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Sample records for muscle afferent fibers

  1. Partial transformation from fast to slow muscle fibers induced by deafferentation of capsaicin-sensitive muscle afferents.

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    Brunetti, O; Barazzoni, A M; Della Torre, G; Clavenzani, P; Pettorossi, V E; Bortolami, R

    1997-11-01

    Mechanical and histochemical characteristics of the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle of the rat were examined 21 days after capsaicin injection into the LG muscle. The capsaicin caused a decrease in generation rate of twitch and tetanic tension and an increase in fatigue resistance of LG muscle. The histochemical muscle fiber profile evaluated by myosin adenosine triphosphatase and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium reductase methods showed an increase of type I and IIC fibers and a decrease of the type IIB in whole muscle, and a decrease of the IIA, IIX fibers in the red part accompanied by their increase in the white part. Therefore the capsaicin treatment, which selectively eliminated fibers belonging to the III and IV groups of muscle afferents, induced muscle fiber transformation from fast contracting fatiguing fibers to slowly contracting nonfatiguing ones.

  2. Does metabosensitive afferent fibers activity differ from slow- and fast-twitch muscles?

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    Caron, Guillaume; Decherchi, Patrick; Marqueste, Tanguy

    2015-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the metabosensitive afferent response evoked by electrically induced fatigue (EIF), lactic acid (LA) and potassium chloride (KCl) in three muscle types. We recorded the activity of groups III-IV afferents originating from soleus, gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles. Our data showed a same pattern of response in the three muscles after chemical injections, i.e., a bell curve with maximal discharge rate at 1 mM for LA injections and a linear relationship between KCl concentrations and the afferent discharge rate. Furthermore, a stronger response was recorded after EIF in the gastrocnemius muscle compared to the two other muscles. The change in afferent discharge after 1 mM LA injection was higher for the gastrocnemius muscle compared to the response obtained with the corresponding concentration applied in the two other muscles, whereas changes to KCl injections did not dramatically differ between the three muscles. We conclude that anatomical (mass, phenotype, vascularization, receptor and afferent density…) and functional (flexor vs. extensor) differences between muscles could explain the amplitude of these responses.

  3. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle.

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    Guillaume Caron

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1 untreated animals acting as control and 2 treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i no recovery (B0, ii 50% recovery (B50 and iii full recovery (B100. Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF, and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity.

  4. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle.

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    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity.

  5. Inhibition of muscle spindle afferent activity during masseter muscle fatigue in the rat.

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    Brunetti, Orazio; Della Torre, Giovannella; Lucchi, Maria Luisa; Chiocchetti, Roberto; Bortolami, Ruggero; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2003-09-01

    The influence of muscle fatigue on the jaw-closing muscle spindle activity has been investigated by analyzing: (1) the field potentials evoked in the trigeminal motor nucleus (Vmot) by trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) stimulation, (2) the orthodromic and antidromic responses evoked in the Vmes by stimulation of the peripheral and central axons of the muscle proprioceptive afferents, and (3) the extracellular unitary discharge of masseter muscle spindles recorded in the Vmes. The masseter muscle was fatigued by prolonged tetanic masseter nerve electrical stimulation. Pre- and postsynaptic components of the potentials evoked in the Vmot showed a significant reduction in amplitude following muscle fatigue. Orthodromic and antidromic potentials recorded in the Vmes also showed a similar amplitude decrease. Furthermore, muscle fatigue caused a decrease of the discharge frequency of masseter muscle spindle afferents in most of the examined units. The inhibition of the potential amplitude and discharge frequency was strictly correlated with the extent of muscle fatigue and was mediated by the group III and IV afferent muscle fibers activated by fatigue. In fact, the inhibitory effect was abolished by capsaicin injection in the masseter muscle that provokes selective degeneration of small afferent muscle fibers containing neurokinins. We concluded that fatigue signals originating from the muscle and traveling through capsaicin-sensitive fibers are able to diminish the proprioceptive input by a central presynaptic influence. In the second part of the study, we examined the central projection of the masseter small afferents sensitive to capsaicin at the electron-microscopic level. Fiber degeneration was induced by injecting capsaicin into the masseter muscle. Degenerating terminals were found on the soma and stem process in Vmes and on the dendritic tree of neurons in Vmot. This suggests that small muscle afferents may influence the muscle spindle activity through

  6. Fatigue-induced changes in group IV muscle afferent activity: differences between high- and low-frequency electrically induced fatigues.

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    Darques, J L; Jammes, Y

    1997-03-07

    Recordings of group IV afferent activity of tibialis anterior muscle were performed in paralysed rabbits during runs of electrically induced fatigue produced by direct muscle stimulation at a high (100 Hz, high-frequency fatigue HFF) or a low rate (10 Hz, low-frequency fatigue LFF). In addition to analysis of afferent nerve action potentials, muscle force and compound muscle action potentials (M waves) elicited by direct muscle stimulation with single shocks were recorded. Changes in M wave configuration were used as an index of the altered propagation of membrane potentials and the associated efflux of potassium from muscle fibers. The data show that increased group IV afferent activity occurred during LFF as well as HFF trials and developed parallel with force failure. Enhanced afferent activity was significantly higher during LFF (maximal delta f(impulses) = 249 +/- 35%) than HFF (147 +/- 45%). No correlation was obtained between the responses of group IV afferents to LFF or to pressure exerted on tibialis anterior muscle. On the other hand, decreased M wave amplitude was minimal with LFF while it was pronounced with HFF. Close correlations were found between fatigue-induced activation of group IV afferents and decreases in force or M wave amplitude, but their strength was significantly higher with LFF compared to HFF. Thus, electrically induced fatigue activates group IV muscle afferents with a prominent effect of low-frequency stimulation. The mechanism of muscle afferent stimulation does not seem to be due to the sole increase in extracellular potassium concentration, but also by the efflux of muscle metabolites, present during fatiguing contractions at low rate of stimulation.

  7. Afferent Innervation, Muscle Spindles, and Contractures Following Neonatal Brachial Plexus Injury in a Mouse Model.

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    Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-10-01

    We used an established mouse model of elbow flexion contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) to test the hypothesis that preservation of afferent innervation protects against contractures and is associated with preservation of muscle spindles and ErbB signaling. A model of preganglionic C5 through C7 NBPI was first tested in mice with fluorescent axons using confocal imaging to confirm preserved afferent innervation of spindles despite motor end plate denervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were then created in wild-type mice. Four weeks later, we assessed total and afferent denervation of the elbow flexors by musculocutaneous nerve immunohistochemistry. Biceps muscle volume and cross-sectional area were measured by micro computed tomography. An observer who was blinded to the study protocol measured elbow flexion contractures. Biceps spindle and muscle fiber morphology and ErbB signaling pathway activity were assessed histologically and immunohistochemically. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries caused similar total denervation and biceps muscle atrophy. However, after preganglionic injuries, afferent innervation was partially preserved and elbow flexion contractures were significantly less severe. Spindles degenerated after postganglionic injury but were preserved after preganglionic injury. ErbB signaling was inactivated in denervated spindles after postganglionic injury but ErbB signaling activity was preserved in spindles after preganglionic injury with retained afferent innervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were associated with upregulation of ErbB signaling in extrafusal muscle fibers. Contractures after NBPI are associated with muscle spindle degeneration and loss of spindle ErbB signaling activity. Preservation of afferent innervation maintained spindle development and ErbB signaling activity, and protected against contractures. Pharmacologic modulation of ErbB signaling, which is being investigated as a

  8. Central projections and entries of capsaicin-sensitive muscle afferents.

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    Della Torre, G; Lucchi, M L; Brunetti, O; Pettorossi, V E; Clavenzani, P; Bortolami, R

    1996-03-25

    The entry pathway and central distribution of A delta and C muscle afferents within the central nervous system (CNS) were investigated by combining electron microscopy and electrophysiological analysis after intramuscular injection of capsaicin. The drug was injected into the rat lateral gastrocnemius (LG) and extraocular (EO) muscles. The compound action potentials of LG nerve and the evoked field potentials recorded in semilunar ganglion showed an immediate and permanent reduction in A delta and C components. The morphological data revealed degenerating unmyelinated axons and terminals in the inner sublamina II and in the border of laminae I-II of the dorsal horn at L4-L5 and C1-C2 (subnucleus caudalis trigemini) spinal cord segments. Most degenerating terminals were the central bouton (C) of type I and II synaptic glomeruli. Furthermore, degenerating peripheral axonal endings (V2) presynaptic to normal C were found. Since V2 were previously found degenerated after cutting the oculomotor nerve (ON) or L4 ventral root, we conclude that some A delta and C afferents from LG and EO muscles entering the CNS by ON or ventral roots make axoaxonic synapses on other primary afferents to promote an afferent control of sensory input.

  9. Muscle weakness, afferent sensory dysfunction and exercise in knee osteoarthritis

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    Roos, Ewa M.; Herzog, Walter; Block, Joel A

    2011-01-01

    Lower-extremity muscle strength and afferent sensory dysfunction, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity, are potentially modifiable putative risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Findings from current studies suggest that muscle weakness is a predictor of knee OA onset, while there is confli...... with previous knee injuries) are easily identified, and may benefit from exercise interventions to prevent or delay OA onset....... there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of muscle weakness in OA progression. In contrast, the literature suggests a role for afferent sensory dysfunction in OA progression but not necessarily in OA onset. The few pilot exercise studies performed in patients who are at risk of incident OA indicate...... a possibility for achieving preventive structure or load modifications. In contrast, large randomized controlled trials of patients with established OA have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of strengthening exercises. Subgroups of individuals who are at increased risk of knee OA (such as those...

  10. On the nature of the afferent fibers of oculomotor nerve.

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    Manni, E; Draicchio, F; Pettorossi, V E; Carobi, C; Grassi, S; Bortolami, R; Lucchi, M L

    1989-03-01

    The oculogyric nerves contain afferent fibers originating from the ophthalmic territory, the somata of which are located in the ipsilateral semilunar ganglion. These primary sensory neurons project to the Subnucleus Gelatinosus of the Nucleus Caudalis Trigemini, where they make presynaptic contact with the central endings of the primary trigeminal afferents running in the fifth cranial nerve. After complete section of the trigeminal root, the antidromic volleys elicited in the trunk of the third cranial nerve by stimulating SG of NCT consisted of two waves belonging to the A delta and C groups. The area of both components of the antidromic volleys decreased both after bradykinin and hystamine injection into the corresponding cutaneous region and after thermic stimulation of the ipsilateral trigeminal ophthalmic territory. The reduction of such potentials can be explained in terms of collision between the antidromic volleys and those elicited orthodromically by chemical and thermic stimulation. Also, capsaicin applied on the nerve induced an immediate increase, followed by a long lasting decrease, of orthodromic evoked response area. These findings bring further support to the nociceptive nature of the afferent fibers running into the oculomotor nerve.

  11. Muscle afferent receptors engaged in augmented sympathetic responsiveness in peripheral artery disease

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    Jianhua eLi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The exercise pressor reflex (EPR is a neural control mechanism responsible for the cardiovascular responses to exercise. As exercise is initiated, thin fiber muscle afferent nerves are activated by mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising in the contracting muscles. This leads to reflex increases in arterial blood pressure and heart rate primarily through activation of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. Studies of humans and animals have indicated that the EPR is exaggerated in a number of cardiovascular diseases. For the last several years, studies have specifically employed a rodent model to examine the mechanisms at receptor and cellular levels by which responses of SNA and blood pressure to static exercise are heightened in peripheral artery disease (PAD, one of the most common cardiovascular disorders. A rat model of this disease has well been established. Specifically, femoral artery occlusion is used to study intermittent claudication that is observed in human PAD. The receptors on thin fiber muscle afferents that are engaged in this disease include transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1, purinergic P2X and acid sensing ion channel (ASIC. The role played by nerve growth factor (NGF in regulating those sensory receptors in the processing of amplified EPR was also investigated. The purpose of this review is to focus on a theme namely that PAD accentuates autonomic reflex responses to exercise and further address regulatory mechanisms leading to abnormal sympathetic responsiveness. This review will present some of recent results in regard with several receptors in muscle sensory neurons in contribution to augmented autonomic reflex responses in PAD. Review of the findings from recent studies would lead to a better understanding in integrated processing of sympathetic nervous system in PAD.

  12. Influence of oculomotor nerve afferents on central endings of primary trigeminal fibers.

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    Manni, E; Bortolami, R; Pettorossi, V E; Lucchi, M L; Callegari, E; Draicchio, F

    1987-12-01

    Painful fibers running in the third nerve and originating from the ophthalmic trigeminal area send their central projections at level of substantia gelatinosa of nucleus caudalis trigemini. The central endings of these fibers form axoaxonic synapses with trigeminal fibers entering the brain stem through the trigeminal root. The effect of electrical stimulation of the third nerve central stump on the central endings of trigeminal afferent fibers consists in an increased excitability, possibly resulting in a presynaptic inhibition. This inhibitory influence is due to both direct and indirect connections of the third nerve afferent fibers with the trigeminal ones.

  13. Neuronal thresholds and choice-related activity of otolith afferent fibers during heading perception.

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    Yu, Xiong-jie; Dickman, J David; DeAngelis, Gregory C; Angelaki, Dora E

    2015-05-19

    How activity of sensory neurons leads to perceptual decisions remains a challenge to understand. Correlations between choices and single neuron firing rates have been found early in vestibular processing, in the brainstem and cerebellum. To investigate the origins of choice-related activity, we have recorded from otolith afferent fibers while animals performed a fine heading discrimination task. We find that afferent fibers have similar discrimination thresholds as central cells, and the most sensitive fibers have thresholds that are only twofold or threefold greater than perceptual thresholds. Unlike brainstem and cerebellar nuclei neurons, spike counts from afferent fibers do not exhibit trial-by-trial correlations with perceptual decisions. This finding may reflect the fact that otolith afferent responses are poorly suited for driving heading perception because they fail to discriminate self-motion from changes in orientation relative to gravity. Alternatively, if choice probabilities reflect top-down inference signals, they are not relayed to the vestibular periphery.

  14. Modulation of jaw muscle spindle afferent activity following intramuscular injections with hypertonic saline.

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    Ro, J Y; Capra, N F

    2001-05-01

    Transient noxious chemical stimulation of small diameter muscle afferents modulates jaw movement-related responses of caudal brainstem neurons. While it is likely that the effect is mediated from the spindle afferents in the mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) via the caudally projecting Probst's tract, the mechanisms of pain induced modulations of jaw muscle spindle afferents is not known. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that jaw muscle nociceptors gain access to muscle spindle afferents in the same muscle via central mechanisms and alter their sensitivity. Thirty-five neurons recorded from the Vmes were characterized as muscle spindle afferents based on their responses to passive jaw movements, muscle palpation, and electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve. Each cell was tested by injecting a small volume (250 microl) of either 5% hypertonic and/or isotonic saline into the receptor-bearing muscle. Twenty-nine units were tested with 5% hypertonic saline, of which 79% (23/29) showed significant modulation of mean firing rates (MFRs) during one or more phases of ramp-and-hold movements. Among the muscle spindle primary-like units (n = 12), MFRs of 4 units were facilitated, five reduced, two showed mixed responses and one unchanged. In secondary-like units (n = 17), MFRs of 9 were facilitated, three reduced and five unchanged. Thirteen units were tested with isotonic saline, of which 77% showed no significant changes of MFRs. Further analysis revealed that the hypertonic saline not only affected the overall output of muscle spindle afferents, but also increased the variability of firing and altered the relationship between afferent signal and muscle length. These results demonstrated that activation of muscle nociceptors significantly affects proprioceptive properties of jaw muscle spindles via central neural mechanisms. The changes can have deleterious effects on oral motor function as well as kinesthetic sensibility.

  15. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

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    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  16. Decreased contribution from afferent feedback to the soleus muscle during walking in patients with spastic stroke

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    Mazzaro, Nazarena; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk; Grey, Michael James

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of afferent feedback to the soleus (SOL) muscle activity during the stance phase of walking in patients with spastic stroke. A total of 24 patients with hemiparetic spastic stroke and age-matched healthy volunteers participated in the study. A robotic actuator...... by the Ashworth score. These results indicate that although the stretch reflex response is facilitated during spastic gait, the contribution of afferent feedback to the ongoing locomotor SOL activity is depressed in patients with spastic stroke....

  17. Capsaicin-sensitive muscle afferents modulate the monosynaptic reflex in response to muscle ischemia and fatigue in the rat.

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    Della Torre, G; Brunetti, O; Pettorossi, V E

    2002-01-01

    The role of muscle ischemia and fatigue in modulating the monosynaptic reflex was investigated in decerebrate and spinalized rats. Field potentials and fast motoneuron single units in the lateral gastrocnemious (LG) motor pool were evoked by dorsal root stimulation. Muscle ischemia was induced by occluding the LG vascular supply and muscle fatigue by prolonged tetanic electrical stimulation of the LG motor nerve. Under muscle ischemia the monosynaptic reflex was facilitated since the size of the early and late waves of the field potential and the excitability of the motoneuron units increased. This effect was abolished after L3-L6 dorsal rhizotomy, but it was unaffected after L3-L6 ventral rhizotomy. By contrast, the monosynaptic reflex was inhibited by muscle fatiguing stimulation, and this effect did not fully depend on the integrity of the dorsal root. However, when ischemia was combined with repetitive tetanic muscle stimulation the inhibitory effect of fatigue was significantly enhanced. Both the ischemia and fatigue effects were abolished by capsaicin injected into the LG muscle at a dose that blocked a large number of group III and IV muscle afferents. We concluded that muscle ischemia and fatigue activate different groups of muscle afferents that are both sensitive to capsaicin, but enter the spinal cord through different roots. They are responsible for opposite effects, when given separately: facilitation during ischemia and inhibition during fatigue; however, in combination, ischemia enhances the responsiveness of the afferent fibres to fatigue.

  18. Group Ia afferents likely contribute to short-latency interlimb reflexes in the human biceps femoris muscle

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    Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Kamavuako, Ernest Nlandu; Geertsen, Svend Sparre

    2017-01-01

    amplitudes (4 vs. 8°) at the same 150°/s velocity (p’s > 0.08). Conclusion: Because fast conducting group Ia muscle spindle afferents are sensitive to changes in muscle stretch velocity, while group II spindle afferents are sensitive to changes in amplitude (Grey et al., JPhysiol., 2001; Matthews, Trends...... Neurosci., 1991), group Ia velocity sensitive muscle spindle afferents likely contribute to the short-latency crossed spinal reflexes in the cBF muscle following iKnee joint rotations. This supports the findings for the short-latency crossed responses in the human soleus muscle (Stubbs & Mrachacz...... neurons in humans, with primary contributions from group Ia muscle spindle afferents....

  19. Local translation in primary afferent fibers regulates nociception.

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    Lydia Jiménez-Díaz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of local protein synthesis for neuronal plasticity. In particular, local mRNA translation through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been shown to play a key role in regulating dendrite excitability and modulating long-term synaptic plasticity associated with learning and memory. There is also increased evidence to suggest that intact adult mammalian axons have a functional requirement for local protein synthesis in vivo. Here we show that the translational machinery is present in some myelinated sensory fibers and that active mTOR-dependent pathways participate in maintaining the sensitivity of a subpopulation of fast-conducting nociceptors in vivo. Phosphorylated mTOR together with other downstream components of the translational machinery were localized to a subset of myelinated sensory fibers in rat cutaneous tissue. We then showed with electromyographic studies that the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduced the sensitivity of a population of myelinated nociceptors known to be important for the increased mechanical sensitivity that follows injury. Behavioural studies confirmed that local treatment with rapamycin significantly attenuated persistent pain that follows tissue injury, but not acute pain. Specifically, we found that rapamycin blunted the heightened response to mechanical stimulation that develops around a site of injury and reduced the long-term mechanical hypersensitivity that follows partial peripheral nerve damage--a widely used model of chronic pain. Our results show that the sensitivity of a subset of sensory fibers is maintained by ongoing mTOR-mediated local protein synthesis and uncover a novel target for the control of long-term pain states.

  20. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

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    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  1. NMClab, a model to assess the contributions of muscle visco-elasticity and afferent feedback to joint dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; Mugge, Winfred; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a neuromusculoskeletal system results from the complex mechanical interaction between muscle visco-elasticity resulting from (co-)contraction and afferent feedback from muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. As a result of the multiple interactions the individual effect of

  2. Bioenergetics and ATP Synthesis during Exercise: Role of Group III/IV Muscle Afferents.

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    Broxterman, Ryan M; Layec, Gwenael; Hureau, Thomas J; Morgan, David E; Bledsoe, Amber D; Jessop, Jacob E; Amann, Markus; Richardson, Russell S

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the group III/IV muscle afferents in the bioenergetics of exercising skeletal muscle beyond constraining the magnitude of metabolic perturbation. Eight healthy men performed intermittent isometric knee-extensor exercise to task failure at ~58% maximal voluntary contraction under control conditions (CTRL) and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl to attenuate group III/IV leg muscle afferents (FENT). Intramuscular concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), diprotonated phosphate (H2PO4), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and pH were determined using phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-MRS). The magnitude of metabolic perturbation was significantly greater in FENT compared with CTRL for [Pi] (37.8 ± 16.8 vs 28.6 ± 8.6 mM), [H2PO4] (24.3 ± 12.2 vs 17.9 ± 7.1 mM), and [ATP] (75.8% ± 17.5% vs 81.9% ± 15.8% of baseline), whereas there was no significant difference in [PCr] (4.5 ± 2.4 vs 4.4 ± 2.3 mM) or pH (6.51 ± 0.10 vs 6.54 ± 0.14). The rate of perturbation in [PCr], [Pi], [H2PO4], and pH was significantly faster in FENT compared with CTRL. Oxidative ATP synthesis was not significantly different between conditions. However, anaerobic ATP synthesis, through augmented creatine kinase and glycolysis reactions, was significantly greater in FENT than in CTRL, resulting in a significantly greater ATP cost of contraction (0.049 ± 0.016 vs 0.038 ± 0.010 mM·min·N). Group III/IV muscle afferents not only constrain the magnitude of perturbation in intramuscular Pi, H2PO4, and ATP during small muscle mass exercise but also seem to play a role in maintaining efficient skeletal muscle contractile function in men.

  3. The role of capsaicin-sensitive muscle afferents in fatigue-induced modulation of the monosynaptic reflex in the rat.

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    Pettorossi, V E; Della Torre, G; Bortolami, R; Brunetti, O

    1999-03-01

    1. The role of group III and IV afferent fibres of the lateral gastrocnemious muscle (LG) in modulating the homonymous monosynaptic reflex was investigated during muscle fatigue in spinalized rats. 2. Muscle fatigue was induced by a series of increasing tetanic electrical stimuli (85 Hz, 600 ms) delivered to the LG muscle nerve. Series consisted of increasing train numbers from 1 to 60. 3. Potentials from the spinal cord LG motor pool and from the ventral root were recorded in response to proprioceptive afferent stimulation and analysed before and during tetanic muscle activations. Both the pre- and postsynaptic waves showed an initial enhancement and, after a '12-train' series, an increasing inhibition. 4. The enhancement of the responses to muscle fatiguing stimulation disappeared after L3-L6 dorsal root section, while a partial reflex inhibition was still present. Conversely, after section of the corresponding ventral root, there was only a reduction in the inhibitory effect. 5. The monosynaptic reflex was also studied in animals in which a large number of group III and IV muscle afferents were eliminated by injecting capsaicin (10 mM) into the LG muscle. As a result of capsaicin treatment, the fatigue-induced inhibition of the pre- and postsynaptic waves disappeared, while the response enhancement remained. 6. We concluded that the monosynaptic reflex inhibition, but not the enhancement, was mediated by those group III and IV muscle afferents that are sensitive to the toxic action of capsaicin. The afferents that are responsible for the response enhancement enter the spinal cord through the dorsal root, while those responsible for the inhibition enter the spinal cord through both the ventral and dorsal roots.

  4. Deriving muscle fiber diameter from recorded single fiber potential.

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    Zalewska, Ewa

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate muscle fiber diameters through analysis of single muscle fiber potentials (SFPs) recorded in the frontalis muscle of a healthy subject. Our previously developed analytical and graphic method to derive fiber diameter from the analysis of the negative peak duration and the amplitude of SFP, was applied to a sample of ten SFPs recorded in vivo. Muscle fiber diameters derived from the simulation method for the sample of frontalis muscle SFPs are consistent with anatomical data for this muscle. The results confirm the utility of proposed simulation method. Outlying data could be considered as the result of a contribution of other fibers to the potential recorded using an SFEMG electrode. Our graphic tool provides a rapid estimation of muscle fiber diameter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Bilateral sensory deprivation of trigeminal afferent fibers on corticomotor control of human tongue musculature: A preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Svensson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has demonstrated changes in motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in human limb muscles following modulation of sensory afferent inputs. Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine whether bilateral local anaesthesia (LA) of the lingual ne...

  7. Lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin I specifically labels a subset of primary afferent fibers which project selectively to the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K

    1986-02-19

    To examine differential carbohydrate expression among different subsets of primary afferent fibers, several fluorescein-isothiocyanate conjugated lectins were used in a histochemical study of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord of the rabbit. The lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin I specifically labeled a subset of DRG cells and primary afferent fibers which projected to the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn. These results suggest that specific carbohydrates containing L-fucosyl residue is expressed selectively in small diameter primary afferent fibers which subserve nociception or thermoception.

  8. Single muscle fiber adaptations with marathon training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Scott; Harber, Matthew; Creer, Andrew; Gallagher, Philip; Slivka, Dustin; Minchev, Kiril; Whitsett, David

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the effects of marathon training on single muscle fiber contractile function in a group of recreational runners. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the gastrocnemius muscle of seven individuals (22 +/- 1 yr, 177 +/- 3 cm, and 68 +/- 2 kg) before, after 13 wk of run training, and after 3 wk of taper. Slow-twitch myosin heavy chain [(MHC) I] and fast-twitch (MHC IIa) muscle fibers were analyzed for size, strength (P(o)), speed (V(o)), and power. The run training program led to the successful completion of a marathon (range 3 h 56 min to 5 h 35 min). Oxygen uptake during submaximal running and citrate synthase activity were improved (P training program. Muscle fiber size declined (P training. P(o) was maintained in both fiber types with training and increased (P 60% increase (P training and was unchanged in MHC IIa fibers. Peak power increased (P training with a further increase (P marathon training decreased slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fiber size but that it maintained or improved the functional profile of these fibers. A taper period before the marathon further improved the functional profile of the muscle, which was targeted to the fast-twitch muscle fibers.

  9. Selective activation of primary afferent fibers evaluated by sine-wave electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katafuchi Toshihiko

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transcutaneous sine-wave stimuli at frequencies of 2000, 250 and 5 Hz (Neurometer are thought to selectively activate Aβ, Aδ and C afferent fibers, respectively. However, there are few reports to test the selectivity of these stimuli at the cellular level. In the present study, we analyzed action potentials (APs generated by sine-wave stimuli applied to the dorsal root in acutely isolated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG preparations using intracellular recordings. We also measured excitatory synaptic responses evoked by transcutaneous stimuli in substantia gelatinosa (SG neurons of the spinal dorsal horn, which receive inputs predominantly from C and Aδ fibers, using in vivo patch-clamp recordings. In behavioral studies, escape or vocalization behavior of rats was observed with both 250 and 5 Hz stimuli at intensity of ~0.8 mA (T5/ T250, whereas with 2000 Hz stimulation, much higher intensity (2.14 mA, T2000 was required. In DRG neurons, APs were generated at T5/T250 by 2000 Hz stimulation in Aβ, by 250 Hz stimulation both in Aβ and Aδ, and by 5 Hz stimulation in all three classes of DRG neurons. However, the AP frequencies elicited in Aβ and Aδ by 5 Hz stimulation were much less than those reported previously in physiological condition. With in vivo experiments large amplitude of EPSCs in SG neurons were elicited by 250 and 5 Hz stimuli at T5/ T250. These results suggest that 2000 Hz stimulation excites selectively Aβ fibers and 5 Hz stimulation activates noxious transmission mediated mainly through C fibers. Although 250 Hz stimulation activates both Aδ and Aβ fibers, tactile sensation would not be perceived when painful sensation is produced at the same time. Therefore, 250 Hz was effective stimulus frequency for activation of Aδ fibers initiating noxious sensation. Thus, the transcutaneous sine-wave stimulation can be applied to evaluate functional changes of sensory transmission by comparing thresholds with the three

  10. Kinesthetic perception based on integration of motor imagery and afferent inputs from antagonistic muscles with tendon vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, E; Kaneko, F

    2013-04-29

    The perceptual integration of afferent inputs from two antagonistic muscles, or the perceptual integration of afferent input and motor imagery are related to the generation of a kinesthetic sensation. However, it has not been clarified how, or indeed whether, a kinesthetic perception would be generated by motor imagery if afferent inputs from two antagonistic muscles were simultaneously induced by tendon vibration. The purpose of this study was to investigate how a kinesthetic perception would be generated by motor imagery during co-vibration of the two antagonistic muscles at the same frequency. Healthy subjects participated in this experiment. Illusory movement was evoked by tendon vibration. Next, the subjects imaged wrist flexion movement simultaneously with tendon vibration. Wrist flexor and extensor muscles were vibrated according to 4 patterns such that the difference between the two vibration frequencies was zero. After each trial, the perceived movement sensations were quantified on the basis of the velocity and direction of the ipsilateral hand-tracking movements. When the difference in frequency applied to the wrist flexor and the extensor was 0Hz, no subjects perceived movements without motor imagery. However, during motor imagery, the flexion velocity of the perceived movement was higher than the flexion velocity without motor imagery. This study clarified that the afferent inputs from the muscle spindle interact with motor imagery, to evoke a kinesthetic perception, even when the difference in frequency applied to the wrist flexor and extensor was 0Hz. Furthermore, the kinesthetic perception resulting from integrations of vibration and motor imagery increased depending on the vibration frequency to the two antagonistic muscles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The role in masseter muscle activities of functionally elicited periodontal afferents from abutment teeth under overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushimoto, E

    1981-09-01

    Five overdenture wearers with a small number of remaining natural teeth were selected to evaluate the effect of the afferent input from periodontal mechanoreceptors on masseter activity in man. As a control, a full denture wearer was included. The subjects were instructed to chew a piece of gum, and/or tap their teeth. Surface EmG from the bilateral masseter muscles were recorded and analysed. When functional pressure was applied, during chewing, to the abutment teeth as well as to mucosa through the denture base, masseter activities were encouraged. Following application of anaesthesia to the periodontal membrane of the abutments, masseter activities were reduced. The duration of the silent period (SP) appearing in the EMG burst following tooth tapping was significantly increased with root support compared to mucosal support only. With topical anaesthesia of the periodontal tissues, SP duration decreased significantly. In conclusion, it has become apparent that the pressure sensibility of abutment teeth bearing functional pressure under an overdenture base is capable of facilitating masseter activity, as one of the sources of oral sensory input during mastication.

  12. Ultrasonography as a tool to study afferent feedback from the muscle-tendon complex during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin, Neil J.; Klint, Richard af; Grey, Michael James

    2011-01-01

    In humans, one of the most common tasks in everyday life is walking, and sensory afferent feedback from peripheral receptors, particularly the muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs (GTO), makes an important contribution to the motor control of this task. One factor that can complicate the ability...... with an examination of muscle activation to give a broader insight to neuromuscular interaction during walking. Despite the advances in understanding that these techniques have brought, there is clearly still a need for more direct methods to study both neural and mechanical parameters during human walking in order...... of these receptors to act as length, velocity and force transducers is the complex pattern of interaction between muscle and tendinous tissues, as tendon length is often considerably greater than muscle fibre length in the human lower limb. In essence, changes in muscle-tendon mechanics can influence the firing...

  13. Bradykinin Contributes to Sympathetic and Pressor Responses Evoked by Activation of Skeletal Muscle Afferents P2X in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Xing

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Published data suggest that purinergic P2X receptors of muscle afferent nerves contribute to the enhanced sympathetic nervous activity (SNA and blood pressure (BP responses during static exercise in heart failure (HF. In this study, we examined engagement of bradykinin (BK in regulating responses of SNA and BP evoked by P2X stimulation in rats with HF. We further examined cellular mechanisms responsible for BK. We hypothesized that BK potentiates P2X currents of muscle dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons, and this effect is greater in HF due to upregulation of BK kinin B2 and P2X3 receptor. As a result, BK amplifies muscle afferents P2X-mediated SNA and BP responses. Methods: Renal SNA and BP responses were recorded in control rats and rats with HF. Western Blot analysis and patch-clamp methods were employed to examine the receptor expression and function of DRG neurons involved in the effects of BK. Results: BK injected into the arterial blood supply of the hindlimb muscles heightened the reflex SNA and BP responses induced by P2X activation with α,β-methylene ATP to a greater degree in HF rats. In addition, HF upregulated the protein expression of kinin B2 and P2X3 in DRG and the prior application of BK increased the magnitude of α,β-methylene ATP-induced currents in muscle DRG neurons from HF rats. Conclusion: BK plays a facilitating role in modulating muscle afferent P2X-engaged reflex sympathetic and pressor responses. In HF, P2X responsivness is augmented due to increases in expression of kinin B2 and P2X3 receptors and P2X current activity.

  14. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mouse skeletal muscle afferents are heteromers composed of ASIC1a, ASIC2, and ASIC3 subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Mamta; Benson, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are expressed in skeletal muscle afferents, in which they sense extracellular acidosis and other metabolites released during ischemia and exercise. ASICs are formed as homotrimers or heterotrimers of several isoforms (ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, and ASIC3), with each channel displaying distinct properties. To dissect the ASIC composition in muscle afferents, we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to study the properties of acid-evoked currents (amplitude, pH sensitivity, the kinetics of desensitization and recovery from desensitization, and pharmacological modulation) in isolated, labeled mouse muscle afferents from wild-type (C57BL/6J) and specific ASIC−/− mice. We found that ASIC-like currents in wild-type muscle afferents displayed fast desensitization, indicating that they are carried by heteromeric channels. Currents from ASIC1a−/− muscle afferents were less pH-sensitive and displayed faster recovery, currents from ASIC2−/− mice showed diminished potentiation by zinc, and currents from ASIC3−/− mice displayed slower desensitization than those from wild-type mice. Finally, ASIC-like currents were absent from triple-null mice lacking ASIC1a, ASIC2a, and ASIC3. We conclude that ASIC1a, ASIC2a, and ASIC3 heteromers are the principle channels in skeletal muscle afferents. These results will help us understand the role of ASICs in exercise physiology and provide a molecular target for potential drug therapies to treat muscle pain.—Gautam, M., Benson, C. J. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mouse skeletal muscle afferents are heteromers composed of ASIC1a, ASIC2, and ASIC3 subunits. PMID:23109675

  15. Cardinal features of involuntary force variability can arise from the closed-loop control of viscoelastic afferented muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Christopher M.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2018-01-01

    Involuntary force variability below 15 Hz arises from, and is influenced by, many factors including descending neural drive, proprioceptive feedback, and mechanical properties of muscles and tendons. However, their potential interactions that give rise to the well-structured spectrum of involuntary force variability are not well understood due to a lack of experimental techniques. Here, we investigated the generation, modulation, and interactions among different sources of force variability using a physiologically-grounded closed-loop simulation of an afferented muscle model. The closed-loop simulation included a musculotendon model, muscle spindle, Golgi tendon organ (GTO), and a tracking controller which enabled target-guided force tracking. We demonstrate that closed-loop control of an afferented musculotendon suffices to replicate and explain surprisingly many cardinal features of involuntary force variability. Specifically, we present 1) a potential origin of low-frequency force variability associated with co-modulation of motor unit firing rates (i.e.,‘common drive’), 2) an in-depth characterization of how proprioceptive feedback pathways suffice to generate 5-12 Hz physiological tremor, and 3) evidence that modulation of those feedback pathways (i.e., presynaptic inhibition of Ia and Ib afferents, and spindle sensitivity via fusimotor drive) influence the full spectrum of force variability. These results highlight the previously underestimated importance of closed-loop neuromechanical interactions in explaining involuntary force variability during voluntary ‘isometric’ force control. Furthermore, these results provide the basis for a unifying theory that relates spinal circuitry to various manifestations of altered involuntary force variability in fatigue, aging and neurological disease. PMID:29309405

  16. Cardinal features of involuntary force variability can arise from the closed-loop control of viscoelastic afferented muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamori, Akira; Laine, Christopher M; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2018-01-01

    Involuntary force variability below 15 Hz arises from, and is influenced by, many factors including descending neural drive, proprioceptive feedback, and mechanical properties of muscles and tendons. However, their potential interactions that give rise to the well-structured spectrum of involuntary force variability are not well understood due to a lack of experimental techniques. Here, we investigated the generation, modulation, and interactions among different sources of force variability using a physiologically-grounded closed-loop simulation of an afferented muscle model. The closed-loop simulation included a musculotendon model, muscle spindle, Golgi tendon organ (GTO), and a tracking controller which enabled target-guided force tracking. We demonstrate that closed-loop control of an afferented musculotendon suffices to replicate and explain surprisingly many cardinal features of involuntary force variability. Specifically, we present 1) a potential origin of low-frequency force variability associated with co-modulation of motor unit firing rates (i.e.,'common drive'), 2) an in-depth characterization of how proprioceptive feedback pathways suffice to generate 5-12 Hz physiological tremor, and 3) evidence that modulation of those feedback pathways (i.e., presynaptic inhibition of Ia and Ib afferents, and spindle sensitivity via fusimotor drive) influence the full spectrum of force variability. These results highlight the previously underestimated importance of closed-loop neuromechanical interactions in explaining involuntary force variability during voluntary 'isometric' force control. Furthermore, these results provide the basis for a unifying theory that relates spinal circuitry to various manifestations of altered involuntary force variability in fatigue, aging and neurological disease.

  17. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mouse skeletal muscle afferents are heteromers composed of ASIC1a, ASIC2, and ASIC3 subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Gautam, Mamta; Benson, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are expressed in skeletal muscle afferents, in which they sense extracellular acidosis and other metabolites released during ischemia and exercise. ASICs are formed as homotrimers or heterotrimers of several isoforms (ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2a, ASIC2b, and ASIC3), with each channel displaying distinct properties. To dissect the ASIC composition in muscle afferents, we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to study the properties of acid-evoked currents (amplitu...

  18. Abnormal muscle afferent function in a model of Taxol chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaojie; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite muscle pain being a well-described symptom in patients with diverse forms of peripheral neuropathy, the role of neuropathic mechanisms in muscle pain have received remarkably little attention. We have recently demonstrated in a well-established model of chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy (CIPN) that the anti-tumor drug paclitaxel (Taxol) produces mechanical hyperalgesia in skeletal muscle, of similar time course to and with shared mechanism with cutaneous symptoms. In the present...

  19. Glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Handberg, A; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2000-01-01

    , but its expression is markedly reduced around birth and is further reduced to undetectable levels within the first year of life; 2) GLUT-3 protein expression appears at 18 wk of gestation and disappears after birth; and 3) GLUT-4 protein is diffusely expressed in muscle cells throughout gestation, whereas...... after birth, the characteristic subcellular localization is as seen in adult muscle fibers. Our results show that GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 seem to be of importance during muscle fiber growth and development. GLUT-5 protein was undetectable in fetal and adult skeletal muscle fibers. In adult muscle...... amplification (TSA) technique to detect the localization of glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle. We found expression of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 in developing human muscle fibers showing a distinct expression pattern. 1) GLUT-1 is expressed in human skeletal muscle cells during gestation...

  20. Muscle fiber population and biochemical properties of whole body muscles in Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Minako; Minami, Yoshio; Sayama, Yukiko; Kuwano, Atsutoshi; Hiraga, Atsushi; Miyata, Hirofumi

    2009-10-01

    We examine the muscle fiber population and metabolic properties of skeletal muscles from the whole body in Thoroughbred horses. Postmortem samples were taken from 46 sites in six Thoroughbred horses aged between 3 and 6 years. Fiber type population was determined on muscle fibers stained with monoclonal antibody to each myosin heavy chain isoform and metabolic enzyme activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Histochemical analysis demonstrated that most of the muscles had a high percentage of Type IIa fibers. In terms of the muscle characteristic in several parts of the horse body, the forelimb muscles had a higher percentage of Type IIa fiber and a significantly lower percentage of Type IIx fiber than the hindlimb muscles. The muscle fiber type populations in the thoracic and trunk portion were similar to those in the hindlimb portion. Biochemical analysis indicated high succinate dehydrogenase activity in respiratory-related muscle and high phosphofructokinase activity in hindlimbs. We suggested that the higher percentage of Type IIa fibers in Thoroughbred racehorses is attributed to training effects. To consider further the physiological significance of each part of the body, data for the recruitment pattern of each muscle fiber type during exercise are needed. The muscle fiber properties in this study combined with the recruitment data would provide fundamental information for physiological and pathological studies in Thoroughbred horses.

  1. Effect of altering starting length and activation timing of muscle on fiber strain and muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-05-01

    Muscle strain injuries are some of the most frequent injuries in sports and command a great deal of attention in an effort to understand their etiology. These injuries may be the culmination of a series of subcellular events accumulated through repetitive lengthening (eccentric) contractions during exercise, and they may be influenced by a variety of variables including fiber strain magnitude, peak joint torque, and starting muscle length. To assess the influence of these variables on muscle injury magnitude in vivo, we measured fiber dynamics and joint torque production during repeated stretch-shortening cycles in the rabbit tibialis anterior muscle, at short and long muscle lengths, while varying the timing of activation before muscle stretch. We found that a muscle subjected to repeated stretch-shortening cycles of constant muscle-tendon unit excursion exhibits significantly different joint torque and fiber strains when the timing of activation or starting muscle length is changed. In particular, measures of fiber strain and muscle injury were significantly increased by altering activation timing and increasing the starting length of the muscle. However, we observed differential effects on peak joint torque during the cyclic stretch-shortening exercise, as increasing the starting length of the muscle did not increase torque production. We conclude that altering activation timing and muscle length before stretch may influence muscle injury by significantly increasing fiber strain magnitude and that fiber dynamics is a more important variable than muscle-tendon unit dynamics and torque production in influencing the magnitude of muscle injury.

  2. Afferent-mediated modulation of the soleus muscle activity during the stance phase of human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazarena, Mazzaro; Grey, Michael James; do Nascimento, Omar Feix

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of proprioceptive feedback to the amplitude modulation of the soleus muscle activity during human walking. We have previously shown that slow-velocity, small-amplitude ankle dorsiflexion enhancements and reductions applied during the stance...

  3. Acylcarnitines as markers of exercise-associated fuel partitioning, xenometabolism, and potential signals to muscle afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Light, Alan R; Hoppel, Charles L; Campbell, Caitlin; Chandler, Carol J; Burnett, Dustin J; Souza, Elaine C; Casazza, Gretchen A; Hughen, Ronald W; Keim, Nancy L; Newman, John W; Hunter, Gary R; Fernandez, Jose R; Garvey, W Timothy; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Fiehn, Oliver; Adams, Sean H

    2017-01-01

    that a weight-loss/fitness intervention alters plasma xenometabolites [i.e. cis-3,4-methylene-heptanoylcarnitine and γ-butyrobetaine (a co-metabolite possibly derived in part from gut bacteria)], suggesting that host metabolic health regulated gut microbe metabolism. Finally, we considered whether acylcarnitine metabolites signal to muscle-innervating afferents; palmitoylcarnitine at concentrations as low as 1-10 μm activated a subset (∼2.5-5%) of these neurons ex vivo. This supports the hypothesis that in addition to tracking exercise-associated shifts in fuel metabolism, muscle acylcarnitines act as signals of exertion to short-loop somatosensory-motor circuits or to the brain. © 2016 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  4. MOTOR UNIT TERRITORIES AND FIBER TYPES IN RABBIT MASSETER MUSCLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WEIJS, WA; JUCH, PJW; KWA, SHS; KORFAGE, JAM

    1993-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) content and spatial distribution of the fibers of 11 motor units (MUs) of the rabbit masseter muscle were determined. The fibers of single MUs were visualized in whole-muscle serial sections by a negative periodic acid/Schiff reaction for glycogen after they had been

  5. Muscle organizers in Drosophila: the role of persistent larval fibers in adult flight muscle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, E. R.; Fernandes, J.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    In many organisms muscle formation depends on specialized cells that prefigure the pattern of the musculature and serve as templates for myoblast organization and fusion. These include muscle pioneers in insects and muscle organizing cells in leech. In Drosophila, muscle founder cells have been proposed to play a similar role in organizing larval muscle development during embryogenesis. During metamorphosis in Drosophila, following histolysis of most of the larval musculature, there is a second round of myogenesis that gives rise to the adult muscles. It is not known whether muscle founder cells organize the development of these muscles. However, in the thorax specific larval muscle fibers do not histolyze at the onset of metamorphosis, but instead serve as templates for the formation of a subset of adult muscles, the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs). Because these persistent larval muscle fibers appear to be functioning in many respects like muscle founder cells, we investigated whether they were necessary for DLM development by using a microbeam laser to ablate them singly and in combination. We found that, in the absence of the larval muscle fibers, DLMs nonetheless develop. Our results show that the persistent larval muscle fibers are not required to initiate myoblast fusion, to determine DLM identity, to locate the DLMs in the thorax, or to specify the total DLM fiber volume. However, they are required to regulate the number of DLM fibers generated. Thus, while the persistent larval muscle fibers are not obligatory for DLM fiber formation and differentiation, they are necessary to ensure the development of the correct number of fibers.

  6. Preferential type II muscle fiber damage from plyometric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Filippo; Isaacs, Ashwin W; Myburgh, Kathryn H

    2012-01-01

    Plyometric training has been successfully used in different sporting contexts. Studies that investigated the effect of plyometric training on muscle morphology are limited, and results are controversial with regard to which muscle fiber type is mainly affected. To analyze the skeletal muscle structural and ultrastructural change induced by an acute bout of plyometric exercise to determine which type of muscle fibers is predominantly damaged. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Eight healthy, untrained individuals (age = 22 ± 1 years, height = 179.2 ± 6.4 cm, weight = 78.9 ± 5.9 kg). Participants completed an acute bout of plyometric exercise (10 sets of 10 squat-jumps with a 1-minute rest between sets). Blood samples were collected 9 days and immediately before and 6 hours and 1, 2, and 3 days after the acute intervention. Muscle samples were collected 9 days before and 3 days after the exercise intervention. Blood samples were analyzed for creatine kinase activity. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for damage using fluorescent and electron transmission microscopy. Creatine kinase activity peaked 1 day after the exercise bout (529.0 ± 317.8 U/L). Immunofluorescence revealed sarcolemmal damage in 155 of 1616 fibers analyzed. Mainly fast-twitch fibers were damaged. Within subgroups, 7.6% of type I fibers, 10.3% of type IIa fibers, and 14.3% of type IIx fibers were damaged as assessed by losses in dystrophin staining. Similar damage was prevalent in IIx and IIa fibers. Electron microscopy revealed clearly distinguishable moderate and severe sarcomere damage, with damage quantifiably predominant in type II muscle fibers of both the glycolytic and oxidative subtypes (86% and 84%, respectively, versus only 27% of slow-twitch fibers). We provide direct evidence that a single bout of plyometric exercise affected mainly type II muscle fibers.

  7. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John J.; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B.; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A.; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Esser, Karyn A.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2011-01-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca2+ sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells. PMID:21828094

  8. Changes in muscle fiber contractility and extracellular matrix production during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, Christopher L; Schwartz, Andrew J; Grekin, Jeremy A; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Sugg, Kristoffer B

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle can adapt to increased mechanical loads by undergoing hypertrophy. Transient reductions in whole muscle force production have been reported during the onset of hypertrophy, but contractile changes in individual muscle fibers have not been previously studied. Additionally, the extracellular matrix (ECM) stores and transmits forces from muscle fibers to tendons and bones, and determining how the ECM changes during hypertrophy is important in understanding the adaptation of muscle tissue to mechanical loading. Using the synergist ablation model, we sought to measure changes in muscle fiber contractility, collagen content, and cross-linking, and in the expression of several genes and activation of signaling proteins that regulate critical components of myogenesis and ECM synthesis and remodeling during muscle hypertrophy. Tissues were harvested 3, 7, and 28 days after induction of hypertrophy, and nonoverloaded rats served as controls. Muscle fiber specific force (sF o ), which is the maximum isometric force normalized to cross-sectional area, was reduced 3 and 7 days after the onset of mechanical overload, but returned to control levels by 28 days. Collagen abundance displayed a similar pattern of change. Nearly a quarter of the transcriptome changed over the course of overload, as well as the activation of signaling pathways related to hypertrophy and atrophy. Overall, this study provides insight into fundamental mechanisms of muscle and ECM growth, and indicates that although muscle fibers appear to have completed remodeling and regeneration 1 mo after synergist ablation, the ECM continues to be actively remodeling at this time point. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study utilized a rat synergist ablation model to integrate changes in single muscle fiber contractility, extracellular matrix composition, activation of important signaling pathways in muscle adaption, and corresponding changes in the muscle transcriptome to provide novel insight into the basic

  9. Anatomy and physiology of phrenic afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Jayakrishnan; Streeter, Kristi A; Turner, Sara M F; Sunshine, Michael D; Bolser, Donald C; Fox, Emily J; Davenport, Paul W; Fuller, David D

    2017-12-01

    Large-diameter myelinated phrenic afferents discharge in phase with diaphragm contraction, and smaller diameter fibers discharge across the respiratory cycle. In this article, we review the phrenic afferent literature and highlight areas in need of further study. We conclude that 1 ) activation of both myelinated and nonmyelinated phrenic sensory afferents can influence respiratory motor output on a breath-by-breath basis; 2 ) the relative impact of phrenic afferents substantially increases with diaphragm work and fatigue; 3 ) activation of phrenic afferents has a powerful impact on sympathetic motor outflow, and 4 ) phrenic afferents contribute to diaphragm somatosensation and the conscious perception of breathing. Much remains to be learned regarding the spinal and supraspinal distribution and synaptic contacts of myelinated and nonmyelinated phrenic afferents. Similarly, very little is known regarding the potential role of phrenic afferent neurons in triggering or modulating expression of respiratory neuroplasticity. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Repeated blood flow restriction induces muscle fiber hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Mizuki; Ando, Soichi; Kano, Yutaka

    2017-02-01

    We recently developed an animal model to investigate the effects of eccentric contraction (ECC) and blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscle tissue at the cellular level. This study clarified the effects of repeated BFR, ECC, and BFR combined with ECC (BFR+ECC) on muscle fiber hypertrophy. Male Wistar rats were assigned to 3 groups: BFR, ECC, and BFR+ECC. The contralateral leg in the BFR group served as a control (CONT). Muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of the tibialis anterior was determined after the respective treatments for 6 weeks. CSA was greater in the BFR+ECC group than in the CONT (P muscle fiber hypertrophy at the cellular level. Muscle Nerve 55: 274-276, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Muscle spindle thixotropy affects force perception through afferent-induced facilitation of the motor pathways as revealed by the Kohnstamm effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjo, Florian; Forestier, Nicolas

    2018-04-01

    This study was designed to explore the effects of intrafusal thixotropy, a property affecting muscle spindle sensitivity, on the sense of force. For this purpose, psychophysical measurements of force perception were performed using an isometric force matching paradigm of elbow flexors consisting of matching different force magnitudes (5, 10 and 20% of subjects' maximal voluntary force). We investigated participants' capacity to match these forces after their indicator arm had undergone voluntary isometric conditioning contractions known to alter spindle thixotropy, i.e., contractions performed at long ('hold long') or short muscle lengths ('hold short'). In parallel, their reference arm was conditioned at the intermediate muscle length ('hold-test') at which the matchings were performed. The thixotropy hypothesis predicts that estimation errors should only be observed at low force levels (up to 10% of the maximal voluntary force) with overestimation of the forces produced following 'hold short' conditioning and underestimation following 'hold long' conditioning. We found the complete opposite, especially following 'hold-short' conditioning where subjects underestimated the force they generated with similar relative error magnitudes across force levels. In a second experiment, we tested the hypothesis that estimation errors depended on the degree of afferent-induced facilitation using the Kohnstamm phenomenon as a probe of motor pathway excitability. Because the stronger post-effects were observed following 'hold-short' conditioning, it appears that the conditioning-induced excitation of spindle afferents leads to force misjudgments by introducing a decoupling between the central effort and the cortical motor outputs.

  12. Group II muscle afferents probably contribute to the medium latency soleus stretch reflex during walking in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Ladouceur, Michel; Andersen, Jacob B.

    2001-01-01

    1. The objective of this study was to determine which afferents contribute to the medium latency response of the soleus stretch reflex resulting from an unexpected perturbation during human walking. 2. Fourteen healthy subjects walked on a treadmill at approximately 3.5 km h(-1) with the left ankle...... = 0.007), whereas the short latency component was unchanged (P = 0.653). 7. An ankle block with lidocaine hydrochloride was performed to suppress the cutaneous afferents of the foot and ankle. Neither the short (P = 0.453) nor medium (P = 0.310) latency reflexes were changed. 8. Our results support...

  13. Striated muscle fiber size, composition and capillary density in diabetes in relation to neuropathy and muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Christer Swan; Jensen, Jacob Malte; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    study was to evaluate histologic properties and capillarization of diabetic skeletal muscle in relation to DPN and muscle strength. METHODS: Twenty type 1 and 20 type 2 diabetic (T1D and T2D, respectively) patients underwent biopsy of the gastrocnemic muscle, isokinetic dynamometry at the ankle...... between muscle fiber diameter, muscle fiber type distribution, or capillary density and degree of neuropathy or muscle strength for either patient group. Muscle fiber diameter and the proportion of Type II fibers were greater for T1D patients than both T2D patients and controls. The T2D patients had fewer...

  14. Theory of the tensile actuation of fiber reinforced coiled muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamuta, C.; Messelot, S.; Tawfick, S.

    2018-05-01

    There is a strong need for compact artificial muscles capable of applying large contractile strokes and lift heavy weights. Coiled fibers recently emerged as attractive candidates for these purposes, owing to their simple construction and the possibility of their thermal, electrical and chemical actuation. An intuitive theoretical understanding of the mechanics of actuation of these muscles is essential for the enhancement of their performance and can pave the way for the development of new applications and technologies. In this paper, a complete theoretical model for the tensile actuation of fiber reinforced artificial muscles is presented and experimentally validated. The model demonstrates that all muscles made from the same material have a universal behavior, which can be described by a single master curve. It enables the systematic design and understanding of coiled muscles for specific performance owing to a comprehensive mathematical correlation among the geometry, materials properties, and actuation. Carbon fibers (CF)/polydimethylsiloxane coiled muscles are demonstrated as simple to fabricate yet powerful muscles owing to the availability of high strength CF. In addition to showing excellent agreement with the theoretical models, they can be actuated by joule heating or chemical swelling, lift up to 12 600 times their own weight, support up to 60 MPa of mechanical stress, provide tensile strokes higher than 25%, and a specific work up to 758 J kg‑1, the latter is more than 18 times higher than that of natural muscles.

  15. Stimulation of renal afferent fibers leads to activation of catecholaminergic and non-catecholaminergic neurons in the medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Erika E; Martins, Beatriz S; Milanez, Maycon I O; Lopes, Nathalia R; de Melo, Jose F; Pontes, Roberto B; Girardi, Adriana C; Campos, Ruy R; Bergamaschi, Cássia T

    2017-05-01

    Presympathetic neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) including the adrenergic cell groups play a major role in the modulation of several reflexes required for the control of sympathetic vasomotor tone and blood pressure (BP). Moreover, sympathetic vasomotor drive to the kidneys influence natriuresis and diuresis by inhibiting the cAMP/PKA pathway and redistributing the Na + /H + exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) to the body of the microvilli in the proximal tubules. In this study we aimed to evaluate the effects of renal afferents stimulation on (1) the neurochemical phenotype of Fos expressing neurons in the medulla oblongata and (2) the level of abundance and phosphorylation of NHE3 in the renal cortex. We found that electrical stimulation of renal afferents increased heart rate and BP transiently and caused activation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons in the RVLM and non-TH neurons in the NTS. Additionally, activation of the inhibitory renorenal reflex over a 30-min period resulted in increased natriuresis and diuresis associated with increased phosphorylation of NHE3 at serine 552, a surrogate for reduced activity of this exchanger, in the contralateral kidney. This effect was not dependent of BP changes considering that no effects on natriuresis or diuresis were found in the ipsilateral-stimulated kidney. Therefore, our data show that renal afferents leads to activation of catecholaminergic and non-catecholaminergic neurons in the medulla oblongata. When renorenal reflex is induced, NHE3 exchanger activity appears to be decreased, resulting in decreased sodium and water reabsorption in the contralateral kidney. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Satellite cell depletion prevents fiber hypertrophy in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, Ingrid M; Bruusgaard, Jo C; Gundersen, Kristian

    2016-08-15

    The largest mammalian cells are the muscle fibers, and they have multiple nuclei to support their large cytoplasmic volumes. During hypertrophic growth, new myonuclei are recruited from satellite stem cells into the fiber syncytia, but it was recently suggested that such recruitment is not obligatory: overload hypertrophy after synergist ablation of the plantaris muscle appeared normal in transgenic mice in which most of the satellite cells were abolished. When we essentially repeated these experiments analyzing the muscles by immunohistochemistry and in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we found that overload hypertrophy was prevented in the satellite cell-deficient mice, in both the plantaris and the extensor digitorum longus muscles. We attribute the previous findings to a reliance on muscle mass as a proxy for fiber hypertrophy, and to the inclusion of a significant number of regenerating fibers in the analysis. We discuss that there is currently no model in which functional, sustainable hypertrophy has been unequivocally demonstrated in the absence of satellite cells; an exception is re-growth, which can occur using previously recruited myonuclei without addition of new myonuclei. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Interdependency between mechanical parameters and afferent nerve discharge in remodeled diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Yang, Jian; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders are very common in diabetic patients, but the pathogenesis is still not well understood. Peripheral afferent nerves may be involved due to the complex regulation of gastrointestinal function by the enteric nervous system. We aimed to characterize the stimulus-response function of afferent fibers innervating the jejunum in the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) type 2 diabetic rat model. A key question is whether changes in afferent firing arise from remodeled tissue or from adaptive afferent processes. Seven 32-week-old male GK rats and seven age-matched normal Wistar rats were studied. Firing from mesenteric afferent nerves was recorded in excised jejunal segments of seven GK rats and seven normal Wistar rats during ramp test, stress relaxation test, and creep test. The circumferential stress-strain, spike rate increase ratio (SRIR), and single unit firing rates were calculated for evaluation of interdependency of the mechanical stimulations and the afferent nerve discharge. Elevated sensitivity to mechanical stimuli was found for diabetic nerve bundles and single unit activity ( P <0.05). The stress relaxed less in the diabetic intestinal segment ( P <0.05). Linear association between SRIR and the thickness of circumferential muscle layer was found at high stress levels as well as for SRIR and the glucose level. Altered viscoelastic properties and elevated mechanosensitivity were found in the GK rat intestine. The altered nerve signaling is related to muscle layer remodeling and glucose levels and may contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms experienced by diabetic patients.

  18. Single muscle fiber gene expression with run taper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Murach

    Full Text Available This study evaluated gene expression changes in gastrocnemius slow-twitch myosin heavy chain I (MHC I and fast-twitch (MHC IIa muscle fibers of collegiate cross-country runners (n = 6, 20±1 y, VO₂max = 70±1 ml•kg-1•min-1 during two distinct training phases. In a controlled environment, runners performed identical 8 kilometer runs (30:18±0:30 min:s, 89±1% HRmax while in heavy training (∼72 km/wk and following a 3 wk taper. Training volume during the taper leading into peak competition was reduced ∼50% which resulted in improved race times and greater cross-section and improved function of MHC IIa fibers. Single muscle fibers were isolated from pre and 4 hour post run biopsies in heavily trained and tapered states to examine the dynamic acute exercise response of the growth-related genes Fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (FN14, Myostatin (MSTN, Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72, Muscle ring-finger protein-1 (MURF1, Myogenic factor 6 (MRF4, and Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 via qPCR. FN14 increased 4.3-fold in MHC IIa fibers with exercise in the tapered state (P<0.05. MSTN was suppressed with exercise in both fiber types and training states (P<0.05 while MURF1 and HSP72 responded to running in MHC IIa and I fibers, respectively, regardless of training state (P<0.05. Robust induction of FN14 (previously shown to strongly correlate with hypertrophy and greater overall transcriptional flexibility with exercise in the tapered state provides an initial molecular basis for fast-twitch muscle fiber performance gains previously observed after taper in competitive endurance athletes.

  19. Energetic aspects of skeletal muscle contraction: implications of fiber types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, J A

    1985-01-01

    In this chapter fundamental energetic properties of skeletal muscles as elucidated from isolated muscle preparations are described. Implications of these intrinsic properties for the energetic characterization of different fiber types and for the understanding of locomotion have been considered. Emphasis was placed on the myriad of physical and chemical techniques that can be employed to understand muscle energetics and on the interrelationship of results from different techniques. The anaerobic initial processes which liberate energy during contraction and relaxation are discussed in detail. The high-energy phosphate (approximately P) utilized during contraction and relaxation can be distributed between actomyosin ATPase or cross-bridge cycling (70%) and the Ca2+ ATPase of the sacroplasmic reticulum (30%). Muscle shortening increases the rate of approximately P hydrolysis, and stretching a muscle during contraction suppresses the rate of approximately P hydrolysis. The economy of an isometric contraction is defined as the ratio of isometric mechanical response to energetic cost and is shown to be a fundamental intrinsic parameter describing muscle energetics. Economy of contraction varies across the animal kingdom by over three orders of magnitude and is different in different mammalian fiber types. In mammalian skeletal muscles differences in economy of contraction can be attributed mainly to differences in the specific actomyosin and Ca2+ ATPase of muscles. Furthermore, there is an inverse relationship between economy of contraction and maximum velocity of muscle shortening (Vmax) and maximum power output. This is a fundamental relationship. Muscles cannot be economical at developing and maintaining force and also exhibit rapid shortening. Interestingly, there appears to be a subtle system of unknown nature that modulates the Vmax and economy of contraction. Efficiency of a work-producing contraction is defined and contrasted to the economy of contraction

  20. Electrically and hybrid-induced muscle activations: effects of muscle size and fiber type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Stratton

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of three electrical stimulation (ES frequencies (10, 35, and 50 Hz on two muscle groups with different proportions of fast and slow twitch fibers (abductor pollicis brevis (APB and vastus lateralis (VL was explored. We evaluated the acute muscles’ responses individually and during hybrid activations (ES superimposed by voluntary activations. Surface electromyography (sEMG and force measurements were evaluated as outcomes. Ten healthy adults (mean age: 24.4 ± 2.5 years participated after signing an informed consent form approved by the university Institutional Review Board. Protocols were developed to: 1 compare EMG activities during each frequency for each muscle when generating 25% Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC force, and 2 compare EMG activities during each frequency when additional voluntary activation was superimposed over ES-induced 25% MVC to reach 50% and 75% MVC. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD was utilized to separate ES artifacts from voluntary muscle activation. For both muscles, higher stimulation frequency (35 and 50Hz induced higher electrical output detected at 25% of MVC, suggesting more recruitment with higher frequencies. Hybrid activation generated proportionally less electrical activity than ES alone. ES and voluntary activations appear to generate two different modes of muscle recruitment. ES may provoke muscle strength by activating more fatiguing fast acting fibers, but voluntary activation elicits more muscle coordination. Therefore, during the hybrid activation, less electrical activity may be detected due to recruitment of more fatigue-resistant deeper muscle fibers, not reachable by surface EMG.

