinctive experiences of the Hindu and Muslim interviewees. Financial constraints, lack of safety for women in public space, and gender bias, gossip and social control within the family and the local community affected Hindu and Muslim interviewees in substantially similar ways. For the Muslim interviewees, however, gender disadvantage was compounded by their minority status. This both underlines the importance of incorporating communal politics into our analysis and undermines popular discourses that stereotype Muslims in India as averse to girls' and young women's education.

  15. Majority versus Minority: ‘Governmentality’ and Muslims in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Sofie Roald

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the Muslim community in Sweden in view of the majority–minority dynamics with focus on how values, attitudes, behaviors, and practices of the Swedish majority influence Muslim minority communities and how majority society’s approach to Muslims and Islam influences both the relationship Muslims have with non-Muslims and the understandings that Muslims have of Islam.

  16. Actual Arabic loan-words of religious content (on the material of modern foreign words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Shammari Majid Jamil Ashur

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Application of thematic classification of actual vocabulary as a whole to the formation of loan words allows to see the uniqueness of seperate groups of the vocabulary. English loan words prevail relating to the sphere of economy, science and technology, loan words from Arabic dominate from the religious vocabulary. Application of field approach to the analysis of actual religious Arabisms revealed both nuclear and peripheral components of the field. At the core of the field there are such Arabisms as Allah and Islam, which can be characterized as key words. However, in unifying the features of these words vary at a number of parameters. The word Allah has zero derivation productivity and at lexicographical description (as opposed to functioning in the language of the media is free of connotations. Arabism, Islam, by contrast, has a high derivation productivity and derived words can express evaluation. Lexicographic description of the Arabism Islam is also quite diverse stylistically and in contents. The core of the field “Muslim religion” also includes a number of words fixed in most modern dictionaries of foreign words. At the periphery of the field there are Arabisms that do not have high levels of frequency, but at the same time as an indicator of dominant Arabisms of religious content among topical Arabisms.

  17. Help seeking in school by Israeli Arab minority adolescents with emotional and behavioral problems: results from the Galilee Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeem, Raida; Mansbach-Kleinfeld, Ivonne; Farbstein, Ilana; Khamaisi, Raseem; Ifrah, Anneke; Sheikh Muhammad, Ahmad; Fennig, Sylvana; Apter, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Many distressed minority adolescents with little access to professional mental health services use teachers and school counselors as their main consultation sources. This paper presents data from the Galilee study on factors that may increase the probability of adolescents' help-seeking in school and discusses the needed linkage between the school mental health services and those provided by other agencies, in the framework of the Mental Health Reform in Israel. This cross-sectional survey included 1639, 9th grade students living in 5 Arab localities in the Galilee in northern Israel, representative of the Muslim and Druze populations. The study was carried out in two stages: in the screening stage, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) was completed in the classroom. During the follow-up stage 704 students were selected and interviewed at home regarding service use in school and wellbeing at home. Their mothers were interviewed as well providing information on sociodemographic traits of the family. Total response rate was 69.3 % during the screening stage and 84.4 % during the follow-up. Students were categorized according to their SDQ scores and all students in the higher 25th percentile (high risk) and a simple systematic sample without replacement of those in the lower 75 % (low risk) were included in the follow-up study. Significantly more high risk than low risk students reported having felt the need to seek professional help (14.0 and 6.5 % respectively) and more high risk than low risk consulted a school source (27.1 and 15.2 %, respectively). Bivariate analyses show that among Muslim adolescents more high risk than low risk consulted a school source (30 vs. 16.2 % respectively) and among high risk students more Muslim than Druze sought help from a school source (30 vs. 18 %). Higher consultation rates were found among adolescents who felt uncomfortable at home, than among those who felt very comfortable. Binary logistic regression

  18. Images of the Muslim Woman and the Construction of Muslim Identity. The Essentialist Paradigm

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    Elham Manea

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that much of the postmodern discourse on the Muslim woman and her veil is symptomatic of what I call the “essentialist paradigm”. The world is seen through the prism of a group’s religious/cultural identity and eventually constructs a Muslim identity – and with it an image of the Muslim Woman. The image of the oppressed veiled Muslim Woman and the treatment of a piece of cloth as synonymous with her whole identity and being are products of this paradigm of thought. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines discourse analysis and a case study of the construction of the British Muslim community, this article argues that the essentialist paradigm ignores the context of its subject matter with all its accompanying power structures, political and social factors, and the roles played by both the state and fundamentalist Islam in constructing a Muslim identity and with it the Muslim Woman and her dress code.

  19. German Policy Towards Muslim Communities

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    Liudmila R. Sadykova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The past two-three decades can be characterized by the period of global migration and sharp jump of migratory streams is connected with globalization and with the economic factor, generating labor movement behind resources from Third World countries to the countries with deficiency of labor. The desire to receive comfort life becomes the major reason, and the migrant makes the decision being guided by private interest more often instead of external factors. Western Europe became one of the most important center of gravity of migrants. During the post-war period the need of Europe in foreign labor for restoration of the economy destroyed by war, laid the foundation of mass international migration to this region. Globalization of migratory streams, penetration of foreign culture groups into structure of accepting society and prevalence of multicultural, multiethnic societies are important characteristics of a modern era. Western Europe became one of the most important centers of gravity of migrants. During the post-war period, the need of Europe in foreign labor for restoration of the economy destroyed by war laid the foundation of mass international migration to this region. Special relevance the problem of reception of immigrants, in particular from the Muslim countries, got for the former colonial powers, in particular Great Britain, France, and the Netherlands. Germany also faced this problem; migrants workers from other countries were required for the post-war restoration. Now Germany still is one of the main centers of an attraction of migrants, and concentration of them in this country annually increases. Despite the steps taken by the German government on elimination of Muslim isolation in the German society, its efforts did not bear fruits so far. The majority of Muslims live their life and are still torn off from high life of the country. A possible threat of destruction of the German community appeared when the various ethnic groups

  20. A Study On Utilisation Of Health Services In A Muslim Slum Community Of Calcutta

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    Bhattacharya S.K

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross- sectional survey of utilization of child immunization and family planning services was carried out in a systematic random sample of 100 families from a Muslim slum community of Calcutta. 15.6% of children (1-4 years were fully immunized (DPT, OPV & BCG. Couple protection rate was 28.4%. But interestingly, the proportion of protected eligible couples in single families (32.8% was significantly higher than in joint families (11.6%.

  1. Halal Lifestyle: Understanding Muslim Consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Halal Lifestyle: Understanding Muslim Consumers \\ud November 25th, 2013 Parallel Session 1C Hall C \\ud \\ud my talk starts at: 16:15-25:00 \\ud my answers start at 42:20 [to questions starting at 36:30] \\ud \\ud The Global Islamic Economy Summit 2013 was organized by Dubai Chamber of Commerce & Industry and Thomson Reuters, held on 25th-26th November, 2013 at Madinat Jumeirah, Dubai, UAE under the patronage of HH Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, \\ud Vice President and Prime Minister of the...

  2. Trumpal Fears, Anthropological Possibilities, and Muslim Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arshad Imtiaz

    2017-01-01

    Reflecting upon a decade of research with Muslim youth across the United States, this article highlights the fears and concerns Muslim communities have expressed in the wake of Donald Trump's 2016 U.S. presidential victory. In explicating the concerns expressed by these youth, the author examines the context of Trump's rise and its relationship to…

  3. Muslim Youth Cry Out for Help!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, W.B.S.; Budak, B.; el Bouayadi- van de Wetering, W.B.S.; Miedema, Siebren

    2012-01-01

    The problems Muslim youth experience in Dutch secular postmodern society. Muslim children and youth are confronted with conflicting norms, values, and expectations at home, in the mosque and in school. If they do not find adults who are able to clarify the conflicts that may arise from this

  4. Are Muslim countries more prone to violence?

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    Nils Petter Gleditsch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, most armed conflicts have taken place in Muslim countries. Are Muslim countries more war-prone? Not necessarily, if we look at data for the whole period after World War II. But in the post-Cold War era, most wars are civil wars and Muslim countries have a disproportionate share of these. This is not mainly because conflicts among Muslims have increased, but because other conflicts have declined. Muslim countries are also overrepresented among countries with high levels of other forms of internal violence, including non-state conflict, one-sided violence, highly repressive human rights policies, and countries that practice capital punishment. They also have a higher than average participation in interstate conflicts. This is not a “clash of civilizations”—most of the victims are Muslims. We list several hypotheses, apart from religion itself, for why this pattern has emerged, including colonial history, interventions from major powers, and economic and political development. Finally, on a more optimistic note, while many Muslims are exposed to violence, four of the five countries with the largest Muslim populations do not currently experience civil war.

  5. Reluctant Learners? Muslim Youth Confront the Holocaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    There is good reason to believe that anti-Semitism is rife in Muslim communities across the world. Consequently, one might expect that teaching the Holocaust in schools with a substantial Muslim presence would prove a difficult and stressful experience. In this article, I draw on a diverse body of literature to argue for a more nuanced approach to…

  6. News exposure predicts anti-Muslim prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, John H; Sibley, Chris G; Osborne, Danny; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    News coverage of Islamic extremism is reigniting debates about the media's role in promoting prejudice toward Muslims. Psychological theories of media-induced prejudice date to the 1950's, and find support from controlled experiments. However, national-scale studies of media effects on Muslim prejudice are lacking. Orthogonal research investigating media-induced prejudice toward immigrants has failed to establish any link. Moreover, it has been found that people interpret the news in ways that confirm pre-existing attitudes, suggesting that media induced Muslim prejudice in liberal democracies is unlikely. Here, we test the association between news exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice in a diverse national sample from one of the world's most tolerant societies, where media effects are least likely to hold (N = 16,584, New Zealand). In support of media-induced Islamophobia, results show that greater news exposure is associated with both increased anger and reduced warmth toward Muslims. Additionally, the relationship between media exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice does not reliably vary with political ideology, supporting claims that it is widespread representations of Muslims in the news, rather than partisan media biases, that drives anti-Muslim prejudice.

  7. NAJI ATTALLAH’S CREW: STEREOTYPES OF JEWS, ARABS, AND AMERICANS IN EGYPT’S MOST-­‐WATCHED RAMADAN 2012 SOAP OPERA

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    Amaya Martin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In addition to its strict fasting regiments, observed by practicing Muslims, the month of Ramadan has become known for its high viewership of serialized television programs throughout the Arabic-speaking world.  During Ramadan - a month during which millions partake of festive fast breaking (Iftaar gatherings after sundown - competition among television stations pull all the stops to attract the largest audiences possible, often by offering compelling seasonal soap operas featuring major local and pan-Arab actors.

  8. CIVIL-MILITARY RELATIONS IN MUSLIM COUNTRIES. THE CASES OF EGYPT, PAKISTAN, AND TURKEY

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    Thomas C. BRUNEAU

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the role of the military in the contemporary politics of Egypt, Pakistan, and Turkey. While there is literature on military coups, and analyses of the military in democratic consolidation, there is little on the military’s role in democratic transitions. There is virtually none on Arab or Muslim countries. The Arab Spring has brought renewed attention to the role of the military in these problematic transitions. Utilizing a common framework, based on Alfred Stepan’s “prerogatives”, the article compares and contrasts the position of the military in these three countries. In order to explain the different powers of the militaries in accord with these variables, the article then examines a series of five commonly identified factors promoting or impeding the political role position of the military.

  9. Positioning the Testimony of Job Ben Solomon, An Enslaved African American Muslim

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    Muna Sulaiman Al-Badaai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ayyub Ben Suleiman Diallo, better known as Job ben Solomon was among thousands of African Muslims enslaved in America. Job was a son of a high Priest from Senegal. He was kidnapped by his African enemy and sold as a slave in the New World in 1731. He worked on a tobacco plantation in Maryland. He ran away and was captured and imprisoned. Job’s literacy in Arabic attracted the attention of the philanthropist James Oglethorpe who helped to free him. In 1733, Job sailed to England and later returned to Africa. Upon Job’s request, Thomas Bluett wrote Some Memoirs of the Life of Job the Son of Solomon (1734. Allan Austin claims in his book African Muslims in Antebellum America: Transatlantic Stories and Spiritual Struggles (1997 that Job might be considered as the “father of African American Literature”. Muhammad Al-Ahari (2006 states that this account “is perhaps the earliest biography of any African-Americans”. However, William Andrews (1988 with other scholars consider the year of 1760 the appearance of slave narrative as genre. What is more, African Muslim slave narratives have been excluded from African American anthologies. Florence Marfo (2009 in her article entitled “African Muslims in African American Literature” discusses some possible reasons for this omission which mostly relate to the perceived identity of enslaved African American Muslims and the absence of an anti-slavery goal in their narratives. This paper aims to position Job’s testimony in the light of arguments made by the other scholars.

  10. Pedagogies of Muslim Feminisms: Reflections on Faith, Space and Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidoo, Sameena

    2018-01-01

    In this article, I offer a qualitative study of three spaces created by and for young Muslim women in Toronto, Canada: an after-school drop-in programme for Muslim girls, a Somali women's group and a Muslim women's collective. I focus on data gathered from interviews of seven Muslim women in their 20s who created the spaces, which offered refuge…

  11. MARRIAGE GAP IN CHRISTIANS AND MUSLIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieder, Martin; Huber, Susanne; Pichl, Elmar; Wallner, Bernard; Seidler, Horst

    2018-03-01

    For modern Western societies with a regime of monogamy, it has recently been demonstrated that the socioeconomic status of men is positively associated with being or having been married. This study aims to compare marriage patterns (if a person has been married at least once) for cultures with a tradition of monogamy and polygyny. As no worldwide data on polygyny exist, religion was used as a proxy for monogamy (Christians) vs polygyny (Muslims). The analyses were based on 2000-2011 census data from 39 countries worldwide for 52,339,594 men and women, controlling for sex, sex ratio, age, education, migration within the last 5 years and employment. Overall, a higher proportion of Muslims were married compared with Christians, but the difference in the fraction of married men compared with married women at a certain age (the 'marriage gap') was much more pronounced in Muslims than in Christians, i.e. compared with Christians, a substantially higher proportion of Muslim women than men were married up to the age of approximately 31 years. As expected for a tradition of polygyny, the results indicate that the socioeconomic threshold for entering marriage is higher for Muslim than Christian men, and Muslim women in particular face a negative effect of socioeconomic status on the probability of ever being married. The large 'marriage gap' at a certain age in Muslim societies leads to high numbers of married women and unmarried young men, and may put such polygenic societies under pressure.

  12. Custody Regulations in the United Arab Emirates: Legal Reforms and Social Realities

    OpenAIRE

    Möller, L.

    2013-01-01

    One major area of discussion during the 2005 process of initially codifying Muslim personal status law in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) were regulations regarding the divorced mother's right to custody of her minor children. The new rules regarding the allocation and duration of female custodianship are the outcome of fiery debates among various actors involved in the codification process. The new codified custody rules differ from traditional Islamic law and concede large discretionary powe...

  13. Ensuring cultural sensitivity for Muslim patients in the Australian ICU: considerations for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Melissa J; Al-Mutair, Abbas

    2013-11-01

    Australia is a diverse and multicultural nation, made up of a population with a predominant Christian faith. Islam, the second largest religion in the world, has demonstrated significant growth in Australia in the last decade. Coming from various countries of origin and cultural backgrounds, Muslim beliefs can range from what is considered 'traditional' to very 'liberal'. It is neither possible nor practical for every intensive care clinician to have an intimate understanding of Islam and Muslim practices, and cultural variations amongst Muslims will mean that not all beliefs/practices will be applicable to all Muslims. However, being open and flexible in the way that care is provided and respectful of the needs of Muslim patients and their families is essential to providing culturally sensitive care. This discussion paper aims to describe the Islamic faith in terms of Islamic teachings, beliefs and common practices, considering how this impacts upon the perception of illness, the family unit and how it functions, decision-making and care preferences, particularly at the end of life in the intensive care unit. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A "good death": perspectives of Muslim patients and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayeb, Mohamad A; Al-Zamel, Ersan; Fareed, Muhammed M; Abouellail, Hesham A

    2010-01-01

    Twelve "good death" principles have been identified that apply to Westerners. This study aimed to review the TFHCOP good death perception to determine its validity for Muslim patients and health care providers, and to identify and describe other components of the Muslim good death perspective. Participants included 284 Muslims of both genders with different nationalities and careers. We used a 12-question questionnaire based on the 12 principles of the TFHCOP good death definition, followed by face-to-face interviews. We used descriptive statistics to analyze questionnaire responses. However, for new themes, we used a grounded theory approach with a "constant comparisons" method. On average, each participant agreed on eight principles of the questionnaire. Dignity, privacy, spiritual and emotional support, access to hospice care, ability to issue advance directives, and to have time to say goodbye were the top priorities. Participants identified three main domains. The first domain was related to faith and belief. The second domain included some principles related to self-esteem and person's image to friends and family. The third domain was related to satisfaction about family security after the death of the patient. Professional role distinctions were more pronounced than were gender or nationality differences. Several aspects of "good death," as perceived by Western communities, are not recognized as being important by many Muslim patients and health care providers. Furthermore, our study introduced three novel components of good death in Muslim society.

  15. ARABIC LIGHT STEMMER (ARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASMA AL-OMARI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stemming is a main step used to process textual data. It is usually used in several types of applications such as: text mining, information retrieval (IR, and natural language processing (NLP. A major task in stemming is to standardize words; which can be achieved by reducing each word to its base (root or stem. Arabic stemming is not an easy task. Unlike other languages, Arabic language is a highly inflected language, since it uses many inflectional forms. Researchers are divided on the benefit of using stemming in fields of IR, NLP...etc., since in Arabic the morphological variants of a certain word are not always semantically related. The aim of this paper is to design and implement a new Arabic light stemmer (ARS which is not based on Arabic root patterns. Instead, it depends on well defined mathematical rules and several relations between letters. A series of tests were conducted on ARS stemmer to compare its effectiveness with the effectiveness of two other Arabic stemmers. Test shows clearly the effectiveness superiority of ARS compared to effectiveness of these two Arabic stemmers.

  16. Arab Spring: Islam dalam gerakan sosial dan demokrasi Timur Tengah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafira Elnanda Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Social movement during Arab Spring has lead to political uprising in Middle East. Started from Tunisia, the revolt spread to neighboring states such as Egypt, Libya, also Syiria. Influenced by religion and strong Islamic tradition, protestors demand the presence of democracy within political system which had held autocracy as ruling system for decades. It is commonly assumed that democracy and Islam were mostly incompatible, moreover in a state whose Islamic values has deeply rooted in the daily life of its people. This article focuses in the usage of Islamic values within global civil society movement in Arab Spring. Theory of Islam and Ideology were applied to analyze the phenomena. Having view the revolution generally, this research found that Arab Spring is required as a phase which led Islam into particular flexibility level towards democracy and brought democratization into the Arab world. This article resulted in the conclusion that trigger a revolution not because of religious affairs, the demonstrators were joined not one hundred percent Muslim, and the issues that required not related to the religious life of the community, but Islam is either the value or the practice of worship, can not be separated in the organization of the masses during the revolution.

  17. Gulf Arab women's transition to motherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missal, Bernita

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the findings of a study of Gulf Arab women's perspectives of the transition to motherhood. Transition to motherhood is a universal phenomenon in which every culture has its own expectations and varying supports for women moving through this transition. International studies have provided models or categories of maternal responses related to cultural aspects of transition to motherhood. However, no known research has focused on transition to motherhood among Gulf Arab women. In the initial cohort seventeen first time Gulf Arab mothers in the United Arab Emirates were interviewed during the following three times: before childbirth, two-four weeks after childbirth, and forty-days after childbirth. A second cohort of seventeen first time new mothers was interviewed after childbirth in Sultanate of Oman. Four patterns were identified as indicators of change as women transitioned into motherhood: 1) Women's personal transition: women changed from feeling of freedom to feeling of dependency to self-confidence. 2) Mother/baby relationships: women changed from fear, anxiety, and uncertainty to feelings of care and confidence. 3) Family influences: women experienced family support to being integrated and feeling respected by family. 4) Cultural/religious beliefs and practices: women felt they were initially observers of culture, to experiencing cultural/religious beliefs and practices. This was followed by accomplishment in childbearing and childrearing practices. As Gulf Arab new mothers made the transition to motherhood, four implications for international nursing practice emerged: 1) patient teaching to help relieve anxiety, fears, and uncertainty, 2) facilitation of mother/baby relationships, 3) family-centered care, and 4) the importance of cultural/religious beliefs and practices to new mothers.

  18. Arab Youth in Canada: Acculturation, Enculturation, Social Support, and Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Ashley D.; Hakim-Larson, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Results from 98 Arab youth in Canada showed that having a positive Arab culture orientation was related to greater family life satisfaction with family social support as a mediator. A positive European Canadian orientation was related to greater school life satisfaction, but this relation was not mediated by friend social support. Implications for…

  19. Islamism, Secularism and the Woman Question in the Aftermath of the Arab Spring: Evidence from the Arab Barometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M. Fox

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The uprisings that led to regime change during the early period of the Arab Spring were initially inclusive and pluralistic in nature, with men and women from every political and religious orientation engaging actively in political activities on the street and in virtual spaces. While there was an opening of political space for women and the inclusion of demands of marginalized groups in the activists’ agenda, the struggle to reimagine national identities that balance Islamic roots and secular yearnings is still ongoing in many countries in the region. This paper seeks to deepen understanding of the extent to which the pluralistic sentiments and openness to accepting the rights women have persisted following the uprising. We aim to examine changes in attitudes towards women’s equality in countries that underwent regime change through popular uprisings during revolutionary upheavals of the Arab Spring and in countries where regimes have remained unchanged. Using available data from consecutive rounds of the Arab Barometer survey, we examine changes in attitudes in nine countries with two rounds of Arab Barometer during and post Arab Spring (Egypt, Yemen, Tunisia, Algeria, Lebanon, Sudan, Jordan, Iraq, Palestine. We find that support for “Muslim feminism” (an interpretation of gender equality grounded in Islam has increased over the period and particularly in Arab Spring countries, while support for “secular feminism” has declined. In most countries examined, relatively high degrees of support for gender equality co-exist with a preference for Islamic interpretations of personal status codes pertaining to women. We discuss the implications of these findings for academics and activists concerned with women’s rights in the Middle East North Africa (MENA.

  20. Not Eating the Muslim Other: Halal Certification, Scaremongering, and the Racialisation of Muslim Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakira Hussein

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Campaigns against the halal certification of food in Muslim-minority societies reveal the shift in the representation of Muslims from a visible, alien presence to a hidden, covert threat. This paper uses one such campaign in Australia as a point of entry for analysing the ramifications for Muslim identity of this ‘stealth jihad’ discourse. Muslims living in the west are increasingly targeted not for ‘standing out’ as misfits, but for blending in as the invisible enemy. The scare campaign against halal certification closely parallels previous campaigns against kosher certification, highlighting the increasing resemblance between contemporary Islamophobia and historical anti-Semitism.

  1. Domestic Violence in Arab Society: A Comparison of Arab and Jewish Women in Shelters in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Porat, Anat; Levy, Drorit; Kattoura, Ola; Dekel, Rachel; Itzhaky, Haya

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to address a gap in the literature by determining prevalence, specific types of violence, and risk factors of intimate partner violence (IPV) among Israeli born Arab women compared with Israeli born Jewish women. The following measures were compared: demographic and socioeconomic measures; measures relating to the characteristics of the violence, that is, the three types of violence (physical, emotional, and verbally threatening), sense of danger, and history of violence in childhood; family support levels; and perpetrator characteristics. The sample consisted of 154 Israeli born Arab women and 149 Israeli born Jewish women who were staying in shelters for victims of domestic violence in Israel. A comparison of the two groups revealed that the Arab women were exposed to more physical violence and received less family support than did their Jewish counterparts. The proportion of Arab perpetrators with access to weapons was higher than that of Jewish perpetrators, whereas the proportion of police complaints against Jewish perpetrators was higher than that against Arab perpetrators. Arab women were also younger, less educated, and less a part of the workforce than Jewish women. The contribution of the woman's age to the variance in levels of physical violence was negative and significant. In contrast, the contribution of her sense of danger, and various perpetrator characteristics, was positive. Moreover, the interaction between sense of danger × ethnicity contributed significantly to levels of violence. This study extends the existing knowledge about the contribution of ethnicity as one of many variables that play a role in the lives of women who are victims of domestic violence and highlights the need to develop, in particular, unique individual, community, and social interventions for Arab women in Israeli society.

  2. "Islam in Diachrony : Classical and Modernistic Interpretations on Pluralism and Democracy" : A Study based on Arabic-Islamic Sources and Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellethy, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Islam has been often presented or perceived, in the West and even by some Muslims, as a fixed template religion which can hardly keep pace with a developing and changing worldly context. Despite the great deal of Arabic and Islamic literature on the topic of Islam in changing contexts the problem of

  3. The Muslim World after 9/11

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabasa, Angel

    2004-01-01

    ... world and attitudes toward the United States. However, some of the dynamics that are influencing the environment in Muslim countries are also the product of trends that have been at work for many decades...

  4. Uyghur Muslim Ethnic Separatism in Xinjiang, China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Wie Davis, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    .... Two justifications ethnic separatism and religious rhetoric are given. The Uyghurs, who reside throughout the immediate region, are the largest Turkic ethnic group living in Xinjiang as well as being overwhelmingly Muslim...

  5. The history of relations between Christians and Muslims in the Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-08

    Apr 8, 2016 ... Licensee: AOSIS. This work ... the eastern coastline of Africa. Muslim .... In this regard the Dutch West India and Dutch. East India .... She descended from a noble family from the Tallo kingdom. .... however, determined solely from the perspective of ..... religions, tries to create a balance between plurality and.

  6. The scope of sexual, physical, and psychological abuse in a Bedouin-Arab community of female adolescents: The interplay of racism, urbanization, polygamy, family honor, and the social marginalization of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbedour, Salman; Abu-Bader, Soleman; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J; Abu-Rabia, Aref; El-Aassam, Salman

    2006-03-01

    This is an exploratory study of the abuse-especially sexual-of female adolescents in a conservative and traditional Bedouin-Arab community in southern Israel. The objectives were (1) to examine the rate of sexual abuse, (2) to examine the rate of physical and psychological abuse, and (3) to develop regression models to predict these forms of abuse. : A self-administered survey that measured demographic characteristics and psychological abuse was distributed to 217 female high-school students (aged 14-18 years). Sexual and physical abuse were measured via the Finkelhor's scale [Finkelhor, D. (1979). Sexually victimized children. New York: Free Press]. Sixty-nine percent of the participants (n=149) reported no sexual abuse experiences, 16% reported one or two experiences, 11% reported three or four, and 4% reported more than four. Most participants indicated that they had been physically abused at least once by their father (37.1%), mother (43.7%), or siblings (44%) during the previous month. More than 50% of the participants reported being psychologically abused by members of their immediate families. Mother's age and closeness to mother significantly predicted physical abuse, and marital satisfaction and mother's age significantly predicted psychological abuse. This study addresses a topic that has never before been fully investigated--the maltreatment of females in a conservative, tribal Arab community. Although this was an exploratory study, the results attest that female abuse is a serious social problem in this community, and that the rate of abuse exceeds that of other Palestinian groups. These findings demonstrate an immediate need for professional intervention and prevention to address this problem.

  7. Inclusive Security for the Muslim World

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    building national security structures in most Muslim countries while neglecting social development , particu- larly gender equality . Governments from...tries remain hostage to traditional views on gender issues. While some Muslim-majority countries have inducted women into their armed forces, at... Development (OECD): The average median age in the MENA countries is 25 years, well below the aver- age of other emerging regions such as Asia (29 years

  8. The Mobilisation of Muslim Women in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    Under the headline of ‘the mobilisation of Muslim women in Denmark', this paper contains a series of introductory considerations as well as a few preliminary findings on the relatively unexplored question of how and why Muslim women in Denmark form organisations, and via their organisations...... immigrant women´s organisations, this paper aims to explore patterns of networking among these women, and the level and nature of their interaction with other organisations and societal institutions....

  9. ARABIC LIGHT STEMMER (ARS)

    OpenAIRE

    ASMA AL-OMARI; BELAL ABUATA

    2014-01-01

    Stemming is a main step used to process textual data. It is usually used in several types of applications such as: text mining, information retrieval (IR), and natural language processing (NLP). A major task in stemming is to standardize words; which can be achieved by reducing each word to its base (root or stem). Arabic stemming is not an easy task. Unlike other languages, Arabic language is a highly inflected language, since it uses many inflectional forms. Researchers are divided on the b...

  10. Gender boundaries and sexual categories in the Arab world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukhalil, A

    1997-01-01

    This essay considers the construction of gender and sexual images in the Arab world and how Western responses to Islam have affected the way Islam is perceived and interpreted. After a brief introduction, the essay discusses the problems of using Islam as a standard methodological yardstick in the face of the diversity of Muslim lifestyles and interpretations. The next section describes gender boundaries and social barriers in Islam that involve rigid segregation of the sexes. While Islam is shown not to favor full gender equality, the dynamic interaction between a Middle Eastern culture and the Islamic religion, each of which promote the ostensible inferiority of women, makes it difficult to determine whether culture or religion has had more influence on gender relations. The essay continues with a look at controversies about homosexuality, the condition that defined the difference between Christianity and Islam. Characteristics of present-day sexism and sexuality among the Arabs are highlighted in a look at the persistence of male dominance, the restriction of women from the public sphere, theories about the toleration of homosexuality, and the taboo extended towards lesbians and others practicing free sex. It is concluded that the study of gender and sexuality in the Middle East remains incomplete and preliminary, although gender studies have progressed in the past two decades. Social and sexual tensions have been exacerbated by the rise of fundamentalism, and homosexuality remains a forbidden topic for Muslim scholars.

