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Sample records for murine xenograft models

  1. Therapeutic activity of two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia

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    Berthou Christian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that allanxanthone C and macluraxanthone, two xanthones purified from Guttiferae trees, display in vitro antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities in leukemic cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and leukemia B cell lines. Results Here, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic effects of the two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human CLL, developed by engrafting CD5-transfected chronic leukemia B cells into SCID mice. Treatment of the animals with five daily injections of either allanxanthone C or macluraxanthone resulted in a significant prolongation of their survival as compared to control animals injected with the solvent alone (p = 0.0006 and p = 0.0141, respectively. The same treatment of mice which were not xenografted induced no mortality. Conclusion These data show for the first time the in vivo antileukemic activities of two plant-derived xanthones, and confirm their potential interest for CLL therapy.

  2. The utility of fecal corticosterone metabolites and animal welfare assessment protocols as predictive parameters of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Jørgensen, Pernille Schønning; Pipper, Christian Bressen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of various non-invasive parameters for the prediction of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model in male C.B-17 SCID (C.B-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid)) mice. The study showed that body weight, food and water...

  3. Local delivery of cannabinoid-loaded microparticles inhibits tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of glioblastoma multiforme.

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    Dolores Hernán Pérez de la Ossa

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ(9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD - the two major ingredients of marijuana - have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1:1 w:w of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies.

  4. The utility of fecal corticosterone metabolites and animal welfare assessment protocols as predictive parameters of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Jørgensen, Pernille Schønning; Pipper, Christian Bressen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of various non-invasive parameters for the prediction of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model in male C.B-17 SCID (C.B-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid)) mice. The study showed that body weight, food and water consumpt......The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of various non-invasive parameters for the prediction of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model in male C.B-17 SCID (C.B-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid)) mice. The study showed that body weight, food and water...... consumption, and an animal welfare assessment (AWA) protocol revealed marked differences between control and cancer lines as the size of the tumor increased. However, only the AWA protocol was effective in predicting the tumor size and the level of fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM). FCM levels were......, however, negatively-correlated to the AWA score, and the tumor size, both when evaluated on a given day and when accumulated over the entire period. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that body weight and food and water consumption were negatively-affected as tumor developed but only the animal...

  5. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

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    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd., Suite 2114, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  6. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

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    Kim, Manbok, E-mail: manbok66@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Rahman, Masmudur M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Cogle, Christopher R. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McFadden, Grant [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  7. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2015-07-10

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts.

  8. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

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    Kaylani, Samer Z. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda (United States); Pressey, Joseph G. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  9. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

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    Frost, Sophia; Frayo, Shani; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Back, Tom; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice.

  10. Reproducibility study of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} uptake in murine models of human tumor xenografts

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    Chang, Edwin; Liu, Shuangdong; Chin, Frederick; Cheng, Zhen [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Yaghoubi, Shahriar [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Wedgeworth, James Patrick [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Berndorff, Dietmar; Gekeler, Volker [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Berlin (Germany); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Nuclear Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    An {sup 18}F-labeled PEGylated arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) dimer [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} has been used to image tumor {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin levels in preclinical and clinical studies. Serial positron emission tomography (PET) studies may be useful for monitoring antiangiogenic therapy response or for drug screening; however, the reproducibility of serial scans has not been determined for this PET probe. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeted PET probe, [{sup 18}F ]FPP(RGD){sub 2} using small animal PET. Human HCT116 colon cancer xenografts were implanted into nude mice (n = 12) in the breast and scapular region and grown to mean diameters of 5-15 mm for approximately 2.5 weeks. A 3-min acquisition was performed on a small animal PET scanner approximately 1 h after administration of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} (1.9-3.8 MBq, 50-100 {mu}Ci) via the tail vein. A second small animal PET scan was performed approximately 6 h later after reinjection of the probe to assess for reproducibility. Images were analyzed by drawing an ellipsoidal region of interest (ROI) around the tumor xenograft activity. Percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) values were calculated from the mean or maximum activity in the ROIs. Coefficients of variation and differences in %ID/g values between studies from the same day were calculated to determine the reproducibility. The coefficient of variation (mean {+-}SD) for %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} small animal PET scans performed 6 h apart on the same day were 11.1 {+-} 7.6% and 10.4 {+-} 9.3%, respectively. The corresponding differences in %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between scans were -0.025 {+-} 0.067 and -0.039 {+-} 0.426. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a direct relationship between extent of {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 3} integrin expression in tumors and tumor vasculature

  11. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

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    Ni Xiao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h. Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more

  12. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h). Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV). Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS); and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous) human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more abundant high molecular

  13. Pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells promote breast cancer growth in bone in a murine xenograft model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas M. Bodenstine; Benjamin H. Beck; Xuemei Cao; Leah M. Cook; Aimen Ismai; J. Kent Powers; Andrea M. Mastro; Danny R. Welch

    2011-01-01

    The bones are the most common sites of breast cancer metastasis. Upon arrival within the bone microenvironment, breast cancer cells coordinate the activities of stromal cells, resulting in an increase in osteoclast activity and bone matrix degradation. In late stages of bone metastasis, breast cancer cells induce apoptosis in osteoblasts, which further exacerbates bone loss. However, in early stages, breast cancer cells induce osteoblasts to secrete inflammatory cytokines purported to drive tumor progression. To more thoroughly evaluate the role of osteoblasts in early stages of breast cancer metastasis to the bones, we used green fluorescent protein-labeled human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435, which both induce osteolysis after intra-femoral injection in athymic mice, and the murine pre-osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 to modulate osteoblast populations at the sites of breast cancer metastasis. Breast cancer cells were injected directly into the femur with or without equal numbers of MC3T3-E1 cells. Tumors grew significantly larger when co-injected with breast cancer cells and MC3T3-E1 cells than injected with breast cancer cells alone. Osteolysis was induced in both groups, indicating that MC3T3-E1 cells did not block the ability of breast cancer cells to cause bone destruction. MC3T3-E1 cells promoted tumor growth out of the bone into the extraosseous stroma. These data suggest that breast cancer cells and osteoblasts communicate during early stages of bone metastasis and promote tumor growth.