  1. Biochemical adaptations of antigravity muscle fibers to disuse atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Studies are presented in four parts of this report. The four parts include; (1) studies to gain information on the molecular basis of atrophy by antigravity muscle; (2) studies on the work capacity of antigravity muscles during atrophy and during recovery from atrophy; (3) studies on recovery of degenerated antigravity fibers after removal of hind-limb casts; and (4) studies on the atrophy and recovery of bone. The philosophy of these studies was to identify the time sequence of events in the soleus muscle of the rat following immobilization of the hind limbs, so that the length of the soleus muscle within the fixed limb is less than its resting length. In two separate studies, no decline in the weight of the soleus muscle could be detected during the first 72 hours of limb immobilization.

  2. Pervasive satellite cell contribution to uninjured adult muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowski, Bradley; Pulliam, Crystal; Betta, Nicole Dalla; Kardon, Gabrielle; Olwin, Bradley B

    2015-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle adapts to functional needs, maintaining consistent numbers of myonuclei and stem cells. Although resident muscle stem cells or satellite cells are required for muscle growth and repair, in uninjured muscle, these cells appear quiescent and metabolically inactive. To investigate the satellite cell contribution to myofibers in adult uninjured skeletal muscle, we labeled satellite cells by inducing a recombination of LSL-tdTomato in Pax7(CreER) mice and scoring tdTomato+ myofibers as an indicator of satellite cell fusion. Satellite cell fusion into myofibers plateaus postnatally between 8 and 12 weeks of age, reaching a steady state in hindlimb muscles, but in extra ocular or diaphragm muscles, satellite cell fusion is maintained at postnatal levels irrespective of the age assayed. Upon recombination and following a 2-week chase in 6-month-old mice, tdTomato-labeled satellite cells fused into myofibers as 20, 50, and 80 % of hindlimb, extra ocular, and diaphragm myofibers, respectively, were tdTomato+. Satellite cells contribute to uninjured myofibers either following a cell division or directly without an intervening cell division. The frequency of satellite cell fusion into the skeletal muscle fibers is greater than previously estimated, suggesting an important functional role for satellite cell fusion into adult myofibers and a requirement for active maintenance of satellite cell numbers in uninjured skeletal muscle.

  3. Overexpression of SMPX in adult skeletal muscle does not change skeletal muscle fiber type or size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einar Eftestøl

    Full Text Available Mechanical factors such as stretch are thought to be important in the regulation of muscle phenotype. Small muscle protein X-linked (SMPX is upregulated by stretch in skeletal muscle and has been suggested to serve both as a transcription factor and a mechanosensor, possibly giving rise to changes in both fiber size and fiber type. We have used in vivo confocal imaging to study the subcellular localization of SMPX in skeletal muscle fibers of adult rats using a SMPX-EGFP fusion protein. The fusion protein was localized predominantly in repetitive double stripes flanking the Z-disc, and was excluded from all nuclei. This localization would be consistent with SMPX being a mechanoreceptor, but not with SMPX playing a role as a transcription factor. In vivo overexpression of ectopic SMPX in skeletal muscle of adult mice gave no significant changes in fiber type distribution or cross sectional area, thus a role of SMPX in regulating muscle phenotype remains unclear.

  4. Fresh muscle fiber fragments on a scaffold in rats-a new concept in urogynecology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boennelycke, Marie; Christensen, Lise; Nielsen, Lene F

    2011-01-01

    To investigate if a synthetic, biodegradable scaffold with either autologous in vitro cultured muscle-derived cells or autologous fresh muscle fiber fragments could be used for tissue repair.......To investigate if a synthetic, biodegradable scaffold with either autologous in vitro cultured muscle-derived cells or autologous fresh muscle fiber fragments could be used for tissue repair....

  5. Myoglobin plasma level related to muscle mass and fiber composition: a clinical marker of muscle wasting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Marc-André; Kinscherf, Ralf; Krakowski-Roosen, Holger; Aulmann, Michael; Renk, Hanna; Künkele, Annette; Edler, Lutz; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hildebrandt, Wulf

    2007-08-01

    Progressive muscle wasting is a central feature of cancer-related cachexia and has been recognized as a determinant of poor prognosis and quality of life. However, until now, no easily assessable clinical marker exists that allows to predict or to track muscle wasting. The present study evaluated the potential of myoglobin (MG) plasma levels to indicate wasting of large locomotor muscles and, moreover, to reflect the loss of MG-rich fiber types, which are most relevant for daily performance. In 17 cancer-cachectic patients (weight loss 22%) and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls, we determined plasma levels of MG and creatine kinase (CK), maximal quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) by magnetic resonance imaging, muscle morphology and fiber composition in biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle, body cell mass (BCM) by impedance technique as well as maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max). In cachectic patients, plasma MG, muscle CSA, BCM, and VO(2)max were 30-35% below control levels. MG showed a significant positive correlation to total muscle CSA (r = 0.65, p max as an important functional readout. CK plasma levels appear to be less reliable because prolonged increases are observed in even subclinical myopathies or after exercise. Notably, cancer-related muscle wasting was not associated with increases in plasma MG or CK in this study.

  6. Direct evidence of fiber type-dependent GLUT-4 expression in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Poulsen, P; Handberg, A

    2000-01-01

    GLUT-4 expression in individual fibers of human skeletal muscles in younger and older adults was studied. Furthermore, the dependency of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake on fiber type distribution was investigated. Fiber type distribution was determined in cryosections of muscle biopsies from 8...... of slow fibers in the young (r = -0.45, P > 0.25) or in the elderly (r = 0. 11, P > 0.75) subjects. In conclusion, in human skeletal muscle, GLUT-4 expression is fiber type dependent and decreases with age, particularly in fast muscle fibers....

  7. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1 (PGC-1α) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  8. The effect of resistance training combined with timed ingestion of protein on muscle fiber size and muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.L.; Tufekovic, G.; Zebis, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    of resistance training combined with timed ingestion of isoenergetic protein vs carbohydrate supplementation on muscle fiber hypertrophy and mechanical muscle performance. Supplementation was administered before and immediately after each training bout and, in addition, in the morning on nontraining days...

  9. Muscle fiber velocity and electromyographic signs of fatigue in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaver-Król, Ewa G; Rasker, Johannes J; Henriquez, Nizare R; Verheijen, Wilma G; Zwarts, Machiel J

    2012-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder of widespread muscular pain. We investigated possible differences in surface electromyography (sEMG) in clinically unaffected muscle between patients with FM and controls. sEMG was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 13 women with FM and 14 matched healthy controls during prolonged dynamic exercises, unloaded, and loaded up to 20% of maximum voluntary contraction. The sEMG parameters were: muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV); skewness of motor unit potential (peak) velocities; peak frequency (PF) (number of peaks per second); and average rectified voltage (ARV). There was significantly higher CV in the FM group. Although the FM group performed the tests equally well, their electromyographic fatigue was significantly less expressed compared with controls (in CV, PF, and ARV). In the patients with FM, we clearly showed functional abnormalities of the muscle membrane, which led to high conduction velocity and resistance to fatigue in electromyography. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) with chronic cough and preserved muscle stretch reflexes: evidence for selective sparing of afferent Ia fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Jon; García, Antonio; Serrano-Cárdenas, Karla M; González-Aguado, Rocío; Gazulla, José; de Lucas, Enrique M; Berciano, José

    2018-04-25

    The aim of this study was to describe five patients with cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) with chronic cough and preserved limb muscle stretch reflexes. All five patients were in the seventh decade of age, their gait imbalance having been initiated in the fifth decade. In four patients cough antedated gait imbalance between 15 and 29 years; cough was spasmodic and triggered by variable factors. Established clinical picture included severe hypopallesthesia predominating in the lower limbs with postural imbalance, and variable degree of cerebellar axial and appendicular ataxia, dysarthria and horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus. Upper- and lower-limb tendon jerks were preserved, whereas jaw jerk was absent. Vestibular function testing showed bilateral impairment of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Nerve conduction studies demonstrated normal motor conduction parameters and absence or severe attenuation of sensory nerve action potentials. Somatosensory evoked potentials were absent or severely attenuated. Biceps and femoral T-reflex recordings were normal, while masseter reflex was absent or attenuated. Sympathetic skin responses were normal. Cranial MRI showed vermian and hemispheric cerebellar atrophy predominating in lobules VI, VII and VIIa. We conclude that spasmodic cough may be an integral part of the clinical picture in CANVAS, antedating the appearance of imbalance in several decades and that sparing of muscle spindle afferents (Ia fibres) is probably the pathophysiological basis of normoreflexia.

  11. Induction of GLUT-1 protein in adult human skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Franch, J; Staehr, P

    2000-01-01

    Prompted by our recent observations that GLUT-1 is expressed in fetal muscles, but not in adult muscle fibers, we decided to investigate whether GLUT-1 expression could be reactivated. We studied different stimuli concerning their ability to induce GLUT-1 expression in mature human skeletal muscle...... fibers. Metabolic stress (obesity, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), contractile activity (training), and conditions of de- and reinnervation (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) could not induce GLUT-1 expression in human muscle fibers. However, regenerating muscle fibers in polymyositis expressed...... GLUT-1. In contrast to GLUT-1, GLUT-4 was expressed in all investigated muscle fibers. Although the significance of GLUT-1 in adult human muscle fibers appears limited, GLUT-1 may be of importance for the glucose supplies in immature and regenerating muscle....

  12. Afferent fibers and sensory ganglion cells within the oculomotor nerve in some mammals and man. II. Electrophysiological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, E; Bortolami, R; Pettorossi, V E; Lucchi, M L; Callegari, E

    1978-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to localize with electrophysiological techniques the central projections and terminations of the aberrant trigeminal fibres contained in the oculomotor nerve of the lamb. After severing a trigeminal root, single-shock electrical stimulation of the trigeminal axons present in the central stump of the ipsilateral oculomotor nerve evoked field potentials in the area of, i) the subnucleus gelatinosus of the nucleus caudalis trigemini at the level of C1-C2; ii) the main sensory trigeminal nucleus; iii) the descending trigeminal nucleus and tract; iv) the adjacent reticular formation. Units whose discharge rate was influenced by such a stimulation were also found in the same territories. These regions actually exhibited degenerations after cutting an oculomotor nerve. We conclude, therefore, that the trigeminal fibres which leave the Vth nerve at the level of the cavernous sinus and enter the brain stem through the IIIrd nerve, end in the same structures which receive the terminations of the afferent fibres entering the brain stem through the sensory trigeminal root.

  13. Fiber type effects on contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 abundance in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorena, Carlos M; Arias, Edward B; Sharma, Naveen; Bogan, Jonathan S; Cartee, Gregory D

    2015-02-01

    To fully understand skeletal muscle at the cellular level, it is essential to evaluate single muscle fibers. Accordingly, the major goals of this study were to determine if there are fiber type-related differences in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle for: 1) contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and/or 2) the abundance of GLUT4 and other metabolically relevant proteins. Paired epitrochlearis muscles isolated from Wistar rats were either electrically stimulated to contract (E-Stim) or remained resting (No E-Stim). Single fibers isolated from muscles incubated with 2-deoxy-d-[(3)H]glucose (2-DG) were used to determine fiber type [myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform protein expression], 2-DG uptake, and abundance of metabolically relevant proteins, including the GLUT4 glucose transporter. E-Stim, relative to No E-Stim, fibers had greater (P contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Modeling the dispersion effects of contractile fibers in smooth muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtada, Sae-Il; Kroon, Martin; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2010-12-01

    Micro-structurally based models for smooth muscle contraction are crucial for a better understanding of pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, incontinence and asthma. It is meaningful that models consider the underlying mechanical structure and the biochemical activation. Hence, a simple mechanochemical model is proposed that includes the dispersion of the orientation of smooth muscle myofilaments and that is capable to capture available experimental data on smooth muscle contraction. This allows a refined study of the effects of myofilament dispersion on the smooth muscle contraction. A classical biochemical model is used to describe the cross-bridge interactions with the thin filament in smooth muscles in which calcium-dependent myosin phosphorylation is the only regulatory mechanism. A novel mechanical model considers the dispersion of the contractile fiber orientations in smooth muscle cells by means of a strain-energy function in terms of one dispersion parameter. All model parameters have a biophysical meaning and may be estimated through comparisons with experimental data. The contraction of the middle layer of a carotid artery is studied numerically. Using a tube the relationships between the internal pressure and the stretches are investigated as functions of the dispersion parameter, which implies a strong influence of the orientation of smooth muscle myofilaments on the contraction response. It is straightforward to implement this model in a finite element code to better analyze more complex boundary-value problems.

  15. Effect of one stretch a week applied to the immobilized soleus muscle on rat muscle fiber morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes A.R.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the effect of stretching applied once a week to the soleus muscle immobilized in the shortened position on muscle fiber morphology. Twenty-six male Wistar rats weighing 269 ± 26 g were divided into three groups. Group I, the left soleus was immobilized in the shortened position for 3 weeks; group II, the soleus was immobilized in the shortened position and stretched once a week for 3 weeks; group III, the soleus was submitted only to stretching once a week for 3 weeks. The medial part of the soleus muscle was frozen for histology and muscle fiber area evaluation and the lateral part was used for the determination of number and length of serial sarcomeres. Soleus muscle submitted only to immobilization showed a reduction in weight (44 ± 6%, P = 0.002, in serial sarcomere number (23 ± 15% and in cross-sectional area of the fibers (37 ± 31%, P < 0.001 compared to the contralateral muscles. The muscle that was immobilized and stretched showed less muscle fiber atrophy than the muscles only immobilized (P < 0.05. Surprisingly, in the muscles submitted only to stretching, fiber area was decreased compared to the contralateral muscle (2548 ± 659 vs 2961 ± 806 µm², respectively, P < 0.05. In conclusion, stretching applied once a week for 40 min to the soleus muscle immobilized in the shortened position was not sufficient to prevent the reduction of muscle weight and of serial sarcomere number, but provided significant protection against muscle fiber atrophy. In contrast, stretching normal muscles once a week caused a reduction in muscle fiber area.

  16. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor signaling prevents muscle fiber growth during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugg, Kristoffer B; Korn, Michael A; Sarver, Dylan C; Markworth, James F; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptors alpha and beta (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) mark fibroadipogenic progenitor cells/fibroblasts and pericytes in skeletal muscle, respectively. While the role that these cells play in muscle growth and development has been evaluated, it was not known whether the PDGF receptors activate signaling pathways that control transcriptional and functional changes during skeletal muscle hypertrophy. To evaluate this, we inhibited PDGFR signaling in mice subjected to a synergist ablation muscle growth procedure, and performed analyses 3 and 10 days after induction of hypertrophy. The results from this study indicate that PDGF signaling is required for fiber hypertrophy, extracellular matrix production, and angiogenesis that occur during muscle growth. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline adjust actions of myelinated afferents via modulation of presynaptic inhibition in the mouse spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L García-Ramírez

    Full Text Available Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD. PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT, dopamine (DA and noradrenaline (NA on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs. The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75% but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic

  18. Ultrastructure of striated muscle fibers in the middle third of the human esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Faussone-Pellegrini, M.S; Cortesini, C.

    1986-01-01

    Striated muscle fibers and .their spatial relationship to smooth muscle cells have been studied in the middle third of human esophagus. Biopsies were obtained from 3 patients during surgery. In both the circular and longitudinal layers, the muscle coat of this transition zone was composed of fascicles of uniform dimensioi~ (100-200 pm of diameter); some of these bundles were made up of striated muscle fibers, others were pure bundles of smooth muscle cells and ...

  19. Single muscle fiber gene expression in human skeletal muscle: validation of internal control with exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jemiolo, Bozena; Trappe, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Reverse transcription and real-time PCR have become the method of choice for the detection of low-abundance mRNA transcripts obtained from small human muscle biopsy samples. GAPDH, β-actin, β-2M, and 18S rRNA are widely employed as endogenous control genes, with the assumption that their expression is unregulated and constant for given experimental conditions. The aim of this study was to determine if mRNA transcripts could be performed on isolated human single muscle fibers and to determine reliable housekeeping genes (HKGs) using quantitative gene expression protocols at rest and in response to an acute exercise bout. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the gastrocnemius of three adult males before, immediately after, and 4 h following 30 min of treadmill running at 70% of VO 2 max. A total of 40 single fibers (MHC I and IIa) were examined for GAPDH, β-actin, β-2M, and 18S rRNA using quantitative RT-PCR and SYBR Green detection. All analyzed single fiber segments showed ribosomal RNA (28S/18S). No degradation or additional bands below ribosomal were detected (rRNA ratio 1.5-1.8). Also, no high or low-molecular weight genomic DNA contamination was observed. For each housekeeping gene the duplicate average SD was ±0.13 with a CV of 0.58%. Stable expression of GAPDH was observed at all time points for each fiber type (MHC I and IIa). Inconsistent expression of β-actin, β-2M, and 18S rRNA was observed during the post-exercise time points for each fiber type. These data indicate that successful extraction of high quality RNA from human single muscle fibers along with quantification of mRNA of selected genes can be performed. Furthermore, exercise does influence the expression of certain HKGs with GAPDH being the most stable

  20. Mechanical muscle function, morphology, and fiber type in lifelong trained elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Per; Magnusson, Peter S; Larsson, Benny

    2007-01-01

    compared with U, and S also demonstrated greater type II fiber CSA than did U and E. The proportion of type I fibers was greater in E compared with U and S. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle fiber size and mechanical muscle performance, particularly RFD, were consistently elevated in aged individuals exposed to chronic...

  1. Immunohistochemical detection of interleukin-6 in human skeletal muscle fibers following exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Keller, Charlotte; Keller, Pernille

    2003-01-01

    individuals. The IL-6 immunostainings of skeletal muscle cells were homogeneous and without difference between muscle fiber types. The IL-6 mRNA peaked immediately after the exercise, and, in accordance, the IL-6 protein expression within muscle cells was most pronounced around 3 h post-exercise. However......, the finding that plasma IL-6 concentration peaked in the end of exercise indicates a high turnover of muscle-derived IL-6. In conclusion, the finding of marked IL-6 protein expression exclusively within skeletal muscle fibers following exercise demonstrates that skeletal muscle fibers of all types...

  2. Interdependency between mechanical parameters and afferent nerve discharge in remodeled diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao J

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Jingbo Zhao,1 Jian Yang,1 Donghua Liao,1 Hans Gregersen2 1Giome Academia, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Giome Center, Department of Surgery, Chinese University of Hong Kong and Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong Background: Gastrointestinal disorders are very common in diabetic patients, but the pathogenesis is still not well understood. Peripheral afferent nerves may be involved due to the complex regulation of gastrointestinal function by the enteric nervous system. Objective: We aimed to characterize the stimulus–response function of afferent fibers innervating the jejunum in the Goto-Kakizaki (GK type 2 diabetic rat model. A key question is whether changes in afferent firing arise from remodeled tissue or from adaptive afferent processes. Design: Seven 32-week-old male GK rats and seven age-matched normal Wistar rats were studied. Firing from mesenteric afferent nerves was recorded in excised jejunal segments of seven GK rats and seven normal Wistar rats during ramp test, stress relaxation test, and creep test. The circumferential stress–strain, spike rate increase ratio (SRIR, and single unit firing rates were calculated for evaluation of interdependency of the mechanical stimulations and the afferent nerve discharge. Results: Elevated sensitivity to mechanical stimuli was found for diabetic nerve bundles and single unit activity (P<0.05. The stress relaxed less in the diabetic intestinal segment (P<0.05. Linear association between SRIR and the thickness of circumferential muscle layer was found at high stress levels as well as for SRIR and the glucose level. Conclusion: Altered viscoelastic properties and elevated mechanosensitivity were found in the GK rat intestine. The altered nerve signaling is related to muscle layer remodeling and glucose levels and may contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms experienced by diabetic patients. Keywords: afferents, spike rate, stress–strain, creep

  3. Influence of exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on human skeletal muscle satellite cell content and muscle fiber growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Riis, Simon

    2014-01-01

    -specific association between emergence of satellite cells (SCs), muscle growth, and remodeling in response to 12 wk unilateral resistance training performed as eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc) resistance training ± whey protein (Whey, 19.5 g protein + 19.5 g glucose) or placebo (Placebo, 39 g glucose......Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are involved in remodeling and hypertrophy processes of skeletal muscle. However, little knowledge exists on extrinsic factors that influence the content of SCs in skeletal muscle. In a comparative human study, we investigated the muscle fiber type......) supplementation. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were analyzed for fiber type-specific SCs, myonuclei, and fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). Following training, SCs increased with Conc in both type I and type II fibers (P

  4. Evidence for ACTN3 as a Speed Gene in Isolated Human Muscle Fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siacia Broos

    Full Text Available To examine the effect of α-actinin-3 deficiency due to homozygosity for the ACTN3 577X-allele on contractile and morphological properties of fast muscle fibers in non-athletic young men.A biopsy was taken from the vastus lateralis of 4 RR and 4 XX individuals to test for differences in morphologic and contractile properties of single muscle fibers. The cross-sectional area of the fiber and muscle fiber composition was determined using standard immunohistochemistry analyses. Skinned single muscle fibers were subjected to active tests to determine peak normalized force (P0, maximal unloading velocity (V0 and peak power. A passive stretch test was performed to calculate Young's Modulus and hysteresis to assess fiber visco-elasticity.No differences were found in muscle fiber composition. The cross-sectional area of type IIa and IIx fibers was larger in RR compared to XX individuals (P<0.001. P0 was similar in both groups over all fiber types. A higher V0 was observed in type IIa fibers of RR genotypes (P<0.001 but not in type I fibers. The visco-elasticity as determined by Young's Modulus and hysteresis was unaffected by fiber type or genotype.The greater V0 and the larger fast fiber CSA in RR compared to XX genotypes likely contribute to enhanced whole muscle performance during high velocity contractions.

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament tear induces a sustained loss of muscle fiber force production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumucio, Jonathan P; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Enselman, Elizabeth R Sibilsky; Konja, Alexis C; Eckhardt, Logan R; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2018-01-18

    Patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears have persistent quadriceps strength deficits that are thought to be due to altered neurophysiological function. Our goal was to determine the changes in muscle fiber contractility independent of the ability of motor neurons to activate fibers. We obtained quadriceps biopsies of patients undergoing ACL reconstruction, and additional biopsies 1, 2, and 6 months after surgery. Muscles fiber contractility was assessed in vitro, along with whole muscle strength testing. Compared with controls, patients had a 30% reduction in normalized muscle fiber force at the time of surgery. One month later, the force deficit was 41%, and at 6 months the deficit was 23%. Whole muscle strength testing demonstrated similar trends. While neurophysiological dysfunction contributes to whole muscle weakness, there is also a reduction in the force generating capacity of individual muscle cells independent of alpha motor neuron activation. Muscle Nerve, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Skeletal muscle fiber characteristics and oxidative capacity in hemiparetic stroke survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kaare; Dalgas, Ulrik; Overgaard, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    by ATPase histochemistry. Enzymatic concentrations of citrate synthase (CS) and 3-Hydroxyacyl-coenzymeA-dehydrogenase (HAD) were determined using freeze-dried muscle tissue. Findings were correlated with clinical outcomes. RESULTS: In the paretic muscles the mean fiber area was smaller (P=0.......0004), and a lower proportion of type 1 fibers (P=0.0016) and a higher proportion of type 2X fibers (P=0.0002) were observed. The paretic muscle had lower CS (P=0.013) and HAD concentrations (P=0.037). Mean fiber area correlated with muscle strength (r=0.43, P=0.041), and CS concentration correlated with aerobic...

  7. Severe insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus in patients with congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Klein, H H; Hansen, T

    1995-01-01

    Congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy (CFTDM) is a chronic, nonprogressive muscle disorder characterized by universal muscle hypotrophy and growth retardation. Histomorphometric examination of muscle shows a preponderance of smaller than normal type 1 fibers and overall fiber size....... Insulin receptor function and glycogen synthase (GS) activity and expression were examined in biopsies of vastus lateralis muscle. Despite a 45-90-fold increase in both fasting and postprandial serum insulin levels, both CFTDM patients had diabetes mellitus. Clamp studies revealed that the oldest boy had...

  8. Effects of Streptomycin Administration on Increases in Skeletal Muscle Fiber Permeability and Size Following Eccentric Muscle Contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayao, Keishi; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Kouki; Tamakoshi, Keigo; Takahashi, Hideaki; Yotani, Kengo; Ogita, Futoshi; Yamamoto, Noriaki; Onishi, Hideaki

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the preventive effect of streptomycin (Str) administration on changes in membrane permeability and the histomorphological characteristics of damaged muscle fibers following eccentric contraction (ECC ). Eighteen 7-week-old male Fischer 344 rats were randomly assigned to three groups: control (Cont), ECC, and ECC with Str (ECC + Str). The tibialis anterior (TA) muscles in both ECC groups were stimulated electrically and exhibited ECC. Evans blue dye (EBD), a marker of muscle fiber damage associated with increased membrane permeability, was injected 24 hr before TA muscle sampling. The number of EBD-positive fibers, muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), and roundness were determined via histomorphological analysis. The ECC intervention resulted in an increased fraction of EBD-positive fibers, a larger CSA, and decreased roundness. The fraction of EBD-positive fibers was 79% lower in the ECC + Str group than in the ECC group. However, there was no difference in the CSA and roundness of the EBD-positive fibers between the two ECC groups. These results suggest that Str administration can reduce the number of myofibers that increase membrane permeability following ECC, but does not ameliorate the extent of fiber swelling in extant EBD-positive fibers. Anat Rec, 301:1096-1102, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Reduced muscle fiber force production and disrupted myofibril architecture in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, Christopher L; Roche, Stuart M; Harning, Julie A; Davis, Max E; Lynch, Evan B; Sibilsky Enselman, Elizabeth R; Jacobson, Jon A; Claflin, Dennis R; Calve, Sarah; Bedi, Asheesh

    2015-01-01

    A persistent atrophy of muscle fibers and an accumulation of fat, collectively referred to as fatty degeneration, commonly occur in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears. The etiology of fatty degeneration and function of the residual rotator cuff musculature have not been well characterized in humans. We hypothesized that muscles from patients with chronic rotator cuff tears have reduced muscle fiber force production, disordered myofibrils, and an accumulation of fat vacuoles. The contractility of muscle fibers from biopsy specimens of supraspinatus muscles of 13 patients with chronic full-thickness posterosuperior rotator cuff tears was measured and compared with data from healthy vastus lateralis muscle fibers. Correlations between muscle fiber contractility, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, and tear size were analyzed. Histology and electron microscopy were also performed. Torn supraspinatus muscles had a 30% reduction in maximum isometric force production and a 29% reduction in normalized force compared with controls. Normalized supraspinatus fiber force positively correlated with ASES score and negatively correlated with tear size. Disordered sarcomeres were noted, along with an accumulation of lipid-laden macrophages in the extracellular matrix surrounding supraspinatus muscle fibers. Patients with chronic supraspinatus tears have significant reductions in muscle fiber force production. Force production also correlates with ASES scores and tear size. The structural and functional muscle dysfunction of the residual muscle fibers is independent of the additional area taken up by fibrotic tissue. This work may help establish future therapies to restore muscle function after the repair of chronically torn rotator cuff muscles. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Constant Fiber Number During Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Modified Arachidonate Metabolism During Hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, G.

    1985-01-01

    A previously documented shift from Type I to IIA predominance of the soleus muscle during rat suspension was further investigated to determine if this shift was by selective reduction of a single fiber type, simultaneous reduction and formation of fibers with different fiber types, or a transformation of fiber type by individual fibers. By partial acid digestion and dissection, average total soleus fiber number was found to be 3022 + or - 80 (SE) and 3008 + or - 64 before and after four-week suspension (n=12). Another area of current research was based on previous studies which indicate that prostaglandins are biosynthesized by skeletal muscle and evoke protein synthesis and degradation.

  11. Muscle-specific integrins in masseter muscle fibers of chimpanzees: an immunohistochemical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Vaccarino

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Most notably, recent comparative genomic analyses strongly indicate that the marked differences between modern human and chimpanzees are likely due more to changes in gene regulation than to modifications of the genes. The most peculiar aspect of hominoid karyotypes is that human have 46 chromosomes whereas gorillas and chimpanzees have 48. Interestingly, human and chimpanzees do share identical inversions on chromosome 7 and 9 that are not evident in the gorilla karyotype. Thus, the general phylogeny suggests that humans and chimpanzees are sister taxa; based on this, it seems that human-chimpanzee sequence similarity is an astonishing 99%. At this purpose, of particular interest is the inactivation of the myosin heavy chain 16 (MYH16 gene, most prominently expressed in the masticatory muscle of mammals. It has been showed that the loss of this gene in humans may have resulted in smaller masticatory muscle and consequential changes to cranio-facial morphology and expansion of the human brain case. Powerful masticatory muscles are found in most primates; contrarily, in both modern and fossil member Homo, these muscles are considerably smaller. The evolving hominid masticatory apparatus shifted towards a pattern of gracilization nearly simultaneously with accelerated encephalization in early Homo. To better comprehend the real role of the MYH16 gene, we studied the primary proteins present in the muscle fibers of humans and non-humans, in order to understand if they really can be influenced by MYH16 gene. At this aim we examined the muscle-specific integrins, alpha 7B and beta 1D-integrins, and their relative fetal isoforms, alpha 7A and beta 1A-integrins, analyzing, by immunohistochemistry, muscle biopsies of two components of a chimpanzee's group in captivity, an alpha male and a non-alpha male subjects; all these integrins participate in vital biological processes such as maintenance of tissue integrity, embryonic development, cell

  12. Early changes in extrafusal and intrafusal muscle fibers following heterochronous isotransplantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirmanová, Isa; Soukup, Tomáš

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 5 (2001), s. 473-484 ISSN 0001-6322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/00/1653 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscle transplantation * degeneration and regeneration of muscle fibers * extrafusal and intrafusal fibers Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.165, year: 2001

  13. Deformation and three-dimensional displacement of fibers in isometrically contracting rat plantaris muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelberg, Hans H.C.M.; Willems, Paul J.B.; Willems, P.; Baan, Guus C.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the deformation of different fibers of the rat m. plantaris during isometric contractions at different muscle lengths was considered. Because the m. plantaris has an obviously inhomogeneous architecture, its fibers on the medial side of the muscle belly are judged to be shorter than

  14. Electrophysiological characteristics of motor units and muscle fibers in trained and untrained young male subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duez, Lene; Qerama, Erisela; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that the amplitudes of compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and interference pattern analysis (IPA) would be larger in trained subjects compared with untrained subjects, possibly due to hypertrophy of muscle fibers and/or increased central drive. Moreover, we hypothesized...... and untrained subjects in IPA power spectrum and turns per second or amplitude of the CMAPs obtained by DMS. Muscle fiber hypertrophy and/or altered central drive may account for our results, but there was no indication of changes in muscle fiber excitability. Muscle Nerve, 2010....... that the untrained muscle is less excitable compared with the trained muscle. An electromyographic (EMG) needle electrode was used to record the IPA at maximal voluntary effort. The CMAP was obtained by stimulating the musculocutaneous nerve and recording the brachial biceps muscle using surface electrodes. CMAPs...

  15. Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase 2 regulates myoblast proliferation and controls muscle fiber length

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jennifer K; Hallock, Peter T; Burden, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    Muscle fiber length is nearly uniform within a muscle but widely different among different muscles. We show that Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase 2 (Abl2) has a key role in regulating myofiber length, as a loss of Abl2 leads to excessively long myofibers in the diaphragm, intercostal and levator auris muscles but not limb muscles. Increased myofiber length is caused by enhanced myoblast proliferation, expanding the pool of myoblasts and leading to increased myoblast fusion. Abl2 acts in myobla...

  16. Contraction and AICAR Stimulate IL-6 Vesicle Depletion From Skeletal Muscle Fibers In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans P M M; Brandauer, Josef; Schjerling, Peter

    2013-01-01

    muscle fibers and in live animals in vivo. Using confocal imaging to visualize endogenous IL-6 protein in fixed muscle fibers, we found IL-6 in small vesicle structures distributed throughout the fibers under basal (resting) conditions. To determine the kinetics of IL-6 secretion, intact quadriceps...... muscles were transfected with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged IL-6 (IL-6-EGFP), and 5 days later anesthetized mice were imaged before and after muscle contractions in situ. Contractions decreased IL-6-EGFP-containing vesicles and protein by 62% (P

  17. Oxygen diffusion coefficient in isolated chicken red and white skeletal muscle fibers in ontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V I; Belichenko, V M; Shoshenko, C A

    2000-09-01

    Oxygen diffusion from medium to cultured isolated muscle fibers from red gastrocnemius muscle (deep part) (RGM) and white pectoralis muscle (WPM) of embryonic and postnatal chickens (about 6 months) was explored. The intracellular effective O(2) diffusion coefficient (D(i)) in muscle fiber was calculated from a model of a cylindrical fiber with a uniform distribution of an oxygen sink based on these experimentally measured parameters: critical tension of O(2) (PO(2)) on the surface of a fiber, specific rate of O(2) consumption by a weight unit of muscle fibers (;VO(2)), and average diameter of muscle fibers. The results document the rapid hypertrophic growth of RGM fibers when compared to WPM fibers in the second half of the embryonic period and the higher values of;VO(2) and critical PO(2) during the ontogenetic period under study. The oxygen D(i) in RGM fibers of embryos and 1-day chickens was two to three times higher than observed for WPM fibers. For senior chickens, the oxygen D(i) value in RGM and WPM fibers does not differ. The D(i) of O(2) in both RGM and WPM fibers increased from 1.4-2.7 x 10(-8) to 90-95 x 10(-8) cm(2)/s with an ontogenetic increase in fiber diameter from 7. 5 to 67.0 microm. At all stages the oxygen D(i) values in RGM and WPM fibers are significantly lower than the O(2) diffusion coefficient in water: for 11-day embryos they are 889 and 1714 times lower and for adult individuals 25 and 27 times lower, respectively. Why oxygen D(i) values in RGM and WPM fibers are so low and why they are gradually increasing during the course of hypertrophic ontogenetic growth are still unclear. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  18. Ontogenetic changes in skeletal muscle fiber type, fiber diameter and myoglobin concentration in the Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colby eMoore

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris (NES are known to be deep, long-duration divers and to sustain long-repeated patterns of breath-hold, or apnea. Some phocid dives remain within the bounds of aerobic metabolism, accompanied by physiological responses inducing lung compression, bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction. Current data suggest an absence of type IIb fibers in pinniped locomotory musculature. To date, no fiber type data exist for NES, a consummate deep diver. In this study, NES were biopsied in the wild. Ontogenetic changes in skeletal muscle were revealed through succinate dehydrogenase (SDH based fiber typing. Results indicated a predominance of uniformly shaped, large type I fibers and elevated myoglobin (Mb concentrations in the longissimus dorsi (LD muscle of adults. No type II muscle fibers were detected in any adult sampled. This was in contrast to the juvenile animals that demonstrated type II myosin in Western Blot analysis, indicative of an ontogenetic change in skeletal muscle with maturation. These data support previous hypotheses that the absence of type II fibers indicates reliance on aerobic metabolism during dives, as well as a depressed metabolic rate and low energy locomotion. We also suggest that the lack of type IIb fibers (adults may provide a protection against ischemia reperfusion (IR injury in vasoconstricted peripheral skeletal muscle.

  19. Blood vessels and desmin control the positioning of nuclei in skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Lu, Z; Biscocho, N

    2006-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers contain hundreds to thousands of nuclei which lie immediately under the plasmalemma and are spaced out along the fiber, except for a small cluster of specialized nuclei at the neuromuscular junction. How the nuclei attain their positions along the fiber is not understood...

  20. Slow-tonic muscle fibers and their potential innervation in the turtle, Pseudemys (Trachemys) scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Robert J; Pierce, Patricia A; McDonagh, Jennifer C; Stuart, Douglas G

    2005-04-01

    A description is provided of the ratio of slow-tonic vs. slow- and fast-twitch fibers for five muscles in the adult turtle, Pseudemys (Trachemys) scripta elegans. The cross-sectional area of each fiber type and an estimation of the relative (weighted) cross-sectional area occupied by the different fiber types are also provided. Two hindlimb muscles (flexor digitorum longus, FDL; external gastrocnemius, EG) were selected on the basis of their suitability for future motor-unit studies. Three neck muscles (the fourth head of testo-cervicis, TeC4; the fourth head of retrahens capitus collique, RCCQ4; transversalis cervicis, TrC) were chosen for their progressively decreasing oxidative capacity. Serial sections were stained for myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), NADH-diaphorase, and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-GPDH). Conventional fiber-type classification was then performed using indirect markers for contraction speed and oxidative (aerobic) vs. glycolytic (anaerobic) metabolism: i.e., slow oxidative (SO, including slow-twitch and possibly slow-tonic fibers), fast-twitch, oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), and fast-twitch glycolytic (Fg) fibers. Slow-tonic fibers in the SO class were then revealed by directing the monoclonal antibody, ALD-58 (raised against the slow-tonic fiber myosin heavy chain of chicken anterior latissimus dorsi), to additional muscle cross sections. All five of the tested muscles contained the four fiber types, with the ATPase-stained fibers including both slow-tonic and slow-twitch fibers. The extreme distributions of SO fibers were in the predominately glycolytic TrC vs. the predominately oxidative TeC4 muscle (TrC-SO, 9%; FOG, 20%; Fg, 71% vs. TeC4-SO, 58%: FOG, 16%; Fg, 25%). Across the five muscles, the relative prevalence of slow-tonic fibers (4-47%) paralleled that of the SO fibers (9-58%). TeC4 had the highest prevalence of slow-tonic fibers (47%). The test muscles exhibited varying degrees of regional concentration of each

  1. Persistent muscle fiber regeneration in long term denervation. Past, present, future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Carraro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ravages of long term denervation there is structural and ultrastructural evidence for survival of muscle fibers in mammals, with some fibers surviving at least ten months in rodents and 3-6 years in humans. Further, in rodents there is evidence that muscle fibers may regenerate even after repeated damage in the absence of the nerve, and that this potential is maintained for several months after denervation. While in animal models permanently denervated muscle sooner or later loses the ability to contract, the muscles may maintain their size and ability to function if electrically stimulated soon after denervation. Whether in mammals, humans included, this is a result of persistent de novo formation of muscle fibers is an open issue we would like to explore in this review. During the past decade, we have studied muscle biopsies from the quadriceps muscle of Spinal Cord Injury (SCI patients suffering with Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome, a condition that fully and irreversibly disconnects skeletal muscle fibers from their damaged innervating motor neurons. We have demonstrated that human denervated muscle fibers survive years of denervation and can be rescued from severe atrophy by home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation (h-bFES. Using immunohistochemistry with both non-stimulated and the h-bFES stimulated human muscle biopsies, we have observed the persistent presence of muscle fibers which are positive to labeling by an antibody which specifically recognizes the embryonic myosin heavy chain (MHCemb. Relative to the total number of fibers present, only a small percentage of these MHCemb positive fibers are detected, suggesting that they are regenerating muscle fibers and not pre-existing myofibers re-expressing embryonic isoforms. Although embryonic isoforms of acetylcholine receptors are known to be re-expressed and to spread from the end-plate to the sarcolemma of muscle fibers in early phases of muscle denervation, we suggest

  2. MicroRNA in Skeletal Muscle: Its Crucial Roles in Signal Proteins, Mus cle Fiber Type, and Muscle Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu Lan

    2017-01-01

    Pork is one of the most economical sources of animal protein for human consumption. Meat quality is an important economic trait for the swine industry, which is primarily determined by prenatal muscle development and postnatal growth. Identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle development is a key priority. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that have emerged as key regulators of skeletal muscle development. A number of muscle-related miRNAs have been identified by functional gain and loss experiments in mouse model. However, determining miRNA-mRNA interactions involved in pig skeletal muscle still remains a significant challenge. For a comprehensive understanding of miRNA-mediated mechanisms underlying muscle development, miRNAome analyses of pig skeletal muscle have been performed by deep sequencing. Additionally, porcine miRNA single nucleotide polymorphisms have been implicated in muscle fiber types and meat quality. The present review provides an overview of current knowledge on recently identified miRNAs involved in myogenesis, muscle fiber type and muscle protein metabolism. Undoubtedly, further systematic understanding of the functions of miRNAs in pig skeletal muscle development will be helpful to expand the knowledge of basic skeletal muscle biology and be beneficial for the genetic improvement of meat quality traits. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Influence of muscle fiber type composition on early fat accumulation under high-fat diet challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ning; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yee, Grace M; Kitajima, Yoichiro; Katagiri, Sayaka; Kojima, Motoyasu; Anzai, Keizo; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Hamilton, James A

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether differences in muscle fiber types affect early-stage fat accumulation, under high fat diet challenge in mice. Twelve healthy male C57BL/6 mice experienced with short-term (6 weeks) diet treatment for the evaluation of early pattern changes in muscular fat. The mice were randomly divided into two groups: high fat diet (n = 8) and normal control diet (n = 4). Extra- and intra-myocellular lipid (EMCL and IMCL) in lumbar muscles (type I fiber predominant) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscle (type II fiber predominant) were determined using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Correlation of EMCL, IMCL and their ratio between TA and lumbar muscles was evaluated. EMCL increased greatly in both muscle types after high fat diet. IMCL in TA and lumbar muscles increased to a much lower extent, with a slightly greater increase in TA muscles. EMCLs in the 2 muscles were positively correlated (r = 0.84, p = 0.01), but IMCLs showed a negative relationship (r = -0.84, p = 0.01). In lumbar muscles, high fat diet significantly decreased type I fiber while it increased type II fiber (all p≤0.001). In TA muscle, there was no significant fiber type shifting (p>0.05). Under short-time high fat diet challenge, lipid tends to initially accumulate extra-cellularly. In addition, compared to type II dominant muscle, Type I dominant muscle was less susceptible to IMCL accumulation but more to fiber type shifting. These phenomena might reflect compensative responses of skeletal muscle to dietary lipid overload in order to regulate metabolic homeostasis.

  4. Effects of aging on muscle mechanical function and muscle fiber morphology during short-term immobilization and subsequent retraining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Lars; Aagaard, Per; Justesen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    Very little attention has been given to the combined effects of aging and disuse as separate factors causing deterioration in muscle mechanical function. Thus the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 2 wk of immobilization followed by 4 wk of retraining on knee extensor muscle...... to the deleterious effects of short-term muscle disuse on muscle fiber size and rapid force capacity than YM. Furthermore, OM seems to require longer time to recover and regain rapid muscle force capacity, which may lead to a larger risk of falling in aged individuals after periods of short-term disuse....

  5. Effects of aging on muscle mechanical function and muscle fiber morphology during short-term immobilization and subsequent retraining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Lars; Aagaard, Per; Justesen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    to the deleterious effects of short-term muscle disuse on muscle fiber size and rapid force capacity than YM. Furthermore, OM seems to require longer time to recover and regain rapid muscle force capacity, which may lead to a larger risk of falling in aged individuals after periods of short-term disuse.......Very little attention has been given to the combined effects of aging and disuse as separate factors causing deterioration in muscle mechanical function. Thus the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 2 wk of immobilization followed by 4 wk of retraining on knee extensor muscle...... mechanical function (e.g., maximal strength and rapid force capacity) and muscle fiber morphology in 9 old (OM: 67.3 ± 1.3 yr) and 11 young healthy men (YM: 24.4 ± 0.5 yr) with comparable levels of physical activity. Following immobilization, OM demonstrated markedly larger decreases in rapid force capacity...

  6. Lipid droplet size and location in human skeletal muscle fibers are associated with insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Christensen, Anders E; Nellemann, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, an accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs) in the subsarcolemmal space is associated with insulin resistance, but the underlying mechanism is not clear. We aimed to investigate how the size, number and location of LDs are associated with insulin sensitivity and muscle fiber types...... are associated with insulin resistance in skeletal muscle....

  7. Vascular smooth muscle cells express the alpha(1A) subunit of a P-/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+)Channel, and It is functionally important in renal afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard; Jensen, Boye L.; Andreasen, D

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, we tested whether the alpha(1A) subunit, which encodes a neuronal isoform of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) (P-/Q-type), was present and functional in vascular smooth muscle and renal resistance vessels. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction...... preglomerular resistance vessels and aorta, as well as mesangial cells, and that P-type VDCCs contribute to Ca(2+) influx in aortic and renal VSMCs and are involved in depolarization-mediated contraction in renal afferent arterioles....

  8. Muscle-fiber conduction velocity and electromyography as diagnostic tools in patients with suspected inflammatory myopathy: a prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijham, P.J.; Hengstman, G.J.D.; Laak, H.J. ter; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Zwarts, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Combinations of different techniques can increase the diagnostic yield from neurophysiological examination of muscle. In 25 patients with suspected inflammatory myopathy, we prospectively performed needle electromyography (EMG) and measured muscle-fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) in a single muscle,

  9. Muscle fiber type distribution in climbing Hawaiian gobioid fishes: ontogeny and correlations with locomotor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cediel, Roberto A; Blob, Richard W; Schrank, Gordon D; Plourde, Robert C; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2008-01-01

    Three species of Hawaiian amphidromous gobioid fishes are remarkable in their ability to climb waterfalls up to several hundred meters tall. Juvenile Lentipes concolor and Awaous guamensis climb using rapid bursts of axial undulation, whereas juvenile Sicyopterus stimpsoni climb using much slower movements, alternately attaching oral and pelvic sucking disks to the substrate during prolonged bouts of several cycles. Based on these differing climbing styles, we hypothesized that propulsive musculature in juvenile L. concolor and A. guamensis would be dominated by white muscle fibers, whereas S. stimpsoni would exhibit a greater proportion of red muscle fibers than other climbing species. We further predicted that, because adults of these species shift from climbing to burst swimming as their main locomotor behavior, muscle from adult fish of all three species would be dominated by white fibers. To test these hypotheses, we used ATPase assays to evaluate muscle fiber type distribution in Hawaiian climbing gobies for three anatomical regions (midbody, anal, and tail). Axial musculature was dominated by white muscle fibers in juveniles of all three species, but juvenile S. stimpsoni had a significantly greater proportion of red fibers than the other two species. Fiber type proportions of adult fishes did not differ significantly from those of juveniles. Thus, muscle fiber type proportions in juveniles appear to help accommodate differences in locomotor demands among these species, indicating that they overcome the common challenge of waterfall climbing through both diverse behaviors and physiological specializations.

  10. Rotator cuff tear reduces muscle fiber specific force production and induces macrophage accumulation and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumucio, Jonathan P; Davis, Max E; Bradley, Joshua R; Stafford, Patrick L; Schiffman, Corey J; Lynch, Evan B; Claflin, Dennis R; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2012-12-01

    Full-thickness tears to the rotator cuff can cause severe pain and disability. Untreated tears progress in size and are associated with muscle atrophy and an infiltration of fat to the area, a condition known as "fatty degeneration." To improve the treatment of rotator cuff tears, a greater understanding of the changes in the contractile properties of muscle fibers and the molecular regulation of fatty degeneration is essential. Using a rat model of rotator cuff injury, we measured the force generating capacity of individual muscle fibers and determined changes in muscle fiber type distribution that develop after a full thickness rotator cuff tear. We also measured the expression of mRNA and miRNA transcripts involved in muscle atrophy, lipid accumulation, and matrix synthesis. We hypothesized that a decrease in specific force of rotator cuff muscle fibers, an accumulation of type IIb fibers, and an upregulation in fibrogenic, adipogenic, and inflammatory gene expression occur in torn rotator cuff muscles. Thirty days following rotator cuff tear, we observed a reduction in muscle fiber force production, an induction of fibrogenic, adipogenic, and autophagocytic mRNA and miRNA molecules, and a dramatic accumulation of macrophages in areas of fat accumulation. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. Muscle fiber type proportion and size is not altered in mcardle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Franclo; Cunninghame, Carol Anne; Martín, Miguel Angel; Rubio, Juan Carlos; Arenas, Joaquín; Lucia, Alejandro; HernáNdez-Laín, Aurelio; Kohn, Tertius Abraham

    2017-06-01

    McArdle disease is a metabolic myopathy that presents with exercise intolerance and episodic rhabdomyolysis. Excessive muscle recruitment has also been shown to be present during strenuous exercise, suggesting decreased power output. These findings could potentially be explained by either impaired contractility, decreased fiber size, or altered fiber type proportion. However, there is a paucity of data on the morphological features seen on muscle histology. We examined muscle biopsies of patients with McArdle disease from a Spanish cohort and compared the findings with healthy controls. We found no significant difference in the fiber type proportion or mean fiber size between McArdle patients and controls in the biceps brachii or vastus lateralis muscles. No alterations in muscle fiber type proportion or size were found on muscle histology of patients with McArdle disease. Future research should focus on assessment of muscle fiber contractility to investigate the functional impairment. Muscle Nerve 55: 916-918, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Catalase-positive microperoxisomes in rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle fiber types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L. W.; Ellis, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    The size, distribution, and content of catalase-reactive microperoxisomes were investigated cytochemically in three types of muscle fibers from the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of male rats. Muscle fibers were classified on the basis of the mitochondrial content and distribution, the Z-band widths, and the size and shape of myofibrils as the slow-twitch oxidative (SO), the fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and the fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers. It was found that both the EDL and soleus SO fibers possessed the largest microperoxisomes. A comparison of microperoxisome number per muscle fiber area or the microperoxisome area per fiber area revealed following ranking, starting from the largest number and the area-ratio values: soleus SO, EDL SO, EDL FOG, and EDL FG.

  13. Intrauterine growth-restricted sheep fetuses exhibit smaller hindlimb muscle fibers and lower proportions of insulin-sensitive Type I fibers near term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Dustin T; Cadaret, Caitlin N; Beede, Kristin A; Riley, Hannah E; Macko, Antoni R; Anderson, Miranda J; Camacho, Leticia E; Limesand, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) reduces muscle mass and insulin sensitivity in offspring. Insulin sensitivity varies among muscle fiber types, with Type I fibers being most sensitive. Differences in fiber-type ratios are associated with insulin resistance in adults, and thus we hypothesized that near-term IUGR sheep fetuses exhibit reduced size and proportions of Type I fibers. Placental insufficiency-induced IUGR fetuses were ∼54% smaller (P fetal muscles develop smaller fibers and have proportionally fewer Type I fibers, which is indicative of developmental adaptations that may help explain the link between IUGR and adulthood insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Effects of Fiber Type and Size on the Heterogeneity of Oxygen Distribution in Exercising Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2012-01-01

    The process of oxygen delivery from capillary to muscle fiber is essential for a tissue with variable oxygen demand, such as skeletal muscle. Oxygen distribution in exercising skeletal muscle is regulated by convective oxygen transport in the blood vessels, oxygen diffusion and consumption in the tissue. Spatial heterogeneities in oxygen supply, such as microvascular architecture and hemodynamic variables, had been observed experimentally and their marked effects on oxygen exchange had been confirmed using mathematical models. In this study, we investigate the effects of heterogeneities in oxygen demand on tissue oxygenation distribution using a multiscale oxygen transport model. Muscles are composed of different ratios of the various fiber types. Each fiber type has characteristic values of several parameters, including fiber size, oxygen consumption, myoglobin concentration, and oxygen diffusivity. Using experimentally measured parameters for different fiber types and applying them to the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle, we evaluated the effects of heterogeneous fiber size and fiber type properties on the oxygen distribution profile. Our simulation results suggest a marked increase in spatial heterogeneity of oxygen due to fiber size distribution in a mixed muscle. Our simulations also suggest that the combined effects of fiber type properties, except size, do not contribute significantly to the tissue oxygen spatial heterogeneity. However, the incorporation of the difference in oxygen consumption rates of different fiber types alone causes higher oxygen heterogeneity compared to control cases with uniform fiber properties. In contrast, incorporating variation in other fiber type-specific properties, such as myoglobin concentration, causes little change in spatial tissue oxygenation profiles. PMID:23028531

  15. Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase 2 Regulates Myoblast Proliferation and Controls Muscle Fiber Length

    OpenAIRE

    Burden, Steven; Lee, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Muscle fiber length is nearly uniform within a muscle but widely different among muscles. Here, we show that Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase 2 (Abl2) has a key role in regulating myofiber length, as a loss of Abl2 leads to excessively long myofibers in the diaphragm and other muscles. Increased myofiber length is caused by enhanced myoblast proliferation, expanding the pool of available myoblasts and leading to increased myoblast fusion. Abl2 acts in myoblasts, but expansion of the diaphragm ...

  16. Activation of GLP-1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells reduces the autoregulatory response in afferent arterioles and increases renal blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Elisa P; Poulsen, Steen S; Kissow, Hannelouise; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Deacon, Carolyn F; Jensen, Boye L; Holst, Jens J; Sorensen, Charlotte M

    2015-04-15

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 has a range of extrapancreatic effects, including renal effects. The mechanisms are poorly understood, but GLP-1 receptors have been identified in the kidney. However, the exact cellular localization of the renal receptors is poorly described. The aim of the present study was to localize renal GLP-1 receptors and describe GLP-1-mediated effects on the renal vasculature. We hypothesized that renal GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal microcirculation and that activation of these affects renal autoregulation and increases renal blood flow. In vivo autoradiography using (125)I-labeled GLP-1, (125)I-labeled exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog), and (125)I-labeled exendin 9-39 (GLP-1 receptor antagonist) was performed in rodents to localize specific GLP-1 receptor binding. GLP-1-mediated effects on blood pressure, renal blood flow (RBF), heart rate, renin secretion, urinary flow rate, and Na(+) and K(+) excretion were investigated in anesthetized rats. Effects of GLP-1 on afferent arterioles were investigated in isolated mouse kidneys. Specific binding of (125)I-labeled GLP-1, (125)I-labeled exendin-4, and (125)I-labeled exendin 9-39 was observed in the renal vasculature, including afferent arterioles. Infusion of GLP-1 increased blood pressure, RBF, and urinary flow rate significantly in rats. Heart rate and plasma renin concentrations were unchanged. Exendin 9-39 inhibited the increase in RBF. In isolated murine kidneys, GLP-1 and exendin-4 significantly reduced the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles in response to stepwise increases in pressure. We conclude that GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal vasculature, including afferent arterioles. Activation of these receptors reduces the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles to acute pressure increases and increases RBF in normotensive rats. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Neurochemical characterization of sea lamprey taste buds and afferent gustatory fibers: presence of serotonin, calretinin, and CGRP immunoreactivity in taste bud bi-ciliated cells of the earliest vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Villar-Cerviño, Verona; Villar-Cheda, Begoña; Anadón, Ramón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2008-12-01

    Neuroactive substances such as serotonin and other monoamines have been suggested to be involved in the transmission of gustatory signals from taste bud cells to afferent fibers. Lampreys are the earliest vertebrates that possess taste buds, although these differ in structure from taste buds in jawed vertebrates, and their neurochemistry remains unknown. We used immunofluorescence methods with antibodies raised against serotonin, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), calretinin, and acetylated alpha-tubulin to characterize the neurochemistry and innervation of taste buds in the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus L. For localization of proliferative cells in taste buds we used bromodeoxyuridine labeling and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. Results with both markers indicate that proliferating cells are restricted to a few basal cells and that almost all cells in taste buds are nonproliferating. A large number of serotonin-, calretinin-, and CGRP-immunoreactive bi-ciliated cells were revealed in lamprey taste buds. This suggests that serotonin participates in the transmission of gustatory signals and indicates that this substance appeared early on in vertebrate evolution. The basal surface of the bi-ciliated taste bud cells was contacted by tubulin-immunoreactive fibers. Some of the fibers surrounding the taste bud were calretinin immunoreactive. Lamprey taste bud cells or afferent fibers did not exhibit TH, GABA, glutamate, or NPY immunoreactivity, which suggests that expression of these substances evolved in taste buds of some gnathostomes lines after the separation of gnathostomes and lampreys. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Age-related effect of cell death on fiber morphology and number in tongue muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletzien, Heidi; Hare, Allison J; Leverson, Glen; Connor, Nadine P

    2018-01-01

    Multiple pathways may exist for age-related tongue muscle degeneration. Cell death is one mechanism contributing to muscle atrophy and decreased function. We hypothesized with aging, apoptosis, and apoptotic regulators would be increased, and muscle fiber size and number would be reduced in extrinsic tongue muscles. Cell death indices, expression of caspase-3 and Bcl-2, and measures of muscle morphology and number were determined in extrinsic tongue muscles of young and old rats. Significant increases in cell death, caspase-3, and Bcl-2 were observed in all extrinsic tongue muscles along with reductions in muscle fiber number in old rats. We demonstrated that apoptosis indices increase with age in lingual muscles and that alterations in apoptotic regulators may be associated with age-related degeneration in muscle fiber size and number. These observed apoptotic processes may be detrimental to muscle function, and may contribute to degradation of cranial functions with age. Muscle Nerve 57: E29-E37, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Differences in muscle fiber size and associated energetic costs in phylogenetically paired tropical and temperate birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Williams, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    Tropical and temperate birds provide a unique system to examine mechanistic consequences of life-history trade-offs at opposing ends of the pace-of-life spectrum; tropical birds tend to have a slow pace of life whereas temperate birds the opposite. Birds in the tropics have a lower whole-animal basal metabolic rate and peak metabolic rate, lower rates of reproduction, and longer survival than birds in temperate regions. Although skeletal muscle has a relatively low tissue-specific metabolism at rest, it makes up the largest fraction of body mass and therefore contributes more to basal metabolism than any other tissue. A principal property of muscle cells that influences their rate of metabolism is fiber size. The optimal fiber size hypothesis attempts to link whole-animal basal metabolic rate to the cost of maintaining muscle mass by stating that larger fibers may be metabolically cheaper to maintain since the surface area∶volume ratio (SA∶V) is reduced compared with smaller fibers and thus the amount of area to transport ions is also reduced. Because tropical birds have a reduced whole-organism metabolism, we hypothesized that they would have larger muscle fibers than temperate birds, given that larger muscle fibers have reduced energy demand from membrane Na(+)-K(+) pumps. Alternatively, smaller muscle fibers could result in a lower capacity for shivering and exercise. To test this idea, we examined muscle fiber size and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in 16 phylogenetically paired species of tropical and temperate birds. We found that 3 of the 16 paired comparisons indicated that tropical birds had significantly larger fibers, contrary to our hypothesis. Our data show that SA∶V is proportional to Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in muscles of birds.

  20. Caveolin-3 is associated with the T-tubules of mature skeletal muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Ploug, Thorkil

    1999-01-01

    Caveolae are abundant in skeletal muscle and their coat contains a specific isoform of caveolin, caveolin-3. It has been suggested that during muscle development, caveolin-3 is associated with the T-tubules, but that in adult muscle it is found on the plasma membrane only. We have studied...... the distribution of caveolin-3 in single skeletal muscle fibers from adult rat soleus by confocal immunofluorescence and by immunogold electron microscopy. We found that caveolin-3 occurs at the highest density on the plasma membrane but is also present in the core of the fibers, at the I-band/A-band interface...

  1. Redundancy or heterogeneity in the electric activity of the biceps brachii muscle? Added value of PCA-processed multi-channel EMG muscle activation estimates in a parallel-fibered muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudenmann, D.; Stegeman, D.F.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional bipolar EMG provides imprecise muscle activation estimates due to possibly heterogeneous activity within muscles and due to improper alignment of the electrodes with the muscle fibers. Principal component analysis (PCA), applied on multi-channel monopolar EMG yielded substantial

  2. 2-Deoxyglucose autoradiography of single motor units: labelling of individual acutely active muscle fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toop, J.; Burke, R.E.; Dum, R.P.; O'Donovan, M.J.; Smith, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    2-Deoxy-D-[1- 14 C]glucose (2DG) was given intravenously during repetitive stimulation of single motor units in adult cats and autoradiographs were made of frozen sections of the target muscles in order to evaluate methods designed to improve the spatial resolution of [ 14 C]2DG autoradiography. With the modifications used, acutely active muscle fibers, independently identified by depletion of intrafiber glycogen, were associated with highly localized accumulations of silver grains over the depleted fibers. The results indicate that [ 14 C]2DG autoradiography can successfully identify individual active muscle fibers and might in principle be used to obtain quantitative data about rates of glucose metabolism in single muscle fibers of defined histochemical type. The modifications may be applicable also to other tissues to give improved spatial resolution with [ 14 C]-labeled metabolic markers. (Auth.)

  3. Activation of GLP-1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells reduces the autoregulatory response in afferent arterioles and increases renal blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Elisa Pouline; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Kissow, Hannelouise

    2015-01-01

    was to localize renal GLP-1 receptors and describe GLP-1 mediated effects on the renal vasculature. We hypothesized that renal GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal microcirculation and activation of these affects renal autoregulation and increases renal blood flow. In vivo autoradiography using 125I-GLP-1......, 125I-exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog) and 125I-exendin 9-39 (GLP-1 receptor antagonist) was performed in rodents to localize specific GLP-1 receptor binding. GLP-1 mediated effects on blood pressure (BP), renal blood flow (RBF), heart rate (HR), renin secretion, urinary flow rate and Na+ and K+ excretion were...... conclude that GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal vasculature including afferent arterioles. Activation of these receptors reduces the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles to acute pressure increases and increases renal blood flow in normotensive rats....

  4. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Li; Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared wi...