  11. Spirituality, illness and personal responsibility: the experience of Jordanian Muslim men with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabolsi, Manar M; Carson, Alexander M

    2011-12-01

    Spiritual care is an aspect of nursing in many parts of the world; however, there is very little evidence of this in an Arab Muslim country. This qualitative study explores the meaning of spirituality as experienced by Jordanian Muslim men living with coronary artery disease. A hermeneutical phenomenological orientation was used to explore the experience of spirituality as lived by Arab Muslim men with coronary artery disease. A purposive sample of 19 men was selected from the Coronary care Unit (CCU) in a teaching hospital in Jordan. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using Colaizzi's steps of phenomenological analysis. Four themes emerged from the data. The participants explained that faith facilitated their acceptance of illness and enhanced their coping strategies, that seeking medical treatment did not conflict with their belief in fate, that spirituality enhanced their inner strength, hope and acceptance of self-responsibility and it helped to them to find meaning and purpose in their life. In this study, Parse's theory of human becoming served as the foundation for understanding the paradoxical rhythmical pattern of the human experience of spirituality in illness. The findings suggest that patients' faith plays a central role in the choices they make either healthy or unhealthy, or accepting or rejecting their personal responsibility in promoting their future health and well-being. In addition, it provide nurses with the basis for providing spiritual care and developing a culturally sensitive healthcare plans in this population. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. Religious beliefs and mammography intention: findings from a qualitative study of a diverse group of American Muslim women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Vu, Milkie; Muhammad, Hadiyah; Marfani, Farha; Mallick, Saleha; Peek, Monica; Quinn, Michael T

    2016-10-01

    Studies suggest that American Muslim women underutilize mammography. While religion has a strong influence upon Muslim health behaviors, scant research has examined how religion-related beliefs inform Muslim women's intention for mammography. Our study identifies and examines such beliefs. Muslim women aged 40 years and older sampled from mosques participated in focus groups and individual interviews. Drawing upon the theory of planned behavior, interviews elicited salient behavioral, normative, and control beliefs regarding mammography and the influence of Islam upon screening intention. Fifty women participated in 6 focus groups and 19 in semistructured interviews, with near-equal numbers of African American, South Asian, and Arab Muslims. Forty-two percent of participants had not had a mammogram within the past 2 years. Across differences in race/ethnicity and mammography status, women voiced four religion-related salient beliefs that inform mammography intention: (1) the perceived duty to care for one's health, (2) religious practices as methods of disease prevention, (3) fatalistic notions about health, and (4) comfort with gender concordant health care. Religious beliefs influence decisions to pursue mammography across the ethnic/racial diversity of Muslim women. Notions about duty to God and the stewardship of one's body appear to enhance mammography intention. Theocentric notions of cure and illness and varied views regarding personal agency also inform decisional frames that impact mammography intention. Given the salience of religion among our participants, religiously tailored messages in interventions have the potential to enhance cancer screening. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Mahdi Elmandjra and the Future of the Muslim World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Fariza Alyati Wan Zakaria

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing problems and challenges facing the Muslims and the Muslim world nowadays have raised serious concern about the future of the Muslims and the Muslim World among many Muslim scholars. The post-Iranian Islamic Revolution in 1979 had always been seen as the landmark of the rising discourses over the future of Islam, Muslims and the Muslim world. Mahdi Elmandjra, a prominent sociologist and futurist, is one of the Muslim scholars who consistently discuss about the issue and urge the Muslims to take responsibility to create a better future in a systematic way and not to fall into the vicious cycle of misfortunes. This paper aims at discussing Elmandjra’s views on this issue and underscoring the contribution and significance of such discourse within contemporary development.

  14. Integrative review of cervical cancer screening in Western Asian and Middle Eastern Arab countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Suhailah; Skirton, Heather; Clark, Maria T; Donaldson, Craig

    2017-12-01

    Population-based screening programs have resulted in minimizing mortality and morbidity from cervical cancer. The aim of this integrative review was to explore the factors influencing access of women from Western Asian and Middle Eastern Arab countries to cervical cancer screening. A systematic search for studies conducted in Arab countries in those regions, and published in English between January 2002 and January 2017, was undertaken. Thirteen papers were selected and subjected to quality appraisal. A three step analysis was used, which involved a summary of the evidence, analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data, and integration of the results in narrative form. Few population-based cervical cancer screening programs had been implemented in the relevant countries, with low knowledge of, and perceptions about, cervical screening among Arab women, the majority of whom are Muslim. Factors affecting the uptake of cervical cancer screening practices were the absence of organized, systematic programs, low screening knowledge among women, healthcare professionals' attitudes toward screening, pain and embarrassment, stigma, and sociocultural beliefs. Policy changes are urgently needed to promote population-based screening programs. Future research should address the promotion of culturally-sensitive strategies to enable better access of Arab Muslim women to cervical cancer screening. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. In the Arab Bedroom: The Sex Life of Arabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, P

    2016-12-01

    The sex life of Arabs is terra incognita for scientists and policy makers. Shereen El Feki's book "Sex and the Citadel" is the first serious attempt to chart sexual intimacy in the rapidly changing Arab world.

  16. In the Arab Bedroom: The Sex Life of Arabs

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, P

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The sex life of Arabs is terra incognita for scientists and policy makers. Shereen El Feki?s book ?Sex and the Citadel? is the first serious attempt to chart sexual intimacy in the rapidly changing Arab world.

  17. Arab Knowledge Society: Who Represents the Arab World Online ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Arab Knowledge Society: Who Represents the Arab World Online? ... Wikipedia's culture of openness, extensive reuse and near ubiquity makes it an ideal place to ... IWRA/IDRC webinar on climate change and adaptive water management.

  18. ETOS PENDIDIKAN DAN KESEJAHTERAAN MIGRAN MUSLIM STUDI KASUS DI PEMUKIMAN MIGRAN PANGKOH KAB. PULANG PISAU PROVINSI KALIMANTAN TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qodir

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Muslim migrants in society Pangkoh much success in the field of education, work, and life is better in the third decade (2002-2011. In fact, at the beginning of the decade arrived I (1982-1991, a small portion has a secondary education, the majority of elementary school, all start a new life. MasaIahnya ethos is focused on education and welfare. This research is descriptive qualitative, which is closely related to cultural studies. The approach used in this study is ethnography in an effort to understand the ethos of education and prosper in migrant communities Pangkoh. Subjects were Pangkoh Muslim migrants. In collecting the data, using primary techniques are in-depth interviews and observations hooks with problems. The data were analyzed qualitatively ie by way of narrative and interpretive description of the phenomenon and welfare ethos that has been found in the Muslim migrant families studied. This study shows that, first, the Muslim migrant communities in the early arriving (1982 educated middle or slightly higher in the second decade increased by taking up a bachelor S.1 for himself and family. The principal work of this group some Muslim migrants increased in rank and the task of leading the school. Increased revenue from the allowances and benefits lead educator certification. Second, Muslim migrant communities that early arrival basic education, primary school or its equivalent, has the educational ethos that indirectly, in three decades.

  19. Muslim and Non-Muslim Adolescents’ Reasoning About Freedom of Speech and Minority Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuyten, Maykel; Slooter, Luuk

    2008-01-01

    An experimental questionnaire study, conducted in the Netherlands, examined adolescents’ reasoning about freedom of speech and minority rights. Muslim minority and non-Muslim majority adolescents (12 – 18 years) made judgments of different types of behaviors and different contexts. The group

  20. Muslim and Non-Muslim Adolescents' Reasoning about Freedom of Speech and Minority Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuyten, Maykel; Slooter, Luuk

    2008-01-01

    An experimental questionnaire study, conducted in the Netherlands, examined adolescents' reasoning about freedom of speech and minority rights. Muslim minority and non-Muslim majority adolescents (12-18 years) made judgments of different types of behaviors and different contexts. The group membership of participants had a clear effect. Muslim…

  1. Yemen Arab Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    The government of the Yemen Arab Republic does not have a population policy, but promotes family planning for health reasons since one of its goals is to reduce maternal and child mortality and morbidity. The 2nd 5-Year Plan (1982-86) aims for increased gross domestic product and per capita income, regional development, infrastructure development, job creation, and human resources mobilization. The population increased from 4.8 million in 1970 to 5.8 million in 1980 and is projected to reach 6.5 million by 1985 (indicating a 2.4% growth rate from 1980-1985). Life expectancy is 44 years for both sexes; infant mortality now stands at a high 156/1000 due largely to early marriage and little maternal care. The government concentrates on improving health care, mainly through its national health plans, by emphasizing immunization, education, and training doctors abroad. Current total fertility is 6.7, the birth rate is 48.5/1000, and the average age at marriage for girls is 13. Contraceptives and sterilization are available; abortion for contraceptive purposes is illegal. Up to 30% of Yemen's labor force may have emigrated to neighboring Gulf states and Saudi Arabia. The shortage in labor is partially made up by immigrants from the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, but the government still considers emigration too high since many of those who leave are the most skilled. There is no policy on international migration, due to the great value of remittances, but the government would like to encourage return migration. Yemen's urban population increased from 1.9% in 1950 to 15.3% in 1980. 4/5 of the population live in 5 of Yemen's 10 governorates. The government's policy seeks to strengthen the agricultural sector, improve living quality in rural areas, build up a balanced regional infrastructure, and establish more educational opportunities in small cities and villages.

  2. Interventions Highlighting Hypocrisy Reduce Collective Blame of Muslims for Individual Acts of Violence and Assuage Anti-Muslim Hostility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, Emile; Kteily, Nour; Falk, Emily

    2018-03-01

    Collectively blaming groups for the actions of individuals can license vicarious retribution. Acts of terrorism by Muslim extremists against innocents, and the spikes in anti-Muslim hate crimes against innocent Muslims that follow, suggest that reciprocal bouts of collective blame can spark cycles of violence. How can this cycle be short-circuited? After establishing a link between collective blame of Muslims and anti-Muslim attitudes and behavior, we used an "interventions tournament" to identify a successful intervention (among many that failed). The "winning" intervention reduced collective blame of Muslims by highlighting hypocrisy in the ways individuals collectively blame Muslims-but not other groups (White Americans, Christians)-for individual group members' actions. After replicating the effect in an independent sample, we demonstrate that a novel interactive activity that isolates the psychological mechanism amplifies the effectiveness of the collective blame hypocrisy intervention and results in downstream reductions in anti-Muslim attitudes and anti-Muslim behavior.

  3. Attitudes of Arab and Jewish patients toward integration of complementary medicine in primary care clinics in Israel: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Karkabi, Khaled; Karkabi, Sonia; Keshet, Yael; Haddad, Maria; Frenkel, Moshe

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-cultural study was to evaluate patient perspectives on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) integration within primary care clinics. It is one of the first multiethnic studies to explore patients' perspectives on the best model for integrating CAM into the conventional care setting. We developed a 13-item questionnaire that addresses issues of CAM use, expectations from the primary care physicians concerning CAM, and attitudes toward CAM integration within a patient's primary care clinic. We constructed the questionnaire with cross-cultural sensitivity concerning the core concepts of CAM and traditional medicine in both the Arab and Jewish communities in northern Israel. Data for statistical analysis were obtained from 3840 patients attending seven primary care clinics. Of the 3713 respondents who were willing to identify their religion, 2184 defined themselves as Muslims, Christians, or Druze and 1529 as Jews. Respondents in the two groups were equally distributed by sex but differed significantly by age, education, self-rated religiosity, and self-reported chronic diseases in their medical background. Respondents in the two groups reported comparable overall CAM use during the previous year, but the Arab respondents reported more use of herbs and traditional medicine. Respondents in both groups stated that their primary expectation from a family physician concerning CAM was to refer them appropriately and safely to a CAM practitioner. Respondents in both groups greatly supported a theoretical scenario of CAM integration into primary medical care. However, Arab respondents were more supportive of the option that non-physician CAM practitioners would provide CAM rather than physicians.

  4. Muslim Identity in the Speeches of Mahathir Mohamad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Shahriar Haque

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Islam is a misunderstood religion and Muslims suffer from a negative image of being violent and terrorist. The Western projection of the Muslim image falls short of the real identity of Muslims. Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad, considered outspoken by the West, has not only set the foundation for the materialization of the true Muslim identity but has also been bold enough to point out the weaknesses of the Muslim communities of the world. An analysis of selected speeches and an interview of the former Prime Minister of Malaysia shows how he constructs and consolidates the Muslim identity in his discourse from a critical discourse analysis perspective.

  5. Infant Attachment and Maternal Sensitivity in the Arab Minority in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreik, Ghadir; Oppenheim, David; Sagi-Schwartz, Abraham

    2017-07-01

    This study is the first to examine infant-mother attachment in the Arab culture. Eighty-five Arab 1-year-old infants from Israel were observed in the strange situation, and maternal sensitivity was assessed from home observations. Supporting attachment theory's normativity hypothesis, no differences were found between the Arab-Israeli attachment distribution and Jewish-Israeli, Western, and non-Western distributions when examined at the two-way secure versus insecure level, although a few differences emerged when examined at the four-way ABCD level. Supporting the sensitivity hypothesis, mothers of secure infants were more sensitive than those of insecure infants but only in the case of Christian (and not Muslim) mothers. The findings provide support to attachment theory's generalizability but raise questions regarding the assessment of maternal sensitivity cross-culturally. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  6. PROSES PEMBENTUKAN KOMUNITAS MUSLIM INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirhan AM

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a study in mapping out more about the process of formation of the Muslim community in Indonesia. History is a reconstruct of the past. It seems as if the past was to be away from the present. Is it true that this view. We borrow the Kuntowijoyo’s words: “Historians are like people take who takes the train to look back, and he can freely turn to the right and to the left, which can not be done is to look ahead”. History is a valuable clue, a picture of the past that can be used as guidelines in stride, present and future. The Indonesian Islam history has significance for this nation generation. Because it has its own characteristics compared to the history of Islam in other countries. It can give the feel of the real Islam in Indonesia. The Indonesian Islam is an Islamic hue promising future in the era of globalization. Thus, Indonesian Islam will be in focus in the eyes of the world. In this description, the writer describes the entry and the development of Islam in Indonesia with discussion; process and the introduction of Islam to Indonesia, acceptance by indigenous and institutionalization of Islam in society. Then, point the establishment of Islam in Indonesia, as well as the transformation of Indonesia society

  7. Arab American Journalism and Its Relation to Arab American Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melki, Henry H.

    Because of the influence which the Arab press in the U.S. had on Arab literature, it was thought advisable to record a history of its development and find the relation between the two. Ten different newspapers and magazines that directly relate to Arabic literature were examined: "Kawkab Amerika,""Al-Huda,""Mer'at…

  8. Cervical Cancer Screening Among Arab Women in the United States: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Sarah; De Penning, Emily; Brawner, Bridgette M; Menon, Usha; Glanz, Karen; Sommers, Marilyn S

    2017-01-01

    Arab American women are an ethnic minority and immigrant population in the United States with unique and nuanced sociocultural factors that influence preventive health behaviors. The aims of this article are to evaluate and synthesize the existing evidence on cervical cancer screening behaviors, as well as determine factors that influence these behaviors, among Arab American women.
. Extensive literature searches were performed using PubMed, CINAHL®, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane databases; articles published through October 2015 were sought. 
. Of 17 articles, 14 explicitly identified Arab and/or Muslim women and cervical cancer screening in either the title or the abstract; the remaining three focused on cancer attitudes and behaviors in Arab Americans in general but measured cervical cancer screening. Eleven articles reported different aspects of one intervention. Because of methodologic heterogeneity, the current authors synthesized results narratively.
. Key factors influencing cervical cancer screening were identified as the following. Cervical cancer screening rates among Arab American women are comparable to other ethnic minorities and lower than non-Hispanic White women. Findings are inconsistent regarding factors influencing cervical cancer screening behaviors in this underrepresented group. 
. Significant need exists for more research to better understand cervical cancer prevention behaviors in this group to inform culturally relevant interventions. Healthcare providers play a crucial role in increasing cervical cancer screening awareness and recommendations for Arab American women.

  9. Factors associated with positive attitudes toward organ donation in Arab Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Rasheed, Shoaib; Warren, Gareth J W; Choi, Hwajung; Mathur, Amit K

    2011-01-01

    The demand for transplantable organ continues to exceed supply, particularly in minority patient populations. We explored the factors influencing organ donation attitude within the Arab American community. Secondary data analysis from a face-to-face survey administered in late 2003 to 1016 adults from a representative population-based sample on Greater Detroit Arab Americans. Christian Arab Americans were more likely than Muslim Arab Americans, and women more than men, to believe organ donation after death was justifiable. Higher educational attainment and income, as well as greater acculturation into American society, were associated with greater odds of believing organ donation to be justified. Self-reported health status and level of psychological distress and health insurance status were not associated with beliefs about organ donation. A multifaceted approach toward increasing organ donation rates in this growing population requires targeted community-health care system collaborations involving religious and civic leaders using Arabic language and culturally sensitive media. Arab Americans represent a growing population about which little is known in regard to organ donation and transplantation. This population is not specifically captured within national and local transplantation databases, and little empiric work has assessed attitudes and barriers toward organ donation and transplantation within this community. Our work represents the first to use a representative population-based sample to explore the modifiable and non-modifiable characteristics of those who believe cadaveric organ donation to be justified. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Perspectives on cervical cancer screening among educated Muslim women in Dubai (the UAE): a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sarah; Woolhead, Gillian

    2015-10-24

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the seventh leading cause of death among women in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), with most deaths attributed to late detection of this cancer. The UAE lacks a national CC screening programme. Thus, cervical screening is only performed opportunistically during women's visits to health facilities. CC screening rates in the UAE are as low as 16.9 %, and little is known about the perspectives of the nation's educated Muslim women regarding screening. Consequently, the aim of this study is to explore Muslim women's perspectives towards cervical screening in Dubai to promote strategies for increasing its uptake, thereby leading to a decrease in morbidity and mortality associated with CC. Interpretivist and social constructivist epistemological approaches were applied for this qualitative study. Data were obtained through 13 in-depth interviews. Purposive and snowballing methods were used to recruit six South Asian women and seven Emirati women living in Dubai. Thematic content analysis was concurrently applied with comparative analysis to the data. Four themes regarding women's perceptions of CC emerged from the data. First, CC was considered a 'silent disease' that could be detected with early screening. However, it was also associated with extramarital sexual relations, which negatively influenced screening uptake. Second, women's fear, pain and embarrassment, along with cultural influences, deterred them from undergoing screening. Third, a growing mistrust of allopathic medicine and impersonal healthcare promoted a negative view of screening. Last, women became aware of screening mainly when they were pregnant or receiving fertility treatment. The study highlighted a number of important factors relating to cultural, religious and sexual behaviour that shaped educated Muslim women's perspectives on CC screening. Evidently, the current opportunistic approach to screening is flawed. A national awareness programme on CC screening should be

  11. Moderate Muslims and Islamist Terrorism: Between Denial and Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex P. Schmid

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Since President Trump attempted to ban Muslims from certain countries from entering the United States, the question which Muslims are ‘moderate Muslims’ and which are potential ‘radical Islamist terrorists’ has gained new relevance. While some Muslim leaders deny any connection between their religion and terrorism, it is undeniable that many terrorists claim to act in the name of Islam. This Research Paper first seeks to determine where the world’s 1.6 billion Muslims stand in relation to terrorism, distinguishing between Jihadist Muslims, Islamist Muslims, Conservative Muslims and Pluralist Muslims. It then looks at which criteria would allow us to distinguish between ‘moderates’ and other Muslims. Subsequently, the focus is on the role of moderation in Islam itself, whereby attention is given to the Global Movement of Moderates which originated in Malaysia. While some leading Muslim scholars stress that moderation is a central value in Islam, many Muslims nevertheless do not like to be called ‘moderates’ for fear of being seen as pro-Western. A further section of this Research Paper looks at how Islamist extremists view moderate Muslims. This is followed by a section that focuses on moderate Muslims voicing their opposition to Islamist terrorism – something often overlooked by Western media. The concluding section raises the thorny question whether moderation is rooted in Islam itself or comes from outside and the author pleads for humanism to be the middle ground for moderates of all faiths and political persuasions.

  12. Arab American Women Negotiating Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Oraib

    2012-01-01

    Compared to the literature available on other ethnic groups in the United States, there is very little information about school experiences of Arab Americans (Nieto, 2003). This study examines the ways that Arab American women reported positioning themselves when faced with difficult situations related to stereotypical images of Arabs and Arab…

  13. Egyptian Arab Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In this work are given the principal news concerning petroleum and natural gas in Egyptian Arab Republic. An important discovery of natural gas has been made in Khalda (Egyptian Arab Republic). The discovery well will be temporarily abandoned until it is connected to the egyptian pipeline system. In 1996 the south Khalda will be explored with at least two well drilling. The transit duties by the Suez canal for liquefied natural gas exports have decreased of 35%. The Arab Petroleum Pipeline Company studies a connection project of the trans saudi pipeline with the Suez mediterranean pipeline. The Egyptian General Petroleum Corporation will furnish 2,5 milliards of m 3 per year of natural gas to Israel during 20 years. (O.L.). 2 figs

  14. Muslim institutions of higher education in postcolonial africa

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Mbaye

    2016-01-01

    Muslim Institutions of Higher Education in Postcolonial Africa examines the colonial discriminatory practices against Muslim education through control and dismissal and discusses the education reform movement of the post-colonial experience.

  15. ANALISIS KONTRASTIF PENULISAN ARAB MELAYU RIAU DAN PENULISAN BAHASA ARAB SERTA IMPLIKASINYA TERHADAP PENGAJARAN BAHASA ARAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprijon Efendi, Alwizar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pada kaedah penulisan Arab Melayu klasik, semua kosa-kata yang berasal dari bahasa Arab mesti ditulis sesuai dengan tulisan bahasa asalnya yaitu bahasa Arab itu sendiri. Namun, pada kaedah penulisan Arab Melayu Riau saat ini, semua kosa-kata ditulis sesuai dengan konsonannya tanpa membedakan antara kosa-kata yang berasal dari bahasa Arab atau bukan bahasa Arab. Implikasi dari pergeseran kaedah penulisan ini, banyak kosa kata yang diadobsi dari bahasa Arab berbeda penulisannya dari bentuk asalnya. Perbedaan penulisan yang kontras ini menyebabkan banyak peserta didik, baik di tingkat sekolah menengah maupun perguruan tinggi salah dalam menulis nama sendiri, nama pahlawan, nama jalan, nama instansi, yayasan, dan kosa kata lainnya yang berasal dari bahasa Arab. Akibat dari kesalahan tersebut tidak hanya sekedar salah dilihat dari segi kaedah, bahkan juga dapat merubah makna kata dari makna asalnya dalam bahasa Arab. Jika hal ini tidak dikaji ulang, maka misi penulisan Arab Melayu tidak lagi untuk mendekatkan penggunanya agar mudah mempelajari bahasa Arab, akan tetapi keberadaannya akan mengganggu kesuksesan pengajaran bahasa Arab di bumi Lancang Kuning

  16. Mental Health of Muslim Nursing Students in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Ratanasiripong, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the mental health and well-being of Muslim nursing students in Thailand. Specifically, the study investigated the factors that impact anxiety and depression among Muslim nursing students. This cross-sectional research was conducted with a half sampling method of Muslim undergraduate students who were studying at a public nursing college in Thailand. From the 220 self-identified Muslim nursing students, 110 were sampled for this study, representing 1...

  17. Americans' views of the Muslim world realities and fallacies

    OpenAIRE

    Sulehri, Waqas A.

    2006-01-01

    The 9/11 terror attacks prompted a large number of public opinion surveys in the Islamic world by Gallup, Pew, Zogby, and others seeking to understand the level and nature of muslim antagonism toward America. Far less attention has been paid to public opinion surveys of Americans concerning their views of Islam, Muslims, and Muslim countries. This thesis sorts through the surveys and presents some surprising findings. First, while American views of Muslim have generally been rather unfavor...

  18. Sight Restrictions in Maghrib Muslim Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Ben Hamouche

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Sight in Islamic culture is subject to legal restrictions that aim at preserving moral consciousness in Muslim societies. These restrictions have a direct impact on architecture in traditional Muslim cities. Details such as placement of doors and windows, the use of balconies and rooftops, and building heights were shaped by legal reasoning based on sight restrictions. The present study aims at highlighting this legal reasoning system by analyzing legal opinions that were continuously advocated by jurists in response to daily practices, and the legal principles on which these opinions were based. This is expected to contribute in developing a new intellectual discourse on Muslim architecture that could go beyond the present design theories.

  19. Quality of Life After Ostomy Surgery in Muslim Patients: A Systematic Review of the Literature and Suggestions for Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Fareed; Kujan, Omar; Bowley, Douglas M; Keighley, Michael R B; Vaizey, Carolynne J

    2016-01-01

    To determine factors that influence health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after ostomy surgery in Muslim patients. A systematic literature review of published data was carried out using MeSH terms ("Muslim" OR "Islam") AND ("stoma" OR "ostomy" OR "colostomy" OR "ileostomy") AND "quality of life" AND "outcomes." Twelve studies enrolling 913 subjects were deemed suitable for inclusion in the review. HRQOL was found to be particularly impaired in Muslims; this impairment went beyond that experienced by non-Muslim patients. Factors associated with this difference included psychological factors, social isolation, underreporting of complications, and sexual dysfunction leading to breakdown of marital relations as well as diminished religious practices. Muslims requiring ostomies should receive preoperative counseling by surgeons and ostomy nurses. These discussions should also include faith leaders and/or hospital chaplains. Ongoing support after surgery can be extended into the community and encompass family doctors and faith leaders. Additional research exploring HRQOL after surgery in Muslims living in Western societies is indicated.

  20. Grief Counseling for Muslim Preschool and Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggerly, Jennifer; Abugideiri, Salma Elkadi

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Sunni Muslims' view of death, mourning and burial rituals, and accepted healing practices. Interventions for addressing death with Muslim children, group counseling, play therapy, and community outreach are discussed. A case study of interventions for coping with a preschool Muslim boy's death is provided.

  1. Say the Word Islam: School Counselors and Muslim Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Daa'iyah; Rasheed, Sakinah

    2010-01-01

    Two Muslim women who hold Ph.D.'s, a clinical and developmental psychologist and a teacher educator speak personally and professionally about important information school counselors need to know about Islam and providing services to Muslim children. First, the authors draw from personal experiences in parenting Muslim children who have come of age…

  2. Teaching about Islam and Muslims While Countering Cultural Misrepresentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbih, Randa

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary global events of the War on Terror, the War on ISIS, and the United States contentious relationship with Muslim societies make it crucial to teach about Islam and Muslims in school. However, negative representations of Islam and Muslims often impede this process. Overcoming these challenges is critical for the development of…

  3. Religious trends and social integration: Muslim minorities in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maliepaard, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I set out to describe religiosity and religious trends among the Dutch Muslim population, and to assess the influence of the social integration of Muslims in co-ethnic minority and majority social networks. Muslim immigrants in the Netherlands migrated from countries in which

  4. Myths and Facts on the Future Number of Muslims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian Arly

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses various estimates of Muslim populations in Europe, showing that the public debate on numbers reflects academia’s difficulties in quantifying the Muslim populations. Projections of growth in the number of Muslims in Europe are exaggerated both in academia and in the public in...

  5. KESALEHAN SOSIAL SEBAGAI RITUAL KELAS MENENGAH MUSLIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jati Raharjo Wasisto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of social piety is an interesting phenomenon among recent middle class Indonesian muslim. The aims and scope of social piety which established is to redefine spirituality. Process of reconstucting social piety can be traced from the intersection from both material and spiritual aspect. Spiritual is a holy effort to pray God and material can be analyzed as a complementer factor in spirtual effort. To become pious man is the main thing however the most intention are both recognition and representation from others. This article will elaborate more deeply about the meaning of social piety in recent middle class Indonesian muslim.

  6. Arab Media Discourse: Breaking Taboos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Mustapha Lahlali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the development and change of Arab media discourse since mid-1990s. The paper looks at how the production and consumption of media discourse have changed dramatically in the Arab world over the last decade or so, notably in relation to taboos such as religion, governance and gender. The paper argues that transnational Arab media, particularly al-Jazeera, have contributed to this change by adopting a liberal and critical approach when dealing with Arab taboos. This change is clearly reflected in the new discourse adopted by both the Arab public and Arab media. Such a discourse practice shapes and is shaped by a new Arab social, cultural and political practice.

  7. Tay-Sachs disease in an Arab family due to c.78G>A HEXA nonsense mutation encoding a p.W26X early truncation enzyme peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Alireza; Masri, Amira; Kornreich, Ruth; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), a pan-ethnic, autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative, lysosomal disease, results from deficient β-hexosaminidase A activity due to β-hexosaminidase α-subunit (HEXA) mutations. Prenatal/premarital carrier screening programs in the Ashkenazi Jewish community have markedly reduced disease occurrence. We report the first Jordanian Arab TSD patient diagnosed by deficient β-hexosaminidase A activity. HEXA mutation analysis revealed homozygosity for a nonsense mutation, c.78G>A (p.W26X). Previously reported in Arab patients, this mutation is a candidate for TSD screening in Arab populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Construction Meaning of Mixed Marriages for Indonesian Muslim Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zikri Fachrul Nurhadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The background of this problem is the increasing number of Indonesian citizens who perform mixed marriages, especially women who are married to foreign nationals. This, resulted in the problem starts from differences of religion or belief, culture and lifestyle are different. The purpose of this study is to find and explain the motives, meaning and experience of Indonesian Muslim women as perpetrators of intermarriage. This research method using the phenomenological method that focuses on the study of meaning in everyday life from the perspective of those who experience it. Data collection techniques used participant observation, interview and documentation study. Subjects were Indonesian Muslim women aged 30-40 years, were married to foreign nationals by purposive sampling technique. The results showed that mixed marriages have a motive "because" that is the motive trauma and interest, while the motive "for" consists of the dream motive, worship and repair descent. Likewise intermarriage experience demonstrated mutual culturally adjust, adapt to a multicultural, open and romantic attitude. While the meaning of marriage is an interesting mix, happy, merging two cultures, respect for differences, mutual understanding, complex, beautiful. Construction of meaning formed that a mixed marriage is a marriage of attractive, beautiful, full of challenges in the face of differences in terms of culture, habits and mindset in running family life.

  9. DATABASES FOR RECOGNITION OF HANDWRITTEN ARABIC CHEQUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alohali, Y.; Cheriet, M.; Suen, C.Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an effort toward building Arabic cheque databases for research in recognition of handwritten Arabic cheques. Databases of Arabic legal amounts, Arabic sub­ words, courtesy amounts, Indian digits, and Arabic cheques are provided. This paper highlights the characteristics of the

  10. Teaching Islam and Arabic over the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, Chaim

    2004-01-01

    Arabic is the language of the Arab minority in Israel, the Palestinian Authority, and the neighbors of Israel (Egypt, Syria, Jordan, and Lebanon). Hence, learning Arabic and Arab culture is very important to promoting understanding between Arabs and Jews. The concept of using the internet to promote learning and communication between students in…

  11. Muslim Identity in the Speeches of Mahathir Mohamad

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammed Shahriar Haque; Mahmud Hasan Khan

    2004-01-01

    Islam is a misunderstood religion and Muslims suffer from a negative image of being violent and terrorist. The Western projection of the Muslim image falls short of the real identity of Muslims. Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad, considered outspoken by the West, has not only set the foundation for the materialization of the true Muslim identity but has also been bold enough to point out the weaknesses of the Muslim communities of the world. An analysis of selected speeches and an interview of the for...

  12. American Muslim Undergraduates' Views on Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Khadija Engelbrecht

    2016-01-01

    A qualitative investigation into American Muslim undergraduates' views on evolution revealed three main positions on evolution: theistic evolution, a belief in special creation of all species, and a belief in special creation of humans with evolution for all non-human species. One can conceive of the manner in which respondents chose their…

  13. Constitutional Struggles in the Muslim World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afsah, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    About this Course: Learn what motivates the restive Muslim youth from Tunis to Tehran, what political positions Islamists from Mali to Chechnya are fighting for, where the seeming obsession with Islamic law comes from, where the secularists have vanished to, and whether it makes sense to speak...

  14. Formats, fabrics, and fashions: Muslim headscarves revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ünal, R.A.; Moors, A.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the sartorial practices of Dutch-Turkish women who wear Muslim headscarves may be summarized as a shift from sober, religiously inspired forms of dress towards colorful, more fashionable styles. A focus on the materiality of headscarves indicates, however, that the relation between Islam,

  15.  Muslims on the Political Agenda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian Arly

    2009-01-01

    Within four decades of immigration, Islam has become the largest minority-religion in Denmark. This has resulted in a need for Muslim institutions in Denmark such as burial places, educational institutions and places for prayer. The need for these religious institutions has been disputed since...