  14. Quantitation of Murine Stroma and Selective Purification of the Human Tumor Component of Patient-Derived Xenografts for Genomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Valentina E; Allaj, Viola; Gardner, Eric E; Poirier, J T; Rudin, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models are increasingly used for preclinical therapeutic testing of human cancer. A limitation in molecular and genetic characterization of PDX tumors is the presence of integral murine stroma. This is particularly problematic for genomic sequencing of PDX models. Rapid and dependable approaches for quantitating stromal content and purifying the malignant human component of these tumors are needed. We used a recently developed technique exploiting species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicon length (ssPAL) differences to define the fractional composition of murine and human DNA, which was proportional to the fractional composition of cells in a series of lung cancer PDX lines. We compared four methods of human cancer cell isolation: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), an immunomagnetic mouse cell depletion (MCD) approach, and two distinct EpCAM-based immunomagnetic positive selection methods. We further analyzed DNA extracted from the resulting enriched human cancer cells by targeted sequencing using a clinically validated multi-gene panel. Stromal content varied widely among tumors of similar histology, but appeared stable over multiple serial tumor passages of an individual model. FACS and MCD were superior to either positive selection approach, especially in cases of high stromal content, and consistently allowed high quality human-specific genomic profiling. ssPAL is a dependable approach to quantitation of murine stromal content, and MCD is a simple, efficient, and high yield approach to human cancer cell isolation for genomic analysis of PDX tumors.

  15. Suppression subtractive hybridization method for the identification of a new strain of murine hepatitis virus from xenografted SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed M; Toohey, Brendan; Purcell, Damian F J; Kannourakis, George

    2015-12-01

    During attempts to clone retroviral determinants associated with a mouse model of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify unique viruses in the liver of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice transplanted with LCH tissues. A partial genomic sequence of a murine coronavirus was identified, and the whole genome (31428 bp) of the coronavirus was subsequently sequenced using PCR cloning techniques. Nucleotide sequence comparisons revealed that the genome sequence of the new virus was 91-93% identical to those of known murine hepatitis viruses (MHVs). The predicted open reading frame from the nucleotide sequence encoded all known proteins of MHVs. Analysis at the protein level showed that the virus was closely related to the highly virulent MHV-JHM strain. The virus strain was named MHV-MI. No type D retroviruses were found. Degenerate PCR targeting of type D retrovirus and 5'-RACE targeting of other types of retroviruses confirmed the absence of any retroviral association with the LCH xenografted SCID mice.

  16. Inhibition of rejection in murine islet xenografts by CTLA4Ig and CD40LIg gene transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian; LI Hua; JIANG Nan; WANG Guo-ying; FU Bin-sheng; WANG Gen-shu; YANG Yang; CHEN Gui-hua

    2010-01-01

    Background Costimulatory signals play a vital role in T cell activation. Blockade of costimulatory pathway by CTLA4Ig or CD40LIg have enhanced graft survival in experimental transplantation models yet mechanisms remain undetermined.We investigated the effects of CTLA4Ig and CD40LIg gene transfer on islet xenografts rejection in rats.Methods Human islets were infected with recombinant adenoviruses containing CTLA4Ig and CD40LIg genes and implanted beneath the kidney capsule of diabetic rats. Levels of blood sugar, morphological changes, and survival of grafts were recorded. Expressions of CTLA4Ig, CD40LIg and insulin were detected by immunohistochemical staining and cytokines levels were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Results Blood glucose levels in transplant rats decreased to normal level on the 2nd day post transplantation. The mean blood glucose in the control group, CTLA4Ig transfected group, CD40LIg transfected group and CTLA4Ig +CD40LIg cotransfected group increased on days 8, 24, 21, 68, post transplantation respectively. The grafts in control group, CTLA4Ig transfected group, CD40LIg transfected group and CTLA4Ig + CD40LIg cotransfected group survived for (8±1), (29±4), (27±3), and (74±10) days, respectively. Survival in CTLA4Ig + CD40LIg cotransfected group was significantly longer. Survivals of CTLA4Ig transfected group and CD40LIg transfected group were significantly longer than control group. In controJ animals, serum interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor a concentration significantly increased within seven days post transplantation. Haematoxylin eosin staining of grafts showed live islets in situ of transplant rats without inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the expression of insulin at islets in all experimental groups.Conclusions Transfer of CTLA4Ig and CD40Llg genes, especially the cotransfer of both, inhibits rejection of murine islet xenografts. Downregulated expressions of Th1

  17. Xenograft model for therapeutic drug testing in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Julie; Bishop, Justin A; Akpeng, Belinda; Pai, Sara I; Best, Simon R A

    2015-02-01

    Identifying effective treatment for papillomatosis is limited by a lack of animal models, and there is currently no preclinical model for testing potential therapeutic agents. We hypothesized that xenografting of papilloma may facilitate in vivo drug testing to identify novel treatment options. A biopsy of fresh tracheal papilloma was xenografted into a NOD-scid-IL2Rgamma(null) (NSG) mouse. The xenograft began growing after 5 weeks and was serially passaged over multiple generations. Each generation showed a consistent log-growth pattern, and in all xenografts, the presence of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genome was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histopathologic analysis demonstrated that the squamous architecture of the original papilloma was maintained in each generation. In vivo drug testing with bevacizumab (5 mg/kg i.p. twice weekly for 3 weeks) showed a dramatic therapeutic response compared to saline control. We report here the first successful case of serial xenografting of a tracheal papilloma in vivo with a therapeutic response observed with drug testing. In severely immunocompromised mice, the HPV genome and squamous differentiation of the papilloma can be maintained for multiple generations. This is a feasible approach to identify therapeutic agents in the treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Identification of replication-competent HSV-1 Cgal+ strain targets in a mouse model of human hepatocarcinoma xenograft

    OpenAIRE

    Santamaria, E. (Enrique); Mora, M.I.; Carro-Roldan, E. (Elvira); M Molina; Fernandez-Irigoyen, J. (Joaquín); Marconi, P; Manservigi, R; Greco, A.; Epstein, A L; Prieto, J.; Hernandez-Alcoceba, R. (Rubén); Corrales, F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies based on animal models have shown the advantages and potential of oncolytic viral therapy using HSV-1 -based replication-competent vectors in the treatment of liver tumors, but little is known about the cellular targets that are modulated during viral infection. In the present work, we have studied the effects of intratumoral injections of HSV-1 Cgal(+) strain in a murine model of human hepatoma xenografts. Viral replication was assessed for more than 1month, leading to a signi...