  5. Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Nicholas L.; Banks, Glen B.; Tsang, Mark; Margineantu, Daciana; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Chan, Jacky; Torres, Michelle; Liggitt, H. Denny; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K.; Hockenbery, David M.; Raftery, Daniel; Iritani, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscle is broadly characterized by the presence of two distinct categories of muscle fibers called type I “red” slow twitch and type II “white” fast twitch, which display marked differences in contraction strength, metabolic strategies, and susceptibility to fatigue. The relative representation of each fiber type can have major influences on susceptibility to obesity, diabetes, and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecular factors controlling fiber type specification remain incompletely defined. In this study, we describe the control of fiber type specification and susceptibility to metabolic disease by folliculin interacting protein-1 (Fnip1). Using Fnip1 null mice, we found that loss of Fnip1 increased the representation of type I fibers characterized by increased myoglobin, slow twitch markers [myosin heavy chain 7 (MyH7), succinate dehydrogenase, troponin I 1, troponin C1, troponin T1], capillary density, and mitochondria number. Cultured Fnip1-null muscle fibers had higher oxidative capacity, and isolated Fnip1-null skeletal muscles were more resistant to postcontraction fatigue relative to WT skeletal muscles. Biochemical analyses revealed increased activation of the metabolic sensor AMP kinase (AMPK), and increased expression of the AMPK-target and transcriptional coactivator PGC1α in Fnip1 null skeletal muscle. Genetic disruption of PGC1α rescued normal levels of type I fiber markers MyH7 and myoglobin in Fnip1-null mice. Remarkably, loss of Fnip1 profoundly mitigated muscle damage in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results indicate that Fnip1 controls skeletal muscle fiber type specification and warrant further study to determine whether inhibition of Fnip1 has therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophy diseases. PMID:25548157

  6. Cycle Training Increased GLUT4 and Activation of mTOR in Fast Twitch Muscle Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Charles A.; Howell, Mary E.A.; Baker, Jonathan D.; Dykes, Rhesa J.; Duffourc, Michelle M.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Stone, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine if cycle training of sedentary subjects would increase the expression of the principle muscle glucose transporters, six volunteers completed six weeks of progressively increasing intensity stationary cycle cycling. Methods In vastus lateralis muscle biopsies, changes in expression of GLUT1, GLUT4, GLUT5, and GLUT12 were compared using quantitative immunoblots with specific protein standards. Regulatory pathway components were evaluated by immunoblots of muscle homogenates and immunohistochemistry of microscopic sections. Results GLUT1 was unchanged, GLUT4 increased 66%, GLUT12 increased 104%, and GLUT5 decreased 72%. A mitochondrial marker (cytochrome c) and regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α and phospho-AMPK) were unchanged, but the muscle hypertrophy pathway component, phospho-mTOR increased 83% after the exercise program. In baseline biopsies, GLUT4 by immunohistochemical techniques was 37% greater in Type I (slow twitch, red) muscle fibers, but the exercise training increased GLUT4 expression in Type II (fast twitch, white) fibers by 50%, achieving parity with the Type I fibers. Baseline phospho-mTOR expression was 50% higher in Type II fibers and increased more in Type II fibers (62%) with training, but also increased in Type I fibers (34%). Conclusion Progressive intensity stationary cycle training of previously sedentary subjects increased muscle insulin-responsive glucose transporters (GLUT4 and GLUT12) and decreased the fructose transporter (GLUT5). The increase in GLUT4 occurred primarily in Type II muscle fibers and this coincided with activation of the mTOR muscle hypertrophy pathway. There was little impact on Type I fiber GLUT4 expression and no evidence of change in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:20010125

  7. Enzymatically modified isoquercitrin supplementation intensifies plantaris muscle fiber hypertrophy in functionally overloaded mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Akiko; Machida, Masanao; Setoguchi, Yuko; Ito, Ryouichi; Sugitani, Masanori; Maruki-Uchida, Hiroko; Inagaki, Hiroyuki; Ito, Tatsuhiko; Omi, Naomi; Takemasa, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Enzymatically modified isoquercitrin (EMIQ) is produced from rutin using enzymatic hydrolysis followed by treatment with glycosyltransferase in the presence of dextrin to add glucose residues. EMIQ is absorbed in the same way as quercetin, a powerful antioxidant reported to prevent disused muscle atrophy by targeting mitochondria and to have ergogenic effects. The present study investigated the effect of EMIQ on skeletal muscle hypertrophy induced by functional overload. In Study 1, 6-week-old ICR male mice were divided into 4 groups: sham-operated control, sham-operated EMIQ, overload-operated control, and overload-operated EMIQ groups. In Study 2, mice were divided into 3 groups: overload-operated whey control, overload-operated whey/EMIQ (low dose), and overload-operated whey/EMIQ (high dose) groups. The functional overload of the plantaris muscle was induced by ablation of the synergist (gastrocnemius and soleus) muscles. EMIQ and whey protein were administered with food. Three weeks after the operation, the cross-sectional area and minimal fiber diameter of the plantaris muscle fibers were measured. In Study 1, functional overload increased the cross-sectional area and minimal fiber diameter of the plantaris muscle. EMIQ supplementation significantly increased the cross-sectional area and minimal fiber diameter of the plantaris muscle in both the sham-operated and overload-operated groups. In Study 2, EMIQ supplementation combined with whey protein administration significantly increased the cross-sectional area and minimal fiber diameter of the plantaris muscle. EMIQ, even when administered as an addition to whey protein supplementation, significantly intensified the fiber hypertrophy of the plantaris muscle in functionally overloaded mice. EMIQ supplementation also induced fiber hypertrophy of the plantaris in sham-operated mice.

  8. A new method for non-invasive estimation of human muscle fiber type composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Baguet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been established that excellence in sports with short and long exercise duration requires a high proportion of fast-twitch (FT or type-II fibers and slow-twitch (ST or type-I fibers, respectively. Until today, the muscle biopsy method is still accepted as gold standard to measure muscle fiber type composition. Because of its invasive nature and high sampling variance, it would be useful to develop a non-invasive alternative. METHODOLOGY: Eighty-three control subjects, 15 talented young track-and-field athletes, 51 elite athletes and 14 ex-athletes volunteered to participate in the current study. The carnosine content of all 163 subjects was measured in the gastrocnemius muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1H-MRS. Muscle biopsies for fiber typing were taken from 12 untrained males. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A significant positive correlation was found between muscle carnosine, measured by (1H-MRS, and percentage area occupied by type II fibers. Explosive athletes had ∼30% higher carnosine levels compared to a reference population, whereas it was ∼20% lower than normal in typical endurance athletes. Similar results were found in young talents and ex-athletes. When active elite runners were ranked according to their best running distance, a negative sigmoidal curve was found between logarithm of running distance and muscle carnosine. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle carnosine content shows a good reflection of the disciplines of elite track-and-field athletes and is able to distinguish between individual track running distances. The differences between endurance and sprint muscle types is also observed in young talents and former athletes, suggesting this characteristic is genetically determined and can be applied in early talent identification. This quick method provides a valid alternative for the muscle biopsy method. In addition, this technique may also contribute to the diagnosis and monitoring of many conditions and

  9. Myosin content of individual human muscle fibers isolated by laser capture microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Charles A; Stone, William L; Howell, Mary E A; Brannon, Marianne F; Hall, H Kenton; Gibson, Andrew L; Stone, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Muscle fiber composition correlates with insulin resistance, and exercise training can increase slow-twitch (type I) fibers and, thereby, mitigate diabetes risk. Human skeletal muscle is made up of three distinct fiber types, but muscle contains many more isoforms of myosin heavy and light chains, which are coded by 15 and 11 different genes, respectively. Laser capture microdissection techniques allow assessment of mRNA and protein content in individual fibers. We found that specific human fiber types contain different mixtures of myosin heavy and light chains. Fast-twitch (type IIx) fibers consistently contained myosin heavy chains 1, 2, and 4 and myosin light chain 1. Type I fibers always contained myosin heavy chains 6 and 7 (MYH6 and MYH7) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), whereas MYH6, MYH7, and MYL3 were nearly absent from type IIx fibers. In contrast to cardiomyocytes, where MYH6 (also known as α-myosin heavy chain) is seen solely in fast-twitch cells, only slow-twitch fibers of skeletal muscle contained MYH6. Classical fast myosin heavy chains (MHC1, MHC2, and MHC4) were present in variable proportions in all fiber types, but significant MYH6 and MYH7 expression indicated slow-twitch phenotype, and the absence of these two isoforms determined a fast-twitch phenotype. The mixed myosin heavy and light chain content of type IIa fibers was consistent with its role as a transition between fast and slow phenotypes. These new observations suggest that the presence or absence of MYH6 and MYH7 proteins dictates the slow- or fast-twitch phenotype in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Development of medial pterygoid muscle fibers in rabbits fed with a liquid diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Kozue; Morita, Takumi; Takasu, Hiroki; Saito, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Takuya; Hiraba, Katsunari; Goto, Shigemi

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of decreased functional load on the medial pterygoid muscle during mastication in rabbits fed with a liquid-diet. Medial pterygoid muscles from 54 rabbits (solid- and liquid-diet groups, n=48; unweaned group, n=6) were histochemically examined at 4, 9, 12, 18, and 33 weeks after birth. Six fiber types (I, IC, IIC, IIA, IIAB, and IIB) were distinguished via mATPase staining. Significant increases in the diameters of all fiber types were seen up to 33 weeks of age in the solid-diet group; however, no significant increase was noted in fiber types I and IC, from 4 to 33 weeks of age, in the liquid-diet group. The proportion of slow fibers increased up to 12 weeks followed by an increase in the number of fast fibers in the solid-diet group, whereas in the liquid-diet group, the number of slow fiber declined after weaning. Liquid-diet consumption caused muscle fiber atrophy and an increase in the number of fast fibers during early developmental stages after weaning. Furthermore, the growth pattern of the medial pterygoid muscle in the liquid-diet group was different from that in the solid-diet group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Jaw muscle fiber type distribution in Hawaiian gobioid stream fishes: histochemical correlations with feeding ecology and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maie, Takashi; Meister, Andrew B; Leonard, Gerald L; Schrank, Gordon D; Blob, Richard W; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2011-12-01

    Differences in fiber type distribution in the axial muscles of Hawaiian gobioid stream fishes have previously been linked to differences in locomotor performance, behavior, and diet across species. Using ATPase assays, we examined fiber types of the jaw opening sternohyoideus muscle across five species, as well as fiber types of three jaw closing muscles (adductor mandibulae A1, A2, and A3). The jaw muscles of some species of Hawaiian stream gobies contained substantial red fiber components. Some jaw muscles always had greater proportions of white muscle fibers than other jaw muscles, independent of species. In addition, comparing across species, the dietary generalists (Awaous guamensis and Stenogobius hawaiiensis) had a lower proportion of white muscle fibers in all jaw muscles than the dietary specialists (Lentipes concolor, Sicyopterus stimpsoni, and Eleotris sandwicensis). Among Hawaiian stream gobies, generalist diets may favor a wider range of muscle performance, provided by a mix of white and red muscle fibers, than is typical of dietary specialists, which may have a higher proportion of fast-twitch white fibers in jaw muscles to help meet the demands of rapid predatory strikes or feeding in fast-flowing habitats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. The organization of the Golgi complex and microtubules in skeletal muscle is fiber type-dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Lu, Z; Ploug, Thorkil

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a nonconventional Golgi complex (GC), the organization of which has been a subject of controversy in the past. We have now examined the distribution of the GC by immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy in whole fibers from different rat muscles, both innervated a...

  13. Jaw-muscle fiber architecture in tufted capuchins favors generating relatively large muscle forces without compromising jaw gape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrea B.; Vinyard, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Cebus apella is renowned for its dietary flexibility and capacity to exploit hard and tough objects. Cebus apella differs from other capuchins in displaying a suite of craniodental features that have been functionally and adaptively linked to their feeding behavior, particularly the generation and dissipation of relatively large jaw forces. We compared fiber architecture of the masseter and temporalis muscles between the tufted capuchin (C. apella; n = 12 ) and two “untufted” capuchins (C. capuchinus, n = 3; C. albifrons, n = 5). These three species share broadly similar diets, but tufted capuchins occasionally exploit mechanically challenging tissues. We tested the hypothesis that C. apella exhibits architectural properties of their jaw muscles that facilitate relatively large forces, including relatively greater physiologic cross-sectional areas (PCSA), more pinnate fibers, and lower ratios of mass to tetanic tension (Mass/P0). Results show some evidence supporting these predictions, as C. apella has relatively greater superficial masseter, whole masseter, and temporalis PCSAs, significantly so only for the temporalis following Bonferroni adjustment. Capuchins did not differ in pinnation angle or Mass/P0. As an architectural trade-off between maximizing muscle force and muscle excursion/contraction velocity, we also tested the hypothesis that C. apella exhibits relatively shorter muscle fibers. Contrary to our prediction, there are no significant differences in relative fiber lengths between tufted and untufted capuchins. Therefore, we attribute the relatively greater PCSAs in C. apella primarily to their larger muscle masses. These findings suggest that relatively large jaw-muscle PCSAs can be added to the suite of masticatory features that have been functionally linked to the exploitation of a more resistant diet by C. apella. By enlarging jaw-muscle mass to increase PCSA, rather than reducing fiber lengths and increasing pinnation, tufted capuchins appear

  14. Physiological recruitment of motor units by high-frequency electrical stimulation of afferent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L; Muceli, Silvia; Dosen, Strahinja; Laine, Christopher M; Farina, Dario

    2015-02-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly used in rehabilitation, but electrically evoked muscle activation is in several ways different from voluntary muscle contractions. These differences lead to challenges in the use of NMES for restoring muscle function. We investigated the use of low-current, high-frequency nerve stimulation to activate the muscle via the spinal motoneuron (MN) pool to achieve more natural activation patterns. Using a novel stimulation protocol, the H-reflex responses to individual stimuli in a train of stimulation pulses at 100 Hz were reliably estimated with surface EMG during low-level contractions. Furthermore, single motor unit recruitment by afferent stimulation was analyzed with intramuscular EMG. The results showed that substantially elevated H-reflex responses were obtained during 100-Hz stimulation with respect to a lower stimulation frequency. Furthermore, motor unit recruitment using 100-Hz stimulation was not fully synchronized, as it occurs in classic NMES, and the discharge rates differed among motor units because each unit was activated only after a specific number of stimuli. The most likely mechanism behind these observations is the temporal summation of subthreshold excitatory postsynaptic potentials from Ia fibers to the MNs. These findings and their interpretation were also verified by a realistic simulation model of afferent stimulation of a MN population. These results suggest that the proposed stimulation strategy may allow generation of considerable levels of muscle activation by motor unit recruitment that resembles the physiological conditions. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase 2 regulates myoblast proliferation and controls muscle fiber length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer K; Hallock, Peter T; Burden, Steven J

    2017-12-12

    Muscle fiber length is nearly uniform within a muscle but widely different among different muscles. We show that Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase 2 (Abl2) has a key role in regulating myofiber length, as a loss of Abl2 leads to excessively long myofibers in the diaphragm, intercostal and levator auris muscles but not limb muscles. Increased myofiber length is caused by enhanced myoblast proliferation, expanding the pool of myoblasts and leading to increased myoblast fusion. Abl2 acts in myoblasts, but as a consequence of expansion of the diaphragm muscle, the diaphragm central tendon is reduced in size, likely contributing to reduced stamina of Abl2 mutant mice. Ectopic muscle islands, each composed of myofibers of uniform length and orientation, form within the central tendon of Abl2 +/- mice. Specialized tendon cells, resembling tendon cells at myotendinous junctions, form at the ends of these muscle islands, suggesting that myofibers induce differentiation of tendon cells, which reciprocally regulate myofiber length and orientation.

  16. Selective muscle fiber loss and molecular compensation in mitochondrial myopathy due to TK2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà, Maya R; Villarroya, Joan; García-Arumí, Elena; Castellote, Amparo; Meseguer, Anna; Hirano, Michio; Roig, Manuel

    2008-04-15

    A 12-year-old patient with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome due to TK2 gene mutations has been evaluated serially over the last 10 years. We observed progressive muscle atrophy with selective loss of type 2 muscle fibers and, despite severe depletion of mtDNA, normal activities of respiratory chain (RC) complexes and levels of COX II mitochondrial protein in the remaining muscle fibers. These results indicate that compensatory mechanisms account for the slow progression of the disease. Identification of factors that ameliorate mtDNA depletion may reveal new therapeutic targets for these devastating disorders.

  17. Nuclear receptor/microRNA circuitry links muscle fiber type to energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhenji; Rumsey, John; Hazen, Bethany C; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Xie, Hui; Conley, Kevin E; Auwerx, Johan; Smith, Steven R; Olson, Eric N; Kralli, Anastasia; Kelly, Daniel P

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the coordinate regulation of the metabolic and structural programs controlling muscle fitness and endurance are unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ was shown to activate muscle endurance programs in transgenic mice. In contrast, muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of the related nuclear receptor, PPARα, results in reduced capacity for endurance exercise. We took advantage of the divergent actions of PPARβ/δ and PPARα to explore the downstream regulatory circuitry that orchestrates the programs linking muscle fiber type with energy metabolism. Our results indicate that, in addition to the well-established role in transcriptional control of muscle metabolic genes, PPARβ/δ and PPARα participate in programs that exert opposing actions upon the type I fiber program through a distinct muscle microRNA (miRNA) network, dependent on the actions of another nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies in mice, together with assessment of muscle biopsies from humans, demonstrated that type I muscle fiber proportion is increased via the stimulatory actions of ERRγ on the expression of miR-499 and miR-208b. This nuclear receptor/miRNA regulatory circuit shows promise for the identification of therapeutic targets aimed at maintaining muscle fitness in a variety of chronic disease states, such as obesity, skeletal myopathies, and heart failure.

  18. Histological identification of phrenic afferent projections to the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Jayakrishnan; Bezdudnaya, Tatiana; Zholudeva, Lyandysha V; Detloff, Megan R; Reier, Paul J; Lane, Michael A; Fuller, David D

    2017-02-01

    Limited data are available regarding the spinal projections of afferent fibers in the phrenic nerve. We describe a method that robustly labels phrenic afferent spinal projections in adult rats. The proximal end of the cut phrenic nerve was secured in a microtube filled with a transganglionic tracer (cholera toxin β-subunit, CT-β, or Cascade Blue) and tissues harvested 96-h later. Robust CT-β labeling occurred in C3-C5 dorsal root ganglia cell bodies and phrenic afferent projections were identified in the mid-cervical dorsal horn (laminae I-III), intermediate grey matter (laminae IV, VII) and near the central canal (laminae X). Afferent fiber labeling was reduced or absent when CT-β was delivered to the intrapleural space or directly to the hemidiaphragm. Soaking the phrenic nerve with Cascade Blue also produced robust labeling of mid-cervical dorsal root ganglia cells bodies, and primary afferent fibers were observed in spinal grey matter and dorsal white matter. Our results show that the 'nerve soak' method effectively labels both phrenic motoneurons and phrenic afferent projections, and show that primary afferents project throughout the ipsilateral mid-cervical gray matter. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. In Vivo Microscopy Reveals Extensive Embedding of Capillaries within the Sarcolemma of Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glancy, Brian; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Dao, Lam; Bakalar, Matthew; French, Stephanie; Chess, David J.; Taylor, Joni L.; Picard, Martin; Aponte, Angel; Daniels, Mathew P.; Esfahani, Shervin; Cushman, Samuel; Balaban, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide insight into mitochondrial function in vivo, we evaluated the 3D spatial relationship between capillaries, mitochondria, and muscle fibers in live mice. Methods 3D volumes of in vivo murine Tibialis anterior muscles were imaged by multi-photon microscopy (MPM). Muscle fiber type, mitochondrial distribution, number of capillaries, and capillary-to-fiber contact were assessed. The role of myoglobin-facilitated diffusion was examined in myoglobin knockout mice. Distribution of GLUT4 was also evaluated in the context of the capillary and mitochondrial network. Results MPM revealed that 43.6 ± 3.3% of oxidative fiber capillaries had ≥ 50% of their circumference embedded in a groove in the sarcolemma, in vivo. Embedded capillaries were tightly associated with dense mitochondrial populations lateral to capillary grooves and nearly absent below the groove. Mitochondrial distribution, number of embedded capillaries, and capillary-to-fiber contact were proportional to fiber oxidative capacity and unaffected by myoglobin knockout. GLUT4 did not preferentially localize to embedded capillaries. Conclusions Embedding capillaries in the sarcolemma may provide a regulatory mechanism to optimize delivery of oxygen to heterogeneous groups of muscle fibers. We hypothesize that mitochondria locate to paravascular regions due to myofibril voids created by embedded capillaries, not to enhance the delivery of oxygen to the mitochondria. PMID:25279425

  20. The role of nitric oxide in muscle fibers with oxidative phosphorylation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tengan, Celia H.; Kiyomoto, Beatriz H.; Godinho, Rosely O.; Gamba, Juliana; Neves, Afonso C.; Schmidt, Beny; Oliveira, Acary S.B.; Gabbai, Alberto A.

    2007-01-01

    NO has been pointed as an important player in the control of mitochondrial respiration, especially because of its inhibitory effect on cytochrome c oxidase (COX). However, all the events involved in this control are still not completely elucidated. We demonstrate compartmentalized abnormalities on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity on muscle biopsies of patients with mitochondrial diseases. NOS activity was reduced in the sarcoplasmic compartment in COX deficient fibers, whereas increased activity was found in the sarcolemma of fibers with mitochondrial proliferation. We observed increased expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) in patients and a correlation between nNOS expression and mitochondrial content. Treatment of skeletal muscle culture with an NO donor induced an increase in mitochondrial content. Our results indicate specific roles of NO in compensatory mechanisms of muscle fibers with mitochondrial deficiency and suggest the participation of nNOS in the signaling process of mitochondrial proliferation in human skeletal muscle

  1. Effects of high-intensity physical training on muscle fiber characteristics in poststroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Jørgensen, Jørgen R.; Zeeman, Peter

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. High-intensity physical training can improve muscle strength and gait speed, but adaptive mechanisms at the muscle cellular level are largely unknown. METHODS: Outpatients with poststroke hemiparesis participated in a 3-month...... rehabilitation program combining high-intensity strength and body-weight supported treadmill-training. Biopsies sampled bilaterally from vastus lateralis muscles, before, after, and at 1-year follow-up after intervention, were analyzed for fiber size, type, and capillarization. RESULTS: At baseline, paretic...... lower limbs had smaller muscle fiber size and lower type I and IIA and higher type IIX percentages than nonparetic lower limbs. Paretic lower limbs had increased type IIA fibers after training. At follow-up, no difference between the lower limbs remained. CONCLUSIONS: Although high-intensity training...

  2. Human muscle fiber type-specific insulin signaling: Impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Peter Hjorth; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Birk, Jesper Bratz

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue composed of different fiber types. Studies suggest that insulin-mediated glucose metabolism is different between muscle fiber types. We hypothesized that differences are due to fiber-type specific expression/regulation of insulin signaling elements and....../or metabolic enzymes. Pools of type I and II fibers were prepared from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscles from lean, obese and type 2 diabetic subjects before and after a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Type I fibers compared to type II fibers have higher protein levels of the insulin receptor, GLUT4......, hexokinase II, glycogen synthase (GS), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH-E1α) and a lower protein content of Akt2, TBC1D4 and TBC1D1. In type I fibers compared to type II fibers, the phosphorylation-response to insulin was similar (TBC1D4, TBC1D1 and GS) or decreased (Akt and PDH-E1α). Phosphorylation...

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 ablation in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles reduces angiogenesis resulting in impaired growth of regenerated muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Daigo; Nakamura, Akinori; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2011-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases classified into subgroups based on substrate preference in normal physiological processes such as embryonic development and tissue remodeling, as well as in various disease processes via degradation of extracellular matrix components. Among the MMPs, MMP-9 and MMP-2 have been reported to be up-regulated in skeletal muscles in the lethal X-linked muscle disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by loss of dystrophin. A recent study showed that deletion of the MMP9 gene in mdx, a mouse model for DMD, improved skeletal muscle pathology and function; however, the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle is not well known. In this study, we aimed at verifying the role of MMP-2 in the dystrophin-deficient muscle by using mdx mice with genetic ablation of MMP-2 (mdx/MMP-2(-/-)). We found impairment of regenerated muscle fiber growth with reduction of angiogenesis in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), an important angiogenesis-related factor, decreased in mdx/MMP-2(-/-) mice at 3 months of age. MMP-2 had not a critical role in the degradation of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) components such as β-dystroglycan and β-sarcoglycan in the regeneration process of the dystrophic muscle. Accordingly, MMP-2 may be essential for growth of regenerated muscle fibers through VEGF-associated angiogenesis in the dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  4. Spaceflight effects on single skeletal muscle fiber function in the rhesus monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, R. H.; Desplanches, D.; Romatowski, J. G.; Widrick, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to understand how 14 days of weightlessness alters the cellular properties of individual slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibers in the rhesus monkey. The diameter of the soleus (Sol) type I, medial gastrocnemius (MG) type I, and MG type II fibers from the vivarium controls averaged 60 +/- 1, 46 +/- 2, and 59 +/- 2 microm, respectively. Both a control 1-G capsule sit (CS) and spaceflight (SF) significantly reduced the Sol type I fiber diameter (20 and 13%, respectively) and peak force, with the latter declining from 0.48 +/- 0.01 to 0.31 +/- 0.02 (CS group) and 0.32 +/- 0.01 mN (SF group). When the peak force was expressed as kiloNewtons per square meter (kN/m(2)), only the SF group showed a significant decline. This group also showed a significant 15% drop in peak fiber stiffness that suggests that fewer cross bridges were contracting in parallel. In the MG, SF but not CS depressed the type I fiber diameter and force. Additionally, SF significantly depressed absolute (mN) and relative (kN/m(2)) force in the fast-twitch MG fibers by 30% and 28%, respectively. The Ca(2+) sensitivity of the type I fiber (Sol and MG) was significantly reduced by growth but unaltered by SF. Flight had no significant effect on the mean maximal fiber shortening velocity in any fiber type or muscle. The post-SF Sol type I fibers showed a reduced peak power and, at peak power, an elevated velocity and decreased force. In conclusion, CS and SF caused atrophy and a reduced force and power in the Sol type I fiber. However, only SF elicited atrophy and reduced force (mN) in the MG type I fiber and a decline in relative force (kN/m(2)) in the Sol type I and MG type II fibers.

  5. The arrangement of muscle fibers and tendons in two muscles used for growth studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickland, N C

    1983-01-01

    The arrangement of muscle fibres and tendons was examined in the soleus muscle of rats from 6 to 175 days post partum. The muscle was seen to change from a simple structure, with mean fibre length of approximately 90% of complete muscle length, to a unipennate structure, with mean fibre length of only about 60% of muscle length. The dog pectineus muscle was also investigated and found to have a bipennate structure throughout postnatal growth. The arrangement of muscle fibres in both these muscles is such that it might be difficult (particularly in the older animals) to cut a transverse section through all the fibres contained in the muscle; some fibres might not enter the plane of section. Results on muscle fibre number in these muscles at different ages may therefore be misleading.

  6. Impact of Western and Mediterranean Diets and Vitamin D on Muscle Fibers of Sedentary Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purrello, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome is associated with sarcopenia. Decreased serum levels of Vitamin D (VitD) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and their mutual relationship were also reported. We aimed to evaluate whether different dietary profiles, containing or not VitD, may exert different effects on muscle molecular morphology. Methods: Twenty-eight male rats were fed for 10 weeks in order to detect early defects induced by different dietary regimens: regular diet (R); regular diet with vitamin D supplementation (R-DS) and regular diet with vitamin D restriction (R-DR); high-fat butter-based diets (HFB-DS and HFB-DR) with 41% energy from fat; high-fat extra-virgin olive oil-based diets (HFEVO-DS and HFEVO-DR) with 41% energy from fat. IL-1β, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)1, Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1), and VitD-receptor (VDR) expressions were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Muscle fiber perimeter was measured by histology and morphometric analysis. Results: The muscle fibers of the HEVO-DS rats were hypertrophic, comparable to those of the R-DS rats. An inverse correlation existed between the dietary fat content and the perimeter of the muscle fibers (p < 0.01). In the HFB-DR rats, the muscle fibers appeared hypotrophic with an increase of IL-1β and a dramatic decrease of IGF-1 expression. Conclusions: High-fat western diet could impair muscle metabolism and lay the ground for subsequent muscle damage. VitD associated with a Mediterranean diet showed trophic action on the muscle fibers. PMID:29462978

  7. Bion 11 Spaceflight Project: Effect of Weightlessness on Single Muscle Fiber Function in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, Robert H.; Romatowski, Janell G.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; DeLaCruz, Lourdes

    1999-01-01

    Although it is well known that microgravity induces considerable limb muscle atrophy, little is known about how weightlessness alters cell function. In this study, we investigated how weightlessness altered the functional properties of single fast and slow striated muscle fibers. Physiological studies were carried out to test the hypothesis that microgravity causes fiber atrophy, a decreased peak force (Newtons), tension (Newtons/cross-sectional area) and power, an elevated peak rate of tension development (dp/dt), and an increased maximal shortening velocity (V(sub o)) in the slow type I fiber, while changes in the fast-twitch fiber are restricted to atrophy and a reduced peak force. For each fiber, we determined the peak force (P(sub o)), V(sub o), dp/dt, the force-velocity relationship, peak power, the power-force relationship, the force-pCa relationship, and fiber stiffness. Biochemical studies were carried out to assess the effects of weightlessness on the enzyme and substrate profile of the fast- and slow-twitch fibers. We predicted that microgravity would increase resting muscle glycogen and glycolytic metabolism in the slow fiber type, while the fast-twitch fiber enzyme profile would be unaltered. The increased muscle glycogen would in part result from an elevated hexokinase and glycogen synthase. The enzymes selected for study represent markers for mitochondrial function (citrate synthase and 0-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase), glycolysis (Phosphofructokinase and lactate dehydrogenase), and fatty acid transport (Carnitine acetyl transferase). The substrates analyzed will include glycogen, lactate, adenosine triphosphate, and phosphocreatine.

  8. Mitochondrial specialization revealed by single muscle fiber proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiaffino, S; Reggiani, C; Kostrominova, T Y

    2015-01-01

    to buffering the H2 O2 produced by the respiratory chain. Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT), the other major mito-chondrial enzyme involved in NADPH generation, is also more abundant in type 1 fibers. We suggest that the continuously active type 1 fibers are endowed with a more efficient H2 O2...

  9. Single muscle fiber proteomics reveals unexpected mitochondrial specialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Deshmukh, Atul S

    2015-01-01

    and unbiased proteomics methods yielded the same subtype assignment. We discovered novel subtype-specific features, most prominently mitochondrial specialization of fiber types in substrate utilization. The fiber type-resolved proteomes can be applied to a variety of physiological and pathological conditions...

  10. Recruitment of single muscle fibers during submaximal cycling exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altenburg, T.M.; Degens, H.; van Mechelen, W.; Sargeant, A.J.; de Haan, A.

    2007-01-01

    In literature, an inconsistency exists in the submaximal exercise intensity at which type II fibers are activated. In the present study, the recruitment of type I and II fibers was investigated from the very beginning and throughout a 45-min cycle exercise at 75% of the maximal oxygen uptake, which

  11. Modulation of long-latency afferent inhibition by the amplitude of sensory afferent volley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Claudia V; El-Sayes, Jenin; Fassett, Hunter J; Chen, Robert; Nelson, Aimee J

    2017-07-01

    Long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI) is the inhibition of the transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) motor-evoked potentials (MEP) by the sensory afferent volley following electrical stimulation of a peripheral nerve. It is unknown how the activation of sensory afferent fibers relates to the magnitude of LAI. This study investigated the relationship between LAI and the sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) from the median nerve (MN) and the digital nerves (DN) of the second digit. LAI was obtained by delivering nerve stimulation 200 ms before a TMS pulse delivered over the motor cortex. Experiment 1 assessed the magnitude of LAI following stimulation of the contralateral MN or DN using nerve stimulus intensities relative to the maximum SNAP (SNAP max ) of that nerve and two TMS intensities (0.5- and 1-mV MEP). Results indicate that MN LAI is maximal at ~50% SNAP max , when presumably all sensory afferents are recruited for TMS of 0.5-mV MEP. For DN, LAI appears at ~50% SNAP max and does not increase with further recruitment of sensory afferents. Experiment 2 investigated the magnitude of LAI following ipsilateral nerve stimulation at intensities relative to SNAP max Results show minimal LAI evoked by ipsilateral MN and no LAI following ipsilateral DN stimulation. Implications for future studies investigating LAI include adjusting nerve stimulation to 50% SNAP max to obtain maximal LAI. Additionally, MN LAI can be used as a marker for neurological disease or injury by using a nerve stimulation intensity that can evoke a depth of LAI capable of increasing or decreasing. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first investigation of the relationship between long-latency afferent inhibition (LAI) and the sensory afferent volley. Differences exist between median and digital nerve LAI. For the median nerve, LAI increases until all sensory fibers are presumably recruited. In contrast, digital nerve LAI does not increase with the recruitment of additional sensory fibers but

  12. Contraction and AICAR stimulate IL-6 vesicle depletion from skeletal muscle fibers in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Hans P M M; Brandauer, Josef; Schjerling, Peter; Koh, Ho-Jin; Treebak, Jonas T; Hirshman, Michael F; Galbo, Henrik; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that interleukin 6 (IL-6) is released from contracting skeletal muscles; however, the cellular origin, secretion kinetics, and signaling mechanisms regulating IL-6 secretion are unknown. To address these questions, we developed imaging methodology to study IL-6 in fixed mouse muscle fibers and in live animals in vivo. Using confocal imaging to visualize endogenous IL-6 protein in fixed muscle fibers, we found IL-6 in small vesicle structures distributed throughout the fibers under basal (resting) conditions. To determine the kinetics of IL-6 secretion, intact quadriceps muscles were transfected with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged IL-6 (IL-6-EGFP), and 5 days later anesthetized mice were imaged before and after muscle contractions in situ. Contractions decreased IL-6-EGFP-containing vesicles and protein by 62% (P contraction. However, contraction-mediated IL-6-EGFP reduction was normal in muscle-specific AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α2-inactive transgenic mice. In contrast, the AMPK activator AICAR decreased IL-6-EGFP vesicles, an effect that was inhibited in the transgenic mice. In conclusion, resting skeletal muscles contain IL-6-positive vesicles that are expressed throughout myofibers. Contractions stimulate the rapid reduction of IL-6 in myofibers, occurring through an AMPKα2-independent mechanism. This novel imaging methodology clearly establishes IL-6 as a contraction-stimulated myokine and can be used to characterize the secretion kinetics of other putative myokines.

  13. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sarah A.; Sandesara, Pooja B.; Senf, Sarah M.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Cachexia is characterized by inexorable muscle wasting that significantly affects patient prognosis and increases mortality. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of this muscle wasting is of significant importance. Recent work showed that components of the forkhead box O (FoxO) pathway are increased in skeletal muscle during cachexia. In the current study, we tested the physiological significance of FoxO activation in the progression of muscle atrophy associated with cachexia. FoxO-DNA binding dependent transcription was blocked in the muscles of mice through injection of a dominant negative (DN) FoxO expression plasmid prior to inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma cells or the induction of sepsis. Expression of DN FoxO inhibited the increased mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF1, cathepsin L, and/or Bnip3 and inhibited muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis. Interestingly, during control conditions, expression of DN FoxO decreased myostatin expression, increased MyoD expression and satellite cell proliferation, and induced fiber hypertrophy, which required de novo protein synthesis. Collectively, these data show that FoxO-DNA binding-dependent transcription is necessary for normal muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis, and further suggest that basal levels of FoxO play an important role during normal conditions to depress satellite cell activation and limit muscle growth.—Reed, S. A., Sandesara, P. B., Senf, S. F., Judge, A. R. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy. PMID:22102632

  14. Progressive recruitment of muscle fibers is not necessary for the slow component of VO2 kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Gladden, L Bruce; Hogan, Michael C; Nieckarz, Zenon; Grassi, Bruno

    2008-08-01

    The "slow component" of O2 uptake (VO2) kinetics during constant-load heavy-intensity exercise is traditionally thought to derive from a progressive recruitment of muscle fibers. In this study, which represents a reanalysis of data taken from a previous study by our group (Grassi B, Hogan MC, Greenhaff PL, Hamann JJ, Kelley KM, Aschenbach WG, Constantin-Teodosiu D, Gladden LB. J Physiol 538: 195-207, 2002) we evaluated the presence of a slow component-like response in the isolated dog gastrocnemius in situ (n=6) during 4 min of contractions at approximately 60-70% of peak VO2. In this preparation all muscle fibers are maximally activated by electrical stimulation from the beginning of the contraction period, and no progressive recruitment of fibers is possible. Muscle VO2 was calculated as blood flow multiplied by arteriovenous O2 content difference. The muscle fatigued (force decreased by approximately 20-25%) during contractions. Kinetics of adjustment were evaluated for 1) VO2, uncorrected for force development; 2) VO2 normalized for peak force; 3) VO2 normalized for force-time integral. A slow component-like response, described in only one muscle out of six when uncorrected VO2 was considered, was observed in all muscles when VO2/peak force and VO2/force-time were considered. The amplitude of the slow component-like response, expressed as a fraction of the total response, was higher for VO2/peak force (0.18+/-0.06, means+/-SE) and for VO2/force-time (0.22+/-0.05) compared with uncorrected VO2 (0.04+/-0.04). A progressive recruitment of muscle fibers may not be necessary for the development of the slow component of VO2 kinetics, which may be caused by the metabolic factors that induce muscle fatigue and, as a consequence, reduce the efficiency of muscle contractions.

  15. The arrangement of muscle fibers and tendons in two muscles used for growth studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Stickland, N C

    1983-01-01

    The arrangement of muscle fibres and tendons was examined in the soleus muscle of rats from 6 to 175 days post partum. The muscle was seen to change from a simple structure, with mean fibre length of approximately 90% of complete muscle length, to a unipennate structure, with mean fibre length of only about 60% of muscle length. The dog pectineus muscle was also investigated and found to have a bipennate structure throughout postnatal growth. The arrangement of muscle fibres in both these mus...

  16. Design and analysis of adaptive honeycomb structure with pneumatic muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weilong; Tian, Dongkui; Chen, Yijin

    2012-04-01

    The adaptive honeycomb structure actuated by pneumatic muscle fibers is proposed in this paper. The FE model of adaptive honeycomb structure is developed by use of ANSYS software. The elastics modulus of the developed pneumatic muscle fibers is experimentally determined and their output force is tested. The results show that the contraction ratio of the pneumatic muscle fibers with inner diameter of 2mm could reach up to 26.8% and the force could reach to a value of 27N when the applied pressure is 0.4MPa and the contraction ratio is zero. When the adaptive honeycomb has a certain load and an effective output displacement, the applied force must be greater than a certain value. The adaptive honeycomb must be consumed extra energy when the output displacement and force are produced.

  17. Na+-K+-ATPase in rat skeletal muscle: muscle fiber-specific differences in exercise-induced changes in ion affinity and maximal activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear whether muscle activity reduces or increases Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase maximal in vitro activity in rat skeletal muscle, and it is not known whether muscle activity changes the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase ion affinity. The present study uses quantification of ATP hydrolysis to characterize muscle fiber...... membranes of glycolytic muscle, which abolished the fiber-type difference in Na(+) affinity. K(m) for K(+) (in the presence of Na(+)) was not influenced by running. Running only increased the maximal in vitro activity (V(max)) in total membranes from soleus, whereas V(max) remained constant in the three...... other muscles tested. In conclusion, muscle activity induces fiber type-specific changes both in Na(+) affinity and maximal in vitro activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. The underlying mechanisms may involve translocation of subunits and increased association between PLM units and the alphabeta complex...

  18. Muscle fiber velocity and electromyographic signs of fatigue in fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver-Krol, E.G.; Rasker, Johannes J.; Henriquez, N.R.; Verheijen, W.G.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder of widespread muscular pain. We investigated possible differences in surface electromyography (sEMG) in clinically unaffected muscle between patients with FM and controls. Methods: sEMG was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 13 women with FM and

  19. Incidence of centrally positioned nuclei in mouse masticatory muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, A; Vilmann, H; Kirkeby, S

    1989-01-01

    Cross-sections of normal digastric, temporalis and masseter muscles from 7- and 30-week-old mice were studied for centrally positioned nuclei. Such nuclei were inhomogeneously distributed throughout each muscle and varied markedly between specimens. The incidence of centrally positioned nuclei in...

  20. STRETCHY ELECTRONICS. Hierarchically buckled sheath-core fibers for superelastic electronics, sensors, and muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z F; Fang, S; Moura, F A; Ding, J N; Jiang, N; Di, J; Zhang, M; Lepró, X; Galvão, D S; Haines, C S; Yuan, N Y; Yin, S G; Lee, D W; Wang, R; Wang, H Y; Lv, W; Dong, C; Zhang, R C; Chen, M J; Yin, Q; Chong, Y T; Zhang, R; Wang, X; Lima, M D; Ovalle-Robles, R; Qian, D; Lu, H; Baughman, R H

    2015-07-24

    Superelastic conducting fibers with improved properties and functionalities are needed for diverse applications. Here we report the fabrication of highly stretchable (up to 1320%) sheath-core conducting fibers created by wrapping carbon nanotube sheets oriented in the fiber direction on stretched rubber fiber cores. The resulting structure exhibited distinct short- and long-period sheath buckling that occurred reversibly out of phase in the axial and belt directions, enabling a resistance change of less than 5% for a 1000% stretch. By including other rubber and carbon nanotube sheath layers, we demonstrated strain sensors generating an 860% capacitance change and electrically powered torsional muscles operating reversibly by a coupled tension-to-torsion actuation mechanism. Using theory, we quantitatively explain the complementary effects of an increase in muscle length and a large positive Poisson's ratio on torsional actuation and electronic properties. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Differentiation and fiber type-specific activity of a muscle creatine kinase intronic enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Phillip WL

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hundreds of genes, including muscle creatine kinase (MCK, are differentially expressed in fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers, but the fiber type-specific regulatory mechanisms are not well understood. Results Modulatory region 1 (MR1 is a 1-kb regulatory region within MCK intron 1 that is highly active in terminally differentiating skeletal myocytes in vitro. A MCK small intronic enhancer (MCK-SIE containing a paired E-box/myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 regulatory motif resides within MR1. The SIE's transcriptional activity equals that of the extensively characterized 206-bp MCK 5'-enhancer, but the MCK-SIE is flanked by regions that can repress its activity via the individual and combined effects of about 15 different but highly conserved 9- to 24-bp sequences. ChIP and ChIP-Seq analyses indicate that the SIE and the MCK 5'-enhancer are occupied by MyoD, myogenin and MEF2. Many other E-boxes located within or immediately adjacent to intron 1 are not occupied by MyoD or myogenin. Transgenic analysis of a 6.5-kb MCK genomic fragment containing the 5'-enhancer and proximal promoter plus the 3.2-kb intron 1, with and without MR1, indicates that MR1 is critical for MCK expression in slow- and intermediate-twitch muscle fibers (types I and IIa, respectively, but is not required for expression in fast-twitch muscle fibers (types IIb and IId. Conclusions In this study, we discovered that MR1 is critical for MCK expression in slow- and intermediate-twitch muscle fibers and that MR1's positive transcriptional activity depends on a paired E-box MEF2 site motif within a SIE. This is the first study to delineate the DNA controls for MCK expression in different skeletal muscle fiber types.

  2. Myostatin promotes distinct responses on protein metabolism of skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers of rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, L H; Paula-Gomes, S; Zanon, N M; Kettelhut, I C

    2017-10-19

    Myostatin is a novel negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Myostatin expression is also found in heart in a much less extent, but it can be upregulated in pathological conditions, such as heart failure. Myostatin may be involved in inhibiting protein synthesis and/or increasing protein degradation in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Herein, we used cell cultures and isolated muscles from rats to determine protein degradation and synthesis. Muscles incubated with myostatin exhibited an increase in proteolysis with an increase of Atrogin-1, MuRF1 and LC3 genes. Extensor digitorum longus muscles and C2C12 myotubes exhibited a reduction in protein turnover. Cardiomyocytes showed an increase in proteolysis by activating autophagy and the ubiquitin proteasome system, and a decrease in protein synthesis by decreasing P70S6K. The effect of myostatin on protein metabolism is related to fiber type composition, which may be associated to the extent of atrophy mediated effect of myostatin on muscle.

  3. The Masticatory Contractile Load Induced Expression and Activation of Akt1/PKBα in Muscle Fibers at the Myotendinous Junction within Muscle-Tendon-Bone Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Korkmaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell specific detection of enzyme activation in response to the physiological contractile load within muscle-tendon-bone unit is essential for understanding of the mechanical forces transmission from muscle cells via tendon to the bone. The hypothesis that the physiological mechanical loading regulates activation of Akt1/PKBα at Thr308 and at Ser473 in muscle fibers within muscle-tendon-bone unit was tested using quantitative immunohistochemistry, confocal double fluorescence analysis, and immunoblot analysis. In comparison to the staining intensities in peripheral regions of the muscle fibers, Akt1/PKBα was detected with a higher staining intensity in muscle fibers at the myotendinous junction (MTJ areas. In muscle fibers at the MTJ areas, Akt1/PKBα is dually phosphorylated at Thr308 and Ser473. The immunohistochemical results were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. We conclude that contractile load generated by masticatory muscles induces local domain-dependent expression of Akt1/PKBα as well as activation by dually phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473 in muscle fibers at the MTJ areas within muscle-tendon-bone unit.

  4. De novo synthesis of adenine nucleotides in different skeletal muscle fiber types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullson, P.C.; John-Alder, H.B.; Hood, D.A.; Terjung, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Management of adenine nucleotide catabolism differs among skeletal muscle fiber types. This study evaluated whether there are corresponding differences in the rates of de novo synthesis of adenine nucleotide among fiber type sections of skeletal muscle using an isolated perfused rat hindquarter preparation. Label incorporation into adenine nucleotides from the [1-14C]glycine precursor was determined and used to calculate synthesis rates based on the intracellular glycine specific radioactivity. Results show that intracellular glycine is closely related to the direct precursor pool. Rates of de novo synthesis were highest in fast-twitch red muscle (57.0 +/- 4.0, 58.2 +/- 4.4 nmol.h-1.g-1; deep red gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis), relatively high in slow-twitch red muscle (47.0 +/- 3.1; soleus), and low in fast-twitch white muscle (26.1 +/- 2.0 and 21.6 +/- 2.3; superficial white gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis). Rates for four mixed muscles were intermediate, ranging between 32.3 and 37.3. Specific de novo synthesis rates exhibited a strong correlation (r = 0.986) with muscle section citrate synthase activity. Turnover rates (de novo synthesis rate/adenine nucleotide pool size) were highest in high oxidative muscle (0.82-1.06%/h), lowest in low oxidative muscle (0.30-0.35%/h), and intermediate in mixed muscle (0.44-0.55%/h). Our results demonstrate that differences in adenine nucleotide management among fiber types extends to the process of de novo adenine nucleotide synthesis

  5. Fiber Specific Changes in Sphingolipid Metabolism in Skeletal Muscles of Hyperthyroid Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Chabowski, A.; ?endzian-Piotrowska, M.; Mik?osz, A.; ?ukaszuk, B.; Kurek, K.; G?rski, J.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (T3, T4) are well known modulators of different cellular signals including the sphingomyelin pathway. However, studies regarding downstream effects of T3 on sphingolipid metabolism in skeletal muscle are scarce. In the present work we sought to investigate the effects of hyperthyroidism on the activity of the key enzymes of ceramide metabolism as well as the content of fundamental sphingolipids. Based on fiber/metabolic differences, we chose three different skeletal muscles, ...

  6. Regulation of the muscle fiber microenvironment by activated satellite cells during hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher S.; Lee, Jonah D.; Jackson, Janna R.; Kirby, Tyler J.; Stasko, Shawn A.; Liu, Honglu; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.; McCarthy, John J.; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2014-01-01

    Our aim in the current study was to determine the necessity of satellite cells for long-term muscle growth and maintenance. We utilized a transgenic Pax7-DTA mouse model, allowing for the conditional depletion of > 90% of satellite cells with tamoxifen treatment. Synergist ablation surgery, where removal of synergist muscles places functional overload on the plantaris, was used to stimulate robust hypertrophy. Following 8 wk of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle demonstrated an accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and fibroblast expansion that resulted in reduced specific force of the plantaris. Although the early growth response was normal, an attenuation of hypertrophy measured by both muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area occurred in satellite cell-depleted muscle. Isolated primary myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs) negatively regulated fibroblast ECM mRNA expression in vitro, suggesting a novel role for activated satellite cells/MPCs in muscle adaptation. These results provide evidence that satellite cells regulate the muscle environment during growth.—Fry, C. S., Lee, J. D., Jackson, J. R., Kirby, T. J., Stasko, S. A., Liu, H., Dupont-Versteegden, E. E., McCarthy, J. J., Peterson, C. A. Regulation of the muscle fiber microenvironment by activated satellite cells during hypertrophy. PMID:24376025

  7. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency and Type 2C Muscle Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, evaluated retrospectively clinical, laboratory, and muscle histochemistry and oxidative enzyme characteristics in 49 children with suspected mitochondrial disorders.

  9. RNA sequencing reveals a slow to fast muscle fiber type transition after olanzapine infusion in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Lynch

    Full Text Available Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs, like olanzapine, exhibit acute metabolic side effects leading to metabolic inflexibility, hyperglycemia, adiposity and diabetes. Understanding how SGAs affect the skeletal muscle transcriptome could elucidate approaches for mitigating these side effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused intravenously with vehicle or olanzapine for 24h using a dose leading to a mild hyperglycemia. RNA-Seq was performed on gastrocnemius muscle, followed by alignment of the data with the Rat Genome Assembly 5.0. Olanzapine altered expression of 1347 out of 26407 genes. Genes encoding skeletal muscle fiber-type specific sarcomeric, ion channel, glycolytic, O2- and Ca2+-handling, TCA cycle, vascularization and lipid oxidation proteins and pathways, along with NADH shuttles and LDH isoforms were affected. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that olanzapine decreased the expression of slower and more oxidative fiber type genes (e.g., type 1, while up regulating those for the most glycolytic and least metabolically flexible, fast twitch fiber type, IIb. Protein turnover genes, necessary to bring about transition, were also up regulated. Potential upstream regulators were also identified. Olanzapine appears to be rapidly affecting the muscle transcriptome to bring about a change to a fast-glycolytic fiber type. Such fiber types are more susceptible than slow muscle to atrophy, and such transitions are observed in chronic metabolic diseases. Thus these effects could contribute to the altered body composition and metabolic disease olanzapine causes. A potential interventional strategy is implicated because aerobic exercise, in contrast to resistance exercise, can oppose such slow to fast fiber transitions.

  10. Protein Supplementation Does Not Further Increase Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Fiber Hypertrophy after Eight Weeks of Resistance Training in Novice Subjects, but Partially Counteracts the Fast-to-Slow Muscle Fiber Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paoli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The response to resistance training and protein supplementation in the latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM has never been investigated. We investigated the effects of resistance training (RT and protein supplementation on muscle mass, strength, and fiber characteristics of the LDM. Eighteen healthy young subjects were randomly assigned to a progressive eight-week RT program with a normal protein diet (NP or high protein diet (HP (NP 0.85 vs. HP 1.8 g of protein·kg−1·day−1. One repetition maximum tests, magnetic resonance imaging for cross-sectional muscle area (CSA, body composition, and single muscle fibers mechanical and phenotype characteristics were measured. RT induced a significant gain in strength (+17%, p < 0.0001, whole muscle CSA (p = 0.024, and single muscle fibers CSA (p < 0.05 of LDM in all subjects. Fiber isometric force increased in proportion to CSA (+22%, p < 0.005 and thus no change in specific tension occurred. A significant transition from 2X to 2A myosin expression was induced by training. The protein supplementation showed no significant effects on all measured outcomes except for a smaller reduction of 2X myosin expression. Our results suggest that in LDM protein supplementation does not further enhance RT-induced muscle fiber hypertrophy nor influence mechanic muscle fiber characteristics but partially counteracts the fast-to-slow fiber shift.

  11. Controlled chaos: three-dimensional kinematics, fiber histochemistry, and muscle contractile dynamics of autotomized lizard tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Timothy E; Lipsett, Kathryn R; Syme, Douglas A; Russell, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    The ability to shed an appendage occurs in both vertebrates and invertebrates, often as a tactic to avoid predation. The tails of lizards, unlike most autotomized body parts of animals, exhibit complex and vigorous movements once disconnected from the body. Despite the near ubiquity of autotomy across groups of lizards and the fact that this is an extraordinary event involving the self-severing of the spinal cord, our understanding of why and how tails move as they do following autotomy is sparse. We herein explore the histochemistry and physiology of the tail muscles of the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), a species that exhibits vigorous and variable tail movements following autotomy. To confirm that the previously studied tail movements of this species are generally representative of geckos and therefore suitable for in-depth muscle studies, we quantified the three-dimensional kinematics of autotomized tails in three additional species. The movements of the tails of all species were generally similar and included jumps, flips, and swings. Our preliminary analyses suggest that some species of gecko exhibit short but high-frequency movements, whereas others exhibit larger-amplitude but lower-frequency movements. We then compared the ATPase and oxidative capacity of muscle fibers and contractile dynamics of isolated muscle bundles from original tails, muscle from regenerate tails, and fast fibers from an upper limb muscle (iliofibularis) of the leopard gecko. Histochemical analysis revealed that more than 90% of the fibers in original and regenerate caudal muscles had high ATPase but possessed a superficial layer of fibers with low ATPase and high oxidative capacity. We found that contraction kinetics, isometric force, work, power output, and the oscillation frequency at which maximum power was generated were lowest in the original tail, followed by the regenerate tail and then the fast fibers of the iliofibularis. Muscle from the original tail exhibited

  12. Newly formed skeletal muscle fibers are prone to false positive immunostaining by rabbit antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Kliem, Anette; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2011-01-01

    rely on controls that reveal non-specific binding by the secondary antibody and neglect that the primary rabbit antibody itself may cause false positive staining of the muscle. We suggest that reliable immuno-based protein detection in newly formed muscle fibers at least requires a nonsense rabbit......Reports on muscle biology and regeneration often implicate immuno(cyto/histo)chemical protein characterization using rabbit polyclonal antibodies. In this study we demonstrate that newly formed myofibers are especially prone to false positive staining by rabbit antibodies and this unwanted staining...

  13. Genetic Effects of Polymorphisms in Myogenic Regulatory Factors on Chicken Muscle Fiber Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qin Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The myogenic regulatory factors is a family of transcription factors that play a key role in the development of skeletal muscle fibers, which are the main factors to affect the meat taste and texture. In the present study, we performed candidate gene analysis to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MyoD, Myf5, MyoG, and Mrf4 genes using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism in 360 Erlang Mountain Chickens from three different housing systems (cage, pen, and free-range. The general linear model procedure was used to estimate the statistical significance of association between combined genotypes and muscle fiber traits of chickens. Two polymorphisms (g.39928301T>G and g.11579368C>T were detected in the Mrf4 and MyoD gene, respectively. The diameters of thigh and pectoralis muscle fibers were higher in birds with the combined genotypes of GG-TT and TT-CT (p0.05. Our findings suggest that the combined genotypes of TT-CT and GG-TT might be advantageous for muscle fiber traits, and could be the potential genetic markers for breeding program in Erlang Mountain Chickens.

  14. Expression of Dihydropyridine and Ryanodine Receptors in Type IIA Fibers of Rat Skeletal Muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anttila, Katja; Mänttäri, Satu; Järvilehto, Matti

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the fiber type specificity of dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in different rat limb muscles was investigated. Western blot and histochemical analyses provided for the first time evidence that the expression of both receptors correlates to a specific myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition. We observed a significant (p=0.01) correlation between DHP as well as Ry receptor density and the expression of MHC IIa (correlation factor r=0.674 and r=0.645, respectively) in one slow-twitch, postural muscle (m. soleus), one mixed, fast-twitch muscle (m. gastrocnemius) and two fast-twitch muscles (m. rectus femoris, m. extensor digitorum longus). The highest DHP and Ry receptor density was found in the white part of m. rectus femoris (0.058±0.0060 and 0.057±0.0158 ODu, respectively). As expected, the highest relative percentage of MHC IIa was also found in the white part of m. rectus femoris (70.0±7.77%). Furthermore, histochemical experiments revealed that the IIA fibers stained most strongly for the fluorophore-conjugated receptor blockers. Our data clearly suggest that the expression of DHPRs and RyRs follows a fiber type-specific pattern, indicating an important role for these proteins in the maintenance of an effective Ca 2+ cycle in the fast contracting fiber type IIA

  15. An image processing pipeline to detect and segment nuclei in muscle fiber microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanen; Xu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yaming; Xia, Shunren; Yang, Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Muscle fiber images play an important role in the medical diagnosis and treatment of many muscular diseases. The number of nuclei in skeletal muscle fiber images is a key bio-marker of the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. In nuclei segmentation one primary challenge is to correctly separate the clustered nuclei. In this article, we developed an image processing pipeline to automatically detect, segment, and analyze nuclei in microscopic image of muscle fibers. The pipeline consists of image pre-processing, identification of isolated nuclei, identification and segmentation of clustered nuclei, and quantitative analysis. Nuclei are initially extracted from background by using local Otsu's threshold. Based on analysis of morphological features of the isolated nuclei, including their areas, compactness, and major axis lengths, a Bayesian network is trained and applied to identify isolated nuclei from clustered nuclei and artifacts in all the images. Then a two-step refined watershed algorithm is applied to segment clustered nuclei. After segmentation, the nuclei can be quantified for statistical analysis. Comparing the segmented results with those of manual analysis and an existing technique, we find that our proposed image processing pipeline achieves good performance with high accuracy and precision. The presented image processing pipeline can therefore help biologists increase their throughput and objectivity in analyzing large numbers of nuclei in muscle fiber images. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Artificial muscles made of chiral two-way shape memory polymer fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qianxi; Fan, Jizhou; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the unusual improvement of the tensile actuation of hierarchically chiral structured artificial muscle made of two-way shape memory polymer (2W-SMP) fiber. Experimental results show that the chemically cross-linked poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) 2W-SMP fibers possess an average negative coefficient of thermal expansion (NCTE) that is at least one order higher than that of the polyethylene fiber used previously. As expected, the increase in axial thermal contraction of the precursor fiber leads to an increase in the recovered torque ( 4.4 Nmm ) of the chiral fiber and eventually in the tensile actuation of the twisted-then-coiled artificial muscle ( 67.81 ±1.82 % ). A mechanical model based on Castigliano's second theorem is proposed, and the calculated result is consistent with the experimental result (64.17% tensile stroke). The model proves the significance of the NCTE and the recovered torque on tensile actuation of the artificial muscle and can be used as a guidance for the future design.

  17. Tetranectin in slow intra- and extrafusal chicken muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, X; Gilpin, B; Iba, K

    2001-01-01

    Tetranectin is a C-type lectin that occurs in the mammalian musculoskeletal system. In the present report we describe the first studies on an avian tetranectin. A full-length chicken tetranectin cDNA was isolated. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of chicken tetranectin with mouse...... and human tetranectin showed an identity of 67 and 68%, respectively. Northern blot analysis demonstrated broad expression of chicken tetranectin mRNA, which was first detected on embryonic day 4. Tetranectin protein was detected in chicken serum and egg yolk. Since muscle is one of few tissues in which...... tetranectin protein is retained, we examined the distribution of tetranectin in various muscle types in chicken. Myofibers strongly positive for tetranectin were observed in several muscles including m. tibialis ant. and m. sartorius (from embryonic day 10 to adult). Using antibodies to fast and slow myosin...

  18. The role of Sox6 in zebrafish muscle fiber type specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Harriet E; Ono, Yosuke; Wang, Xingang; Elworthy, Stone; Cunliffe, Vincent T; Ingham, Philip W

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Sox6 has been implicated in regulating muscle fiber type-specific gene expression in mammals. In zebrafish, loss of function of the transcription factor Prdm1a results in a slow to fast-twitch fiber type transformation presaged by ectopic expression of sox6 in slow-twitch progenitors. Morpholino-mediated Sox6 knockdown can suppress this transformation but causes ectopic expression of only one of three slow-twitch specific genes assayed. Here, we use gain and loss of function analysis to analyse further the role of Sox6 in zebrafish muscle fiber type specification. The GAL4 binary misexpression system was used to express Sox6 ectopically in zebrafish embryos. Cis-regulatory elements were characterized using transgenic fish. Zinc finger nuclease mediated targeted mutagenesis was used to analyse the effects of loss of Sox6 function in embryonic, larval and adult zebrafish. Zebrafish transgenic for the GCaMP3 Calcium reporter were used to assay Ca2+ transients in wild-type and mutant muscle fibres. Ectopic Sox6 expression is sufficient to downregulate slow-twitch specific gene expression in zebrafish embryos. Cis-regulatory elements upstream of the slow myosin heavy chain 1 (smyhc1) and slow troponin c (tnnc1b) genes contain putative Sox6 binding sites required for repression of the former but not the latter. Embryos homozygous for sox6 null alleles expressed tnnc1b throughout the fast-twitch muscle whereas other slow-specific muscle genes, including smyhc1, were expressed ectopically in only a subset of fast-twitch fibers. Ca2+ transients in sox6 mutant fast-twitch fibers were intermediate in their speed and amplitude between those of wild-type slow- and fast-twitch fibers. sox6 homozygotes survived to adulthood and exhibited continued misexpression of tnnc1b as well as smaller slow-twitch fibers. They also exhibited a striking curvature of the spine. The Sox6 transcription factor is a key regulator of fast-twitch muscle fiber differentiation

  19. Altered skeletal muscle fiber composition and size precede whole-body insulin resistance in young men with low birth weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christine B; Storgaard, Heidi; Madsbad, Sten

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Low birth weight (LBW), a surrogate marker of an adverse fetal milieu, is linked to muscle insulin resistance, impaired insulin-stimulated glycolysis, and future risk of type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle mass, fiber composition, and capillary density are important determinants of muscle...

  20. Quantitative PCR Analysis of Laryngeal Muscle Fiber Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Daele, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    Voice and swallowing dysfunction as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis can be improved with vocal fold injections or laryngeal framework surgery. However, denervation atrophy can cause late-term clinical failure. A major determinant of skeletal muscle physiology is myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and previous protein analyses…

  1. Solutions to muscle fiber equations and their long time behaviour

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Pavel; Sainte-Marie, J.; Sorine, M.; Urquiza, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2006), s. 535-558 ISSN 1468-1218 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : existence * uniqueness * muscle and cardiac mechanics Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.194, year: 2006 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1468121805000507

  2. Chronic intrinsic transient tracheal occlusion elicits diaphragmatic muscle fiber remodeling in conscious rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara K Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the prevalence of inspiratory muscle strength training has increased in clinical medicine, its effect on diaphragm fiber remodeling is not well-understood and no relevant animal respiratory muscle strength training-rehabilitation experimental models exist. We tested the postulate that intrinsic transient tracheal occlusion (ITTO conditioning in conscious animals would provide a novel experimental model of respiratory muscle strength training, and used significant increases in diaphragmatic fiber cross-sectional area (CSA as the primary outcome measure. We hypothesized that ITTO would increase costal diaphragm fiber CSA and further hypothesized a greater duration and magnitude of occlusions would amplify remodeling. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sprague-Dawley rats underwent surgical placement of a tracheal cuff and were randomly assigned to receive daily either 10-minute sessions of ITTO, extended-duration, 20-minute ITTO (ITTO-20, partial obstruction with 50% of cuff inflation pressure (ITTO-PAR or observation (SHAM over two weeks. After the interventions, fiber morphology, myosin heavy chain composition and CSA were examined in the crural and ventral, medial, and dorsal costal regions. In the medial costal diaphragm, with ITTO, type IIx/b fibers were 26% larger in the medial costal diaphragm (p<0.01 and 24% larger in the crural diaphragm (p<0.05. No significant changes in fiber composition or morphology were detected. ITTO-20 sessions also yielded significant increases in medial costal fiber cross-sectional area, but the effects were not greater than those elicited by 10-minute sessions. On the other hand, ITTO-PAR resulted in partial airway obstruction and did not generate fiber hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the magnitude of the load was more influential in altering fiber cross-sectional area than extended-duration conditioning sessions. The results also indicated that ITTO was

  3. The expression of HSP in human skeletal muscle. Effects of muscle fiber phenotype and training background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Mattias; Mackey, Abigail L; Langberg, Henning

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Exercise-induced adaptations of skeletal muscle are related to training mode and can be muscle fibre type specific. This study aimed to investigate heat shock protein expression in type I and type II muscle fibres in resting skeletal muscle of subjects with different training backgrounds...... myosin heavy chain I and IIA, αB-crystallin, HSP27, HSP60 and HSP70. RESULTS: In ACT and RES, but not in END, a fibre type specific expression with higher staining intensity in type I than type II fibres was seen for αB-crystallin. The opposite (II>I) was found for HSP27 in subjects from ACT (6 of 12...... HSPs in human skeletal muscle is influenced by muscle fibre phenotype. The fibre type specific expression of HSP70 is influenced by resistance and endurance training whereas those of αB-crystallin and HSP27 are influenced only by endurance training suggesting the existence of a training...