  16. Al-Biruni: A Muslim Critical Thinker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Noviani Ardi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As an academic course, critical thinking has emerged in the last century as the one of the important subjects, especially in the second half. But as a kind of thinking and a process of the human reason, it was exist as old as mankind. What are known, nowadays, as (standards of critical thinking or (characteristic of critical thinker were used by some ancient Greek philosophers, e.g. Socrates, Aristotle, as well as great Muslim scholars, e.g. al-Biruni, al-Ghazali, etc. al-Biruni was known as a great Muslim scholar due to objectively scientific method in his works. Moreover, he also was famed in comparative religion which early in history of discipline of comparative religion. However, this study attempts to talk about al-Biruni, one of greatest Muslim scholar in history from another side of previously discussion. It is tries to analyze al-Biruni as a Muslim critical thinker based on his monumental work of Tahqiq ma li al-Hind min Maqulah Maqbulah fi al-‘Aql aw Mardhulah or it is known by Kitab al-Hind.

  17. Representing Canadian Muslims: Media, Muslim Advocacy Organizations, and Gender in the Ontario Shari’ah Debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Sharify-Funk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes a highly public conflict between two Muslim non-profit organizations, the Canadian Islamic Congress (CIC and the Muslim Canadian Congress (MCC, as it played out on the pages of Canadian newspapers and Internet websites. Sparked by profoundly divergent convictions about gender norms and fuelled by contradictory blueprints for “being Muslim in Canada”, this incendiary conflict was fanned by Canadian media coverage. Focusing especially, but not exclusively, on the 2003-2005 debate over Shari’ah-based alternative dispute resolution in Ontario, I will argue that the media have played a role in constructing internal Muslim debates and identity negotiations concerning what it means to be genuinely Canadian and authentically Muslim through controversy-driven journalism that has highlighted opposing ends of a liberal/progressive versus conservative/traditional axis in a search for “point/counter-point” views. Through short stories and commentaries on controversial topicsthat juxtapose two increasingly antagonistic organizational voices, the media have not merely reflected Muslim realities, but also helped to shape them and, more often than not, reinforce polarization between a “majority Muslim” culture seeking to secure space for itself within Canadian society and a “dissident Muslim” culture that seeks to consolidate external support for internal change.

  18. Partition and poliomyelitis: an investigation of the polio disparity affecting Muslims during India's eradication program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rashid S; McGarvey, Stephen T; Fruzzetti, Lina M

    2015-01-01

    Significant disparities in the incidence of polio existed during its eradication campaign in India. In 2006, Muslims, who comprise 16% of the population in affected states, comprised 70% of paralytic polio cases. This disparity was initially blamed on the Muslims and a rumor that the vaccination program was a plot to sterilize their children. Using the framework of structural violence, this paper describes how the socio-political and historical context of Muslim populations in India shaped the polio disparity. A qualitative study utilizing methods of rapid ethnography was conducted from May-August 2009 in Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India. Field methods included participant observation of vaccination teams, historical document research, and 107 interviews with both Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) stakeholders and families with vaccine-eligible children. Almost all respondents agreed that Aligarh was a highly segregated city, mostly due to riots after Partition and during the 1990s. Since the formation of segregated neighborhoods, most respondents described that "Muslim areas" had been underdeveloped compared to "Hindu areas," facilitating the physical transmission of poliovirus. Distrust of the government and resistance to vaccination were linked to this disparate development and fears of sterilization influenced by the "Family Planning Program" from 1976-1977. Ethnic violence and social marginalization since the Partition and during the rise of Hindu nationalism led to distrust of the government, the formation of segregated slums, and has made Muslims victims of structural violence. This led to the creation of disease-spreading physical environments, lowered vaccine efficacy, and disproportionately higher levels of resistance to vaccination. The causes of the polio disparity found in this study elucidate the nature of possible other health disparities affecting minorities in India. This study is limited by the manual coding of the transcribed data, size

  19. Partition and poliomyelitis: an investigation of the polio disparity affecting Muslims during India's eradication program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid S Hussain

    Full Text Available Significant disparities in the incidence of polio existed during its eradication campaign in India. In 2006, Muslims, who comprise 16% of the population in affected states, comprised 70% of paralytic polio cases. This disparity was initially blamed on the Muslims and a rumor that the vaccination program was a plot to sterilize their children. Using the framework of structural violence, this paper describes how the socio-political and historical context of Muslim populations in India shaped the polio disparity.A qualitative study utilizing methods of rapid ethnography was conducted from May-August 2009 in Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India. Field methods included participant observation of vaccination teams, historical document research, and 107 interviews with both Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI stakeholders and families with vaccine-eligible children. Almost all respondents agreed that Aligarh was a highly segregated city, mostly due to riots after Partition and during the 1990s. Since the formation of segregated neighborhoods, most respondents described that "Muslim areas" had been underdeveloped compared to "Hindu areas," facilitating the physical transmission of poliovirus. Distrust of the government and resistance to vaccination were linked to this disparate development and fears of sterilization influenced by the "Family Planning Program" from 1976-1977.Ethnic violence and social marginalization since the Partition and during the rise of Hindu nationalism led to distrust of the government, the formation of segregated slums, and has made Muslims victims of structural violence. This led to the creation of disease-spreading physical environments, lowered vaccine efficacy, and disproportionately higher levels of resistance to vaccination. The causes of the polio disparity found in this study elucidate the nature of possible other health disparities affecting minorities in India.This study is limited by the manual coding of the

  20. Changing epistemologies under conditions of social change in two Arab communities in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The study of epistemic thinking focuses on how people understand and coordinate objective and subjective aspects of knowing and make sense of multiple and discrepant knowledge claims. Typically described in terms of normative development, cross-cultural studies show differences in epistemic development and characteristics of epistemic thinking. This study focuses on within-culture variations of epistemic thinking, with the assumption that social change will produce changes in development. Arab society in Israel has undergone notable change over the last half century. In this cross-sectional research design, cross-generational comparison and rural-urban comparison were used as proxies for longitudinal social change. Three generations of Muslim Arab women in a village in Israel (20 adolescents, 20 mothers and 20 grandmothers) and 20 Muslim Arab adolescents from a large, mixed city in the same region responded to six dilemmas invoking epistemic thinking. Village adolescents were more subjectivist than their mothers and grandmothers. Sociodemographic characteristics representing greater exposure to diverse people and ideas accounted for generational differences. Both urban and rural adolescents tended towards subjectivist perspectives, and they did not differ. Parents' education levels emerged as the sociodemographic variables most consistently related to epistemic thinking. Epistemic thinking mediated the relationship between generation and gender role/cross-sex relation values. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  1. Social dimensions of health across the life course: Narratives of Arab immigrant women ageing in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Jordana; Keating, Norah; Ogilvie, Linda; Hunter, Kathleen F

    2018-04-01

    The increase in ethnically and linguistically diverse older adults in Canada necessitates attention to their experiences and needs for healthy ageing. Arab immigrant women often report challenges in maintaining health, but little is known about their ageing experiences. This interpretive descriptive study uses a transnational life course framework to understand Arab Muslim immigrant women's experiences of engaging in health-promoting practices as they age in Canada. Women's stories highlight social dimensions of health such social connectedness, social roles and social support that are constructed and maintained within different migration contexts across the life course. Barriers and facilitators to healthy ageing in this population centred around five themes: (i) the necessity of staying strong, (ii) caring for self while caring for others, (iii) double jeopardy of chronic illnesses and loneliness, (iv) inadequate support within large social networks and (v) navigating access to health-supporting resources. The findings point to transnational connections and post-migration social support as major influencers in creating facilitators and barriers to healthy ageing for Arab Muslim immigrant women. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    This discussion of the United Arab Emirates focuses on the following: the people; geography; history; government; political conditions; defense; the economy; foreign relations; and relations between the US and the United Arab Emirates. In 1983 the population was estimated at 1,194,000. In 1984 the annual growth rate was negative. Life expectancy is about 60 years. Fewer than 20% of the population are UAE citizens. Indigenous Emiris are Arab; the rest of the population includes significant numbers of other Arabs -- Palestinians, Egyptians, Jordanians, Yemenis, Omanis, as well as many Iranians, Pakistanis, Indians, and West Europeans, especially in Dubai. The UAE is in the eastern Arabian Peninsula, bounded on the north by the Persian Gulf. European and Arab pirates roamed the Trucial Coast area from the 17th century into the 19th century. Early British expeditions against the pirates led to further campaigns against their headquarters. Piracy continued intermittently until 1835, when the shaikhs agreed not to engage in hostilities at sea. Primarily in reaction to the ambitions of other European countries, the UK and the Trucial States established closer bonds in an 1892 treaty. In 1968 the British government announced its decision, reaffirmed in March 1971, to end the treaty relationship with the gulf shaikhdoms. When the British protective treaty with the Trucial Shaikhdoms ended on December 1, they became fully independent. On December 2, 1971, 6 of them entered into a union called the United Arab Emirates. The 7th, Ras al-Khaimah, joined in early 1972. Administratively, the UAE is a loose federation of 7 emirates, each with its own ruler. The pace at which local government in each emirate is evolving, from traditional to modern, is set primarily by the ruler. Under the provisional constitution of 1971, each emirate reserves considerable powers, including control over mineral rights, taxation, and police powers. In this milieu, the growth of federal powers has

  3. Working for change in the Arab world. Advocacy for reproductive health: Arab world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamand, J

    1996-01-01

    The International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) revealed that within the Arab world there are special difficulties with regard to family planning (FP) and the status of women. There is general social opposition to women's empowerment and employment outside the home, which FP associations have to tackle. At the Cairo ICPD in 1994 the Vatican and Islamic fundamentalists formed a holy alliance against undesirable Western ideas. Eventually most Arab governments became convinced about the need for the program of action. A regional conference was also held in January 1996 on this agenda organized by the IPPF Arab World Region in Cairo to implement the program of action with the participation of 140 representatives. The question of population at the Cairo meeting was linked to economic and social development leading up to the women's conference in Beijing in 1995. At the 1996 implementation meeting the unmet need for reproductive health services was voiced along with the need for solid research in this area. FP has a vital role in social development and in combating poverty. The implementation of IPPF's Vision 2000 strategic plan also contributes to the implementation of the ICPD program of action, which deals with sex education, unsafe abortion, marginalized groups, and women's empowerment. Even Islam has come to support responsible FP for the sake of the well-being of the family. The Grand Mufti of Egypt pronounced his support for FP for health and socioeconomic reasons, for the education of girls, and for equality with men. In Arab countries the outstanding problems are early marriage, female genital mutilation, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and HIV, unwanted pregnancy, unsafe abortion, and ignorance about reproduction. Listening to young people, funding restrictions hampering progress, and an advocacy group of prominent leaders, and the formation of an Arab parliamentarians group on FP were other high points.

  4. Transnationalism among Second-Generation Muslim Americans: Being and Belonging in Their Transnational Social Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Byng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An increase in transnationalism, the ability of individuals and families to travel and maintain relationships across national borders, has led to questions about its impact on identity especially for the children of migrants. When combined with concerns about global and national security such as those that are associated with Muslims and Islam, then questions about the strength national identity are particularly pertinent. This analysis uses the theories of transnational social fields and intersectionality to examine the transnational experiences of second-generation Muslim Americans. It relies on qualitative interview data. The data show the intersection of their national, religious, and gender identities. It demonstrates that they experience transnational being in their parents’ country of origin and belonging in the United States. Nationality, religion, and gender influence what they experience in each location. The analysis demonstrates the stability and centrality of American national identity in what second-generation Muslims experience in both locations. Moreover, their belonging in the United States rests squarely on their perceptions of themselves as Americans and their construction of their Muslim identity as an American religious identity.

  5. The Shia Factor in Relations Between the Arab Countries of the Persian Gulf and Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirichenko Vladimir P.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The author studies the influence of the “Shia factor” on the relations between Iran and the Gulf Arab countries. In most countries of the Persian Gulf, there are Shia communities that constitute a significant part of the population. After the Islamic revolution of 1979 relations between Iran and most Arab countries have become particularly tense. In the 1980s, the Gulf monarchies also became wary of exporting the Islamic revolution in their countries. This was due to the fact that, being inspired by the success of the co-religionists in Iran, the Arab Shiites became more involved in politics. It should be noted that the way the Arab Gulf countries treat the Shiites in the region is influenced by the fact that Iran and the Arab Gulf countries compete for political and economic predominance in the region. Often the Shia Muslims are discriminated by the authorities of the Arab countries, and are regarded as the so-called “fifth column” of Iran. In the author’s opinion, the policy of oppression of the Shia Muslims in the Persian Gulf monarchies not only worsens the political situation in these countries, but also complicates relations with neighboring Iran. This policy is not constructive. Moreover, the mythical “Iranian threat” does not go to any comparison with the threat posed by the Islamic State. According to the author, although after the execution of the Shia cleric Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr in Saudi Arabia at the beginning of 2016 Iran’s relations with Arab countries became even more strained, the further escalation of the conflict is not in the interests of Iran. Especially now, at the initial stage of removing sanctions against Iran’s nuclear program, the military operations against the Shiites in the Arab countries may slow down the process. As for Saudi Arabia, in the event of the outbreak of hostilities Riyadh may seriously damage relations with the United States. This is because Washington sees no benefits in involving

  6. Arab countries are waking up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauron, M.

    2008-01-01

    Year after year, the Arab world is confirming its interest for the gas industry. In front of an increasing local consumption, a growth of export demand and a rise of rates, the Arab countries are multiplying the projects and partnerships in a sector for which the intervention of foreign expert companies and investment are often necessary. This paper presents an overview of the past year of the gas industry in Arab countries: the projects in progress, the penetration of occidental markets by Arab companies, and the difficulties encountered by the GTL (Gas to Liquid) industry. (J.S.)

  7. Muslim refugees in Southeast Asia, the Malaysian response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorall, R F

    1988-01-01

    This article surveys the arrivals of Muslim refugees from countries in Southeast Asia who have not only come to Malaysia for political refuge, but who have also stayed on, in many instances integrating into the local Muslim community. The author concludes that Burmese, Thai, and Filipino Muslim refugee-cum-migrants, and the estimated 500,000 illegal Indonesian migrant workers in East and Peninsular Malaysia make the presence of economic migrants in Malaysia's towns and rural sectors a far more pressing concern to Malaysians than that posed by the arrival of genuine political refugees. Only the Indonesians present in Malaysia are consistently termed by all parties as illegal migrants and some of them have been subjected to well-publicized deportation by the Malaysian immigration authorities. Sympathy for fellow-Muslims in distress explains Malaysia's open-door policy to Muslim refugees. The Koran specifically enjoins Muslims to assist Muslim refugees who have been persecuted by others. However, the necessity to maintain regional political and military alliances, principally as a bulwark against Communism, and the Malay--Non-Malay, Muslim--Non-Muslim dichotomy in Malaysia which almost evenly divides Malaysia's 16 million population into mutually antagonistic halves, results in any overt public policy in favor of Malays and Muslims to be immediately denounced by the other half of the population as a move against the Non-Malays and Non-Muslims. Without political and media attention, the refugees live wherever they can find work, as do hundreds of thousands of mainly Indonesian illegal migrant workers. They surreptitiously get their children admitted to public schools, and through bribery, can even get Malaysian identification papers. Malaysia is a relatively tranquil haven for Malaysia's Muslim refugees compared to their homelands, but their continued stay remains dependent on the ever-present struggle for more equitable sharing of political and economic power between

  8. Justice in Post-Conflict Settings: Islamic Law and Muslim Communities as Stakeholders in Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corri Zoli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This essay is one of the first collaborative efforts to identify the underlying norms embedded in diverse traditions of Islamic law as these apply to contemporary Muslim communities experiencing conflict or transitioning from conflict. This long overdue endeavor draws upon comparative legal analyses, postconflict justice traditions, global governance, and empirical conflict studies to explore why Islamic legal norms are not often used as a resource for restraint and guidance in contemporary conflict settings. In exploring this puzzle, the authors make the case for strengthening commensurate Islamic and international conflict norms for complex conflicts and postconflict tradition. We also situate Islamic postconflict justice norms—which are too often confined to religious and natural law discussions—into contemporary problems of security policy, conflict prevention, and problems of governance. We indicate the many benefits of such a comparative approach for citizens of diverse Muslim and Arabs states and communities, trying to build pathways out of conflict, and for humanitarian and human rights practitioners working in such arenas toward similar goals. An additional, important benefit in excavating such shari’a norms is in providing the intellectual basis to counter politicized, extremist, and instrumentalist uses of Islamic law to justify extreme uses of political violence across the Middle East, Central and South Asian, and African regions.

  9. Arab Parents' Reactions to Child Sexual Abuse: A Review of Clinical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Baker, Khawla

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses parents' reactions to sexual abuse cases in their families. The study analyzed the clinical records of individual and family therapy sessions with 35 cases of Arab Palestinian clients, citizens of Israel (27 individuals and 8 families). Families were categorized as either functional or dysfunctional. It was concluded that the…

  10. Arabic summarization in Tw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawal El-Fishawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Twitter, an online micro blogs, enables its users to write and read text-based posts known as “tweets”. It became one of the most commonly used social networks. However, an important problem arises is that the returned tweets, when searching for a topic phrase, are only sorted by recency not relevancy. This makes the user to manually read through the tweets in order to understand what are primarily saying about the particular topic. Some strategies were developed for summarizing English micro blogs but Arabic micro blogs summarization is still an active research area. This paper presents a machine learning based solution for summarizing Arabic micro blogging posts and more specifically Egyptian dialect summarization. The goal is to produce short summary for Arabic tweets related to a specific topic in less time and effort. The proposed strategy is evaluated and the results are compared with that obtained by the well-known multi-document summarization algorithms including; SumBasic, TF-IDF, PageRank, MEAD, and human summaries.

  11. Associations Between Religion-Related Factors and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Muslims in Greater Chicago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I.; Peek, Monica; Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista E.; Hosseinian, Zahra; Curlin, Farr

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess rates of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing and associations between religion-related factors and these rates among a racially and ethnically diverse sample of American Muslim women. Materials and Methods A community-based participatory research design was used in partnering with the Council of Islamic Organizations of Greater Chicago to recruit Muslim women attending mosque and community events. These participants self-administered surveys incorporating measures of fatalism, religiosity, perceived discrimination, Islamic modesty, and a marker of Pap test use. Results A total of 254 survey respondents were collected with nearly equal numbers of Arabs, South Asians, and African American respondents. Of these respondents, 84% had obtained a Pap test in their lifetime, with individuals who interpret disease as a manifestation of God’s punishment having a lower odds of having had Pap testing after controlling for sociodemographic factors (odds ratio [OR] = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.77–1.0). In multivariate models, living in the United States for more than 20 years (OR = 4.7, 95% CI = 1.4–16) and having a primary care physician (OR = 7.7, 95% CI = 2.5–23.4) were positive predictors of having had a Pap test. Ethnicity, fatalistic beliefs, perceived discrimination, and modesty levels were not significantly associated with Pap testing rates. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess Pap testing behaviors among a diverse sample of American Muslim women and to observe that negative religious coping (e.g., viewing health problems as a punishment from God) is associated with a lower odds of obtaining a Pap test. The relationship between religious coping and cancer screening behaviors deserves further study so that religious values can be appropriately addressed through cancer screening programs. PMID:24914883

  12. Islam and the Arabs in the work of a Maronite scholar in the service of the Catholic church (Abraham Ecchellensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyberger, Bernard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As an expert in Arabic documents in the “Republic of Letters”, Abraham Ecchellensis devoted himself in his work to an attempt at synthesis that was characteristic of his time: he tried to reconcile contemporary scholars’ expectations of specialised knowledge both with his Catholic and controversialist commitments and with his status, in his role as a Maronite, as a spokesman for Arabic and even Muslim culture. Ecchellensis provided the public with translations of Arabic Muslim philosophical and scientific texts which he deemed to have drawn on universal “wisdom”. However, a disinterested curiosity concerning Islam could not be publicly advertised and had to be cloaked in the form of anti-Protestant controversy or Catholic apology. In the work of Ecchellensis this stance was accompanied by an expurgation of all Islamic terminology from the Arabic language and by a recourse to the Christian Arabic literature writen during the first centuries of the Hijra.

    [fr] Expert en documents arabes dans la « République des Lettres », Abraham Ecchellensis se livre dans son oeuvre à un essai de synthèse caractéristique de son temps : il tente de concillier l’attente de connaissances des savants de son temps avec son engagement catholique et controversiste, et avec son identification, en tant que maronite, comme porte-parole de la culture arabe, y compris musulmane. Il fournit au public des traductions de textes philosophiques et scientifiques arabes musulmans qui lui paraissent participer d’une « sagesse » universelle. Mais une curiosité désintéressée pour l’islam ne peut s’afficher : elle doit prendre les formes de la controverse anti-protestante ou de l’apologie catholique. Chez Ecchellensis cette posture s’accompagne d’une expurgation de toute terminologie islamique dans la langue arabe, et d’un recours à la littérature arabe chrétienne élaboré aux premiers siècles de l’Hégire.

  13. Is There Muslim Exceptionalism in Democracy Research?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner

    to and between the 16th and 18th centuries are relatively less democratic today. The negative effect of early statehood on current levels of democracy is mediated by European colonization and settlement: Europeans were less likely to colonize and settle in territories with more developed state institutions......, also, to alternative theories of the causes and correlates of democracy. This paper presents evidence against the notion of Muslim exceptionalism in democracy research. Thus, outside the European continent, territories that were governed earlier and more consistently by state organizations up...... and were therefore less likely to bring nascent legalistic and representative institutions to these territories. When we remove the autocratic legacy of early statehood and the influence of European settlement, there is nothing signicantly negative about the degree of democracy in Muslim-majority countries....

  14. The Good Citizen and the Good Muslim

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Garbi

    Based on two fieldworks in Chicago this working paper discusses the role that an Islamic organization – the Inner-City Muslim Action Network (IMAN)– plays for the invigoration of the deprived neighborhood Chicago Lawn. The working paper describes and analyses IMAN’s claim to so-called ghetto cosm...... activities. Via its focus on popular music, graffiti art and talks the festival can be seen as an example of teaching the public – both about a minority religion but also about the potential resources of a deprived inner-city neighborhood....... cosmopolitanism, its building on past race-based struggles in the neighborhood, and also how IMAN challenges ideas of correct religious practice within the American Muslim community. The particular context of the working paper is the festival “Takin’ it to the Streets” which is one of IMANs most prolific...

  15. Transfer of Knowledge in Muslim Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez-Lopez, Adday

    2018-01-01

    Muslims in Ethiopia represent a considerable part of the total population, but until recently, their literary tradition and their cultural heritage have remained understudied. The present article aims to shed light on the Islamic manuscript tradition in Ethiopia in the late Nineteenth and early...... Twentieth century by focusing on the codices owned by šayḫ Ḥabīb, a renowned scholar and respected walī from Wallo, in northeastern Ethiopia....

  16. KESALEHAN SOSIAL SEBAGAI RITUAL KELAS MENENGAH MUSLIM

    OpenAIRE

    Wasisto, Jati Raharjo

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of social piety is an interesting phenomenon among recent middle class Indonesian muslim. The aims and scope of social piety which established is to redefine spirituality. Process of reconstucting social piety can be traced from the intersection from both material and spiritual aspect. Spiritual is a holy effort to pray God and material can be analyzed as a complementer factor in spirtual effort. To become pious man is the main thing however the most intention are both recogniti...

  17. Kesalehan Sosial Sebagai Ritual Kelas Menengah Muslim

    OpenAIRE

    Wasisto, Jati Raharjo

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of social piety is an interesting phenomenon among recent middle class Indonesian muslim. The aims and scope of social piety which established is to redefine spirituality. Process of reconstucting social piety can be traced from the intersection from both material and spiritual aspect. Spiritual is a holy effort to pray God and material can be analyzed as a complementer factor in spirtual effort. To become pious man is the main thing however the most intention are both recogniti...

  18. ADVERTISEMENT & ISLAM: A MUSLIM WORLD PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Adeel Bari; Rana Zamin Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary advertisement practices have created many social and ethical problems due to their materialistic focus. The effect of these problems can also be seen in many Muslim countries including Pakistan in terms of diversion from their cultural and religious values. This paper attempts to integrate the Islamic business ethics in contemporary advertisement practices to find the solution of the ethical dilemma which is created by these materialistic advertisement practices. The focus of Isl...

  19. Best Practices: Intercultural Integration of Arabic Refugees in Berlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyuchukov, Hristo; New, William

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the work of a Berlin-based NGO (ANE) in Germany, which works with migrants and Arab refugees. The organisation has a strong record publishing a Parents Newsletter and conducting family counselling for migrants and refugees in Berlin. One of the major activities of the organisation in 2016 was an international conference with…

  20. A grammar of Darfur Arabic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roset, C.J.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis provides grammatical details on the phonology, morphology and syntax of the Arabic as it is spoken in Darfur (West Sudan). All three of these linguistic fields give evidence that this variety of Arabic is heavily influenced by the other, particularly Nilo-Saharan languages which are also

  1. Spring in the Arab Spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, G.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Column Gert Borg | Spring in the Arab Spring door dr. Gert Borg, onderzoeker bij Islam en Arabisch aan de Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen en voormalig directeur van het Nederlands-Vlaams Instituut Caïro Spring If, in Google, you type "Arab Spring" and hit the button, you get more than

  2. Libya: A Future Arab Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    with the Berber tribes of North Africa. The eastern region of Cyrenaica is more closely associated with the Arab states of the Middle East...Springborg’s analysis is nationalism. Libya has a strong sense of national identity as well as a very homogeneous population that is 97% Berber /Arab

  3. The Arab Community in Israel Coping with Intellectual and Developmental Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isack Kandel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Arab family in Israel is still embedded in the traditional society with extended family support systems, but we see a population in transition influenced by the surrounding society. This paper looks at the different religious attitudes toward the exceptional people in our society (i.e., the family reaction to a child born with intellectual or developmental disability, reviews recent studies on the Arab and Bedouin families in Israel, and presents data on the Arab population in residential care centers.Today, out of 57 residential care centers in Israel for persons with intellectual disability, 13 (22.8% are providing service to the non-Jewish population. The Arab population constitutes 12–13% of the total residential care population, lower than the 19–20% in the total population. In residential care, the Arab population is characterized by younger children with severe and profound intellectual disability. The informal family support system is still a very important factor in the Arab family in Israel, a fact that we believe should be strengthened by implementing the British and Danish model of nurse home visitation.

  4. Muslim consumption and anti-consumption in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2015-01-01

    in Malaysia became the subject of increasing consumer activism and I explore how Malaysian federal state institutions, Islamic organizations and consumers respond to and are affected by calls to boycott (anti-consumption) and boycott (consumption) a range of products. More specifically, this article examines...... the above issues building on ethnography from fieldwork with Muslim Consumers Association of Malaysia (PPIM), which is an organization that protects the interests of Muslim consumers and entrepreneurs, as well as Malay Muslim middle-class informants....

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF THE ISLAMIC BANKING AND FINANCE IN THE MUSLIM AND NON-MUSLIM WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Ali Jimale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In Islamic countries, many of them poor and not highly developed, large segments of the Muslim population do not have access to adequate banking services—often because devout Muslims are unwilling to put their savings into a traditional financial system that runs counter to their religious principles. Islamic banks seek to provide financial services in a way that is compatible with Islamic teaching, and if Islamic banks can tap that potential Muslim clientele, that could hasten economic development in these countries.             It is expanding not only in nations with majority Muslim populations, but also in other countries where Muslims are a minority, such as the United Kingdom and Japan. Similarly, countries such as India, the Kyrgyz Republic, and Syria have recently granted, or are considering granting, licenses for Islamic banking activities.             In fact, there are currently more than 300 Islamic financial institutions spread over 51 countries, plus well over 250 mutual funds that comply with Islamic principles. And, over the past decade, the Islamic banking industry has experienced growth rates of 10-15 percent per year—a trend that is expected to continue.            Globally, the assets of Islamic banks have been expanding at double-digit rates for a decade, and Islamic banking is an increasingly visible alternative to conventional banks in Islamic countries and countries with many Muslims. My study identifies the sources of Islamic banking expansion and ways to stimulate its continued growth. Knowing what drives the development of Islamic banking will help developing countries in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East catch up.

  6. From Islamist to Muslim Democrat: The Present Phenomenon of Muslim Politics in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHD IZANI MOHD ZAIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Muslim political rivalry in democracy has triggered the birth of two groups; Islamist and Muslim Democrat. The two groups are competing by using a different approach in getting the support of the people. The Islamist group is championing its Islamic State agenda and the implementation of Shari`a as a political ambition within the framework of democracy while the Muslim Democrat recognises democracy and freedom as the basis of their struggle. Due to a greater development in democracy and a more open political rivalry, the Islamist group that was initially strongly backed by their rigid ideology and approach, has decided to change for a more moderate approach. This can be seen through their political strategy that emphasises on universal issues such as democracy, justice and good governance without rhetorical expressions of Islam and Shari`a. This change from Islamist to that of Muslim Democrat is an exciting development for it shows the transition path and direction of Muslim politics in Malaysia. This paper examines the latest development of the Islamist group, i.e. PAS in political rivalry in Malaysia, particularly in the recent General Election in 2013. This article reveals that due to the changing political landscape and democratization, the Islamist has pragmatically moderated their stance to gain more supports and it has embarked on a new landscape for Muslim political rivalry in Malaysia. Although PAS’s new approach to transform its approach to be more open and democratic is still questionable, this study believes that the participation of the party in democracy is no longer just for the sake of election, on the other hand it should recognise democracy as a political culture that emphasizes justice, freedom and good governance.

  7. The relationships among Muslim Uyghur and Kazakh disabled elders' life satisfaction, activity of daily living, and informal family caregiver's burden, depression, and life satisfaction in far western China: A structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen Ting; He, Bin; Wang, Yu Huan; Wang, Mei Yan; Chen, Xue Feng; Wu, Fu Chen; Yang, Xue

    2017-04-01

    1 Hypothesis Disabled elders' activities of daily living, caregiver burden, caregiver depression, and caregivers' life satisfaction are significantly related to the life satisfaction of elderly people with disability. 2 Hypothesis There are direct and indirect effects between the life satisfaction of elders, disabled elders' activities of daily living, and family caregivers' factors. This study explored the interrelationships of disabled elders' life satisfaction and activities of daily living, caregivers' factors (burden, depression, and life satisfaction) through a structural equation model. In total, 621 dyads of disabled elders and informal family caregivers completed questionnaires during face-to-face interviews in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region from September 2013 to January 2014. Activity of daily living exerted a direct effect on life satisfaction of disabled elders and 30.4% indirect effect through caregivers' factors. Caregiver burden had a 60.0% direct effect on life satisfaction of disabled elders and a 40.0% indirect effect through the caregiver depression. Caregiver depression showed 76% direct effect on life satisfaction of disabled elders and 24% indirect effect through caregivers' life satisfaction. Direct relationships between activity of daily living and caregiver burden, caregiver burden and caregiver depression, and caregiver depression and caregivers' life satisfaction were observed. Activity of daily living had a 91.3% indirect effect on caregiver depression mediated by caregiver burden; caregiver burden had a 40.0% indirect effect on caregivers' life satisfaction mediated by caregiver depression. Results provide useful information for nurses and policymakers and shed light on the need to consider caregivers' factors in improving care recipients' life satisfaction. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Danish teacher attitudes towards muslim immigration into danish society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Lotte Rahbek

    2007-01-01

    This proposal highlights the AERA 2007 theme of foreign educational research by seeking to pinpoint potential causes of inter-group conflict among the immigrant Muslim and native communities in Denmark by surveying Danish teacher values. The perceptions Muslim and non-Muslim teachers have about...... and public policy developed. Denmark's localized Muslim immigrant community has leaders who lent support to this effort. Based on a summary of interviews, a validated survey instrument available in English and Danish has been designed and administered via the Internet to all teachers in Denmark in 2007...