  19. Utility of a human-mouse xenograft model and in vivo near-infrared fluorescent imaging for studying wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tassi, Elena; Schmidt, Marcel O; McNish, Sean; Baker, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar; Wellstein, Anton

    2015-12-01

    To study the complex cellular interactions involved in wound healing, it is essential to have an animal model that adequately mimics the human wound microenvironment. Currently available murine models are limited because wound contraction introduces bias into wound surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate utility of a human-mouse xenograft model for studying human wound healing. Normal human skin was harvested from elective abdominoplasty surgery, xenografted onto athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, and allowed to engraft for 3 months. The graft was then wounded using a 2-mm punch biopsy. Wounds were harvested on sequential days to allow tissue-based markers of wound healing to be followed sequentially. On the day of wound harvest, mice were injected with XenoLight RediJect cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) probe and imaged according to package instructions. Immunohistochemistry confirms that this human-mouse xenograft model is effective for studying human wound healing in vivo. Additionally, in vivo fluorescent imaging for inducible COX-2 demonstrated upregulation from baseline to day 4 (P = 0·03) with return to baseline levels by day 10, paralleling the reepithelialisation of the wound. This human-mouse xenograft model, combined with in vivo fluorescent imaging provides a useful mechanism for studying molecular pathways of human wound healing.

  20. Pathologic Correlates of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma Defined in an Orthotopic Xenograft Model

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    Kadoch, Cigall; Dinca, Eduard B.; Voicu, Ramona; Chen, Lingjing; Nguyen, Diana; Parikh, Seema; Karrim, Juliana; Shuman, Marc A.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Treseler, Patrick A.; James, C. David; Rubenstein, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The prospect for advances in the treatment of patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is likely dependent on the systematic evaluation of its pathobiology. Animal models of PCNSL are needed to facilitate the analysis of its molecular pathogenesis and for the efficient evaluation of novel therapeutics. Experimental Design We characterized the molecular pathology of CNS lymphoma tumors generated by the intracerebral implantation of Raji B lymphoma cells in athymic mice. Lymphoma cells were modified for bioluminescence imaging to facilitate monitoring of tumor growth and response to therapy. In parallel, we identified molecular features of lymphoma xenograft histopathology that are evident in human PCNSL specimens. Results Intracerebral Raji tumors were determined to faithfully reflect the molecular pathogenesis of PCNSL, including the predominant immunophenotypic state of differentiation of lymphoma cells and their reactive microenvironment. We show the expression of interleukin-4 by Raji and other B lymphoma cell lines in vitro and by Raji tumors in vivo and provide evidence for a role of this cytokine in the M2 polarization of lymphoma macrophages both in the murine model and in diagnostic specimens of human PCNSL. Conclusion Intracerebral implantation of Raji cells results in a reproducible and invasive xenograft model, which recapitulates the histopathology and molecular features of PCNSL, and is suitable for preclinical testing of novel agents. We also show for the first time the feasibility and accuracy of tumor bioluminescence in the monitoring of a highly infiltrative brain tumor. PMID:19276270

  1. Combining fisetin and ionizing radiation suppresses the growth of mammalian colorectal cancers in xenograft tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Bo-Shen; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Chang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Fu-Du; Avirmed, Shiirevnyamba; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-12-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), which belongs to the flavonoid group of polyphenols and is found in a wide range of plants, has been reported to exhibit a number of biological activities in human cancer cells, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, anti-invasive and antiproliferative effects. Although previous in vitro studies have shown that fisetin treatment increases the apoptotic rate and enhances the radiosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells, the in vivo effects of fisetin on tumor growth remain unclear. In the present study a murine xenograft tumor model was employed to investigate the therapeutic effects of fisetin in combination with radiation on CT-26 colon cancer cells and human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. This revealed that intratumoral injection of fisetin significantly suppressed the growth of CT-26 tumors compared with the untreated control group, but had little effect on the growth of HCT116 tumors. However, fisetin in combination with 2-Gy radiation enhanced tumor suppressor activity in murine colon and human colorectal xenograft tumors, as compared with 2-Gy fractionated radiation administered alone for 5 days and fisetin alone. Interestingly, fisetin downregulated the expression of the oncoprotein securin in a p53-independent manner. However, securin-null HCT116 tumors showed only moderate sensitivity to fisetin treatment, and the combination of fisetin and radiation did not significantly suppress securin-null HCT116 tumor growth compared with normal HCT116 tumors. Therefore, the role of securin in mediating the effect of fisetin on colorectal cancer growth warrants further investigation. In conclusion, the results of the current study provide important preclinical data for evaluating the efficacy of fisetin and radiation combination treatment as an adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for human colorectal cancers.

  2. Murine models of ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Christopher; Levine, Joel; Rosenberg, Daniel W

    2003-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology limited to the large intestine. The disease is prevalent in industrial societies and is associated with specific ethnic populations. A number of murine models, each focused on distinct aspects of the disease process, were developed over the past 20 years to further our understanding of the pathogenesis of UC. These models have been and remain our best resource for the study of the disorder as a result of their homology to human UC and the ease in which they can be manipulated and examined. This review examines and distills what has been leamed from these models and how this information is related back to human UC.

  3. Histone modifications patterns in tissues and tumours from acute promyelocytic leukemia xenograft model in response to combined epigenetic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiulienė, Giedrė; Treigytė, Gražina; Savickienė, Jūratė; Matuzevičius, Dalius; Alksnė, Milda; Jarašienė-Burinskaja, Rasa; Bukelskienė, Virginija; Navakauskas, Dalius; Navakauskienė, Rūta

    2016-04-01

    Xenograft models are suitable for in vivo study of leukemia's pathogenesis and the preclinical development of anti-leukemia agents but understanding of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms linking to adult cell functions in pathological conditions during different in vivo treatments is yet unknown. In this study, for the first time epigenetic chromatin modifications were characterized in tissues and tumours from murine xenograft model generated using the human acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) NB4 cells engrafted in immunodeficient NOG mice. Xenografts were subjected to combined epigenetic treatment by histone deacetylase inhibitor Belinostat, histone methyltransferase inhibitor 3-DZNeaplanocin A and all-trans-retinoic acid based on in vitro model, where such combination inhibited NB4 cell growth and enhanced retinoic acid-induced differentiation to granulocytes. Xenotransplantation was assessed by peripheral blood cells counts, the analysis of cell surface markers (CD15, CD33, CD45) and the expression of certain genes (PML-RAR alpha, CSF3, G-CSFR, WT1). The combined treatment prolonged APL xenograft mice survival and prevented tumour formation. The analysis of the expression of histone marks such as acetylation of H4, trimethylation of H3K4, H3K9 and H3K27 in APL xenograft mice tumours and tissues demonstrated tissue-specific changes in the level of histone modifications and the APL prognostic mark, WT1 protein. In summary, the effects of epigenetic agents used in this study were positive for leukemia prevention and linked to a modulation of the chromatin epigenetic environment in adult tissues of malignant organism.