  4. Effect of Myostatin SNP on muscle fiber properties in male Thoroughbred horses during training period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Hirofumi; Itoh, Rika; Sato, Fumio; Takebe, Naoya; Hada, Tetsuro; Tozaki, Teruaki

    2017-10-20

    Variants of the Myostatin gene have been shown to have an influence on muscle hypertrophy phenotypes in a wide range of mammalian species. Recently, a Thoroughbred horse with a C-Allele at the g.66493737C/T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been reported to be suited to short-distance racing. In this study, we examined the effect of the Myostatin SNP on muscle fiber properties in young Thoroughbred horses during a training period. To investigate the effect of the Myostatin SNP on muscle fiber before training, several mRNA expressions were relatively quantified in biopsy samples from the middle gluteal muscle of 27 untrained male Thoroughbred horses (1.5 years old) using real-time RT-PCR analysis. The remaining muscle samples were used for immunohistochemical analysis to determine the population and area of each fiber type. All measurements were revaluated in biopsy samples of the same horses after a 5-month period of conventional training. Although the expressions of Myostatin mRNA decreased in all SNP genotypes, a significant decrease was found in only the C/C genotype after training. While, expression of VEGFa, PGC1α, and SDHa mRNAs, which relate to the biogenesis of mitochondria and capillaries, was significantly higher (54-82%) in the T/T than the C/C genotypes after training. It is suggested that hypertrophy of muscle fiber is directly associated with a decrease in Myostatin mRNA expression in the C/C genotype, and that increased expressions of VEGFa, PGC1α, and SDHa in the T/T genotype might be indirectly caused by the Myostatin SNP.

  5. Afferent nerves regulating the cough reflex: Mechanisms and Mediators of Cough in Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Brendan J.

    2010-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary C-fibers and acid-sensitive, capsaicin-insensitive mechanoreceptors innervating the larynx, trachea and large bronchi regulate the cough reflex. These vagal afferent nerves may interact centrally with sensory input arising from afferent nerves innervating the intrapulmonary airways or even extrapulmonary afferents such as those innervating the nasal mucosa and esophagus to produce chronic cough or enhanced cough responsiveness. The mechanisms of cough initiation in health and in disease are briefly described. PMID:20172253

  6. One-dimensional chain of quantum molecule motors as a mathematical physics model for muscle fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si Tie-Yan

    2015-01-01

    A quantum chain model of multiple molecule motors is proposed as a mathematical physics theory for the microscopic modeling of classical force-velocity relation and tension transients in muscle fibers. The proposed model was a quantum many-particle Hamiltonian to predict the force-velocity relation for the slow release of muscle fibers, which has not yet been empirically defined and was much more complicated than the hyperbolic relationships. Using the same Hamiltonian model, a mathematical force-velocity relationship was proposed to explain the tension observed when the muscle was stimulated with an alternative electric current. The discrepancy between input electric frequency and the muscle oscillation frequency could be explained physically by the Doppler effect in this quantum chain model. Further more, quantum physics phenomena were applied to explore the tension time course of cardiac muscle and insect flight muscle. Most of the experimental tension transient curves were found to correspond to the theoretical output of quantum two- and three-level models. Mathematical modeling electric stimulus as photons exciting a quantum three-level particle reproduced most of the tension transient curves of water bug Lethocerus maximus. (special topic)

  7. Afferent innervation of the utricular macula in pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Xiaohong; Zakir, Mridha Md; Dickman, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was used to retrogradely label afferents innervating the utricular macula in adult pigeons. The pigeon utriclar macula consists of a large rectangular-shaped neuroepithelium with a dorsally curved anterior edge and an extended medioposterior tail. The macula could be demarcated into several regions based on cytoarchitectural differences. The striola occupied 30% of the macula and contained a large density of type I hair cells with fewer type II hair cells. Medial and lateral extrastriola zones were located outside the striola and contained only type II hair cells. A six- to eight-cell-wide band of type II hair cells existed near the center of the striola. The reversal line marked by the morphological polarization of hair cells coursed throughout the epithelium, near the peripheral margin, and through the center of the type II band. Calyx afferents innervated type I hair cells with calyceal terminals that contained between 2 and 15 receptor cells. Calyx afferents were located only in the striola region, exclusive of the type II band, had small total fiber innervation areas and low innervation densities. Dimorph afferents innervated both type I and type II hair cells with calyceal and bouton terminals and were primarily located in the striola region. Dimorph afferents had smaller calyceal terminals with few type I hair cells, extended fiber branches with bouton terminals and larger innervation areas. Bouton afferents innervated only type II hair cells in the extrastriola and type II band regions. Bouton afferents innervating the type II band had smaller terminal fields with fewer bouton terminals and smaller innervation areas than fibers located in the extrastriolar zones. Bouton afferents had the most bouton terminals on the longest fibers, the largest innervation areas with the highest innervation densities of all afferents. Among all afferents, smaller terminal innervation fields were observed in the striola and large fields were

  8. Adaptation of rat jaw muscle fibers in postnatal development with a different food consistency: an immunohistochemical and electromyographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Kinouchi, Nao; Kawakami, Emi; Tanne, Kazuo; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanaka, Eiji

    2010-06-01

    The development of the craniofacial system occurs, among other reasons, as a response to functional needs. In particular, the deficiency of the proper masticatory stimulus affects the growth. The purpose of this study was to relate alterations of muscle activity during postnatal development to adaptational changes in the muscle fibers. Fourteen 21-day-old Wistar strain male rats were randomly divided into two groups and fed on either a solid (hard-diet group) or a powder (soft-diet group) diet for 63 days. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time), the total burst number and their average length exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining and their cross-sectional area was measured. All muscle fibers were identified as slow type I and fast type IIA, IIX or IIB (respectively, with increasing twitch contraction speed and fatigability). At lower activity levels (exceeding 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle was significantly higher in the soft-diet group than in the hard-diet group (P fast transition of muscle fiber was shown in only the superficial masseter muscle. Therefore, the reduction in the amount of powerful muscle contractions could be important for the slow-to-fast transition of the myosin heavy chain isoform in muscle fibers.

  9. Simulation of propagation along an isolated skeletal muscle fiber in an isotropic volume conductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Kaj-åge; F.A., Roberge

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a model of the frog skeletal muscle fiber that includes the effects of the transverse tubular system (T system) on propagation. Uniform propagation on an isolated fiber suspended in Ringer's solution or in air is simulated by placing the cylindrical fiber model in a concentric...... three-dimensional isotropic volume conductor. The current through the T system outlets at the sarcolemmal surface is comparable in magnitude to the sarcolemmal current density, but is of opposite polarity. When it is added to the sarcolemmal current, the resulting triphasic waveform has a 100% increase...... of the extracellular potential. Compared to an isolated fiber in a large volume of Ringer's solution, uniform propagation within a 2-mu m-thick volume conductor annulus is slowed down from 1.92 to 0.72 m/s, and the extracellular potential is increased from 1 to 108 mV peak to peak, in agreement with published...

  10. GLUT4 is reduced in slow muscle fibers of type 2 diabetic patients: is insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes a slow, type 1 fiber disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Staehr, P; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2001-01-01

    To gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying muscle insulin resistance, the influence of obesity and type 2 diabetes on GLUT4 immunoreactivity in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers was studied. Through a newly developed, very sensitive method using immunohistochemistry combined...... with morphometry, GLUT4 density was found to be significantly higher in slow compared with fast fibers in biopsy specimens from lean and obese subjects. In contrast, in type 2 diabetic subjects, GLUT4 density was significantly lower in slow compared with fast fibers. GLUT4 density in slow fibers from diabetic...... was reduced to 77% in the obese subjects and to 61% in type 2 diabetic patients compared with the control subjects. We propose that a reduction in the fraction of slow-twitch fibers, combined with a reduction in GLUT4 expression in slow fibers, may reduce the insulin-sensitive GLUT4 pool in type 2 diabetes...

  11. Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase 2 regulates myoblast proliferation and controls muscle fiber length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer K; Hallock, Peter T

    2017-01-01

    Muscle fiber length is nearly uniform within a muscle but widely different among different muscles. We show that Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase 2 (Abl2) has a key role in regulating myofiber length, as a loss of Abl2 leads to excessively long myofibers in the diaphragm, intercostal and levator auris muscles but not limb muscles. Increased myofiber length is caused by enhanced myoblast proliferation, expanding the pool of myoblasts and leading to increased myoblast fusion. Abl2 acts in myoblasts, but as a consequence of expansion of the diaphragm muscle, the diaphragm central tendon is reduced in size, likely contributing to reduced stamina of Abl2 mutant mice. Ectopic muscle islands, each composed of myofibers of uniform length and orientation, form within the central tendon of Abl2+/− mice. Specialized tendon cells, resembling tendon cells at myotendinous junctions, form at the ends of these muscle islands, suggesting that myofibers induce differentiation of tendon cells, which reciprocally regulate myofiber length and orientation. PMID:29231808

  12. Distinct Fiber Type Signature in Mouse Muscles Expressing a Mutant Lamin A Responsible for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy in a Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Barateau

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Specific mutations in LMNA, which encodes nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamins A/C, affect skeletal muscle tissues. Early-onset LMNA myopathies reveal different alterations of muscle fibers, including fiber type disproportion or prominent dystrophic and/or inflammatory changes. Recently, we identified the p.R388P LMNA mutation as responsible for congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD and lipodystrophy. Here, we asked whether viral-mediated expression of mutant lamin A in murine skeletal muscles would be a pertinent model to reveal specific muscle alterations. We found that the total amount and size of muscle fibers as well as the extent of either inflammation or muscle regeneration were similar to wildtype or mutant lamin A. In contrast, the amount of fast oxidative muscle fibers containing myosin heavy chain IIA was lower upon expression of mutant lamin A, in correlation with lower expression of genes encoding transcription factors MEF2C and MyoD. These data validate this in vivo model for highlighting distinct muscle phenotypes associated with different lamin contexts. Additionally, the data suggest that alteration of muscle fiber type identity may contribute to the mechanisms underlying physiopathology of L-CMD related to R388P mutant lamin A.

  13. Bifunctional Rhodamine Probes of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain Orientation in Relaxed Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Andrew S.; Brandmeier, Birgit D.; Ferguson, Roisean E.; Criddle, Susan; Dale, Robert E.; Irving, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    The orientation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) region of the myosin heads in relaxed skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle was investigated by polarized fluorescence from bifunctional rhodamine (BR) probes cross-linking pairs of cysteine residues introduced into the RLC. Pure 1:1 BR-RLC complexes were exchanged into single muscle fibers in EDTA rigor solution for 30 min at 30°C; ∼60% of the native RLC was removed and stoichiometrically replaced by BR-RLC, and >85% of the BR-RLC was located in the sarcomeric A-bands. The second- and fourth-rank order parameters of the orientation distributions of BR dipoles linking RLC cysteine pairs 100-108, 100-113, 108-113, and 104-115 were calculated from polarized fluorescence intensities, and used to determine the smoothest RLC orientation distribution—the maximum entropy distribution—consistent with the polarized fluorescence data. Maximum entropy distributions in relaxed muscle were relatively broad. At the peak of the distribution, the “lever” axis, linking Cys707 and Lys843 of the myosin heavy chain, was at 70–80° to the fiber axis, and the “hook” helix (Pro830–Lys843) was almost coplanar with the fiber and lever axes. The temperature and ionic strength of the relaxing solution had small but reproducible effects on the orientation of the RLC region. PMID:15041671

  14. Zebrafish embryos exposed to alcohol undergo abnormal development of motor neurons and muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvain, Nicole J; Brewster, Daniel L; Ali, Declan W

    2010-01-01

    Children exposed to alcohol in utero have significantly delayed gross and fine motor skills, as well as deficiencies in reflex development. The reasons that underlie the motor deficits caused by ethanol (EtOH) exposure remain to be fully elucidated. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of embryonic alcohol exposure (1.5%, 2% and 2.5% EtOH) on motor neuron and muscle fiber morphology in 3 days post fertilization (dpf) larval zebrafish. EtOH treated fish exhibited morphological deformities and fewer bouts of swimming in response to touch, compared with untreated fish. Immunolabelling with anti-acetylated tubulin indicated that fish exposed to 2.5% EtOH had significantly higher rates of motor neuron axon defects. Immunolabelling of primary and secondary motor neurons, using znp-1 and zn-8, revealed that fish exposed to 2% and 2.5% EtOH exhibited significantly higher rates of primary and secondary motor neuron axon defects compared to controls. Examination of red and white muscle fibers revealed that fish exposed to EtOH had significantly smaller fibers compared with controls. These findings indicate that motor neuron and muscle fiber morphology is affected by early alcohol exposure in zebrafish embryos, and that this may be related to deficits in locomotion. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aging Enhances Indirect Flight Muscle Fiber Performance yet Decreases Flight Ability in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Mark S.; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Vigoreaux, Jim O. (IIT); (Vermont)

    2008-10-02

    We investigated the effects of aging on Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle from the whole organism to the actomyosin cross-bridge. Median-aged (49-day-old) flies were flight impaired, had normal myofilament number and packing, barely longer sarcomeres, and slight mitochondrial deterioration compared with young (3-day-old) flies. Old (56-day-old) flies were unable to beat their wings, had deteriorated ultrastructure with severe mitochondrial damage, and their skinned fibers failed to activate with calcium. Small-amplitude sinusoidal length perturbation analysis showed median-aged indirect flight muscle fibers developed greater than twice the isometric force and power output of young fibers, yet cross-bridge kinetics were similar. Large increases in elastic and viscous moduli amplitude under active, passive, and rigor conditions suggest that median-aged fibers become stiffer longitudinally. Small-angle x-ray diffraction indicates that myosin heads move increasingly toward the thin filament with age, accounting for the increased transverse stiffness via cross-bridge formation. We propose that the observed protein composition changes in the connecting filaments, which anchor the thick filaments to the Z-disk, produce compensatory increases in longitudinal stiffness, isometric tension, power and actomyosin interaction in aging indirect flight muscle. We also speculate that a lack of MgATP due to damaged mitochondria accounts for the decreased flight performance.

  16. Regulation of mitochondrial respiration by inorganic phosphate; comparing permeabilized muscle fibers and isolated mitochondria prepared from type-1 and type-2 rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    ADP is generally accepted as a key regulator of oxygen consumption both in isolated mitochondria and in permeabilized fibers from skeletal muscle. The present study explored inorganic phosphate in a similar regulatory role. Saponin permeabilized fibers and isolated mitochondria from type-I and type...

  17. Dopamine D1/D5, but not D2/D3, receptor dependency of synaptic plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses that is enabled by patterned afferent stimulation, or spatial learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Hagena

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the mossy fiber (MF synapses of the hippocampal CA3 region display quite distinct properties in terms of the molecular mechanisms that underlie synaptic plasticity, they nonetheless exhibit persistent (>24h synaptic plasticity that is akin to that observed at the Schaffer collateral (SCH-CA1 and perforant path (PP-dentate gyrus (DG synapses of freely behaving rats. In addition, they also respond to novel spatial learning with very enduring forms of long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD. These latter forms of synaptic plasticity are directly related to the learning behavior: novel exploration of generalized changes in space facilitates the expression of LTP at MF-CA3 synapses, whereas exploration of novel configurations of large environmental features facilitates the expression of LTD. In the absence of spatial novelty, synaptic plasticity is not expressed. Motivation is a potent determinant of whether learning about spatial experience effectively occurs and the neuromodulator dopamine plays a key role in motivation-based learning. Prior research on the regulation by dopamine receptors of long-term synaptic plasticity in CA1 and dentate gyrus synapses in vivo suggests that whereas D2/D3 receptors may modulate a general predisposition toward expressing plasticity, D1/D5 receptors may directly regulate the direction of change in synaptic strength that occurs during learning. Although the CA3 region is believed to play a pivotal role in many forms of learning, the role of these receptors in persistent (>24h forms of synaptic plasticity at MF-CA3 synapses is unknown. Here, we report that whereas pharmacological antagonism of D2/D3 receptors had no impact on LTP or LTD, antagonism of D1/D5 receptors significantly impaired LTP and LTD that were induced by solely by means of patterned afferent stimulation, or LTP/LTD that are typically enhanced by the conjunction of afferent stimulation and novel spatial learning. These data

  18. Therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic muscles after local injection of fragmented fibers with loaded traditional Chinese medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyan; Wan, Huiying; Xia, Tian; Chen, Maohua; Zhang, Yun; Luo, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis remains the most effective method to re-establish a proper blood flow in ischemic tissues. There is a great clinical need to identify an injectable format to achieve a well accumulation following local administration and a sustained delivery of biological factors at the ischemic sites. In the current study, fragmented nanofibers with loaded traditional Chinese medicines, astragaloside IV (AT), the main active ingredient of astragalus, and ferulic acid (FA), the main ingredient of angelica, were proposed to promote the microvessel formation after intramuscular injection into ischemic hindlimbs. Fragmented fibers with average lengths of 5 (FF-5), 20 (FF-20) and 80 μm (FF-80) were constructed by the cryocutting of aligned electrospun fibers. Their dispersion in sodium alginate solution (0.2%) indicated good injectability. After injection into the quadriceps muscles of the hindlimbs, FF-20 and FF-80 fiber fragments showed higher tissue retentions than FF-5, and around 90% of the injected doses were determined after 7 days. On a hindlimb ischemia model established by ligating the femoral arteries, intramuscular injection of the mixtures of FA-loaded and AT-loaded FF-20 fiber fragments substantially reduced the muscle degeneration with minimal fibrosis formation, significantly enhanced the neovessel formation and hindlimb perfusion in the ischemic tissues, and efficiently promoted the limb salvage with few limb losses. Along with the easy manipulation and lower invasiveness for in vivo administration, fragmented fibers should become potential drug carriers for disease treatment, wound recovery and tissue repair after local injection.

  19. Muscle Fiber Characteristics, Satellite Cells and Soccer Performance in Young Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas I. Metaxas, Athanasios Mandroukas, Efstratios Vamvakoudis, Kostas Kotoglou, Björn Ekblom, Konstantinos Mandroukas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to examine the muscle fiber type, composition and satellite cells in young male soccer players and to correlate them to cardiorespiratory indices and muscle strength. The participants formed three Groups: Group A (n = 13, 11.2 ± 0.4yrs, Group B (n=10, 13.1 ± 0.5yrs and Group C (n = 9, 15.2 ± 0.6yrs. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. Peak torque values of the quadriceps and hamstrings were recorded and VO2max was measured on the treadmill. Group C had lower type I percentage distribution compared to A by 21.3% (p < 0.01, while the type IIA relative percentage was higher by 18.1% and 18.4% than in Groups A and B (p < 0.05. Groups B and C had higher cross-sectional area (CSA values in all fiber types than in Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001. The number of satellite cells did not differ between the groups. Groups B and C had higher peak torque at all angular velocities and absolute VO2max in terms of ml·min-1 than Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001. It is concluded that the increased percentage of type IIA muscle fibers noticed in Group C in comparison to the Groups A and B should be mainly attributed to the different workload exercise and training programs. The alteration of myosin heavy chain (MHC isoforms composition even in children is an important mechanism for skeletal muscle characteristics. Finally, CSA, isokinetic muscle strength and VO2max values seems to be expressed according to age.

  20. Effects of resistance training on endurance capacity and muscle fiber composition in young top-level cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, P; Andersen, J L; Bennekou, M

    2011-01-01

    Equivocal findings exist on the effect of concurrent strength (S) and endurance (E) training on endurance performance and muscle morphology. Further, the influence of concurrent SE training on muscle fiber-type composition, vascularization and endurance capacity remains unknown in top......-level endurance athletes. The present study examined the effect of 16 weeks of concurrent SE training on maximal muscle strength (MVC), contractile rate of force development (RFD), muscle fiber morphology and composition, capillarization, aerobic power (VO(2max) ), cycling economy (CE) and long....../short-term endurance capacity in young elite competitive cyclists (n=14). MVC and RFD increased 12-20% with SE (P...

  1. Effects of resistance training on endurance capacity and muscle fiber composition in young top-level cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, P; Andersen, J L; Bennekou, M

    2011-01-01

    Equivocal findings exist on the effect of concurrent strength (S) and endurance (E) training on endurance performance and muscle morphology. Further, the influence of concurrent SE training on muscle fiber-type composition, vascularization and endurance capacity remains unknown in top......-level endurance athletes. The present study examined the effect of 16 weeks of concurrent SE training on maximal muscle strength (MVC), contractile rate of force development (RFD), muscle fiber morphology and composition, capillarization, aerobic power (VO2max), cycling economy (CE) and long/short-term endurance...... capacity in young elite competitive cyclists (n=14). MVC and RFD increased 12-20% with SE (P...

  2. Skeletal muscle ATP turnover and muscle fiber conduction velocity are elevated at higher muscle temperatures during maximal power output development in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Stuart R; De Vito, Giuseppe; Nimmo, Myra A; Farina, Dario; Ferguson, Richard A

    2006-02-01

    The effect of temperature on skeletal muscle ATP turnover and muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) was studied during maximal power output development in humans. Eight male subjects performed a 6-s maximal sprint on a mechanically braked cycle ergometer under conditions of normal (N) and elevated muscle temperature (ET). Muscle temperature was passively elevated through the combination of hot water immersion and electric blankets. Anaerobic ATP turnover was calculated from analysis of muscle biopsies obtained before and immediately after exercise. MFCV was measured during exercise using surface electromyography. Preexercise muscle temperature was 34.2 degrees C (SD 0.6) in N and 37.5 degrees C (SD 0.6) in ET. During ET, the rate of ATP turnover for phosphocreatine utilization [temperature coefficient (Q10) = 3.8], glycolysis (Q10 = 1.7), and total anaerobic ATP turnover [Q10 = 2.7; 10.8 (SD 1.9) vs. 14.6 mmol x kg(-1) (dry mass) x s(-1) (SD 2.3)] were greater than during N (P < 0.05). MFCV was also greater in ET than in N [3.79 (SD 0.47) to 5.55 m/s (SD 0.72)]. Maximal power output (Q10 = 2.2) and pedal rate (Q10 = 1.6) were greater in ET compared with N (P < 0.05). The Q10 of maximal and mean power were correlated (P < 0.05; R = 0.82 and 0.85, respectively) with the percentage of myosin heavy chain type IIA. The greater power output obtained with passive heating was achieved through an elevated rate of anaerobic ATP turnover and MFCV, possibly due to a greater effect of temperature on power production of fibers, with a predominance of myosin heavy chain IIA at the contraction frequencies reached.

  3. Distinctive genes determine different intramuscular fat and muscle fiber ratios of the longissimus dorsi muscles in Jinhua and landrace pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wu

    Full Text Available Meat quality is determined by properties such as carcass color, tenderness and drip loss. These properties are closely associated with meat composition, which includes the types of muscle fiber and content of intramuscular fat (IMF. Muscle fibers are the main contributors to meat mass, while IMF not only contributes to the sensory properties but also to the plethora of physical, chemical and technological properties of meat. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that determine meat composition in different pig breeds. In this report we show that Jinhua pigs, a Chinese breed, contains much higher levels of IMF than do Landrace pigs, a Danish breed. We analyzed global gene expression profiles in the longissimus dorsi muscles in Jinhua and Landrace breeds at the ages of 30, 90 and 150 days. Cross-comparison analysis revealed that genes that regulate fatty acid biosynthesis (e.g., fatty acid synthase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase are expressed at higher levels in Jinhua pigs whereas those that regulate myogenesis (e.g., myogenic factor 6 and forkhead box O1 are expressed at higher levels in Landrace pigs. Among those genes which are highly expressed in Jinhua pigs at 90 days (d90, we identified a novel gene porcine FLJ36031 (pFLJ, which functions as a positive regulator of fat deposition in cultured intramuscular adipocytes. In summary, our data showed that the up-regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis regulatory genes such as pFLJ and myogenesis inhibitory genes such as myostatin in the longissimus dorsi muscles of Jinhua pigs could explain why this local breed produces meat with high levels of IMF.

  4. Distinctive genes determine different intramuscular fat and muscle fiber ratios of the longissimus dorsi muscles in Jinhua and landrace pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting; Zhang, Zhenhai; Yuan, Zhangqin; Lo, Li Jan; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yizhen; Peng, Jinrong

    2013-01-01

    Meat quality is determined by properties such as carcass color, tenderness and drip loss. These properties are closely associated with meat composition, which includes the types of muscle fiber and content of intramuscular fat (IMF). Muscle fibers are the main contributors to meat mass, while IMF not only contributes to the sensory properties but also to the plethora of physical, chemical and technological properties of meat. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that determine meat composition in different pig breeds. In this report we show that Jinhua pigs, a Chinese breed, contains much higher levels of IMF than do Landrace pigs, a Danish breed. We analyzed global gene expression profiles in the longissimus dorsi muscles in Jinhua and Landrace breeds at the ages of 30, 90 and 150 days. Cross-comparison analysis revealed that genes that regulate fatty acid biosynthesis (e.g., fatty acid synthase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase) are expressed at higher levels in Jinhua pigs whereas those that regulate myogenesis (e.g., myogenic factor 6 and forkhead box O1) are expressed at higher levels in Landrace pigs. Among those genes which are highly expressed in Jinhua pigs at 90 days (d90), we identified a novel gene porcine FLJ36031 (pFLJ), which functions as a positive regulator of fat deposition in cultured intramuscular adipocytes. In summary, our data showed that the up-regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis regulatory genes such as pFLJ and myogenesis inhibitory genes such as myostatin in the longissimus dorsi muscles of Jinhua pigs could explain why this local breed produces meat with high levels of IMF.

  5. A new function for ATP: activating cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    2010-12-01

    Myocardial ischemia activates cardiac sympathetic afferents leading to chest pain and reflex cardiovascular responses. Brief myocardial ischemia leads to ATP release in the interstitial space. Furthermore, exogenous ATP and α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP), a P2X receptor agonist, stimulate cutaneous group III and IV sensory nerve fibers. The present study tested the hypothesis that endogenous ATP excites cardiac afferents during ischemia through activation of P2 receptors. Nerve activity of single unit cardiac sympathetic afferents was recorded from the left sympathetic chain or rami communicates (T(2)-T(5)) in anesthetized cats. Single fields of 45 afferents (conduction velocities = 0.25-4.92 m/s) were identified in the left ventricle with a stimulating electrode. Five minutes of myocardial ischemia stimulated 39 of 45 cardiac afferents (8 Aδ, 37 C fibers). Epicardial application of ATP (1-4 μmol) stimulated six ischemically sensitive cardiac afferents in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, epicardial ATP (2 μmol), ADP (2 μmol), a P2Y agonist, and α,β-meATP (0.5 μmol) significantly activated eight other ischemically sensitive afferents. Third, pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid, a P2 receptor antagonist, abolished the responses of six afferents to epicardial ATP (2 μmol) and attenuated the ischemia-related increase in activity of seven other afferents by 37%. In the absence of P2 receptor blockade, cardiac afferents responded consistently to repeated application of ATP (n = 6) and to recurrent myocardial ischemia (n = 6). Finally, six ischemia-insensitive cardiac spinal afferents did not respond to epicardial ATP (2-4 μmol), although these afferents did respond to epicardial bradykinin. Taken together, these data indicate that, during ischemia, endogenously released ATP activates ischemia-sensitive, but not ischemia-insensitive, cardiac spinal afferents through stimulation of P2 receptors likely located on the cardiac sensory

  6. Simulation of propagation in a bundle of skeletal muscle fibers: Modulation effects of passive fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Kaj-åge; F.A., Roberge

    1997-01-01

    source current (I-ma) enters the passive tissue as a radial load current (I-ep) while the rest flows longitudinally in the cleft between the active and adjacent passive fibers. The conduction velocity of 1.32 m/s was about 30% lower than on an isolated fiber in a Ringer bath, in close agreement...... rate of rise of the action potential upstroke (V-max) from 512 to 503 V/s. Increasing the phase angle of the passive fiber membrane impedence (Z(m)) increases the phase delay between I-ma and I-ep, thereby increasing phi(epp) which in turn slows down propagation and increases V-max....

  7. Effects of gamma rays on rat vascular smooth muscle fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassan, A [Radio-Biology and Health Dept. Syrian Atomic Energy Commission, (Syrian Arab Republic)

    1995-10-01

    Modifications of the Vasomotoricity induced by gamma rays have been investigated. Vascular smooth muscle fibres (VSMF) of rat portal vein have been used in this study. Irradiation procedures using a {sup 60} Co source have been carried out as follows: - Whole body irradiation. - Irradiation of isolated portal vein and isolated VSMF. Our results show that : 1-irradiation reduces the functional competition between Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}, thus hyper magnetic Krebs solutions have a negligible effect on irradiated VSMF. 2- irradiation activates Ca{sup 2+} influx into the VSMF. Thus the effect of hypocalcemic solutions on irradiated VSMF is minor compared with control. 3- Hyperpotassic solutions provoke titanic contractions with high amplitude on the irradiated VSMF compared with control. 5 figs.

  8. Development of fusimotor innervation correlates with group Ia afferents but is independent of neurotrophin-3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringstedt, T; Copray, S; Walro, J; Kucera, J

    1998-01-01

    Fusimotor neurons, group Ia afferents and muscle spindles are absent in mutant mice lacking the gene for neurotrophin-3 (NT3). To partition the effect of Ia afferent or spindle absence from that of NT3 deprivation on fusimotor neuron development, we examined the fusimotor system in a mutant mouse

  9. Structural design and analysis of morphing skin embedded with pneumatic muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yijin; Yin, Weilong; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a kind of morphing skin embedded with pneumatic muscle fibers is proposed from the bionics perspective. The elastic modulus of the designed pneumatic muscle fibers is experimentally determined and their output force is tested with internal air pressure varying from 0 to 0.4 MPa. The experimental results show that the contraction ratio of the pneumatic muscle fibers using the given material could reach up to 26.8%. Isothermal tensile tests are conducted on the fabricated morphing skin, and the results are compared with theoretical predictions based on the rule of mixture. When the strain is lower than 3% and in its linear-elastic range, the rule of mixture is proved to possess satisfying accuracy in the prediction of the elastic modulus of the morphing skin. Subsequently, the output force of the morphing skin is tested. It is revealed that when the volume ratio of the pneumatic muscle fibers is 0.228, the contraction ratio can reach up to 17.8%, which is satisfactory for meeting the camber requirement of morphing skin with maximum strain level below 2%. Finally, stress-bearing capability tests of the morphing skin on local uniformly distributed loads are conducted, and the test results show that the transverse stiffness of the morphing skin can be regulated by changing the internal air pressure. Under a uniformly distributed load of 540 Pa, the designed morphing skin is capable of varying by more than two orders of magnitude in the transverse stiffness by changing the internal air pressure.

  10. Composition and adaptation of human myotendinous junction and neighboring muscle fibers to heavy resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jens R.; Mackey, A L; Knudsen, A B

    2017-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a common site of strain injury and yet understanding of its composition and ability to adapt to loading is poor. The main aims of this study were to determine the profile of selected collagens and macrophage density in human MTJ and adjoining muscle fibers...... 4 weeks of training may reflect a training-induced protection against strain injuries in this region....

  11. Human Masseter Muscle Fibers From the Elderly Express Less Neonatal Myosin Than Those of Young Adults

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvetko, E.; Karen, Petr; Janáček, Jiří; Kubínová, Lucie; Plasencia, A.L.; Eržen, I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 295, č. 8 (2012), s. 1364-1372 ISSN 1932-8486 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA MŠk(CZ) MEB090910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : aging * confocal microscopy * myosin heavy chain * immunohistochemistry * muscle fiber types Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.343, year: 2012

  12. Structural design and analysis of morphing skin embedded with pneumatic muscle fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yijin; Yin, Weilong; Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Yanju

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a kind of morphing skin embedded with pneumatic muscle fibers is proposed from the bionics perspective. The elastic modulus of the designed pneumatic muscle fibers is experimentally determined and their output force is tested with internal air pressure varying from 0 to 0.4 MPa. The experimental results show that the contraction ratio of the pneumatic muscle fibers using the given material could reach up to 26.8%. Isothermal tensile tests are conducted on the fabricated morphing skin, and the results are compared with theoretical predictions based on the rule of mixture. When the strain is lower than 3% and in its linear-elastic range, the rule of mixture is proved to possess satisfying accuracy in the prediction of the elastic modulus of the morphing skin. Subsequently, the output force of the morphing skin is tested. It is revealed that when the volume ratio of the pneumatic muscle fibers is 0.228, the contraction ratio can reach up to 17.8%, which is satisfactory for meeting the camber requirement of morphing skin with maximum strain level below 2%. Finally, stress-bearing capability tests of the morphing skin on local uniformly distributed loads are conducted, and the test results show that the transverse stiffness of the morphing skin can be regulated by changing the internal air pressure. Under a uniformly distributed load of 540 Pa, the designed morphing skin is capable of varying by more than two orders of magnitude in the transverse stiffness by changing the internal air pressure

  13. Superpixel-based segmentation of muscle fibers in multi-channel microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Binh P; Heemskerk, Hans; So, Peter T C; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2016-12-05

    Confetti fluorescence and other multi-color genetic labelling strategies are useful for observing stem cell regeneration and for other problems of cell lineage tracing. One difficulty of such strategies is segmenting the cell boundaries, which is a very different problem from segmenting color images from the real world. This paper addresses the difficulties and presents a superpixel-based framework for segmentation of regenerated muscle fibers in mice. We propose to integrate an edge detector into a superpixel algorithm and customize the method for multi-channel images. The enhanced superpixel method outperforms the original and another advanced superpixel algorithm in terms of both boundary recall and under-segmentation error. Our framework was applied to cross-section and lateral section images of regenerated muscle fibers from confetti-fluorescent mice. Compared with "ground-truth" segmentations, our framework yielded median Dice similarity coefficients of 0.92 and higher. Our segmentation framework is flexible and provides very good segmentations of multi-color muscle fibers. We anticipate our methods will be useful for segmenting a variety of tissues in confetti fluorecent mice and in mice with similar multi-color labels.

  14. Fiber specific changes in sphingolipid metabolism in skeletal muscles of hyperthyroid rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabowski, A; Zendzian-Piotrowska, M; Mikłosz, A; Łukaszuk, B; Kurek, K; Górski, J

    2013-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (T3, T4) are well known modulators of different cellular signals including the sphingomyelin pathway. However, studies regarding downstream effects of T3 on sphingolipid metabolism in skeletal muscle are scarce. In the present work we sought to investigate the effects of hyperthyroidism on the activity of the key enzymes of ceramide metabolism as well as the content of fundamental sphingolipids. Based on fiber/metabolic differences, we chose three different skeletal muscles, with diverse fiber compositions: soleus (slow-twitch oxidative), red (fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic) and white (fast-twitch glycolytic) section of gastrocnemius. We demonstrated that T3 induced accumulation of sphinganine, ceramide, sphingosine, as well as sphingomyelin, mostly in soleus and in red, but not white section of gastrocnemius. Concomitantly, the activity of serine palmitoyltransferase and acid/neutral ceramidase was increased in more oxidative muscles. In conclusion, hyperthyroidism induced fiber specific changes in the content of sphingolipids that were relatively more related to de novo synthesis of ceramide rather than to its generation via hydrolysis of sphingomyelin.

  15. An image processing approach to analyze morphological features of microscopic images of muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin, Cesar Henrique; Xu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yaming; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Yang, Zhong

    2014-12-01

    We present an image processing approach to automatically analyze duo-channel microscopic images of muscular fiber nuclei and cytoplasm. Nuclei and cytoplasm play a critical role in determining the health and functioning of muscular fibers as changes of nuclei and cytoplasm manifest in many diseases such as muscular dystrophy and hypertrophy. Quantitative evaluation of muscle fiber nuclei and cytoplasm thus is of great importance to researchers in musculoskeletal studies. The proposed computational approach consists of steps of image processing to segment and delineate cytoplasm and identify nuclei in two-channel images. Morphological operations like skeletonization is applied to extract the length of cytoplasm for quantification. We tested the approach on real images and found that it can achieve high accuracy, objectivity, and robustness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Revertant fibers in the mdx murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an age- and muscle-related reappraisal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Pigozzo

    Full Text Available Muscles in Duchenne dystrophy patients are characterized by the absence of dystrophin, yet transverse sections show a small percentage of fibers (termed "revertant fibers" positive for dystrophin expression. This phenomenon, whose biological bases have not been fully elucidated, is present also in the murine and canine models of DMD and can confound the evaluation of therapeutic approaches. We analyzed 11 different muscles in a cohort of 40 mdx mice, the most commonly model used in pre-clinical studies, belonging to four age groups; such number of animals allowed us to perform solid ANOVA statistical analysis. We assessed the average number of dystrophin-positive fibers, both absolute and normalized for muscle size, and the correlation between their formation and the ageing process. Our results indicate that various muscles develop different numbers of revertant fibers, with different time trends; besides, they suggest that the biological mechanism(s behind dystrophin re-expression might not be limited to the early development phases but could actually continue during adulthood. Importantly, such finding was seen also in cardiac muscle, a fact that does not fit into the current hypothesis of the clonal origin of "revertant" myonuclei from satellite cells. This work represents the largest, statistically significant analysis of revertant fibers in mdx mice so far, which can now be used as a reference point for improving the evaluation of therapeutic approaches for DMD. At the same time, it provides new clues about the formation of revertant fibers/cardiomyocytes in dystrophic skeletal and cardiac muscle.

  17. Myostatin promotes distinct responses on protein metabolism of skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers of rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.H. Manfredi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin is a novel negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Myostatin expression is also found in heart in a much less extent, but it can be upregulated in pathological conditions, such as heart failure. Myostatin may be involved in inhibiting protein synthesis and/or increasing protein degradation in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Herein, we used cell cultures and isolated muscles from rats to determine protein degradation and synthesis. Muscles incubated with myostatin exhibited an increase in proteolysis with an increase of Atrogin-1, MuRF1 and LC3 genes. Extensor digitorum longus muscles and C2C12 myotubes exhibited a reduction in protein turnover. Cardiomyocytes showed an increase in proteolysis by activating autophagy and the ubiquitin proteasome system, and a decrease in protein synthesis by decreasing P70S6K. The effect of myostatin on protein metabolism is related to fiber type composition, which may be associated to the extent of atrophy mediated effect of myostatin on muscle.

  18. A biologically inspired artificial muscle based on fiber-reinforced and electropneumatic dielectric elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Chi; Luo, Meng; Chen, Xi; Li, Dichen; Chen, Hualing

    2017-08-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have great potential for use as artificial muscles because of the following characteristics: electrical activity, fast and large deformation under stimuli, and softness as natural muscles. Inspired by the traditional McKibben actuators, in this study, we developed a cylindrical soft fiber-reinforced and electropneumatic DE artificial muscle (DEAM) by mimicking the spindle shape of natural muscles. Based on continuum mechanics and variation principle, the inhomogeneous actuation of DEAMs was theoretically modeled and calculated. Prototypes of DEAMs were prepared to validate the design concept and theoretical model. The theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental results; they successfully predicted the evolutions of the contours of DEAMs with voltage. A pneumatically supported high prestretch in the hoop direction was achieved by our DEAM prototype without buckling the soft fibers sandwiched by the DE films. Besides, a continuously tunable prestretch in the actuation direction was achieved by varying the supporting pressure. Using the theoretical model, the failure modes, maximum actuations, and critical voltages were analyzed; they were highly dependent on the structural parameters, i.e., the cylinder aspect ratio, prestretch level, and supporting pressure. The effects of structural parameters and supporting pressure on the actuation performance were also investigated to optimize the DEAMs.

  19. The relationships among jaw-muscle fiber architecture, jaw morphology, and feeding behavior in extant apes and modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrea B; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    The jaw-closing muscles are responsible for generating many of the forces and movements associated with feeding. Muscle physiologic cross-sectional area (PCSA) and fiber length are two architectural parameters that heavily influence muscle function. While there have been numerous comparative studies of hominoid and hominin craniodental and mandibular morphology, little is known about hominoid jaw-muscle fiber architecture. We present novel data on masseter and temporalis internal muscle architecture for small- and large-bodied hominoids. Hominoid scaling patterns are evaluated and compared with representative New- (Cebus) and Old-World (Macaca) monkeys. Variation in hominoid jaw-muscle fiber architecture is related to both absolute size and allometry. PCSAs scale close to isometry relative to jaw length in anthropoids, but likely with positive allometry in hominoids. Thus, large-bodied apes may be capable of generating both absolutely and relatively greater muscle forces compared with smaller-bodied apes and monkeys. Compared with extant apes, modern humans exhibit a reduction in masseter PCSA relative to condyle-M1 length but retain relatively long fibers, suggesting humans may have sacrificed relative masseter muscle force during chewing without appreciably altering muscle excursion/contraction velocity. Lastly, craniometric estimates of PCSAs underestimate hominoid masseter and temporalis PCSAs by more than 50% in gorillas, and overestimate masseter PCSA by as much as 30% in humans. These findings underscore the difficulty of accurately estimating jaw-muscle fiber architecture from craniometric measures and suggest models of fossil hominin and hominoid bite forces will be improved by incorporating architectural data in estimating jaw-muscle forces. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Morphometric analysis of somatotropic cells of the adenohypophysis and muscle fibers of the psoas muscle in the process of aging in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antić, Vladimir M; Stefanović, Natalija; Jovanović, Ivan; Antić, Milorad; Milić, Miroslav; Krstić, Miljan; Kundalić, Braca; Milošević, Verica

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this research was to quantify changes of the adenohypophyseal somatotropes and types 1 and 2 muscle fibers with aging, as well as to establish mutual interactions and correlations with age. Material was samples of hypophysis and psoas major muscle of 27 cadavers of both genders, aged from 30 to 90 years. Adenohypophyseal and psoas major tissue sections were immunohistochemically processed and stained by anti-human growth hormone and anti-fast myosin antibodies, respectively. Morphometric analysis was performed by ImageJ. Results of morphometric analysis showed a significant increase in the somatotrope area, and significant decrease in somatotrope volume density and nucleocytoplasmic ratio with age. Cross-sectional areas of types 1 and 2, and volume density of type 2 muscle fibers decreased significantly with age. One Way ANOVA showed that the latter cited changes in the somatotropes and types 1 and 2 muscle fibers mostly become significant after the age of 70. Significant positive correlation was observed between the area of the somatotropes and volume density of type 2 muscle fibers. A significant negative correlation was detected between the nucleocytoplasmic ratio of the somatotropes and cross-sectional areas of types 1 and 2 muscle fibers. So, it can be concluded that after the age of 70, there is significant loss of the anterior pituitary's somatotropes associated with hypertrophy and possible functional decline of the remained cells. Age-related changes in the somatotropes are correlated with the simultaneous atrophy of type 1, as well as with the atrophy and loss of type 2 muscle fibers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Could the peristaltic transition zone be caused by non-uniform esophageal muscle fiber architecture? A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, W; Pandolfino, J E; Kahrilas, P J; Patankar, N A

    2017-06-01

    Based on a fully coupled computational model of esophageal transport, we analyzed how varied esophageal muscle fiber architecture and/or dual contraction waves (CWs) affect bolus transport. Specifically, we studied the luminal pressure profile in those cases to better understand possible origins of the peristaltic transition zone. Two groups of studies were conducted using a computational model. The first studied esophageal transport with circumferential-longitudinal fiber architecture, helical fiber architecture and various combinations of the two. In the second group, cases with dual CWs and varied muscle fiber architecture were simulated. Overall transport characteristics were examined and the space-time profiles of luminal pressure were plotted and compared. Helical muscle fiber architecture featured reduced circumferential wall stress, greater esophageal distensibility, and greater axial shortening. Non-uniform fiber architecture featured a peristaltic pressure trough between two high-pressure segments. The distal pressure segment showed greater amplitude than the proximal segment, consistent with experimental data. Dual CWs also featured a pressure trough between two high-pressure segments. However, the minimum pressure in the region of overlap was much lower, and the amplitudes of the two high-pressure segments were similar. The efficacy of esophageal transport is greatly affected by muscle fiber architecture. The peristaltic transition zone may be attributable to non-uniform architecture of muscle fibers along the length of the esophagus and/or dual CWs. The difference in amplitude between the proximal and distal pressure segments may be attributable to non-uniform muscle fiber architecture. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Supersonic Shear Imaging Elastography in Skeletal Muscles: Relationship Between In Vivo and Synthetic Fiber Angles and Shear Modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Kelly; Rouffaud, Remi; Pereira, Wagner; Oliveira, Liliam F

    2018-04-30

    To verify a relationship between the pennation angle of synthetic fibers and muscle fibers with the shear modulus (μ) generated by Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) elastography and to compare the anisotropy of synthetic and in vivo pennate muscle fibers in the x 2 -x 3 plane (probe perpendicular to water surface or skin). First, the probe of Aixplorer ultrasound scanner (v.9, Supersonic Imagine, Aix-en-Provence, France) was placed in 2 positions (parallel [aligned] and transverse to the fibers) to test the anisotropy in the x 2 -x 3 plane. Subsequently, it was inclined (x 1 -x 3 plane) in relation to the fibers, forming 3 angles (18.25 °, 21.55 °, 36.86 °) for synthetic fibers and one (approximately 0 °) for muscle fibers. On the x 2 -x 3 plane, μ values of the synthetic and vastus lateralis fibers were significantly lower (P < .0001) at the transverse probe position than the longitudinal one. In the x 1 -x 3 plane, the μ values were significantly reduced (P < .0001) with the probe angle increasing, only for the synthetic fibers (approximately 0.90 kPa for each degree of pennation angle). The pennation angle was not related to the μ values generated by SSI elastography for the in vivo lateral head of the gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis muscles. However, a μ reduction with an angle increase in the synthetic fibers was observed. These findings contribute to increasing the applicability of SSI in distinct muscle architecture at normal or pathologic conditions. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Muscle hypertrophy and fast fiber type conversions in heavy resistance-trained women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staron, R S; Malicky, E S; Leonardi, M J; Falkel, J E; Hagerman, F C; Dudley, G A

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four women completed a 20-week heavy-resistance weight training program for the lower extremity. Workouts were twice a week and consisted of warm-up exercises followed by three sets each of full squats, vertical leg presses, leg extensions, and leg curls. All exercises were performed to failure using 6-8 RM (repetition maximum). Weight training caused a significant increase in maximal isotonic strength (1 RM) for each exercise. After training, there was a decrease in body fat percentage (p less than 0.05), and an increase in lean body mass (p less than 0.05) with no overall change in thigh girth. Biopsies were obtained before and after training from the superficial portion of the vastus lateralis muscle. Sections were prepared for histological and histochemical examination. Six fiber types (I, IC, IIC, IIA, IIAB, and IIB) were distinguished following routine myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase histochemistry. Areas were determined for fiber types I, IIA, and IIAB + IIB. The heavy-resistance training resulted in significant hypertrophy of all three groups: I (15%), IIA (45%), and IIAB + IIB (57%). These data are similar to those in men and suggest considerable hypertrophy of all major fiber types is also possible in women if exercise intensity and duration are sufficient. In addition, the training resulted in a significant decrease in the percentage of IIB with a concomitant increase in IIA fibers, suggesting that strength training may lead to fiber conversions.

  4. Tuning of spinal networks to frequency components of spike trains in individual afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerber, H R; Seymour, A W; Mendell, L M

    1991-10-01

    Cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) evoked by primary afferent fiber stimulation reflect the response of postsynaptic dorsal horn neurons. The properties of these CDPs have been shown to vary in accordance with the type of primary afferent fiber stimulated. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationships between frequency modulation of the afferent input trains, the amplitude modulation of the evoked CDPs, and the type of primary afferent stimulated. The somata of individual primary afferent fibers were impaled in the L7 dorsal root ganglion of alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cats. Action potentials (APs) were evoked in single identified afferents via the intracellular microelectrode while simultaneously recording the response of dorsal horn neurons as CDPs, or activity of individual target interneurons recorded extracellularly or intracellularly. APs were evoked in afferents using temporal patterns identical to the responses of selected afferents to natural stimulation of their receptive fields. Two such physiologically realistic trains, one recorded from a hair follicle and the other from a slowly adapting type 1 receptor, were chosen as standard test trains. Modulation of CDP amplitude in response to this frequency-modulated afferent activity varied according to the type of peripheral mechanoreceptor innervated. Dorsal horn networks driven by A beta afferents innervating hair follicles, rapidly adapting pad (Krause end bulb), and field receptors seemed "tuned" to amplify the onset of activity in single afferents. Networks driven by afferents innervating down hair follicles and pacinian corpuscles required more high-frequency activity to elicit their peak response. Dorsal horn networks driven by afferents innervating slowly adapting receptors including high-threshold mechanoreceptors exhibited some sensitivity to the instantaneous frequency, but in general they reproduced the activity in the afferent fiber much more faithfully. Responses of

  5. Fluorescent modification and orientation of myosin sulfhydryl 2 in skeletal muscle fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajtai, K.; Burghardt, T.P.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe a protocol for the selective covalent labeling of the sulfhydryl 2 (SH2) on the myosin cross-bridge in glycerinated muscle fibers using the sulfhydryl-selective label 4-[N-[(iodoacetoxy)ethyl]-N-methylamino]-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (IANBD). The protocol promotes the specificity of IANBD by using the ability to protect sulfhydryl 1 (SH1) from modification by binding the cross-bridge to the actin filament and using cross-bridge-bound MgADP to promote the accessibility of SH2. They determined the specificity of the probe using fluorescence gel scanning of fiber-extracted proteins to isolate the probe on myosin subfragment 1 (S1), limited proteolysis of the purified S1 to isolate the probe on the 20-kilodalton fragment of S1, and titration of the free SH1's on purified S1 using the radiolabeled SH1-specific reagent [ 14 C]iodoacetamide or enzymatic activity measurements. They characterized the angular distribution of the IANBD on cross-bridges in fibers when the fibers are in rigor, in relaxation, in the presence of MgADP, and in isometric contraction using wavelength-dependent fluorescence polarization. They find that the SH2 probe distinguishes the different states of the fiber such that rigor and MgADP are ordered and maintain a similar orientation throughout the excitation wavelength domain. The relaxed cross-bridge is ordered and has an orientation that is distinct from the orientation of the cross-bridge in rigor and MgADP over the entire wavelength domain. The active isometric cross-bridge is also oriented differently from the other states, suggesting the presence of a predominant actin-bound cross-bridge state that precedes the power stroke during muscle contraction

  6. The equivalent circuit of single crab muscle fibers as determined by impedance measurements with intracellular electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, R S

    1967-07-01

    The input impedance of muscle fibers of the crab was determined with microelectrodes over the frequency range 1 cps to 10 kc/sec. Care was taken to analyze, reduce, and correct for capacitive artifact. One dimensional cable theory was used to determine the properties of the equivalent circuit of the membrane admittance, and the errors introduced by the neglect of the three dimensional spread of current are discussed. In seven fibers the equivalent circuit of an element of the membrane admittance must contain a DC path and two capacitances, each in series with a resistance. In two fibers, the element of membrane admittance could be described by one capacitance in parallel with a resistance. In several fibers there was evidence for a third very large capacitance. The values of the elements of the equivalent circuit depend on which of several equivalent circuits is chosen. The circuit (with a minimum number of elements) that was considered most reasonably consistent with the anatomy of the fiber has two branches in parallel: one branch having a resistance R(e) in series with a capacitance C(e); the other branch having a resistance R(b) in series with a parallel combination of a resistance R(m) and a capacitance C(m). The average circuit values (seven fibers) for this model, treating the fiber as a cylinder of sarcolemma without infoldings or tubular invaginations, are R(e) = 21 ohm cm(2); C(e) = 47 microf/cm(2); R(b) = 10.2 ohm cm(2); R(m) = 173 ohm cm(2); C(m) = 9.0 microf/cm(2). The relation of this equivalent circuit and another with a nonminimum number of circuit elements to the fine structure of crab muscle is discussed. In the above equivalent circuit R(m) and C(m) are attributed to the sarcolemma; R(e) and C(e), to the sarcotubular system; and R(b), to the amorphous material found around crab fibers. Estimates of actual surface area of the sarcolemma and sarcotubular system permit the average circuit values to be expressed in terms of unit membrane area. The

  7. An optimized histochemical method to assess skeletal muscle glycogen and lipid stores reveals two metabolically distinct populations of type I muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats Gavalda, Clara; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Nordby, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle energy metabolism has been a research focus of physiologists for more than a century. Yet, how the use of intramuscular carbohydrate and lipid energy stores are coordinated during different types of exercise remains a subject of debate. Controversy arises from contradicting data...... preservation of muscle energy stores, air drying cryosections or cycles of freezing-thawing need to be avoided. Furthermore, optimization of the imaging settings in order to specifically image intracellular lipid droplets stained with oil red O or Bodipy-493/503 is shown. When co-staining lipid droplets...... distinct myosin heavy chain I expressing fibers: I-1 fibers have a smaller crossectional area, a higher density of lipid droplets, and a tendency to lower glycogen content compared to I-2 fibers. Type I-2 fibers have similar lipid content than IIA. Exhaustive exercise lead to glycogen depletion in type IIA...

  8. The influence of controlled nutrition intensity on the muscle fiber characteristics in fattening pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luboš Brzobohatý

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of controlled nutrition on the selected muscle fibres indicators and carcass value in pork. The test included 72 hybrid pigs of the D x (LWD x L genotype of a balanced sex (barrows/gilts. Animals were divided into two groups; the 1st (control group was fed ad libitum, while the nutrition of the 2nd (experimental group was restricted upon reaching 80 kg of live weight. The nutritional restriction was achieved by feeding the animals with maximum dose of CFM up to 2.8 kg*day-1 (corresponding to 36.4 MJ ME*day-1, 46.76 g NS*day-1 and 23.52 g LYS*day-1. From the obtained results it is evident that the daily feed intake restriction corresponds with greater number of the MLLT muscle fibers as well as with a higher IIB type muscle fibers share, higher lean meat share and a higher shoulder proportion in the carcass.

  9. The visceromotor and somatic afferent nerves of the penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Djibril; Zaitouna, Mazen; Alsaid, Bayan; Quillard, Jeanine; Ba, Nathalie; Allodji, Rodrigue Sètchéou; Benoit, Gérard; Bedretdinova, Dina; Bessede, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Innervation of the penis supports erectile and sensory functions. This article aims to study the efferent autonomic (visceromotor) and afferent somatic (sensory) nervous systems of the penis and to investigate how these systems relate to vascular pathways. Penises obtained from five adult cadavers were studied via computer-assisted anatomic dissection (CAAD). The number of autonomic and somatic nerve fibers was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Proximally, penile innervation was mainly somatic in the extra-albugineal sector and mainly autonomic in the intracavernosal sector. Distally, both sectors were almost exclusively supplied by somatic nerve fibers, except the intrapenile vascular anastomoses that accompanied both somatic and autonomic (nitrergic) fibers. From this point, the neural immunolabeling within perivascular nerve fibers was mixed (somatic labeling and autonomic labeling). Accessory afferent, extra-albugineal pathways supplied the outer layers of the penis. There is a major change in the functional type of innervation between the proximal and distal parts of the intracavernosal sector of the penis. In addition to the pelvis and the hilum of the penis, the intrapenile neurovascular routes are the third level where the efferent autonomic (visceromotor) and the afferent somatic (sensory) penile nerve fibers are close. Intrapenile neurovascular pathways define a proximal penile segment, which guarantees erectile rigidity, and a sensory distal segment. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  10. Electrically controllable twisted-coiled artificial muscle actuators using surface-modified polyester fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungwoo; Yoo, Ji Wang; Seo, Hee Won; Lee, Youngkwan; Suhr, Jonghwan; Moon, Hyungpil; Koo, Ja Choon; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Hunt, Robert; Kim, Kwang Jin; Kim, Soo Hyun; Nam, Jae-Do

    2017-03-01

    As a new class of thermally activated actuators based on polymeric fibers, we investigated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) yarns for the development of a twisted-coiled polymer fiber actuator (TCA). The PET yarn TCA exhibited the maximum linear actuation up to 8.9% by external heating at above the glass transition temperature, 160 °C-180 °C. The payload of the actuator was successfully correlated with the preload and training-load conditions by an empirical equation. Furthermore, the PET-based TCA was electrically driven by Joule heating after the PET surface was metallization with silver. For the fast and precise control of PET yarn TCA, electroless silver plating was conducted to form electrical conductive layers on the PET fiber surface. The silver plated PET-based TCA was tested by Joule heating and the tensile actuation was increased up to 12.1% (6 V) due to the enhanced surface hardness and slippage of PET fibers. Overall, silver plating of the polymeric yarn provided a fast actuation speed and enhanced actuation performance of the TCA actuator by Joule heating, providing a great potential for being used in artificial muscle for biomimetic machines including robots, industrial actuators and powered exoskeletons.

  11. Skeletal muscle fiber type composition and performance during repeated bouts of maximal, concentric contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, E. B.; Dudley, G. A.; Tesch, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Force output and fatigue and recovery patterns were studied during intermittent short-term exercise. 27 men performed three bouts of 30 maximal unilateral knee extensions on 2 different occasions. Blood flow was maintained or occluded during recovery periods (60 s). Blood flow was restricted by inflating a pneumatic cuff placed around the proximal thigh. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis were analyzed for identification of fast twitch (FT) and slow twitch (ST) fibers and relative FT area. Peak torque decreased during each bout of exercise and more when blood flow was restricted during recovery. Initial peak torque (IPT) and average peak torque (APT) decreased over the three exercise bouts. This response was 3 fold greater without than with blood flow during recovery. IPT and APT decreased more in individuals with mainly FT fibers than in those with mainly ST fibers. It is suggested that performance during repeated bouts of maximal concentric contractions differs between individuals with different fiber type composition. Specifically, in high intensity, intermittent exercise with emphasis on anaerobic energy release a high FT composition may not necessarily be advantageous for performance.

  12. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared with a value approximating normal resting Po2. Dihydrofluorescein was loaded into single frog (Xenopus) fibers, and fluorescence was used to monitor ROS using confocal microscopy. Myofibers were exposed to two maximal tetanic contractile periods (1 contraction/3 s for 2 min, separated by a 60-min rest period), each consisting of one of the following treatments: high Po2 (30 Torr), low Po2 (3–5 Torr), high Po2 with ebselen (antioxidant), or low Po2 with ebselen. Ebselen (10 μM) was administered before the designated contractile period. ROS formation during low Po2 treatment was greater than during high Po2 treatment, and ebselen decreased ROS generation in both low- and high-Po2 conditions (P Po2. Force was reduced >30% for each condition except low Po2 with ebselen, which only decreased ∼15%. We concluded that single myofibers under low Po2 conditions develop accelerated and more oxidative stress than at Po2 = 30 Torr (normal human resting Po2). Ebselen decreases ROS formation in both low and high Po2, but only mitigates skeletal muscle fatigue during reduced Po2 conditions. PMID:23576612

  13. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei; Ouyang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB +/− mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity

  14. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, Pin, E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  15. Mechanical Defects of Muscle Fibers with Myosin Light Chain Mutants that Cause Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Roopnarine, Osha

    2003-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a disease caused by single mutations in several sarcomeric proteins, including the human myosin ventricular regulatory light chain (vRLC). The effects of four of these mutations (A13T, F18L, E22K, and P95A) in vRLC on force generation were determined as a function of Ca2+ concentration. The endogenous RLC was removed from skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers, and replaced with either rat wildtype vRLC or recombinant rat vRLC (G13T, F18L, E22K, and P95A). ...

  16. Calcium-binding properties of troponin C in detergent-skinned heart muscle fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, B.S.; Solaro, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    In order to obtain information with regard to behavior of the Ca 2+ receptor, troponin C (TnC), in intact myofilament lattice of cardiac muscle, we investigated Ca 2+ -binding properties of canine ventricular muscle fibers skinned with Triton X-100. Analysis of equilibrium Ca 2+ -binding data of the skinned fibers in ATP-free solutions suggested that there were two distinct classes of binding sites which were saturated over the physiological range of negative logarithm of free calcium concentration (pCa): class I (KCa = 7.4 X 10(7) M-1, KMg = 0.9 X 10(3) M-1) and class II (KCa = 1.2 X 10(6) M-1, KMg = 1.1 X 10(2) M-1). The class I and II were considered equivalent, respectively, to the Ca 2+ -Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ -specific sites of TnC. The assignments were supported by TnC content of the skinned fibers determined by electrophoresis and 45 Ca autoradiograph of electroblotted fiber proteins. Dissociation of rigor complexes by ATP caused a downward shift of the binding curve between pCa 7 and 5, an effect which could be largely accounted for by lowering of KCa of the class II sites. When Ca 2+ binding and isometric force were measured simultaneously, it was found that the threshold pCa for activation corresponds to the range of pCa where class II sites started to bind Ca 2+ significantly. We concluded that the low affinity site of cardiac TnC plays a key role in Ca 2+ regulation of contraction under physiological conditions, just as it does in the regulation of actomyosin ATPase. Study of kinetics of 45 Ca washout from skinned fibers and myofibrils revealed that cardiac TnC in myofibrils contains Ca 2+ -binding sites whose off-rate constant for Ca 2+ is significantly lower than the Ca 2+ off-rate constant hitherto documented for the divalent ion-binding sites of either cardiac/slow muscle TnC or fast skeletal TnC

  17. Acute Elevated Glucose Promotes Abnormal Action Potential-Induced Ca2+ Transients in Cultured Skeletal Muscle Fibers

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    Erick O. Hernández-Ochoa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A common comorbidity of diabetes is skeletal muscle dysfunction, which leads to compromised physical function. Previous studies of diabetes in skeletal muscle have shown alterations in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC—the sequential link between action potentials (AP, intracellular Ca2+ release, and the contractile machinery. Yet, little is known about the impact of acute elevated glucose on the temporal properties of AP-induced Ca2+ transients and ionic underlying mechanisms that lead to muscle dysfunction. Here, we used high-speed confocal Ca2+ imaging to investigate the temporal properties of AP-induced Ca2+ transients, an intermediate step of ECC, using an acute in cellulo model of uncontrolled hyperglycemia (25 mM, 48 h.. Control and elevated glucose-exposed muscle fibers cultured for five days displayed four distinct patterns of AP-induced Ca2+ transients (phasic, biphasic, phasic-delayed, and phasic-slow decay; most control muscle fibers show phasic AP-induced Ca2+ transients, while most fibers exposed to elevated D-glucose displayed biphasic Ca2+ transients upon single field stimulation. We hypothesize that these changes in the temporal profile of the AP-induced Ca2+ transients are due to changes in the intrinsic excitable properties of the muscle fibers. We propose that these changes accompany early stages of diabetic myopathy.