  9. Elections in the Muslim World, 1990-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdul Wahid A. Al-Zandani

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Aggregate data analysis of elections held between 1990 and 2002 in the Muslim world show that most of these elections belong to the non-democratic category and these elections were mostly non-competitive. Approximately, 98% of the Muslim world people do not enjoy full political liberty. About 96% of the people in the Muslim world enjoy the right to vote, but their votes hardly result in transfer of power. However, there are four countries in the Muslim world, Bangladesh, Iran, Malaysia and Mali, where elections are relatively free and fair.

  10. Elections in the Muslim World, 1990-2002

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Abdul Wahid A. Al-Zandani

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: Aggregate data analysis of elections held between 1990 and 2002 in the Muslim world show that most of these elections belong to the non-democratic category and these elections were mostly non-competitive. Approximately, 98% of the Muslim world people do not enjoy full political liberty. About 96% of the people in the Muslim world enjoy the right to vote, but their votes hardly result in transfer of power. However, there are four countries in the Muslim world, Bangladesh, Iran, Malay...

  11. Rectification And Revival Of Muslim World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M azram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present doldrums position and state of decadence, internal differences, external aggression (geographical and ideological, lack of self-confidence and dependence, illiteracy, political instability, economic disaster, lack of knowledge and wisdom, back benchers in science and technology, education, medicine, trade and business, banking system and defensive incapability of Muslim Ummah prompted me to write this article.  Although most of the Muslim nations got their independence because of their dedicated struggle and historic events and incidents but the old masters remained active for a remote control over the Muslim Ummah.  Their intellectuals and scholars, individually as well as collectively, have propagated and advised their leadership, the tactics and approaches by which Muslim Ummah can again be enslaved.  Writings of S.P. Huntington and F. Fukuyama are clear examples.  They are actively gearing the international institutions so cleverly that Muslim Ummah does not even realize their ill motives and objectives.  They brought their leadership in a confronting position with Muslim Ummah and hence threatening the world peace.  This situation prompted us to look at our principal sources of inspiration, which are, the Qur’an, Sunnah of the Prophet (SAW, and examples of the “enlightened Caliphs” and see if we could work out a seminal guidelines for our rectification  and revival.  We have gathered together some of these impressions; these are all tentative, nothing final about them, but these are here nonetheless. ABSTRAK: Kehadiran situasi kebelungguan dan  keruntuhan, perbezaan dalaman, pencerobohan luar (geografi dan ideologi, kurang keyakinan diri dan pergantungan, buta huruf, ketidakstabilan politik, bencana ekonomi, kekurangan ilmu dan hikmah, ketinggalan dalam sains dan teknologi, pendidikan, perubatan, perdagangan dan perniagaan, sistem perbankan dan ketidakupayaan pertahanan umat Islam mendorong saya untuk menulis

  12. Islam and state school: opinions of Muslim parents in Piedmont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Guolo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available What are the opinions of Muslim parents, as to the teaching of Islamic religion? In case it were possible, would they prefer it to be taught in state or religious schools? And in the first case, by whom? What do families think about problems like the observance of dietary laws in school canteens, the class of physical education for girls in mixed classes, the wearing of veil? The article summarizes the data of a survey on these topics (between 2006 and 2007 carried out in Piedmont, in particular in Turin, on a sample of about 1000 people representing the different ethnonational islamic communities living in the region. The methodology employed is both quantitative (the whole sample was given a structured questionnaire and qualitative. The latter concerns detailed interviews with the leaders of Islamic associations in the region. The result is definitely in favour of the teaching of Islamic religion in state schools, together with the request to observe dietary laws, both cultural and religious, and the acceptance, on principle, of the mixed class of physical education. There are of course different opinions which, however, show a growing trend in favour of free choice as to the obligation of veil: a picture widely determined by the ethnonational origin of the interviewed, confirming the pluralism of Italian Islam. The result points out that most Muslims in Piedmont have an inclusive approach and that religion does not mean cultural separation. The main trend, apart from the opinions and projects of a few associative leaderships, is one of an Islam that wishes to become a recognized member of Italian religious and cultural scene.

  13. "We are Arabs:" The Embodiment of Virginity Through Arab and Arab American Women's Lived Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Sarah; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet; Sommers, Marilyn S

    2015-12-01

    Virginity is part of our existence in the world as embodied sexual subjects. While many meanings are associated with virginity, in most of the Arab world virginity relates to the presence of a hymen and extends to encompass the honor of the Arab community, and virginity loss commonly relate to first vaginal intercourse. This study explored the meanings of virginity from the perspectives of Arab and Arab American women. A qualitative phenomenological approach, informed by the philosophy of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, was used to conduct in-depth interviews with ten women. We identified one over-arching theme Virginity as Identity , and two major themes Embodiment of Virginity and "We are Arabs." To reach an embodied virginity, participants went through a disembodied virginity process, reflecting society's perceptions and values of virginity related to anatomical presence of a hymen and society's honor. "We are Arabs" describes the ways women identified with the Arab ethnic identity as a shared overall identification, but differed from one lived experience to another, and influenced how participants embodied virginity. Our participants provided a better understanding of the diverse meanings of virginity that move beyond the binary of virginity and virginity loss, and into a spectrum of embodied meanings. Findings suggest the need for future research around sexuality in Arab Americans with attention to socio-political contexts in order to understand the nature and context of sexual initiation and its impact on sexual behaviors and well-being.

  14. Multilingual Development in Children with Autism: Perspectives of South Asian Muslim Immigrant Parents on Raising a Child with a Communicative Disorder in Multilingual Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheesan, Brinda

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of three Muslim families on multilingual development in their children with autism. Findings indicate that the families' goal of maintaining normalcy in their children's life could not be attained without immersion in multiple languages. They believe that immersion in multilingual contexts helped their children…

  15. Novel Techniques for Dialectal Arabic Speech Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Elmahdy, Mohamed; Minker, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Novel Techniques for Dialectal Arabic Speech describes approaches to improve automatic speech recognition for dialectal Arabic. Since speech resources for dialectal Arabic speech recognition are very sparse, the authors describe how existing Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) speech data can be applied to dialectal Arabic speech recognition, while assuming that MSA is always a second language for all Arabic speakers. In this book, Egyptian Colloquial Arabic (ECA) has been chosen as a typical Arabic dialect. ECA is the first ranked Arabic dialect in terms of number of speakers, and a high quality ECA speech corpus with accurate phonetic transcription has been collected. MSA acoustic models were trained using news broadcast speech. In order to cross-lingually use MSA in dialectal Arabic speech recognition, the authors have normalized the phoneme sets for MSA and ECA. After this normalization, they have applied state-of-the-art acoustic model adaptation techniques like Maximum Likelihood Linear Regression (MLLR) and M...

  16. Tobacco Use Among Arab Immigrants Living in Colorado: Prevalence and Cultural Predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajj, Dana G; Cook, Paul F; Magilvy, Kathy; Galbraith, Michael E; Gilbert, Lynn; Corwin, Marla

    2017-03-01

    The authors determined the prevalence of smoking among Arab immigrants living in Colorado. The authors also evaluated the relationship between acculturation and tobacco use, including both cigarettes and hookah among Arab immigrants. A cross-sectional survey of 100 adult Arab immigrants living in Colorado was carried out. The results revealed that 19% of the study participants were current cigarette smokers and 21% were current hookah smokers. Participants who were more integrated into Arab culture were more likely to use tobacco products ( p = .03) and to have family members ( p = .02) and friends who use tobacco products ( p = .007). Acculturation plays a major role in affecting the health habits of Arab immigrants living in Colorado, especially in the area of hookah smoking. Understanding some culturally relevant predictors of tobacco use might assist health care providers in designing successful smoking cessation programs.

  17. [Cardiovascular risk factors in an Arab and Hispanic working population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivielso, P; García, A; de Rus, I; Avila, J M; Andrade, R; Escolar, J L; González, P

    1991-07-01

    318 records of male workers, 169 Spanish and 149 Arab were retrospectively studied in 1987 at the "Gabinete de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo" (Council for Safety and Hygiene in the Workplace) in Ceuta in order to prove the hypothesis that 2 different ethnic groups living in the same geographic area have a non-equal distribution of cardiovascular risk factors. The Spanish group showed a higher prevalence in blood hypertension, diabetes, glucose intolerance, obesity and alcohol intake, compared to the Arab group. Smoking and high levels of seric cholesterol were similar in both groups, however, medium levels of seric cholesterol were lower in the Arab group. Family histories of cardiovascular disease were very rare in the latter mentioned group. These observations suggested a major predisposition to ischemic cardiopathy in the Spanish group.

  18. The first lady phenomenon:Elites, states, and the contradictory politics of women’s empowerment in the neoliberal arab world

    OpenAIRE

    Sukarieh, Mayssoun

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on analysis of different sources-media analysis, policy documents, interviews, and participant observation-this article analyzes the representation of Queen Rania of Jordan and the First Lady of Syria, Asma al-Assad, and their work in civil society. An analysis of Rania and Assad helps illustrate the ways in which gender roles and representations, in the Arab and Muslim world as elsewhere, are always multiple and contradictory, varying across lines of social class and intimately conne...

  19. Intersectionality at Work: South Asian Muslim Women's Experiences of Employment and Leadership in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Memoona; Syed, Jawad

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on qualitative interviews with 20 South Asian heritage, Muslim, female leaders, managers, and supervisors in the United Kingdom, we examine the multi-layered issues and challenges they face in pursuit of employment and leadership positions. The paper offers an intersectional perspective taking into account interconnected and overlapping factors (gender, ethnicity, religion, and family status) that affect not only the issues and challenges these women face in the labour market but also the individual agency and strategies they use to overcome any obstacles in the way of their employment and career. The results show that although Muslim women continue to face a myriad of challenges in the workplace, they are also able to tackle some of these issues through their individual strategies and networks, such as personal networks and further education. The study highlights the need for policymakers and employers to consider intersectionality to enable ethnic minority women's inclusion and leadership within and outside the workplace.

  20. Criminalisation of the Muslim community and the fight for the presumption of innocence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iker Barbero González

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In parallel to the strategy of neo-Orientalising the Muslim community in Europe, acts of resistance emerge to condemn it. This article considers neo-Orientalisation not only as a strategy for exoticising and/or undermining the community, it demonstrates that it may be understood as an “agonistic Government strategy”. To this end, the paper presents the case of the “Raval 11” and bases its analysis on the interpretation of the resistance by family and activists to the arrests of 11 Pakistanis and Indians on charges of terrorism in Barcelona in 2008 as “acts of citizenship”. New political subjects were engaged: women, young people and children burst onto the scene demanding both freedom and the presumption of innocence for their relatives and dignity for the wider Muslim and migrant community criminalised by the dominant political and media discourses.

  1. The Scope of Sexual, Physical, and Psychological Abuse in a Bedouin-Arab Community of Female Adolescents: The Interplay of Racism, Urbanization, Polygamy, Family Honor, and the Social Marginalization of Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbedour, Salman; Abu-Bader, Soleman; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Abu-Rabia, Aref; El-Aassam, Salman

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: This is an exploratory study of the abuse--especially sexual--of female adolescents in a conservative and traditional Bedouin-Arab community in southern Israel. The objectives were (1) to examine the rate of sexual abuse, (2) to examine the rate of physical and psychological abuse, and (3) to develop regression models to predict these…

  2. Parenting Style as a Moderator of Effects of Political Violence: Cross-Cultural Comparison of Israeli Jewish and Arab Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Michelle; Shechner, Tomer; Farah, Oula Khoury

    2012-01-01

    This study examined cross-cultural differences in the moderating function of authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive parenting styles for Jewish and Arab Israeli children exposed to political violence. Respondents were parents and children aged 10-11 from 94 families (42 Arab, 52 Jewish). Parents completed the Parenting Styles and Dimensions…

  3. The language of racism. Textual testimonies of Jewish-Arab hostility in the Israeli Academia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Heger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The persistent Jewish Arab conflict is present in every aspect of life in Israeli society and its echoes penetrate the everyday reality of higher educational institutions. Feelings of mutual hostility among Arab and Jewish students, faculty and administration are common experiences on Israeli campuses. This article analyzes two textual expressions of this mutual resentment which were circulated in 2011 in Tel Hai College, Israel. One of the texts was produced by Muslim Arab student association and the other by a Zionist Jewish organization. Both groups are present on every campus in Israel. Despite the significant difference of the political location occupied by each organization in the Israeli power structure, we argue that these texts share similar attitudes to the conflict and parallel operational strategies. The paper demonstrates the attempts by these texts to encourage the mutual hostility between Jews and Arabs by employing racist and violent discourse. The article tries to explain the silence of the college administration and faculty in the face of these racist acts, subsequently outlining a vision of a responsible academia which will banish any acts of racism.

  4. ISLAMIC CHARITIES AND DAKWAH MOVEMENTS IN A MUSLIM MINORITY ISLAND: The Experience of Niasan Muslims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilman Latief

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the roles of Islamic charitable organisations in running dakwah activities on Nias Island. By Showing how Islamic charitable organizations have attempted to create welfare programmes under the dakwah scheme, it investigates whether inclusive attitudes towards beneficiaries with different religious backgrounds have characterised Islamic social activism in ‘non-Islamic’ regions. As a Muslim minority area, post-disaster Nias Island has increasingly become a place where Islamic charitable associations and dakwah movements from outside Nias have attempted to deliver aid as well as to assist the communities, notably the Muslim minority population. As the outer islands and isolated regions have become an arena of contestation for religious missionaries, Muslim preachers to a certain extent should compete with Christian missionaries and indigenous religious groups. By way of a case study, this paper also examines the way in which Islamic charitable associations, negotiate between serving the Muslim community through dakwah, and serving humanity at large through social welfare activities.

  5. Pemberdayaan Ekonomi Komunitas Muslim Melalui Bank Sampah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rihlah Nur Aulia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is motivated by the empowerment of Muslim community through majlis talim or recitation group of mothers in the field of religion and social empowerment of society and its member economics in solving the environmental problems and protection of nature and natural resources can not be solved only by relying on knowledge and technology. Environmental problems and crises can only be overcome by fundamental and radically changing the way people view and behave towards their natural environment. What is needed is a change of perspective and behavior that is not only an individual, but it must be a culture of society at large. The main purpose of this study is to find out how the model of empowerment of Muslim community conducted by the group of majlis talim alkaromah dikelurahan Pejuang sub district Medan satria Bekasi. This research uses qualitative approach. This research is a kind of qualitative research that is through library research which is kind of research from literature treasury and make text world as the main object of analysis, that is by writing, identifying, clarifying, reducing, and presenting data obtained from written source. This study concludes: First, the model of economic empowerment of Muslim society conducted by majlis talim mothers through Garbage Bank can improve the economics of the members of majlis alkaromah. Second, in Bank garbage majlis talim alkaromah aims to empower and can make society more independent. Such programs save the waste which is then converted to rupiah, then with managing the waste, the sharing of profits with the profit-sharing system, and there is also a group of joint ventures through cooperatives, with this joint effort can improve the skills and independence of the community so that when the community Islam is independent, the empowerment has been successful.

  6. African Muslim Youth and the Middle East

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihle, Annette Haaber

    this African tradition of religious scholarship in the Middle East. The paper will, with the help of Pierre Bourdieu's notion of forms of capital related to various fields, analyse the challenges which Muslim students encounter during their stay in the Middle East and the forms of capital they bring back......, marked by economic decline and political instability. In Africa a weak or even failed state often means that young people have in reality no access to political, educational or economic positions and resources. In some countries like Nigeria, Ghana and the Ivory Coast the marginalisation of the youth...

  7. The Roots of Muslim Rage Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    freedom of speech , our freedom to vote and assemble and disagree with each other” 24, and therefore “This is not […] just America’s fight, and what is at...widespread belief that Islam and western concepts such as democracy, freedom of speech and women’s rights are incompatible. In the aftermath of 9/11, the...Turkey, Indonesia, and Malaysia, which work fairly well.45 Furthermore, many in the Muslim world agree that political freedom, liberty, and freedom of speech , is

  8. Holistic Development: Muslim Women's Civil Society Groups in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Holistic Development: Muslim Women's Civil Society Groups in Nigeria, Ghana and Tanzania. ... we conceptualize economic and political participation and measure inequality. ... Tanzania to help develop mechanisms for sustainable economic growth and ... Keywords: African women, muslim women, civil society, economic ...

  9. Secular tolerance? : Anti‐Muslim sentiment in Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribberink, E.C.; Achterberg, P.H.J.; Houtman, D.

    2017-01-01

    he literature about secularization proposes two distinct explanations of anti-Muslim sentiment in secularized societies. The first theory understands it in terms of religious competition between Muslims and the remaining minority of orthodox Protestants; the second understands it as resulting from

  10. Allama Shibli and the early Muslim League: A dissenting voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Islam

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The All-India Muslim League (AIML was formed in 1906, with the primary aim to improve the educational and socioeconomic status of Muslims. Allama Shibli Nu‘mani (1857-1914 put forward an argument in support of Muslims recovering from the political stupor into which they had fallen after the British suppression of the 1857 uprising. He encouraged Muslims to participate in democratic politics in India, departing from the educational focus of his mentor, Sir Saiyid Ahmad Khan (1817-1898. Shibli advanced a strong critique of the Muslim League’s limited ambitions in comparison with the Indian National Congress (INC. His critique, notably in ironic and emotive poetry, significantly contributed to the national discussion pertaining to the Muslim League’s reform and restructure. Based on Shibli’s original writings, this paper analyses his critique of the Muslim League and his efforts to overhaul its structure and policies. It examines the response of the Muslim League to these critiques and studies the extent to which its structure and policies changed.

  11. Lived Islam: Religious identity with Non-organized Muslim minorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeldtoft, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show how a focus on ‘non-organized’ Muslims in Europe can contribute with insights on the everyday lives and practices of Muslim minorities. The empirical foundation is interviews conducted in Germany and Denmark. I argue that by focusing on institutionalized for...

  12. The Puzzle of Muslim Advantage in Child Survival in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhalotra, S.; Valente, C.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    2009-01-01

    The socio-economic status of Indian Muslims is, on average, considerably lower than that of upper caste Hindus. Muslims have higher fertility and shorter birth spacing and are a minority group that, it has been argued, have poorer access to public goods. They nevertheless exhibit substantially

  13. Highly-Valued Reasons Muslim Caregivers Choose Evangelical Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Andrew E.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated what were the most highly-valued reasons among Muslim caregivers for sending their children to Lebanese evangelical Christian schools. Muslim caregivers (N = 1,403) from four Lebanese evangelical Christian schools responded to determine what were the most highly-valued reasons for sending their children to an evangelical…

  14. Swazi Journalism and the 'Muslim Threat' | Rooney | Lwati: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Swaziland constitution; (ii) a report that Muslims were enticing university students to convert to Islam in return for scholarships; and (iii) a public symposium run on the subject of Islam. It concludes that Swazi newspapers frame Muslims as warlike people who are plotting against the kingdom and who pose a threat to Swazi ...

  15. Religion and Education Gender Gap: Are Muslims Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajj, Mandana; Panizza, Ugo

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses individual-level data and a differences-in-differences estimation strategy to test whether the education gender gap of Muslims is different from that of Christians. In particular, the paper uses data for young Lebanese and shows that, other things equal, girls (both Muslim and Christian) tend to receive more education than boys and…

  16. Muslim women's experiences of domestic violence in the Nelson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article provides a reflection on the experiences of Muslim women with regard to domestic violence. A qualitative approach was utilised following an explorative, descriptive, phenomenological contextual research design, as the researchers sought to understand the lived experiences of Muslim women in abusive ...

  17. “Speaking for Ourselves”: American Muslim Women's Confessional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    representation through the medium of autobiography post-9/11, focusing on Sumbul Ali- Karamali's The Muslim Next Door, Asma Gull Hasan's Red, White, and Muslim and the edited collections I Speak for Myself and Love, InshAllah. Highlighting the ...

  18. Prejudice towards Muslims in The Netherlands : Testing integrated threat theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velasco González, Karina; Verkuyten, Maykel; Weesie, Jeroen; Poppe, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    This study uses integrated threat theory to examine Dutch adolescents’ (N ¼ 1; 187) prejudice towards Muslim minorities. One out of two participants was found to have negative feelings towards Muslims. Perceived symbolic and realistic threat and negative stereotypes were examined as mediators

  19. A Muslim Archipelago: Islam and Politics in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    President as well as to Muslim leaders in that only Basilan Island (excluding the municipality of Isabela) and Marawi City voted to be included...N. Mercado . 100 years of Filipino Muslim- Christian Relations. Zamboanga City, Philippines: Silsilah Publications, 1999. Davis, Leonard...Politics and Armed Separatism in the Southern Philippines. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998. Mercado , Eliseo R. Mission and Dialogue

  20. Succession Issues among Family Entrepreneursin Countries of the Gulf

    OpenAIRE

    Ralph Palliam; Hanas A. Cader; Charles Chiemeke

    2011-01-01

    Small family business succession is gaining increased prominence in Western societies. In Arab societies, literature on family business succession is virtually nonexistent. As Arab societies are embracing Western values, the issues of family business succession that are considered in the West will become major issues in Arab societies. This empirical study explores the transferability of theoretical constructs developed in the West to the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council. The finding...

  1. ‘They Make Us Feel Like We’re a Virus’: The Multiple Impacts of Islamophobic Hostility Towards Veiled Muslim Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Zempi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Within the prevailing post-9/11 climate, veiled Muslim women are commonly portrayed as oppressed, ‘culturally dangerous’ and ‘threatening’ to the western way of life and to notions of public safety and security by virtue of being fully covered in the public sphere. It is in such a context that manifestations of Islamophobia often emerge as a means of responding to these ‘threats’. Drawing from qualitative data elicited through a UK-based study, this article reflects upon the lived experiences of veiled Muslim women as actual and potential victims of Islamophobia and examines the impacts of Islamophobic attacks upon victims, their families and wider Muslim communities. Among the central themes we explore are impacts upon their sense of vulnerability, the visibility of their Muslim identity, and the management of their safety in public. The individual and collective harms associated with this form of victimisation are considered through notions of a worldwide, transnational Muslim community, the ummah, which connects Muslims from all over world. We conclude by noting that the effects of this victimisation are not exclusively restricted to the global ummah; rather, the harm extends to society as a whole by exacerbating the polarisation which already exists between ‘us’ and ‘them’.

  2. America's Credibility at Stake: Arab Perceptions of US Foreign Policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meyer, Michael

    2002-01-01

    ... and Arab governments as biased against the Arabs and in favor of Israel From the Arab view, two lesser factors that contribute to Arab feelings that US policies are unjust include the long-term American...

  3. Arab oil and gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This review explains the situation of petroleum products and gas in Arab countries. Several kinds of difficulties are exposed: too many projects, concurrence of other producers like Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Norway, Russian Federation, will be rude. New exporters (Iran, Venezuela, Nigeria, even Alaska) will appear and will want a part of market and western countries will probably diversify their tradesmen. An other point is that producers overestimate future growth of worldwide demand or underestimate the impact of more expansive gas price on this demand. Inversely if this one is too low, several projects, would not be profitable. The last point is in the concurrence between gas and petroleum products, which needs a consistent policy

  4. Learning Arabic through play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Ibrahim, Zeinab; Karatsolis, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the use of educational games in the context of the “Arabiyyatii” research project, a three-year project funded through Qatar National Research Fund. The scope of the project is teaching Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) to kindergarten students (5-6 years old) that are native...... speakers of the Qatari dialect. Part of the new curriculum envisioned in the project includes the use of simple educational games, specifically designed and developed for tabletop surface computers. The paper presents a naturalistic study design, following the activities of 18 students for a period of 9...... weeks in the project. The paper presents three of the most played games by the students, along with analysis on collected data, focusing on students’ performance and attitudes towards the new curriculum. Results analysis provided an encouraging image, suggesting that the conducted activity was able...

  5. A Question of Balance: Exploring the Acculturation, Integration and Adaptation of Muslim Immigrant Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimee Stuart

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses criticisms of contemporary acculturation research by adopting a mixed method approach (open-ended survey responses, interviews, focus groups and projective techniques to the study of the acculturation experiences of Muslim youth in New Zealand. The research explores: 1 the meaning, definition and achievement of success; 2 the process of negotiating multiple social identities; and 3 the graphic representation of identity. Thematic analysis indicated that young Muslims aspire to achieve success in personal, social, material and religious domains and that they seek to balance potentially competing demands from family, friends, the Muslim community and the wider society. At the same time they aspire to balance multiple identities, retaining religious and cultural elements in the definition of self while endeavoring to integrate into the wider society. The process of achieving this balance is characterized by three strategies: alternating orientations, blending orientations and minimizing differences. The findings are discussed in relation to advancing our understanding of integration as an acculturation option, and the community-based policy implications for multicultural societies are considered.

  6. Increasing trend of HIV/AIDS among Arab and Jewish male persons in Israel, 1986-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Z; Grayeb, E; Beany, A; Grotto, I

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the HIV/AIDS burdens in Jewish and Arab Israeli males, as HIV/AIDS affects different population groups disproportionally. The National HIV/AIDS Registry (NHAR) was used as the source of HIV/AIDS infection records, while the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics was used to determine group-specific disease rates. Between 1986 and 2010, 3499 HIV/AIDS-infected male Israelis were reported to the NHAR: 3369 (96.3%) Jews and 130 (3.7%) Arabs, with an average annual incidence of 5.5 and 0.8 per 100 000 of the population, respectively (P = 0.05). Of the Jews, 1018 (29.9%) were born in Ethiopia, while 2389 were Jews who were not Ethiopian-born (JNE). Most of the Arabs (n = 99; 74.8%) were Muslims, followed by Christians (21; 16.2%) and Druze (13; 10%). AIDS rather than HIV infection at the time of reporting was diagnosed in 568 (23.8%) of the JNE and 31 (23.8%) of the Arabs (p = 1). The most affected age group was those aged 25-34 years among the JNE and those aged 20-24 years among the Arabs, and the respective cumulative death rates were 24.9% (n = 594) and 32.5% (n = 40) (P = 0.1). The point prevalences in 2010 were 58.4 and 11.4 per 100 000 for JNE and Arabs, and in adults aged 15-59 years they were 71.5 and 26.3 per 100 000, respectively. In Muslims, Christians and Druze, the point prevalences were 4.2, 11.2 and 7.1 per 100 000, and in adults aged 15-59 years they were 22.6, 42.9 and 29.4, respectively. The most common risk group among JNE was men who have sex with men (MSM; n = 1223; 51.2%), followed by injecting drug users (n = 661; 27.7%), while among Arabs it was MSM (n = 63; 48.1%), followed by heterosexuals (n = 36; 27.3%). The HIV/AIDS burden in Israeli Arab males was significantly lower than that in Jews, and in both populations the most common risk group was MSM, with the proportion of MSM increasing with time. © 2012 British HIV Association.

  7. Breast cancer screening utilization among women from Muslim majority countries in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Mandana; Lofters, Aisha; Kim, Eliane; Wong, Josephine Pui-Hing; Ellison, Lisa; Graves, Erin; Glazier, Richard H

    2017-12-01

    Breast cancer screening disparities continue to prevail with immigrant women being at the forefront of the under screened population. There is a paucity of knowledge about the role of religious affiliation or cultural orientation on immigrant women's cancer screening uptake. This study examined differences in uptake of breast cancer screening among women from Muslim and non- Muslim majority countries in Ontario, Canada. A cohort of 1,851,834 screening-eligible women living in Ontario during April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2015 was created using linked health and social administrative databases. The study found that being born in a Muslim majority country was associated with lower breast cancer screening uptake after adjusting for region of origin, neighbourhood income, and primary care-related factors. However, screening uptake in Muslim majority countries varied by world region with the greatest differences found in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Screening uptake was lower for women who had no primary care provider, were in a traditional fee-for service model of primary care, had a male physician, had an internationally trained physician, resided in a low income neighbourhood, and entered Canada under the family class of immigration. Religion may play a role in screening uptake, however, the variation in rates by regions of origin, immigration class, and access to primary care providers alludes to confluence of socio-demographic, cultural beliefs and practices, immigration trajectories and system level factors. Facilitating access for immigrant women to regular primary care providers, particularly female providers and enrollment in primary care models could enhance screening uptake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploring the Multitude of Muslims in Europe. Essays in Honour of Jørgen S. Nielsen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    through conceptualisations, productions and explorations of the multitudes of Muslims in Europe, and the authors draw on Jørgen S. Nielsen’s own work on the history and challenges of the Muslim community in Europe, critical thinking, ethnicities and theologies of Muslims in Europe, Muslim minorities...

  9. "I Feel Different Though": Narratives of Young Indonesian Muslims in Australian Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfikar, T.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines six Indonesian Muslim youth's narratives and those of their parents in relation to their experiences of being Muslim in Australian public schools. Previous studies on similar issue found a certain degree of exclusion and discrimination for being Muslims in public school, this present article however, perceives Muslims'…

  10. Not Too "College-Like," Not Too Normal: American Muslim Undergraduate Women's Gendered Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Shabana

    2009-01-01

    Building on an ethnographic study of American Muslim undergraduate women at two universities in Washington, D.C., I examine undergraduate Muslim women's construction of gendered discourses. Stereotypes feed into both majority and minority constructions of Muslim women's gendered identities. I highlight Muslim women's resistance to and adoption of…

  11. Minority Political Representation: Muslim Councilors in Newham and Hackney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Tatari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Scholars have long been intrigued by the role of minority elected officials in representing the interests of their communities. There is an on-going debate on whether distinctive minority agendas exist and whether the existence of minority representatives (descriptive representation is a necessary condition to secure the representation of minority interests (substantive representation. This article analyzes original interview data to examine these issues through a case study of Muslim city councilors and the dynamics of local government in the Newham and Hackney Borough Councils of London. It finds that the exceptionally high ethnic diversity of Newham with no dominant ethnic group, the lack of racial or religious divides among neighborhoods, and low racial tensions shapes the political culture of the Council, as well as the Muslim councilors, and yields high responsiveness for all minorities. It also finds that non-Muslim councilors play a significant role in the substantive representation of minority interests, including Muslim interests. In contrast, the case study of the Hackney Council reveals that beyond high party fragmentation, ethnicity and religiosity of the Muslim councilors vary widely and hinder effective representation. In addition, their political incorporation is low, and the leadership positions they hold seem to have symbolic rather than substantive impact. The political behavior and representative styles of Muslim councilors reveal a balancing perspective, whereby they advocate for group interests with a more moderate tone. These factors account for the low government responsiveness to Muslim interests in Hackney.

  12. Muslim Youth Experiences in Quebec Secondary Schools: Race, Racialization, and the 'Dangerous Muslim Man'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naved Bakali

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the experiences of Muslim men who had attended the secondary schools in Quebec in the post-9/11 context. Employing a critical ethnographic approach stemming from institutional ethnography, this study presents biases/racism these men had experienced in their secondary schools in the aftermath of the 9/11 terror attacks and throughout the period of the War on Terror, and the possible causes for this treatment.