  4. Murine model of TB meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Umesh Datta; Abbas, Ali; Kashyap, Raj Pal Singh; Gupta, Pushpa

    2016-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are the most severe forms of extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) due to high levels of mortality and neurological morbidity. Limited studies are available on CNS-TB animal-model development, despite the steady rise in cerebral-TB cases in India over the past decade. This study describes the development of a murine model of CNS-TB using a clinical strain (C3) isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of CNS-TB patients. Groups of mice were infected intravenously with an MTB C3 strain isolated from the CSF of CNS-TB patients in order to mimic the dynamics of actual infection. Brain and lung tissue were evaluated for bacterial burden, as well as histopathology and surrogate markers of TB infection at 30- and 50-days post-infection. Mice infected intravenously with MTB C3 strains showed progressive development of CNS disease, with high bacillary burden in the lungs during the initial stage (30days), which eventually disseminated to the brain at a later stage (50days). All C3-infected mice showed elevated levels of mycobacterial antigens and antibodies, as well as increased T cell adenosine deaminase activity in brain homogenates, which explicitly correlated with mycobacterial load in the brain and chronic brain pathology. High mortality rates (60%) were associated with mice infected with the C3 strain as compared to those of controls. Our findings demonstrated the design of a novel murine model of CNS-TB using a C3 strain and that replicated events of EPTB dissemination. This model will promote efforts to understand the pathogenesis CNS-TB infection for development of improved therapeutic interventions in the future. Copyright © 2016.

  5. Human airway xenograft models of epithelial cell regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puchelle Edith

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regeneration and restoration of the airway epithelium after mechanical, viral or bacterial injury have a determinant role in the evolution of numerous respiratory diseases such as chronic bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis. The study in vivo of epithelial regeneration in animal models has shown that airway epithelial cells are able to dedifferentiate, spread, migrate over the denuded basement membrane and progressively redifferentiate to restore a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. Recently, human tracheal xenografts have been developed in immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID and nude mice. In this review we recall that human airway cells implanted in such conditioned host grafts can regenerate a well-differentiated and functional human epithelium; we stress the interest in these humanized mice in assaying candidate progenitor and stem cells of the human airway mucosa.

  6. A human lung xenograft mouse model of Nipah virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Valbuena

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV is a member of the genus Henipavirus (family Paramyxoviridae that causes severe and often lethal respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans with high mortality rates (up to 92%. NiV can cause Acute Lung Injury (ALI in humans, and human-to-human transmission has been observed in recent outbreaks of NiV. While the exact route of transmission to humans is not known, we have previously shown that NiV can efficiently infect human respiratory epithelial cells. The molecular mechanisms of NiV-associated ALI in the human respiratory tract are unknown. Thus, there is an urgent need for models of henipavirus infection of the human respiratory tract to study the pathogenesis and understand the host responses. Here, we describe a novel human lung xenograft model in mice to study the pathogenesis of NiV. Following transplantation, human fetal lung xenografts rapidly graft and develop mature structures of adult lungs including cartilage, vascular vessels, ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium, and primitive "air" spaces filled with mucus and lined by cuboidal to flat epithelium. Following infection, NiV grows to high titers (10(7 TCID50/gram lung tissue as early as 3 days post infection (pi. NiV targets both the endothelium as well as respiratory epithelium in the human lung tissues, and results in syncytia formation. NiV infection in the human lung results in the production of several cytokines and chemokines including IL-6, IP-10, eotaxin, G-CSF and GM-CSF on days 5 and 7 pi. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that NiV can replicate to high titers in a novel in vivo model of the human respiratory tract, resulting in a robust inflammatory response, which is known to be associated with ALI. This model will facilitate progress in the fundamental understanding of henipavirus pathogenesis and virus-host interactions; it will also provide biologically relevant models for other respiratory viruses.

  7. Ineffective photodynamic therapy (PDT) in a poorly vascularized xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, L.; Gomer, C. J.; Doiron, D. R.; Szirth, B. C.

    1988-01-01

    Haematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) photodynamic therapy (PDT) may have clinical application in the management of patients with retinoblastoma. Heterotransplantation of retinoblastoma cells into the anterior chamber of the nude mouse eye and the subsequent growth of small tumour masses has provided a model for evaluation of various therapeutic modalities. Ninety-four evaluable xenograft tumours in 54 nude mice were randomized to receive one of the following treatments: cyclophosphamide (CPM) alone, HPD-PDT alone, CPM followed by HPD-PDT, HPD-PDT followed by CPM, or saline control. Responses were demonstrated after CPM treatment in all three relevant groups. However, HPD-PDT was found to be ineffective either alone or as a contributor in the double modality treatment groups. The small tumour masses treated can be demonstrated histologically to be avascular. It is proposed that although the same retinoblastoma cells in different circumstances are responsive to HPD-PDT, no clinical response is demonstrable utilizing this model, due to the absence of tumor vascularity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3395551

  8. Gene Expression Profiles Can Predict Panitumumab Monotherapy Responsiveness in Human Tumor Xenograft Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Boedigheimer

    2013-02-01

    Conclusion A model was constructed from microarray data that prospectively predict responsiveness to panitumumab in xenograft models. This approach may help identify patients, independent of disease origin, likely to benefit from panitumumab.

  9. The In Ovo Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane (CAM) Assay as an Efficient Xenograft Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Michael; Pathak, Ravi R; Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Friedman, Scott L; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Sikora, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    .... More recently, the CAM assay has been modified to work as an in vivo xenograft model system for various cancers that bridges the gap between basic in vitro work and more complex animal cancer models...