  18. TRPV1 marks synaptic segregation of multiple convergent afferents at the rat medial solitary tract nucleus.

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    James H Peters

    Full Text Available TRPV1 receptors are expressed on most but not all central terminals of cranial visceral afferents in the caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS. TRPV1 is associated with unmyelinated C-fiber afferents. Both TRPV1+ and TRPV1- afferents enter NTS but their precise organization remains poorly understood. In horizontal brainstem slices, we activated solitary tract (ST afferents and recorded ST-evoked glutamatergic excitatory synaptic currents (ST-EPSCs under whole cell voltage clamp conditions from neurons of the medial subnucleus. Electrical shocks to the ST produced fixed latency EPSCs (jitter<200 µs that identified direct ST afferent innervation. Graded increases in shock intensity often recruited more than one ST afferent and ST-EPSCs had consistent threshold intensity, latency to onset, and unique EPSC waveforms that characterized each unitary ST afferent contact. The TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (100 nM blocked the evoked TRPV1+ ST-EPSCs and defined them as either TRPV1+ or TRPV1- inputs. No partial responses to capsaicin were observed so that in NTS neurons that received one or multiple (2-5 direct ST afferent inputs--all were either blocked by capsaicin or were unaltered. Since TRPV1 mediates asynchronous release following TRPV1+ ST-evoked EPSCs, we likewise found that recruiting more than one ST afferent further augmented the asynchronous response and was eliminated by capsaicin. Thus, TRPV1+ and TRPV1- afferents are completely segregated to separate NTS neurons. As a result, the TRPV1 receptor augments glutamate release only within unmyelinated afferent pathways in caudal medial NTS and our work indicates a complete separation of C-type from A-type afferent information at these first central neurons.

  19. Action potential-evoked calcium release is impaired in single skeletal muscle fibers from heart failure patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino DiFranco

    Full Text Available Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC, but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+ release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers.Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms was markedly (2.6-fold and significantly (p<0.05 smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms. This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers.These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients.

  20. Contractile Activity Is Necessary to Trigger Intermittent Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Fiber Size and Vascular Adaptations in Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rizo-Roca

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Altitude training has become increasingly popular in recent decades. Its central and peripheral effects are well-described; however, few studies have analyzed the effects of intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH alone on skeletal muscle morphofunctionality. Here, we studied the effects of IHH on different myofiber morphofunctional parameters, investigating whether contractile activity is required to elicit hypoxia-induced adaptations in trained rats. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained 1 month and then divided into three groups: (1 rats in normobaria (trained normobaric inactive, TNI; (2 rats subjected daily to a 4-h exposure to hypobaric hypoxia equivalent to 4,000 m (trained hypobaric inactive, THI; and (3 rats subjected daily to a 4-h exposure to hypobaric hypoxia just before performing light exercise (trained hypobaric active, THA. After 2 weeks, the tibialis anterior muscle (TA was excised. Muscle cross-sections were stained for: (1 succinate dehydrogenase to identify oxidative metabolism; (2 myosin-ATPase to identify slow- and fast-twitch fibers; and (3 endothelial-ATPase to stain capillaries. Fibers were classified as slow oxidative (SO, fast oxidative glycolytic (FOG, fast intermediate glycolytic (FIG or fast glycolytic (FG and the following parameters were measured: fiber cross-sectional area (FCSA, number of capillaries per fiber (NCF, NCF per 1,000 μm2 of FCSA (CCA, fiber and capillary density (FD and CD, and the ratio between CD and FD (C/F. THI rats did not exhibit significant changes in most of the parameters, while THA animals showed reduced fiber size. Compared to TNI rats, FOG fibers from the lateral/medial fields, as well as FIG and FG fibers from the lateral region, had smaller FCSA in THA rats. Moreover, THA rats had increased NCF in FG fibers from all fields, in medial and posterior FIG fibers and in posterior FOG fibers. All fiber types from the three analyzed regions (except the posterior FG fibers displayed a

  1. Use it or lose it: tonic activity of slow motoneurons promotes their survival and preferentially increases slow fiber-type groupings in muscles of old lifelong recreational sportsmen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Mosole

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Histochemistry, immuno-histochemistry, gel electrophoresis of single muscle fibers and electromyography of aging muscles and nerves suggest that: i denervation contributes to muscle atrophy, ii impaired mobility accelerates the process, and iii lifelong running protects against loss of motor units. Recent corroborating results on the muscle effects of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES of aged muscles will be also mentioned, but we will in particular discuss how and why a lifelong increased physical activity sustains reinnervation of muscle fibers. By analyzing distribution and density of muscle fibers co-expressing fast and slow Myosin Heavy Chains (MHC we are able to distinguish the transforming muscle fibers due to activity related plasticity, to those that adapt muscle fiber properties to denervation and reinnervation. In muscle biopsies from septuagenarians with a history of lifelong high-level recreational activity we recently observed in comparison to sedentary seniors: 1. decreased proportion of small-size angular myofibers (denervated muscle fibers; 2. considerable increase of fiber-type groupings of the slow type (reinnervated muscle fibers; 3. sparse presence of muscle fibers co-expressing fast and slow MHC. Immuno-histochemical characteristics fluctuate from those with scarce fiber-type modulation and groupings to almost complete transformed muscles, going through a process in which isolated fibers co-expressing fast and slow MHC fill the gaps among fiber groupings. Data suggest that lifelong high-level exercise allows the body to adapt to the consequences of the age-related denervation and that it preserves muscle structure and function by saving otherwise lost muscle fibers through recruitment to different slow motor units. This is an opposite behavior of that described in long term denervated or resting muscles. These effects of lifelong high level activity seems to act primarily on motor neurons, in particular on those always

  2. Use it or Lose It: Tonic Activity of Slow Motoneurons Promotes Their Survival and Preferentially Increases Slow Fiber-Type Groupings in Muscles of Old Lifelong Recreational Sportsmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosole, Simone; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Loefler, Stefan; Zampieri, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Histochemistry, immuno-histochemistry, gel electrophoresis of single muscle fibers and electromyography of aging muscles and nerves suggest that: i) denervation contributes to muscle atrophy, ii) impaired mobility accelerates the process, and iii) lifelong running protects against loss of motor units. Recent corroborating results on the muscle effects of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) of aged muscles will be also mentioned, but we will in particular discuss how and why a lifelong increased physical activity sustains reinnervation of muscle fibers. By analyzing distribution and density of muscle fibers co-expressing fast and slow Myosin Heavy Chains (MHC) we are able to distinguish the transforming muscle fibers due to activity related plasticity, to those that adapt muscle fiber properties to denervation and reinnervation. In muscle biopsies from septuagenarians with a history of lifelong high-level recreational activity we recently observed in comparison to sedentary seniors: 1. decreased proportion of small-size angular myofibers (denervated muscle fibers); 2. considerable increase of fiber-type groupings of the slow type (reinnervated muscle fibers); 3. sparse presence of muscle fibers co-expressing fast and slow MHC. Immuno-histochemical characteristics fluctuate from those with scarce fiber-type modulation and groupings to almost complete transformed muscles, going through a process in which isolated fibers co-expressing fast and slow MHC fill the gaps among fiber groupings. Data suggest that lifelong high-level exercise allows the body to adapt to the consequences of the age-related denervation and that it preserves muscle structure and function by saving otherwise lost muscle fibers through recruitment to different slow motor units. This is an opposite behavior of that described in long term denervated or resting muscles. These effects of lifelong high level activity seems to act primarily on motor neurons, in particular on those always more active

  3. Use it or Lose It: Tonic Activity of Slow Motoneurons Promotes Their Survival and Preferentially Increases Slow Fiber-Type Groupings in Muscles of Old Lifelong Recreational Sportsmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosole, Simone; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Loefler, Stefan; Zampieri, Sandra

    2016-09-15

    Histochemistry, immuno-histochemistry, gel electrophoresis of single muscle fibers and electromyography of aging muscles and nerves suggest that: i) denervation contributes to muscle atrophy, ii) impaired mobility accelerates the process, and iii) lifelong running protects against loss of motor units. Recent corroborating results on the muscle effects of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) of aged muscles will be also mentioned, but we will in particular discuss how and why a lifelong increased physical activity sustains reinnervation of muscle fibers. By analyzing distribution and density of muscle fibers co-expressing fast and slow Myosin Heavy Chains (MHC) we are able to distinguish the transforming muscle fibers due to activity related plasticity, to those that adapt muscle fiber properties to denervation and reinnervation. In muscle biopsies from septuagenarians with a history of lifelong high-level recreational activity we recently observed in comparison to sedentary seniors: 1. decreased proportion of small-size angular myofibers (denervated muscle fibers); 2. considerable increase of fiber-type groupings of the slow type (reinnervated muscle fibers); 3. sparse presence of muscle fibers co-expressing fast and slow MHC. Immuno-histochemical characteristics fluctuate from those with scarce fiber-type modulation and groupings to almost complete transformed muscles, going through a process in which isolated fibers co-expressing fast and slow MHC fill the gaps among fiber groupings. Data suggest that lifelong high-level exercise allows the body to adapt to the consequences of the age-related denervation and that it preserves muscle structure and function by saving otherwise lost muscle fibers through recruitment to different slow motor units. This is an opposite behavior of that described in long term denervated or resting muscles. These effects of lifelong high level activity seems to act primarily on motor neurons, in particular on those always more active

  4. Repeated Muscle Injury as a Presumptive Trigger for Chronic Masticatory Muscle Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Dessem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available skeletal muscles sustain a significant loss of maximal contractile force after injury, but terminally damaged fibers can eventually be replaced by the growth of new muscle (regeneration, with full restoration of contractile force over time. After a second injury, limb muscles exhibit a smaller reduction in maximal force and reduced inflammation compared with that after the initial injury (i.e., repeated bout effect. In contrast, masticatory muscles exhibit diminished regeneration and persistent fibrosis, after a single injury; following a second injury, plasma extravasation is greater than after a single injury and maximal force is decreased more than after the initial injury. Thus, masticatory muscles do not exhibit a repeated bout effect and are instead increasingly damaged by repeated injury. We propose that the impaired ability of masticatory muscles to regenerate contributes to chronic muscle pain by leading to an accumulation of tissue damage, fibrosis, and a persistent elevation and prolonged membrane translocation of nociceptive channels such as P2X3 as well as enhanced expression of neuropeptides including CGRP within primary afferent neurons. These transformations prime primary afferent neurons for enhanced responsiveness upon subsequent injury thus triggering and/or exacerbating chronic muscle pain.

  5. Orientation of spin-labeled light chain 2 of myosin heads in muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, T

    1990-07-20

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (e.p.r.) spectroscopy has been used to monitor the orientation of spin labels attached rigidly to a reactive SH residue on the light chain 2 (LC2) of myosin heads in muscle fibers. e.p.r. spectra from spin-labeled myosin subfragment-1 (S1), allowed to diffuse into unlabeled rigor (ATP-free) fibers, were roughly approximated by a narrow angular distribution of spin labels centered at 66 degrees relative to the fiber axis, indicating a uniform orientation of S1 bound to actin. On the other hand, spectra from spin-labeled heavy meromyosin (HMM) were roughly approximated by two narrow angular distributions centered at 42 degrees and 66 degrees, suggesting that the LC2 domains of the two HMM heads have different orientations. In contrast to S1 or HMM, the spectra from rigor fibers, in which LC2 of endogenous myosin heads was labeled, showed a random orientation which may be due to distortion imposed by the structure of the filament lattice and the mismatch of the helical periodicities of the thick and thin filaments. However, spectra from the fibers in the presence of ATP analog 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMPPNP) were approximated by two narrow angular distributions similar to those obtained with HMM. Thus, AMPPNP may cause the LC2 domain to be less flexible and/or the S2 portion to be more flexible, so as to release the distortion of the LC2 domain and make it return to its natural position. At high ionic strength, AMPPNP disoriented the spin labels as ATP did under relaxing conditions, suggesting that the myosin head is detached from and/or weakly (flexibly) attached to a thin filament.

  6. Dynamics of tropomyosin in muscle fibers as monitored by saturation transfer EPR of bi-functional probe.

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    Roni F Rayes

    Full Text Available The dynamics of four regions of tropomyosin was assessed using saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance in the muscle fiber. In order to fully immobilize the spin probe on the surface of tropomyosin, a bi-functional spin label was attached to i,i+4 positions via cysteine mutagenesis. The dynamics of bi-functionally labeled tropomyosin mutants decreased by three orders of magnitude when reconstituted into "ghost muscle fibers". The rates of motion varied along the length of tropomyosin with the C-terminus position 268/272 being one order of magnitude slower then N-terminal domain or the center of the molecule. Introduction of troponin decreases the dynamics of all four sites in the muscle fiber, but there was no significant effect upon addition of calcium or myosin subfragment-1.

  7. Peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular nerve afferents in the bullfrog utriculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Vestibular nerve afferents innervating the bullfrog utriculus differ in their response dynamics and sensitivity to natural stimulation. They also supply hair cells that differ markedly in hair bundle morphology. To examine the peripheral innervation patterns of individual utricular afferents more closely, afferent fibers were labeled by the extracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the vestibular nerve after sectioning the vestibular nerve medial to Scarpa's ganglion to allow the degeneration of sympathetic and efferent fibers. The peripheral arborizations of individual afferents were then correlated with the diameters of their parent axons, the regions of the macula they innervate, and the number and type of hair cells they supply. The utriculus is divided by the striola, a narrow zone of distinctive morphology, into media and lateral parts. Utiricular afferents were classified as striolar or extrastriolar according to the epithelial entrance of their parent axons and the location of their terminal fields. In general, striolar afferents had thicker parent axons, fewer subepithelial bifurcations, larger terminal fields, and more synaptic endings than afferents in extrstriolar regions. Afferents in a juxtastriolar zone, immediately adjacent to the medial striola, had innervation patterns transitional between those in the striola and more peripheral parts of the medial extrastriola. moast afferents innervated only a single macular zone. The terminal fields of striolar afferents, with the notable exception of a few afferents with thin parent axons, were generally confined to one side of the striola. Hair cells in the bullfrog utriculus have perviously been classified into four types based on hair bundle morphology. Afferents in the extrastriolar and juxtastriolar zones largely or exclusively innervated Type B hair cells, the predominant hair cell type in the utricular macula. Striolar afferents supplied a mixture of four hair cell types, but largely

  8. Fiber type conversion by PGC-1α activates lysosomal and autophagosomal biogenesis in both unaffected and Pompe skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichi Takikita

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PGC-1α is a transcriptional co-activator that plays a central role in the regulation of energy metabolism. Our interest in this protein was driven by its ability to promote muscle remodeling. Conversion from fast glycolytic to slow oxidative fibers seemed a promising therapeutic approach in Pompe disease, a severe myopathy caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA which is responsible for the degradation of glycogen. The recently approved enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has only a partial effect in skeletal muscle. In our Pompe mouse model (KO, the poor muscle response is seen in fast but not in slow muscle and is associated with massive accumulation of autophagic debris and ineffective autophagy. In an attempt to turn the therapy-resistant fibers into fibers amenable to therapy, we made transgenic KO mice expressing PGC-1α in muscle (tgKO. The successful switch from fast to slow fibers prevented the formation of autophagic buildup in the converted fibers, but PGC-1α failed to improve the clearance of glycogen by ERT. This outcome is likely explained by an unexpected dramatic increase in muscle glycogen load to levels much closer to those observed in patients, in particular infants, with the disease. We have also found a remarkable rise in the number of lysosomes and autophagosomes in the tgKO compared to the KO. These data point to the role of PGC-1α in muscle glucose metabolism and its possible role as a master regulator for organelle biogenesis - not only for mitochondria but also for lysosomes and autophagosomes. These findings may have implications for therapy of lysosomal diseases and other disorders with altered autophagy.

  9. Critical determinants of combined sprint and endurance performance: an integrative analysis from muscle fiber to the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaard, Stephan; van der Laarse, Willem J; Weide, Guido; Bloemers, Frank W; Hofmijster, Mathijs J; Levels, Koen; Noordhof, Dionne A; de Koning, Jos J; de Ruiter, Cornelis J; Jaspers, Richard T

    2018-04-01

    Optimizing physical performance is a major goal in current physiology. However, basic understanding of combining high sprint and endurance performance is currently lacking. This study identifies critical determinants of combined sprint and endurance performance using multiple regression analyses of physiologic determinants at different biologic levels. Cyclists, including 6 international sprint, 8 team pursuit, and 14 road cyclists, completed a Wingate test and 15-km time trial to obtain sprint and endurance performance results, respectively. Performance was normalized to lean body mass 2/3 to eliminate the influence of body size. Performance determinants were obtained from whole-body oxygen consumption, blood sampling, knee-extensor maximal force, muscle oxygenation, whole-muscle morphology, and muscle fiber histochemistry of musculus vastus lateralis. Normalized sprint performance was explained by percentage of fast-type fibers and muscle volume ( R 2 = 0.65; P body.

  10. Effect of spaceflight on the isotonic contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibers in the rhesus monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, R. H.; Romatowski, J. G.; Blaser, C.; De La Cruz, L.; Gettelman, G. J.; Widrick, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments from both Cosmos and Space Shuttle missions have shown weightlessness to result in a rapid decline in the mass and force of rat hindlimb extensor muscles. Additionally, despite an increased maximal shortening velocity, peak power was reduced in rat soleus muscle post-flight. In humans, declines in voluntary peak isometric ankle extensor torque ranging from 15-40% have been reported following long- and short-term spaceflight and prolonged bed rest. Complete understanding of the cellular events responsible for the fiber atrophy and the decline in force, as well as the development of effective countermeasures, will require detailed knowledge of how the physiological and biochemical processes of muscle function are altered by spaceflight. The specific purpose of this investigation was to determine the extent to which the isotonic contractile properties of the slow- and fast-twitch fiber types of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were altered by a 14-day spaceflight.

  11. Effect of speed endurance training and reduced training volume on running economy and single muscle fiber adaptations in trained runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper; Christiansen, Danny; Christensen, Peter Møller

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether improved running economy with a period of speed endurance training and reduced training volume could be related to adaptations in specific muscle fibers. Twenty trained male (n = 14) and female (n = 6) runners (maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 -m.......3 ± 0.3 vs. 18.9 ± 0.3 km/h) after than before the intervention. Thus, improved running economy with intense training may be related to changes in expression of proteins linked to energy consuming processes in primarily ST muscle fibers....

  12. Skeletal muscle myostatin mRNA expression is fiber-type specific and increases during hindlimb unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, C. J.; Booth, F. W.; Gordon, S. E.

    1999-01-01

    Transgenic mice lacking a functional myostatin (MSTN) gene demonstrate greater skeletal muscle mass resulting from muscle fiber hypertrophy and hyperplasia (McPherron, A. C., A. M. Lawler, and S. -J. Lee. Nature 387: 83-90, 1997). Therefore, we hypothesized that, in normal mice, MSTN may act as a negative regulator of muscle mass. Specifically, we hypothesized that the predominately slow (type I) soleus muscle, which demonstrates greater atrophy than the fast (type II) gastrocnemius-plantaris complex (Gast/PLT), would show more elevation in MSTN mRNA abundance during hindlimb unloading (HU). Surprisingly, MSTN mRNA was not detectable in weight-bearing or HU soleus muscle, which atrophied 42% by the 7th day of HU in female ICR mice. In contrast, MSTN mRNA was present in weight-bearing Gast/PLT muscle and was significantly elevated (67%) at 1 day but not at 3 or 7 days of HU. However, the Gast/PLT muscle had only atrophied 17% by the 7th day of HU. Because the soleus is composed only of type I and IIa fibers, whereas the Gast/PLT expresses type IId/x and IIb in addition to type I and IIa, it was necessary to perform a more careful analysis of the relationship between MSTN mRNA levels and myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoform expression (as a marker of fiber type). A significant correlation (r = 0.725, P < 0. 0005) was noted between the percentage of MHC isoform IIb expression and MSTN mRNA abundance in several muscles of the mouse hindlimb. These results indicate that MSTN expression is not strongly associated with muscle atrophy induced by HU; however, it is strongly associated with MHC isoform IIb expression in normal muscle.

  13. Transversal stiffness of fibers and desmin content in leg muscles of rats under gravitational unloading of various durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, I V

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this research was the analysis of structural changes in various parts of the sarcolemma and contractile apparatus of muscle fibers by measuring their transversal stiffness by atomic force microscopy under gravitational unloading. Soleus, medial gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles of Wistar rats were the objects of the study. Gravitational unloading was carried out by antiorthostatic suspension of hindlimbs for 1, 3, 7, and 12 days. It was shown that the transversal stiffness of different parts of the contractile apparatus of soleus muscle fibers decreases during gravitational unloading in the relaxed, calcium-activated, and rigor states, the fibers of the medial gastrocnemius show no changes, whereas the transversal stiffness of tibialis anterior muscle increases. Thus the transversal stiffness of the sarcolemma in the relaxed state is reduced in all muscles, which may be due to the direct action of gravity as an external mechanical factor that can influence the tension on a membrane. The change of sarcolemma stiffness in activated fibers, which is due probably to the transfer of tension from the contractile apparatus, correlates with the dynamics of changes in the content of desmin.

  14. Functional role of peripheral opioid receptors in the regulation of cardiac spinal afferent nerve activity during myocardial ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Thinly myelinated Aδ-fiber and unmyelinated C-fiber cardiac sympathetic (spinal) sensory nerve fibers are activated during myocardial ischemia to transmit the sensation of angina pectoris. Although recent observations showed that myocardial ischemia increases the concentrations of opioid peptides and that the stimulation of peripheral opioid receptors inhibits chemically induced visceral and somatic nociception, the role of opioids in cardiac spinal afferent signaling during myocardial ischemia has not been studied. The present study tested the hypothesis that peripheral opioid receptors modulate cardiac spinal afferent nerve activity during myocardial ischemia by suppressing the responses of cardiac afferent nerve to ischemic mediators like bradykinin and extracellular ATP. The nerve activity of single unit cardiac afferents was recorded from the left sympathetic chain (T2–T5) in anesthetized cats. Forty-three ischemically sensitive afferent nerves (conduction velocity: 0.32–3.90 m/s) with receptive fields in the left and right ventricles were identified. The responses of these afferent nerves to repeat ischemia or ischemic mediators were further studied in the following protocols. First, epicardial administration of naloxone (8 μmol), a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, enhanced the responses of eight cardiac afferent nerves to recurrent myocardial ischemia by 62%, whereas epicardial application of vehicle (PBS) did not alter the responses of seven other cardiac afferent nerves to ischemia. Second, naloxone applied to the epicardial surface facilitated the responses of seven cardiac afferent nerves to epicardial ATP by 76%. Third, administration of naloxone enhanced the responses of seven other afferent nerves to bradykinin by 85%. In contrast, in the absence of naloxone, cardiac afferent nerves consistently responded to repeated application of ATP (n = 7) or bradykinin (n = 7). These data suggest that peripheral opioid peptides suppress the

  15. Advanced age-related denervation and fiber-type grouping in skeletal muscle of SOD1 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrominova, Tatiana Y

    2010-11-30

    In this study skeletal muscles from 1.5- and 10-month-old Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) homozygous knockout (JLSod1(-/-)) mice obtained from The Jackson Laboratory (C57Bl6/129SvEv background) were compared with muscles from age- and sex-matched heterozygous (JLSod1(+/-)) littermates. The results of this study were compared with previously published data on two different strains of Sod1(-/-) mice: one from Dr. Epstein's laboratory (ELSod1(-/-); C57Bl6 background) and the other from Cephalon, Inc. (CSod1(-/-); 129/CD-1 background). Grouping of succinate dehydrogenase-positive fibers characterized muscles of Sod1(-/-) mice from all three strains. The 10-month-old Sod1(-/-)C and JL mice displayed pronounced denervation of the gastrocnemius muscle, whereas the ELSod1(-/-) mice displayed a small degree of denervation at this age, but developed accelerated age-related denervation later on. Denervation markers were up-regulated in skeletal muscle of 10-month-old JLSod1(-/-) mice. This study is the first to show that metallothionein mRNA and protein expression was up-regulated in the skeletal muscle of 10-month-old JLSod1(-/-) mice and was mostly localized to the small atrophic muscle fibers. In conclusion, all three strains of Sod1(-/-) mice develop accelerated age-related muscle denervation, but the genetic background has significant influence on the progress of denervation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Conduction velocity of action potentials measured from unidimensional latency-topography in human and frog skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, S; Nakajima, Y; Hayashi, K; Toma, S

    1986-01-01

    Conduction of an action potential along skeletal muscle fibers was graphically displayed by unidimensional latency-topography, UDLT. Since the slopes of the equipotential line were linear and the width of the line was constant, it was possible to calculate conduction velocity from the slope. To determine conduction direction of the muscle action potential elicited by electric stimulation applied directly to the muscle, surface recording electrodes were placed on a two-dimensional plane over a human muscle. Thus a bi-dimensional topography was obtained. Then, twelve or sixteen surface electrodes were placed linearly along the longitudinal direction of the action potential conduction which was disclosed by the bi-dimensional topography. Thus conduction velocity of muscle action potential in man, calculated from the slope, was for m. brachioradialis, 3.9 +/- 0.4 m/s; for m. biceps brachii, 3.6 +/- 0.2 m/s; for m. sternocleidomastoideus, 3.6 +/- 0.4 m/s. By using a tungsten microelectrode to stimulate the motor axons, a convex-like equipotential line of an action potential in UDLT was obtained from human muscle fibers. Since a similar pattern of UDLT was obtained from experiments on isolated frog muscles, in which the muscle action potential was elicited by stimulating the motor axon, it was assumed that the maximum of the curve corresponds to the end-plate region, and that the slopes on both sides indicate bi-directional conduction of the action potential.

  17. Functional recovery of anterior semicircular canal afferents following hair cell regeneration in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M.; Carey, John P.; Xu, Jinping

    2002-01-01

    Streptomycin sulfate (1.2 g/kg i.m.) was administered for 5 consecutive days to 5-7-day-old white Leghorn chicks; this causes damage to semicircular canal hair cells that ultimately regenerate to reform the sensory epithelium. During the recovery period, electrophysiological recordings were taken sequentially from anterior semicircular canal primary afferents using an indentation stimulus of the canal that has been shown to mimic rotational stimulation. Chicks were assigned to an early (14-18 days; n = 8), intermediate (28-34 days; n = 5), and late (38-58 days; n = 4) period based on days after treatment. Seven untreated chicks, 15-67 days old, provided control data. An absence of background and indent-induced discharge was the prominent feature of afferents in the early period: only "silent" afferents were encountered in 5/8 experiments. In several of these chicks, fascicles of afferent fibers were seen extending up to the epithelium that was void of hair cells, and intra- and extracellular biocytin labeling revealed afferent processes penetrating into the supporting cell layer of the crista. In 3/8 chicks 74 afferents could be characterized, and they significantly differed from controls (n = 130) by having a lower discharge rate and a negligible response to canal stimulation. In the intermediate period there was considerable variability in discharge properties of 121 afferents, but as a whole the number of "silent" fibers in the canal nerve diminished, the background rate increased, and a response to canal stimulation detected. Individually biocytin-labeled afferents had normal-appearing terminal specializations in the sensory epithelium by 28 days poststreptomycin. In the late period, afferents (n = 58) remained significantly different from controls in background discharge properties and response gain. The evidence suggests that a considerable amount of variability exists between chicks in the return of vestibular afferent function following ototoxic injury and

  18. Unexpected dependence of RyR1 splice variant expression in human lower limb muscles on fiber-type composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, Hermia; Theodoratos, Angelo; Smith, Paul N; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2016-02-01

    The skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release channel (RyR1), essential for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, demonstrates a known developmentally regulated alternative splicing in the ASI region. We now find unexpectedly that the expression of the splice variants is closely related to fiber type in adult human lower limb muscles. We examined the distribution of myosin heavy chain isoforms and ASI splice variants in gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and vastus medialis from patients aged 45 to 85 years. There was a strong positive correlation between ASI(+)RyR1 and the percentage of type 2 fibers in the muscles (r = 0.725), and a correspondingly strong negative correlation between the percentages of ASI(+)RyR1 and percentage of type 1 fibers. When the type 2 fiber data were separated into type 2X and type 2A, the correlation with ASI(+)RyR1 was stronger in type 2X fibers (r = 0.781) than in type 2A fibers (r = 0.461). There was no significant correlation between age and either fiber-type composition or ASI(+)RyR1/ASI(-)RyR1 ratio. The results suggest that the reduced expression of ASI(-)RyR1 during development may reflect a reduction in type 1 fibers during development. Preferential expression of ASI(-) RyR1, having a higher gain of in Ca(2+) release during EC coupling than ASI(+)RyR1, may compensate for the reduced terminal cisternae volume, fewer junctional contacts and reduced charge movement in type 1 fibers.

  19. Effects of acute exposure of heavy ion to spinal cord on the properties of motoneurons and muscle fibers in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Akihiko; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Norifumi; Nagaoka, Shunji; Nojima, Kumie

    2003-01-01

    We investigate effects of localized exposure of heavy ion to the lumbar 4th to 6th segments of the rat spinal cord on the properties of motoneurons and the innervated muscle fibers without surgical treatments. Twenty 7-week-old male Wistar rats were exposed to 5 mm spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) carbon beam (290 MeV, linear energy transfer (LET)=130 keV/μm): Two doses (15 Gy or 20 Gy) were applied to each group of rats (n=5) in two different depths; one group was exposed only for ventral horn of the spinal cord while other for whole spinal cord. Five rats served as controls. The rats were exposed to carbon irons on October 26, 2002. We will sacrifice the rats soon after they show an abnormal behavior including posture and walking. Cell body size and oxidative enzyme activity of spinal motoneurons of the control and heavy-ion-exposed rats will be analyzed. In addition, cell size, oxidative enzyme activity, and expressions of myosin heavy chain isoforms of the gastrocnemius, soleus, plantaris, extensor digitorum longus, and tibialis anterior muscle fibers will be also determined. This study is performed to test our hypothesis that atrophy and a decrease in cross-sectional area of motoneurons and muscle fibers which they innervate, as well as a decrease in oxidative activity of motoneurons and muscle fibers, will be induced due to exposure to heavy ion. (author)

  20. MUSCLE-FIBER CONDUCTION-VELOCITY IN AMYOTROPHIC-LATERAL-SCLEROSIS AND TRAUMATIC LESIONS OF THE PLEXUS BRACHIALIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHOEVEN, JH; ZWARTS, MJ; VANWEERDEN, TW

    1993-01-01

    Muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) in biceps brachii was studied in traumatic brachial plexus lesions (16 patients) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (22 patients) by means of an invasive (S-MFCV) and a surface (S-MFCV) method. After complete denervation an exponential decrease of the

  1. Fiber type composition of unoperated rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles after unilateral isotransplantation of a foreign muscle in long-term experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Tomáš; Smerdu, V.; Zachařová, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2009), s. 253-262 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0327; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-CT-2004-511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscle transplantations * muscle fiber types * myosin heavy chains Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  2. Effect of temperature on crossbridge force changes during fatigue and recovery in intact mouse muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Nocella

    Full Text Available Repetitive or prolonged muscle contractions induce muscular fatigue, defined as the inability of the muscle to maintain the initial tension or power output. In the present experiments, made on intact fiber bundles from FDB mouse, fatigue and recovery from fatigue were investigated at 24°C and 35°C. Force and stiffness were measured during tetani elicited every 90 s during the pre-fatigue control phase and recovery and every 1.5 s during the fatiguing phase made of 105 consecutive tetani. The results showed that force decline could be split in an initial phase followed by a later one. Loss of force during the first phase was smaller and slower at 35°C than at 24°C, whereas force decline during the later phase was greater at 35°C so that total force depression at the end of fatigue was the same at both temperatures. The initial force decline occurred without great reduction of fiber stiffness and was attributed to a decrease of the average force per attached crossbridge. Force decline during the later phase was accompanied by a proportional stiffness decrease and was attributed to a decrease of the number of attached crossbridge. Similarly to fatigue, at both 24 and 35°C, force recovery occurred in two phases: the first associated with the recovery of the average force per attached crossbridge and the second due to the recovery of the pre-fatigue attached crossbridge number. These changes, symmetrical to those occurring during fatigue, are consistent with the idea that, i initial phase is due to the direct fast inhibitory effect of [Pi]i increase during fatigue on crossbridge force; ii the second phase is due to the delayed reduction of Ca(2+ release and /or reduction of the Ca(2+ sensitivity of the myofibrils due to high [Pi]i.

  3. Effects of low level laser in the morphology of the skeletal muscle fiber during compensatory hypertrophy in plantar muscle of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terena, Stella Maris Lins; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Kalil, Sandra; Alves, Agnelo Neves; Mesquita Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli

    2015-06-01

    The hypertrophy is known as an increase the cross-sectional area of the muscle as a result of a muscular work against an overload, and it is compensatory because the overload is induced by functional elimination of synergistic muscles. The importance of study the compensatory hypertrophy is understand how this process can be influenced by the irradiation with regard to the weight and muscle cross-sectional area, to assist in the rehabilitation process and the effectiveness functional return. The aim was evaluate the effects of low-level laser irradiation on morphological aspects of muscle tissue, comparing the weight and cross-sectional area in rat skeletal muscle. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control, hypertrophy group without irradiation (right plantar muscle) and hypertrophy group and irradiation (left plantar muscle), both analyzed after 7 and 14 days. The irradiation was performed daily immediately after the surgery. The parameters were: λ = 780nm, beam spot of 0.04 cm2, output power of 40mW, power density of 1W/cm2, energy density of 10J / cm2 and 10s exposure time with a total energy of 3.2 J. The results revealed that low level laser irradiation an increase the weight of the plantaris muscle after 7 and 14 days with a difference of 7.06% and 11.51% respectively. In conclusion, low level laser irradiation has an effect on compensatory hypertrophy to produce increased muscle weight and promoted an increase in cross-sectional area of muscle fibers in the compensatory hypertrophy model after 14 days with parameters cited above.

  4. Impact of elastin incorporation into electrochemically aligned collagen fibers on mechanical properties and smooth muscle cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy-Uyen; Bashur, Chris A; Kishore, Vipuil

    2016-03-17

    Application of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) for the replacement of small-diameter arteries is limited due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Previous studies have attempted to address the limitations of TEVGs by developing scaffolds that mimic the composition (collagen and elastin) of native arteries to better match the mechanical properties of the graft with the native tissue. However, most existing scaffolds do not recapitulate the aligned topography of the collagen fibers found in native vessels. In the current study, based on the principles of isoelectric focusing, two different types of elastin (soluble and insoluble) were incorporated into highly oriented electrochemically aligned collagen (ELAC) fibers and the effect of elastin incorporation on the mechanical properties of the ELAC fibers and smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype was investigated. The results indicate that elastin incorporation significantly decreased the modulus of ELAC fibers to converge upon that of native vessels. Further, a significant increase in yield strain and decrease in Young's modulus was observed on all fibers post SMC culture compared with before the culture. Real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed a significant increase in the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and calponin on ELAC fibers with insoluble elastin, suggesting that incorporation of insoluble elastin induces a contractile phenotype in SMCs after two weeks of culture on ELAC fibers. Immunofluorescence results showed that calponin expression increased with time on all fibers. In conclusion, insoluble elastin incorporated ELAC fibers have the potential to be used for the development of functional TEVGs for the repair and replacement of small-diameter arteries.

  5. Changes in muscle fiber conduction velocity indicate recruitment of distinct motor unit populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtman, C J; Stegeman, D F; Van Dijk, J P; Zwarts, M J

    2003-09-01

    To obtain more insight into the changes in mean muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) during sustained isometric exercise at relatively low contraction levels, we performed an in-depth study of the human tibialis anterior muscle by using multichannel surface electromyogram. The results show an increase in MFCV after an initial decrease of MFCV at 30 or 40% maximum voluntary contraction in all of the five subjects studied. With a peak velocity analysis, we calculated the distribution of conduction velocities of action potentials in the bipolar electromyogram signal. It shows two populations of peak velocities occurring simultaneously halfway through the exercise. The MFCV pattern implies the recruitment of two different populations of motor units. Because of the lowering of MFCV of the first activated population of motor units, the newly recruited second population of motor units becomes visible. It is most likely that the MFCV pattern can be ascribed to the fatiguing of already recruited predominantly type I motor units, followed by the recruitment of fresh, predominantly type II, motor units.

  6. Afferent control of central pattern generators: experimental analysis of scratching in the decerebrate cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baev, K V; Esipenko, V B; Shimansky, Y P

    1991-01-01

    Systematic quantitative analysis of changes in the spinal scratching generator motor activity evoked by tonic and phasic peripheral afferent signals during "fictitious" scratching was carried out in the cat. Correlations between the kinematics of hindlimb scratching movement, sensory inflow, and primary afferent depolarization were investigated. Reliable correlations between the parameters of generator motor activity during fictitious scratching were revealed: they depended on tonic peripheral afferent inflow. The functional role of these dependencies consists of providing stability for aiming the hindlimb to the itch site. It was shown that scratching generator reaction to a phasic sensory signal depended significantly on afferent input, signal intensity, and its arrival phase in the cycle of motor activity. Phase correction of "scratching" rhythm was performed by inhibition of the current stage of "scratching" cycle, the inhibition magnitude depending on the intensity of a sensory signal run along high threshold afferent fibers. The moments in the scratching cycle, in which the afferent signal caused no rearrangement in scratching generator activity, were discovered for all investigated afferent inputs. These moments corresponded to the transitions from one scratching cycle phase to another. Integral afferent activity was distributed unevenly in the cycle during real scratching. The main part of it was observed just in that scratching cycle part which included the above mentioned no rearrangement phase points. The data obtained allowed us to conclude that the scratching generator should be considered as a working program for the motor optimal control system containing the intrinsic model of the controlled object dynamics (e.g. hindlimb scratching movement dynamics), which produces an inner analog of peripheral flow. This inner flow interacts with peripheral afferent inflow just as one of the latter components. Centrally originated modulation of primary afferent

  7. Exercise training during chemotherapy preserves skeletal muscle fiber area, capillarization, and mitochondrial content in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijwel, Sara; Cardinale, Daniele A; Norrbom, Jessica; Chapman, Mark; Ivarsson, Niklas; Wengström, Yvonne; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Rundqvist, Helene

    2018-05-11

    Exercise has been suggested to ameliorate the detrimental effects of chemotherapy on skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different exercise regimens with usual care on skeletal muscle morphology and mitochondrial markers in patients being treated with chemotherapy for breast cancer. Specifically, we compared moderate-intensity aerobic training combined with high-intensity interval training (AT-HIIT) and resistance training combined with high-intensity interval training (RT-HIIT) with usual care (UC). Resting skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained pre- and postintervention from 23 randomly selected women from the OptiTrain breast cancer trial who underwent RT-HIIT, AT-HIIT, or UC for 16 wk. Over the intervention, citrate synthase activity, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, capillaries per fiber, and myosin heavy chain isoform type I were reduced in UC, whereas RT-HIIT and AT-HIIT were able to counteract these declines. AT-HIIT promoted up-regulation of the electron transport chain protein levels vs. UC. RT-HIIT favored satellite cell count vs. UC and AT-HIIT. There was a significant association between change in citrate synthase activity and self-reported fatigue. AT-HIIT and RT-HIIT maintained or improved markers of skeletal muscle function compared with the declines found in the UC group, indicating a sustained trainability in addition to the preservation of skeletal muscle structural and metabolic characteristics during chemotherapy. These findings highlight the importance of supervised exercise programs for patients with breast cancer during chemotherapy.-Mijwel, S., Cardinale, D. A., Norrbom, J., Chapman, M., Ivarsson, N., Wengström, Y., Sundberg, C. J., Rundqvist, H. Exercise training during chemotherapy preserves skeletal muscle fiber area, capillarization, and mitochondrial content in patients with breast cancer.

  8. Imaging mass spectrometry reveals fiber-specific distribution of acetylcarnitine and contraction-induced carnitine dynamics in rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Manabe, Yasuko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Masuda, Kazumi; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2014-10-01

    Carnitine is well recognized as a key regulator of long-chain fatty acyl group translocation into the mitochondria. In addition, carnitine, as acetylcarnitine, acts as an acceptor of excess acetyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Here, we provide a new methodology for accurate quantification of acetylcarnitine content and determination of its localization in skeletal muscles. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) to visualize acetylcarnitine distribution in rat skeletal muscles. MALDI-IMS and immunohistochemistry of serial cross-sections showed that acetylcarnitine was enriched in the slow-type muscle fibers. The concentration of ATP was lower in muscle regions with abundant acetylcarnitine, suggesting a relationship between acetylcarnitine and metabolic activity. Using our novel method, we detected an increase in acetylcarnitine content after muscle contraction. Importantly, this increase was not detected using traditional biochemical assays of homogenized muscles. We also demonstrated that acetylation of carnitine during muscle contraction was concomitant with glycogen depletion. Our methodology would be useful for the quantification of acetylcarnitine and its contraction-induced kinetics in skeletal muscles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cytosolic calcium transients are a determinant of contraction-induced HSP72 transcription in single skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stary, Creed M; Hogan, Michael C

    2016-05-15

    The intrinsic activating factors that induce transcription of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in skeletal muscle following exercise remain unclear. We hypothesized that the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with depolarization is a determinant. We utilized intact, single skeletal muscle fibers from Xenopus laevis to test the role of the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient and several other exercise-related factors (fatigue, hypoxia, AMP kinase, and cross-bridge cycling) on the activation of HSP72 transcription. HSP72 and HSP60 mRNA levels were assessed with real-time quantitative PCR; cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was assessed with fura-2. Both fatiguing and nonfatiguing contractions resulted in a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. As expected, peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained tightly coupled with peak developed tension in contracting fibers. Pretreatment with N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS) resulted in depressed peak developed tension with stimulation, while peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained largely unchanged from control values. Despite excitation-contraction uncoupling, BTS-treated fibers displayed a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. Treatment of fibers with hypoxia (Po2: skeletal muscle depolarization provides a sufficient activating stimulus for HSP72 transcription. Metabolic or mechanical factors associated with fatigue development and cross-bridge cycling likely play a more limited role. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Tissue engineering the mechanosensory circuit of the stretch reflex arc: sensory neuron innervation of intrafusal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, John W; Das, Mainak; Bhalkikar, Abhijeet; Stancescu, Maria; Hickman, James J

    2010-11-01

    The sensory circuit of the stretch reflex arc, composed of specialized intrafusal muscle fibers and type Ia proprioceptive sensory neurons, converts mechanical information regarding muscle length and stretch to electrical action potentials and relays them to the central nervous system. Utilizing a non-biological substrate, surface patterning photolithography and a serum-free medium formulation a co-culture system was developed that facilitated functional interactions between intrafusal muscle fibers and sensory neurons. The presence of annulospiral wrappings (ASWs) and flower-spray endings (FSEs), both physiologically relevant morphologies in sensory neuron-intrafusal fiber interactions, were demonstrated and quantified using immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, two proposed components of the mammalian mechanosensory transduction system, BNaC1 and PICK1, were both identified at the ASWs and FSEs. To verify functionality of the mechanoreceptor elements the system was integrated with a MEMS cantilever device, and Ca(2+) currents were imaged along the length of an axon innervating an intrafusal fiber when stretched by cantilever deflection. This system provides a platform for examining the role of this mechanosensory complex in the pathology of myotonic and muscular dystrophies, peripheral neuropathy, and spasticity inducing diseases like Parkinson's. These studies will also assist in engineering fine motor control for prosthetic devices by improving our understanding of mechanosensitive feedback. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lecithin Prevents Cortical Cytoskeleton Reorganization in Rat Soleus Muscle Fibers under Short-Term Gravitational Disuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V Ogneva

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to prevent the cortical cytoskeleton reorganization of rat soleus muscle fibers under short-term gravitational disuse. Once a day, we injected the right soleus muscle with 0.5 ml lecithin at a concentration of 200 mg/ml and the left soleus muscle with a diluted solution in an equal volume for 3 days prior to the experiment. To simulate microgravity conditions in rats, an anti-orthostatic suspension was used according to the Ilyin-Novikov method modified by Morey-Holton et al. for 6 hours. The following groups of soleus muscle tissues were examined: "C", "C+L", "HS", and "HS+L". The transversal stiffness of rat soleus muscle fibers after 6 hours of suspension did not differ from that of the control group for the corresponding legs; there were no differences between the groups without lecithin «C» and «HS» or between the groups with lecithin "C+L" and "HS+L". However, lecithin treatment for three days resulted in an increase in cell stiffness; in the "C+L" group, cell stiffness was significantly higher by 22.7% (p < 0.05 compared with that of group "C". The mRNA content of genes encoding beta- and gamma-actin and beta-tubulin did not significantly differ before and after suspension in the corresponding groups. However, there was a significant increase in the mRNA content of these genes after lecithin treatment: the beta-actin and gamma-actin mRNA content in group "C+L" increased by 200% compared with that of group "C", and beta-tubulin increased by 100% (as well as the mRNA content of tubulin-binding proteins Ckap5, Tcp1, Cct5 and Cct7. In addition, desmin mRNA content remained unchanged in all of the experimental groups. As a result of the lecithin injections, there was a redistribution of the mRNA content of genes encoding actin monomer- and filament-binding proteins in the direction of increasing actin polymerization and filament stability; the mRNA content of Arpc3 and Lcp1 increased by 3- and 5-fold, respectively

  12. Lecithin Prevents Cortical Cytoskeleton Reorganization in Rat Soleus Muscle Fibers under Short-Term Gravitational Disuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukov, Nikolay S.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prevent the cortical cytoskeleton reorganization of rat soleus muscle fibers under short-term gravitational disuse. Once a day, we injected the right soleus muscle with 0.5 ml lecithin at a concentration of 200 mg/ml and the left soleus muscle with a diluted solution in an equal volume for 3 days prior to the experiment. To simulate microgravity conditions in rats, an anti-orthostatic suspension was used according to the Ilyin-Novikov method modified by Morey-Holton et al. for 6 hours. The following groups of soleus muscle tissues were examined: «C», «C+L», «HS», and «HS+L». The transversal stiffness of rat soleus muscle fibers after 6 hours of suspension did not differ from that of the control group for the corresponding legs; there were no differences between the groups without lecithin «C» and «HS» or between the groups with lecithin «C+L» and «HS+L». However, lecithin treatment for three days resulted in an increase in cell stiffness; in the «C+L» group, cell stiffness was significantly higher by 22.7% (p lecithin treatment: the beta-actin and gamma-actin mRNA content in group «C+L» increased by 200% compared with that of group «C», and beta-tubulin increased by 100% (as well as the mRNA content of tubulin-binding proteins Ckap5, Tcp1, Cct5 and Cct7). In addition, desmin mRNA content remained unchanged in all of the experimental groups. As a result of the lecithin injections, there was a redistribution of the mRNA content of genes encoding actin monomer- and filament-binding proteins in the direction of increasing actin polymerization and filament stability; the mRNA content of Arpc3 and Lcp1 increased by 3- and 5-fold, respectively, but the levels of Tmod1 and Svil decreased by 2- and 5-fold, respectively. However, gravitational disuse did not result in changes in the mRNA content of Arpc3, Tmod1, Svil or Lcp1. Anti-orthostatic suspension for 6 hours resulted in a decrease in the mRNA content of alpha

  13. Lecithin Prevents Cortical Cytoskeleton Reorganization in Rat Soleus Muscle Fibers under Short-Term Gravitational Disuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, Irina V; Biryukov, Nikolay S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prevent the cortical cytoskeleton reorganization of rat soleus muscle fibers under short-term gravitational disuse. Once a day, we injected the right soleus muscle with 0.5 ml lecithin at a concentration of 200 mg/ml and the left soleus muscle with a diluted solution in an equal volume for 3 days prior to the experiment. To simulate microgravity conditions in rats, an anti-orthostatic suspension was used according to the Ilyin-Novikov method modified by Morey-Holton et al. for 6 hours. The following groups of soleus muscle tissues were examined: "C", "C+L", "HS", and "HS+L". The transversal stiffness of rat soleus muscle fibers after 6 hours of suspension did not differ from that of the control group for the corresponding legs; there were no differences between the groups without lecithin «C» and «HS» or between the groups with lecithin "C+L" and "HS+L". However, lecithin treatment for three days resulted in an increase in cell stiffness; in the "C+L" group, cell stiffness was significantly higher by 22.7% (p lecithin treatment: the beta-actin and gamma-actin mRNA content in group "C+L" increased by 200% compared with that of group "C", and beta-tubulin increased by 100% (as well as the mRNA content of tubulin-binding proteins Ckap5, Tcp1, Cct5 and Cct7). In addition, desmin mRNA content remained unchanged in all of the experimental groups. As a result of the lecithin injections, there was a redistribution of the mRNA content of genes encoding actin monomer- and filament-binding proteins in the direction of increasing actin polymerization and filament stability; the mRNA content of Arpc3 and Lcp1 increased by 3- and 5-fold, respectively, but the levels of Tmod1 and Svil decreased by 2- and 5-fold, respectively. However, gravitational disuse did not result in changes in the mRNA content of Arpc3, Tmod1, Svil or Lcp1. Anti-orthostatic suspension for 6 hours resulted in a decrease in the mRNA content of alpha-actinin-4 (Actn4) and

  14. Reduced resting potentials in dystrophic (mdx) muscle fibers are secondary to NF-κB-dependent negative modulation of ouabain sensitive Na+-K+ pump activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, M T; Cottey, E; Cottey, A; Stefanski, C; Carlson, C G

    2011-04-15

    To examine potential mechanisms for the reduced resting membrane potentials (RPs) of mature dystrophic (mdx) muscle fibers, the Na(+)-K(+) pump inhibitor ouabain was added to freshly isolated nondystrophic and mdx fibers. Ouabain produced a 71% smaller depolarization in mdx fibers than in nondystrophic fibers, increased the [Na(+)](i) in nondystrophic fibers by 40%, but had no significant effect on the [Na(+)](i) of mdx fibers, which was approximately double that observed in untreated nondystrophic fibers. Western blots indicated no difference in total and phosphorylated Na(+)-K(+) ATPase catalytic α1 subunit between nondystrophic and mdx muscle. Examination of the effects of the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) indicated that direct application of the drug slowly hyperpolarized mdx fibers (7 mV in 90 min) but had no effect on nondystrophic fibers. Pretreatment with ouabain abolished this hyperpolarization, and pretreatment with PDTC restored ouabain-induced depolarization and reduced [Na(+)](i). Administration of an NF-κB inhibitor that utilizes a different mechanism for reducing nuclear NF-κB activation, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), also hyperpolarized mdx fibers. These results suggest that in situ Na(+)-K(+) pump activity is depressed in mature dystrophic fibers by NF-κB dependent modulators, and that this reduced pump activity contributes to the weakness characteristic of dystrophic muscle. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effect of Muscle Fiber Direction on the Cut Surface Angle of Frozen Fish Muscular Tissue Cut by Bending Force

    OpenAIRE

    岡本, 清; 羽倉, 義雄; 鈴木, 寛一; 久保田, 清

    1996-01-01

    We have proposed a new cutting method named "Cryo-cutting" for frozen foodstuffs by applying a bending force instead of conventional cutting methods with band saw. This paper investigated the effect of muscle fiber angle (θf) to cut surface angle (θs) of frozen tuna muscular tissue at -70, -100 and -130°C for the purpose of evaluating the applicability of the cryo-cutting method to frozen fishes. The results were as follows : (1) There were two typical cutting patterns ("across the muscle fib...

  16. Effects of tetracaine on voltage-activated calcium sparks in frog intact skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, Stephen; Chandler, W Knox; Baylor, Stephen M

    2006-03-01

    The properties of Ca(2+) sparks in frog intact skeletal muscle fibers depolarized with 13 mM [K(+)] Ringer's are well described by a computational model with a Ca(2+) source flux of amplitude 2.5 pA (units of current) and duration 4.6 ms (18 degrees C; Model 2 of Baylor et al., 2002). This result, in combination with the values of single-channel Ca(2+) current reported for ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in bilayers under physiological ion conditions, 0.5 pA (Kettlun et al., 2003) to 2 pA (Tinker et al., 1993), suggests that 1-5 RyR Ca(2+) release channels open during a voltage-activated Ca(2+) spark in an intact fiber. To distinguish between one and greater than one channel per spark, sparks were measured in 8 mM [K(+)] Ringer's in the absence and presence of tetracaine, an inhibitor of RyR channel openings in bilayers. The most prominent effect of 75-100 microM tetracaine was an approximately sixfold reduction in spark frequency. The remaining sparks showed significant reductions in the mean values of peak amplitude, decay time constant, full duration at half maximum (FDHM), full width at half maximum (FWHM), and mass, but not in the mean value of rise time. Spark properties in tetracaine were simulated with an updated spark model that differed in minor ways from our previous model. The simulations show that (a) the properties of sparks in tetracaine are those expected if tetracaine reduces the number of active RyR Ca(2+) channels per spark, and (b) the single-channel Ca(2+) current of an RyR channel is normal voltage-activated sparks (i.e., in the absence of tetracaine) are produced by two or more active RyR Ca(2+) channels. The question of how the activation of multiple RyRs is coordinated is discussed.

  17. C-tactile afferent stimulating touch carries a positive affective value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawling, Ralph; Cannon, Peter R; McGlone, Francis P; Walker, Susannah C

    2017-01-01

    The rewarding sensation of touch in affiliative interactions is hypothesized to be underpinned by a specialized system of nerve fibers called C-Tactile afferents (CTs), which respond optimally to slowly moving, gentle touch, typical of a caress. However, empirical evidence to support the theory that CTs encode socially relevant, rewarding tactile information in humans is currently limited. While in healthy participants, touch applied at CT optimal velocities (1-10cm/sec) is reliably rated as subjectively pleasant, neuronopathy patients lacking large myelinated afferents, but with intact C-fibres, report that the conscious sensation elicited by stimulation of CTs is rather vague. Given this weak perceptual impact the value of self-report measures for assessing the specific affective value of CT activating touch appears limited. Therefore, we combined subjective ratings of touch pleasantness with implicit measures of affective state (facial electromyography) and autonomic arousal (heart rate) to determine whether CT activation carries a positive affective value. We recorded the activity of two key emotion-relevant facial muscle sites (zygomaticus major-smile muscle, positive affect & corrugator supercilii-frown muscle, negative affect) while participants evaluated the pleasantness of experimenter administered stroking touch, delivered using a soft brush, at two velocities (CT optimal 3cm/sec & CT non-optimal 30cm/sec), on two skin sites (CT innervated forearm & non-CT innervated palm). On both sites, 3cm/sec stroking touch was rated as more pleasant and produced greater heart rate deceleration than 30cm/sec stimulation. However, neither self-report ratings nor heart rate responses discriminated stimulation on the CT innervated arm from stroking of the non-CT innervated palm. In contrast, significantly greater activation of the zygomaticus major (smiling muscle) was seen specifically to CT optimal, 3cm/sec, stroking on the forearm in comparison to all other stimuli

  18. C-tactile afferent stimulating touch carries a positive affective value.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Pawling

    Full Text Available The rewarding sensation of touch in affiliative interactions is hypothesized to be underpinned by a specialized system of nerve fibers called C-Tactile afferents (CTs, which respond optimally to slowly moving, gentle touch, typical of a caress. However, empirical evidence to support the theory that CTs encode socially relevant, rewarding tactile information in humans is currently limited. While in healthy participants, touch applied at CT optimal velocities (1-10cm/sec is reliably rated as subjectively pleasant, neuronopathy patients lacking large myelinated afferents, but with intact C-fibres, report that the conscious sensation elicited by stimulation of CTs is rather vague. Given this weak perceptual impact the value of self-report measures for assessing the specific affective value of CT activating touch appears limited. Therefore, we combined subjective ratings of touch pleasantness with implicit measures of affective state (facial electromyography and autonomic arousal (heart rate to determine whether CT activation carries a positive affective value. We recorded the activity of two key emotion-relevant facial muscle sites (zygomaticus major-smile muscle, positive affect & corrugator supercilii-frown muscle, negative affect while participants evaluated the pleasantness of experimenter administered stroking touch, delivered using a soft brush, at two velocities (CT optimal 3cm/sec & CT non-optimal 30cm/sec, on two skin sites (CT innervated forearm & non-CT innervated palm. On both sites, 3cm/sec stroking touch was rated as more pleasant and produced greater heart rate deceleration than 30cm/sec stimulation. However, neither self-report ratings nor heart rate responses discriminated stimulation on the CT innervated arm from stroking of the non-CT innervated palm. In contrast, significantly greater activation of the zygomaticus major (smiling muscle was seen specifically to CT optimal, 3cm/sec, stroking on the forearm in comparison to all

  19. Force deficits and breakage rates after single lengthening contractions of single fast fibers from unconditioned and conditioned muscles of young and old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Gordon S; Faulkner, John A; Brooks, Susan V

    2008-07-01

    The deficit in force generation is a measure of the magnitude of damage to sarcomeres caused by lengthening contractions of either single fibers or whole muscles. In addition, permeabilized single fibers may suffer breakages. Our goal was to understand the interaction between breakages and force deficits in "young" and "old" permeabilized single fibers from control muscles of young and old rats and "conditioned" fibers from muscles that completed a 6-wk program of in vivo lengthening contractions. Following single lengthening contractions of old-control fibers compared with young-control fibers, the twofold greater force deficits at a 10% strain support the concept of an age-related increase in the susceptibility of fibers to mechanical damage. In addition, the much higher breakage rates for old fibers at all strains tested indicate an increase with aging in the number of fibers at risk of being severely injured during any given stretch. Following the 6-wk program of lengthening contractions, young-conditioned fibers and old-conditioned fibers were not different with respect to force deficit or the frequency of breakages. A potential mechanism for the increased resistance to stretch-induced damage of old-conditioned fibers is that, through intracellular damage and subsequent degeneration and regeneration, weaker sarcomeres were replaced by stronger sarcomeres. These data indicate that, despite the association of high fiber breakage rates and large force deficits with aging, the detrimental characteristics of old fibers were improved by a conditioning program that altered both sarcomeric characteristics as well as the overall structural integrity of the fibers.

  20. Protein Supplementation Augments Muscle Fiber Hypertrophy but Does Not Modulate Satellite Cell Content During Prolonged Resistance-Type Exercise Training in Frail Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Marlou L; Tieland, Michael; Verdijk, Lex B; Losen, Mario; Nilwik, Rachel; Mensink, Marco; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2017-07-01

    Protein supplementation increases gains in lean body mass following prolonged resistance-type exercise training in frail older adults. We assessed whether the greater increase in lean body mass can be attributed to muscle fiber type specific hypertrophy with concomitant changes in satellite cell (SC) content. A total of 34 frail elderly individuals (77 ± 1 years, n = 12 male adults) participated in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with 2 arms in parallel. Participants performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance-type exercise training (2 sessions per week) during which they were supplemented twice-daily with milk protein (2 × 15 g) or a placebo. Muscle biopsies were taken at baseline, and after 12 and 24 weeks of intervention, to determine type I and type II muscle fiber specific cross-sectional area (CSA), SC content, and myocellular characteristics. In the placebo group, a trend for a 20% ± 11% increase in muscle fiber CSA was observed in type II fibers only (P = .051), with no increase in type I muscle fiber CSA. In the protein group, type I and II muscle fiber CSA increased by 23% ± 7% and 34% ± 10% following 6 months of training, respectively (P  .05). No changes in myonuclear content and SC contents were observed over time in either group (both P > .05). Regression analysis showed that changes in myonuclear content and domain size are predictive of muscle fiber hypertrophy. Protein supplementation augments muscle fiber hypertrophy following prolonged resistance-type exercise training in frail older people, without changes in myonuclear and SC content. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Force generation and temperature-jump and length-jump tension transients in muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J S; Rodgers, M E

    1995-01-01

    Muscle tension rises with increasing temperature. The kinetics that govern the tension rise of maximally Ca(2+)-activated, skinned rabbit psoas fibers over a temperature range of 0-30 degrees C was characterized in laser temperature-jump experiments. The kinetic response is simple and can be readily interpreted in terms of a basic three-step mechanism of contraction, which includes a temperature-sensitive rapid preequilibrium(a) linked to a temperature-insensitive rate-limiting step and followed by a temperature-sensitive tension-generating step. These data and mechanism are compared and contrasted with the more complex length-jump Huxley-Simmons phases in which all states that generate tension or bear tension are perturbed. The rate of the Huxley-Simmons phase 4 is temperature sensitive at low temperatures but plateaus at high temperatures, indicating a change in rate-limiting step from a temperature-sensitive (phase 4a) to a temperature-insensitive reaction (phase 4b); the latter appears to correlate with the slow, temperature-insensitive temperature-jump relaxation. Phase 3 is absent in the temperature-jump, which excludes it from tension generation. We confirm that de novo tension generation occurs as an order-disorder transition during phase 2slow and the equivalent, temperature-sensitive temperature-jump relaxation. PMID:7612845

  2. Immunomodulation of afferent neurons in guinea-pig isolated airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, M M; Myers, A C; Undem, B J

    1996-03-01

    1. The trachea, larynx and main bronchi with the right vagus nerve and nodose ganglion were isolated from guinea-pigs passively immunized 24 h previously with serum containing anti-ovalbumin antibody. 2. The airways were placed in one compartment of a Perspex chamber for recording of isometric tension while the nodose ganglion and attached vagus nerve were pulled into another compartment. Action potentials arriving from single airway afferent nerve endings were monitored extracellularly using a glass microelectrode positioned near neuronal cell bodies in the ganglion. Mechanosensitivity of the nerve endings was quantified using calibrated von Frey filaments immediately before and after exposure to antigen (10 micrograms ml-1 ovalbumin). 3. Ten endings responded to the force exerted by the lowest filament (0.078 mN) and were not further investigated. In airways from thirteen immunized guinea-pigs, the mechanical sensitivity of A delta afferent fibres (conduction velocity = 4.3 +/- 0.6 m s-1) was enhanced 4.1 +/- 0.9-fold following airway exposure to antigen (P action potential generation except in one instance when the receptive field was located over the smooth muscle. This ending also responded to methacholine suggesting that spatial changes in the receptive field, induced by muscle contraction, were responsible for the activation. 5. The mediators responsible for these effects are unknown, although histamine, prostaglandins, leukotrienes and tachykinins do not appear to be essential. The increase in mechanical responsiveness was not associated with the smooth muscle contraction since leukotriene C4, histamine and tachykinins, which all caused a similar contraction to antigen, did not affect mechanical thresholds. Moreover, the antigen-induced increases in excitability persisted beyond the duration of the smooth muscle contraction. 6. These results demonstrate that antigen-antibody-mediated inflammatory processes may enhance the excitability of vagal afferent

  3. Improvement of Endurance Based on Muscle Fiber-Type Composition by Treatment with Dietary Apple Polyphenols in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Mizunoya

    Full Text Available A recent study demonstrated a positive effect of apple polyphenol (APP intake on muscle endurance of young-adult animals. While an enhancement of lipid metabolism may be responsible, in part, for the improvement, the contributing mechanisms still need clarification. Here we show that an 8-week intake of 5% (w/w APP in the diet, up-regulates two features related to fiber type: the ratio of myosin heavy chain (MyHC type IIx/IIb and myoglobin protein expression in plantaris muscle of 9-week-old male Fischer F344 rats compared to pair-fed controls (P < 0.05. Results were demonstrated by our SDS-PAGE system specialized for MyHC isoform separation and western blotting of whole muscles. Animal-growth profiles (food intake, body-weight gain, and internal-organ weights did not differ between the control and 5% APP-fed animals (n = 9/group. Findings may account for the increase in fatigue resistance of lower hind limb muscles, as evidenced by a slower decline in the maximum isometric planter-flexion torque generated by a 100-s train of electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve. Additionally, the fatigue resistance was lower after 8 weeks of a 0.5% APP diet than after 5% APP, supporting an APP-dose dependency of the shift in fiber-type composition. Therefore, the present study highlights a promising contribution of dietary APP intake to increasing endurance based on fiber-type composition in rat muscle. Results may help in developing a novel strategy for application in animal sciences, and human sports and age-related health sciences.