  13. German "Soft power" Policies in the Muslim World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili R. Rustamova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a number of foreign policy concepts declared the importance of using the instruments of "soft power" to promote the national interests of a country. Soft power is the ability through political values, culture and foreign policy to influence others by forming attractiveness [18]. Germany is generally recognized as the leader in the resources of "soft power." The article discusses what kind of resources are deployed by Germany to increase its "soft power" in the Muslim direction of foreign policy. The Muslim world has its own specifics, which complicate the use of instruments of "soft power." Countries with large Muslim population are difficult to influence, as they differ from Europe in the civilizational respect, have their own customs and traditions which they strictly follow because of the nature of Muslim religion. The author notes that in the Muslim direction of foreign policy the problem for Germany lies in the fact that the formation of its attractiveness resulted in a significant flow of immigration of Muslims in the country. A part of immigrant Muslims tries to live isolated from European society, professes radical currents ofIslam and participates in military conflicts abroad, participation in which in the role of active player is ruled out by Germany. Failure to integrate them into German society and the lack of progress in the formation of its positive image in the Muslim countries resulted, on the one hand, in the split of German society, on the other hand, in the threat of absorption by foreign civilization, as it is observed now in Germany the presence of "soft power" of Muslim countries, which use its former and current citizens to influence German political course. The article was written within the constructivist methodology, which consider the "soft power" as a way of construction of social reality with the use of tangible and intangible resources for the formation of an attractive image of Germany in world

  14. Muslim Poetic: Songs to the Beloved Woman. Muahmmud Ibn Al-Mahad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna Carretero Rangel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to share the discovery of the mystical songs of muslim poet Muahmmud Ibn Al-Mahad. His poems disclose our poetic and mystical ancestral wealth, since the Muslim legacy, as well as the Greek and Hebrew,are part of our civilization matrix. The uruguayan poet Saúl Ibargoyen through the narrative identity of Al-Mahad, whom unveils as one Other on himself, has configured a very special kind of poetic mirror, close to a palimpsest sui géneriswhere we find the signs of an eternal scripture, which approach us to the Beloved woman’s beauty and the desert as images of the mystical experience. Inthe Al-Mahad’ songs we find out the profound traces of the well-known Sufi poet Yalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi, who expressed in his verses the union with his beloved (tawhid the Perfect One. Also we perceive on his poems the delicate fragrance of Ibn ‘Arabî, called al Shaykh al-Akbar, “The Great Master”, whogaves us the gift of the “unity of the divine Essence”. The Real Being is incomparable and transcendent, but unveils itself as divine manifestation (tajallí in allthings. Thus, Al-Mahad’s verses configure this relation between love and unity to express with all subtleness the passion for the Beloved woman, as we appreciate in this poem: “In the book came from the Highest, is written also the silence ofthe zeal that cross your heart. Love the Beloved woman with that silence and the book will have new words for you”.

  15. ETOS KERJA PENGUSAHA MUSLIM (Studi Kasus pada Pengusaha Muslim Alumni UIN Walisongo Semarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choirul Huda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the work ethos of Moeslim entrepreneurs who graduated from UIN Walisongo Semarang. It is very interesting to study because of their profession as a businessmen and their educational background which based on Islamic sciences. Through a qualitative descriptive approach, there are two issues to be answered, namely how the work ethos of Muslim entrepreneurs who graduated from UIN Walisongo Semarang in running a business and how relationships between work ethos of muslim entrepreneurs with their success in business? Results of this study stated that Muslim entrepreneurs who graduated from UIN Walisongo Semarang have a high work ethic as capital in running and developing a business that was involved. Their work ethos is not only driven by economic motives, namely in order to meeth the economic needs alone, but it is also driven by social and religious motives. It correlates with the answer to the second issue, that, a high work ethich as been able to deliver the mon the success of the business that was involved, albeit with varying levels of success. It was determined by the type of business that is occupied and the time period to run the business. It also showed a good ability of the entrepreneur to manage and develop their business

  16. Archives: Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 17 of 17 ... Archives: Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation. Journal Home > Archives: Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. The New Arab Left and 1967

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugbølle, Sune

    2017-01-01

    In Arab political culture, the Naksa of 1967 had a number of watershed effects. Scholars have paid a lot of attention to the decline of secular Arab nationalism and the concurrent rise of Islamism. Much less research has been done on the way 1967 spurred radical left organizations, also known as ...... moment that followed. This moment has had a lasting impact on Arab political culture and is being re-interpreted in interesting ways today by Arab revolutionaries post-2011....

  18. Arabic Natural Language Processing System Code Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 This technical note provides a brief description of a Java library for Arabic natural language processing ( NLP ) containing code...for training and applying the Arabic NLP system described in the paper "A Cross-Task Flexible Transition Model for Arabic Tokenization, Affix...and also English) natural language processing ( NLP ), containing code for training and applying the Arabic NLP system described in Stephen Tratz’s

  19. Teaching the Arabic Alphabet to Kindergarteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Ibrahim, Zeinab; Karatsolis, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents initial results regarding writing activities in the context of the ALADDIN project. The goal of the project is to teach Modern Standard Arabic in 5-year-old kindergarten students in Qatar. A total of 18 students, enrolled in the ‘Arabic Class’, participated for 9 weeks in the ...... computers affected students’ performance and attitude towards the Arabic class and, consequently, the Arabic language....

  20. The Historical and religious conditions of the split of Sudan ... in the context of Christian-Muslim relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Cisło

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The split into the predominantly Muslim Northern Sudan, and Southern Sudan with a Christian and animist majority, had been emerging in the course of many centuries. Without any doubt, one is bound to mention the natural and geographical boundaries, the ethnical diversity of the regions, the influence exercised during the centuries by the Egyptians, Arabs and later on by the British. According to the opinions of some experts on the subject, there can be two distinct matters that have contributed to the split of the North and the South. These were education and religion. Apart from education, also the issue of religion was dividing the Sudan. After the declaration of independence on January 1, 1954 all the Christian private schools in the South were closed down. There remained only state schools with Arabic as the language of instruction and with the upbringing model based on the Koran teaching. Having obtained political independence, the fears of the British administration and Christian missionaries became a reality: Islam was made the state religion. The only way to attain an occupational and social status was to convert to Islam. Frequently, this took place according to the rule of an already accomplished fact or by pressure. In the context of Sudan, one of the biggest country in Africa, with its population of over 37 million, made up of 70 per cent Muslim believers , 14 per cent of Christians, and 12 per cent of animists, it is of great importance for the perception of fundamentalism to be familiar with the history of this country.

  1. Differences in knowledge of breast cancer screening among African American, Arab American, and Latina women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Karen Patricia; Mabiso, Athur; Todem, David; Hammad, Adnan; Hill-Ashford, Yolanda; Hamade, Hiam; Palamisono, Gloria; Robinson-Lockett, Murlisa; Zambrana, Ruth E

    2011-01-01

    We examined differences in knowledge and socioeconomic factors associated with 3 types of breast cancer screening (breast self-examination, clinical breast examination, and mammogram) among African American, Arab, and Latina women. Community health workers used a community-based intervention to recruit 341 women (112 Arab, 113 Latina, and 116 African American) in southeastern Michigan to participate in a breast cancer prevention intervention from August through October 2006. Before and after the intervention, women responded to a previously validated 5-item multiple-choice test on breast cancer screening (possible score range: 0 to 5) in their language of preference (English, Spanish, or Arabic). We used generalized estimating equations to analyze data and to account for family-level and individual correlations. Although African American women knew more about breast cancer screening at the baseline (pretest median scores were 4 for African American, 3 for Arab and 3 for Latina women), all groups significantly increased their knowledge after participating in the breast cancer prevention intervention (posttest median scores were 5 for African American and 4 for Arab and Latina women). Generalized estimating equations models show that Arab and Latina women made the most significant gains in posttest scores (P American, Arab, and Latina women to promote adherence to breast cancer screening guidelines.

  2. Son preference among the historical Sandžak Muslim population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čvorović Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to explain parental son preferences among historical Muslim population in the Sandžak region, southwestern Serbia. The paper draws upon data collected in the course of anthropological fieldwork studies in the region. The fieldwork was performed among Muslim and Christian families in Serbian rural area of Sandžak, measuring maternal fitness in relation to several variables. The data set comes from 120 women born between 1880-1924, representing so a historical demographic data based on individual and lineage records. These data were complemented with official records from Archive of Novi Pazar, whenever possible. In this Serbian rural area, land is still considered as an abundant resource, useful in establishing a family, livestock or agriculture. In the past, in spite of yearly fluctuations in production, lands and labor constituted a stable source of wealth from generation to generation. In this study, the data include the socio-economic status of each woman, assigned according to her husband’s family economic status: land-ownership vs. landless. This represents differences in resource availability in terms of nutrition, wealth and workload among these women. As the results show, the Muslim families, on average, left more surviving descendants through sons, in contrast with their Christian counterparts. The basic research question, then, is why? Furthermore, what were the impacts of particular behaviors on reproductive and lineage success, under particular social and ecological conditions? In this sample, regarding the Muslim families, the family structure was/is traditional and stratified, characterized by a large disparity in the status of males and females. Patrilineal inheritance, the concentration of wealth and power in males and the social restriction of women all characterize even today this patriarchal family arrangement. This supports the Trivers-Willard hypothesis, especially in terms of sex-biased parental

  3. FONOLOGI DAN MORFOLOGI BAHASA ARAB 'AMIYAH MESIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufrodi Mufrodi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of Arabic language, it is divided into two, namely Arabic fuṣhâ and ‘âmiyah. Arabic fuṣhâ  used as a written language, and Arabic ‘âmiyah used as a spoken language. In daily activities, Arab people used Arabic ‘âmiyah more frequently. This is due to a fairly high level of formality that is owned by Arabic fuṣhâ, that should be in the spoken language is communicative, consultative, relaxed and intimate, both in term of morphological and syntactical. In the Egyptian Arabic occur in phonological and morphological differences were deemed difficult for students who only learn Arabic fuṣhâ. The difficulty that arises due to the ignorance of students to the differences that occur between Arabic fuṣhâ  and Egyptian dialect. With an understanding of phonological and morphological of Arabic ‘âmiyah expected that the students of Arabic language or people who have learned fuṣhâ can understand-at least a few understanding-spoken language so that communication will run smoothly.DOI: 10.15408/a.v2i2.2184

  4. Teaching the Arab World: Evaluating Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Deborah

    1981-01-01

    Discusses a study of 19 junior and senior high school textbooks used in the Washington D.C. area to introduce students to the Arab World and Islam. Findings indicated that Middle Eastern culture and history were frequently measured by western standards, information was often inaccurate, the Arab-Israeli conflict often portrayed Arabs as being at…

  5. Smoking behavior in pregnant Arab Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulwicki, Anahid; Smiley, Karen; Devine, Susan

    2007-01-01

    To determine the smoking behavior in pregnant Arab American women who attended a Women, Infant and Children (WIC) program at a local county public health clinic and compare the incidence of smoking behaviors of pregnant Arab American women with pregnant women who were not Arab Americans. Data were extracted from a computer database that contained information from health history charts of pregnant Arab and non-Arab American women. The study sample was 830 women, 823 of whom were Arab American participants enrolled in the WIC program in Michigan. Approximately 6% of pregnant Arab Americans smoked during pregnancy. The prevalence of smoking behavior among pregnant Arab American women was similar to that of smoking behaviors of Hispanics and Asian Americans in the United States. Although smoking behavior is a serious problem among Arab American immigrants in general and in the Arab world in particular, cultural factors that support healthy behavior during pregnancy in the Arab culture seem to limit the use of tobacco in pregnant women. Nurses who care for Arab American pregnant women can use this information to better inform their care of these patients.

  6. Investigation into The Effect of Arabic Incompetence on The Students’ Performance in Islamic Studies in Ibadan South-East Of Oyo State In Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazeem Adekunle Adegoke

    2016-11-01

    dianalisis dengan menggunakan persentase sederhana dan analisis statistik chi-square. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan buruknya kinerja sebagian besar siswa sekolah menengah atas studi Islam adalah karena ketidakmampuan mereka dalam bahasa Arab sebagai akibat dari kurangnya eksposisi terhadap bahasa Arab dan kurangnya latar belakang bahasa Arab mereka dari kelas sebelumnya. Penelitian ini juga mengungkapkan bahwa beberapa guru mereka pada program studi Islam tidak kompeten dalam membaca dan menulis bahasa Arab.   How to Cite : Kazeem Adekunle Adegoke. (2016. Investigation into The Effect of Arabic Incompetence on The Students’ Performance in Islamic Studies in Ibadan South-East Of Oyo State In Nigeria. TARBIYA: Journal Of Education In Muslim Society, 3(1, 20-31. doi:10.15408/tjems.v3i1.3374. Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15408/tjems.v3i1.3374  

  7. Lessons on Holistic Development from Muslim Women's Civil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muslim women's organizations in East and West Africa have cultivated successful ... we conceptualize economic and political participation and measure inequality. ... Tanzania to help develop mechanisms for sustainable economic growth and ...

  8. Halal Tourism in Indonesia: Does it attract only Muslim Tourists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktifani Winarti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian Halal Tourism became a raising mode to attract Muslim Tourist by Ministry of Tourism Republic Indonesia. Indonesia, as a non-Muslim country by nation ideology, tries to highlight the spiritual spirit of Islam as a culture to attract more tourists and put it into physical practice by having more tourism hospitalities; such as Halal Hotel that has Halal certification, which provides less or even none of alcohol beverages and serves only food based on Halal dietary. Indonesia in developing tourism brand of “Indonesia The Halal Wonders” would possibly lead into positive and negative possibilities. This article used literature review to reach data about Halal tourism in Indonesia. It has a tendency for tourism halal markets to lose the customers that are not Muslim travellers. Keywords: Halal Tourism, Indonesia, Muslim, Tourist

  9. Christian – Muslim Relations in Nigeria: The Problems and Prospects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Christian – Muslim Relations in Nigeria: The Problems and Prospects. ... Basic findings of this study show that Nigeria.s stability, democracy, and national ... must embrace Inter-religious dialogue which demands religions nurture, faith, trust, ...

  10. Americans' Views of the Muslim World: Realities and Fallacies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sulehri, Waqas A

    2006-01-01

    The 9/11 terror attacks prompted a large number of public opinion surveys in the Islamic world by Gallup, Pew, Zogby, and others seeking to understand the level and nature of Muslim antagonism toward America...

  11. Multiculturalism and England's Muslim Minority: Solution or Problem?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fleming, Todd D

    2007-01-01

    .... While the United Kingdom takes great pride in its past multicultural policies, it finds itself increasingly estranged from its Muslim minority community while seeing a notable rise in the growth of radicalism...

  12. Majority members' feelings about political representation of muslim immigrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuyten, Maykel; Hindriks, Paul; Coenders, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    In three survey experimental studies among national samples of the native Dutch, we examined feelings towards Muslim immigrants' political party representation. The strategy of disengagement (reject political representation) was evaluated most positively, followed by the descriptive representation

  13. Female Muslim students' dress practices in a South African campus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    turation from a socio-cultural perspective, as the occurrence ..... gies, a two-way contingency table analysis was used. This was ..... Muslim students‟ management of their appea- ..... apparel and contemporary American clothing. Journal of ...

  14. Performing Transnational Arab American Womanhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koegeler-Abdi, Martina

    2016-01-01

    The first Miss Lebanon-America, Rosemary Hakim, landed at Beirut Airport in July 1955 to start a public diplomacy tour. As an American beauty queen from Detroit visiting Lebanon, her parents' homeland, she was greeted enthusiastically by the local press and closely monitored by US government...... a transnational sense of Arab Americanness to negotiate her own gender and ethnic identity. This is significant because we currently lack a broader historical understanding of Arab American women’s public agency, particularly during the mid-twentieth century. Hakim’s memoir requires us to rethink the history...... of Arab American women’s strategies of self-representation in ways that acknowledge but are not confined within the terms of conventional orientalist discourses....

  15. STRATEGI KOMUNIKASI PEMASARAN ONLINE PRODUK BUSANA MUSLIM QUEENOVA

    OpenAIRE

    Dian Sarastuti

    2017-01-01

    Queenova is one of the Muslim fashion brand who play in the online market that has been able to grow rapidly. The purpose of this study is to find out the online marketing communication strategy conducted by Queenova Muslim fashion in increasing brand awareness. This type of research uses descriptive type qualitative approach with qualitative descriptive research method. Technique of data collecting by interview and observation. Technique examination of data validity using triangulation. Quee...

  16. The Veiled Muslim, the Anorexic and the Transsexual

    OpenAIRE

    Gressgård , Randi

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The Muslim woman wearing the veil, the female anorexic and the from-male-to-female transsexual constitute three different figures that, despite their striking differences, have a common symbolic ground. By focusing on the similarity between the veiled woman and the other two figures, the article sheds a different light on the debate about the Muslim veil in western societies. It is argued that the ...

  17. To the Question of the Use of the Ethnic Term“Tatars” in Arab Historical Literature »

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Sayfetdinova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of the ethnogenesis of the peoples inhabited the Golden Horde is one of the issues being studied intensively in modern historical scholarship. Medieval Arab sources play an important role in studying the history of the peoples of the Golden Horde. Study of contemporary Arab authors’ historical researches where medieval Arab chronicles are analyzed in greater detail, is necessary to understand their importance. Objective: study of the Arab historical literature regarding the issue of the use of the ethnic term “Tatars”. Some contemporary Arab historical researches are used as materials for this research. For example, Muhammad Sahil Takkush calls the Golden Horde – “Magul-Kypchak”, and Iran – “Magul-Faris” in his book “History of the Mamluks in Egypt and Syria”. Qasim Abdel Qasim, the author of the book “Era of the Mamluk Sultans”, calls the Golden Horde “bilad al-kypchak”. In his work “The Mamluks”, Shaydiyaz al-Garini calls Berke the “khan of the Golden Horde tribe” and the Golden Horde inhabitants – “at-tatar al-kypchak”, i.e. the “Kypchak Tatars”. Of particular interest is the book of Egyptian historian Muhammad Abdelgani al-Ashqar “Salar – the Tatar Muslim Emir (Naib of the Mamluk Sultan in Egypt, 1260–1310”. It describes the reign of Sultan al-Malik an-Nasir Muhammad who was in close friendly relations with the Golden Horde khan Uzbek. It is known that the Golden Horde Muslims prayed for Sultan al-Malik al-Nasir mentioning his name after khan Uzbek. Long-term friendship between the Golden Horde and Egypt eventually led to the conclusion of a dynastic marriage between Egyptian Sultan an-Nasir and the Golden Horde princess Tulunbay. As a result, the study of the use of the ethnic term “Tatars” in Arab historical literature remains relevant and requires a review of some of the preconceived ideas about the ethnic history of the Tatar people in the Arab world in favor of

  18. The Hindu-Arabic numerals

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, David Eugene

    1911-01-01

    The numbers that we call Arabic are so familiar throughout Europe and the Americas that it can be difficult to realize that their general acceptance in commercial transactions is a matter of only the last four centuries and they still remain unknown in parts of the world.In this volume, one of the earliest texts to trace the origin and development of our number system, two distinguished mathematicians collaborated to bring together many fragmentary narrations to produce a concise history of Hindu-Arabic numerals. Clearly and succinctly, they recount the labors of scholars who have studied the

  19. Ekspresi dan Representasi Budaya Perempuan Muslim Kelas Menengah di Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rofhani Rofhani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses Islamic culture that undergoes shift in meaning as a form of expression and self-representation of Middle Class Muslim Women. Basically, the religious movement of women constitutes a form of identity assertion. The Middle Class Muslim Women unconsciously exhibit new culture, although it must be admitted that not all Middle Class Muslims in Indonesia follow popular lifestyle. Instead, they demonstrate culture different from what of fundamentalist groups with their turban, cloak, and veil of a specific color. Middle Class Muslim Women create an alternative lifestyle which conforms Islamic norms, flexible, not rigid to build Islamic identity. In general, Middle Class Muslim Women in Surabaya have a relatively similar lifestyle. They tend to be rationalistic in understanding religion. They prefer, for example, more scientific materials to enrich their religious knowledge. Although they are rationalistic and follow the values of modernity, they still adhere to normative values of religion. The ethical values or religious norms are their main guideline for behavior including the reason for wearing Muslim clothing and veil.

  20. Etika Al-Qur’an Terhadap Non-Muslim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harda Armayanto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the ethics toward non-Muslims based on al-Qur’an. Islam as a religion of peace was accused and insulted by the orientalists frequently. These accusations and insulting stated in several articles, journals either in their books. Their books like Islamic Invasion wrote by Robert Morey and Islam Revealed by Anis A Shorrosh are some sample of how the orientalists discredits Islam. Whereas Islam is not like what they accused. On the contrary, Islam has responding their accusations with an elegant and tolerant doctrine. Islam has teaches its peoples to respects another religion’s people, Islam forbids his people to insult other religions, to excoriate their worships or forcing non-Muslims to convert  or believes  to Islam, even  Islam teaches  its  people to acknowledge non-Muslims  as  brother  and  sister.  This  is  Islam’s  admiration  toward  non- Muslims. Surprisingly, these admirations inversely proportional to what non- Muslims did toward Islam and its people. The abuses as what we mention it before, was being happened even until now. Lately, one of  Christian pastor in United State was told his people to burn the Holly Qur’an or as we known about suppression of Rohingya’s Muslims that was did by Myanmar’s Buddhists.

  1. EEG activity in Muslim prayer: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider H. Alwasiti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Almost all religions incorporate some form of meditation. Muslim prayer is the meditation of Islam. It is an obligatory prayer for all Muslims that is performed five times a day. Although a large body of literature exists on EEG changes in meditation, to date there has been no research published in a peer-reviewed journal on EEG changes during Muslim prayer. The purpose of this pilot study is to encourage further investigation on this type of meditation. Results of EEG analysis in twenty-five trials of Muslim prayer are reported. Some of the findings are consistent with the majority of the previous meditation studies (alpha rhythm slowing, increased alpha rhythm coherence. However, Muslim prayer does not show an increase in alpha and/or theta power like most of the results of other meditation studies. The possible cause of this discrepancy in meditation-related studies is highlighted and a systematic and standardised roadmap for future Muslim prayer EEG research is proposed.

  2. Islamic Religiosity, Depression and Anxiety among Muslim Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadzirah Ahmad Basri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active religious practice is central to Muslim livelihood. Among Muslims, this religious engagement is rarely studied with regards to its association in coping with critical illnesses. This study investigated the association between Islamic religiosity with depression and anxiety in Muslim cancer patients. Fifty-nine cancer patients recruited from a Malaysian public hospital and a cancer support group completed the Muslim Religiosity and Personality Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory in July and August 2010. Islamic religiosity score, obtained from the sum of subscale scores of Islamic worldview and religious personality represents a greater understanding and practice of Islam in a comprehensive manner. Results yielded a significant negative correlation between Islamic religiosity score with both depression and anxiety. Depression was also found to be negatively associated with religious personality subscale. Older patients scored significantly higher on both Islamic worldview and religious personality whereas patients with higher education scored higher on Islamic worldview. Married patients scored significantly higher scores on religious personality than the single patients. Results provided an insight into the significant role of religious intervention which has huge potentials to improve the psychological health of cancer patients particularly Muslims in Malaysia. Research implication includes the call for professionals to meet the spiritual needs of Muslim cancer patients and incorporating religious components in their treatment, especially in palliative care.

  3. ADAM: Analyzer for Dialectal Arabic Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Salloum

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While Modern Standard Arabic (MSA has many resources, Arabic Dialects, the primarily spoken local varieties of Arabic, are quite impoverished in this regard. In this article, we present ADAM (Analyzer for Dialectal Arabic Morphology. ADAM is a poor man’s solution to quickly develop morphological analyzers for dialectal Arabic. ADAM has roughly half the out-of-vocabulary rate of a state-of-the-art MSA analyzer and is comparable in its recall performance to an Egyptian dialectal morphological analyzer that took years and expensive resources to build.

  4. Reading Arabic : legibility studies for the Arabic script

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chahine, Nadine

    2012-01-01

    What is the cost of visual complexity? This dissertation sets out to determine the effect of the complexity of word formation on the legibility of Arabic and the role that vocalization plays in reading. This is carried out via a holistic approach to legibility research that combines the visual

  5. Adult-onset diabetes among Arabs and Jews in Israel: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter-Leibovici, O; Chetrit, A; Lubin, F; Atamna, A; Alpert, G; Ziv, A; Abu-Saad, K; Murad, H; Eilat-Adar, S; Goldbourt, U

    2012-06-01

    To study the age at presentation and factors associated with adult-onset diabetes (≥ 20 years) among Arabs and Jews in Israel. Participants (n = 1100) were randomly selected from the urban population of the Hadera District in Israel. The study sample was stratified into equal groups according to sex, ethnicity (Arabs and Jews) and age. Information on age at diabetes presentation, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes, socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics was obtained through personal interviews. Self reports of diabetes were compared with medical records and were found reliable (κ = 0.87). The risk for diabetes was calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Factors associated with diabetes in both ethnic groups were studied using Cox proportional hazard model. The prevalence of adult-onset diabetes was 21% among Arabs and 12% among Jews. Arab participants were younger than Jews at diabetes presentation. By the age of 57 years, 25% of Arabs had diagnosed diabetes; the corresponding age among Jews was 68 years, a difference of 11 years (P Arabs was independent of lifestyle factors, family history of diabetes and, among women, history of gestational diabetes; adjusted hazard ratio 1.70; 95% confidence interval 1.19-2.43. Arabs in Israel are at greater risk for adult-onset diabetes than Jews and are younger at diabetes presentation. Culturally sensitive interventions aimed at maintaining normal body weight and active lifestyle should be targeted at this population. Possible genetic factors and gene-environmental interactions underlying the high risk for diabetes among Arabs should be investigated. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  6. EFFECT OF MIX MARKETING ON RE–PURCHASE DECISION OF MUSLIM DRESS IN BOGOR (MUSLIM CLOTHING PRODUCT OF KEKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indarto Setiawan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to analyze the factors that determines consumers in their purchasing decisions Muslim dress and recommend the proposed marketing mix strategy affects customer satisfaction and loyalty which can have an impact on purchasing decisions / repurchase (repurchase by consumers. The analytical methods used in this study Chi-Square Test, Thurstone Case-V Analysis, Correspondence Analysis, and Structural Equation Model. The results showed the purchasing decisions Muslim clothing there is a relationship between level of education and average revenue / expenditure per month with custom usage Muslim clothing, there are five sequences attribute Muslim clothing that is essential according to the respondents, the underwear model, quality of materials, patterns typical, leisure time used as well as an attractive packaging design. Muslim clothing brand Ke'ke is purchased by consumers because the ads fit the facts, reasonably priced, there are many models of quality koko and containerized, while shortcomings are in the variation of the veil / hijab and less spread of sales outlets. The products are very dominant. They influence purchasing decisions of consumers so that the superiority of the product should be maintained and even improved.Keywords: muslim clothing, the mix marketing, re-purchasing decisions

  7. A Phonology of Darfur Arabic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roset, C.

    2015-01-01

    In the introduction of this article, I summon the state of the art of Sudanic Arabic and the language situation in Darfur. Then the inventory of the consonants and vowels in the language variety at issue are given, followed by phonological processes, syllable structure, word stress and historical

  8. Democracy in the Arab World

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Given that liberalism contains principles that 'have been profoundly hostile to democracy', ..... The challenge posed for Arab democracy by Islamist thought and practice is probably the ..... (2nd edn), London: Malaysian Think Tank London. ...... Thus, the Jordanian treasury was not very dependent on internal taxes, certainly ...

  9. Special Report: Banjul Islam Conference endorses family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    44 participants from 12 West African nations met in Banjul, the Gambia, from October 22-26, 1979 and unanimously agreed that family planning is in conformity with Islam. They called for greater involvement of local Muslim leaders in African countries to encourage family planning for the promotion of maternal and child health. The Conference was sponsored by IPPF Africa Region and attended by representatives of Muslim associations, health and family planning workers, teachers, government officials, and experts on Muslim law from Cameroon, The Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Upper Volta, and Zaire. The Conference members acknowledged that while the Koran, the Sunna, and the concensus of most Islam scholars is that family planning is acceptable within marriage, most traditional religious leaders are ignorant of the fact. Muslim women should be encouraged to take an interest in family planning. Other recommendations were educating Muslims on nutrition, sanitation, and health; to collect views of African Muslim leaders and publicize them; and, to persuade Ministries of Education to include family relations and parenthood in school curricula.

  10. Muslim gay men: identity conflict and politics in a Muslim majority nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Nassim; Lachheb, Monia; Anderson, Eric

    2017-12-08

    While a number of investigations have examined how gay Muslim men view homosexuality in relation to religious Western homophobia, this research constitutes the first account of the experiences of self-identified gay men living in an African, Muslim nation, where same-sex sex is both illegal and actively persecuted. We interviewed 28 gay men living in Tunisia in order to understand how they assimilate their sexual, religious and ethnic identities within a highly homophobic culture. Utilizing notions of homoerasure and homohysteria (McCormack and Eric Anderson ,b), and examining the intersection of identity conflict and new social movement theory, we highlight four strategies that participants use to negotiate the dissonance of living with conflicting identities in a context of religious homophobia: (1) privileging their Islamic identities and rejecting homosexuality as a legitimate sexual identity; (2) rejecting Islam and accepting homosexuality as a legitimate sexual identity; (3) interpreting Islam to be supportive of homosexuality; and (4) creating a non-penetrative homosexuality to be compatible with literal Qur'anic interpretations. We discuss the multiple difficulties these men face in relation to religious intolerance and ethnic heteronormativity, and reflect upon the possibilities and obstacles of using Western identity politics towards the promotion of social justice within a framework of growing homohysteria. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  11. Experimental evaluation of Arabic OCR systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Alghamdi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The aim of this paper is to experimentally evaluate the effectiveness of the state-of-the-art printed Arabic text recognition systems to determine open areas for future improvements. In addition, this paper proposes a standard protocol with a set of metrics for measuring the effectiveness of Arabic optical character recognition (OCR systems to assist researchers in comparing different Arabic OCR approaches. Design/methodology/approach – This paper describes an experiment to automatically evaluate four well-known Arabic OCR systems using a set of performance metrics. The evaluation experiment is conducted on a publicly available printed Arabic dataset comprising 240 text images with a variety of resolution levels, font types, font styles and font sizes. Findings – The experimental results show that the field of character recognition for printed Arabic still requires further research to reach an efficient text recognition method for Arabic script. Originality/value – To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first work that provides a comprehensive automated evaluation of Arabic OCR systems with respect to the characteristics of Arabic script and, in addition, proposes an evaluation methodology that can be used as a benchmark by researchers and therefore will contribute significantly to the enhancement of the field of Arabic script recognition.

  12. PENGARUH BAHASA ARAB TERHADAP PERKEMBANGAN BAHASA INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuba Pantu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to discover and describe how the Arabic influence on the development of the Indonesian language,  which focused on the influence of the vocabulary,  the influence of the Arabic alphabet and its influences on Indonesian syntax,  as well as to discover how changes are absorbed Arabic vocabulary into Indonesian. The method used in this study is a literature review using the technique of content analysis,  which is a research technique for making inferences that can be replicable,  and valid the data by looking at the context. Sources of data in this study are the books relating to the object of research,  among Indonesian Dictionary and other books. The results showed that the effect of Indonesian Arabic is big enough. This can be seen in the uptake of the Arabic word which ranks third after Dutch and English 1, 495 words. In addition,  the use of Arabic script in Indonesian,  which until now still many books,  both Islamic religious books,  Arabic books,  tales,  literature,  written in Arabic alphabet Malay. Arabic influence on Indonesian syntax can be seen in books or Qur’an translations. The words of the absorption Arabic generally undergo changes in shape,  as adapted to the Indonesian grammar or phonemes. It also changes the meaning,  although the numbers are limited.