  10. Optimization of Glioblastoma Mouse Orthotopic Xenograft Models for Translational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irtenkauf, Susan M; Sobiechowski, Susan; Hasselbach, Laura A; Nelson, Kevin K; Transou, Andrea D; Carlton, Enoch T; Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor predominantly localized to the cerebral cortex. We developed a panel of patient-derived mouse orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) for preclinical drug studies by implanting cancer stem cells (CSC) cultured from fresh surgical specimens intracranially into 8-wk-old female athymic nude mice. Here we optimize the glioblastoma PDOX model by assessing the effect of implantation location on tumor growth, survival, and histologic characteristics. To trace the distribution of intracranial injections, toluidine blue dye was injected at 4 locations with defined mediolateral, anterioposterior, and dorsoventral coordinates within the cerebral cortex. Glioblastoma CSC from 4 patients and a glioblastoma nonstem-cell line were then implanted by using the same coordinates for evaluation of tumor location, growth rate, and morphologic and histologic features. Dye injections into one of the defined locations resulted in dye dissemination throughout the ventricles, whereas tumor cell implantation at the same location resulted in a much higher percentage of small multifocal ventricular tumors than did the other 3 locations tested. Ventricular tumors were associated with a lower tumor growth rate, as measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and decreased survival in 4 of 5 cell lines. In addition, tissue oxygenation, vasculature, and the expression of astrocytic markers were altered in ventricular tumors compared with nonventricular tumors. Based on this information, we identified an optimal implantation location that avoided the ventricles and favored cortical tumor growth. To assess the effects of stress from oral drug administration, mice that underwent daily gavage were compared with stress-positive and -negative control groups. Oral gavage procedures did not significantly affect the survival of the implanted mice or physiologic measurements of stress. Our findings document the importance of optimization of the implantation site for

  11. Anticancer Efficacy of Cordyceps militaris Ethanol Extract in a Xenografted Leukemia Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Gwang Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordyceps militaris is used widely as a traditional medicine in East Asia. Although a few studies have attempted to elucidate the anticancer activities of C. militaris, the precise mechanism of C. militaris therapeutic effects is not fully understood. We examined the anticancer activities of C. militaris ethanolic extract (Cm-EE and its cellular and molecular mechanisms. For this purpose, a xenograft mouse model bearing murine T cell lymphoma (RMA cell-derived cancers was established to investigate in vivo anticancer mechanisms. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, immunoblotting analysis, and flow cytometric assay were employed to check in vitro cytotoxicity, molecular targets, and proapoptotic action of Cm-EE. Interestingly, cancer sizes and mass were reduced in a C. militaris-administered group. Levels of the phosphorylated forms of p85 and AKT were clearly decreased in the group administered with Cm-EE. This result indicated that levels of phosphoglycogen synthase kinase 3β (p-GSK3β and cleaved caspase-3 were increased with orally administered Cm-EE. In addition, Cm-EE directly inhibited the viability of cultured RMA cells and C6 glioma cells. The number of proapoptotic cells was significantly increased in a Cm-EE treated group compared with a control group. Our results suggested that C. militaris might be able to inhibit cancer growth through regulation of p85/AKT-dependent or GSK3β-related caspase-3-dependent apoptosis.

  12. Anticancer Efficacy of Cordyceps militaris Ethanol Extract in a Xenografted Leukemia Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Gwang; Son, Young-Jin; Lee, Tae Ho; Baek, Nam Joon; Yoon, Deok Hyo; Kim, Tae Woong; Aravinthan, Adithan; Hong, Sungyoul; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Sung, Gi-Ho; Cho, Jae Youl

    2017-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris is used widely as a traditional medicine in East Asia. Although a few studies have attempted to elucidate the anticancer activities of C. militaris, the precise mechanism of C. militaris therapeutic effects is not fully understood. We examined the anticancer activities of C. militaris ethanolic extract (Cm-EE) and its cellular and molecular mechanisms. For this purpose, a xenograft mouse model bearing murine T cell lymphoma (RMA) cell-derived cancers was established to investigate in vivo anticancer mechanisms. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, immunoblotting analysis, and flow cytometric assay were employed to check in vitro cytotoxicity, molecular targets, and proapoptotic action of Cm-EE. Interestingly, cancer sizes and mass were reduced in a C. militaris-administered group. Levels of the phosphorylated forms of p85 and AKT were clearly decreased in the group administered with Cm-EE. This result indicated that levels of phosphoglycogen synthase kinase 3β (p-GSK3β) and cleaved caspase-3 were increased with orally administered Cm-EE. In addition, Cm-EE directly inhibited the viability of cultured RMA cells and C6 glioma cells. The number of proapoptotic cells was significantly increased in a Cm-EE treated group compared with a control group. Our results suggested that C. militaris might be able to inhibit cancer growth through regulation of p85/AKT-dependent or GSK3β-related caspase-3-dependent apoptosis.

  13. Improvement of Radiation-Mediated Immunosuppression of Human NSCLC Tumour Xenografts in a Nude Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Tokalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model have consistently been used as an essential part of preclinical studies for anticancer drugs activity in human. Commonly, these animals receive whole body irradiation to assure immunosuppression. But whole body dose delivery might be inhomogeneous and the resulting incomplete bone marrow depletion may modify tumour behaviour. To improve irradiation-mediated immunosuppression of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model irradiation (2 + 2 Gy from opposite sides of animals has been performed using a conventional X-ray tube. The described modification of whole body irradiation improves growth properties of human NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model. The design of the whole body irradiation mediated immunosuppression described here for NSCLC xenografts may be useful for research applications involving other types of human tumours.