  4. Cortical Presynaptic Control of Dorsal Horn C–Afferents in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Condés-Lara, Miguel; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Lamina 5 sensorimotor cortex pyramidal neurons project to the spinal cord, participating in the modulation of several modalities of information transmission. A well-studied mechanism by which the corticospinal projection modulates sensory information is primary afferent depolarization, which has been characterized in fast muscular and cutaneous, but not in slow-conducting nociceptive skin afferents. Here we investigated whether the inhibition of nociceptive sensory information, produced by activation of the sensorimotor cortex, involves a direct presynaptic modulation of C primary afferents. In anaesthetized male Wistar rats, we analyzed the effects of sensorimotor cortex activation on post tetanic potentiation (PTP) and the paired pulse ratio (PPR) of dorsal horn field potentials evoked by C–fiber stimulation in the sural (SU) and sciatic (SC) nerves. We also explored the time course of the excitability changes in nociceptive afferents produced by cortical stimulation. We observed that the development of PTP was completely blocked when C-fiber tetanic stimulation was paired with cortex stimulation. In addition, sensorimotor cortex activation by topical administration of bicuculline (BIC) produced a reduction in the amplitude of C–fiber responses, as well as an increase in the PPR. Furthermore, increases in the intraspinal excitability of slow-conducting fiber terminals, produced by sensorimotor cortex stimulation, were indicative of primary afferent depolarization. Topical administration of BIC in the spinal cord blocked the inhibition of C–fiber neuronal responses produced by cortical stimulation. Dorsal horn neurons responding to sensorimotor cortex stimulation also exhibited a peripheral receptive field and responded to stimulation of fast cutaneous myelinated fibers. Our results suggest that corticospinal inhibition of nociceptive responses is due in part to a modulation of the excitability of primary C–fibers by means of GABAergic inhibitory

  5. Qualitative-feed-restricted heavy swine: meat quality and morpho-histochemical characteristics of muscle fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Thomaz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of different levels of qualitative feed restriction (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% on pork quality and muscle morpho-histochemical characteristics, 60 castrated male swines were used. Ten animals were slaughtered at 89 kg BW. Other 50 pigs were fed experimental diets and slaughtered at 128 kg BW. Qualitative restriction increased pH45, and water holding capacity, and reduced the redness, yellowness and cholesterol concentrations of Longissimus lumborum. Quadratic tendency for oleic acid contents of loin and fiber cross-section area of Multifidus dorsi (P=0.08 were observed, with maximum point at 11-12% of restriction. No effect (P>0.1 on percentage of M. dorsi fibers SO, FG and FOG was found. The meat from 128-kg-BW pig showed numerically higher values for colorness, water losses, and lipid content and lower shear force than 89-kg-BW pigs. Qualitative feed restriction for finishing swines neither affected negatively pork quality nor modified the muscle fiber profile.Para avaliar o efeito de diferentes níveis de restrição alimentar qualitative (0, 5, 10, 15 e 20% sobre a qualidade da carne e características morfohistoquímicas musculares, sessenta suínos machos castrados foram utilizados. Dez suínos formaram o grupo abatido inicialmente (89 kg PV e outros 50 suínos foram alimentados com as dietas experimentais e foram abatidos aos 128 kg PV. A restrição qualitativa aumentou o pH45, e a capacidade de retenção de água, bem como reduziu a coloração vermelha e amarela, e o teor de colesterol do músculo Longissimus lumborum. Tendência quadrática para conteúdo de ácido oléico do lombo e da área de seção transversal do músculo Multifidus dorsi (P=0.08 foram observada, com ponto de máxima em11-12% de restrição. Não foi encontrado efeito (P>0.1 na porcentagem de fibras SO, FG e FOG no músculo Multifidus. A carne dos animais abatidos aos 128 kg PV apresentou valores numericamente maiores para coloração, perda de

  6. PHRED-1 is a divergent neurexin-1 homolog that organizes muscle fibers and patterns organs during regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Carolyn E; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2017-07-01

    Regeneration of body parts requires the replacement of multiple cell types. To dissect this complex process, we utilized planarian flatworms that are capable of regenerating any tissue after amputation. An RNAi screen for genes involved in regeneration of the pharynx identified a novel gene, Pharynx regeneration defective-1 (PHRED-1) as essential for normal pharynx regeneration. PHRED-1 is a predicted transmembrane protein containing EGF, Laminin G, and WD40 domains, is expressed in muscle, and has predicted homologs restricted to other lophotrochozoan species. Knockdown of PHRED-1 causes abnormal regeneration of muscle fibers in both the pharynx and body wall muscle. In addition to defects in muscle regeneration, knockdown of PHRED-1 or the bHLH transcription factor MyoD also causes defects in muscle and intestinal regeneration. Together, our data demonstrate that muscle plays a key role in restoring the structural integrity of closely associated organs, and in planarians it may form a scaffold that facilitates normal intestinal branching. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of cleft palate repair on the susceptibility to contraction-induced injury of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenitally-clefted goat palates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite cleft palate repair, velopharyngeal competence is not achieved in ~ 15% of patients, often necessitating secondary surgical correction. Velopharyngeal competence postrepair may require the conversion of levator veli palatini muscle fibers from injury-susceptible type 2 fibers to injury-resi...

  8. Coordinated increase in skeletal muscle fiber area and expression of IGF-I with resistance exercise in elderly post-operative patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Andersen, Jesper L

    2010-01-01

    Hypertrophy of developing skeletal muscle involves stimulation by insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), however, the role of IGF-I in adult muscle is less clarified. In the present study, the mRNA splice variants of IGF-I (IGF-IEa and MGF) and the changes in muscle fiber cross sectional area after...... and in addition induces marked increases in the expression of IGF-I splice variants, supporting the idea that IGF-I is involved in regulating muscle hypertrophy.......-operated-side served as a within subject control. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis of both limbs at +2d post-operative (baseline), at 5weeks and 12weeks post-surgery to analyze for changes in type 1 and type 2 muscle fiber area. Changes in expression levels of IGF-I mRNA isoforms were determined...

  9. [Changes in cell respiration of postural muscle fibers under long-term gravitational unloading after dietary succinate supplementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, I V; Veselova, O M; Larina, I M

    2011-01-01

    The intensity of cell respiration of the rat m. soleus, m. gastrocnemius c.m. and tibialis anterior fibers during 35-day gravitational unloading, with the addition of succinate in the diet at a dosage rate of 50 mg per 1 kg animal weight has been investigated. The gravitational unloading was modeled by antiorthostatic hindlimb suspension. The intensity of cell respiration was estimated by polarography. It was shown that the rate of oxygen consumption by soleus and gastrocnemius fibers on endogenous and exogenous substrates and with the addition of ADP decreases after the discharge. This may be associated with the transition to the glycolytic energy path due to a decrease in the EMG-activity. At the same time, the respiration rate after the addition of exogenous substrates in soleus fibers did not increase, indicating a disturbance in the function of the NCCR-section of the respiratory chain and more pronounced changes in the structure of muscle fibers. In tibialis anterior fibers, no changes in oxygen consumption velocity were observed. The introduction of succinate to the diet of rats makes it possible to prevent the negative effects of hypokinesia, although it reduces the basal level of intensity of cell respiration.

  10. Rem uncouples excitation–contraction coupling in adult skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beqollari, Donald; Romberg, Christin F.; Filipova, Dilyana; Meza, Ulises; Papadopoulos, Symeon

    2015-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, excitation–contraction (EC) coupling requires depolarization-induced conformational rearrangements in L-type Ca2+ channel (CaV1.1) to be communicated to the type 1 ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release channel (RYR1) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via transient protein–protein interactions. Although the molecular mechanism that underlies conformational coupling between CaV1.1 and RYR1 has been investigated intensely for more than 25 years, the question of whether such signaling occurs via a direct interaction between the principal, voltage-sensing α1S subunit of CaV1.1 and RYR1 or through an intermediary protein persists. A substantial body of evidence supports the idea that the auxiliary β1a subunit of CaV1.1 is a conduit for this intermolecular communication. However, a direct role for β1a has been difficult to test because β1a serves two other functions that are prerequisite for conformational coupling between CaV1.1 and RYR1. Specifically, β1a promotes efficient membrane expression of CaV1.1 and facilitates the tetradic ultrastructural arrangement of CaV1.1 channels within plasma membrane–SR junctions. In this paper, we demonstrate that overexpression of the RGK protein Rem, an established β subunit–interacting protein, in adult mouse flexor digitorum brevis fibers markedly reduces voltage-induced myoplasmic Ca2+ transients without greatly affecting CaV1.1 targeting, intramembrane gating charge movement, or releasable SR Ca2+ store content. In contrast, a β1a-binding–deficient Rem triple mutant (R200A/L227A/H229A) has little effect on myoplasmic Ca2+ release in response to membrane depolarization. Thus, Rem effectively uncouples the voltage sensors of CaV1.1 from RYR1-mediated SR Ca2+ release via its ability to interact with β1a. Our findings reveal Rem-expressing adult muscle as an experimental system that may prove useful in the definition of the precise role of the β1a subunit in skeletal-type EC coupling. PMID:26078055

  11. Modulation of the masseteric reflex by gastric vagal afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettorossi, V E

    1983-04-01

    Several investigations have shown that the vagal nerve can affect the reflex responses of the masticatory muscles acting at level either of trigeminal motoneurons or of the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (MTN). The present experiments have been devoted to establish the origin of the vagal afferent fibres involved in modulating the masseteric reflex. In particular, the gastric vagal afferents were taken into consideration and selective stimulations of such fibres were performed in rabbit. Conditioning electrical stimulation of truncus vagalis ventralis (TVV) reduced the excitability of the MTN cells as shown by a decrease of the antidromic response recorded from the semilunar ganglion and elicited by MTN single-shock electrical stimulation. Sympathetic and cardiovascular influences were not involved in these responses. Mechanical stimulation of gastric receptors, by means of gastric distension, clearly diminished the amplitude of twitch tension of masseteric reflex and inhibited the discharge frequency of proprioceptive MTN units. The effect was phasic and depended upon the velocity of distension. Thus the sensory volleys originating from rapid adapting receptors reach the brain stem through vagal afferents and by means of a polysynaptic connection inhibits the masseteric reflex at level of MTN cells.

  12. Caloric restriction induces energy-sparing alterations in skeletal muscle contraction, fiber composition and local thyroid hormone metabolism that persist during catch-up fat upon refeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Bresciani M. De Andrade

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Weight regain after caloric restriction results in accelerated fat storage in adipose tissue. This catch-up fat phenomenon is postulated to result partly from suppressed skeletal muscle thermogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated whether the reduced rate of skeletal muscle contraction-relaxation cycle that occurs after caloric restriction persists during weight recovery and could contribute to catch-up fat. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding, in which fat recovery is driven by suppressed thermogenesis, we show that contraction and relaxation of leg muscles are slower after both semistarvation and refeeding. These effects are associated with (i higher expression of muscle deiodinase type 3 (DIO3 which inactivates tri-iodothyronine (T3, and lower expression of T3-activating enzyme, deiodinase type 2 (DIO2, (ii slower net formation of T3 from its T4 precursor in muscles, and (iii accumulation of slow fibers at the expense of fast fibers. These semistarvation-induced changes persisted during recovery and correlated with impaired expression of transcription factors involved in slow-twitch muscle development.We conclude that diminished muscle thermogenesis following caloric restriction results from reduced muscle T3 levels, alteration in muscle-specific transcription factors, and fast-to-slow fiber shift causing slower contractility. Energy-sparing effects persist during weight recovery and likely contribute to catch-up fat.

  13. Caloric restriction induces energy-sparing alterations in skeletal muscle contraction, fiber composition and local thyroid hormone metabolism that persist during catch-up fat upon refeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Andrade, Paula B M; Neff, Laurence A; Strosova, Miriam K; Arsenijevic, Denis; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophélie; Scapozza, Leonardo; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T; Dulloo, Abdul G; Dorchies, Olivier M

    2015-01-01

    Weight regain after caloric restriction results in accelerated fat storage in adipose tissue. This catch-up fat phenomenon is postulated to result partly from suppressed skeletal muscle thermogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated whether the reduced rate of skeletal muscle contraction-relaxation cycle that occurs after caloric restriction persists during weight recovery and could contribute to catch-up fat. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding, in which fat recovery is driven by suppressed thermogenesis, we show that contraction and relaxation of leg muscles are slower after both semistarvation and refeeding. These effects are associated with (i) higher expression of muscle deiodinase type 3 (DIO3), which inactivates tri-iodothyronine (T3), and lower expression of T3-activating enzyme, deiodinase type 2 (DIO2), (ii) slower net formation of T3 from its T4 precursor in muscles, and (iii) accumulation of slow fibers at the expense of fast fibers. These semistarvation-induced changes persisted during recovery and correlated with impaired expression of transcription factors involved in slow-twitch muscle development. We conclude that diminished muscle thermogenesis following caloric restriction results from reduced muscle T3 levels, alteration in muscle-specific transcription factors, and fast-to-slow fiber shift causing slower contractility. These energy-sparing effects persist during weight recovery and contribute to catch-up fat.

  14. miR-206 represses hypertrophy of myogenic cells but not muscle fibers via inhibition of HDAC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winbanks, Catherine E; Beyer, Claudia; Hagg, Adam; Qian, Hongwei; Sepulveda, Patricio V; Gregorevic, Paul

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs regulate the development of myogenic progenitors, and the formation of skeletal muscle fibers. However, the role miRNAs play in controlling the growth and adaptation of post-mitotic musculature is less clear. Here, we show that inhibition of the established pro-myogenic regulator miR-206 can promote hypertrophy and increased protein synthesis in post-mitotic cells of the myogenic lineage. We have previously demonstrated that histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) is a target of miR-206 in the regulation of myogenic differentiation. We confirmed that inhibition of miR-206 de-repressed HDAC4 accumulation in cultured myotubes. Importantly, inhibition of HDAC4 activity by valproic acid or sodium butyrate prevented hypertrophy of myogenic cells otherwise induced by inhibition of miR-206. To test the significance of miRNA-206 as a regulator of skeletal muscle mass in vivo, we designed recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV6 vectors) expressing miR-206, or a miR-206 "sponge," featuring repeats of a validated miR-206 target sequence. We observed that over-expression or inhibition of miR-206 in the muscles of mice decreased or increased endogenous HDAC4 levels respectively, but did not alter muscle mass or myofiber size. We subsequently manipulated miR-206 levels in muscles undergoing follistatin-induced hypertrophy or denervation-induced atrophy (models of muscle adaptation where endogenous miR-206 expression is altered). Vector-mediated manipulation of miR-206 activity in these models of cell growth and wasting did not alter gain or loss of muscle mass respectively. Our data demonstrate that although the miR-206/HDAC4 axis operates in skeletal muscle, the post-natal expression of miR-206 is not a key regulator of basal skeletal muscle mass or specific modes of muscle growth and wasting. These studies support a context-dependent role of miR-206 in regulating hypertrophy that may be dispensable for maintaining or modifying the adult skeletal muscle phenotype

  15. Diaphragm muscle fiber dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: toward a pathophysiological concept.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottenheijm, C.A.C.; Heunks, L.M.A.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.

    2007-01-01

    Inspiratory muscle weakness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is of major clinical relevance; maximum inspiratory pressure generation is an independent determinant of survival in severe COPD. Traditionally, inspiratory muscle weakness has been ascribed to

  16. Intramyocellular lipid dependence on skeletal muscle fiber type and orientation characterized by diffusion tensor imaging and 1H-MRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaparla, Sunil K.; Gao, Feng; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Clarke, Geoffrey D.

    2014-03-01

    When muscle fibers are aligned with the B0 field, intramyocellular lipids (IMCL), important for providing energy during physical activity, can be resolved in proton magnetic resonance spectra (1H-MRS). Various muscles of the leg differ significantly in their proportion of fibers and angular distribution. This study determined the influence of muscle fiber type and orientation on IMCL using 1H-MRS and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Muscle fiber orientation relative to B0 was estimated by pennation angle (PA) measurements from DTI, providing orientation-specific extramyocellular lipid (EMCL) chemical shift data that were used for subject-specific IMCL quantification. Vastus lateralis (VL), tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SO) muscles of 6 healthy subjects (21-40 yrs) were studied on a Siemens 3T MRI system with a flex 4-channel coil. 1H-MRS were acquired using stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM, TR=3s, TE=270ms). DTI was performed using single shot EPI (b=600s/mm2, 30 directions, TR=4.5s, TE=82ms, and ten×5mm slices) with center slice indexed to the MRS voxel. The average PA's measured from ROI analysis of primary eigenvectors were PA=19.46+/-5.43 for unipennate VL, 15.65+/-3.73 for multipennate SO, and 7.04+/-3.34 for bipennate TA. Chemical shift (CS) was calculated using [3cos2θ-1] dependence: 0.17+/-0.02 for VL, 0.18+/-0.01 for SO and 0.19+/-0.004 ppm for TA. IMCL-CH2 concentrations from spectral analysis were 12.77+/-6.3 for VL, 3.07+/-1.63 for SO and 0.27+/-0.08 mmol/kg ww for TA. Small PA's were measured in TA and large CS with clear separation between EMCL and IMCL peaks were observed. Larger variations in PA were measured VL and SO resulting in an increased overlap of the EMCL on IMCL peaks.

  17. Gene regulation mediating fiber-type transformation in skeletal muscle cells is partly glucose- and ChREBP-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Nina; Scheibe, Renate J; Manukjan, Georgi; Ewers, David; Umeda, Patrick K; Chang, Kin-Chow; Kubis, Hans-Peter; Gros, Gerolf; Meissner, Joachim D

    2011-03-01

    Adaptations in the oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle cells can occur under several physiological or pathological conditions. We investigated the effect of increasing extracellular glucose concentration on the expression of markers of energy metabolism in primary skeletal muscle cells and the C2C12 muscle cell line. Growth of myotubes in 25mM glucose (high glucose, HG) compared with 5.55mM led to increases in the expression and activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a marker of glycolytic energy metabolism, while oxidative markers peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and citrate synthase decreased. HG induced metabolic adaptations as are seen during a slow-to-fast fiber transformation. Furthermore, HG increased fast myosin heavy chain (MHC) IId/x but did not change slow MHCI/β expression. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) was shown to mediate the effects of HG on GAPDH and MHCIId/x. Carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), a glucose-dependent transcription factor downstream of PP2A, partially mediated the effects of glucose on metabolic markers. The glucose-induced increase in PP2A activity was associated with an increase in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, which presumably mediates the increase in MHCIId/x promoter activity. Liver X receptor, another possible mediator of glucose effects, induced only an incomplete metabolic shift, mainly increasing the expression of the glycolytic marker. Taken together, HG induces a partial slow-to-fast transformation comprising metabolic enzymes together with an increased expression of MHCIId/x. This work demonstrates a functional role for ChREBP in determining the metabolic type of muscle fibers and highlights the importance of glucose as a signaling molecule in muscle. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Afferent Endocrine Control of Eating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhans, Wolfgang; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    The afferent endocrine factors that control eating can be separated into different categories. One obvious categorization is by the time course of their effects, with long-term factors that signal adiposity and short-term factors that operate within the time frame of single meals. The second...... obvious categorization is by the origin of the endocrine signalling molecules. The level of knowledge concerning the physiological mechanisms and relevance of the hormones that are implicated in the control of eating is clearly different. With the accumulating knowledge about the hormones' actions......, various criteria have been developed for when the effect of a hormone can be considered 'physiologic'. This chapter treats the hormones separately and categorizes them by origin. It discusses ALL hormones that are implicated in eating control such as Gastrointestinal (GI) hormone and glucagon-like peptide...

  19. Withdrawal and restoration of central vagal afferents within the dorsal vagal complex following subdiaphragmatic vagotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, James H; Gallaher, Zachary R; Ryu, Vitaly; Czaja, Krzysztof

    2013-10-15

    Vagotomy, a severing of the peripheral axons of the vagus nerve, has been extensively utilized to determine the role of vagal afferents in viscerosensory signaling. Vagotomy is also an unavoidable component of some bariatric surgeries. Although it is known that peripheral axons of the vagus nerve degenerate and then regenerate to a limited extent following vagotomy, very little is known about the response of central vagal afferents in the dorsal vagal complex to this type of damage. We tested the hypothesis that vagotomy results in the transient withdrawal of central vagal afferent terminals from their primary central target, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral subdiaphragmatic vagotomy and were sacrificed 10, 30, or 60 days later. Plastic changes in vagal afferent fibers and synapses were investigated at the morphological and functional levels by using a combination of an anterograde tracer, synapse-specific markers, and patch-clamp electrophysiology in horizontal brain sections. Morphological data revealed that numbers of vagal afferent fibers and synapses in the NTS were significantly reduced 10 days following vagotomy and were restored to control levels by 30 days and 60 days, respectively. Electrophysiology revealed transient decreases in spontaneous glutamate release, glutamate release probability, and the number of primary afferent inputs. Our results demonstrate that subdiaphragmatic vagotomy triggers transient withdrawal and remodeling of central vagal afferent terminals in the NTS. The observed vagotomy-induced plasticity within this key feeding center of the brain may be partially responsible for the response of bariatric patients following gastric bypass surgery. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Coupling between skeletal muscle fiber size and capillarization is maintained during healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnouin, Yoann; McPhee, Jamie S; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Bosutti, Alessandra; De Vito, Giuseppe; Jones, David A; Narici, Marco; Behin, Anthony; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Degens, Hans

    2017-08-01

    As muscle capillarization is related to the oxidative capacity of the muscle and the size of muscle fibres, capillary rarefaction may contribute to sarcopenia and functional impairment in older adults. Therefore, it is important to assess how ageing affects muscle capillarization and the interrelationship between fibre capillary supply with the oxidative capacity and size of the fibres. Muscle biopsies from healthy recreationally active young (22 years; 14 men and 5 women) and older (74 years; 22 men and 6 women) people were assessed for muscle capillarization and the distribution of capillaries with the method of capillary domains. Oxidative capacity of muscle fibres was assessed with quantitative histochemistry for succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity. There was no significant age-related reduction in muscle fibre oxidative capacity. Despite 18% type II fibre atrophy (P = 0.019) and 23% fewer capillaries per fibre (P age and sex. Based on SDH, the maximal oxygen consumption supported by a capillary did not differ significantly between young and old people. The similar quantitative and qualitative distribution of capillaries within muscle from healthy recreationally active older people and young adults indicates that the age-related capillary rarefaction, which does occur, nevertheless maintains the coupling between skeletal muscle fibre size and capillarization during healthy ageing. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  1. The delayed rectifier potassium conductance in the sarcolemma and the transverse tubular system membranes of mammalian skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFranco, Marino; Quinonez, Marbella

    2012-01-01

    A two-microelectrode voltage clamp and optical measurements of membrane potential changes at the transverse tubular system (TTS) were used to characterize delayed rectifier K currents (IKV) in murine muscle fibers stained with the potentiometric dye di-8-ANEPPS. In intact fibers, IKV displays the canonical hallmarks of KV channels: voltage-dependent delayed activation and decay in time. The voltage dependence of the peak conductance (gKV) was only accounted for by double Boltzmann fits, suggesting at least two channel contributions to IKV. Osmotically treated fibers showed significant disconnection of the TTS and displayed smaller IKV, but with similar voltage dependence and time decays to intact fibers. This suggests that inactivation may be responsible for most of the decay in IKV records. A two-channel model that faithfully simulates IKV records in osmotically treated fibers comprises a low threshold and steeply voltage-dependent channel (channel A), which contributes ∼31% of gKV, and a more abundant high threshold channel (channel B), with shallower voltage dependence. Significant expression of the IKV1.4 and IKV3.4 channels was demonstrated by immunoblotting. Rectangular depolarizing pulses elicited step-like di-8-ANEPPS transients in intact fibers rendered electrically passive. In contrast, activation of IKV resulted in time- and voltage-dependent attenuations in optical transients that coincided in time with the peaks of IKV records. Normalized peak attenuations showed the same voltage dependence as peak IKV plots. A radial cable model including channels A and B and K diffusion in the TTS was used to simulate IKV and average TTS voltage changes. Model predictions and experimental data were compared to determine what fraction of gKV in the TTS accounted simultaneously for the electrical and optical data. Best predictions suggest that KV channels are approximately equally distributed in the sarcolemma and TTS membranes; under these conditions, >70% of IKV

  2. Abdominal and internal intercostal motoneurones are strong synergists for expiration but are not synergists for Group I monosynaptic afferent inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ford, Tim W; Meehan, Claire Francesca; Kirkwood, Peter

    2014-01-01

    , 9 being in Group B Dist motoneurones. The complete absence of heteronymous monosynaptic Group I reflex excitation between muscles that are synergistically activated in expiration leads us to conclude that such connections from muscle spindle afferents of the thoracic nerves have little role...... in controlling expiratory movements but, where present, support other motor acts....

  3. Improvement of Endurance Based on Muscle Fiber-Type Composition by Treatment with Dietary Apple Polyphenols in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Miyahara, Hideo; Okamoto, Shinpei; Akahoshi, Mariko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Do, Mai-Khoi Q; Ohtsubo, Hideaki; Komiya, Yusuke; Lan, Mu; Waga, Toshiaki; Iwata, Akira; Nakazato, Koichi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide; Anderson, Judy E; Tatsumi, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    A recent study demonstrated a positive effect of apple polyphenol (APP) intake on muscle endurance of young-adult animals. While an enhancement of lipid metabolism may be responsible, in part, for the improvement, the contributing mechanisms still need clarification. Here we show that an 8-week intake of 5% (w/w) APP in the diet, up-regulates two features related to fiber type: the ratio of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) type IIx/IIb and myoglobin protein expression in plantaris muscle of 9-week-old male Fischer F344 rats compared to pair-fed controls (P strategy for application in animal sciences, and human sports and age-related health sciences.

  4. Effect of speed endurance training and reduced training volume on running economy and single muscle fiber adaptations in trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Casper; Christiansen, Danny; Christensen, Peter M; Almquist, Nicki W; Thomassen, Martin; Bangsbo, Jens

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether improved running economy with a period of speed endurance training and reduced training volume could be related to adaptations in specific muscle fibers. Twenty trained male (n = 14) and female (n = 6) runners (maximum oxygen consumption (VO 2 -max): 56.4 ± 4.6 mL/min/kg) completed a 40-day intervention with 10 sessions of speed endurance training (5-10 × 30-sec maximal running) and a reduced (36%) volume of training. Before and after the intervention, a muscle biopsy was obtained at rest, and an incremental running test to exhaustion was performed. In addition, running at 60% vVO 2 -max, and a 10-km run was performed in a normal and a muscle slow twitch (ST) glycogen-depleted condition. After compared to before the intervention, expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) was lower (P economy at 60% vVO 2 -max (11.6 ± 0.2 km/h) and at v10-km (13.7 ± 0.3 km/h) was ~2% better (P economy with intense training may be related to changes in expression of proteins linked to energy consuming processes in primarily ST muscle fibers. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  5. Preslaughter Transport Effect on Broiler Meat Quality and Post-mortem Glycolysis Metabolism of Muscles with Different Fiber Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Li, Jiaolong; Cong, Jiahui; Chen, Xiangxing; Zhu, Xudong; Zhang, Lin; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2017-11-29

    Preslaughter transport has been reported to decrease the quality of breast meat but not thigh meat of broilers. However, tissue-specific difference in glycogen metabolism between breast and thigh muscles of transported broilers has not been well studied. We thus investigated the differences in meat quality, adenosine phosphates, glycolysis, and bound key enzymes associated with glycolysis metabolism in skeletal muscles with different fiber types of preslaughter transported broilers during summer. Compared to a 0.5 h transport, a 3 h transport during summer decreased ATP content, increased AMP content and AMP/ATP ratio, and accelerated glycolysis metabolism via the upregulation of glycogen phosphorylase expression accompanied by increased activities of bound glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase) in pectoralis major muscle, which subsequently increased the likelihood of pale, soft, and exudative-like breast meat. On the other hand, a 3 h transport induced only a moderate glycolysis metabolism in tibialis anterior muscle, which did not cause any noticeable changes in the quality traits of the thigh meat.

  6. The Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Active Hyperemia: The Differential Role of Adenosine in Muscles of Varied Fiber Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-21

    cyclase mediates the coronary relaxation induced by adenosine. Adenosine-induced relaxation is accompanied by cyclic AMP accumulation in bovine ...and the reaction was started by adding 0.01 ml L-glutamic dehydrogenase ( bovine liver; 1200 U•ml-1 in SO% glycerol and vhosphate buffer; p~ 7.4...Physiol: London 68: 213-237, 1929. Dudley, G.A. and R.L. Terjung. Influence of acidosis on AMP deaTIIinase activity in contracting fast-twitch muscle

  7. Experiment K-6-21. Effect of microgravity on 1) metabolic enzymes of type 1 and type 2 muscle fibers and on 2) metabolic enzymes, neutransmitter amino acids, and neurotransmitter associated enzymes in motor and somatosensory cerebral cortex. Part 1: Metabolic enzymes of individual muscle fibers; part 2: metabolic enzymes of hippocampus and spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, O.; Mcdougal, D., Jr.; Nemeth, Patti M.; Maggie, M.-Y. Chi; Pusateri, M.; Carter, J.; Manchester, J.; Norris, Beverly; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The individual fibers of any individual muscle vary greatly in enzyme composition, a fact which is obscured when enzyme levels of a whole muscle are measured. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the changes due to weightless on the enzyme patterns composed by the individual fibers within the flight muscles. In spite of the limitation in numbers of muscles examined, it is apparent that: (1) that the size of individual fibers (i.e., their dry weight) was reduced about a third, (2) that this loss in dry mass was accompanied by changes in the eight enzymes studied, and (3) that these changes were different for the two muscles, and different for the two enzyme groups. In the soleus muscle the absolute amounts of the three enzymes of oxidative metabolism decreased about in proportion to the dry weight loss, so that their concentration in the atrophic fibers was almost unchanged. In contrast, there was little loss among the four enzymes of glycogenolysis - glycolysis so that their concentrations were substantially increased in the atrophic fibers. In the TA muscle, these seven enzymes were affected in just the opposite direction. There appeared to be no absolute loss among the oxidative enzymes, whereas the glycogenolytic enzymes were reduced by nearly half, so that the concentrations of the first metabolic group were increased within the atrophic fibers and the concentrations of the second group were only marginally decreased. The behavior of hexokinase was exceptional in that it did not decrease in absolute terms in either type of muscle and probably increased as much as 50 percent in soleus. Thus, their was a large increase in concentration of this enzyme in the atrophied fibers of both muscles. Another clear-cut finding was the large increase in the range of activities of the glycolytic enzymes among individual fibers of TA muscles. This was due to the emergence of TA fibers with activities for enzymes of this group extending down to levels as low as

  8. Muscle spindles exhibit core lesions and extensive degeneration of intrafusal fibers in the Ryr1I4895T/wt mouse model of core myopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvaritch, Elena; MacLennan, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle spindles from the hind limb muscles of adult Ryr1 I4895T/wt (IT/+) mice exhibit severe structural abnormalities. Up to 85% of the spindles are separated from skeletal muscle fascicles by a thick layer of connective tissue. Many intrafusal fibers exhibit degeneration, with Z-line streaming, compaction and collapse of myofibrillar bundles, mitochondrial clumping, nuclear shrinkage and pyknosis. The lesions resemble cores observed in the extrafusal myofibers of this animal model and of core myopathy patients. Spindle abnormalities precede those in extrafusal fibers, indicating that they are a primary pathological feature in this murine Ryr1-related core myopathy. Muscle spindle involvement, if confirmed for human core myopathy patients, would provide an explanation for an array of devastating clinical features characteristic of these diseases and provide novel insights into the pathology of RYR1-related myopathies. - Highlights: • Muscle spindles exhibit structural abnormalities in a mouse model of core myopathy. • Myofibrillar collapse and mitochondrial clumping is observed in intrafusal fibers. • Myofibrillar degeneration follows a pattern similar to core formation in extrafusal myofibers. • Muscle spindle abnormalities are a part of the pathological phenotype in the mouse model of core myopathy. • Direct involvement of muscle spindles in the pathology of human RYR1-related myopathies is proposed

  9. Physiological properties of afferents to the rat cerebellum during normal development and after postnatal x irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puro, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    The consequences of an altered cerebellar cortical development on afferent transmission and terminal organization were analyzed in adult rats which had received x irradiation to the cerebellum postnatally. Rats, anesthetized with 0.5 percent halothane, were studied in various ages from day 3 to adult. The ascending mossy and climbing fiber systems were activated by electrical stimulation of the limbs with needle electrodes. Stimulation of the motor cortex activated the descending climbing fiber pathways. Extracellular responses from cerebellar Purkinje cells were observed on an oscilloscope as poststimulus time histograms were constructed ''on-line''. Conclusions and assertions include: (1) Synaptogenesis between incoming afferent fibers and target neurons takes place early in cerebellar cortical development. (2) Mossy fiber transmission is mature before the bulk of cerebellar synaptogenesis occurs. (3) The ascending and descending components of the climbing fiber system mature, with respect to latency, in synchrony. (4) The terminal synaptic organization has little effect on the development of transmission characteristics in these afferent systems. (5) One possible mechanism by which an adult neural structure can have an abnormal synaptic organization is to maintain immature synaptic relationships due to the neonatal loss of interneurons

  10. Predicted high-performing piglets exhibit more and larger skeletal muscle fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paredes Escobar, S.P.; Kalbe, C.; Jansman, A.J.M.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Hees, van H.M.J.; Lösel, D.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Rehfeldt, C.

    2013-01-01

    Postnatal (muscle) growth potential in pigs depends on the total number and hypertrophy of myofibers in skeletal muscle tissue. In a previous study an algorithm was developed to predict piglet BW at the end of the nursery period (10 wk of age) on the basis of BW at birth, at weaning, and at 6 wk of

  11. SB431542 treatment promotes the hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers but decreases specific force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watt, K.I.; Jaspers, R.T.; Atherton, P.; Smith, K.; Rennie, M.J.; Ratkevicius, A.; Wackerhage, H.

    2010-01-01

    The small molecule inhibitor SB431542 inhibits activin type I receptors. The muscle growth-inhibitor myostatin binds to and signals via these receptors. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that SB431542 can inhibit myostatinrelated Smad signaling and induce muscle growth in cultured

  12. Mechano- and metabosensitive alterations after injection of botulinum toxin into gastrocnemius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Guillaume; Rouzi, Talifujiang; Grelot, Laurent; Magalon, Guy; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of motor denervation by Clostridium botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A) on the afferent activity of fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were randomized in two groups, 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle. Locomotor activity was evaluated once per day during 12 days with a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats (sciatic functional index). At the end of the functional assessment period, electrophysiological tests were used to measure muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to chemical (KCl and lactic acid) injections, electrically induced fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations. Additionally, ventilatory response was recorded during repetitive muscle contractions. Then, rats were sacrificed, and the BoNT/A-injected muscles were weighed. Twelve days postinjection we observed a complete motor denervation associated with a significant muscle atrophy and loss of force to direct muscle stimulation. In the BoNT/A group, the metabosensitive responses to KCl injections were unaltered. However, we observed alterations in responses to EIF and to 1 mM of lactic acid (which induces the greatest activation). The ventilatory adjustments during repetitive muscle activation were abolished, and the mechanosensitive fiber responses to tendon vibrations were reduced. These results indicate that BoNT/A alters the sensorimotor loop and may induce insufficient motor and physiological adjustments in patients in whom a motor denervation with BoNT/A was performed. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Kinetics of contraction-induced GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle fibers from living mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans Peter M. Mortensen; Galbo, Henrik; Toyoda, Taro

    2010-01-01

    Exercise is an important strategy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This is due in part to an increase in glucose transport that occurs in the working skeletal muscles. Glucose transport is regulated by GLUT4 translocation in muscle, but the molecular machinery mediating this process is poorl...... understood. The purpose of this study was to 1) use a novel imaging system to elucidate the kinetics of contraction-induced GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle and 2) determine the function of AMP-activated protein kinase alpha2 (AMPKalpha2) in this process.......Exercise is an important strategy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This is due in part to an increase in glucose transport that occurs in the working skeletal muscles. Glucose transport is regulated by GLUT4 translocation in muscle, but the molecular machinery mediating this process is poorly...

  14. De novo synthesis of purine nucleotides in different fiber types of rat skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullson, P.C.; John-Alder, H.; Hood, D.A.; Terjung, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The contribution of de novo purine nucleotide synthesis to nucleotide metabolism in skeletal muscles is not known. The authors have determined rates of de novo synthesis in soleus (slow-twitch red), red gastrocnemius (fast-twitch red), and white gastrocnemius (fast-twitch white) using the perfused rat hindquarter. 14 C glycine incorporation into ATP was linear after 1 and 2 hours of perfusion with 0.2 mM added glycine. The intracellular (I) and extracellular (E) specific activity of 14 C glycine was determined by HPLC of phenylisothiocyanate derivatives of neutralized PCA extracts. The rates of de novo synthesis when expressed relative to muscle ATP content show slow and fast-twitch red muscles to be similar and about twice as great as fast-twitch white muscles. This could represent a greater turnover of the adenine nucleotide pool in more oxidative red muscle types

  15. The influence of temperature on the distribution and intensity of the reaction product in rat muscle fibers obtained with the histochemical method for myosin ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Tuxen, A

    1989-01-01

    The influence of temperature in the incubation medium on the localization and intensity of myosin ATPase was investigated in striated muscles from the rat using a conventional histochemical technique. It was found that the enzyme reaction was temperature-dependent since the activity in some fibers...... was raised and in others was depressed by alteration of the incubation temperature. There was no obvious correlation between the temperature sensitivity of ATPase in the muscle fibers and their activity for succinic dehydrogenase. It is proposed that the histochemical method for myosin ATPase can be used...

  16. Peptide and lipid modulation of glutamatergic afferent synaptic transmission in the solitary tract nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Andresen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The brainstem nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS holds the first central neurons in major homeostatic reflex pathways. These homeostatic reflexes regulate and coordinate multiple organ systems from gastrointestinal to cardiopulmonary functions. The core of many of these pathways arise from cranial visceral afferent neurons that enter the brain as the solitary tract (ST with more than two-thirds arising from the gastrointestinal system. About one quarter of ST afferents have myelinated axons but the majority are classed as unmyelinated C-fibers. All ST afferents release the fast neurotransmitter glutamate with remarkably similar, high-probability release characteristics. Second order NTS neurons receive surprisingly limited primary afferent information with one or two individual inputs converging on single second order NTS neurons. A- and C-fiber afferents never mix at NTS second order neurons. Many transmitters modify the basic glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC often by reducing glutamate release or interrupting terminal depolarization. Thus, a distinguishing feature of ST transmission is presynaptic expression of G-protein coupled receptors for peptides common to peripheral or forebrain (e.g. hypothalamus neuron sources. Presynaptic receptors for angiotensin (AT1, vasopressin (V1a, oxytocin (OT, opioid (MOR, ghrelin (GHSR1 and cholecystokinin (CCK differentially control glutamate release on particular subsets of neurons with most other ST afferents unaffected. Lastly, lipid-like signals are transduced by two key ST presynaptic receptors, the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 and the cannabinoid receptor (CB1 that oppositely control glutamate release. Increasing evidence suggests that peripheral nervous signaling mechanisms are repurposed at central terminals to control excitation and are major sites of signal integration of peripheral and central inputs particularly from the hypothalamus.

  17. Fiber orientation measurements by diffusion tensor imaging improve hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy of intramyocellular lipids in human leg muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaparla, Sunil K; Gao, Feng; Daniele, Giuseppe; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Clarke, Geoffrey D

    2015-04-01

    Twelve healthy subjects underwent hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([Formula: see text]) acquisition ([Formula: see text]), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with a [Formula: see text]-value of [Formula: see text], and fat-water magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using the Dixon method. Subject-specific muscle fiber orientation, derived from DTI, was used to estimate the lipid proton spectral chemical shift. Pennation angles were measured as 23.78 deg in vastus lateralis (VL), 17.06 deg in soleus (SO), and 8.49 deg in tibialis anterior (TA) resulting in a chemical shift between extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) of 0.15, 0.17, and 0.19 ppm, respectively. IMCL concentrations were [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] in SO, VL, and TA, respectively. Significant differences were observed in IMCL and EMCL pairwise comparisons in SO, VL, and TA ([Formula: see text]). Strong correlations were observed between total fat fractions from [Formula: see text] and Dixon MRI for VL ([Formula: see text]), SO ([Formula: see text]), and TA ([Formula: see text]). Bland-Altman analysis between fat fractions (FFMRS and FFMRI) showed good agreement with small limits of agreement (LoA): [Formula: see text] (LoA: [Formula: see text] to 0.69%) in VL, [Formula: see text] (LoA: [Formula: see text] to 1.33%) in SO, and [Formula: see text] (LoA: [Formula: see text] to 0.47%) in TA. The results of this study demonstrate the variation in muscle fiber orientation and lipid concentrations in these three skeletal muscle types.

  18. Kinetics of contraction-induced GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle fibers from living mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans Peter M. Mortensen; Galbo, Henrik; Toyoda, Taro

    2010-01-01

    Exercise is an important strategy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This is due in part to an increase in glucose transport that occurs in the working skeletal muscles. Glucose transport is regulated by GLUT4 translocation in muscle, but the molecular machinery mediating this process is poorly...... understood. The purpose of this study was to 1) use a novel imaging system to elucidate the kinetics of contraction-induced GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle and 2) determine the function of AMP-activated protein kinase alpha2 (AMPKalpha2) in this process....

  19. Potassium-transporting proteins in skeletal muscle: cellular location and fiber-type differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Juel, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Potassium (K+) displacement in skeletal muscle may be an important factor in the development of muscle fatigue during intense exercise. It has been shown in vitro that an increase in the extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]e) to values higher than approx. 10 mm significantly reduce force developm......Potassium (K+) displacement in skeletal muscle may be an important factor in the development of muscle fatigue during intense exercise. It has been shown in vitro that an increase in the extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]e) to values higher than approx. 10 mm significantly reduce force......, but is suggested primarily to participate in K+ release to the interstitium. Because there is restricted diffusion of K+ to the interstitium, K+ released to the T-tubules during AP propagation will be removed primarily by reuptake mediated by transport proteins located in the T-tubule membrane. The most important...

  20. Afferent connectivity of the zebrafish habenulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Jane Turner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates.Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish.We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis,posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe, olfactory bulb to the right habenula and from the parapineal to the lefthabenula.In addition,we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus(vENT,confirming and extending observations of Amo et al.(2014.Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hpf.No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus(dENT.Consequently,we confirm that the vENT(and not the dENT should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus proper in zebrafish.Furthermore,comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus,being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals(internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates by both embryonic origin and projections,as previously suggested by Amo et al.(2014.Key words: habenula,connections,afferents,entopeduncular nucleus,posterior tuberculum,basal ganglia,zebrafish

  1. Afferent Connectivity of the Zebrafish Habenulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katherine J.; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Yáñez, Julián; Anadón, Ramón; Wilson, Stephen W.; Folgueira, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are bilateral nuclei located in the dorsal diencephalon that are conserved across vertebrates. Here we describe the main afferents to the habenulae in larval and adult zebrafish. We observe afferents from the subpallium, nucleus rostrolateralis, posterior tuberculum, posterior hypothalamic lobe, median raphe; we also see asymmetric afferents from olfactory bulb to the right habenula, and from the parapineal to the left habenula. In addition, we find afferents from a ventrolateral telencephalic nucleus that neurochemical and hodological data identify as the ventral entopeduncular nucleus (vENT), confirming and extending observations of Amo et al. (2014). Fate map and marker studies suggest that vENT originates from the diencephalic prethalamic eminence and extends into the lateral telencephalon from 48 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). No afferents to the habenula were observed from the dorsal entopeduncular nucleus (dENT). Consequently, we confirm that the vENT (and not the dENT) should be considered as the entopeduncular nucleus “proper” in zebrafish. Furthermore, comparison with data in other vertebrates suggests that the vENT is a conserved basal ganglia nucleus, being homologous to the entopeduncular nucleus of mammals (internal segment of the globus pallidus of primates) by both embryonic origin and projections, as previously suggested by Amo et al. (2014). PMID:27199671

  2. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meals instead of white rice. Add beans (kidney, black, navy, and pinto) to rice dishes for even more fiber. Spice up salads with berries and almonds, chickpeas, cooked artichokes, and beans (kidney, black, navy, or pinto). Use whole-grain (corn or ...

  3. Movement and afferent representations in human motor areas: a simultaneous neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic/peripheral nerve-stimulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi eShitara

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to primary motor cortex (M1 is an emerging technique that can examine motor-system functionality through evoked activity. However, because sensory afferents from twitching muscles are widely represented in motor areas the amount of evoked activity directly resulting from TMS remains unclear. We delivered suprathreshold TMS to left M1 or electrically stimulated the right median nerve (MNS in 18 healthy volunteers while simultaneously conducting functional magnetic resonance imaging and monitoring with electromyography (EMG. We examined in detail the localization of TMS-, muscle afferent- and superficial afferent-induced activity in M1 subdivisions. Muscle afferent- and TMS-evoked activity occurred mainly in rostral M1, while superficial afferents generated a slightly different activation distribution. In 12 participants who yielded quantifiable EMG, differences in brain activity ascribed to differences in movement-size were adjusted using integrated information from the EMGs. Sensory components only explained 10-20% of the suprathreshold TMS-induced activity, indicating that locally and remotely evoked activity in motor areas mostly resulted from the recruitment of neural and synaptic activity. The present study appears to justify the use of fMRI combined with suprathreshold TMS to M1 for evoked motor network imaging.

  4. Cross-Modal Calibration of Vestibular Afference for Human Balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin E Héroux

    Full Text Available To determine how the vestibular sense controls balance, we used instantaneous head angular velocity to drive a galvanic vestibular stimulus so that afference would signal that head movement was faster or slower than actual. In effect, this changed vestibular afferent gain. This increased sway 4-fold when subjects (N = 8 stood without vision. However, after a 240 s conditioning period with stable balance achieved through reliable visual or somatosensory cues, sway returned to normal. An equivalent galvanic stimulus unrelated to sway (not driven by head motion was equally destabilising but in this situation the conditioning period of stable balance did not reduce sway. Reflex muscle responses evoked by an independent, higher bandwidth vestibular stimulus were initially reduced in amplitude by the galvanic stimulus but returned to normal levels after the conditioning period, contrary to predictions that they would decrease after adaptation to increased sensory gain and increase after adaptation to decreased sensory gain. We conclude that an erroneous vestibular signal of head motion during standing has profound effects on balance control. If it is unrelated to current head motion, the CNS has no immediate mechanism of ignoring the vestibular signal to reduce its influence on destabilising balance. This result is inconsistent with sensory reweighting based on disturbances. The increase in sway with increased sensory gain is also inconsistent with a simple feedback model of vestibular reflex action. Thus, we propose that recalibration of a forward sensory model best explains the reinterpretation of an altered reafferent signal of head motion during stable balance.

  5. Effects of variation in porcine MYOD1 gene on muscle fiber characteristics, lean meat production, and meat quality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E A; Kim, J M; Lim, K S; Ryu, Y C; Jeon, W M; Hong, K C

    2012-09-01

    Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the porcine MYOD1 gene were used for association analysis and haplotype construction to evaluate the effects of their substitution. Four hundred and three pigs of Yorkshire and Berkshire breeds were used. The mRNA expression levels of MYOD1 were examined. The g.489C>T and g.1264C>A SNPs were significantly associated with several muscle fiber characteristics, the loin eye area, and lightness. Particularly, animals having hetero-genotypes of both sites showed good performance both in lean meat production and meat quality traits. The results of haplotype substitution were similar to the associations of individual SNPs. Moreover, the 2 SNPs had significant effects on mRNA expression. Therefore, the g.489C>T and g.1264C>A SNPs in MYOD1 may be meaningful DNA markers that can be used for improving important porcine economic traits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Parameters of fibers cell respiration and desmin content in rat soleus muscle at early stages of gravitational unloading].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoev, T M; Biriukov, N S; Veselova, O M; Larina, I M; Shenkman, B S; Ogneva, I V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study the parameters of fibers cell respiration and desmin content in Wistar rat soleus muscle after 1, 3, 7 and 14 days of gravitational unloading. Gravitational unloading was simulated by antiorthostatic hindlimb suspension. The parameters of cell respiration were determined using the polarography, and desmin content was assessed by means of Western blotting. The results showed that the intensity of cell respiration is reduced after three days of gravitational unloading, reaches a minimum level after seven days and slightly increases by the fourteenth day of hindlimb unloading, as well as the content of desmin, which, however, to the fourteenth day returns to the control level. Taking into account that mitochondrial function depends on the state of cytoskeleton the data allow us to assume that early reduction of the intensity of cell respiration under unloading could be caused by degradation of the protein desmin that determines intracellular localization of mitochondria.

  7. Effects of strength training on muscle fiber types and size; consequences for athletes training for high-intensity sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J L; Aagaard, P

    2010-01-01

    Training toward improving performance in sports involving high intense exercise can and is done in many different ways based on a mixture of tradition in the specific sport, coaches' experience and scientific recommendations. Strength training is a form of training that now-a-days have found its...... way into almost all sports in which high intense work is conducted. In this review we will focus on a few selected aspects and consequences of strength training; namely what effects do strength training have of muscle fiber type composition, and how may these effects change the contractile properties...... functional training advises can be made. Thus, more than a review in the traditional context this review should be viewed upon as an attempt to bring sports-physiologists and coaches or others working directly with the athletes together for a mutual discussion on how recently acquired physiological knowledge...

  8. Effects of strength training on muscle fiber types and size; consequences for athletes training for high-intensity sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J L; Aagaard, P

    2010-01-01

    way into almost all sports in which high intense work is conducted. In this review we will focus on a few selected aspects and consequences of strength training; namely what effects do strength training have of muscle fiber type composition, and how may these effects change the contractile properties......Training toward improving performance in sports involving high intense exercise can and is done in many different ways based on a mixture of tradition in the specific sport, coaches' experience and scientific recommendations. Strength training is a form of training that now-a-days have found its...... functional training advises can be made. Thus, more than a review in the traditional context this review should be viewed upon as an attempt to bring sports-physiologists and coaches or others working directly with the athletes together for a mutual discussion on how recently acquired physiological knowledge...

  9. Muscle fibers inside a fat tumor: A non-specific imaging finding of benignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donato, M.; Vanel, D.; Alberghini, M.; Mercuri, M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The differential diagnosis between benign and low-grade well-differentiated malignant lipomatous tumors might be very difficult for both the radiologist and the pathologist, although it has practical consequences. Among the criteria, muscular fibers detected inside the lesion are considered radiologically and histologically as a reliable sign of a benign intramuscular lipoma. New genetic criteria are now available. We report two cases of fat tumors containing muscular fibers both radiologically and histologically, but which are definitely malignant, considering genetic criteria. Material and methods: Two cases of soft tissue fat tumors, containing muscular fibers on imaging examinations as well as histologically, had an aggressive behaviour, suggesting malignancy. Genetic criteria were therefore used to confirm the clinical impression. Results: MDM2 and CDK4 confirmed the malignancy in the two cases. Conclusion: Intra lesional muscular fibers detected on imaging or histological examinations should not be considered as a completely reliable sign of a benign intramuscular lipoma. In case of atypical clinical behaviour, genetic criteria should be used to prove the aggressiveness of the tumor.

  10. The Nuclear Receptor, Nor-1, Markedly Increases Type II Oxidative Muscle Fibers and Resistance to Fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Pearen, Michael A.; Eriksson, Natalie A.; Fitzsimmons, Rebecca L.; Goode, Joel M.; Martel, Nick; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Muscat, George E. O.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NR) have been implicated as regulators of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. The orphan NR4A subgroup has emerged as regulators of metabolic function. Targeted silencing of neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (Nor-1)/NR4A3 in skeletal muscle cells suggested that this NR was necessary for oxidative metabolism in vitro. To investigate the in vivo role of Nor-1, we have developed a mouse model with preferential expression of activated Nor-1 in skeletal muscle. In skeletal...

  11. Cross-bridge blocker BTS permits direct measurement of SR Ca2+ pump ATP utilization in toadfish swimbladder muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Iain S; Harwood, Claire L; Rome, Lawrence C

    2003-10-01

    Because the major processes involved in muscle contraction require rapid utilization of ATP, measurement of ATP utilization can provide important insights into the mechanisms of contraction. It is necessary, however, to differentiate between the contribution made by cross-bridges and that of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ pumps. Specific and potent SR Ca2+ pump blockers have been used in skinned fibers to permit direct measurement of cross-bridge ATP utilization. Up to now, there was no analogous cross-bridge blocker. Recently, N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS) was found to suppress force generation at micromolar concentrations. We tested whether BTS could be used to block cross-bridge ATP utilization, thereby permitting direct measurement of SR Ca2+ pump ATP utilization in saponin-skinned fibers. At 25 microM, BTS virtually eliminates force and cross-bridge ATP utilization (both BTS. At 25 microM, BTS had no effect on SR pump ATP utilization. Hence, we used BTS to make some of the first direct measurements of ATP utilization of intact SR over a physiological range of [Ca2+]at 15 degrees C. Curve fits to SR Ca2+ pump ATP utilization vs. pCa indicate that they have much lower Hill coefficients (1.49) than that describing cross-bridge force generation vs. pCa (approximately 5). Furthermore, we found that BTS also effectively eliminates force generation in bundles of intact swimbladder muscle, suggesting that it will be an important tool for studying integrated SR function during normal motor behavior.

  12. Treadmill Slope Modulates Inflammation, Fiber Type Composition, Androgen, and Glucocorticoid Receptors in the Skeletal Muscle of Overtrained Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson L. da Rocha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Overtraining (OT may be defined as an imbalance between excessive training and adequate recovery period. Recently, a downhill running-based overtraining (OTR/down protocol induced the nonfunctional overreaching state, which is defined as a performance decrement that may be associated with psychological and hormonal disruptions and promoted intramuscular and systemic inflammation. To discriminate the eccentric contraction effects on interleukin 1beta (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-15, and SOCS-3, we compared the release of these cytokines in OTR/down with other two OT protocols with the same external load (i.e., the product between training intensity and volume, but performed in uphill (OTR/up and without inclination (OTR. Also, we evaluated the effects of these OT models on the muscle morphology and fiber type composition, serum levels of fatigue markers and corticosterone, as well as androgen receptor (AR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR expressions. For extensor digitorum longus (EDL, OTR/down and OTR groups increased the cytokines and exhibited micro-injuries with polymorphonuclear infiltration. While OTR/down group increased the cytokines in soleus muscle, OTR/up group only increased IL-6. All OT groups presented micro-injuries with polymorphonuclear infiltration. In serum, while OTR/down and OTR/up protocols increased IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, OTR group increased IL-1β, IL-6, IL-15, and corticosterone. The type II fibers in EDL and soleus, total and phosphorylated AR levels in soleus, and total GR levels in EDL and soleus were differentially modulated by the OT protocols. In summary, the proinflammatory cytokines were more sensitive for OTR/down than for OTR/up and OTR. Also, the specific treadmill inclination of each OT model influenced most of the other evaluated parameters.

  13. Detection thresholds of macaque otolith afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2012-06-13

    The vestibular system is our sixth sense and is important for spatial perception functions, yet the sensory detection and discrimination properties of vestibular neurons remain relatively unexplored. Here we have used signal detection theory to measure detection thresholds of otolith afferents using 1 Hz linear accelerations delivered along three cardinal axes. Direction detection thresholds were measured by comparing mean firing rates centered on response peak and trough (full-cycle thresholds) or by comparing peak/trough firing rates with spontaneous activity (half-cycle thresholds). Thresholds were similar for utricular and saccular afferents, as well as for lateral, fore/aft, and vertical motion directions. When computed along the preferred direction, full-cycle direction detection thresholds were 7.54 and 3.01 cm/s(2) for regular and irregular firing otolith afferents, respectively. Half-cycle thresholds were approximately double, with excitatory thresholds being half as large as inhibitory thresholds. The variability in threshold among afferents was directly related to neuronal gain and did not depend on spike count variance. The exact threshold values depended on both the time window used for spike count analysis and the filtering method used to calculate mean firing rate, although differences between regular and irregular afferent thresholds were independent of analysis parameters. The fact that minimum thresholds measured in macaque otolith afferents are of the same order of magnitude as human behavioral thresholds suggests that the vestibular periphery might determine the limit on our ability to detect or discriminate small differences in head movement, with little noise added during downstream processing.

  14. Effect of age on the occurrence of muscle fiber degeneration associated with myopathies in broiler chickens submitted to feed restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, G; Piccirillo, A; Birolo, M; Bertotto, D; Gratta, F; Ballarin, C; Vascellari, M; Xiccato, G; Trocino, A

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate muscle fiber degeneration (MFD) associated with white striping and wooden breast, pectoralis major of 192 broilers differing for genotype (standard vs. high breast yield), gender, and feeding regime (ad libitum vs. restricted rate 80% from 13 to 21 d of age) were sampled at 14, 21, 28, 35, and 46 d of age for histological analyses by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining to evaluate tissue morphology, Masson's trichrome to identify collagen presence, and Oil red and Nile blue for lipid presence. Microvessels (diameter ≤15 μm), nuclei positive to anti-cleaved lamin A and monoclonal proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) antisera were counted to assess apoptotic and regenerative processes, respectively. Significant differences were found according to feeding system, age, and their interactions. The frequency of chickens with MFD was higher with ad libitum than restricted feeding (75.0% vs. 62.5%; P = 0.01) and increased with age (18.8%, 28.1%, 75.1%, 96.9%, and 96.9% at 14, 21, 28, 35, and 46 d). However, at 14 d a similar frequency (18.8%) was found in all broilers; at 21 d, MFD occurred more in broilers fed ad libitum than in those under restriction (50.0% vs. 6.3%; P < 0.01); at 28 d differences were reduced (87.5% vs. 62.5%; P  = 0.10) to disappear by 35 (100% and 93.8%) and 46 d (96.9% and 96.9%). The number of microvessels decreased with age (20.7 to 9.46; P < 0.001) and the number of nuclei positive to the anti-cleaved lamin A antibody increased. At histology, MFD at 46 d corresponded to loss of typical cross striations, massive necrotic process, degenerating fibers surrounded by inflammatory cells, scattered fibers in an abundant collagen-rich connective tissue, numerous adipose cells; necrotic fibers showed a high percentage of apoptotic nuclei, and regenerating fibers appeared positive to anti-PCNA antibody. In conclusion, MFD soon occurred after 2 wk of growth and increased dramatically within 28 d. Early feed restriction

  15. Reduced muscle-fiber conduction but normal slowing after cold exposure in paramyotonia congenita

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijham, P.J.; Drost, G; Stegeman, D.F.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this study we investigated a family with paramyotonia (PC) congenita caused by a Gly1306Val mutation in the voltage-gated sodium-channel gene SCN4A. A previous study showed that exposure to cold aggravates the muscle stiffness in patients with this mutation. However, the mechanism behind cold

  16. Na+,K+-ATPase Na+ affinity in rat skeletal muscle fiber types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Juel, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies in expression systems have found different ion activation of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isozymes, which suggest that different muscles have different ion affinities. The rate of ATP hydrolysis was used to quantify Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, and the Na(+) affinity of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase...

  17. A study on elongation/contraction behavior and mechanical properties of oxy-polyacrylonitrile(PAN) fiber in basic/acidic solution for artificial muscle applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.K.; Kim, S.W.; Lee, K.S.; Cho, I.H.; Lee, J.H.; Lee, J.W. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea); Kim, K.J. [University of Nevada, Reno (United States); Nam, J.D. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    Oxy-PAN fiber prepared from the preoxidation and saponification of raw PAN fiber is known to elongate and contract when immersed in basic and acidic solutions, respectively. In this study, about 30% elongation in NaOH solution and 30{approx}50% contraction in HCl solution have been observed. In mechanical test, the mechanical properties of oxy-PAN fiber in the contracted state was stronger than that in the elongated state. These behaviors and mechanical properties are compared to those of living muscle and linear actuator. The change of length in NaOH and HCl solutions is due to switching between a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic structure. Other reasons are exchange of ion and water in/out of oxy-PAN fiber, and osmotic pressure difference associated with relevant ions. Much studies are needed to clarify the effective factors on but the oxy-PAN fiber's elongation/contraction behavior and mechanical properties, but the oxy-PAN fiber prepared in our laboratory has a sufficient potential for application as artificial muscle and linear actuator. (author). 20 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  18. Gene expression changes of single skeletal muscle fibers in response to modulation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chemello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU gene codifies for the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM channel responsible for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Cytosolic Ca2+ transients are involved in sarcomere contraction through cycles of release and storage in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition cytosolic Ca2+ regulates various signaling cascades that eventually lead to gene expression reprogramming. Mitochondria are strategically placed in close contact with the ER/SR, thus cytosolic Ca2+ transients elicit large increases in the [Ca2+] of the mitochondrial matrix ([Ca2+]mt. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake regulates energy production and cell survival. In addition, we recently showed that MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake controls skeletal muscle trophism. In the same report, we dissected the effects of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on gene expression through microarray gene expression analysis upon modulation of MCU expression by in vivo AAV infection. Analyses were performed on single skeletal muscle fibers at two time points (7 and 14 days post-AAV injection. Raw and normalized data are available on the GEO database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GSE60931.

  19. The effect of different physical activity levels on muscle fiber size and type distribution of lumbar multifidus. A biopsy study on low back pain patient groups and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazis, N; Papachristou, D J; Zouboulis, P; Tyllianakis, M; Scopa, C D; Megas, P

    2009-12-01

    Previous studies examining the multifidus fiber characteristics among low back pain (LBP) patients have not considered the variable of physical activity. The present study sought to investigate the muscle fiber size and type distribution of the lumbar multifidus muscle among LBP patient groups with different physical activity levels and healthy controls. Sixty-four patients were assigned to one of three groups named according to the physical activity level, determined for each patient by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. These were low (LPA), medium (MPA) and high (HPA) physical activity groups. A control group comprising of 17 healthy individuals was also recruited. Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from the multifidus muscle at the level L4-L5. contrast with the control group, LBP patient groups showed a significantly higher Type II fiber distribution as well as reduced diameter in both fiber types (P0.05) among LPA, MPA and HPA patient groups. Various pathological conditions were detected which were more pronounced in LBP groups compared to the control (P<0.05). Males had a larger fiber diameter compared to females for both fiber types (P<0.05). The results showed that the level of physical activity did not affect muscle fiber size and type distribution among LBP patients groups. These findings suggest that not only inactivity but also high physical activity levels can have an adverse effect on the multifidus muscle fiber characteristics.

  20. Composição de fibras musculares esqueléticas de eqüinos jovens da raça Brasileiro de Hipismo Composition of skeletal muscle fibers of young Brasileiro de Hipismo horse breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H.F. D’Angelis

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to typify the skeletal striated fibers of the gluteus medius muscle of young Brasileiro de Hipismo (BH horses by means of histochemical analysis with m-ATPase and NADH-TR according to the sex and the biopsy depth. It was observed that the frequency (F;% and the relative cross sectional area (RCSA;% of the fibers type IIX were greater than the fibers type IIA, which F and RCSA were greater than the fibers type I. The comparison between sex and muscles depht, showed no significant difference in F and RCSA in the three types of fibers. The results of morphometry showed that the gluteus medius muscle has greater glycolitic metabolism and anaerobic capacity because of the presence of large proportion of type IIX fibers. This may be justified by the genetic influence of Thoroughbred in the formation of Brasileiro de Hipismo breed.