  13. THE ARABIC ORIGINS OF ENGLISH AND INDO-EUROPEAN "URBAN TERMS": A RADICAL LINGUISTIC THEORY APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidan Ali Jassem

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the Arabic origins of English, German, French, Latin, Greek, and Sanskrit "urban terms" from a radical linguistic (or lexical root theory perspective. The data comprises 130 such terms like abide, building, city, construction, courtyard, hotel, house, live, mansion, mason, palace, metropolis, residence, road, rural, sedentary, sojourn, stay, structure, tent, town, urban, villa, village, zoo, and so on. The results clearly show that all such words have true Arabic cognates with the same or similar forms and meanings, whose differences are due to natural and plausible causes and different routes of linguistic change. Moreover, the results support the adequacy of the radical linguistic theory according to which, unlike the Comparative Method and/or Family Tree Model, Arabic, English, German, French, Latin, Greek, and Sanskrit are dialects of the same language or family, renamed Eurabian or Urban family, with Arabic being their origin all for sharing the whole cognates with them and for its huge phonetic, morphological, grammatical, and lexical variety and wealth. Also, they indicate that there is a radical language from which all human languages stemmed and which has been preserved almost intact in Arabic as the most conservative and productive language, without which it is impossible to interpret its linguistic richness and versatility on all levels.

  14. Plague in Arab Maghreb, 1940-2015: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliya Alia Malek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the epidemiology of 49 plague outbreaks which resulted in about 7,612 cases in 30 localities in the Arabic Maghreb (Mauritania, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Egypt over 75 years. Between 1940 and 1950, most cases recorded in Morocco (75% and Egypt (20%, resulted from plague imported to Mediterranean harbours and transmitted by rat ectoparasites. In contrast, the re-emergence of plague in the southern part of Western Sahara in 1953 and in northeast Libya in 1976, was traced to direct contact between nomadic populations and infected goats and camels in natural foci, including the consumption of contaminated meat, illustrating this neglected oral route of contamination. Further familial outbreaks were traced to human ectoparasite transmission. Efforts to identify the factors contributing to natural foci may guide where to focus the surveillance of sentinel animals in order to eradicate human plague, if not Y. pestis from the Arab Maghreb.

  15. Self-esteem among Arab adolescents in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saad, I

    1999-08-01

    This study examined the level of global self-esteem of Arab adolescents in Israel and its relationship to perceived academic status and aspirations, interpersonal relationships, community type, and various demographic variables. A group of 1,560 11th- and 12th-grade Israeli-Arab adolescents answered the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (M. Rosenberg, 1965). The results revealed significant relationships (a) between global self-esteem and students' evaluations of their scholastic levels, their schools' academic levels, and their plans to take matriculation exams and (b) between self-esteem and family and peer relations. There was a significant relationship between self-esteem and community type. Participants living in cities and villages scored higher than those living in Bedouin townships. There were no significant gender differences or differences among grade levels.

  16. THE ADAPTATION AND COOPERATION OF MINORITY MUSLIMS IN RUSSIAN HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fachrizal A. Halim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present essay examines the common approach in reading the relationship between Muslims and Russian society as if they were bound by perpetual conflict. Following this angle, historians argue that the Russians underwent long term conflict with Muslims and claim that the Russians have suffered more than any other people in facing the hostile world of Islam. Some also argue that Muslims were completely subdued by the Russians due to Islam’s incompatibility with the secular and atheist Soviet regime.  A careful survey of literature on the history of Muslims in Russia, however, does not always lead to the conclusion that the two sides were in continuous conflict. In fact, aside from conflict and subjugation, both Russians and the Muslims enjoyed a considerable level of peace and shared a similar attitude of flexibility in mutual cooperation.  Given the extent of flexibility of Muslims in their encounter with the Russians throughout the Czar and the Soviet regimes, I argue that contemporary scholars have scaled down the dynamic of both Russian and Muslims intellectual articulations in relation to modern politics as well as to the internal relationship between the two sides, and that the relationship between them can be written as other than perpetual conflict.[Artikel ini mengulas hubungan Islam dan Rusia yang kerap dijelaskan dalam konteks relasi saling bertentangan. Dari cara pandang demikian, ahli sejarah kerap berpendapat bahwa konflik antara keduanya sudah terjadi lama dan orang Rusia adalah korban paling parah yang diakibatkan kebrutalan Islam. Semantara itu, ahli sejarah lainnya berpendapat bahwa orang Islam jatuh ke tangan kekuasaan Rusia karena Islam tidak mengakui rejim sekuler dan ateis Soviet. Jika literatur mengenai sejarah Islam di Rusia, maka relasi konfliktual antara keduanya tidak sepenuhnya benar. Faktanya, terlepas dari konflik dan penaklukan, baik orang Rusia dan umat Islam dapat hidup secara damai dan fleksibel dalam

  17. Classifying and explaining democracy in the Muslim world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohaizan Baharuddin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to classify and explain democracies in the 47 Muslim countries between the years 1998 and 2008 by using liberties and elections as independent variables. Specifically focusing on the context of the Muslim world, this study examines the performance of civil liberties and elections, variation of democracy practised the most, the elections, civil liberties and democratic transitions and patterns that followed. Based on the quantitative data primarily collected from Freedom House, this study demonstrates the following aggregate findings: first, the “not free not fair” elections, the “limited” civil liberties and the “Illiberal Partial Democracy” were the dominant feature of elections, civil liberties and democracy practised in the Muslim world; second, a total of 413 Muslim regimes out of 470 (47 regimes x 10 years remained the same as their democratic origin points, without any transitions to a better or worse level of democracy, throughout these 10 years; and third, a slow, yet steady positive transition of both elections and civil liberties occurred in the Muslim world with changes in the nature of elections becoming much more progressive compared to the civil liberties’ transitions.

  18. Features influencing Islamic websites use: A Muslim user perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Aliyu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Muslim scholars and organisations use the Internet through various websites to spread Islam globally. The presence of many websites providing Islamic contents online makes it necessary to examine their Islamic features and the factors that influence Muslims to use Islamic websites. This paper empirically investigates the Islamic features that influence the use of Islamic websites by Muslim users. The identified Islamic factors were grouped under five factors: beliefs, ethics, services, symbols, and values. A survey of 246 Muslim Islamic website users was conducted between November and December  2012 at the International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM. The study develops and tests a path measurement model to confirm the psychometric properties of the five identified factors. The study found that Islamic features significantly influence Muslims to use Islamic websites. The measurement model and empirical results provide valuable indicators for the direction of future research and also suggest guidelines for developing Islamic websites that will easily influence many Internet users to visit them in order to learn about Islamic teachings and practices. The findings are also of considerable importance as they contribute to the present body of knowledge on Islamic websites’ evaluation and for practice in designing and developing quality Islamic websites.

  19. Arabic realia as objects of study of Arabic language and culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлия Евгеньевна Власова

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with specific Arabic realia. The author provides a definition of Arabic realia and classifies them according to their social, political and cultural characteristics.

  20. Lead poisoning among Arab American and African American children in the Detroit metropolitan area, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nriagu, Jerome; Senthamarai-Kannan, Raghavendra; Jamil, Hikmet; Fakhori, Monty; Korponic, Summer

    2011-09-01

    This study explored the hypothesis that acculturation is a risk factor for childhood lead poisoning in the Detroit area of Michigan. Blood lead levels (BLLs) were determined in 429 Arab American and African American children, aged 6 months to 15 years, who were receiving well-child examination in three Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) clinics in the city. Mean BLL was 3.8 ± 2.3 μg/dL (range: 1-18 μg/dL) and 3.3% of the children tested had blood lead values above the 10 μg/dL level of concern. Neither the age of the dwelling units nor ethnicity of the child was significantly associated with the BLL. Multivariable analyses instead identified a number of acculturation-related factors that are associated with elevation in blood lead including paternal education, language spoken at home (English only, English and Arabic, or Arabic only), home ownership, smoking in the home, and exposure of child to home health remedies. The difference in blood lead between Arab American children from families where Arabic only versus Arabic and English is spoken at home was found to be statistically significant. This study provides information showing that immigrant children are at heightened risk of being poisoned by lead which can be useful in identifying groups at risk of atypical exposures.

  1. Reflections on world citizens and privilege - comparing indigenous and Muslim minorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    The article treats the significance of status, citizenship and world-citizenship for two 'minorities' - indigenous people and Muslim.......The article treats the significance of status, citizenship and world-citizenship for two 'minorities' - indigenous people and Muslim....

  2. Arabic text classification using Polynomial Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayy M. Al-Tahrawi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an Arabic statistical learning-based text classification system has been developed using Polynomial Neural Networks. Polynomial Networks have been recently applied to English text classification, but they were never used for Arabic text classification. In this research, we investigate the performance of Polynomial Networks in classifying Arabic texts. Experiments are conducted on a widely used Arabic dataset in text classification: Al-Jazeera News dataset. We chose this dataset to enable direct comparisons of the performance of Polynomial Networks classifier versus other well-known classifiers on this dataset in the literature of Arabic text classification. Results of experiments show that Polynomial Networks classifier is a competitive algorithm to the state-of-the-art ones in the field of Arabic text classification.

  3. The Role of Muslim Mentors in Eritrea: Religion, Health and Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Bruzzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of Islam and the participation of Muslim shaykhs, in both defining and implementing colonial policies in Eritrea, have roused less interest among scholars than Christian and missionary activities. This article sheds more light on the Islamic players and especially on the role of a holy family: the Mīrghanī. During the Colonial occupation of Eritrea this family adapted to the political and economic context imposed by the colonial rule. Our aim is to point out their activity not only as religious representatives, but also as medical mentors for local people. As a social and religious focal point, it is remarkable to see their growing interest, not only in endogenous and Islamic practices, but also in colonial medicine within the context of their charity work for the sick.

  4. Developing a New Approach for Arabic Morphological Analysis and Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Gridach, Mourad; Chenfour, Noureddine

    2011-01-01

    Arabic morphological analysis is one of the essential stages in Arabic Natural Language Processing. In this paper we present an approach for Arabic morphological analysis. This approach is based on Arabic morphological automaton (AMAUT). The proposed technique uses a morphological database realized using XMODEL language. Arabic morphology represents a special type of morphological systems because it is based on the concept of scheme to represent Arabic words. We use this concept to develop th...

  5. Guiding Digital and Media Literacy Development in Arab Curricula through Understanding Media Uses of Arab Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melki, Jad P.

    2015-01-01

    The role of new media in the Arab uprisings and the news of widespread surveillance of digital and mobile media have triggered a renewed interest in Arab audiences research, particularly as it pertains to these audiences' critical abilities and digital media literacy competencies. Taken for granted have been Arab youth's widespread use of social…

  6. DALILA: The Dialectal Arabic Linguistic Learning Assistant

    OpenAIRE

    Khalifa , Salam; Bouamor , Houda; Habash , Nizar

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Dialectal Arabic (DA) poses serious challenges for Natural Language Processing (NLP). The number and sophistication of tools and datasets in DA are very limited in comparison to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and other languages. MSA tools do not effectively model DA which makes the direct use of MSA NLP tools for handling dialects impractical. This is particularly a challenge for the creation of tools to support learning Arabic as a living language on the web, where aut...

  7. Muslim personal law and the meaning of "law" in the South African and Indian constitutions

    OpenAIRE

    Rautenbach, Christa

    1999-01-01

    The Muslim population of South Africa follows a practice which may be referred to as Muslim personal law. Although section 15 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa 108 of 1996 recognises religious freedom and makes provision for the future recognition of other personal law systems, Muslim personal law is, at this stage, not formally recognised in terms of South African law. Since Muslim personal law receives no constitutional recognition the question may be asked whether the 199...

  8. The origins of Muslim nationalism in British India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Baltar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available British rule of India stripped Muslim elites of their traditional status of ruling class and reduced them to the status of a religious minority doubly pressured by the new conditions of colonial society and competition of the majority Hindu community. These pressures strengthened in the collective imagination the perception of a minority at a disadvantage and it helped the Muslim elites to become gradually aware of their right to constitute in nationhood and the need to organize politically to defend their interests. This article aims to analyze how Islamic nationalism was taking shape during the second half of the nineteenth century and an early twentieth century from two fundamental assumptions: the backwardness of the Muslim community and the fear of Hindu hegemony.

  9. Health beliefs and practices of Muslim women during Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kridli, Suha Al-Oballi

    2011-01-01

    There are clear exemptions in Islam from fasting in Ramadan during sickness, pregnancy, and breastfeeding. Yet, some Muslim women still elect to fast while sick, pregnant, or breastfeeding because of a confluence of social, religious, and cultural factors. Little is known about the physiological effects of fasting during Ramadan on the mother or her unborn baby, and thus nurses and other healthcare providers are faced with the difficult task of providing appropriate medical advice to Muslim women regarding the safety and impact of their fasting. This article describes what is known about this topic and suggests that healthcare professionals learn as much as possible about the multicultural best practices and research-driven information about fasting in order to help Muslim women make informed decisions.

  10. ILMU PENGETAHUAN DAN PERKEMBANGANNYA: Tantangan Kemajuan dan Kemunduran Dunia Muslim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Hasyim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many history of science writers thought that nowadays science phenomenon achieved by the West without including contribution of some other Moslem countries science. They truly interested with these believed, since the fact that science revolution happen in West Europe. However, labelling all aspect of science invention on the West precisely uncorrect. The fact that some other nation and civilization, such as Greece, China and India strongly and spreadly constribute, direct and indirectly to these science phenomenon. Among nations and it’s contribution to improvement of science which should be countable; is Muslim civilitation with it’s Islam civilitation. Importance of their contribution so that someone surely believed that if Muslim science would be the only trigger of science revolution on the West. Someone also logically believe that revolution of science could be happen among Muslim if only some events would not be happen since it sparge the science development at that time.

  11. Arab oil and gas directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This reference book is the only oil and gas encyclopedia in the world providing detailed country surveys on the oil and gas industry in the Arab countries and Iran. It provides thorough country reports and detailed statistics on oil and gas exploration, production, transport, refining and petrochemicals, as well as on development projects in all countries in the Middle East and North Africa: Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates and Yemen. Separate chapters cover OPEC and OAPEC, as well as world oil and gas statistics. It includes 53 maps and 268 tables and graphs, and 2420 addresses and contact names

  12. ANDRAGOGI DALAM PEMBELAJARAN BAHASA ARAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hasyim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to get empirical evidence whether there is a significant difference between the class which is taught by andragogy technique and which is taught by conventional technique. This article describes that technique is one of the important factors in conducting Arabic class. This study categorized as an experimental research. The data is collected by giving the test for both experimental and conventional class. The result of the study shows that experimental class which is taught by applying andragogy technique get higher score than the conventional one. Means that Al-Ittihad Islamic Boarding School get higher score than Ulil Albâb. It seems that technique influences the quality of teaching and learning Arabic.DOI: 10.15408/a.v2i1.1512

  13. Hebrew-Arabic bilingual schooling in Israel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Carmit Romano

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the policies and practices employed in the teaching of Arabic and Hebrew at a school belonging to the “Hand In Hand Centre for Jewish-Arab Education in Israel”. Its focus is on strategies that the school has developed in order to support the acquisition of biliteracy....... The “Hand In Hand Centre for Jewish-Arab Education in Israel” is a grass-root movement of bilingual, bi-national primary schools in which Jewish and Arab children study together. The first school was open in Jerusalem in 1998. Currently there are 4 schools throughout the country The schools’ rational is...

  14. Energy planning in the Arab world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elshafei, A.N.

    1979-09-01

    Efficient use of energy is of interest to the energy-surplus regions as well as the energy-deficit regions. Similarly, concern about energy conservation is not confined to the industrially developed regions of the world. This article discusses energy planning from the Arab point of view. A framework for Arab energy modeling is first described. Then the application of a computer model - that of Mesarovic and Pestel - to Arab energy-planning needs is discussed and some of the results are presented. Finally, current priorities in Arab energy-modeling studies are outlined. The Appendix surveys some existing models which address regional and international energy problems.

  15. Three Writers of Arabic Texts in Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Murtadlo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the use of the Arabic alphabet in religious literature in Yogyakarta. This study uses a case study on three figure writers of religious texts that using the Arabic alphabet in southern part of Central Java (Yogyakarta, namely Asrori Ahmad (Magelang, Ali Maksum (Yogyakarta, and Ahmad Mujab Mahalli (Bantul. This study concluded that the writing of religious texts in Arabic alphabet in the southern Java area had been carried out by means of using Arabic Pegon, and only a few people who wrote in the Arabic language. The transmission of Arabic Pegon in Yogyakarta is allegedly from north coast of Java, especially from Lasem / East Java. The tradition of Arabic language teaching in the pesantrens still focuses mostly on the reading effort, communication, and understanding and it is not oriented to the writing skill. The presence of international journals initiated by the College of Islamic religious institutions and the effort of translation business into Arabic from certain institutions gives an opportunity to strengthen the use of the Arabic alphabet in Indonesia.

  16. Islam, mental health and being a Muslim in the West.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankir, Ahmed; Carrick, Frederick R; Zaman, Rashid

    2015-09-01

    The allegation that, 'Being Muslim means that you cannot be British' is often made. In view of this, we conducted a small survey (n=75) utilising purposive sampling on Muslims residing in the United Kingdom. Participants were recruited in a King's College London Islamic Society event in November 2014 in Guy's Hospital, London. 75/75 (100%) of the participants recruited responded. 69/75 (94%) of respondents either disagreed or strongly disagreed that, 'Being Muslim means that you cannot be British' (75/75 (100%) Muslim participants, 43/75 (57.3%) female participants, 32/75 (42.7%) male participants, mean Age 20.5 years, (Std. Dev. ±2.5)). This paper broadly seeks to answer two related questions. Firstly, 'What is the relationship between Islam and the West?' and secondly, 'What is the relationship between Islam and mental health?' In relation to the former, the rise of radicalization over recent years and the Islamophobia that has ensued have brought Islam and Muslims under intense scrutiny. Hence we feel it is both timely and important to offer a brief background of Islam and its relevance to the Western world. In relation to the latter, for many people religion and mental health are deeply and intimately intertwined. For example, religion can enable a person to develop mental health resilience and Islam has been reported to be a protective factor against suicidal behaviour. We conclude our paper by illustrating how the two questions are interrelated. We do so by offering an autobiographical narrative from a Muslim healthcare professional residing in the UK who developed a mental health problem precipitated by war in the country of his origin. His narrative includes descriptions of the role Islam that played in his recovery as well as his attempts to reconcile seemingly disparate aspects of his identity.

  17. The Political Economy of English Education in Muslim Bengal: 1871-1912.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Aminur

    1992-01-01

    Examines explanations for lack of progress by Muslims in English education in East Bengal, colonial British India (now Bangladesh). Argues that urban-based, elitist English education failed to provide opportunities to rural Muslim farmers, and that, after the British formulated educational policies meeting Muslim needs, that community responded…

  18. Context, Focus and New Perspectives in the Study of Muslim Religiosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines Muslim religiosities by focusing on the variety of Islam classes offered by Muslim organizations in Denmark. More specifically, the paper highlights conditions for studying religiosity among Muslims in Denmark, and suggests new focus areas. The paper argues against an ‘ethnic’...

  19. Performance and Surveillance in an Era of Austerity: Schooling the Reflexive Generation of Muslim Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac an Ghaill, Mairtin; Haywood, Chris

    2018-01-01

    The last 15 years have seen a remarkable shift in the educational representation of British-born Muslim young men. In the media-led reclassification of them, from South Asian to Muslim, they have moved from ideal student to potential jihadist. This article draws upon a three-year ethnographic study with young Muslim men located within the West…

  20. Critical Race Theory, Policy Rhetoric and Outcomes: The Case of Muslim Schools in Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Damian

    2018-01-01

    The expansion of state-funded Muslim schools in Britain since 1998 has developed against a backdrop of sustained public political rhetoric around the wider position of British Muslims in both political and educational contexts. This article explores the public policy rhetoric around Muslim schools under New Labour and the subsequent Coalition and…

  1. ‘Praise to the Emptiness’ Locating Home in the Arab Diaspora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Rao Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the continuing negotiations which occur among the diasporic communities to arrive at definitions of home within the new geographical spaces occupied by them. Using the liminal and hybrid theories of Avtar Brah, Stuart Hall and their literary manifestations in Salman Rushdie and Meena Alexander, it explores the notion of home among the Arab diaspora in The United States, particularly as expressed by women writers. Using the specific example of Mohja Kahf’s the girl in the tangerine scarf, this study examines the way in which Muslim women in the diaspora struggle to find multiple possibilities of ‘home’. It presents the possibility that the inability to establish a final home could be a literary tool for the creative artist to examine multiple identities and inhabit marginal spaces in ways which are imaginative and hopeful rather than being zones of loss and longing.

  2. Design and Realization of an Arabic Morphological Automaton-New Approach for Arabic Morphological Analysis and Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Mourad Gridach; Noureddine Chenfour

    2011-01-01

    Arabic morphological analysis is one of the essential stages in Arabic Natural Language Processing. In this paper we present an approach for Arabic morphological analysis. This approach is based on Arabic morphological automaton (AMAUT). The proposed technique uses a morphological database realized using XMODEL language. Arabic morphology represents a special type of morphological systems because it is based on the concept of scheme to represent Arabic words. We use this concept to develop th...

  3. STRATEGI KOMUNIKASI PEMASARAN ONLINE PRODUK BUSANA MUSLIM QUEENOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Sarastuti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Queenova is one of the Muslim fashion brand who play in the online market that has been able to grow rapidly. The purpose of this study is to find out the online marketing communication strategy conducted by Queenova Muslim fashion in increasing brand awareness. This type of research uses descriptive type qualitative approach with qualitative descriptive research method. Technique of data collecting by interview and observation. Technique examination of data validity using triangulation. Queenova is a Muslim fashion brand that chooses online path in marketing its products. The results show that in marketing communication strategy undertaken by Muslim fashion Queenova using Above The Line and Below The Line, with focus on promotion and advertisement banner ad sales on facebook. In conclusion the marketing strategy focuses on the promotion of banner ad sales and advertising on the facebook site. Visual communication factors and recommendations also have an effect on increasing brand awareness. Suggestions to improve relationships with existing fans made a form of activity to establish relationships with consumers. It is proposed to have a special person in charge of taking care of online media Queenova merupakan salah satu brand busana muslim yang bermain di pasar online yang telah mampu berkembang pesat. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui strategi komunikasi pemasaran online yang dilakukan oleh busana muslim Queenova dalam meningkatkan brand awareness. Tipe penelitian menggunakan tipe deskriptif pendekatan kualitatif dengan metode penelitian deskriptif kualitatif. Teknik pengumpulan data yang dilakukan dengan wawancara dan observasi. Teknik pemeriksaan keabsahan data menggunakan triangulasi. Queenova merupakan brand busana muslim yang memilih jalur online dalam memasarkan produk-produknya. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa dalam strategi komunikasi pemasaran yang dilakukan oleh busana muslim Queenova mempergunakan jalur Above The Line

  4. Cosmic Anger Abdus Salam - The First Muslim Nobel Scientist

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Gordon Murray

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a biography of Abdus Salam, the first Muslim to win a Nobel Prize for Science (Physics 1979), who was nevertheless excommunicated and branded as a heretic in his own country. His achievements are often overlooked, even besmirched. Realizing that the whole world had to be his stage, he pioneered the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, a vital focus of Third World science which remains as his monument. A staunch Muslim, he was ashamed of thedecline of science in the heritage of Islam, and struggled doggedly to restore it to its former glory. Undermined by

  5. Feminist dilemmas and the agency of veiled Muslim women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses dilemmas of agency for feminism through reflections on social psychological research on the role of representations in the construction of identity by Muslim women. Engaging first with Saba Mahmood’s account of religious subjectivities in Politics of Piety (2005), the author...... argues that feminist research requires a social conception of agency that addresses dialogical dynamics of representation and identity. Drawing on research concerning veiling and identity among Muslim women in the UK and Denmark, the author shows how a social conception of agency may be elaborated...

  6. Interpersonal violence in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Ossama T; Abbas, Alaa K; Eid, Hani O; Salem, Mohamed O; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study the anatomical distribution, severity and outcome of hospitalised interpersonal violence-related injured patients in Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates so as to give recommendations regarding the magnitude of this problem, its causes and priorities of prevention. Data were retrieved from Al-Ain Hospital Trauma Registry, which was prospectively collected over three years. There were 75 patients (males = 85.3%) having a mean age of 30 years. Eighty-one percent had blunt trauma. The estimated annual injury hospitalisation of interpersonal violence in Al-Ain city was 6.7 per 100,000 population. Females were significantly more injured by a family member (p = 0.02), at home (p = 0.005), and had more severe injuries (p = 0.003). There was a trend for children less than 18 years old to have more penetrating trauma (p = 0.06) and to be injured by a family member (p = 0.09). There was only one case of woman sexual assault and two cases of child abuse. The mean (SD) hospital stay was 7.87 (14.1) days. Less than 3% (n = 2) were admitted to the intensive care unit with no deaths. In conclusion, the majority of patients in our study had minor injuries. Nevertheless, the psychological impact may be major. This highlights the need to develop suitable mental health services in support of victims of interpersonal violence.

  7. Issues post-stroke for Muslim people in maintaining the practice of salat (prayer): A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Che Rabiaah; Nelson, Katherine; Wood, Pamela; Moss, Cheryle

    2015-01-01

    Muslims throughout the world perform salat (prayer) five times a day; salat involves a person reciting the Holy Qur'an while being in several positions. There are several steps that should be carried out before prayer, including wudhu (ablution) and covering one's awrah (body). To identify educational needs for stroke patients and their caregivers in Malaysia. Another purpose is to report on the needs identified by stroke patients and their families related to salat. Descriptive qualitative study. Phase 1 involved semi-structured interviews with stroke patients (n = 5), family caregivers (n = 5) and health professionals (n = 12) in Kelantan Malaysia. Phase 2 involved presenting the findings from Phase 1 to the health professionals with the aim of establishing priorities and processes to develop education strategies for stroke patients and their families. Preparing for and performing salat was challenging for both patient and family carers to do following a stroke. Themes identified were prayer and the meaning of the stroke events for participants, difficulties praying post-stroke, prayer as part of rehabilitation therapy. Providing culturally safe care should include how nurses assess and support patients and their caregivers post stroke to meet their prayer needs. Nurses have a role in discussing with stroke patients and their families how in addition to its spiritual and customary benefits, prayer and for Muslims reciting the Holy Qur'an can have cognitive and rehabilitation benefits, as well as being a source of psychological support for stroke patients.

  8. VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY OF THE SPIRITUAL COPING STRATEGIES SCALE ARABIC VERSION IN SAUDI PATIENTS UNDERGOING HAEMODIALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonas P; Baldacchino, Donia R; Alquwez, Nahed

    2016-06-01

    Patients often resort to religious and spiritual activities to cope with physical and mental challenges. The effect of spiritual coping on overall health, adaptation and health-related quality of life among patients undergoing haemodialysis (HD) is well documented. Thus, it is essential to establish a valid and reliable instrument that can assess both the religious and non-religious coping methods in patients undergoing HD. This study aimed to assess the validity and reliability of the Spiritual Coping Strategies Scale Arabic version (SCS-A) in Saudi patients undergoing HD. A convenience sample of 60 Saudi patients undergoing HD was recruited for this descriptive, cross-sectional study. Data were collected between May and June 2015. Forward-backward translation was used to formulate the SCS-A. The SCS-A, Muslim Religiosity Scale and the Quality of Life Index Dialysis Version III were used to procure the data. Internal consistency reliability, stability reliability, factor analysis and construct validity tests were performed. Analyses were set at the 0.05 level of significance. The SCS-A showed an acceptable internal consistency and strong stability reliability over time. The EFA produced two factors (non-religious and religious coping). Satisfactory construct validity was established by the convergent and divergent validity and known-groups method. The SCS-A is a reliable and valid tool that can be used to measure the religious and non-religious coping strategies of patients undergoing HD in Saudi Arabia and other Muslim and Arabic-speaking countries. © 2016 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  9. Psychometric Evaluation of the Spiritual Coping Strategies Scale Arabic Version for Saudi Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Alquwez, Nahed; Alqubeilat, Hikmet; Colet, Paolo C

    2016-05-22

    To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Spiritual Coping Strategies scale Arabic version (SCS-A) in a sample of nursing students in Saudi Arabia. This study had a cross-sectional design with a convenience sample of 100 nursing students in Saudi Arabia. Using the SCS-A and the Muslim Religiosity Scale for data collection, data were analyzed to establish the reliability and validity of the SCS-A. Good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α > .70) and stability reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient > .80) were observed. Two dominant factors were extracted from the scale items, the nonreligious coping strategies and religious coping strategies, which accounted for 35.5% and 32.7% of the variance, respectively. The religious coping subscale exhibited a strong positive correlation with the religious practices subscale of the Muslim Religious Involvement Scale (r = .45, p well as a weak positive correlation with the intrinsic religious beliefs subscale (r = .25, p Scale. The SCS-A exhibited an acceptable validity and reliability, supporting its sound psychometric properties with respect to the responses from Saudi nursing students. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Micro and macrolevel determinants of women's employment in six Arab countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, N.; Smits, J.P.J.M.; Verloo, M.M.T.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed determinants of women's employment with data for 40,792 women living in 103 districts of 6 Arab countries. We tested a new theoretical framework that addresses the roles of needs, opportunities, and values at multiple levels. At the microlevel (individual, family), socioeconomic factors,

  11. Micro- and Macrolevel Determinants of Women's Employment in Six Arab Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Niels; Smits, Jeroen; Verloo, Mieke

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed determinants of women's employment with data for 40,792 women living in 103 districts of 6 Arab countries. We tested a new theoretical framework that addresses the roles of needs, opportunities, and values at multiple levels. At the microlevel (individual, family), socioeconomic factors, care duties, and traditionalism were important;…

  12. Parent Adaptation to and Parenting Satisfaction with Children with Intellectual Disability in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukmak, Samir

    2009-01-01

    Background: This research investigated the impact that children with intellectual disability in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) may have on their families. Method: Sixty-three parents completed three scales related to parent stress, ways of coping, and parenting satisfaction. Results: There were significant relationships between emotional-focused…

  13. Prevalence, phenotype and inheritance of benign neutropenia in Arabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagelkerke Nicollas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benign neutropenia, i.e., neutropenia not associated with an increased risk of infection, may result in serious medical consequences when a 'standard' definition of neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count (ANC 9cells/L is universally applied to all races. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of benign neutropenia among healthy Arabs and evaluate its mode of inheritance. Methods ANCs were studied prospectively amongst a healthy indigenous population (n = 1032 from the United Arab Emirates undergoing a nation-wide sickle-cell and thalassemia screening program. The mean neutrophil count and the prevalence of benign neutropenia were compared by age, sex and amongst various tribes. Results The mean neutrophil count (× 109cells/L was 3.3 (range 0.95–7.6. Benign neutropenia was present in 110 (10.7% subjects of whom 24 (2.3% individuals had moderate neutropenia (ANC 0.5 – 1.0 × 109 cells/L. In the 22 tribe-family groups, the prevalence of benign neutropenia varied between 0% and 38%. Benign neutropenia showed no difference in the frequency amongst the sexes (p = 0.23 and it was independent of age (Spearman's rho = 0.05, p = 0.13. The age-related mean neutrophil count was the lowest in Arabs when compared with other ethnic groups (Blacks, Europeans and Mexicans. The inheritance of benign neutropenia was consistent with an autosomal dominant pattern; however, the diversity of observed phenotypes suggested the presence of more than one genetic variant for this trait. Conclusion Arabs have a high prevalence of benign neutropenia that may be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.