  14. Patient-derived xenograft mouse models of pseudomyxoma peritonei recapitulate the human inflammatory tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuracha, Murali R; Thomas, Peter; Loggie, Brian W; Govindarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a neoplastic syndrome characterized by peritoneal tumor implants with copious mucinous ascites. The standard of care for PMP patients is aggressive cytoreductive surgery performed in conjunction with heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Not all patients are candidates for these procedures and a majority of the patients will have recurrent disease. In addition to secreted mucin, inflammation and fibrosis are central to PMP pathogenesis but the molecular processes that regulate tumor-stromal interactions within the peritoneal tumor microenvironment remain largely unknown. This knowledge is critical not only to elucidate PMP pathobiology but also to identify novel targets for therapy. Here, we report the generation of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models for PMP and assess the ability of these models to replicate the inflammatory peritoneal microenvironment of human PMP patients. PDX mouse models of low- and high-grade PMP were generated and were of a similar histopathology as human PMP. Cytokines previously shown to be elevated in human PMP were also elevated in PDX ascites. Significant differences in IL-6 and IL-8/KC/MIP2 were seen between human and PDX ascites. Interestingly, these cytokines were mostly secreted by mouse-derived, tumor-associated stromal cells rather than by human-derived PMP tumor cells. Our data suggest that the PMP PDX mouse models are especially suited to the study of tumor-stromal interactions that regulate the peritoneal inflammatory environment in PMP as the tumor and stromal cells in these mouse models are of human and murine origins, respectively. These mouse models are therefore, likely to be useful in vivo surrogates for testing and developing novel therapeutic treatment interventions for PMP.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF ANTITUMOR ACTIVITY FOR TUMOR XENOGRAFT STUDIES USING EXPONENTIAL GROWTH MODELS

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    In preclinical tumor xenograft experiments, the antitumor activity of the tested agents is often assessed by endpoints such as tumor doubling time, tumor growth delay (TGD), and log10 cell kill (LCK). In tumor xenograft literature, the values of these endpoints are presented without any statistical inference, which ignores the noise in the experimental data. However, using exponential growth models, these endpoints can be quantified by their growth curve parameters, thus allowing parametric i...

  16. Systematic analysis of a xenograft mice model for KSHV+ primary effusion lymphoma (PEL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Dai

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is the causative agent of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, which arises preferentially in the setting of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Even with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy, PEL continues to cause high mortality rates, requiring the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PEL xenograft models employing immunodeficient mice have been used to study the in vivo effects of a variety of therapeutic approaches. However, it remains unclear whether these xenograft models entirely reflect clinical presentations of KSHV(+ PEL, especially given the recent description of extracavitary solid tumor variants arising in patients. In addition, effusion and solid tumor cells propagated in vivo exhibit unique biology, differing from one another or from their parental cell lines propagated through in vitro culture. Therefore, we used a KSHV(+ PEL/BCBL-1 xenograft model involving non-obese diabetic/severe-combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mice, and compared characteristics of effusion and solid tumors with their parent cell culture-derived counterparts. Our results indicate that although this xenograft model can be used for study of effusion and solid lymphoma observed in patients, tumor cells in vivo display unique features to those passed in vitro, including viral lytic gene expression profile, rate of solid tumor development, the host proteins and the complex of tumor microenvironment. These items should be carefully considered when the xenograft model is used for testing novel therapeutic strategies against KSHV-related lymphoma.

  17. Advances in Murine Models of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Li-li; Wu, Hao; Cui, Wen-peng; Zhou, Wen-hua; Luo, Ping; Sun, Jing; Yuan, Hang; Miao, Li-ning

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the microvascular complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which is also associated with a poor life expectancy of diabetic patients. However, the pathogenesis of DN is still unclear. Thus, it is of great use to establish appropriate animal models of DN for doing research on pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. Although a large number of murine models of DN including artificially induced, spontaneous, and genetically engineered (knockout and transgenic) animal models have been developed, none of them develops renal changes sufficiently reflecting those seen in humans. Here we review the identified murine models of DN from the aspects of genetic background, type of diabetes, method of induction, gene deficiency, animal age and gender, kidney histopathology, and phenotypic alterations in the hope of enhancing our comprehension of genetic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms responsible for this disease and providing new clues as to how to choose appropriate animal models of DN. PMID:23844375

  18. Advances in Murine Models of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-li Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the microvascular complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which is also associated with a poor life expectancy of diabetic patients. However, the pathogenesis of DN is still unclear. Thus, it is of great use to establish appropriate animal models of DN for doing research on pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. Although a large number of murine models of DN including artificially induced, spontaneous, and genetically engineered (knockout and transgenic animal models have been developed, none of them develops renal changes sufficiently reflecting those seen in humans. Here we review the identified murine models of DN from the aspects of genetic background, type of diabetes, method of induction, gene deficiency, animal age and gender, kidney histopathology, and phenotypic alterations in the hope of enhancing our comprehension of genetic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms responsible for this disease and providing new clues as to how to choose appropriate animal models of DN.

  19. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-06-10

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdc(scid) and Il2rg(null) alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation.

  20. Establishment and characterization of a canine xenograft model of inflammatory mammary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, L; Peña, L; González Gil, A; Cáceres, S; Díez, L; Illera, J C

    2013-12-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) and human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) are the most aggressive form of mammary/breast cancer. Both species naturally develop it, sharing epidemiological, clinical and histological characteristics. Thus, IMC has been suggested as a model to study the human disease. We have developed the first IMC xenograft model in SCID mice. Xenografts reproduced the histological features from the primary tumor, were highly aggressive and showed dermal tumor emboli, distinctive hallmarks of IMC/IBC. This model was hormone receptors positive and HER2 negative. Our findings showed that estrogens and androgens are locally produced in tissues. Factors related to tumor vascularization showed positive expression and xenografts with the highest expression of all analyzed vascular factors had the highest rate of tumor proliferation. The role of steroid hormones and the angio/lymphangiogenic properties found in this model, provide additional knowledge for future interventions in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the disease.

  1. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Ramsey

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002. Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  2. Murine models of human wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jerry S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    In vivo wound healing experiments remain the most predictive models for studying human wound healing, allowing an accurate representation of the complete wound healing environment including various cell types, environmental cues, and paracrine interactions. Small animals are economical, easy to maintain, and allow researchers to take advantage of the numerous transgenic strains that have been developed to investigate the specific mechanisms involved in wound healing and regeneration. Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process.

  3. Patient-Derived Xenograft Models : An Emerging Platform for Translational Cancer Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidalgo, Manuel; Amant, Frederic; Biankin, Andrew V.; Budinska, Eva; Byrne, Annette T.; Caldas, Carlos; Clarke, Robert B.; de Jong, Steven; Jonkers, Jos; Maelandsmo, Gunhild Mari; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Seoane, Joan; Trusolino, Livio; Villanueva, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing interest in the development and characterization of patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models for cancer research. PDX models mostly retain the principal histologic and genetic characteristics of their donor tumor and remain stable across passages. These mod

  4. Efficient Generation of Bispecific Murine Antibodies for Pre-Clinical Investigations in Syngeneic Rodent Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labrijn, Aran F.; Meesters, Joyce I.; Bunce, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic concepts exploiting tumor-specific antibodies are often established in pre-clinical xenograft models using immuno-deficient mice. More complex therapeutic paradigms, however, warrant the use of immuno-competent mice, that more accurately capture the relevant biology that is being...... for the generation of therapeutic human IgG1 bispecific antibodies (bsAb). To facilitate the investigation of dual-Targeting concepts in immuno-competent mice, we now applied and optimized our method for the generation of murine bsAbs. We show that the optimized combinations of matched point-mutations enabled...