  1. The embryonic genes Dkk3, Hoxd8, Hoxd9 and Tbx1 identify muscle types in a diet-independent and fiber-type unrelated way

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    Boekschoten Mark V

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mouse skeletal muscle is composed of four distinct fiber types that differ in contractile function, number of mitochondria and metabolism. Every muscle type has a specific composition and distribution of the four fiber types. To find novel genes involved in specifying muscle types, we used microarray analysis to compare the gastrocnemius with the quadriceps from mice fed a low fat diet (LFD or high fat diet (HFD for 8 weeks. Additional qPCR analysis were performed in the gastrocnemius, quadriceps and soleus muscle from mice fed an LFD or HFD for 20 weeks. Results In mice fed the 8-week LFD 162 genes were differentially expressed in the gastrocnemius vs. the quadriceps. Genes with the strongest differences in expression were markers for oxidative fiber types (e.g. Tnni1 and genes which are known to be involved in embryogenesis (Dkk3, Hoxd8,Hoxd9 and Tbx1. Also Dkk2, Hoxa5, Hoxa10, Hoxc9, Hoxc10, Hoxc6 and Tbx15 were detectably, but not differentially expressed in adult muscle tissue. Expression of differentially expressed genes was not influenced by an 8-week or 20-week HFD. Comparing gastrocnemius, quadriceps and soleus, expression of Hoxd8 and Hoxd9 was not related with expression of markers for the four different fiber types. We found that the expression of both Hoxd8 and Hoxd9 was much higher in the gastrocnemius than in the quadriceps or soleus, whereas the expression of Dkk3 was high in quadriceps, but low in both gastrocnemius and soleus. Finally, expression of Tbx1 was high in quadriceps, intermediate in soleus and low in gastrocnemius. Conclusions We found that genes from the Dkk family, Hox family and Tbx family are detectably expressed in adult mouse muscle. Interestingly, expression of Dkk3, Hoxd8, Hoxd9 and Tbx1 was highly different between gastrocnemius, quadriceps and soleus. In fact, every muscle type showed a unique combination of expression of these four genes which was not influenced by diet. Altogether

  2. Syndrome of continuous muscle fiber activity: case report with 11-year follow-up

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    José Teotônio de Oliveira

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old male patient who presented with muscle stiffness and dysphonia is described. Electromyography revealed continuous motor activity that was unaffected by peripheral nerve block or general anaesthesia, but was abolished by curare. The patient had a marked improvement after using phenytoin. The follow-up 11-years later corroborates with the proposed benignity of this syndrome, in spite of being dependent on medication.

  3. Afferent loop syndrome - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Ana Karina Nascimento; Pinheiro, Marco Antonio Lopes; Galvao, Cristine Norwig

    2000-01-01

    The afferent loop syndrome occurs in patients with previous gastric surgery for tumor, when there is anastomotic edema, use of inappropriate reconstruction technique for gastro jejunostomy or recurrent gastric cancer. Complaints such jaundice, intermittent abdominal distension associated with pain, and vomiting should be investigated in order to rule out this syndrome. (author)

  4. Isolation of TRPV1 independent mechanisms of spontaneous and asynchronous glutamate release at primary afferent to NTS synapses.

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    Axel J. Fenwick

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cranial visceral afferents contained within the solitary tract (ST contact second-order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS and release the excitatory amino acid glutamate via three distinct exocytosis pathways; synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous release. The presence of TRPV1 in the central terminals of a majority of ST afferents conveys activity-dependent asynchronous glutamate release and provides a temperature sensitive calcium conductance which largely determines the rate of spontaneous vesicle fusion. TRPV1 is present in unmyelinated C-fiber afferents and these facilitated forms of glutamate release may underlie the relative strength of C-fibers in activating autonomic reflex pathways. However, pharmacological blockade of TRPV1 signaling eliminates only ~50% of the asynchronous profile and attenuates the temperature sensitivity of spontaneous release indicating additional thermosensitive calcium influx pathways may exist which mediate these forms of vesicle release. In the present study we isolate the contribution of TRPV1 independent forms of glutamate release at ST-NTS synapses. We found ST afferent innervation at NTS neurons and synchronous vesicle release from TRPV1 KO mice was not different to control animals; however, only half of TRPV1 KO ST afferents completely lacked asynchronous glutamate release. Further, temperature driven spontaneous rates of vesicle release were not different from 33˚ - 37˚C between control and TRPV1 KO afferents. These findings suggest additional temperature dependent mechanisms controlling asynchronous and thermosensitive spontaneous release at physiological temperatures, possibly mediated by additional thermosensitive TRP channels in primary afferent terminals.

  5. Combined genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 and P2X3 attenuates colorectal hypersensitivity and afferent sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Michael E.; Feng, Bin; Schwartz, Erica S.

    2013-01-01

    The ligand-gated channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and P2X3 have been reported to facilitate colorectal afferent neuron sensitization, thus contributing to organ hypersensitivity and pain. In the present study, we hypothesized that TRPV1 and P2X3 cooperate to modulate colorectal nociception and afferent sensitivity. To test this hypothesis, we employed TRPV1-P2X3 double knockout (TPDKO) mice and channel-selective pharmacological antagonists and evaluated combined channel contributions to behavioral responses to colorectal distension (CRD) and afferent fiber responses to colorectal stretch. Baseline responses to CRD were unexpectedly greater in TPDKO compared with control mice, but zymosan-produced CRD hypersensitivity was absent in TPDKO mice. Relative to control mice, proportions of mechanosensitive and -insensitive pelvic nerve afferent classes were not different in TPDKO mice. Responses of mucosal and serosal class afferents to mechanical probing were unaffected, whereas responses of muscular (but not muscular/mucosal) afferents to stretch were significantly attenuated in TPDKO mice; sensitization of both muscular and muscular/mucosal afferents by inflammatory soup was also significantly attenuated. In pharmacological studies, the TRPV1 antagonist A889425 and P2X3 antagonist TNP-ATP, alone and in combination, applied onto stretch-sensitive afferent endings attenuated responses to stretch; combined antagonism produced greater attenuation. In the aggregate, these observations suggest that 1) genetic manipulation of TRPV1 and P2X3 leads to reduction in colorectal mechanosensation peripherally and compensatory changes and/or disinhibition of other channels centrally, 2) combined pharmacological antagonism produces more robust attenuation of mechanosensation peripherally than does antagonism of either channel alone, and 3) the relative importance of these channels appears to be enhanced in colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:23989007

  6. Light and electron microscopy of contacts between primary afferent fibres and neurones with axons ascending the dorsal columns of the feline spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, D J; Koerber, H R; Bannatyne, B A

    1985-10-01

    In addition to primary afferent fibres, the dorsal columns of the cat spinal cord contain ascending second-order axons which project to the dorsal column nuclei. The aim of the present study was to obtain morphological evidence that certain primary afferent axons form monosynaptic contacts with cells of origin of this postsynaptic dorsal column pathway. In ten adult cats, neurones with axons ascending the dorsal columns were retrogradely labelled with horseradish peroxidase using a pellet implantation method in the thoracic dorsal columns. In the lumbosacral regions of the same animals, primary afferent fibres were labelled intra-axonally with ionophoretic application of horseradish peroxidase. Tissue containing labelled axons was prepared for light and combined light and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated that slowly adapting (Type I), hair follicle, Pacinian corpuscle and group Ia muscle spindle afferents formed monosynaptic contacts with labelled cells and light microscopical analysis suggested that they also received monosynaptic input from rapidly adapting (Krause) afferents. This evidence suggests that sensory information from large-diameter cutaneous and muscle spindle afferent fibres is conveyed disynaptically via the postsynaptic dorsal column pathway to the dorsal column nuclei. Some of the input to this pathway is probably modified in the spinal cord as the majority of primary afferent boutons forming monosynaptic contacts were postsynaptic to other axon terminals. The postsynaptic dorsal column system appears to constitute a major somatosensory pathway in the cat.

  7. Differentiation of the intracellular structure of slow- versus fast-twitch muscle fibers through evaluation of the dielectric properties of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, B.; Li, J.; Bragos, R.; Rutkove, S. B.

    2014-05-01

    Slow-twitch (type 1) skeletal muscle fibers have markedly greater mitochondrial content than fast-twitch (type 2) fibers. Accordingly, we sought to determine whether the dielectric properties of these two fiber types differed, consistent with their distinct intracellular morphologies. The longitudinal and transverse dielectric spectrum of the ex vivo rat soleus (a predominantly type 1 muscle) and the superficial layers of rat gastrocnemius (predominantly type 2) (n = 15) were measured in the 1 kHz-10 MHz frequency range and modeled to a resistivity Cole-Cole function. Major differences were especially apparent in the dielectric spectrum in the 1 to 10 MHz range. Specifically, the gastrocnemius demonstrated a well-defined, higher center frequency than the soleus muscle, whereas the soleus muscle showed a greater difference in the modeled zero and infinite resistivities than the gastrocnemius. These findings are consistent with the fact that soleus tissue has larger and more numerous mitochondria than gastrocnemius. Evaluation of tissue at high frequency could provide a novel approach for assessing intracellular structure in health and disease.

  8. Differentiation of the intracellular structure of slow- versus fast-twitch muscle fibers through evaluation of the dielectric properties of tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, B; Li, J; Rutkove, S B; Bragos, R

    2014-01-01

    Slow-twitch (type 1) skeletal muscle fibers have markedly greater mitochondrial content than fast-twitch (type 2) fibers. Accordingly, we sought to determine whether the dielectric properties of these two fiber types differed, consistent with their distinct intracellular morphologies. The longitudinal and transverse dielectric spectrum of the ex vivo rat soleus (a predominantly type 1 muscle) and the superficial layers of rat gastrocnemius (predominantly type 2) (n = 15) were measured in the 1 kHz–10 MHz frequency range and modeled to a resistivity Cole–Cole function. Major differences were especially apparent in the dielectric spectrum in the 1 to 10 MHz range. Specifically, the gastrocnemius demonstrated a well-defined, higher center frequency than the soleus muscle, whereas the soleus muscle showed a greater difference in the modeled zero and infinite resistivities than the gastrocnemius. These findings are consistent with the fact that soleus tissue has larger and more numerous mitochondria than gastrocnemius. Evaluation of tissue at high frequency could provide a novel approach for assessing intracellular structure in health and disease. (paper)

  9. Estimation of the number of angiotensin II AT1 receptors in rat kidney afferent and efferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razga, Zsolt; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2007-01-01

    of angiotensin II AT1 receptors along the length of the arterioles and per arteriole, we combined immunoelectron microscopy with stereology. RESULTS: The number of AT1 receptor molecules was significantly lower in the renin-positive smooth muscle cells (SMCs) than in the renin-negative SMCs of the afferent...

  10. Diet-resistant obesity is characterized by a distinct plasma proteomic signature and impaired muscle fiber metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, A B; Antoun, G; Nikpay, M; Patten, D A; DeVlugt, C; Mauger, J-F; Beauchamp, B L; Lau, P; Reshke, R; Doucet, É; Imbeault, P; Boushel, R; Gibbings, D; Hager, J; Valsesia, A; Slack, R S; Al-Dirbashi, O Y; Dent, R; McPherson, R; Harper, M-E

    2018-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Inter-individual variability in weight loss during obesity treatment is complex and poorly understood. Here we use whole body and tissue approaches to investigate fuel oxidation characteristics in skeletal muscle fibers, cells and distinct circulating protein biomarkers before and after a high fat meal (HFM) challenge in those who lost the most (obese diet-sensitive; ODS) vs the least (obese diet-resistant; ODR) amount of weight in a highly controlled weight management program. Subjects/Methods: In 20 weight stable-matched ODS and ODR women who previously completed a standardized clinical weight loss program, we analyzed whole-body energetics and metabolic parameters in vastus lateralis biopsies and plasma samples that were obtained in the fasting state and 6 h after a defined HFM, equivalent to 35% of total daily energy requirements. Results: At baseline (fasting) and post-HFM, muscle fatty acid oxidation and maximal oxidative phosphorylation were significantly greater in ODS vs ODR, as was reactive oxygen species emission. Plasma proteomics of 1130 proteins pre and 1, 2, 5 and 6 h after the HFM demonstrated distinct group and interaction differences. Group differences identified S-formyl glutathione hydratase, heat shock 70 kDA protein 1A/B (HSP72), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5 (eIF5) to be higher in ODS vs ODR. Group-time differences included aryl hydrocarbon interacting protein (AIP), peptidylpropyl isomerase D (PPID) and tyrosine protein-kinase Fgr, which increased in ODR vs ODS over time. HSP72 levels correlated with muscle oxidation and citrate synthase activity. These proteins circulate in exosomes; exosomes isolated from ODS plasma increased resting, leak and maximal respiration rates in C2C12 myotubes by 58%, 21% and 51%, respectively, vs those isolated from ODR plasma. Conclusions: Findings demonstrate distinct muscle metabolism and plasma proteomics in fasting and post-HFM states corresponding in diet

  11. The reproducibility of different metabolic markers for muscle fiber type distributions investigated by functional "3"1P-MRS during dynamic exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzanny, Reinhard; Hiepe, Patrick; Gussew, Alexander; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Stutzig, Norman; Thorhauer, Hans-Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the reproducibility of exercise induced pH-heterogeneity by splitting of the inorganic phosphate (Pi) signal in the corresponding "3"1P-MRS spectra and to compare results of this approach with other fiber-type related markers, like phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate (PCr/ATP) ratio, and PCr-recovery parameters. Subjects (N = 3) with different sportive background were tested in 10 test sessions separated by at least 3 days. A MR-compatible pedal ergometer was used to perform the exercise and to induce a pH-based splitting of the Pi-signal in "3"1P-MR spectra of the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The PCr recovery was analyzed using a non-negative least square algorithm (NNLS) and multi-exponential regression analysis to estimate the number of non-exponential components as well as their amplitude and time constant. The reproducibility of the estimated metabolic marker and the resulting fiber-type distributions between the 10 test sessions were compared. The reproducibility (standard deviation between measurements) based on (1) Pi components varied from 2% to 4%, (2) PCr recovery time components varied from 10% to 12% and (3) phosphate concentrations at rest varied from 8% to 11% between test sessions. Due to the sportive activity differences between the 3 subjects were expected in view of fiber type distribution. All estimated markers indicate the highest type I percentage for volunteer 3 medium for volunteer 2 and the lowest for volunteer 1. The relative high reproducibility of pH dependent Pi components during exercise indicates a high potential of this method to estimate muscle fiber-type distributions in vivo. To make this method usable not only to detect differences in muscle fiber distributions but also to determine individual fiber-type volume contents it is therefore recommended to validate this marker by histological methods and to reveal the effects of muscle fiber recruitments and fiber-type specific Pi

  12. Lack of on-going adaptations in the soleus muscle activity during walking in patients affected by large-fiber neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazarena, Mazzaro; Grey, Michael James; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of feedback from large-diameter sensory fibers to the adaptation of soleus muscle activity after small ankle trajectory modifications during human walking. Small-amplitude and slow-velocity ankle dorsiflexion enhancements and reductions were...... applied during the stance phase of the gait cycle to mimic the normal variability of the ankle trajectory during walking. Patients with demyelination of large sensory fibers (Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy) and age-matched controls participated...... duration (P ankle dorsiflexion was, respectively, enhanced or reduced. In the patients, the soleus EMG increased during the dorsiflexion...

  13. The reproducibility of different metabolic markers for muscle fiber type distributions investigated by functional {sup 31}P-MRS during dynamic exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rzanny, Reinhard; Hiepe, Patrick; Gussew, Alexander; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Univ. Hospital Jena (Germany). Medical Physics Group, Inst. of Diagnostics and Interventional Radiology; Stutzig, Norman [Univ. of Stuttgart (Germany). Exercise Science, Inst. of Sport and Movement Science; Thorhauer, Hans-Alexander [Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany). Exercise Science, Inst. of Sports Science

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the reproducibility of exercise induced pH-heterogeneity by splitting of the inorganic phosphate (Pi) signal in the corresponding {sup 31}P-MRS spectra and to compare results of this approach with other fiber-type related markers, like phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate (PCr/ATP) ratio, and PCr-recovery parameters. Subjects (N = 3) with different sportive background were tested in 10 test sessions separated by at least 3 days. A MR-compatible pedal ergometer was used to perform the exercise and to induce a pH-based splitting of the Pi-signal in {sup 31}P-MR spectra of the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The PCr recovery was analyzed using a non-negative least square algorithm (NNLS) and multi-exponential regression analysis to estimate the number of non-exponential components as well as their amplitude and time constant. The reproducibility of the estimated metabolic marker and the resulting fiber-type distributions between the 10 test sessions were compared. The reproducibility (standard deviation between measurements) based on (1) Pi components varied from 2% to 4%, (2) PCr recovery time components varied from 10% to 12% and (3) phosphate concentrations at rest varied from 8% to 11% between test sessions. Due to the sportive activity differences between the 3 subjects were expected in view of fiber type distribution. All estimated markers indicate the highest type I percentage for volunteer 3 medium for volunteer 2 and the lowest for volunteer 1. The relative high reproducibility of pH dependent Pi components during exercise indicates a high potential of this method to estimate muscle fiber-type distributions in vivo. To make this method usable not only to detect differences in muscle fiber distributions but also to determine individual fiber-type volume contents it is therefore recommended to validate this marker by histological methods and to reveal the effects of muscle fiber recruitments and fiber-type specific

  14. Effects of acute exposure of heavy ion to spinal cord on the properties of motoneurons and muscle fibers in rats. The 2nd report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Akihiko; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Fuminori; Xiao Dong Wang; Nagaoka, Shunji; Nojima, Kumie

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of acute exposure of heavy ion on the properties of motoneurons and their innervating muscle fibers. A 40 Gy dose of heavy ion was applied to the lumbar 4th to 6th segments of the spinal cord in five 8-week-old male rats. Five male rats served as controls. Both the control and heavy-ion-exposed rats were sacrificed one month after exposure to heavy ion. The number, cell body size, and oxidative enzyme activity of motoneurons innervating the soleus and plantaris muscles were analyzed. In addition, cell size, oxidative enzyme activity, and expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the soleus and plantaris muscles were analyzed. There were no changes in the number of motoneurons between the control and heavy-ion-exposed rats. On the other hand, cell body sizes were decreased and oxidative enzyme activities were disappeared in motoneurons of the heavy-ion-exposed rats. There were no changes in the cell size, oxidative enzyme activity, or expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms of the muscles between the control and heavy-ion-exposed rats. It is concluded that a 40 Gy dose of heavy ion affects the properties of spinal motoneurons, although there were no influences on the properties of muscle fibers which they innervate. (author)

  15. The meat quality, muscle fiber characteristics and fatty acid profile in Jinjiang and F1 Simmental×Jinjiang yellow cattle

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    Yue Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study compared the meat quality, muscle fiber characteristics, and fatty acids between Jinjiang yellow cattle (JJ and F1 Simmental×Jinjiang yellow cattle (SJ which were offered the same diet. Methods Six JJ and six SJ individuals were reared and fattened from 10 to 26 months of age. After feeding, the highrib (HR, ribeye (RB, and tenderloin (TL samples were taken from the carcass for meat quality evaluations. Results The results showed that growth performance of SJ was higher than that of JJ (higher live weight and average daily gain, and the hot carcass weight of SJ was higher than that of JJ (p<0.05. pH of JJ was higher than that of SJ in TL (p<0.05; the color of a* of SJ was higher than that of JJ in TL and RB (p<0.05; the cooking loss of SJ was significantly lower than that of JJ in TL and RB (p<0.05; the shear force value was significantly lower in SJ compared to JJ (p<0.05; the muscle fiber diameter was higher and the fiber density was lower in SJ compared to JJ in HR and TL (p<0.05; compared to SJ, the muscles of JJ had higher saturated fatty acid (SFA composition; the sum of monounsaturated fatty acid and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA were lower in the muscle of JJ; the mRNA expressions of myosin heavy chain-I (MyHC-I and MyHC-IIa were higher in SJ compared to JJ in muscle of HR and RB; the mRNA expressions of MyHC-IIx and MyHC-IIb were lower in SJ compared to JJ in HR and RB (p<0.05. Conclusion Meat quality and fatty acid profile differed between SJ and JJ; the muscle of SJ had higher a* and SFA; SJ had lower cooking loss, shear force and PUFA compared to the muscle of JJ. In addition, the type and development characteristics of the muscle fiber had some difference between SJ and JJ; these might be factors which caused the differences in meat quality and fatty acid profile between SJ and JJ.

  16. Myosin content of single muscle fibers following short-term disuse and active recovery in young and old healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Lars G; Brocca, Lorenza; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2017-01-01

    healthy men. Following disuse, myosin content decreased (p... young and old in both fiber types, with MHC 2a fibers demonstrating an overshooting in young (+31%, pStrong correlations were observed between myosin content and single fiber SF in both young and old, with greater slope steepness in MHC 2a vs 1 fibers indicating an enhanced intrinsic...

  17. β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate reduces myonuclear apoptosis during recovery from hind limb suspension-induced muscle fiber atrophy in aged rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yanlei; Jackson, Janna R.; Wang, Yan; Edens, Neile; Pereira, Suzette L.

    2011-01-01

    β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) is a leucine metabolite shown to reduce protein catabolism in disease states and promote skeletal muscle hypertrophy in response to loading exercise. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of HMB to reduce muscle wasting and promote muscle recovery following disuse in aged animals. Fisher 344×Brown Norway rats, 34 mo of age, were randomly assigned to receive either Ca-HMB (340 mg/kg body wt) or the water vehicle by gavage (n = 32/group). The animals received either 14 days of hindlimb suspension (HS, n = 8/diet group) or 14 days of unloading followed by 14 days of reloading (R; n = 8/diet group). Nonsuspended control animals were compared with suspended animals after 14 days of HS (n = 8) or after R (n = 8). HMB treatment prevented the decline in maximal in vivo isometric force output after 2 wk of recovery from hindlimb unloading. The HMB-treated animals had significantly greater plantaris and soleus fiber cross-sectional area compared with the vehicle-treated animals. HMB decreased the amount of TUNEL-positive nuclei in reloaded plantaris muscles (5.1% vs. 1.6%, P HMB did not significantly alter Bcl-2 protein abundance compared with vehicle treatment, HMB decreased Bax protein abundance following R, by 40% and 14% (P HMB-treated reloaded plantaris and soleus muscles, compared with vehicle-treated animals. HMB reduced cleaved caspase-9 by 14% and 30% (P HMB was unable to prevent unloading-induced atrophy, it attenuated the decrease in fiber area in fast and slow muscles after HS and R. HMB's ability to protect against muscle loss may be due in part to putative inhibition of myonuclear apoptosis via regulation of mitochondrial-associated caspase signaling. PMID:21697520

  18. The Effect of Soursop (Announa Muricata L. Leaves Powder on Diameter of Muscle Fiber, Lipid Cell, Body Weight Gain and Carcass Percentage of Tegal Duck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elly Tugiyanti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the supplementation of soursop leaves powder (Annona muricata L. on body weight gain and carcass percentage of male Tegal duck. Research was conducted from 29 November 2015 to 3 January 2016 in duck cage in Sokaraja Kulon, Purwokerto. One hundred male Tegal duck were fed basal feed consisted of 30% corn, 7% soy bean meal, 6,1% vegetable oil, 17% poultry meat meal, 38,2% ricebran, 0,1% L-lysin HCL, 0,3% DL-methionin, 0,2% topmix, 0,1% NaCl, and 1% CaCO3. Experimental research used completely randomized design with treatments composed of basal feed plus 0, 5, 10, and 15% soursop leaves meal, each with 5 replicates. The observed variables were diameter of muscle fiber, lipid cell, body weight gain, and carcass percentage. The obtained data were subject to analysis of variance followed by orthogonal polynomial test. Result showed that treatments affected non significantly (P>0.05 to the diameter of chest muscle fiber, carcass percentage and carcass but significantly affected (P<0,05 body weight gain with equation Y  =  427,74  - 67,10 X  + 2,27 X2..  Conclusively, supplementation of soursop leaves meal (Annona muricata L. in feed has not been able to increase the muscle fiber diameter of intermuscular lipid cell, carcass percentage and carcass parts. Excessive supplement even lowers the body weight gain of male Tegal duck.

  19. Colocalization properties of elementary Ca(2+) release signals with structures specific to the contractile filaments and the tubular system of intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Tihomir; Zapiec, Bolek; Förderer, Moritz; Fink, Rainer H A; Vogel, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Ca(2+) regulates several important intracellular processes. We combined second harmonic generation (SHG) and two photon excited fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) to simultaneously record the SHG signal of the myosin filaments and localized elementary Ca(2+) release signals (LCSs). We found LCSs associated with Y-shaped structures of the myosin filament pattern (YMs), so called verniers, in intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers under hypertonic treatment. Ion channels crucial for the Ca(2+) regulation are located in the tubular system, a system that is important for Ca(2+) regulation and excitation-contraction coupling. We investigated the tubular system of intact, living mouse skeletal muscle fibers using 2PFM and the fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator Fluo-4 dissolved in the external solution or the membrane dye di-8-ANEPPS. We simultaneously measured the SHG signal from the myosin filaments of the skeletal muscle fibers. We found that at least a subset of the YMs observed in SHG images are closely juxtaposed with Y-shaped structures of the transverse tubules (YTs). The distances of corresponding YMs and YTs yield values between 1.3 μm and 4.1 μm including pixel uncertainty with a mean distance of 2.52±0.10 μm (S.E.M., n=41). Additionally, we observed that some of the linear-shaped areas in the tubular system are colocalized with linear-shaped areas in the SHG images. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Desmin content and transversal stiffness of the left ventricle mouse cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibers after a 30-day space flight on board "BION-M1" biosatellite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, I V; Maximova, M V; Larina, I M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the transversal stiffness of the cortical cytoskeleton and the cytoskeletal protein desmin content in the left ventricle cardiomyocytes, fibers of the mouse soleus and tibialis anterior muscle after a 30-day space flight on board the "BION-M1" biosatellite (Russia, 2013). The dissection was made after 13-16.5 h after landing. The transversal stiffness was measured in relaxed and calcium activated state by, atomic force microscopy. The desmin content was estimated by western blotting, and the expression level of desmin-coding gene was detected using real-time PCR. The results indicate that, the transversal stiffness of the left ventricle cardiomyocytes and fibers of the soleus muscle in relaxed and activated states did not differ from the control. The transversal stiffness of the tibialis muscle fibers in relaxed and activated state was increased in the mice group after space flight. At the same time, in all types of studied tissues the desmin content and the expression level of desmin-coding gene did not differ from the control level.

  1. High performance twisted and coiled soft actuator with spandex fiber for artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sang Yul; Cho, Kyeong Ho; Kim, Youngeun; Song, Min-Geun; Jung, Ho Sang; Yoo, Ji Wang; Moon, Hyungpil; Koo, Ja Choon; Nam, Jae-do; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports the twisted and coiled soft actuator (abbreviated with STCA) with spandex fiber. The STCA exhibits higher actuation strain at lower temperature than the previous nylon twisted and coiled soft actuators (abbreviated with NTCAs). While NTCAs are fabricated using a twist-insertion process until coils are formed, a new method is developed to fabricate the STCA using the ultra-stretch of spandex, whereby the STCA is twisted again after the coil has been formed. A 6-gear-twist-insertion device that increases the stability and the fabrication speed is developed to fabricate the STCA. The superior performance exhibited by the STCA is due to the 14% contraction strain of the bare spandex (bare nylon: 4%) and the low spring constant of 0.0115 N mm-1. The maximum tensile actuation strain of STCA was 45% at 130 °C, and the maximum specific work was 1.523 kJ kg-1 at 130 °C. STCA could repeatedly actuate 100 times with a strain change of less than 0.4%.

  2. Downhill Running Excessive Training Inhibits Hypertrophy in Mice Skeletal Muscles with Different Fiber Type Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Alisson L; Pereira, Bruno C; Pauli, José R; de Souza, Claudio T; Teixeira, Giovana R; Lira, Fábio S; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R; Júnior, Carlos R B; da Silva, Adelino S R

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of running overtraining protocols performed in downhill, uphill, and without inclination on the proteins related to hypertrophy signaling pathway in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus of C57BL/6 mice. We also performed histological and stereological analyses. Rodents were divided into control (CT; sedentary mice), overtrained by downhill running (OTR/down), overtrained by uphill running (OTR/up), and overtrained by running without inclination (OTR). The incremental load, exhaustive, and grip force tests were used as performance evaluation parameters. 36 h after the grip force test, EDL and soleus were removed and immediately used for immunoblotting analysis or stored at -80°C for histological and stereological analyses. For EDL, OTR/down decreased the protein kinase B (Akt) and tuberous sclerosis protein 2 (TSC2) phosphorylation (p), and increased myostatin, receptor-activated Smads (pSMAD2-3), and insulin receptor substrate-1 (pIRS-1; Ser307/636). OTR/down also presented low and high relative proportions of cytoplasm and connective tissue, respectively. OTR/up increased the mammalian target of rapamycin (pmTOR), 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (pS6K1) and pSMAD2-3, and decreased pTSC2. OTR decreased pTSC2 and increased pIRS-1 (Ser636). For soleus, OTR/down increased S6 ribosomal protein (pS6RP) and pSMAD2-3, and decreased pIRS-1 (Ser639). OTR/up decreased pS6K1, pS6RP and pIRS-1 (Ser639), and increased pTSC2 (Ser939), and pSMAD2-3. OTR increased pS6RP, 4E-binding protein-1 (p4E-BP1), pTSC2 (Ser939), and pSMAD2-3, and decreased pIRS-1 (Ser639). In summary, OTR/down inhibited the skeletal muscle hypertrophy with concomitant signs of atrophy in EDL. The effects of OTR/up and OTR depended on the analyzed skeletal muscle type. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The urodelean Mauthner cell. Morphology of the afferent synapses to the M-cell of larval Salamandra salamandra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cioni, C; De Palma, F; De Vito, L; Stefanelli, A [Rome, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia Animale e dell` Uomo

    1998-12-31

    In the present work the fine morphology and the distribution of the afferent synapses to the Mauthner cell of larval Salamandra salamandra are described. The aim of the study is to characterize the synaptic bed in the larvae of this terrestrial salamander in order to compare it with that of larval axolotl and larval anurans. Four main types of afferent endings have been identified: myelinated club endings, round-vesicle end bulbs, flattened-vesicle end bulbs and spiral fibers endings. The M-cell afferent synaptology of larval stages of terrestrial amphibians is quite similar to that previously observed in larval stages of aquatic species. This fact can be related to the fundamental similarities between the larval lifestyles.

  4. The urodelean Mauthner cell. Morphology of the afferent synapses to the M-cell of larval Salamandra salamandra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cioni, C.; De Palma, F.; De Vito, L.; Stefanelli, A. [Rome, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia Animale e dell`Uomo

    1997-12-31

    In the present work the fine morphology and the distribution of the afferent synapses to the Mauthner cell of larval Salamandra salamandra are described. The aim of the study is to characterize the synaptic bed in the larvae of this terrestrial salamander in order to compare it with that of larval axolotl and larval anurans. Four main types of afferent endings have been identified: myelinated club endings, round-vesicle end bulbs, flattened-vesicle end bulbs and spiral fibers endings. The M-cell afferent synaptology of larval stages of terrestrial amphibians is quite similar to that previously observed in larval stages of aquatic species. This fact can be related to the fundamental similarities between the larval lifestyles.

  5. Dietary energy source affecting fat deposition mechanism, muscle fiber metabolic and overall meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Hijazeen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to investigate the effect of two dietary energy sources, soy bean oil, and sucrose on regulatory mechanisms of meat preservation. Twenty one day-old Hubbard commercial broilers were randomly allocated into two dietary treatment groups with six replicates per treatment, and four broilers per replicate. All birds were coded for the influence of energy source: fat based diet (FD, and sugar based diet (SD. Formulated grower diets were isonitrogenous and isocaloric. The chickens were slaughtered and then boneless, skinless ground chicken tight meat was prepared. Both raw and cooked meats were analyzed for lipid and protein oxidation, and sensory panel evaluation. In addition, meat from the small muscles of the raw thigh was used to evaluate other meat quality characteristics. Proximate analyses showed no significant differences between both dietary treatments on protein, ash and moisture percentage values. Meat samples of the group that was fed FD showed higher significant values of both TBARS and total carbonyl at day 7 of storage time. However, samples of the second group (Fed SD showed lower values of both ultimate pH and water separation % using raw thigh meat. The effect of FD treatment on the meat composition appeared clearly especially on fat percentage content. In addition, meat samples obtained from chickens fed SD showed better significant values of the overall acceptability attribute. According to the current findings, sucrose could be an excellent alternative to oil in dietary broilers which improved the meat preservation bio-system, and post-mortem storage stability.

  6. Peripheral afferent mechanisms underlying acupuncture inhibition of cocaine behavioral effects in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seol Ah Kim

    Full Text Available Administration of cocaine increases locomotor activity by enhancing dopamine transmission. To explore the peripheral mechanisms underlying acupuncture treatment for drug addiction, we developed a novel mechanical acupuncture instrument (MAI for objective mechanical stimulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether acupuncture inhibition of cocaine-induced locomotor activity is mediated through specific peripheral nerves, the afferents from superficial or deep tissues, or specific groups of nerve fibers. Mechanical stimulation of acupuncture point HT7 with MAI suppressed cocaine-induced locomotor activity in a stimulus time-dependent manner, which was blocked by severing the ulnar nerve or by local anesthesia. Suppression of cocaine-induced locomotor activity was elicited after HT7 stimulation at frequencies of either 50 (for Meissner corpuscles or 200 (for Pacinian corpuscles Hz and was not affected by block of C/Aδ-fibers in the ulnar nerve with resiniferatoxin, nor generated by direct stimulation of C/Aδ-fiber afferents with capsaicin. These findings suggest that HT7 inhibition of cocaine-induced locomotor activity is mediated by A-fiber activation of ulnar nerve that originates in superficial and deep tissue.

  7. The meat quality, muscle fiber characteristics and fatty acid profile in Jinjiang and F1 Simmental×Jinjiang yellow cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yue; Wang, Shizhi; Yan, Peishi

    2018-02-01

    This study compared the meat quality, muscle fiber characteristics, and fatty acids between Jinjiang yellow cattle (JJ) and F1 Simmental×Jinjiang yellow cattle (SJ) which were offered the same diet. Six JJ and six SJ individuals were reared and fattened from 10 to 26 months of age. After feeding, the highrib (HR), ribeye (RB), and tenderloin (TL) samples were taken from the carcass for meat quality evaluations. The results showed that growth performance of SJ was higher than that of JJ (higher live weight and average daily gain), and the hot carcass weight of SJ was higher than that of JJ (pJJ was higher than that of SJ in TL (pJJ in TL and RB (pJJ in TL and RB (pJJ (pJJ in HR and TL (pJJ had higher saturated fatty acid (SFA) composition; the sum of monounsaturated fatty acid and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) were lower in the muscle of JJ; the mRNA expressions of myosin heavy chain-I (MyHC-I) and MyHC-IIa were higher in SJ compared to JJ in muscle of HR and RB; the mRNA expressions of MyHC-IIx and MyHC-IIb were lower in SJ compared to JJ in HR and RB (pJJ; the muscle of SJ had higher a* and SFA; SJ had lower cooking loss, shear force and PUFA compared to the muscle of JJ. In addition, the type and development characteristics of the muscle fiber had some difference between SJ and JJ; these might be factors which caused the differences in meat quality and fatty acid profile between SJ and JJ.

  8. Effects of acute exposure of heavy ion to spinal cord on the properties of motoneurons and muscle fibers in rats (the 3rd report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Akihiko; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Fuminori; Wang, Xiao Dong; Nagaoka, Shunji; Nojima, Kumie

    2005-01-01

    The effects of acute exposure of heavy ion on the properties of spinal motoneurons and their innervating muscle fibers were investigated. A 15, 20, 40, 50, or 70 Gy dose of heavy ion was applied to the lumbar 4th to 6th segments of the spinal cord in 8-week-old male rats. Both the control and heavy-ion-exposed rats were sacrificed one month after exposure to heavy ion. The number, cell body size, and oxidative enzyme activity of spinal motoneurons innervating the soleus and plantaris muscles were analyzed by a computer-assisted image processing system. In addition, cell size, oxidative enzyme activity, and expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the soleus and plantaris muscles were analyzed. There were no differences in the number of spinal motoneurons innervating the soleus and plantaris muscles between the control and heavy-ion-exposed rats, irrespective of the dose level. On the other hand, cell body sizes were decreased and oxidative enzyme activities were disappeared in spinal motoneurons of the heavy-ion-exposed rats at the dose levels of 40, 50, and 70 Gy. There were no differences in the cell size, oxidative enzyme activity, or expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms of the soleus and plantaris muscles between the control and heavy-ion-exposed rats, irrespective of the dose level. It is concluded that more than 40 Gy dose of heavy ion affects the properties of spinal motoneurons, although there are no influences on the properties of muscle fibers which they innervate. (author)

  9. Cholecystokinin enhances visceral pain-related affective memory via vagal afferent pathway in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Bing

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain contains both sensory and affective dimensions. Using a rodent visceral pain assay that combines the colorectal distension (CRD model with the conditioned place avoidance (CPA paradigms, we measured a learned behavior that directly reflects the affective component of visceral pain, and showed that perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC activation is critical for memory processing involved in long-term visceral affective state and prediction of aversive stimuli by contextual cue. Progress has been made and suggested that activation of vagal afferents plays a role in the behavioral control nociception and memory storage processes. In human patients, electrical vagus nerve stimulation enhanced retention of verbal learning performance. Cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK, which is a gastrointestinal hormone released during feeding, has been shown to enhance memory retention. Mice access to food immediately after training session enhanced memory retention. It has been well demonstrated that CCK acting on vagal afferent fibers mediates various physiological functions. We hypothesize that CCK activation of vagal afferent enhances visceral pain-related affective memory. Results In the presented study, infusion of CCK-8 at physiological concentration combining with conditional training significantly increased the CRD-induced CPA scores, and enhanced the pain affective memory retention. In contrast, CCK had no effect on CPA induced by non-nociceptive aversive stimulus (U69,593. The physiological implications were further strengthened by the similar effects observed in the rats with duodenal infusion of 5% peptone, which has been shown to induce increases in plasma CCK levels. CCK-8 receptor antagonist CR-1409 or perivagal application of capsaicin abolished the effect of CCK on aversive visceral pain memory, which was consistent with the notion that vagal afferent modulates affective aspects of visceral pain. CCK does not change

  10. Cholecystokinin enhances visceral pain-related affective memory via vagal afferent pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bing; Zhang, Xu; Yan, Ni; Chen, Shengliang; Li, Ying

    2012-06-09

    Pain contains both sensory and affective dimensions. Using a rodent visceral pain assay that combines the colorectal distension (CRD) model with the conditioned place avoidance (CPA) paradigms, we measured a learned behavior that directly reflects the affective component of visceral pain, and showed that perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC) activation is critical for memory processing involved in long-term visceral affective state and prediction of aversive stimuli by contextual cue. Progress has been made and suggested that activation of vagal afferents plays a role in the behavioral control nociception and memory storage processes.In human patients, electrical vagus nerve stimulation enhanced retention of verbal learning performance. Cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK), which is a gastrointestinal hormone released during feeding, has been shown to enhance memory retention. Mice access to food immediately after training session enhanced memory retention. It has been well demonstrated that CCK acting on vagal afferent fibers mediates various physiological functions. We hypothesize that CCK activation of vagal afferent enhances visceral pain-related affective memory. In the presented study, infusion of CCK-8 at physiological concentration combining with conditional training significantly increased the CRD-induced CPA scores, and enhanced the pain affective memory retention. In contrast, CCK had no effect on CPA induced by non-nociceptive aversive stimulus (U69,593). The physiological implications were further strengthened by the similar effects observed in the rats with duodenal infusion of 5% peptone, which has been shown to induce increases in plasma CCK levels. CCK-8 receptor antagonist CR-1409 or perivagal application of capsaicin abolished the effect of CCK on aversive visceral pain memory, which was consistent with the notion that vagal afferent modulates affective aspects of visceral pain. CCK does not change the nociceptive response (visceral pain

  11. Chloride is essential for contraction of afferent arterioles after agonists and potassium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Ellekvist, Peter; Skøtt, O

    1997-01-01

    to norepinephrine, angiotensin II (ANG II), and potassium were measured after chloride depletion and compared with controls. Chloride depletion did not change arteriolar diameters, but the response to norepinephrine was markedly reduced when chloride was substituted with gluconate (n = 6) or isethionate (n = 6......). Reintroduction of chloride fully restored the sensitivity to norepinephrine. Contractions after ANG II and potassium were totally abolished in the absence of chloride (n = 6). In additional experiments (n = 7), the arteriolar contraction to 100 mM potassium was abolished only 1 min after removal of extracellular......A depolarizing chloride efflux has been suggested to activate voltage-dependent calcium channels in renal afferent arteriolar smooth muscle cells in response to vasoconstrictors. To test this proposal, rabbit afferent arterioles were microperfused, and the contractile dose responses...

  12. Population coding of forelimb joint kinematics by peripheral afferents in monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Umeda

    Full Text Available Various peripheral receptors provide information concerning position and movement to the central nervous system to achieve complex and dexterous movements of forelimbs in primates. The response properties of single afferent receptors to movements at a single joint have been examined in detail, but the population coding of peripheral afferents remains poorly defined. In this study, we obtained multichannel recordings from dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons in cervical segments of monkeys. We applied the sparse linear regression (SLiR algorithm to the recordings, which selects useful input signals to reconstruct movement kinematics. Multichannel recordings of peripheral afferents were performed by inserting multi-electrode arrays into the DRGs of lower cervical segments in two anesthetized monkeys. A total of 112 and 92 units were responsive to the passive joint movements or the skin stimulation with a painting brush in Monkey 1 and Monkey 2, respectively. Using the SLiR algorithm, we reconstructed the temporal changes of joint angle, angular velocity, and acceleration at the elbow, wrist, and finger joints from temporal firing patterns of the DRG neurons. By automatically selecting a subset of recorded units, the SLiR achieved superior generalization performance compared with a regularized linear regression algorithm. The SLiR selected not only putative muscle units that were responsive to only the passive movements, but also a number of putative cutaneous units responsive to the skin stimulation. These results suggested that an ensemble of peripheral primary afferents that contains both putative muscle and cutaneous units encode forelimb joint kinematics of non-human primates.

  13. Reappraisal of VAChT-Cre: Preference in slow motor neurons innervating type I or IIa muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Hidemi; Inomata, Daijiro; Kikuchi, Miseri; Maruyama, Sae; Moriwaki, Yasuhiro; Okuda, Takashi; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Yamanaka, Tomoyuki

    2016-11-01

    VAChT-Cre.Fast and VAChT-Cre.Slow mice selectively express Cre recombinase in approximately one half of postnatal somatic motor neurons. The mouse lines have been used in various studies with selective genetic modifications in adult motor neurons. In the present study, we crossed VAChT-Cre lines with a reporter line, CAG-Syp/tdTomato, in which synaptophysin-tdTomato fusion proteins are efficiently sorted to axon terminals, making it possible to label both cell bodies and axon terminals of motor neurons. In the mice, Syp/tdTomato fluorescence preferentially co-localized with osteopontin, a recently discovered motor neuron marker for slow-twitch fatigue-resistant (S) and fast-twitch fatigue-resistant (FR) types. The fluorescence did not preferentially co-localize with matrix metalloproteinase-9, a marker for fast-twitch fatigable (FF) motor neurons. In the neuromuscular junctions, Syp/tdTomato fluorescence was detected mainly in motor nerve terminals that innervate type I or IIa muscle fibers. These results suggest that the VAChT-Cre lines are Cre-drivers that have selectivity in S and FR motor neurons. In order to avoid confusion, we have changed the mouse line names from VAChT-Cre.Fast and VAChT-Cre.Slow to VAChT-Cre.Early and VAChT-Cre.Late, respectively. The mouse lines will be useful tools to study slow-type motor neurons, in relation to physiology and pathology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Common neural structures activated by epidural and transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation: Elicitation of posterior root-muscle reflexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula S Hofstoetter

    Full Text Available Epidural electrical stimulation of the lumbar spinal cord is currently regaining momentum as a neuromodulation intervention in spinal cord injury (SCI to modify dysregulated sensorimotor functions and augment residual motor capacity. There is ample evidence that it engages spinal circuits through the electrical stimulation of large-to-medium diameter afferent fibers within lumbar and upper sacral posterior roots. Recent pilot studies suggested that the surface electrode-based method of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (SCS may produce similar neuromodulatory effects as caused by epidural SCS. Neurophysiological and computer modeling studies proposed that this noninvasive technique stimulates posterior-root fibers as well, likely activating similar input structures to the spinal cord as epidural stimulation. Here, we add a yet missing piece of evidence substantiating this assumption. We conducted in-depth analyses and direct comparisons of the electromyographic (EMG characteristics of short-latency responses in multiple leg muscles to both stimulation techniques derived from ten individuals with SCI each. Post-activation depression of responses evoked by paired pulses applied either epidurally or transcutaneously confirmed the reflex nature of the responses. The muscle responses to both techniques had the same latencies, EMG peak-to-peak amplitudes, and waveforms, except for smaller responses with shorter onset latencies in the triceps surae muscle group and shorter offsets of the responses in the biceps femoris muscle during epidural stimulation. Responses obtained in three subjects tested with both methods at different time points had near-identical waveforms per muscle group as well as same onset latencies. The present results strongly corroborate the activation of common neural input structures to the lumbar spinal cord-predominantly primary afferent fibers within multiple posterior roots-by both techniques and add to unraveling the

  15. Skeletal muscle eEF2 and 4EBP1 phosphorylation during endurance exercise is dependent on intensity and muscle fiber type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Bisiani, Bruno; Vistisen, Bodil

    2009-01-01

    that the increase in skeletal muscle eEF2 Thr(56) phosphorylation was restricted to type I myofibers. Taken together, these data suggest that the depression of skeletal muscle protein synthesis with endurance-type exercise may be regulated at both initiation (i.e. 4EBP1) and elongation (i.e. eEF2) steps, with eEF2......Protein synthesis in skeletal muscle is known to decrease during exercise and it has been suggested that this may depend on the magnitude of the relative metabolic stress within the contracting muscle. To examine the mechanisms behind this, the effect of exercise intensity on skeletal muscle......) increased during exercise but was not influenced by exercise intensity, and was lower than rest 30min after exercise. On the other hand, 4EBP1 phosphorylation at Thr(37/46) decreased during exercise and this decrease was greater at higher exercise intensities, and was similar to rest 30min after exercise...

  16. Selective expression of the type 3 isoform of ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channel (RyR3) in a subset of slow fibers in diaphragm and cephalic muscles of adult rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, Antonio; Reggiani, Carlo; Sorrentino, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    The expression pattern of the RyR3 isoform of Ca 2+ release channels was analysed by Western blot in neonatal and adult rabbit skeletal muscles. The results obtained show that the expression of the RyR3 isoform is developmentally regulated. In fact, RyR3 expression was detected in all muscles analysed at 2 and 15 days after birth while, in adult animals, it was restricted to a subset of muscles that includes diaphragm, masseter, pterygoideus, digastricus, and tongue. Interestingly, all of these muscles share a common embryonic origin being derived from the somitomeres or from the cephalic region of the embryo. Immunofluorescence analysis of rabbit skeletal muscle cross-sections showed that RyR3 staining was detected in all fibers of neonatal muscles. In contrast, in those adult muscles expressing RyR3 only a fraction of fibers was labelled. Staining of these muscles with antibodies against fast and slow myosins revealed a close correlation between expression of RyR3 and fibers expressing slow myosin isoform

  17. Weighted Mean of Signal Intensity for Unbiased Fiber Tracking of Skeletal Muscles: Development of a New Method and Comparison With Other Correction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudo, Chiara; Motyka, Stanislav; Weber, Michael; Resinger, Christoph; Thorsten, Feiweier; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bogner, Wolfgang

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the origin of random image artifacts in stimulated echo acquisition mode diffusion tensor imaging (STEAM-DTI), assess the role of averaging, develop an automated artifact postprocessing correction method using weighted mean of signal intensities (WMSIs), and compare it with other correction techniques. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained. The right calf and thigh of 10 volunteers were scanned on a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging scanner using a STEAM-DTI sequence.Artifacts (ie, signal loss) in STEAM-based DTI, presumably caused by involuntary muscle contractions, were investigated in volunteers and ex vivo (ie, human cadaver calf and turkey leg using the same DTI parameters as for the volunteers). An automated postprocessing artifact correction method based on the WMSI was developed and compared with previous approaches (ie, iteratively reweighted linear least squares and informed robust estimation of tensors by outlier rejection [iRESTORE]). Diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tracking metrics, using different averages and artifact corrections, were compared for region of interest- and mask-based analyses. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance with Greenhouse-Geisser correction and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used to evaluate differences among all tested conditions. Qualitative assessment (ie, images quality) for native and corrected images was performed using the paired t test. Randomly localized and shaped artifacts affected all volunteer data sets. Artifact burden during voluntary muscle contractions increased on average from 23.1% to 77.5% but were absent ex vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging metrics (mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity) had a heterogeneous behavior, but in the range reported by literature. Fiber track metrics (number, length, and volume) significantly improved in both calves and thighs after artifact

  18. Cold-water immersion after training sessions: Effects on fiber type-specific adaptations in muscle K+ transport proteins to sprint-interval training in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Danny; Bishop, David John; Broatch, James R; Bangsbo, Jens; McKenna, Michael John; Murphy, Robyn M

    2018-05-10

    Effects of regular use of cold-water immersion (CWI) on fiber type-specific adaptations in muscle K + transport proteins to intense training, along with their relationship to changes in mRNA levels after the first training session, were investigated in humans. Nineteen recreationally-active men (24{plus minus}6 y, 79.5{plus minus}10.8 kg, 44.6{plus minus}5.8 mL∙kg -1 ∙min -1 ) completed six weeks of sprint-interval cycling either without (passive rest; CON) or with training sessions followed by CWI (15 min at 10{degree sign}C; COLD). Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after training to determine abundance of Na + ,K + -ATPase isoforms (α 1-3 , β 1-3 ) and FXYD1, and after recovery treatments (+0h and +3h) on the first day of training to measure mRNA content. Training increased (ptraining (p>0.05). CWI after each session did not influence responses to training (p>0.05). However, α 2 mRNA increased after the first session in COLD (+0h, p0.05). In both conditions, α 1 and β 3 mRNA increased (+3h; p 0.05) after the first session. In summary, Na + ,K + -ATPase isoforms are differently regulated in type I and II muscle fibers by sprint-interval training in humans, which for most isoforms do not associate with changes in mRNA levels after the first training session. CWI neither impairs nor improves protein adaptations to intense training of importance for muscle K + regulation.

  19. Chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, H.; Chen, X.; Hartsfield, J. F.; Hara, J.; Martin, D.; Fermin, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Neurons from the vestibular (VG) and the statoacoustic (SAG) ganglion of the chick (Gallus domesticus) were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Embryos at stages 34 (E8 days), 39 (E13 days) and 44 (E18 days) were sacrificed and temporal bones microdissected. Specimens were embedded in JB-4 methacrylate plastic, and stained with a mixture of 0.2% toluidine blue (TB) and 0.1% basic Fuschin in 25% ethanol or with a mixture of 2% TB and 1% paraphenylenediamine (PDA) for axon and myelin measurement study. Images of the VIIIth nerve were produced by a V150 (R) color imaging system and the contour of 200-300 neuronal bodies (perikarya) was traced directly on a video screen with a mouse in real time. The cross-sectional area of VG perikarya was 67.29 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 128.46 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 275.85 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). The cross-sectional area of SAG perikarya was 62.44 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 102.05 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 165.02 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). A significant cross-sectional area increase of the VG perikarya between stage 39 (E13) and stage 44 (E18) was determined. We randomly measured the cross-sectional area of myelin and axoplasm of hatchling afferent nerves, and found a correspondence between axoplasmic and myelin cross-sectional area in the utricular, saccular and semicircular canal nerve branches of the nerve. The results suggest that the period between stage 34 (E8) and 39 (E13) is a critical period for afferent neuronal development. Physiological and behavioral vestibular properties of developing and maturing hatchlings may change accordingly. The results compliment previous work by other investigators and provide valuable anatomical measures useful to correlate physiological data obtained from stimulation of the whole nerve or its parts.

  20. Dynamic modulation of corticospinal excitability and short-latency afferent inhibition during onset and maintenance phase of selective finger movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Joo; Panyakaew, Pattamon; Thirugnanasambandam, Nivethida; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-06-01

    During highly selective finger movement, corticospinal excitability is reduced in surrounding muscles at the onset of movement but this phenomenon has not been demonstrated during maintenance of movement. Sensorimotor integration may play an important role in selective movement. We sought to investigate how corticospinal excitability and short-latency afferent inhibition changes in active and surrounding muscles during onset and maintenance of selective finger movement. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and paired peripheral stimulation, input-output recruitment curve and short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) were measured in the first dorsal interosseus and abductor digiti minimi muscles during selective index finger flexion. Motor surround inhibition was present only at the onset phase, but not at the maintenance phase of movement. SAI was reduced at onset but not at the maintenance phase of movement in both active and surrounding muscles. Our study showed dynamic changes in corticospinal excitability and sensorimotor modulation for active and surrounding muscles in different movement states. SAI does not appear to contribute to motor surround inhibition at the movement onset phase. Also, there seems to be different inhibitory circuit(s) other than SAI for the movement maintenance phase in order to delineate the motor output selectively when corticospinal excitability is increased in both active and surrounding muscles. This study enhances our knowledge of dynamic changes in corticospinal excitability and sensorimotor interaction in different movement states to understand normal and disordered movements. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Proportions of myosin heavy chain mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types in the slow and fast skeletal muscles are maintained after alterations of thyroid status in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, T; Diallo, M

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have established that slow soleus (SOL) and fast extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of euthyroid (EU) Lewis rats posses the same proportions between their four myosin heavy chain (MyHC) mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types as determined by real time RT-PCR, SDS-PAGE and 2-D stereological fiber type analysis, respectively. In the present paper we investigated if these proportions are maintained in adult Lewis rats with hyperthyroid (HT) and hypothyroid (HY) status. Although HT and HY states change MyHC isoform expression, results from all three methods showed that proportion between MyHC mRNA-1, 2a, -2x/d, -2b, protein isoforms MyHC-1, -2a, -2x/d, -2b and to lesser extent also fiber types 1, 2A, 2X/D, 2B were preserved in both SOL and EDL muscles. Furthermore, in the SOL muscle mRNA expression of slow MyHC-1 remained up to three orders higher compared to fast MyHC transcripts, which explains the predominance of MyHC-1 isoform and fiber type 1 even in HT rats. Although HT status led in the SOL to increased expression of MyHC-2a mRNA, MyHC-2a isoform and 2A fibers, it preserved extremely low expression of MyHC-2x and -2b mRNA and protein isoforms, which explains the absence of pure 2X/D and 2B fibers. HY status, on the other hand, almost completely abolished expression of all three fast MyHC mRNAs, MyHC protein isoforms and fast fiber types in the SOL muscle. Our data present evidence that a correlation between mRNA, protein content and fiber type composition found in EU status is also preserved in HT and HY rats.

  2. Severe hypoxia affects exercise performance independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Guillaume Y; Muthalib, Makii; Jubeau, Marc; Laursen, Paul B; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2012-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that hypoxia centrally affects performance independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue, we conducted two experiments under complete vascular occlusion of the exercising muscle under different systemic O(2) environmental conditions. In experiment 1, 12 subjects performed repeated submaximal isometric contractions of the elbow flexor to exhaustion (RCTE) with inspired O(2) fraction fixed at 9% (severe hypoxia, SevHyp), 14% (moderate hypoxia, ModHyp), 21% (normoxia, Norm), or 30% (hyperoxia, Hyper). The number of contractions (performance), muscle (biceps brachii), and prefrontal near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) parameters and high-frequency paired-pulse (PS100) evoked responses to electrical muscle stimulation were monitored. In experiment 2, 10 subjects performed another RCTE in SevHyp and Norm conditions in which the number of contractions, biceps brachii electromyography responses to electrical nerve stimulation (M wave), and transcranial magnetic stimulation responses (motor-evoked potentials, MEP, and cortical silent period, CSP) were recorded. Performance during RCTE was significantly reduced by 10-15% in SevHyp (arterial O(2) saturation, SpO(2) = ∼75%) compared with ModHyp (SpO(2) = ∼90%) or Norm/Hyper (SpO(2) > 97%). Performance reduction in SevHyp occurred despite similar 1) metabolic (muscle NIRS parameters) and functional (changes in PS100 and M wave) muscle states and 2) MEP and CSP responses, suggesting comparable corticospinal excitability and spinal and cortical inhibition between SevHyp and Norm. It is concluded that, in SevHyp, performance and central drive can be altered independently of afferent feedback and peripheral fatigue. It is concluded that submaximal performance in SevHyp is partly reduced by a mechanism related directly to brain oxygenation.

  3. Convergence of cranial visceral afferents within the solitary tract nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Stuart J; Peters, James H; Andresen, Michael C

    2009-10-14

    Primary afferent axons within the solitary tract (ST) relay homeostatic information via glutamatergic synapses directly to second-order neurons within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). These primary afferents arise from multiple organ systems and relay multiple sensory modalities. How this compact network organizes the flow of primary afferent information will shape central homeostatic control. To assess afferent convergence and divergence, we recorded ST-evoked synaptic responses in pairs of medial NTS neurons in horizontal brainstem slices. ST shocks activated EPSCs along monosynaptic or polysynaptic pathways. Gradations in shock intensity discriminated multiple inputs and stimulus recruitment profiles indicated that each EPSC was unitary. In 24 pairs, 75% were second-order neurons with 64% receiving one direct ST input with the remainder receiving additional convergent ST afferent inputs (22% two; 14% three monosynaptic ST-EPSCs). Some (34%) second-order neurons received polysynaptic EPSCs. Neurons receiving only higher-order inputs were uncommon (13%). Most ST-EPSCs were completely independent, but 4 EPSCs of a total of 81 had equal thresholds, highly correlated latencies, and synchronized synaptic failures consistent with divergence from a single source ST axon or from a common interneuron producing a pair of polysynaptic EPSCs. We conclude that ST afferent inputs are remarkably independent with little evidence of substantial shared information. Individual cells receive highly focused information from the viscera. Thus, afferent excitation of second-order NTS neurons is generally dominated by single visceral afferents and therefore focused on a single afferent modality and/or organ region.

  4. Muscle as a secretory organ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body. Skeletal muscles are primarily characterized by their mechanical activity required for posture, movement, and breathing, which depends on muscle fiber contractions. However, skeletal muscle is not just a component in our locomotor system. Recent e...... proteins produced by skeletal muscle are dependent upon contraction. Therefore, it is likely that myokines may contribute in the mediation of the health benefits of exercise.......Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body. Skeletal muscles are primarily characterized by their mechanical activity required for posture, movement, and breathing, which depends on muscle fiber contractions. However, skeletal muscle is not just a component in our locomotor system. Recent...... evidence has identified skeletal muscle as a secretory organ. We have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed, and released by muscle fibers and exert either autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine effects should be classified as "myokines." The muscle secretome consists...

  5. [Acute pancreatitis and afferent loop syndrome. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Fregoso, Elpidio Manuel; Romero-Hernández, Teodoro; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv

    2013-01-01

    The afferent syndrome loop is a mechanic obstruction of the afferent limb before a Billroth II or Roux-Y reconstruction, secondary in most of case to distal or subtotal gastrectomy. Clinical case: Male 76 years old, with antecedent of cholecystectomy, gastric adenocarcinoma six years ago, with subtotal gastrectomy and Roux-Y reconstruction. Beginning a several abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, abdominal distension, without peritoneal irritation sings. Amylase 1246 U/L, lipase 3381 U/L. Computed Tomography with thickness wall and dilatation of afferent loop, pancreas with diffuse enlargement diagnostic of acute pancreatitis secondary an afferent loop syndrome. The afferent loop syndrome is presented in 0.3%-1% in all cases with Billroth II reconstruction, with a mortality of up to 57%, the obstruction lead accumulation of bile, pancreatic and intestinal secretions, increasing the pressure and resulting in afferent limb, bile conduct and Wirsung conduct dilatation, triggering an inflammatory response that culminates in pancreatic inflammation. The severity of the presentation is related to the degree and duration of the blockage.

  6. Afferent loop syndrome: Role of sonography and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Ho; Lim, Jae Hoon; Ko, Young Tae [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Afferent loop syndrome(ALS) is caused by obstruction of the afferent loop after subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth II gastrojejunostomy. Prompt diagnosis of ALS is important as perforation of the loop occurs. The aim of study is to ascertain the sonography and CT to diagnose ALS. We describe the radiologic findings in ten patients with ALS. The cause of ALS, established at surgery, included cancer recurrence (n=4), internal hernia (n=4), marginal ulcer (n=1), and development of cancer at the anastomosis site (n=1). Abdominal X-ray and sonography were performed in all cases, upper GI series in five cases and computed tomography in two cases. The dilated afferent loop was detected in only two cases out often patients in retrospective review of abdominal X-ray. ALS with recurrence of cancer was diagnosed in three cases by upper GI series. Of the cases that had sonography, the afferent loop was seen in the upper abdomen crossing transversely over the midline in all ten patients. The cause of ALS were predicated on the basis of the sonograms in three of the five patients. In two cases of computed tomography, the dilated afferent loop and recurrent cancer at the remnant stomach were seen.Our experience suggests that the diagnosis of afferent syndrome can be made on the basis of the typical anatomic location and shape of the dilated bowel loop in both sonography and computed tomography.

  7. Myopathic EMG findings and type II muscle fiber atrophy in patients with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Christiansen, Ingelise; Vissing, John

    2013-01-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is a rare condition, which may mimic myopathy. A few reports have described that EMG in LEMS may show changes compatible with myopathy, and muscle biopsies have been described with type II as well as type I atrophy. The EMG results were, however, based on ...... on qualitative EMG examination and the histopathological methods were not always clear. The objective of this study was to investigate if the previous EMG findings could be confirmed with quantitative EMG (QEMG) and to describe muscle histology in LEMS.......Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is a rare condition, which may mimic myopathy. A few reports have described that EMG in LEMS may show changes compatible with myopathy, and muscle biopsies have been described with type II as well as type I atrophy. The EMG results were, however, based...

  8. Comparison of myosin heavy chain mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber type proportions in the rat slow and fast muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žurmanová, J.; Soukup, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 4 (2013), s. 445-453 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/1228; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK158; GA MŠk(CZ) LH12058 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-CT-2004-511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : rat * soleus * extensor digitorum longus * myosin heavy chain isoforms * muscle gene expression * quantitative Real Time RT-PCR * SDS - PAGE * fiber type analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  9. Pre-embedding staining of single muscle fibers for light and electron microscopy studies of subcellular organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Ploug, Thorkil

    1996-01-01

    to establish fixation and permeabilization conditions for EM immunogold labeling of the fibers. We find that a simple fixation with depolymerized paraformaldehyde alone, followed by permeabilization with 0.01% saponin, offers the best compromise between the conflicting demands of unhindered tissue penetration...