  14. Break the silence: HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes, and educational needs among Arab university students in United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gańczak, Maria; Barss, Peter; Alfaresi, Fatima; Almazrouei, Shamma; Muraddad, Amal; Al-Maskari, Fatma

    2007-06-01

    In light of increasing spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the Middle East, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and educational needs of young people in United Arab Emirates (UAE), a modern and moderately conservative Islamic country. A cross-sectional survey among randomly selected first-year, gender-segregated Arab students at the national university in Al Ain in 2005 was conducted using an adaptation of an anonymous self-administered World Health Organization questionnaire. Knowledge and attitudes were scored. Response was 89%; 119 males and 148 females. Knowledge scores about HIV/AIDS were low for 75%, moderate for 24%, high for school. Ninety-six percent stated that young people should be taught how to protect themselves and 57% that teaching at school was insufficient. Main information sources were books/media; preferred sources were media, schools, and health professionals. Males scored higher on knowledge and were more susceptible to fear of STDs, society, and family; females showed greater compassion and interest in premarital testing and education to protect themselves. Alarming gaps in knowledge about transmission and curability put young Arabs at risk of contracting HIV. Fear and intolerant attitudes toward PLH were prevalent. HIV/AIDS education designed to raise knowledge and change attitudes, and respectful of community values, is urgently needed from media, schools, and health professionals.

  15. Armaflex in Burj al Arab; Armaflex im Burj al Arab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, B.

    2003-07-01

    This article describes the Burj al Arab in Dubai, the unique seven-star high-rise hotel. The construction of the hotel, that is built on 250 piles driven into the sand of an artificial island in the Persian Gulf, is described. In particular, various special materials used in the building are described, as are the luxurious fittings and furnishings of the hotel. The cooling and air-conditioning installations that are necessary as a result of the desert climate of Dubai are described and the use of 'Armaflex' elastomer insulating material for the insulation of refrigeration machines and cold-water piping is discussed.

  16. Reading the Other and Reading Ourselves: An Interpretive Study of Amazon.com Reviews on Bestsellers about Muslims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angemeer, Alicia Dorothea

    2012-01-01

    Since September 11, 2001, Western readers have been turning to bestselling texts written by or about Muslims in their need to learn more about Muslims. These texts promise an insider's view of predominantly Muslim countries and peoples and are informally influencing and educating many Western readers in their perceptions of Muslims because…

  17. The Dilemma of Islam as School Knowledge in Muslim Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thobani, Shiraz

    2007-01-01

    In the contemporary period, the persistence of the dual system of state and "madrasa" education in many Muslim countries has raised for policymakers the dilemma of what form Islam ought to assume as a pedagogic category in these contexts. At one extreme, in the syllabi of traditionalist "madrasas", we find Islam being deployed as an overarching…

  18. Student Teaching at Ground Zero: One Muslim Woman's Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyat, Zareen Niazi

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author, who is a Muslim English teacher shares her teaching experiences after the events of September 11, 2001 and shares her views on Islam. She points out that her appearance and clothing do not represent oppression and restriction but the liberation of her body from the unwanted gazes of those who reduce women from people…

  19. The New Great Game in Muslim Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    and maci]ine tools, petrol - chemicals, agro-processing and textiles. ’’~ 14 THE NEW GREAT GAME IN MUSLIM CENTRAL ASIA Kazakhstan is well endowed...Algeria, Tunisia , and Morocco---are keeping a wary eye. But at the popular level, this pan-Islmnism has the potential to attract a considerable amount of

  20. EURISLAM workpackage 6: integrated report on interviews with Muslim leaders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heelsum, A.; Koomen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In addition to our target Muslim populations, we aim also to gather information on their community leaders, as well as the policy makers whose policies confront them. We aim through a series of semi-structured interviews to gain information on the position of a variety of community

  1. Meeting needs of Muslim girls in school sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Tansin; Pfister, Gertrud Ursula

    2013-01-01

    influences on PE experiences include gender stereotypes, cultural and religious orientations and practices, as well as actions and expectations of parents, communities and coaches/teachers. The studies provide insights into the ways participants managed their identities as Muslim girls in different sport...

  2. Educating for Sexual Difference? Muslim Teachers' Conversations about Homosexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjakdar, Fida

    2013-01-01

    Homosexuality is widely perceived among many Muslims as a "western disease", a natural outcome of the West's secularity and cultural degeneracy. In spite of the emergence of more liberal attitudes towards sexual differences in modern times, moral issues have not lost their relevance in polemical discourse against homosexuality among many…

  3. Islam and Muslim Life in Current Bavarian Geography Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Stefanie; Popp, Stephan; Yasar, Aysun

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the Islam and Muslim life in German textbooks. The study is based on the analysis of current Geography textbooks in Bavarian secondary schools. As a first step, the authors developed a system for objective analysis of the textbooks that structures the content in categories. In a second step, the authors used the qualitative…

  4. Organ donation in Muslim countries: the case of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Makmor; Noh, Abdillah; Mohd Satar, Nurulhuda; Chin-Sieng, Chong; Soo-Kun, Lim; Abdullah, Nawi; Kok-Peng, Ng

    2013-12-09

    The aim of this paper is to look into the factors influencing Malaysian Muslims' decision to become deceased organ donors in Malaysia. We approached 900 Malaysian Muslims and 779 participated in our survey, conducted in Kuala Lumpur and its suburb. We examined their willingness to become donors and the willing donors were asked why they did not pledge to become donors. Non-donors were asked why they refuse to become donors. The survey found the main reason for Malaysian Muslims not pledging their organs was due to their lack of information on organ donation and/or their lack of confidence in the government's ability to properly administer organ donation procedures. Another interesting finding is that religion is not a main deterrent to organ donation. The survey suggests that Malaysia can explore many ways to encourage organ donation without having to resort to the highly controversial financial incentive option. A key to Malaysia's success or failure to increase organ donation rate lies in its ability to persuade its Muslim population (its largest population) to donate organs. This can be done by adopting a segmented, focused, and highly localized form of public education and by leveraging on existing networks involving local religious and community leaders as well as government and non-governmental institutions.

  5. Dilemma of muslim women regarding divorce in South Africa | Gabru ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On a daily basis people enquire about the dissolution of Islamic marriages, in terms of South African law In South Africa. There exist no legal grounds for obtaining a divorce in a South African court, for persons married in terms of the Islamic law only. The reason for this is due to the fact that Muslim marriages are currently ...

  6. Muslim women representations in the daily newspaper La Libre Belgique

    OpenAIRE

    Rim MEDDEB

    2014-01-01

    This contribution explains the discursive modalities, which offer a media visibility of Muslim women in the daily newspaper La Libre Belgique. The analysis examines the newspaper’s material devices such as the creation of sections, the thematic structures and the reference strategies used in the news articles in order to construct social hierarchies based on religious identity and gender criteria.

  7. Muslim women representations in the daily newspaper La Libre Belgique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rim MEDDEB

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution explains the discursive modalities, which offer a media visibility of Muslim women in the daily newspaper La Libre Belgique. The analysis examines the newspaper’s material devices such as the creation of sections, the thematic structures and the reference strategies used in the news articles in order to construct social hierarchies based on religious identity and gender criteria.

  8. Religious Observance by Muslim Employees: A Framework for Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission for Racial Equality, London (England).

    This paper discusses the relationship between the religious practices of Muslim employees and the requirements of the workplace. It is designed to provide information on the norms of Islam and the difficulties involved in its workplace practice, and to propose suggestions for resolving these difficulties that can form the basis for discussion and…

  9. Making and unmaking Muslim religious authority in Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinissen, M.M. van

    2003-01-01

    In this paper I wish to begin addressing a number of questions concerning Muslim religious authority, to which I do not have ready answers myself and which, I believe, have only incidentally been touched upon by earlier research. Given the fact that Islamic knowledge – by which I mean that which

  10. Status of Muslim Immigrants' Children with Learning Difficulties in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, M. Naeem; Shabbir, Muhammad; Saeed, Wizra; Mohsin, M. Saleem

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to know the status of Muslim immigrants' children with learning difficulties and importance of parents' involvement for the education whose children are with learning difficulties, and the factors responsible for the learning difficulties among immigrants' children. There were 81 immigrant children with learning…

  11. Female ethnicity: Understanding Muslim immigrant businesswomen in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, C.; Benschop, Y.W.M.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Building on theories of intersectionality, in this article we develop the concept of female ethnicity in order to understand the meanings of femininity for Muslim immigrant businesswomen in the context of entrepreneurship. Through the notion of female ethnicity we analyse four life stories and

  12. Muslim Brothrhood” in the Egyptian Revolution of 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Садери Фахиме

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the roots and causes of protests in Egypt at the present stage. The author focuses on the ideological influence of Islamic parties and movements, in particular the association “Muslim Brotherhood” in the Egyptian Revolution of 2011. Methodological basis of this publication principles amounted to politological, sociological, cultural and historical methods of scientific knowledge.

  13. Physical activity of female Malay Muslims before, during and after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramadan is the fasting month for Muslims, during which physical activities like sports may be held in abeyance for a more spiritual life. ... on the standard by Tudor-Locke and Bassett (2004) in which a minimum of 10,000 steps a day denotes an 'active' lifestyle, deemed sufficient to confer health benefits to the individual.

  14. Urbanization in contemporary Arab Gulf states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qutub, I Y

    1983-01-01

    Urbanization in the Arab Gulf states of Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates is analyzed. Topics discussed include the historical background to urbanization; current demographic trends in the region; urban characteristics and growth; socioeconomic factors influencing urbanization, with an emphasis on labor force structure; future urban strategy; and the need for urban research.

  15. Industrial zones and Arab industrialization in Israel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sofer, Michael; Schnell, Izhak; Drori, Israel

    1996-01-01

    Since the 1970s there has been increased integration of the Arab sector into the Israeli economy. This integration has been characterized by the increase in industrial entrepreneurship in the Arab settlements. Critical to the industrialization process are factors related to the availability of

  16. Moroccan Children and Arabic in Spanish Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Bernabe Lopez; Molina, Laura Mijares

    This paper discusses classical Arabic as a minority language for Moroccan children in Spanish schools. It highlights programs of "education des langues et cultures d'origine" (ELCO), which specifically target these students. ELCO is the only public program in Spain recognizing Arabic as an immigrant minority language. Intercultural…

  17. Discrimination of Arabic Contrasts by American Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mahmoud, Mahmoud S.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on second language perception of non-native contrasts. The study specifically tests the perceptual assimilation model (PAM) by examining American learners' ability to discriminate Arabic contrasts. Twenty two native American speakers enrolled in a university level Arabic language program took part in a forced choice AXB…

  18. Pure Left Neglect for Arabic Numerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priftis, Konstantinos; Albanese, Silvia; Meneghello, Francesca; Pitteri, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Arabic numerals are diffused and language-free representations of number magnitude. To be effectively processed, the digits composing Arabic numerals must be spatially arranged along a left-to-right axis. We studied one patient (AK) to show that left neglect, after right hemisphere damage, can selectively impair the computation of the spatial…

  19. Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation is the official publication of the Arab Society of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation. It publishes original articles pertaining to various aspects of renal medicine, as well as editorials, reviews, case reports, short communications, guidelines and statistical data pertaining ...

  20. Challenges in Learning to Speak Arabic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, Sueraya Che; Ahmed, Ismaiel Hassanien; Mamat, Arifin; Ahmad, Wan Rusli Wan; Rawash, Fouad Mahmoud M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a study to investigate the challenges and obstacles to speaking Arabic faced by good and poor Malay speakers of Arabic. The study used individual and focus group interviews with 14 participants to elicit data. The findings revealed 2 types of obstacles, namely, internal and external obstacles. Internal obstacles refer to the…

  1. Australian Muslim civil society organisations: Pathways to social inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Shikeen Amath

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is great interest on issues related to Muslims and Islam; however, a large concentration of the scholarly literature as well as media and political discourses focus predominantly on political issues and actions related to fundamentalism, radicalisation, militancy and terrorism. The dominance of these issues in the discourses does not provide a holistic understanding of Muslims, particularly their role, place and identity as minorities in a Western society. Indeed, we know relatively little about the larger number of Muslim political actors engaged in civil society, especially those involved in creating pathways to social inclusion. Utilising descriptive phenomenology, this paper explores the complex issues of social inclusion and the Australian Muslim communities. Underpinning this discussion is the theory of social capital; as noted by a number of scholars and social policy experts, the theory of social inclusion alone is inadequate and ineffective in creating participation, equality and cohesion. This paper also observes that while many reports and studies provide pragmatic suggestions on how to work towards the social inclusion of Australian Muslims, the concentration on these suggestions tend to focus on how the government can provide these solutions. What is lacking in the literature is the recognition of the Australian Muslim community’s role and agency in initiating and executing the programs needed to address such issues of social exclusion. The 30 unstructured phenomenological interviews demonstrate that Australian MCSOs are proactively engaging with their communities to ensure that they are responding appropriately to these issues. Moreover, they are creating pathways and access for Australian Muslims to better participate, engage in and contribute to mainstream society. In particular, the MCSO actors revealed four themes related to social inclusion: supporting participation in education and training, facilitating participation

  2. A novel root based Arabic stemmer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed N. Al-Kabi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stemming algorithms are used in information retrieval systems, indexers, text mining, text classifiers etc., to extract stems or roots of different words, so that words derived from the same stem or root are grouped together. Many stemming algorithms were built in different natural languages. Khoja stemmer is one of the known and widely used Arabic stemmers. In this paper, we introduced a new light and heavy Arabic stemmer. This new stemmer is presented in this study and compared with two well-known Arabic stemmers. Results showed that accuracy of our stemmer is slightly better than the accuracy yielded by each one of those two well-known Arabic stemmers used for evaluation and comparison. Evaluation tests on our novel stemmer yield 75.03% accuracy, while the other two Arabic stemmers yield slightly lower accuracy.

  3. Suicide among Arab-Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman M El-Sayed

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Arab-American (AA populations in the US are exposed to discrimination and acculturative stress-two factors that have been associated with higher suicide risk. However, prior work suggests that socially oriented norms and behaviors, which characterize recent immigrant ethnic groups, may be protective against suicide risk. Here we explored suicide rates and their determinants among AAs in Michigan, the state with the largest proportion of AAs in the US.ICD-9/10 underlying cause of death codes were used to identify suicide deaths from among all deaths in Michigan between 1990 and 2007. Data from the 2000 U.S. Census were collected for population denominators. Age-adjusted suicide rates among AAs and non-ethnic whites were calculated by gender using the direct method of standardization. We also stratified by residence inside or outside of Wayne County (WC, the county with the largest AA population in the state. Suicide rates were 25.10 per 100,000 per year among men and 6.40 per 100,000 per year among women in Michigan from 1990 to 2007. AA men had a 51% lower suicide rate and AA women had a 33% lower rate than non-ethnic white men and women, respectively. The suicide rate among AA men in WC was 29% lower than in all other counties, while the rate among AA women in WC was 20% lower than in all other counties. Among non-ethnic whites, the suicide rate in WC was higher compared to all other counties among both men (12% and women (16%.Suicide rates were higher among non-ethnic white men and women compared to AA men and women in both contexts. Arab ethnicity may protect against suicide in both sexes, but more so among men. Additionally, ethnic density may protect against suicide among Arab-Americans.

  4. Suicide among Arab-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M; Tracy, Melissa; Scarborough, Peter; Galea, Sandro

    2011-02-17

    Arab-American (AA) populations in the US are exposed to discrimination and acculturative stress-two factors that have been associated with higher suicide risk. However, prior work suggests that socially oriented norms and behaviors, which characterize recent immigrant ethnic groups, may be protective against suicide risk. Here we explored suicide rates and their determinants among AAs in Michigan, the state with the largest proportion of AAs in the US. ICD-9/10 underlying cause of death codes were used to identify suicide deaths from among all deaths in Michigan between 1990 and 2007. Data from the 2000 U.S. Census were collected for population denominators. Age-adjusted suicide rates among AAs and non-ethnic whites were calculated by gender using the direct method of standardization. We also stratified by residence inside or outside of Wayne County (WC), the county with the largest AA population in the state. Suicide rates were 25.10 per 100,000 per year among men and 6.40 per 100,000 per year among women in Michigan from 1990 to 2007. AA men had a 51% lower suicide rate and AA women had a 33% lower rate than non-ethnic white men and women, respectively. The suicide rate among AA men in WC was 29% lower than in all other counties, while the rate among AA women in WC was 20% lower than in all other counties. Among non-ethnic whites, the suicide rate in WC was higher compared to all other counties among both men (12%) and women (16%). Suicide rates were higher among non-ethnic white men and women compared to AA men and women in both contexts. Arab ethnicity may protect against suicide in both sexes, but more so among men. Additionally, ethnic density may protect against suicide among Arab-Americans.

  5. Motivation to Teach: The Case of Arab Teachers in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husny Arar, Khalid; Massry-Herzllah, Asmahan

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an attempt to identify factors influencing teachers' motivation in the Arab education system. In-depth interviews with 10 school principals, 15 teachers and 3 counsellors, yielded three themes influencing Arab teachers' motivation: (1) Arab culture, (2) the school climate and (3) government policies. Arab teachers try to meet…

  6. A study in the lexicographical treatment of Arabic synonyms | Heliel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently three dictionaries of Arabic synonyms were published with the aim of helping Arabic learners, writers and translators. Though Classical Arabic lexicography distinguishes itself in the field of synonymy, Modern Standard Arabic lacks reliable dictionaries in the field and hence the importance of analysing these three ...

  7. A novel BRCA-1 mutation in Arab kindred from east Jerusalem with breast and ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissan Aviram

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of breast cancer (BC in Arab women is lower compared to the incidence in the Jewish population in Israel; still, it is the most common malignancy among Arab women. There is a steep rise in breast cancer incidence in the Arab population in Israel over the last 10 years that can be attributed to life style changes. But, the younger age of BC onset in Arab women compared with that of the Jewish population is suggestive of a genetic component in BC occurrence in that population. Methods We studied the family history of 31 women of Palestinian Arab (PA origin affected with breast (n = 28, ovarian (n = 3 cancer. We used denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC to screen for mutations of BRCA1/2 in 4 women with a personal and family history highly suggestive of genetic predisposition. Results A novel BRCA1 mutation, E1373X in exon 12, was found in a patient affected with ovarian cancer. Four of her family members, 3 BC patients and a healthy individual were consequently also found to carry this mutation. Of the other 27 patients, which were screened for this specific mutation none was found to carry it. Conclusion We found a novel BRCA1 mutation in a family of PA origin with a history highly compatible with BRCA1 phenotype. This mutation was not found in additional 30 PA women affected with BC or OC. Therefore full BRCA1/2 screening should be offered to patients with characteristic family history. The significance of the novel BRCA1 mutation we identified should be studied in larger population. However, it is likely that the E1373X mutation is not a founder frequent mutation in the PA population.

  8. Prevalence of obesity among Arab school children in Nazareth, Israel: comparison with national (Jewish) and international data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, E; Marcus, O; Joubran, S; Abdo, B; Asal, N R

    2013-12-01

    Lack of published data. Absence of Ethnic specific data. Lack of focus on obesity prevention in Arab schools. First set of data on obesity for Arab children. Data will be used as reference data. Alert health/school official for intervention. Objective The objective is to produce the first set of obesity prevalence data and use the data as reference values of body mass index (BMI) trends for Arab children in Israel and compare with Jewish and international data. Methods A prevalence study was carried out in 2009 in which 4130 children aged 6-12, were selected from eight Arab sector schools representing the Nazareth Municipality. Height, weight and BMI measurements were obtained and presented by age, mean age, size, weight, gender and percentile. Appropriate epidemiological and statistical methods used for comparison. Results The obesity and overweight prevalence rates in Arab children by age ranges from 0% to 2.6% and 0% to 11.2%, respectively. Comparison with international and Jewish data revealed differences in almost all age groups but higher rates in Arabs, especially boys. Discussion The higher rates/trends in Arab children may be explained by more Arab women entering the workforce, increase in single-parent families and changes in food and physical activity environments. Conclusion Based on our data, we recommend either an ethnic-specific BMI reference curves and/or inclusion of Arab data in the Israeli data system. Research need to focus on reasons for the increase and interventions to reverse/slow the trend. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  9. Colonial legacy, women's rights and gender-educational inequality in the Arab World with particular reference to Egypt and Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megahed, Nagwa; Lack, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    One aspect of the call for democracy in the recent Arab region uprisings is the issue of women's rights and gender equality. Three cultural and ideological forces have continued to shape the gender discourse in Arab Muslim-majority societies. They are: "Islamic" teaching and local traditions concerning women's roles in a given society; Western, European colonial perception of women's rights; and finally national gender-related policy reforms. This paper examines the past and present status of women and gender-educational inequality in the Arab world with particular reference to Egypt and Tunisia, prior to and post colonialism. Special attention is given to colonial legacy and its influence on gender and education; to current gender practices in the social sphere with a focus on women's modesty ( hijab); to international policies and national responses with regard to women's rights and finally to female participation in pre-university and higher education. These issues incorporate a discussion of cultural and religious constraints. The paper demonstrates similarities and differences between Egypt's and Tunisia's reform policies towards gender parity. It highlights the confrontation of conservative versus liberal ideologies that occurred in each country with the implementation of its gender-related reform policy.

  10. The identity and witness of Arab pre-Islamic Arab Christianity: The Arabic language and the Bible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. Grafton

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that Arab Christianity has had a unique place in the history of World Christianity. Rooted in a biblical witness, the origins and history of Arab Christianity have been largely forgotten or ignored. This is not primarily as a result of the fact that the Arab Christian historical legacy has been overcome by Islam. Rather, unlike other early Christian communities, the Bible was never translated into the vernacular of the Arabs. By the 7th century the language of the Qur’an became the primary standard of the Arabic language, which then became the written religious text of the Arabs. This article will explore the identity and witness of the Christian presence in Arabia and claims that the development of an Arabic Bible provides a unique counter-example to what most missiologists have assumed as the basis for the spread of the Christian faith as a result of the translation of the Christian scriptures into a vernacular.

  11. Herlihy's thesis revisited: some notes on investment in children in Medieval Muslim societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giladi, Avner

    2011-01-01

    David Herlihy proposed "that we seek to evaluate, and on occasion even to measure, the psychological and economic investment which families and societies in the past were willing to make in their children" and suggested an alternative to both the "theory of discovered childhood [in Europe]," as introduced by Philippe Ariès and the notion of Lloyd DeMause that the historical evolution of child-parent relations in general formed a continuous and irreversible process of progress. This article shows that although we lack some of the archival sources that are essential for reconstructing the real lives of children in the premodern Mediterranean Muslim world, we are still able, with the "investment" criterion in mind, to assess attitudes toward children, at least in some defined periods of time and geographical regions.

  12. Inequalities in use of health services among Jews and Arabs in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Epel, Orna; Garty, Noga; Green, Manfred S

    2007-06-01

    To compare the levels of utilization of health services in Jews and Arabs taking into account differences in levels of socioeconomic status (SES) in a country with a National Health Insurance Law (NHIL). A cross-sectional National Health Interview Survey was carried out in Israel based on a random sample of telephone numbers as part of the EUROHIS project (WHO European Health Interview Survey 2003-2004). A random telephone survey included 9,352 interviews. Questions included use of health care services, health status, and socioeconomic variables. After adjusting for sex, age, income, education, marital status, and self-reported chronic diseases, Arabs more often reported visiting a family physician (odds ratio [OR]=1.56, 95 percent confidence interval [CI]=1.35-1.81) and less often reported visiting a specialist (OR=0.73, 95 percent CI=0.60-0.89) compared with Jews. In addition, the odds ratio for hospitalization was similar among Arabs and Jews (OR=1.16, 95 percent CI=0.97-1.38). SES was associated with utilization of health care services only in the Jewish population. A different pattern of utilization of health care services was observed in Arabs and Jews. This was not explained by differences in socioeconomic levels. More research is needed regarding the distribution of services between Jews and Arabs.

  13. Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of Arab-American women regarding inherited cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Suzanne; Gauthier, Jacqueline; Cichon, Michelle; Hammad, Adnan; Simon, Michael S

    2013-04-01

    The increasing incidence of breast cancer in the Arab world, coupled with a relatively early age of onset, raises concern for the presence of hereditary risk factors in this population. However, due to potential structural and cultural barriers, Arab Americans make up the smallest percentage of individuals tested for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome in the United States. The objectives of this qualitative pilot focus group of 13 Arab-American women were to explore attitudes, knowledge and beliefs regarding hereditary breast cancer in the Arab-American community in metropolitan Detroit, identify barriers that would prevent women from seeking hereditary cancer screening/testing and determine who women would talk to about inherited cancer. Results indicated that cultural beliefs and personal experiences with cancer influenced the women's perspectives on hereditary cancer risk. A high level of secrecy about cancer within Arab-American families was present, which may prevent accurate risk assessment and referral for genetic services. Other identified barriers that may influence hereditary risk assessment included stigma, fears and misconceptions of cancer. While these barriers were present, participants also expressed a strong need for education and tailored cancer risk information for their community.

  14. Prevalence of physical, psychological, and sexual abuse among a nationwide sample of Arab high school students: association with family characteristics, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fayez, Ghenaim A; Ohaeri, Jude U; Gado, Osama M

    2012-01-01

    parental relationship seemed protective. The findings support the impression that, despite the conservative culture, child abuse is being experienced by a significant number of children in the Arab world. Preventive education in this culture should include limits on child disciplinary measures, the vulnerable groups identified, the impact on psychosocial functioning, and the protective effect of parental harmony.

  15. Arab Youth: A Contained Youth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Gertel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Young people in the Arab world increasingly have to struggle with economic hardship and difficulties to start their own lives, although the majority is better educated than ever before. The problematic labor market situation combined with weak public schemes to support young careers force large sections of young people to postpone their ambitions to marry. This period of delayed marriage is captured as 'waithood'. I will argue that this term is misleading. Two points of critique apply: The social dimension of waiting exceeds the status of remaining inactive until something expected happens; the ever-changing present continuously generates new realities. Simultaneously uncertainties and insecurities have dramatically expanded since 2011 and further limit livelihood opportunities and future perspectives, particularly of the youth. Young people are hence becoming both, increasingly frustrated and disadvantaged the longer they "wait", and even more dependent on parents and kin networks. This hinders them to develop their personality – they rather have to accommodate with values that are not always suitable to master the present requirements of a globalizing world. In this paper I will inquire, in how far young people of the Arab world have thus to be considered as a “contained youth”.

  16. Masculine and family honor and youth violence: The moderating role of ethnic-cultural affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury-Kassabri, Mona

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the involvement in violent behavior of at-risk Arab and Jewish male youth from a large city in Israel. It explores the role masculine and family honor plays in predicting youth involvement in violence and tests whether this association is moderated by ethnic-cultural affiliation. A total of 282 males (59.2% Arab), aged 15-21, filled out a self-report closed-ended questionnaire. We found that among both Jewish and Arab youth a greater concern with masculine honor was positively associated with involvement in violence. We also found that Arab youth are significantly more involved in violent behavior than Jewish youth, and that Arab participants were more concerned with masculine and family honor. However, contrary to what was expected, greater concern with family honor was associated with lower levels of Arab youth involvement in violence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Preference for Democracy in the Arab World

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    Mohamad Al-Ississ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We take a new look at the question of the Arab democratic exception by looking at the preference for democracy among individuals in the Arab world in a comparative context. We use the new sixth wave of the World Value Survey, which was collected between 2012 and 2013, and which included for the first time 12 Arab countries (up from only four in wave 5 and 68 non-Arab countries. We innovate empirically by measuring the preference for democracy over strong rule in a way that, we argue, is more adapted to an understanding of the Arab world than other measures used in past studies. Our statistical analysis reveals a democratic gap in the Arab region compared to global experience, which is especially marked among the more educated individuals, and to a lesser extent among the youth and the middle class. We conclude by discussing the reasons that may explain the Arab exceptionalism, and argue that it is unlikely to be related to culture alone.

  18. Mortality rates among Arab Americans in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallo, Florence J; Schwartz, Kendra; Ruterbusch, Julie J; Booza, Jason; Williams, David R

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) calculate age-specific and age-adjusted cause-specific mortality rates for Arab Americans; and (2) compare these rates with those for blacks and whites. Mortality rates were estimated using Michigan death certificate data, an Arab surname and first name list, and 2000 U.S. Census data. Age-specific rates, age-adjusted all-cause and cause-specific rates were calculated. Arab Americans (75+) had higher mortality rates than whites and blacks. Among men, all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates for Arab Americans were in the range of whites and blacks. However, Arab American men had lower mortality rates from cancer and chronic lower respiratory disease compared to both whites and blacks. Among women, Arab Americans had lower mortality rates from heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes than whites and blacks. Arab Americans are growing in number. Future study should focus on designing rigorous separate analyses for this population.

  19. The Rise of the Arab Youth Paradigm: A Critical Analysis of the Arab Human Development Report 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayssoun Sukarieh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article offers a critical analysis of the Arab Human Development Report (AHDR 2016, that was released by the United Nations Development Programme in November 2016. AHDR 2016 represents the return of the Arab Human Development project, that had been interrupted by the Arab Spring uprisings of 2011. It also epitomizes the Arab youth paradigm that has increasingly come to frame development and security discourse in the region. While there is much that is familiar in AHDR 2016, there are also concerning developments: a historical revisionism that holds Arab youth responsible for the Arab Spring, and the Arab Spring responsible for the Arab Winter that followed; and a new trend that views not just Arab youth deficits as a dangerous threat to regional and global security, but Arab youth abilities and surfeits as well.