  5. Assessment of antitumor activity for tumor xenograft studies using exponential growth models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianrong

    2011-05-01

    In preclinical tumor xenograft experiments, the antitumor activity of the tested agents is often assessed by endpoints such as tumor doubling time, tumor growth delay (TGD), and log10 cell kill (LCK). In tumor xenograft literature, the values of these endpoints are presented without any statistical inference, which ignores the noise in the experimental data. However, using exponential growth models, these endpoints can be quantified by their growth curve parameters, thus allowing parametric inference, such as an interval estimate, to be used to assess the antitumor activity of the treatment.

  6. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Zebadúa, P.; Lárraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; García-Garduño, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramírez, V.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Paz, C.; Celis, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  7. The T61 human breast cancer xenograft: an experimental model of estrogen therapy of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, N; Spang-Thomsen, M; Cullen, K

    1996-01-01

    Endocrine therapy is one of the principal treatment modalities of breast cancer, both in an adjuvant setting and in advanced disease. The T61 breast cancer xenograft described here provides an experimental model of the effects of estrogen treatment at a molecular level. T61 is an estrogen recepto...

  8. Resolution of psoriasis upon blockade of IL-15 biological activity in a xenograft mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Louise S; Schuurman, Janine; Beurskens, Frank

    2003-01-01

    for binding to its receptor but potently interfered with the assembly of the IL-15 receptor alpha, beta, gamma complex. This antibody effectively blocked IL-15-induced T cell proliferation and monocyte TNF-alpha release in vitro. In a human psoriasis xenograft model, antibody 146B7 reduced the severity...

  9. Validation of a mouse xenograft model system for gene expression analysis of human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Richard W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-clinical models that effectively recapitulate human disease are critical for expanding our knowledge of cancer biology and drug resistance mechanisms. For haematological malignancies, the non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mouse is one of the most successful models to study paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. However, for this model to be effective for studying engraftment and therapy responses at the whole genome level, careful molecular characterisation is essential. Results Here, we sought to validate species-specific gene expression profiling in the high engraftment continuous ALL NOD/SCID xenograft. Using the human Affymetrix whole transcript platform we analysed transcriptional profiles from engrafted tissues without prior cell separation of mouse cells and found it to return highly reproducible profiles in xenografts from individual mice. The model was further tested with experimental mixtures of human and mouse cells, demonstrating that the presence of mouse cells does not significantly skew expression profiles when xenografts contain 90% or more human cells. In addition, we present a novel in silico and experimental masking approach to identify probes and transcript clusters susceptible to cross-species hybridisation. Conclusions We demonstrate species-specific transcriptional profiles can be obtained from xenografts when high levels of engraftment are achieved or with the application of transcript cluster masks. Importantly, this masking approach can be applied and adapted to other xenograft models where human tissue infiltration is lower. This model provides a powerful platform for identifying genes and pathways associated with ALL disease progression and response to therapy in vivo.

  10. [Murine models of platelet diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F

    2007-05-01

    Platelet-related diseases correspond to functional defects or abnormal production (thrombopoiesis) of hereditary and immunological origins. Recent progress in the manipulation of the mouse genome (transgenesis, gene inactivation or insertion) has resulted in the generation of numerous strains exhibiting defective platelet function or production. Some strains reproduce known hereditary diseases affecting haemostasis (Glanzmann thrombasthenia, Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) or thrombopoiesis (Wiscott-Aldrich or May-Hegglin syndrome). More often the mutated strains have no human equivalent and represent useful models to study: (i) the role of adhesive or signalling receptors or of signalling proteins in platelet-dependent haemostasis and thrombosis or; (ii) to study the poorly characterized mechanisms of thrombopoiesis, which implicate transcription factors (GATA, Fli1), growth factors and receptors (TPO, cMPL), and cytoskeletal or contractile proteins (tubulin, myosin). Additional mouse strains result from the selection of spontaneous mutants many of which affect intracellular platelet granules, representing models of storage pool diseases (SPD) such as the Gray platelet syndrome (alphaSPD) or Hermansky-Pudlack syndrome (deltaSPD). More recently, a systematic chemical mutagenesis approach has also identified genes involved in thrombopoiesis and platelet survival. Finally, mouse models of auto- or allo-immune thrombocytopenia have been developed to study the mechanisms of platelet destruction or removal.

  11. Establishment of a Novel Bladder Cancer Xenograft Model in Humanized Immunodeficient Mice

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    Zhen Gong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to develop a novel model by transplanting human bladder cancer xenografts into humanized immunodeficient mice (SCID. Methods: The animals first underwent sublethal irradiation and then were subjected to simultaneous transplantation of human lymphocytes (5 × 107 cells/mouse i.p. and human bladder cancer cells (3 × 106 cells/mouse s.c.. Results: The xenografts developed in all 12 mice that had received bladder cancer BIU-87 cells, and the tumor specimens were evaluated histologically. All 6 model mice expressed human CD3 mRNA and/or protein in the peripheral blood, spleens and xenografts. The mean proportion of human CD3+ cells was 19% with a level of human IgG 532.4µ/ml in the peripheral blood at Week 6 after transplant inoculation. The re-constructed human immune system in these mice was confirmed to be functional by individual in vitro testing of their proliferative, secretory and cytotoxic responses. Conclusion: The successful engraftment of the human bladder cancer xenografts and the establishment of the human immune system in our in vivo model described here may provide a useful tool for the development of novel therapeutic strategies targeting at bladder cancer.