  10. The effect of type of afferent feedback timed with motor imagery on the induction of cortical plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Voigt, Michael; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas

    2017-01-01

    : 8-35 mAmp) or a passive ankle movement (amplitude and velocity matched to a normal gait cycle) was applied such that the first afferent inflow would coincide with the PN of the MRCP. The change in the output of the primary motor cortex (M1) was quantified by applying single transcranial magnetic...... compared these two interventions (BCIFES and BCIpassive) where the afferent input was timed to arrive at the motor cortex during the PN of the MRCP. Twelve healthy participants attended two experimental sessions. They were asked to perform 30 dorsiflexion movements timed to a cue while continuous...... stimuli to the area of M1 controlling the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle and measuring the motor evoked potential (MEP). Spinal changes were assessed pre and post by eliciting the TA stretch reflex. Both BCIFES and BCIpassive led to significant increases in the excitability of the cortical projections...

  11. Presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in relation to acquisition of a visuo-motor skill in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Monica A.; Lungholt, Bjarke K.S.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2005-01-01

    Sensory information continuously converges on the spinal cord during a variety of motor behaviours. Here, we examined presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in relation to acquisition of a novel motor skill. We tested whether repetition of two motor tasks with different degrees of difficulty......, a novel visuo-motor task involving the ankle muscles, and a control task involving simple voluntary ankle movements, would induce changes in the size of the soleus H-reflex. The slope of the H-reflex recruitment curve and the H-max/M-max ratio were depressed after repetition of the visuo-motor skill task...... of the monosynaptic Ia facilitation of the soleus H-reflex evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. The D1 inhibition was increased and the femoral nerve facilitation was decreased following the visuo-motor skill task, suggesting an increase in presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents. No changes were observed...

  12. Separation and estimation of muscle spindle and tension receptor populations by vibration of the biceps muscle in the frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giszter, S F; Kargo, W J

    2002-10-01

    Frog spinal cord reflex behaviors have been used to test the idea of spinal primitives. We have suggested a significant role for proprioception in regulation of primitives. However the in vivo behavior of spindle and golgi tendon receptors in frogs in response to vibration are not well described and the proportions of these proprioceptors are not established. In this study, we examine the selectivity of muscle vibration in the spinal frog. The aim of the study was (1) to examine how hindlimb muscle spindles and GTO receptors are activated by muscle vibration and (2) to estimate the relative numbers of GTO receptors and spindle afferents in a selected muscle, for comparison with the mammal. Single muscle afferents from the biceps muscle were identified in the dorsal roots. These were tested in response to biceps vibration, intramuscular stimulation and biceps nerve stimulation. Biceps units were categorized into two types: First, spindle afferents which had a high conduction velocity (approximately 20-30 m/s), responded reliably (were entrained 1:1) to muscle vibration, and exhibited distinct pauses to shortening muscle contractions. Second, golgi tendon organ afferents, which had a lower conduction velocity (approximately 10-20 m/s), responded less reliably to muscle vibration at physiologic muscle lengths, but responded more reliably at extended lengths or with background muscle contraction, and exhibited distinct bursts to shortening muscle contractions. Vibration responses of these units were tested with and without muscle curarization. Ensemble (suction electrode) recordings from the dorsal roots were used to provide rough estimates of the proportions of the two muscle afferent types.

  13. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...

  14. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase is dislocated in type I fibers of myalgic muscle but can recover with physical exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L; Andersen, L L; Schrøder, H D

    2015-01-01

    Trapezius myalgia is the most common type of chronic neck pain. While physical exercise reduces pain and improves muscle function, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Nitric oxide (NO) signaling is important in modulating cellular function, and a dysfunctional neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) ma...

  15. Muscle ceramide content in man is higher in type I than type II fibers and not influenced by glycogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, P; Prats, C; Kristensen, D

    2010-01-01

    +/- 2 mL O2 min(-1) kg(-1)) participated in the study. On the first day, one leg was glycogen-depleted (DL) by exhaustive intermittent exercise followed by low carbohydrate diet. Next day, in the overnight fasted condition, muscle biopsies were excised from vastus lateralis before and after exhaustive...

  16. Fiber type specific response of skeletal muscle satellite cells to high-intensity resistance training in dialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, Stig; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The aim was to investigate the effect of high-intensity resistance training on satellite cell (SC) and myonuclear number in the muscle of patients undergoing dialysis. Methods. Patients (n=21) underwent a 16-week control period, followed by 16 weeks of resistance training thrice...

  17. Preslaughter handling effects on pork quality and glycolytic potential in two muscles differing in fiber type composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hambrecht, E.; Eissen, J.J.; Newman, D.J.; Smits, C.H.M.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Hartog, den L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present experiment was to investigate the effects of transportation, lairage, and preslaughter stressor treatment on glycolytic potential and pork quality of the glycolytic longissimus and the oxidative supraspinatus (SSP) or serratus ventralis (SV) muscles. In a 2 x 2 x 2

  18. Painful unilateral temporalis muscle enlargement: reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsetos, Christos D; Bianchi, Michael A; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2014-06-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptomatic improvement only after undergoing botulinum toxin injections. Muscle biopsy is key in the diagnosis of reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy and its distinction from masticatory muscle myopathy (hypertrophic branchial myopathy) and other non-reactive causes of painful asymmetric temporalis muscle enlargement.

  19. Contractile properties, fiber types, and myosin isoforms in fast and slow muscles of hyperactive Japanese waltzing mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asmussen, G.; Schmalbruch, I.; Soukup, Tomáš; Pette, D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 184, č. 2 (2003), s. 758-766 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/00/1653 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) -; Sonderforschungsbereich(DE) 156; Schwerpunkt Muskelforschung(DE) As 74/1-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Japanese waltzing mouse * muscle contraction * myosin isoforms Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.676, year: 2003

  20. The neural response properties and cortical organization of a rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response that overlaps with the frequencies that elicit the kinesthetic illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Paul D; Bourbeau, Dennis J; Shell, Courtney E; Granja-Vazquez, Rafael; Ina, Jason G

    2017-01-01

    Kinesthesia is the sense of limb movement. It is fundamental to efficient motor control, yet its neurophysiological components remain poorly understood. The contributions of primary muscle spindles and cutaneous afferents to the kinesthetic sense have been well studied; however, potential contributions from muscle sensory group responses that are different than the muscle spindles have not been ruled out. Electrophysiological recordings in peripheral nerves and brains of male Sprague Dawley rats with a degloved forelimb preparation provide evidence of a rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response that overlaps with vibratory inputs known to generate illusionary perceptions of limb movement in humans (kinesthetic illusion). This group was characteristically distinct from type Ia muscle spindle fibers, the receptor historically attributed to limb movement sensation, suggesting that type Ia muscle spindle fibers may not be the sole carrier of kinesthetic information. The sensory-neural structure of muscles is complex and there are a number of possible sources for this response group; with Golgi tendon organs being the most likely candidate. The rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response projected to proprioceptive brain regions, the rodent homolog of cortical area 3a and the second somatosensory area (S2), with similar adaption and frequency response profiles between the brain and peripheral nerves. Their representational organization was muscle-specific (myocentric) and magnified for proximal and multi-articulate limb joints. Projection to proprioceptive brain areas, myocentric representational magnification of muscles prone to movement error, overlap with illusionary vibrational input, and resonant frequencies of volitional motor unit contraction suggest that this group response may be involved with limb movement processing.

  1. The neural response properties and cortical organization of a rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response that overlaps with the frequencies that elicit the kinesthetic illusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D Marasco

    Full Text Available Kinesthesia is the sense of limb movement. It is fundamental to efficient motor control, yet its neurophysiological components remain poorly understood. The contributions of primary muscle spindles and cutaneous afferents to the kinesthetic sense have been well studied; however, potential contributions from muscle sensory group responses that are different than the muscle spindles have not been ruled out. Electrophysiological recordings in peripheral nerves and brains of male Sprague Dawley rats with a degloved forelimb preparation provide evidence of a rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response that overlaps with vibratory inputs known to generate illusionary perceptions of limb movement in humans (kinesthetic illusion. This group was characteristically distinct from type Ia muscle spindle fibers, the receptor historically attributed to limb movement sensation, suggesting that type Ia muscle spindle fibers may not be the sole carrier of kinesthetic information. The sensory-neural structure of muscles is complex and there are a number of possible sources for this response group; with Golgi tendon organs being the most likely candidate. The rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response projected to proprioceptive brain regions, the rodent homolog of cortical area 3a and the second somatosensory area (S2, with similar adaption and frequency response profiles between the brain and peripheral nerves. Their representational organization was muscle-specific (myocentric and magnified for proximal and multi-articulate limb joints. Projection to proprioceptive brain areas, myocentric representational magnification of muscles prone to movement error, overlap with illusionary vibrational input, and resonant frequencies of volitional motor unit contraction suggest that this group response may be involved with limb movement processing.

  2. Inhibition of Parkinsonian tremor with cutaneous afferent evoked by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Man-Zhao; Xu, Shao-Qin; Hu, Zi-Xiang; Xu, Fu-Liang; Niu, Chuan-Xin M; Xiao, Qin; Lan, Ning

    2017-07-14

    Recent study suggests that tremor signals are transmitted by way of multi-synaptic corticospinal pathway. Neurophysiological studies have also demonstrated that cutaneous afferents exert potent inhibition to descending motor commands by way of spinal interneurons. We hypothesize in this study that cutaneous afferents could also affect the transmission of tremor signals, thus, inhibit tremor in patients with PD. We tested this hypothesis by activating cutaneous afferents in the dorsal hand skin innervated by superficial radial nerve using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Eight patients with PD having tremor dominant symptom were recruited to participate in this study using a consistent experimental protocol for tremor inhibition. Resting tremor and electromyogram (EMG) of muscles in the upper extremity of these subjects with PD were recorded, while surface stimulation was applied to the dorsal skin of the hand. Fifteen seconds of data were recorded for 5 s prior to, during and post stimulation. Power spectrum densities (PSDs) of tremor and EMG signals were computed for each data segment. The peak values of PSDs in three data segments were compared to detect evidence of tremor inhibition. At stimulation intensity from 1.5 to 1.75 times of radiating sensation threshold, apparent suppressions of tremor at wrist, forearm and upper arm and in the EMGs were observed immediately at the onset of stimulation. After termination of stimulation, tremor and rhythmic EMG bursts reemerged gradually. Statistical analysis of peak spectral amplitudes showed a significant difference in joint tremors and EMGs during and prior to stimulation in all 8 subjects with PD. The average percentage of suppression was 61.56% in tremor across all joints of all subjects, and 47.97% in EMG of all muscles. The suppression appeared to occur mainly in distal joints and muscles. There was a slight, but inconsistent effect on tremor frequency in the 8 patients with PD tested. Our

  3. Limb venous distension evokes sympathetic activation via stimulation of the limb afferents in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; McQuillan, Patrick M.; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently shown that a saline infusion in the veins of an arterially occluded human forearm evokes a systemic response with increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure. In this report, we examined whether this response was a reflex that was due to venous distension. Blood pressure (Finometer), heart rate, and MSNA (microneurography) were assessed in 14 young healthy subjects. In the saline trial (n = 14), 5% forearm volume normal saline was infused in an arterially occluded arm. To block afferents in the limb, 90 mg of lidocaine were added to the same volume of saline in six subjects during a separate visit. To examine whether interstitial perfusion of normal saline alone induced the responses, the same volume of albumin solution (5% concentration) was infused in 11 subjects in separate studies. Lidocaine abolished the MSNA and blood pressure responses seen with saline infusion. Moreover, compared with the saline infusion, an albumin infusion induced a larger (MSNA: Δ14.3 ± 2.7 vs. Δ8.5 ± 1.3 bursts/min, P blood pressure responses. These data suggest that venous distension activates afferent nerves and evokes a powerful systemic sympathoexcitatory reflex. We posit that the venous distension plays an important role in evoking the autonomic adjustments seen with postural stress in human subjects. PMID:22707559

  4. Giant renin secretory granules in beige mouse renal afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Rasch, Ruth; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    1997-01-01

    The mutant beige mouse (C57BL/6 bg) has a disease characterised by abnormally enlarged cytoplasmic granules in a variety of cells. With the purpose of establishing a suitable cellular model for studying renin secretion, the present study was undertaken to compare renin granule morphology in beige...... (average granular volume 0.681 microm3), whereas 1-2 large granules were present per cell in beige mice. The volume of afferent arteriole that contained secretory granules was lower in the beige mice. We conclude that the beige mouse synthesizes, stores and releases active renin. Renin secretory granules...... in beige mice are grossly enlarged with 1-2 granules per juxtaglomerular cell. Compared with control mice, a similar amount of total renin granule volume per afferent arteriole is contained in a smaller part of beige mouse afferent arteriole. Granular cells from beige mice could therefore be a valuable...

  5. Morphological changes in different populations of bladder afferent neurons detected by herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors with cell-type-specific promoters in mice with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobutaka; Doyal, Mark F; Goins, William F; Kadekawa, Katsumi; Wada, Naoki; Kanai, Anthony J; de Groat, William C; Hirayama, Akihide; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Glorioso, Joseph C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2017-11-19

    Functional and morphological changes in C-fiber bladder afferent pathways are reportedly involved in neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) after spinal cord injury (SCI). This study examined the morphological changes in different populations of bladder afferent neurons after SCI using replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors encoding the mCherry reporter driven by neuronal cell-type-specific promoters. Spinal intact (SI) and SCI mice were injected into the bladder wall with HSV mCherry vectors driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, CGRP promoter, TRPV1 promoter or neurofilament 200 (NF200) promoter. Two weeks after vector inoculation into the bladder wall, L1 and L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were removed bilaterally for immunofluorescent staining using anti-mCherry antibody. The number of CMV promoter vector-labeled neurons was not altered after SCI. The number of CGRP and TRPV1 promoter vector-labeled neurons was significantly increased whereas the number of NF200 vector-labeled neurons was decreased in L6 DRG after SCI. The median size of CGRP promoter-labeled C-fiber neurons was increased from 247.0 in SI mice to 271.3μm 2 in SCI mice whereas the median cell size of TRPV1 promoter vector-labeled neurons was decreased from 245.2 in SI mice to 216.5μm 2 in SCI mice. CGRP and TRPV1 mRNA levels of laser-captured bladder afferent neurons labeled with Fast Blue were significantly increased in SCI mice compared to SI mice. Thus, using a novel HSV vector-mediated neuronal labeling technique, we found that SCI induces expansion of the CGRP- and TRPV1-expressing C-fiber cell population, which could contribute to C-fiber afferent hyperexcitability and NDO after SCI. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle P Blum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle

  7. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kyle P; Lamotte D'Incamps, Boris; Zytnicki, Daniel; Ting, Lena H

    2017-09-01

    Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs) of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt) predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening) of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle lengthening conditions

  8. Intercellular K⁺ accumulation depolarizes Type I vestibular hair cells and their associated afferent nerve calyx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, D; Zampini, V; Tavazzani, E; Magistretti, J; Russo, G; Prigioni, I; Masetto, S

    2012-12-27

    Mammalian vestibular organs contain two types of sensory receptors, named Type I and Type II hair cells. While Type II hair cells are contacted by several small afferent nerve terminals, the basolateral surface of Type I hair cells is almost entirely enveloped by a single large afferent nerve terminal, called calyx. Moreover Type I, but not Type II hair cells, express a low-voltage-activated outward K(+) current, I(K,L), which is responsible for their much lower input resistance (Rm) at rest as compared to Type II hair cells. The functional meaning of I(K,L) and associated calyx is still enigmatic. By combining the patch-clamp whole-cell technique with the mouse whole crista preparation, we have recorded the current- and voltage responses of in situ hair cells. Outward K(+) current activation resulted in K(+) accumulation around Type I hair cells, since it induced a rightward shift of the K(+) reversal potential the magnitude of which depended on the amplitude and duration of K(+) current flow. Since this phenomenon was never observed for Type II hair cells, we ascribed it to the presence of a residual calyx limiting K(+) efflux from the synaptic cleft. Intercellular K(+) accumulation added a slow (τ>100ms) depolarizing component to the cell voltage response. In a few cases we were able to record from the calyx and found evidence for intercellular K(+) accumulation as well. The resulting depolarization could trigger a discharge of action potentials in the afferent nerve fiber. Present results support a model where pre- and postsynaptic depolarization produced by intercellular K(+) accumulation cooperates with neurotransmitter exocytosis in sustaining afferent transmission arising from Type I hair cells. While vesicular transmission together with the low Rm of Type I hair cells appears best suited for signaling fast head movements, depolarization produced by intercellular K(+) accumulation could enhance signal transmission during slow head movements. Copyright

  9. An animal model for human masseter muscle: histochemical characterization of mouse, rat, rabbit, cat, dog, pig, and cow masseter muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuxen, A; Kirkeby, S

    1990-01-01

    The masseter muscle of several animal species was investigated by use of a histochemical method for the demonstration of acid-stable and alkali-stable myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). The following subdivisions of fiber types were used: Type I fibers show weak ATPase activity at pH 9...... II and I fibers, with type II predominating. Cow masseter muscle consisted mainly of type I fibers, although some cow masseter muscles contained a very small number of type II fibers. Pig masseter muscle had both type I, II, and IM fibers. One of the characteristics of human masseter muscle is type...... IM fibers, which are rarely seen in muscles other than the masticatory muscles. Therefore, pig masseter muscle might be a suitable animal model for experimental studies, such as an investigation of the distribution and diameter of fiber types in the masticatory muscles before and after orthognathic...

  10. Cellular mechanisms for presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie; delgado-lezama, rodolfo; Christensen, Rasmus Kordt

    It is well established that presynaptic inhibition of primary afferents involves the activation of GABAA receptors located on presynaptic terminals. However, the source of GABA remains unknown. In an integrated preparation of the spinal cord of the adult turtle, we evoked dorsal root potentials...

  11. Afferent projections to the pontine micturition center in the cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R; Mouton, LJ; Holstege, G; Kuiper, Rutger

    2006-01-01

    The pontine micturition center (PMC) or Barrington's nucleus controls micturition by way of its descending projections to the sacral spinal cord. However, little is known about the afferents to the PMC that control its function and may be responsible for dysfunction in patients with

  12. Measurement of the relative afferent pupillary defect in retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, J A; Burton, T C

    1980-07-01

    A swinging flashlight test and calibrated neutral density filters were used to quantitate the depth of relative afferent pupillary defects in ten patients with retinal detachment. Postoperatively, the pupillary responses returned to normal in seven of nine patients with anatomically successful surgery.

  13. Characteristics of the mechanosensitive bladder afferent activities in relation with microcontractions in male rats with bladder outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Naoki; Ichihara, Koji; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Homma, Yukio; Igawa, Yasuhiko

    2017-08-09

    We investigated the characteristics of bladder mechanosensitive single-unit afferent activities (SAAs) in rats with a bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and their relationship with bladder microcontractions. Male Wistar rats were divided into Sham and BOO groups. Four or 10 days after the surgery, rats were anesthetized with urethane. The SAAs of Aδ- or C-fibers from the L6 dorsal roots were recorded during bladder filling. The BOO group showed a higher number of microcontractions and lower SAAs of Aδ-fibers compared with those of the Sham group. These findings were significant at day 10 post-operatively. In contrast, SAAs of C-fibers were not significantly different between the groups at either day 4 or 10. In the BOO group at day 10, the SAAs of both Aδ- and C-fibers at the "ascending" phase of microcontractions were significantly higher than those at the other phases (descending or stationary), and a similar tendency was also observed at day 4. Taken together, during bladder filling, the bladder mechanosensitive SAAs of Aδ-fibers were attenuated, but SAAs of both Aδ- and C-fibers were intermittently enhanced by propagation of microcontractions.

  14. Gut vagal afferents differentially modulate innate anxiety and learned fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarer, Melanie; Arnold, Myrtha; Günther, Lydia; Winter, Christine; Langhans, Wolfgang; Meyer, Urs

    2014-05-21

    Vagal afferents are an important neuronal component of the gut-brain axis allowing bottom-up information flow from the viscera to the CNS. In addition to its role in ingestive behavior, vagal afferent signaling has been implicated modulating mood and affect, including distinct forms of anxiety and fear. Here, we used a rat model of subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation (SDA), the most complete and selective vagal deafferentation method existing to date, to study the consequences of complete disconnection of abdominal vagal afferents on innate anxiety, conditioned fear, and neurochemical parameters in the limbic system. We found that compared with Sham controls, SDA rats consistently displayed reduced innate anxiety-like behavior in three procedures commonly used in preclinical rodent models of anxiety, namely the elevated plus maze test, open field test, and food neophobia test. On the other hand, SDA rats exhibited increased expression of auditory-cued fear conditioning, which specifically emerged as attenuated extinction of conditioned fear during the tone re-exposure test. The behavioral manifestations in SDA rats were associated with region-dependent changes in noradrenaline and GABA levels in key areas of the limbic system, but not with functional alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal grand stress. Our study demonstrates that innate anxiety and learned fear are both subjected to visceral modulation through abdominal vagal afferents, possibly via changing limbic neurotransmitter systems. These data add further weight to theories emphasizing an important role of afferent visceral signals in the regulation of emotional behavior. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/347067-10$15.00/0.

  15. Structural changes of the regulatory proteins bound to the thin filaments in skeletal muscle contraction by X-ray fiber diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Yasunobu; Takezawa, Yasunori; Matsuo, Tatsuhito; Ueno, Yutaka; Minakata, Shiho; Tanaka, Hidehiro; Wakabayashi, Katsuzo

    2008-01-01

    In order to clarify the structural changes related to the regulation mechanism in skeletal muscle contraction, the intensity changes of thin filament-based reflections were investigated by X-ray fiber diffraction. The time course and extent of intensity changes of the first to third order troponin (TN)-associated meridional reflections with a basic repeat of 38.4 nm were different for each of these reflections. The intensity of the first and second thin filament layer lines changed in a reciprocal manner both during initial activation and during the force generation process. The axial spacings of the TN-meridional reflections decreased by ∼0.1% upon activation relative to the relaxing state and increased by ∼0.24% in the force generation state, in line with that of the 2.7-nm reflection. Ca 2+ -binding to TN triggered the shortening and a change in the helical symmetry of the thin filaments. Modeling of the structural changes using the intensities of the thin filament-based reflections suggested that the conformation of the globular core domain of TN altered upon activation, undergoing additional conformational changes at the tension plateau. The tail domain of TN moved together with tropomyosin during contraction. The results indicate that the structural changes of regulatory proteins bound to the actin filaments occur in two steps, the first in response to the Ca 2+ -binding and the second induced by actomyosin interaction

  16. Determining physiological cross-sectional area of extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis as a whole and by regions using 3D computer muscle models created from digitized fiber bundle data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandiran, Kajeandra; Ravichandiran, Mayoorendra; Oliver, Michele L; Singh, Karan S; McKee, Nancy H; Agur, Anne M R

    2009-09-01

    Architectural parameters and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) are important determinants of muscle function. Extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB) are used in muscle transfers; however, their regional architectural differences have not been investigated. The aim of this study is to develop computational algorithms to quantify and compare architectural parameters (fiber bundle length, pennation angle, and volume) and PCSA of ECRL and ECRB. Fiber bundles distributed throughout the volume of ECRL (75+/-20) and ECRB (110+/-30) were digitized in eight formalin embalmed cadaveric specimens. The digitized data was reconstructed in Autodesk Maya with computational algorithms implemented in Python. The mean PCSA and fiber bundle length were significantly different between ECRL and ECRB (p < or = 0.05). Superficial ECRL had significantly longer fiber bundle length than the deep region, whereas the PCSA of superficial ECRB was significantly larger than the deep region. The regional quantification of architectural parameters and PCSA provides a framework for the exploration of partial tendon transfers of ECRL and ECRB.

  17. Transient up- and down-regulation of expression of myosin light chain 2 and myostatin mRNA mark the changes from stratified hyperplasia to muscle fiber hypertrophy in larvae of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Stella; Alami-Durante, Hélène; Power, Deborah M; Sarropoulou, Elena; Mamuris, Zissis; Moutou, Katerina A

    2016-02-01

    Hyperplasia and hypertrophy are the two mechanisms by which muscle develops and grows. We study these two mechanisms, during the early development of white muscle in Sparus aurata, by means of histology and the expression of structural and regulatory genes. A clear stage of stratified hyperplasia was identified early in the development of gilthead sea bream but ceased by 35 dph when hypertrophy took over. Mosaic recruitment of new white fibers began as soon as 60 dph. The genes mlc2a and mlc2b were expressed at various levels during the main phases of hyperplasia and hypertrophy. The genes myog and mlc2a were significantly up-regulated during the intensive stratified formation of new fibers and their expression was significantly correlated. Expression of mstn1 and igf1 increased at 35 dph, appeared to regulate the hyperplasia-to-hypertrophy transition, and may have stimulated the expression of mlc2a, mlc2b and col1a1 at the onset of mosaic hyperplasia. The up-regulation of mstn1 at transitional phases in muscle development indicates a dual regulatory role of myostatin in fish larval muscle growth.

  18. Induction and modulation of referred muscle pain in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, René Johannes

    correlated to pain intensity, and LP and RP thresholds were reproducible within and between sessions. Experimentally (electrical stimulation and infusion of hypertonic saline) induced muscle pain seems to be mediated by myelinated and unmyelinated afferents and the peripheral component of RP by myelinated...... afferents. Furthermore, cutaneous anesthesia of the RP area resulted in a reduction of RP intensity of 22%, while a complete nerve block of afferents from the RP area resulted in a 40% reduction. In summary, observations from the presented experiments suggest that elicitation of referred muscle pain...... is depending on and correlated to local muscle pain. Peripheral input from the RP area is involved, but is not a necessary condition for RP to appear. The present studies as well as others suggest that central hyperexcitability is involved in the generation of RP, but further investigations on mechanisms of RP...

  19. Nuclear Positioning in Muscle Development and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Eric eFolker; Mary eBaylies

    2013-01-01

    Muscle disease as a group is characterized by muscle weakness, muscle loss, and impaired muscle function. Although the phenotype is the same, the underlying cellular pathologies, and the molecular causes of these pathologies, are diverse. One common feature of many muscle disorders is the mispositioning of myonuclei. In unaffected individuals myonuclei are spaced throughout the periphery of the muscle fiber such that the distance between nuclei is maximized. However, in diseased muscles, th...

  20. Cerebro-afferent vessel and pupillary basal diameter variation induced by stomatognathic trigeminal proprioception: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cicco, Vincenzo

    2012-09-03

    A patient affected by asymmetric hemodynamics of cerebro-afferent vessels underwent duplex color scanner investigations in occlusal proprioceptive un- and rebalance conditions. Pupillometric video-oculographic examinations were performed in order to spot connected trigeminal proprioceptive motor patterns able to interfere on sympathetic autonomic activity. The aim of this case report is to verify if involuntary jaw closing during swallowing, executed in unbalance and rebalance myoelectric activity, would be able to modify cerebral hemodynamics. A 56-year-old Caucasian Italian woman affected by asymmetric blood flow of cerebro-afferent vessels underwent an electromyographic investigation of her occlusal muscles in order to assess their occlusal functional balance. The extreme asymmetry of myoelectric activity in dental occlusion evidenced by electromyographic values suggested the rebalancing of the functions of occlusal muscles through concurrent transcutaneous stimulation of the trigeminal nerve supra- and submandibular motor branches. The above-mentioned method allowed the detection of a symmetric craniomandibular muscular relation that can be kept constant through the use of a cusp bite modeled on the inferior dental arch: called orthotic-syntropic bite for its peculiar use of electrostimulation. A few days later, the patient underwent a duplex color scanner investigation and pupillometric video-oculographic examinations in occlusal unbalance and rebalance conditions. A comparative data analysis showed that an unbalanced dental occlusal function may represent an interferential pattern on cerebral hemodynamics velocity and pupillometric evaluations have proved useful both in the analysis of locus coeruleus functional modalities and as a diagnostic tool in the assessment of pathologies involving locus coeruleus and autonomic systems. The inclusion of myoelectric masseter examinations can be useful in patients with asymmetric hemodynamics of cerebro-afferent

  1. [Myofibroblasts and afferent signalling in the urinary bladder. A concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, J; Scholler, U; Freick, K; Schwalenberg, T; Heinrich, M; Horn, L C; Stolzenburg, J U

    2008-09-01

    Afferent signal transduction in the urinary bladder is still not clearly understood. An increasing body of evidence supports the view of complex interactions between urothelium, suburothelial myofibroblasts, and sensory nerves. Bladder tissue from tumour patients was used in this study. Methods included confocal immunofluorescence, polymerase chain reaction, calcium imaging, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP).Myofibroblasts express muscarinic and purinergic receptors. They show constitutive spontaneous activity in calcium imaging, which completely depends on extracellular calcium. Stimulation with carbachol and ATP-evoked intracellular calcium transients also depend on extracellular calcium. The intensive coupling between the cells is significantly diminished by incubation with TGF-beta 1. Myofibroblasts form an important cellular element within the afferent signalling of the urinary bladder. They possess all features required to take part in the complex interactions with urothelial cells and sensory nerves. Modulation of their function by cytokines may provide a pathomechanism for bladder dysfunction.

  2. Chloride regulates afferent arteriolar contraction in response to depolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Jensen, B L; Skott, O

    1998-01-01

    -Renal vascular reactivity is influenced by the level of dietary salt intake. Recent in vitro data suggest that afferent arteriolar contractility is modulated by extracellular chloride. In the present study, we assessed the influence of chloride on K+-induced contraction in isolated perfused rabbit...... afferent arterioles. In 70% of vessels examined, K+-induced contraction was abolished by acute substitution of bath chloride. Consecutive addition of Cl- (30, 60, 80, 100, 110, and 117 mmol/L) restored the sensitivity to K+, and half-maximal response was observed at 82 mmol/L chloride. The calcium channel...... antagonist diltiazem (10(-6) mol/L) abolished K+-induced contractions. Bicarbonate did not modify the sensitivity to chloride. Norepinephrine (10(-6) mol/L) induced full contraction in depolarized vessels even in the absence of chloride. Iodide and nitrate were substituted for chloride with no inhibitory...

  3. Afferent activity to necklace glomeruli is dependent on external stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munger Steven D

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main olfactory epithelium (MOE is a complex organ containing several functionally distinct subpopulations of sensory neurons. One such subpopulation is distinguished by its expression of the guanylyl cyclase GC-D. The axons of GC-D-expressing (GC-D+ neurons innervate 9–15 "necklace" glomeruli encircling the caudal main olfactory bulb (MOB. Chemosensory stimuli for GC-D+ neurons include two natriuretic peptides, uroguanylin and guanylin, and CO2. However, the biologically-relevant source of these chemostimuli is unclear: uroguanylin is both excreted in urine, a rich source of olfactory stimuli for rodents, and expressed in human nasal epithelium; CO2 is present in both inspired and expired air. Findings To determine whether the principal source of chemostimuli for GC-D+ neurons is external or internal to the nose, we assessed the consequences of removing external chemostimuli for afferent activity to the necklace glomeruli. To do so, we performed unilateral naris occlusions in Gucy2d-Mapt-lacZ +/- mice [which express a β-galactosidase (β-gal reporter specifically in GC-D+ neurons] followed by immunohistochemistry for β-gal and a glomerular marker of afferent activity, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH. We observed a dramatic decrease in TH immunostaining, consistent with reduced or absent afferent activity, in both necklace and non-necklace glomeruli ipsilateral to the occluded naris. Conclusion Like other MOB glomeruli, necklace glomeruli exhibit a large decrease in afferent activity upon removal of external stimuli. Thus, we conclude that activity in GC-D+ neurons, which specifically innervate necklace glomeruli, is not dependent on internal stimuli. Instead, GC-D+ neurons, like other OSNs in the MOE, primarily sense the external world.

  4. Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veazey, R.B.; Severin, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    Afferent projections to the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DMN) of the rat were demonstrated with axonal transport techniques. Potential sources for projections to the DMN were first identified by injecting the nucleus with HRP and examining the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cortex for retrogradely labeled neurons. Areas consistently labeled were then injected with a tritiated radioisotope, the tissue processed for autoradiography, and the DMN examined for anterograde labeling. Afferent projections to the medial and/or lateral parts of the DMN were found to originate from a number of spinal, bulbar, and cortical centers. Rostral brain centers projecting to both medial and lateral parts of the DMN include the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory cortex, the entopeduncular nucleus, and zona incerta. at the level of the midbrain, the ipsilateral substantia nigra and contralateral DMN likewise project to the DMN. Furthermore, the ipsilateral superior colliculus projects to the DMN, involving mainly the lateral part of the nucleus. Afferents from caudal centers include bilateral projections from the sensory nucleus of the trigeminal complex and the nucleus medulla oblongata centralis, as well as from the contralateral dentate nucleus. The projections from the trigeminal complex and nucleus medullae oblongatae centralis terminate in the intermediate and medial parts of the DMN, whereas projections from the contralateral dentate nucleus terminate mainly in its lateral part. In general, the afferent connections of the DMN arise from diverse areas of the brain. Although most of these projections distribute throughout the entire extent of the DMN, some of them project mainly to either medial or lateral parts of the nucleus, thus suggesting that the organization of the DMN is comparable, at least in part, to that of the reticular formation of the pons and medulla, a region in which hodological differences between medial and lateral subdivisions are known to exist

  5. The spatiotemporal relationships between chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and terminations of calcitonin gene related peptide and parvalbumin immunoreactive afferents in the spinal cord of mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqing; Yu, Chao; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Hui; Chan, Sun-On

    2017-08-10

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycans (PGs) are a family of complex molecules in the extracellular matrix and cell surface that regulate axon growth and guidance during development of the central nervous system. In this study, the expression of CSPGs was investigated in the mouse spinal cord at late embryonic and neonatal stages using CS-56 antibody. CS immunoreactivity was observed abundantly in ventral regions of spinal cord of embryonic day (E) 15 embryos. At E16 to E18, CS expression spread dorsally, but never reached the superficial layers of the dorsal horn. This pattern was maintained until postnatal day 4, the latest stage examined. Antibodies against calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and parvalbumin (PV) were employed to label primary afferents from nociceptors and proprioceptors, respectively. CGRP-immunoreactive fibers terminated in the superficial regions of the dorsal horn where CSPGs were weakly expressed, whereas PV-immunoreactive fibers were found in CSPG-rich regions in the ventral horn. Therefore, we conclude that CS expression is spatiotemporally regulated in the spinal cord, which correlates to the termination of sensory afferents. This pattern suggests a role of CSPGs on patterning afferents in the spinal cord, probably through a differential response of axons to these growth inhibitory molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brichta, Alan M.; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J.; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C.; Poppi, Lauren A.; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT. An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  7. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Brichta, Alan M; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C; Poppi, Lauren A; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. GABA in Paraventricular Nucleus Regulates Adipose Afferent Reflex in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ding

    Full Text Available Chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT induces adipose afferent reflex (AAR, and thereby causes a general sympathetic activation. Paraventricular nucleus (PVN is important in control of sympathetic outflow. This study was designed to investigate the role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA in PVN in regulating the AAR.Experiments were carried out in anesthetized rats. Renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP were continuously recorded. AAR was evaluated by the RSNA and MAP responses to electrical stimulation of the right epididymal WAT (eWAT afferent nerve. Electrical stimulation of eWAT afferent nerve increase RSNA. Bilateral microinjection of the GABAA receptor agonist isoguvacine or the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen attenuated the AAR. The effect of isoguvacine on the AAR was greater than that of baclofen. The GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine enhanced the AAR, while the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP-35348 had no significant effect on the AAR. Bilateral PVN microinjection of vigabatrin, a selective GABA-transaminase inhibitor, to increase endogenous GABA levels in the PVN abolished the AAR. The inhibitory effect of vigabatrin on the AAR was attenuated by the pretreatment with gabazine or CGP-35348. Pretreatment with combined gabazine and CGP-35348 abolished the effects of vigabatrin.Activation of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the PVN inhibits the AAR. Blockade of GABAA receptors in the PVN enhances the AAR. Endogenous GABA in the PVN plays an important role in regulating the AAR.

  9. Apparent Km of mitochondria for oxygen computed from Vmax measured in permeabilized muscle fibers is lower in water enriched in oxygen by electrolysis than injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, Joffrey; Bouitbir, Jamal; Sirvent, Pascal; Klein, Alexis; Charton, Antoine; Jimenez, Liliana; Péronnet, François R; Geny, Bernard; Richard, Ruddy

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that oxygen (O2) diffusion could be favored in water enriched in O2 by a new electrolytic process because of O2 trapping in water superstructures (clathrates), which could reduce the local pressure/content relationships for O2 and facilitate O2 diffusion along PO2 gradients. Mitochondrial respiration was compared in situ in saponin-skinned fibers isolated from the soleus muscles of Wistar rats, in solution enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process 1) at an O2 concentration decreasing from 240 µmol/L to 10 µmol/L (132 mmHg to 5 mmHg), with glutamate-malate or N, N, N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (TMPD)-ascorbate (with antimycin A) as substrates; and 2) at increasing adenosine diphosphate (ADP) concentration with glutamate-malate as substrate. As expected, maximal respiration decreased with O2 concentration and, when compared to glutamate-malate, the apparent Km O2 of mitochondria for O2 was significantly lower with TMPD-ascorbate with both waters. However, when compared to the water enriched in O2 by injection, the Km O2 was significantly lower with both electron donors in water enriched in O2 by electrolysis. This was not associated with any increase in the sensitivity of mitochondria to ADP; no significant difference was observed for the Km ADP between the two waters. In this experiment, a higher affinity of the mitochondria for O2 was observed in water enriched in O2 by electrolysis than by injection. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that O2 diffusion can be facilitated in water enriched in O2 by the electrolytic process.

  10. Single molecule fluorescence image patterns linked to dipole orientation and axial position: application to myosin cross-bridges in muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Burghardt

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoactivatable fluorescent probes developed specifically for single molecule detection extend advantages of single molecule imaging to high probe density regions of cells and tissues. They perform in the native biomolecule environment and have been used to detect both probe position and orientation.Fluorescence emission from a single photoactivated probe captured in an oil immersion, high numerical aperture objective, produces a spatial pattern on the detector that is a linear combination of 6 independent and distinct spatial basis patterns with weighting coefficients specifying emission dipole orientation. Basis patterns are tabulated for single photoactivated probes labeling myosin cross-bridges in a permeabilized muscle fiber undergoing total internal reflection illumination. Emitter proximity to the glass/aqueous interface at the coverslip implies the dipole near-field and dipole power normalization are significant affecters of the basis patterns. Other characteristics of the basis patterns are contributed by field polarization rotation with transmission through the microscope optics and refraction by the filter set. Pattern recognition utilized the generalized linear model, maximum likelihood fitting, for Poisson distributed uncertainties. This fitting method is more appropriate for treating low signal level photon counting data than χ(2 minimization.Results indicate that emission dipole orientation is measurable from the intensity image except for the ambiguity under dipole inversion. The advantage over an alternative method comparing two measured polarized emission intensities using an analyzing polarizer is that information in the intensity spatial distribution provides more constraints on fitted parameters and a single image provides all the information needed. Axial distance dependence in the emission pattern is also exploited to measure relative probe position near focus. Single molecule images from axial scanning fitted

  11. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  12. Heart failure induces changes in acid-sensing ion channels in sensory neurons innervating skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, David D; Kutschke, William J; Weiss, Robert M; Benson, Christopher J

    2015-10-15

    Heart failure is associated with diminished exercise capacity, which is driven, in part, by alterations in exercise-induced autonomic reflexes triggered by skeletal muscle sensory neurons (afferents). These overactive reflexes may also contribute to the chronic state of sympathetic excitation, which is a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are highly expressed in muscle afferents where they sense metabolic changes associated with ischaemia and exercise, and contribute to the metabolic component of these reflexes. Therefore, we tested if ASICs within muscle afferents are altered in heart failure. We used whole-cell patch clamp to study the electrophysiological properties of acid-evoked currents in isolated, labelled muscle afferent neurons from control and heart failure (induced by myocardial infarction) mice. We found that the percentage of muscle afferents that displayed ASIC-like currents, the current amplitudes, and the pH dose-response relationships were not altered in mice with heart failure. On the other hand, the biophysical properties of ASIC-like currents were significantly different in a subpopulation of cells (40%) from heart failure mice. This population displayed diminished pH sensitivity, altered desensitization kinetics, and very fast recovery from desensitization. These unique properties define these channels within this subpopulation of muscle afferents as being heteromeric channels composed of ASIC2a and -3 subunits. Heart failure induced a shift in the subunit composition of ASICs within muscle afferents, which significantly altered their pH sensing characteristics. These results might, in part, contribute to the changes in exercise-mediated reflexes that are associated with heart failure. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  13. Regulation of Metabolic Signaling in Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Peter Hjorth

    sensitivity in type I muscle fibers possibly reflects a superior effect of insulin on metabolic signaling compared to type II muscle fibers. This was investigated in the present thesis by examining muscle biopsies from lean and obese healthy subjects as well as patients with type 2 diabetes. From these muscle...

  14. Bones, Muscles, and Joints: The Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skeletal muscles are called striated (pronounced: STRY-ay-ted) because they are made up of fibers that ... blood through your body. When we smile and talk, muscles are helping us communicate, and when we ...

  15. Proportions of myosin heavy chain mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types in the slow and fast skeletal muscles are maintained after alterations of thyroid status in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Tomáš; Diallo, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2015), s. 111-118 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK158; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK123; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-CT-2004-511978 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : thyroid hormones * muscle gene expression * MyHC isoforms and muscle fiber types * quantitative real time RT-PCR * SDS-PAGE and 2-D Stereological analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  16. Long-term sensitization of mechanosensitive and -insensitive afferents in mice with persistent colorectal hypersensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Bin; La, Jun-ho; Schwartz, Erica S.; Tanaka, Takahiro; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Afferent input contributes significantly to the pain and colorectal hypersensitivity that characterize irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we investigated the contributions of mechanically sensitive and mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs; or silent afferents) to colorectal hypersensitivity. The visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD; 15–60 mmHg) was recorded in mice before and for weeks after intracolonic treatment with zymosan or saline. After CRD tests, the di...

  17. Apparent Km of mitochondria for oxygen computed from Vmax measured in permeabilized muscle fibers is lower in water enriched in oxygen by electrolysis than injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoll J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Joffrey Zoll,1 Jamal Bouitbir,1 Pascal Sirvent,2 Alexis Klein,3 Antoine Charton,1,4 Liliana Jimenez,3 François R Péronnet,5 Bernard Geny,1 Ruddy Richard61Physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine and EA3072, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, 2Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, EA 3533, Laboratoire des Adaptations Métaboliques à l’Exercice en Conditions Physiologiques et Pathologiques, Clermont-Ferrand, 3Danone Research, Centre Daniel Carasso, Palaiseau, 4Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care and EA3072, Hôpital de Hautepierre, Université de Strasbourg, France; 5Kinesiology Department, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 6Department of Sport Medicine and Functional Explorations and INRA UMR 1019, Faculty of Medicine, Université d’Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, FranceBackground: It has been suggested that oxygen (O2 diffusion could be favored in water enriched in O2 by a new electrolytic process because of O2 trapping in water superstructures (clathrates, which could reduce the local pressure/content relationships for O2 and facilitate O2 diffusion along PO2 gradients.Materials and methods: Mitochondrial respiration was compared in situ in saponin-skinned fibers isolated from the soleus muscles of Wistar rats, in solution enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process 1 at an O2 concentration decreasing from 240 µmol/L to 10 µmol/L (132 mmHg to 5 mmHg, with glutamate–malate or N, N, N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (TMPD–ascorbate (with antimycin A as substrates; and 2 at increasing adenosine diphosphate (ADP concentration with glutamate–malate as substrate.Results: As expected, maximal respiration decreased with O2 concentration and, when compared to glutamate–malate, the apparent Km O2 of mitochondria for O2 was significantly lower with TMPD–ascorbate with both waters. However, when compared to the water enriched in O2 by injection, the Km O2 was

  18. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances L Meredith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K+ channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K+ channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space.

  19. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Frances L; Kirk, Matthew E; Rennie, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K(+) channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K(+) channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space.

  20. The modulation of visceral functions by somatic afferent activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, A; Schmidt, R F

    1987-01-01

    We began by briefly reviewing the historical background of neurophysiological studies of the somato-autonomic reflexes and then discussed recent studies on somatic-visceral reflexes in combination with autonomic efferent nerve activity and effector organ responses. Most of the studies that have advanced our knowledge in this area have been carried out on anesthetized animals, thus eliminating emotional factors. We would like to emphasize again that the functions of many, or perhaps all visceral organs can be modulated by somato-sympathetic or somato-parasympathetic reflex activity induced by a appropriate somatic afferent stimulation in anesthetized animals. As mentioned previously, some autonomic nervous outflow, e.g. the adrenal sympathetic nerve activity, is involved in the control of hormonal secretion. John F. Fulton wrote in his famous textbook "Physiology of the Nervous System" (1949) that the posterior pituitary neurosecretion system (i.e. for oxytocin and vasopressin) could be considered a part of the parasympathetic nervous system. In the study of body homeostasis and environmental adaptation it would seem very important to further analyze the contribution of somatic afferent input to the autonomic nervous and hormonal regulation of visceral organ activity. Also, some immunological functions have been found to be influenced by autonomic nerves or hormones (e.g. adrenal cortical hormone and catecholamines). Finally, we must take into account, as we have briefly discussed, that visceral functions can be modulated by somatic afferent input via various degrees of integration of autonomic nerves, hormones, and immunological processes. We trust that such research will be expanded to higher species of mammals, and that ultimately this knowledge of somato-visceral reflexes obtained in the physiological laboratory will become clinically useful in influencing visceral functions.

  1. Role of capsaicin- and heat-sensitive afferents in stimulation of acupoint-induced pain and analgesia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jing; Ye, Gang; Wu, Jiang-Tao; Pertovaara, Antti; You, Hao-Jun

    2017-09-01

    We investigated role of capsaicin-sensitive afferents within and without the areas of Zusanli (ST36)/Shangjuxu (ST37) acupoints along the stomach (ST) meridian in the perception and modulation of pain assessed by visual analog scale of pain and its distribution rated by subjects, pressure pain threshold (PPT), and heat pain threshold (HPT) in humans. Compared with the treatment of non-acupoint area, capsaicin (100µg/50µl) administered into either ST36 or ST37 acupoint caused the strongest pain intensity and the most extensive pain distribution, followed by rapid onset, bilateral, long-lasting secondary mechanical hyperalgesia and slower onset secondary heat hypoalgesia (1day after the capsaicin treatment). Between treatments of different acupoints, capsaicin administrated into the ST36 acupoint exhibited the stronger pain intensity and more widespread pain distribution compared with the treatment of ST37 acupoint. A period of 30- to 45-min, but not 15-min, 43°C heating-needle stimulation applied to the ST36 acupoint significantly enhanced the HPT, and had no effect on PPT. Upon trapezius muscle pain elicited by the i.m. injection of 5.8% saline, pre-emptive treatment of the contralateral ST36 acupoint with 43°C heating-needle stimulation alleviated the ongoing muscle pain, reduced painful area, and reversed the decrease in HPT. It is suggested that (1) pain elicited from the acupoint and non-acupoint areas differs significantly, which are supposed to be dependent on the different distributions and contributions of capsaicin-sensitive afferents. (2) Non-painful heat stimulation is a valid approach in prevention of ongoing muscle pain with associated post-effects of peripheral and central sensitization. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of periodontal afferent inputs on corticomotor excitability in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y; Boudreau, S; Wang, M

    2010-01-01

    for the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) as an internal control. Burning pain intensity and mechanical sensitivity ratings to a von Frey filament applied to the application site were recorded on an electronic visual analogue scale (VAS). All subjects reported a decreased mechanical sensitivity (anova: P = 0......-injection for the LA (anovas: P > 0.22) or capsaicin (anovas: P > 0.16) sessions. These findings suggest that a transient loss or perturbation in periodontal afferent input to the brain from a single incisor is insufficient to cause changes in corticomotor excitability of the face MI, as measured by TMS in humans....

  3. MR features of a case of afferent loop syndrome presenting as obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, P.; Souci, J.; Oddo, F.; Diaine, B.; Padovani, B.; Gueyffier, C.

    2001-01-01

    The afferent loop syndrome corresponds to an acute or chronic obstruction of the afferent loop following a partial gastrectomy with Billroth II gastro-jejunal anastomosis. We describe the case of a 77-year-old man with history of partial gastrectomy for peptic ulcer disease performed 31 years ago and currently admitted for jaundice and poor general status. MR imaging showed dilatation of biliary and pancreatic ducts and showed a soft tissue mass between the afferent loop and the residual stomach. Endoscopy showed complete obstruction of the afferent loop by a biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma. The patient died of sepsis shortly after endoscopy of septicemia. (authors)

  4. Ethanol Exposure Causes Muscle Degeneration in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Coffey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic myopathies are characterized by neuromusculoskeletal symptoms such as compromised movement and weakness. Although these symptoms have been attributed to neurological damage, EtOH may also target skeletal muscle. EtOH exposure during zebrafish primary muscle development or adulthood results in smaller muscle fibers. However, the effects of EtOH exposure on skeletal muscle during the growth period that follows primary muscle development are not well understood. We determined the effects of EtOH exposure on muscle during this phase of development. Strikingly, muscle fibers at this stage are acutely sensitive to EtOH treatment: EtOH induces muscle degeneration. The severity of EtOH-induced muscle damage varies but muscle becomes more refractory to EtOH as muscle develops. NF-kB induction in muscle indicates that EtOH triggers a pro-inflammatory response. EtOH-induced muscle damage is p53-independent. Uptake of Evans blue dye shows that EtOH treatment causes sarcolemmal instability before muscle fiber detachment. Dystrophin-null sapje mutant zebrafish also exhibit sarcolemmal instability. We tested whether Trichostatin A (TSA, which reduces muscle degeneration in sapje mutants, would affect EtOH-treated zebrafish. We found that TSA and EtOH are a lethal combination. EtOH does, however, exacerbate muscle degeneration in sapje mutants. EtOH also disrupts adhesion of muscle fibers to their extracellular matrix at the myotendinous junction: some detached muscle fibers retain beta-Dystroglycan indicating failure of muscle end attachments. Overexpression of Paxillin, which reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish deficient for beta-Dystroglycan, is not sufficient to rescue degeneration. Taken together, our results suggest that EtOH exposure has pleiotropic deleterious effects on skeletal muscle.

  5. FUSIMOTOR EFFECTS OF MIDBRAIN STIMULATION ON JAW MUSCLE-SPINDLES OF THE ANESTHETIZED CAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TAYLOR, A; JUCH, PJW

    The effects of electrical stimulation within the midbrain on fusimotor output to the jaw elevator muscles were studied in anaesthetized cats. Muscle spindle afferents recorded in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus were categorised as primary or secondary by their responses to succinylcholine

  6. Influence of botulinum toxin on rabbit jaw muscle activity and anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfage, J A M; Wang, Jeffrey; Lie, S H J T J; Langenbach, Geerling E J

    2012-05-01

    Muscles can adapt their fiber properties to accommodate to new conditions. We investigated the extent to which a decrease in muscle activation can cause an adaptation of fiber properties in synergistic and antagonistic jaw muscles. Three months after the injection of botulinum toxin type A in one masseter (anterior or posterior) muscle changes in fiber type composition and fiber cross-sectional areas in jaw muscles were studied at the microscopic level. The injected masseter showed a steep increase in myosin type IIX fibers, whereas fast fibers decreased by about 50% in size. Depending on the injection site, both synergistic and antagonistic muscles showed a significant increase in the size of their fast IIA fibers, sometimes combined with an increased number of IIX fibers. Silencing the activity in the masseter not only causes changes in the fibers of the injected muscle but also leads to changes in other jaw muscles. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Interactions between visceral afferent signaling and stimulus processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo D Critchley

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Visceral afferent signals to the brain influence thoughts, feelings and behaviour. Here we highlight the findings of a set of empirical investigations in humans concerning body-mind interaction that focus on how feedback from states of autonomic arousal shapes cognition and emotion. There is a longstanding debate regarding the contribution of the body, to mental processes. Recent theoretical models broadly acknowledge the role of (autonomically-mediated physiological arousal to emotional, social and motivational behaviours, yet the underlying mechanisms are only partially characterized. Neuroimaging is overcoming this shortfall; first, by demonstrating correlations between autonomic change and discrete patterns of evoked, and task-independent, neural activity; second, by mapping the central consequences of clinical perturbations in autonomic response and; third, by probing how dynamic fluctuations in peripheral autonomic state are integrated with perceptual, cognitive and emotional processes. Building on the notion that an important source of the brain’s representation of physiological arousal is derived from afferent information from arterial baroreceptors, we have exploited the phasic nature of these signals to show their differential contribution to the processing of emotionally-salient stimuli. This recent work highlights the facilitation at neural and behavioral levels of fear and threat processing that contrasts with the more established observations of the inhibition of central pain processing during baroreceptors activation. The implications of this body-brain-mind axis are discussed.

  8. Anatomy and physiology of the afferent visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sashank; Galetta, Steven L

    2011-01-01

    The efficient organization of the human afferent visual system meets enormous computational challenges. Once visual information is received by the eye, the signal is relayed by the retina, optic nerve, chiasm, tracts, lateral geniculate nucleus, and optic radiations to the striate cortex and extrastriate association cortices for final visual processing. At each stage, the functional organization of these circuits is derived from their anatomical and structural relationships. In the retina, photoreceptors convert photons of light to an electrochemical signal that is relayed to retinal ganglion cells. Ganglion cell axons course through the optic nerve, and their partial decussation in the chiasm brings together corresponding inputs from each eye. Some inputs follow pathways to mediate pupil light reflexes and circadian rhythms. However, the majority of inputs arrive at the lateral geniculate nucleus, which relays visual information via second-order neurons that course through the optic radiations to arrive in striate cortex. Feedback mechanisms from higher cortical areas shape the neuronal responses in early visual areas, supporting coherent visual perception. Detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the afferent visual system, in combination with skilled examination, allows precise localization of neuropathological processes and guides effective diagnosis and management of neuro-ophthalmic disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Asymmetric Macular Structural Damage Is Associated With Relative Afferent Pupillary Defects in Patients With Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracitelli, Carolina P. B.; Tatham, Andrew J.; Zangwill, Linda M.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Abe, Ricardo Y.; Diniz-Filho, Alberto; Paranhos, Augusto; Baig, Saif; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the relationship between relative afferent pupillary defects (RAPDs) and macular structural damage measured by macular thickness and macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (mGCIPL) thickness in patients with glaucoma. Methods A cross-sectional study was done of 106 glaucoma patients and 85 healthy individuals from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study. All subjects underwent standard automated perimetry (SAP) and optic nerve and macular imaging using Cirrus Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SDOCT). Glaucoma was defined as repeatable abnormal SAP or progressive glaucomatous changes on stereo photographs. Pupil responses were assessed using an automated pupillometer, which records the magnitude of RAPD (RAPD score), with additional RAPD scores recorded for each of a series of colored stimuli (blue, red, green, and yellow). The relationship between RAPD score and intereye differences (right minus left eye) in circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL) thickness, mGCIPL, macular thickness, and SAP mean deviation (MD), was examined using linear regression. Results There was fair correlation between RAPD score and asymmetric macular structural damage measured by intereye difference in mGCIPL thickness (R2 = 0.285, P glaucoma. PMID:27064394

  10. Lung vagal afferent activity in rats with bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelegle, E S; Walby, W F; Mansoor, J K; Chen, A T

    2001-05-01

    Bleomycin treatment in rats results in pulmonary fibrosis that is characterized by a rapid shallow breathing pattern, a decrease in quasi-static lung compliance and a blunting of the Hering-Breuer Inflation Reflex. We examined the impulse activity of pulmonary vagal afferents in anesthetized, mechanically ventilated rats with bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis during the ventilator cycle and static lung inflations/deflations and following the injection of capsaicin into the right atrium. Bleomycin enhanced volume sensitivity of slowly adapting stretch receptors (SARs), while it blunted the sensitivity of these receptors to increasing transpulmonary pressure. Bleomycin treatment increased the inspiratory activity, while it decreased the expiratory activity of rapidly adapting stretch receptors (RARs). Pulmonary C-fiber impulse activity did not appear to be affected by bleomycin treatment. We conclude that the fibrosis-related shift in discharge profile and enhanced volume sensitivity of SARs combined with the increased inspiratory activity of RARs contributes to the observed rapid shallow breathing of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis.

  11. The relation between maximal voluntary force in m. palmaris longus and the temporal and spatial summation of muscle fiber recruitment in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudel, Cécyl G.; Ahmed, Waqas; Elbrønd, Vibeke S.

    2018-01-01

    that AMG is a noninvasive method which can be readily applied to accurately describe how a subject uses a given muscle during any given movement. These findings have relevance when considering training strategies in subjects with muscle trauma or disease, in the elderly, or for both amateur and top...

  12. Monosynaptic connections between primary afferents and giant neurons in the turtle spinal dorsal horn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández, A; Radmilovich, M; Russo, R E

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the occurrence of monosynaptic connections between dorsal root afferents and a distinct cell type-the giant neuron-deep in the dorsal horn of the turtle spinal cord. Light microscope studies combining Nissl stain and transganglionic HRP-labeling of the primary afferents have...

  13. New twist on artificial muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Carter S; Li, Na; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Aliev, Ali E; Di, Jiangtao; Baughman, Ray H

    2016-10-18

    Lightweight artificial muscle fibers that can match the large tensile stroke of natural muscles have been elusive. In particular, low stroke, limited cycle life, and inefficient energy conversion have combined with high cost and hysteretic performance to restrict practical use. In recent years, a new class of artificial muscles, based on highly twisted fibers, has emerged that can deliver more than 2,000 J/kg of specific work during muscle contraction, compared with just 40 J/kg for natural muscle. Thermally actuated muscles made from ordinary polymer fibers can deliver long-life, hysteresis-free tensile strokes of more than 30% and torsional actuation capable of spinning a paddle at speeds of more than 100,000 rpm. In this perspective, we explore the mechanisms and potential applications of present twisted fiber muscles and the future opportunities and challenges for developing twisted muscles having improved cycle rates, efficiencies, and functionality. We also demonstrate artificial muscle sewing threads and textiles and coiled structures that exhibit nearly unlimited actuation strokes. In addition to robotics and prosthetics, future applications include smart textiles that change breathability in response to temperature and moisture and window shutters that automatically open and close to conserve energy.

  14. Structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle provides inspiration for design of new artificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yingxin; Zhang, Chi

    2015-03-01

    A variety of actuator technologies have been developed to mimic biological skeletal muscle that generates force in a controlled manner. Force generation process of skeletal muscle involves complicated biophysical and biochemical mechanisms; therefore, it is impossible to replace biological muscle. In biological skeletal muscle tissue, the force generation of a muscle depends not only on the force generation capacity of the muscle fiber, but also on many other important factors, including muscle fiber type, motor unit recruitment, architecture, structure and morphology of skeletal muscle, all of which have significant impact on the force generation of the whole muscle or force transmission from muscle fibers to the tendon. Such factors have often been overlooked, but can be incorporated in artificial muscle design, especially with the discovery of new smart materials and the development of innovative fabrication and manufacturing technologies. A better understanding of the physiology and structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle will therefore benefit the artificial muscle design. In this paper, factors that affect muscle force generation are reviewed. Mathematical models used to model the structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle are reviewed and discussed. We hope the review will provide inspiration for the design of a new generation of artificial muscle by incorporating the structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle into the design of artificial muscle.

  15. Structure–function relationship of skeletal muscle provides inspiration for design of new artificial muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yingxin; Zhang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    A variety of actuator technologies have been developed to mimic biological skeletal muscle that generates force in a controlled manner. Force generation process of skeletal muscle involves complicated biophysical and biochemical mechanisms; therefore, it is impossible to replace biological muscle. In biological skeletal muscle tissue, the force generation of a muscle depends not only on the force generation capacity of the muscle fiber, but also on many other important factors, including muscle fiber type, motor unit recruitment, architecture, structure and morphology of skeletal muscle, all of which have significant impact on the force generation of the whole muscle or force transmission from muscle fibers to the tendon. Such factors have often been overlooked, but can be incorporated in artificial muscle design, especially with the discovery of new smart materials and the development of innovative fabrication and manufacturing technologies. A better understanding of the physiology and structure–function relationship of skeletal muscle will therefore benefit the artificial muscle design. In this paper, factors that affect muscle force generation are reviewed. Mathematical models used to model the structure–function relationship of skeletal muscle are reviewed and discussed. We hope the review will provide inspiration for the design of a new generation of artificial muscle by incorporating the structure–function relationship of skeletal muscle into the design of artificial muscle. (topical review)

  16. Dynamic cardiomyoplasty using artificial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukui, Kozo; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic cardiomyoplasty using latissimus dorsi muscle was previously used to compensate for congestive heart failure. Now, however, this method is not acceptable because the long-term result was not as expected owing to fatigue of the skeletal muscle. BioMetal fiber developed by Toki Corporation is one of the artificial muscles activated by electric current. The behavior of this fiber is similar to that of organic muscle. We made an artificial muscle like the latissimus dorsi using BioMetal fiber and tested whether we could use this new muscle as a cardiac supporting device. Testing one Biometal fiber showed the following performance: practical use maximal generative force was 30 g, exercise variation was 50%, and the standard driving current was 220 mA. We created a 4 x 12-cm tabular artificial muscle using 8 BioMetal fibers as a cardiac support device. We also made a simulation circuit composed of a 6 x 8-cm soft bag with unidirectional valves, reservoir, and connecting tube. The simulation circuit was filled with water and the soft bag was wrapped with the artificial muscle device. After powering the device electrically at 9 V with a current of 220 mA for each fiber, we measured the inside pressure and observed the movement of the artificial device. The artificial muscle contracted in 0.5 s for peak time and squeezed the soft bag. The peak pressure inside the soft bag was measured as 10 mmHg. Although further work will be needed to enhance the speed of deformability and movement simulating contraction, we conclude that artificial muscle may be potentially useful as a cardiac assistance device that can be developed for dynamic cardiomyoplasty.

  17. Fiber webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; James S. Han; Von L. Byrd

    2005-01-01

    Wood fibers can be used to produce a wide variety of low-density three-dimensional webs, mats, and fiber-molded products. Short wood fibers blended with long fibers can be formed into flexible fiber mats, which can be made by physical entanglement, nonwoven needling, or thermoplastic fiber melt matrix technologies. The most common types of flexible mats are carded, air...

  18. The oculomotor system of decapod cephalopods: eye muscles, eye muscle nerves, and the oculomotor neurons in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budelmann, B U; Young, J Z

    1993-04-29

    Fourteen extraocular eye muscles are described in the decapods Loligo and Sepioteuthis, and thirteen in Sepia; they are supplied by four eye muscle nerves. The main action of most of the muscles is a linear movement of the eyeball, only three muscles produce strong rotations. The arrangement, innervation and action of the decapod eye muscles are compare