  20. Contribution of Arabic Medicine and Pharmacy to the Development of Health Care Protection in Bosnia and Herzegovina - the Second Part.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2017-12-01

    After the collapse of the Arab rule, the Arab territorial expanses and cultural heritage were taken over by the Turks. Although scientific progress in the Turkish period slowed down due to numerous unfavorable political-economic and other circumstances. Thanks to the Turks, Arabic culture and useful Islamic principles expanded to the territory of our homeland of Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H). Significant role in the transfer of Arabic pharmaceutical knowledge was also attributed to the Sephardic Jews who, with their arrival, continued to perform their attar activities, which were largely based on Arab achievements. However, insufficiently elaborated, rich funds of oriental medical and pharmaceutical handwriting testify that Oriental science has nurtured in these areas as well, and that the Arabic component in a specific way was intertwined with other cultures and traditions of B&H. The Franciscan monasteries in Bosnia and Herzegovina have museums which contain important exhibits and libraries rich in books, among which many from the field of medicine and pharmacy. Muslim mosques, also, had small libraries with Arabic books used for spreading medical knowledge. The second category was folk doctors and practitioners who were on disposition to the people of any religion. Some of them listened to lectures in medicine during the studies of theology and philosophy. However, most did not have any medical education, but by reading books and teaching experience they made their own recipe collection. Special books, called "Ljekaruše" (Books of recipes) were also born during the study when they came into contact with an even larger number of health books. However, it should not be neglected that a lot of them contained folk medicines that were used in some environments depending on the habits and available herbs. Although it has been proven that many recipes from Ljekaruše are pharmacologically and medically justified, one should not ignore the knowledge and skill behind

  1. The Impact of Intellectual Disability, Caregiver Burden, Family Functioning, Marital Quality, and Sense of Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Krenawi, Alean; Graham, John R.; Al Gharaibeh, Fakir

    2011-01-01

    The present article is the first to consider the impact of intellectual disability on Bedouin-Arab families' caregiver burden, family functioning, marital quality, and sense of coherence. A random sample of 300 Bedouin-Arab parents with one or more intellectually disabled children, and a control group (n = 100) completed the McMaster Family…

  2. On the status of music and musical instruments in Arabic culture after the advent of Islam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šoštarić Ada I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article bases its arguments mainly on data found in secondary literature about the propriety of music in Arabic culture after the advent of Islam. One of the oldest sources in Arabic on the subject is Damm al-malāhī (The Condemnation of Instruments of Diversion. In it, the author, Ibn Abī al-Dunyā (823-894 condemned listening to music and musical instruments. Subsequently, many books addressed the question of whether music is illicit (ar. harām. Western scholars defined this corpus of literature as a kind of polemic about the permissibility of music and musical instruments in Islamic culture. Since there is no verse (ar. Áya in the Qur’Án which explicitly forbids or allows music, and since, at the same time, the hadīt literature abounds with contradictory statements about the practice of the prophet Muhammad regarding listening to music and musical instruments, this question continues to resurface, either in the media or on web pages specifically devoted to the issue. This topic is also quite interesting in terms of the reflexions one can encounter in the Muslim areas of the ex-Yugoslav region. At the same time, the article touches upon the special place that the Qur’ān recitation (ar. tilāwat al-Qur’ān and Islamic call to prayer (ar. adān have in Muslim communities. We often find both of them in chapters on religious music, and can, for instance, hear Gorans from Kosovo say (colloquially that one sings the call to prayer. Nevertheless, although both the Recitation and the call to prayer employ the system of maqāms found in secular forms of music, in religious Islamic circles they have never been defined as music, nor are they understood as such in Islamic public opinion. It has been said innumerable times that it is not the (listening to music per se that is forbidden, but rather the circumstances surrounding music, sometimes associated with the consumption of alcohol or similar behaviour, which leads to transgression of

  3. KAMUS BAHASA ARAB – INDONESIA ONLINE DENGAN PEMECAHAN SUKU KATA MENGGUNAKAN METODE PARSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anny Yuniarti

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Kebutuhan umat Islam akan fasilitas penunjang belajar bahasa Arab di Indonesia masih belum terpenuhi dengan optimal. Kamus bahasa Arab yang beredar di pasaran sulit dipahami karena minimnya pengetahuan tentang ilmu tata bahasa Arab di kalangan umat Islam. Pada penelitian ini dikembangkan sebuah perangkat lunak yang berfungsi menerjemahkan kata berbahasa Arab dengan metode parsing sehingga dapat mencakup kata-kata yang telah mengalami perubahan bentuk dari bentuk dasarnya. Karena kata bahasa Arab memiliki turunan kata yang jumlahnya cukup besar, dan supaya kamus efisien, maka tidak semua turunan kata disimpan dalam basisdata. Oleh sebab itu diperlukan suatu cara untuk mengenali pola kata, dan cara mengetahui bentuk dasar suatu kata. Keseluruhan perangkat lunak ini diimplementasikan berbasis web sehingga memudahkan pengaksesan pengguna. Dan pengguna tidak memerlukan proses instalasi perangkat lunak atau sistem operasi tertentu. Pembuatan perangkat lunak ini didahului dengan perancangan proses dan perancangan interface. Kemudian rancangan tersebut diimplementasikan menjadi sebuah perangkat lunak yang siap untuk dipakai. Perangkat lunak yang sudah jadi tersebut telah diuji coba sesuai dengan spesifikasi kebutuhan

  4. Observing Privacy, Modesty and Hospitality in the Home Domain: Three Case Studies of Muslim Homes in Brisbane, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkeplee Othman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A home embodies a sensorial space that is layered with personal memories and traces of history. The success of a home in providing a strong sense of place depends on various factors such as geographical location, climatic conditions, and occupants’ world-views and perceptions. This paper explores Muslims’ perceptions of privacy, modesty and hospitality within their homes through their lived experiences. This case study focuses on three Muslim families living in Australian designed homes within the same suburb of Brisbane, Australia. The study provides prefatory insight into the ways in which these families perform their daily activities and entertain their guests without jeopardizing their privacy needs. The study examines the significance of modesty in the design of Muslim homes as a means by which family members are able to achieve optimum privacy while simultaneously extending hospitality to guests inside and outside their homes. The findings of this study provide opportunities too, for expanding research into culturally adaptable housing systems to help meet the changing needs of Australian multicultural society.

  5. Some comments about the situation of the Steel Industry in the Arab Countries (Arab Steel Summit)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidar, Y.; Astier, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Arab Steel Summit, that convened in Abu Dhabi in April, gave us another opportunity to review the situation of the Arab Iron and Steel Industry, with regard to the present World economic context. We will address: - the World situation of steel production, focusing on the Arab Countries; - the related situation of steel consumption; - the steel trade, including imports, exports and prices; - the consequences for technology and economy. (authors)

  6. Arab women employment in the United Arab Emirates: exploring opportunities, motivations and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Karen; Kyriazi, Tenia; Paris, Cody Morris

    2017-01-01

    This research paper identifies and explores the challenges and barriers that Arab women in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) face in their careers. Primary data was collected via an interview process involving 12 Arab women who reside and work in senior decision making positions in the UAE. Taking into account an overview of the global and UAE-specific challenges faced by women in the workplace and considering the significant efforts of the UAE government to promote women in leadership, as repor...

  7. DCU 250 Arabic dependency bank: an LFG gold standard resource for the Arabic Penn treebank

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Raheb, Yafa; Akrout, Amine; van Genabith, Josef; Dichy, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of a dependency bank gold standard for Arabic, DCU 250 Arabic Dependency Bank (DCU 250), based on the Arabic Penn Treebank Corpus (ATB) (Bies and Maamouri, 2003; Maamouri and Bies, 2004) within the theoretical framework of Lexical Functional Grammar (LFG). For parsing and automatically extracting grammatical and lexical resources from treebanks, it is necessary to evaluate against established gold standard resources. Gold standards for various languages h...

  8. Reference in English-Arabic Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensvärd, Martin Gustaf

    2007-01-01

    have an indefinite NP (less explicit) where the other has a definite NP (more explicit). But are these differences in any way systematic? In an article in Babel, Yowell Y. Aziz shows that remarkable differences obtain in the explicitness of various referring expressions when an Arabic text is compared...... with the culture. As a preliminary test of this option, the article compares the explicitness of the referring expressions in an American novel, Sula by Toni Morrison, and its Arabic translation, and in this way the article applies Aziz’ method, but instead of going from Arabic to English like Aziz, it goes...

  9. Mortality Rates Among Arab Americans in Michigan

    OpenAIRE

    Dallo, Florence J.; Schwartz, Kendra; Ruterbusch, Julie J.; Booza, Jason; Williams, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) calculate age-specific and age-adjusted cause-specific mortality rates for Arab Americans; and (2) compare these rates with those for blacks and whites. Mortality rates were estimated using Michigan death certificate data, an Arab surname and first name list, and 2000 U.S. Census data. Age-specific rates, age-adjusted all-cause and cause-specific rates were calculated. Arab Americans (75+) had higher mortality rates than whites and blacks. Among men, ...

  10. MENENTANG SEKULARISME: Upaya Membentuk Kesalehan Subjek Muslim di Banten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hudaeri

    2016-12-01

    Gerakan Islam kontemporer banyak mengalami perubahan visi dan orientasi sosial dan politik. Gerakan tersebut bukan diarahkan untuk mendirikan negara Islam atau mendukung penggunaan militer dan kekerasan untuk me­wujudkan program menciptakan individu dan masyarakat “Muslim yang baik”. Tetapi proyek tersebut diarahkan untuk transformasi-diri melalui penanaman moral dan etika sebagai landasan untuk bisa tampil di ruang publik. Gerakan tersebut lebih diarahkan kepada proses re-Islamisasi yang berkaitan dengan praktek sosial dan praktek disiplin untuk membentuk subjek Muslim yang baik. Tulisan ini mengeksplorasi tentang Islamisasi ruang publik yang ada di Provinsi Banten. Yakni terkait dengan konstruksi identitas Keislaman terhadap tubuh dan tempat publik. Konstruksi identitas Islam terhadap tubuh ditekankan melalui keharusan untuk berjilbab bagi wanita Muslimah. Sedangkan Islamisasi tempat publik adalah pemasangan nama-nama Allah (Asmā’ al-Ḥusnā dan pesan-pesan Islam lainnya di beberapa jalan raya utama.

  11. Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd as a Modern Muslim Thinker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUR ZAINATUL NADRA ZAINOL

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd is a thinker who has produced works in the fields of theology, philosophy, law, politics and humanities. Abu Zayd’s thought, partly on the Quran and its hermeneutics has stirred controversy in Egypt and the Muslim world. This research focuses on the controversy surrounding Nasr Hamid Abu Zayd which led to the declaration of his apostasy by the Supreme Court of Egypt in 1995, as well as his controversial thoughts on the Quran, its method of exegesis and certain fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence issues such as the hijab (veil and polygamy. This paper serves as a literature review which employs the content analysis as a methodology to elaborate on Abu Zayd’s controversial thoughts based on his books, as well as through the views of Muslim and Western scholars on those thoughts.

  12. Trading Activity and Ethnodomestication of Plants by Manipuri Muslims

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    Mohd Mustaque AHMED

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Long distance traveling and trading activity of Muslims from great antiquity brought plants into Manipur (Indo-Burma-China region. The indigenous traveling vehicles, horses needed poppy as their essential medicinal food as well as horse diet. Some words such as- Turushka, Pasha (Pasa, Pangal, Pathan, Mangal, Mughal, are found to be synonymous with the word Muslims and these words were associated with the plants. Ethno-domestication of 18 (eighteen plants in their kitchen garden, flower garden, courtyard, fields, orchards etc, was found. Survey of literature couples with field survey was carried out with an aim to understand the sustainable use of bio-resources. Uses of plants among Manipuri community in various purposes were known to this community. To this aspect, an approach of traditional plant stalk conservation is observed from time immemorial.

  13. CONTEMPORARY MUSLIM POLITICAL IDENTITY: THE SACRED TEXT AND SOCIAL EXPERIENCE

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    И В Кудряшова

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the formation of modern Muslim political identity on the macro-po-litical and individual levels. The author explores the relation between its Islamic and state-national levels. It is shown that this relationship is of dynamic nature and that at present both these levels are significantly differentiated: nationalism outgrows the framework of state nationalism and gradually acquires civil dimension, while the Islamic layer, losing its significance as the only source of identification and self-identification for Muslims, acquires new socio-political content. The latter is reflected in the development of “Islamist pluralism”. It is noted that the ascriptive orientations to kin-groups, ethnic groups and clans remain significant and especially vibrant in the times of political turbulence.

  14. The introduction of breast milk donation in a Muslim country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Naqeeb, N A; Azab, A; Eliwa, M S; Mohammed, B Y

    2000-11-01

    Breast milk donation (wet-nursing) for full-term babies is a well-known practice in Kuwait, but it has never been organized formally in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for preterm babies. Donor milk banking as conducted in Western society is not considered to be ethical in Muslim society, where the milk donor and the recipient are required to know each other. Human milk is known to decrease the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis; improve host defenses, digestion, absorption of nutrients, gastrointestinal function, and neurodevelopment of the child; and contribute to maternal physical and psychological well-being. A culturally accepted approach to donor milk banking is proposed as a means of overcoming the ethical issues surrounding milk donation in Muslim society. This report addresses the first step in raising awareness of the valuable contribution of donor milk to preterm babies and the organization of human milk donation for use in an NICU.

  15. Search Results | Page 6 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Protecting rights and reducing stigma against Vietnamese women married ... family : impact on the wife left behind; an Arab families working group policy brief ... The Muslim community is lagging behind in all levels of educational performance.

  16. PERANAN PEMBELAJARAN MATA KULIAH BAHASA ARAB PADA KEMAMPUAN MENULIS BERBAHASA ARAB BAGI MAHASISWA PROGRAM STUDI PENDIDIKAN BAHASA ARAB (PBA ANGKATAN 2009 JURUSAN TARBIYAH STAIN PEKALONGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Burhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the role of Arabic teaching in increasing academic writing skill of the students of 2009 who were studying at Arabic Teaching Program of STAIN Pekalongan. The result showed that most of them (60% declared not ready to write their minithesis in Arabic. They were not enough well-prepared in Arabic academic writing. Their grades in overall Arabic subject were 68 in range 0 - 100: starting at General Arabic (Arabic I, II, and III; structure (nahwu and Sharf, pronounciation (Qirâ-ah, listening (Istimâ’, speaking (Kalâm, up to writing skill (kitâbah. It verified that student who had a good grade in a lingual subject, like Arabics, is not equal with his language skill, especially in writing skill.

  17. Global Jihad: The Role of Europe’s Radical Muslims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    social state governed by the rule of law.”41 Correspondingly, Turkish immigrants have not been involved in any jihadi activity that has occurred in...Muslims with no choice other than jihad to rectify their situation. 57 Dr. Vije Franchi ...Education National Focal Point for Germany,” 29. 63 Tikly, “Analytical Report on Education National Focal Point for Great Britain,” 19. 64 Franchi

  18. Are you British or Muslim; Can You be Both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-21

    in Great Britain to offer halal foods . However, the requirements for separate preparation and storage for halal and non- halal foods may become such...identity with traditional values. Colin Dye, the senior minister and Leader of Kensington Temple / London City Church, cites the example of halal ... foods as a tool for the Islamization of Great Britain. He describes the incursion this way, ―the expanding Muslim market has encouraged many businesses

  19. Digital dermatoglyphics: A study on Muslim population from India

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Neeti; Badiye, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of fingerprint patterns has been found to be varying amongst the different population groups across the globe. Hence, this knowledge becomes crucially important in forensic investigations. The present study was conducted on 480 healthy and consenting Muslim individuals (240 males and 240 females) from Maharashtra State in India. The aims were to determine the frequency distribution of various fingerprint patterns; establish the most and least predominant patterns; and to find...

  20. Substance Use among Muslim Students in Aceh, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inda Mariana Harahap

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Illicit substance use is a serious social problem faced by adolescents worldwide, including adolescents in Aceh and has many negative consequences. In addition, illicit substance use does not fit with the values of Islamic teaching, and is strictly prohibited in Islam. Purpose: The aims of this paper are to determine the prevalence of illicit substance use, the stages of substance use, and types of substance used among Muslim students in senior high schools in Aceh, Indonesia. Method: Four hundred and twenty six students who met the inclusion criteria were recruited from four senior high schools in Banda Aceh by using simple random sampling, and of these, 290 returned a completed questionnaire. A self reported questionnaire was used to collect data. Result: The mean age of the subjects was 15.9 years old and the majority of them were female (68.6%. The study found that the prevalence of substance use was 2.4%with a higher number of females than males who had used illicit substances. The common substances that were used by the students were marijuana and dextromethorphon, as well as intentionally inhaled substances. Lastly, out of the students who had used illegal substances the majority was in the regular use stage (1.4%. Conclusion: This study found that substance use among Muslim students in Aceh exists, although prevalence was low. Thus, several preventive programs may be needed in Aceh not only for Muslims students who have used substances but also for students who have not use illegal substances. Keywords: Adolescents, Substance use, Muslim students, Indonesia.

  1. Globalization and the cultural safety of an immigrant Muslim community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Cynthia

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a study the aim of which was to further understanding of cultural safety by focusing on the social health of a small immigrant community of Muslims in a relatively homogeneous region of Canada following the terror attacks on 11 September 2001 (9/11). The aftermath of 9/11 negatively affected Muslims living in many centers of Western Europe and North America. Little is known about the social health of Muslims in smaller areas with little cultural diversity. Developed by Maori nurses, the cultural safety concept captures the negative health effects of inequities experienced by the indigenous people of New Zealand. Nurses in Canada have used the concept to understand the health of Aboriginal peoples. It has also been used to investigate the nursing care of immigrants in a Canadian metropolitan centre. Findings indicated, however, that the dichotomy between culturally safe and unsafe groups was blurred. The methodology was qualitative, based on the constructivist paradigm. A purposive sample of 26 Muslims of Middle Eastern, Indian or Pakistani origin and residing in the province of New Brunswick, Canada were interviewed in 2002-2003. Findings. Participants experienced a sudden transition from cultural safety to cultural risk following 9/11. Their experience of cultural safety included a sense of social integration in the community and invisibility as a minority. Cultural risk stemmed from being in the spotlight of an international media and becoming a visible minority. Cultural risk is not necessarily rooted in historical events and may be generated by outside forces rather than by longstanding inequities in relationships between groups within the community. Nurses need to think about the cultural safety of their practices when caring for members of socially disadvantaged cultural minority groups as this may affect the health services delivered to them.

  2. Religiosity and Volunteering Intention Among Undergraduate Malaysian Muslim Students

    OpenAIRE

    Sallam A.A.A.; Abdullah S.; Ramli A.J .; Hussin N.S.; Ahmad Z.; Bahari A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper deals with the question: To what extent do religiosity characteristics, contribute to the influence of volunteering intention among Malaysian Muslim students during disasters? To answer this research question, we focused the students in public universities. The finding concerns found that religiosity increases the likelihood of volunteering intention, implying that religious affiliation of youth increases the likelihood of volunteering. This is in line with previous research, that ...

  3. Constructed Virtual Identity of Muslim Women in Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Syariati, Dian

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon and the development of new media introduce a new communication’s form of social media that requires an individual to have a virtual identity. This identity is an outstanding image of self-presentation that is built up deliberately by an individual in cyberspace. Through social networks, e.g., Facebook, a person acts as producer and simultaneously as gatekeeper of a message who can express a thought without any restrain. Basically, this study aimed to investigate how Muslim wome...

  4. Socially Mediated Publicness in Networked Society for Indonesian Muslim Women

    OpenAIRE

    Beta, Annisa R

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: This paper addresses discursive processes that generated ‘jilboobs’ term. It tries to ground the notion of socially mediated publicness and its affordances by investigating the process of image making of Indonesian Muslim women. Using Foucauldian discourse analysis approach, the result shows three characteristics of Indonesia’s socially mediated publicness: (1) religiosity has a central role in the shift and contestation of private versus public sphere, (2) the visual turn of the so...

  5. Saudi Arabia exporting Salafi education and radicalizing Indonesia's Muslims

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacs, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Salafis, who defend a very conservative, literal interpretation of Islam and treat Shia Muslims with hostility, are not just a phenomenon in the Middle East. They are increasingly pressuring Shias and other religious minorities in Indonesia, too. Saudi Arabia is the world’s main provider of Islamic education. In addition to promoting Salafism and maligning other religious communities, Saudi educational materials present the kingdom in a favorable light and can also exacerba...

  6. Social Inclusion of Children With Down Syndrome: Jewish and Muslim Mothers' Knowledge, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Behavioral Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnoy, Sivia; Biton, Anna; Itzhaki, Michal

    The current study examined mothers' knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and intention to socially integrate children with Down syndrome (DS) in the family, with children without disabilities and school system. A questionnaire based on a descriptive, cross-sectional design was administered to Jewish and Muslim mothers. The questionnaire included demographics, knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and intention to integrate children with DS. Analysis included a regression test of intention to integrate children with DS and a one-way ANOVA for differences between Jewish and Muslim mothers. Nearly all the Jewish mothers (93.7%) and about half the Muslim mothers (52.8%) had performed screening tests for DS during their pregnancy. All mothers displayed low knowledge level about DS. Being Jewish (t=2.89; p=0.005) and holding more positive beliefs (t=3.39; p=0.001) were associated with a higher intention to socially integrate children with DS. Significant positive correlations were found between beliefs and attitudes (r=0.65; psocially integrate children with DS (r=0.39; psocial inclusion of children with DS are quite positive and the intention to integrate children with DS in the family, with children without disabilities, and in the mainstream school system is high. However, their level of knowledge about DS is low. Nurses, as a critical source of information about DS, should develop an ethno-cultural sensitivity to diverse populations in order to influence attitudes and beliefs regarding the social integration of children with DS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Britishness and Community Cohesion in Muslim News Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen ZRIBA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The issues of British national identity and social cohesion have become pressing concerns within the multicultural fabric of contemporary British society. The increasing number of immigrants and their offspring, along with the maintenance of their cultural roots, seem to represent a serious defiance to social cohesion and the alleged “purity” of Britishness. A number of race related reports were produced by the official authorities to churn out the necessary steps to be followed by the British (immigrants and host community in order to keep social stability and community cohesion. Thus, the politics of community cohesion came to the fore as the neologism of contemporary British political discourse. Such new discourse of governance has been digested and processed differently by different mass media. It has been decoded, for instance, preferably by mainstream news agencies like BBC News Online. However, arguably, it is read appositionally or at best negotiatedly by ethnicity-related news agencies such as Muslim News Online. In this article, attempt has been made to adopt media discourse analysis tools to decipher the ways Muslim News Online decoded and then encoded the hegemonic official discourses of Britishness and community cohesion. A critical and interpretative approach is used to accomplish such study. The corpus of this study is primarily extracted from the website of the Muslim News Online.

  8. EVERYDAY QUR’AN DI ERA POST-KONSUMERISME MUSLIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Endy Saputro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to give a preliminary draft to formulate an innovative concept in the Qur’anic studies world in the age of post-consumerism Muslim. Recent studies on tug of war between globalization and religion have been identifying salient social transformation in some parts of Muslim world, such as the rise of new (media religious authority, religious commodification trends, varieties of Islamic consumption, the emergence of public Islam and so forth. Apart from these recent scholarships, which successfully grasp the globalization’s influence toward religion (Islam, this paper offers the concept of everyday Qur’an as an alternative basic approach of understanding the cultures of Qur’an in this changing (Muslim world and at the same time, seeking to briefly explain its emerging issues. Some exemplary issues then have analytically discussed to reflect how the proposed theory applied. Thus, everyday Qur’an can contribute the discourse of cultures based technology in the context of Qur’anic Studies. 

  9. The Muslim football player and Ramadan: current challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerguini, Yacine; Ahmed, Qanta A; Dvorak, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Islam is a monotheistic Abrahamic faith characterised by devotional orthopraxy. The actions expected of followers of Islam are closely prescribed in the Qur'an. Muslims understand Ramadan as a mandatory requirement, excused only in the event of illness, infirmity or extremes of age. Due to the increasing popularity of football among Muslims, more and more Muslim football players of all levels make the decision to follow the Ramadan fast while they need to practise and compete. Sports medicine clinicians and scientists have the responsibility to provide them with the knowledge and evidence on how exactly Ramadan fasting impacts on their performance and how to optimise their eating, drinking and sleeping in order to minimise negative effects of their religious practice, should any have been demonstrated. The first International Federation of Football Associations (FIFA) Medical Assessment and Research Centre (F-MARC) study concluded that biochemical, nutritional, subjective well-being and performance variables were not adversely affected in young male national level players who followed Ramadan fasting in a controlled environment. Match performance was however not measured and the study did not include elite level players, leading to the Ramadan consensus meeting in order to answer the remaining questions. The conclusions and recommendations published in this supplement suggest that the best coping strategies will remain individual - as is the choice to fast.

  10. Terorisme sebagai Cabaran Ideologi Muslim Masa Kini: Satu Analisis dari Perspektif Falsafah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZUL`AZMI YAAKOB

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrorism is currently becoming an ideological challenge for Muslims in contemporary world. The rise of terrorist groups such as the Islamic State (IS and others who claimed themselves as jihadist and propagates Islamic jihad similar to the idea of the medieval ‘Holy War’ not only target non-Muslims or kuffar, but also their Muslim brothers respectively. This act of terrorism raised dilemma among Muslim societies in general whether to support the extreme groups or to defy them as they portrayed themselves as representing the whole Muslims whereas in fact they only represent a group of disillusioned Muslims. This paper aims at analysing their ideological challenge from the philosophical point of view and Islamic ethics. Generally, this analysis emphasizes on the importance of Islamic ethics and law in order to achieve true understanding of jihad.

  11. Crisis of Identity in a Multi-cultural Society: The Case of Muslims in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Serajul Islam

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available A great majority of studies on ethnic identity or ethnic separatism indicate that a minority group dealing with severe deprivation becomes more frustrated, more aggressive, and more demanding of autonomy or separation. However, in a multi-cultural society where the people can live with their both separate and co-existing identities, the minority group usually demands for greater rights within societies, not an exit from them. This is the case of the Muslims in Canada who constitute a tiny minority in the Canadian population. Since Canada is a multicultural country, the Muslims have not demanded any kind of autonomy but have demanded rights to preserve Islamic values, and their own distinct identity as Muslims. In this article some basic questions are raised regarding the Canadian Muslims. When and how did the Muslims arrive in Canada? What types of challenges they are facing? How do they meet these challenges? What is the future of Muslims in Canada?

  12. AHP 21: Tibetans and Muslims in Northwest China: Economic and Political Aspects of a Complex Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Horlemann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past and today, Tibetan-Muslim relations in Qinghai and Gansu are often associated with violent conflicts sparked by religious differences or 'interethnic hatred'. A more nuanced study of the history of Tibetan-Muslim relations, however, reveals complexity as well as considerable local difference with regard to how and when contacts were established, maintained, and broken off. Tibetan Muslim encounters were manifold and varied, including interethnic marriages, close business relations, political alliances, and armed conflicts. To illustrate this wide range of encounters, examples chosen for this paper, i.e., the relations between Amdo Tibetans and the Muslim Baoan nationality, the Muslim Ma warlords, and the Chinese xiejia institution, span different eras and localities. This study suggests that Tibetan-Muslim relations were predominantly shaped by socio-economic and political factors rather than by religious differences or 'interethnic hatred' as is often assumed.

  13. On the politics and practice of Muslim fertility: comparative evidence from West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Hanks, Jennifer

    2006-03-01

    Recent popular works have represented Muslim fertility as dangerously high, both a cause and consequence of religious fundamentalism. This article uses comparative, statistical methods to show that this representation is empirically wrong, at least in West Africa. Although religion strongly inflects reproductive practice, its effects are not constant across different communities. In West African countries with Muslim majorities, Muslim fertility is lower than that of their non-Muslim conationals; in countries where Muslims are in the minority, their apparently higher reproductive rates converge to those of the majority when levels of education and urban residence are taken into account. A similar pattern holds for infant mortality. By contrast, in all seven countries, Muslim women are more likely to report that their most recent child was wanted. The article concludes with a discussion of the relationship between autonomy and fertility desires.

  14. Historical perspectives on health. Early Arabic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Harry

    2004-07-01

    The Arabian conquests during and after the 7th century led to a spread of Islam as well as the consequential influence of theology on health through the teachings of the Qur'an (Koran). Although traditional medicine was widely accepted and used, the character of early aggrandisement of Arabic medicine involved a facility for adapting and absorbing Graeco-Roman knowledge. The translation schools and libraries, famous in both the East and West, preserved and expanded the knowledge acquired. European academic learning owed much to the Arabs. Information came through Spain to Italy, France and, later on, England. The founding of hospitals, whilst not an Arab initiative, received a fillip from the religious prescriptions for care of the sick. The Military Orders developed specialist institutions for the sick, probably as a result of what they saw during their sojourn in the Middle East. The legacy of Arabic medical care is still with us today and deserves understanding and greater appreciation.

  15. Arab Customs and Culture. Second Edition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Richard A; Glass, Robert G; Gasper, Eberhard; Rizzo, Samuel R; Edsall, Curtis C

    1983-01-01

    .... interests along with international understanding and friendship, it is crucial for American Soldiers operating in the Middle East to have a basic understanding of the Arab people, their customs...

  16. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, F-E; Lubrano, V; Lauwers-Cances, V; Giussani, C; Démonet, J-F

    2008-01-15

    Distinct functional pathways for processing words and numbers have been hypothesized from the observation of dissociated impairments of these categories in brain-damaged patients. We aimed to identify the cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading process in patients operated on for various brain lesions. Direct cortical electrostimulation was prospectively used in 60 brain mappings. We used object naming and two reading tasks: alphabetic script (sentences and number words) and Arabic number reading. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading were identified according to location, type of interference, and distinctness from areas associated with other language tasks. Arabic number reading was sustained by small cortical areas, often extremely well localized (area (Brodmann area 45), the anterior part of the dominant supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann area 40; p area (Brodmann area 37; p areas.

  17. GUESSING VERB-ADVERB COLLOCATIONS: ARAB EFL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    In the sections to follow, the concept and meaning of collocation is defined ... expressions (Alexander 1984); formulaic language or speech (Weinert 1995); multi- ... Two further studies reported Arab EFL learners' overall ignorance of col-.

  18. “We are Arabs:” The Embodiment of Virginity Through Arab and Arab American Women’s Lived Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Abboud, Sarah; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet; Sommers, Marilyn S.

    2015-01-01

    Virginity is part of our existence in the world as embodied sexual subjects. While many meanings are associated with virginity, in most of the Arab world virginity relates to the presence of a hymen and extends to encompass the honor of the Arab community, and virginity loss commonly relate to first vaginal intercourse. This study explored the meanings of virginity from the perspectives of Arab and Arab American women. A qualitative phenomenological approach, informed by the philosophy of Mau...

  19. The Shifting Border of Food Perceptions and Cultural Identity in Maghrebi Muslim Migrants. History and the Contemporary Experience of Cultural Mediators in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Rosa Giovine

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, Italy has become a point of entry to the EU and, for many migrants from the Southern shores of the Mediterranean, a final destination (IOM Report, 2011. As massive inflows have often caused emergencies, the pressing needs of these populations in the areas of housing, healthcare, education, etc. have been examined and addressed (data: Regional Authority and Milan Diocese Observatories. Realizing that the cultural implications in the area of food, had not been systematically studied thus far, the author developed a three-year project, focusing on northwest African Muslim migrants and the change in their perception of food, particularly in light of the strong religious implications that food has historically had to Arab populations. After reviewing the key traits of Arab-Berber food history, their translation into contemporary life in the countries of origin and destination was investigated, through interviews with, primarily, cultural mediators, as well as anthropologists, food experts, food chain professionals, and the migrants themselves. The overall research delves into the migrants’ views of food back in Northern Africa and Maghrebi3 and other food in Italy, with an emphasis on ideas of purity and identity (in culinary practices, ingredients, celebrations, table manners, the restaurant system and distribution.

  20. The Shifting Border of Food Perceptions and Cultural Identity in Maghrebi Muslim Migrants. History and the Contemporary Experience of Cultural Mediators in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Giovine

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, Italy has become a point of entry to the EU and, for many migrants from the Southern shores of the Mediterranean, a final destination (IOM Report 2011. As massive inflows have often caused emergencies, the pressing needs of these populations in the areas of housing, healthcare, education, etc. have been examined and addressed (data: Regional Authority and Milan Diocese Observatories. Realizing that the cultural implications in the area of food, had not been systematically studied thus far, the author developed a three-year project, focusing on northwest African Muslim migrants and the change in their perception of food, particularly in light of the strong religious implications that food has historically had to Arab populations. After reviewing the key traits of Arab-Berber food history, their translation into contemporary life in the countries of origin and destination was investigated, through interviews with, primarily, cultural mediators, as well as anthropologists, food experts, food chain professionals, and the migrants themselves. The overall research delves into the migrants’ views of food back in Northern Africa and Maghrebi and other food in Italy, with an emphasis on ideas of purity and identity (in culinary practices, ingredients, celebrations, table manners, the restaurant system and distribution.