  12. A Real-Time Non-invasive Auto-bioluminescent Urinary Bladder Cancer Xenograft Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Bincy Anu; Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2017-02-01

    The study was to develop an auto-bioluminescent urinary bladder cancer (UBC) xenograft animal model for pre-clinical research. The study used a humanized, bacteria-originated lux reporter system consisting of six (luxCDABEfrp) genes to express components required for producing bioluminescent signals in human UBC J82, J82-Ras, and SW780 cells without exogenous substrates. Immune-deficient nude mice were inoculated with Lux-expressing UBC cells to develop auto-bioluminescent xenograft tumors that were monitored by imaging and physical examination. Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent J82-Lux, J82-Ras-Lux, and SW780-Lux cell lines were established. Xenograft tumors derived from tumorigenic Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent J82-Ras-Lux cells allowed a serial, non-invasive, real-time monitoring by imaging of tumor development prior to the presence of palpable tumors in animals. Using Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent tumorigenic cells enabled us to monitor the entire course of xenograft tumor development through tumor cell implantation, adaptation, and growth to visible/palpable tumors in animals.

  13. A human brainstem glioma xenograft model enabled for bioluminescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hashizume, Rintaro; Ozawa, Tomoko; Dinca, Eduard B.; Banerjee, Anuradha; Prados, Michael D.; James, Charles D.; Gupta, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    Despite the use of radiation and chemotherapy, the prognosis for children with diffuse brainstem gliomas is extremely poor. There is a need for relevant brainstem tumor models that can be used to test new therapeutic agents and delivery systems in pre-clinical studies. We report the development of a brainstem-tumor model in rats and the application of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for monitoring tumor growth and response to therapy as part of this model. Luciferase-modified human glioblastoma...

  14. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  15. A novel xenograft model in zebrafish for high-resolution investigating dynamics of neovascularization in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjian Zhao

    Full Text Available Tumor neovascularization is a highly complex process including multiple steps. Understanding this process, especially the initial stage, has been limited by the difficulties of real-time visualizing the neovascularization embedded in tumor tissues in living animal models. In the present study, we have established a xenograft model in zebrafish by implanting mammalian tumor cells into the perivitelline space of 48 hours old Tg(Flk1:EGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos. With this model, we dynamically visualized the process of tumor neovascularization, with unprecedented high-resolution, including new sprouts from the host vessels and the origination from VEGFR2(+ individual endothelial cells. Moreover, we quantified their contributions during the formation of vascular network in tumor. Real-time observations revealed that angiogenic sprouts in tumors preferred to connect each other to form endothelial loops, and more and more endothelial loops accumulated into the irregular and chaotic vascular network. The over-expression of VEGF165 in tumor cells significantly affected the vascularization in xenografts, not only the number and size of neo-vessels but the abnormalities of tumor vascular architecture. The specific inhibitor of VEGFR2, SU5416, significantly inhibited the vascularization and the growth of melanoma xenografts, but had little affects to normal vessels in zebrafish. Thus, this zebrafish/tumor xenograft model not only provides a unique window to investigate the earliest events of tumoral neoangiogenesis, but is sensitive to be used as an experimental platform to rapidly and visually evaluate functions of angiogenic-related genes. Finally, it also offers an efficient and cost-effective means for the rapid evaluation of anti-angiogenic chemicals.

  16. Prolonged exposure to acetaminophen reduces testosterone production by the human fetal testis in a xenograft model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Driesche, Sander; Macdonald, Joni; Anderson, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Most common male reproductive disorders are linked to lower testosterone exposure in fetal life, although the factors responsible for suppressing fetal testosterone remain largely unknown. Protracted use of acetaminophen during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of cryptorchidism in sons......, but effects on fetal testosterone production have not been demonstrated. We used a validated xenograft model to expose human fetal testes to clinically relevant doses and regimens of acetaminophen. Exposure to a therapeutic dose of acetaminophen for 7 days significantly reduced plasma testosterone (45......% reduction; P = 0.025) and seminal vesicle weight (a biomarker of androgen exposure; 18% reduction; P = 0.005) in castrate host mice bearing human fetal testis xenografts, whereas acetaminophen exposure for just 1 day did not alter either parameter. Plasma acetaminophen concentrations (at 1 hour after...

  17. Primary esophageal and gastro-esophageal junction cancer xenograft models: clinicopathological features and engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodbiba, Lorin; Teichman, Jennifer; Fleet, Andrew; Thai, Henry; Sun, Bin; Panchal, Devang; Patel, Devalben; Tse, Alvina; Chen, Zhuo; Faluyi, Olusola O; Renouf, Daniel J; Girgis, Hala; Bandarchi, Bizhan; Schwock, Joerg; Xu, Wei; Bristow, Robert G; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Darling, Gail E; Ailles, Laurie E; El-Zimaity, Hala; Liu, Geoffrey

    2013-04-01

    There are very few xenograft models available for the study of esophageal (E) and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Using a NOD/SCID model, we implanted 90 primary E and GEJ tumors resected from patients and six endoscopic biopsy specimens. Of 69 resected tumors with histologically confirmed viable adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma, 22 (32%) was engrafted. One of 11 tumors, considered to have had a complete pathological response to neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation, also engrafted. Of the 23 patients whose tumors were engrafted, 65% were male; 30% were early stage while 70% were late stage; 22% received neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation; 61% were GEJ cancers. Engraftment occurred in 18/54 (33%) adenocarcinomas and 5/16 (31%) squamous cell carcinomas. Small endoscopic biopsy tissue had a 50% (3/6) engraftment rate. Of the factors analyzed, pretreatment with chemo-radiation and well/moderate differentiation showed significantly lower correlation with engraftment (P<0.05). In the subset of patients who did not receive neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation, 18/41 (44%) engrafted compared with those with pretreatment where 5/29 (17%, P=0.02) engrafted. Primary xenograft lines may be continued through 4-12 passages. Xenografts maintained similar histology and morphological characteristics with only minor variations even after multiple passaging in most instances.

  18. Metabolic syndrome components in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Heather A; Cheverud, James M

    2010-03-01

    Animal models have enriched understanding of the physiological basis of metabolic disorders and advanced identification of genetic risk factors underlying the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Murine models are especially appropriate for this type of research, and are an excellent resource not only for identifying candidate genomic regions, but also for illuminating the possible molecular mechanisms or pathways affected in individual components of MetS. In this review, we briefly discuss findings from mouse models of metabolic disorders, particularly in light of issues raised by the recent flood of human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) results. We describe how mouse models are revealing that genotype interacts with environment in important ways, indicating that the underlying genetics of MetS is highly context dependant. Further we show that epistasis, imprinting and maternal effects each contribute to the genetic architecture underlying variation in metabolic traits, and mouse models provide an opportunity to dissect these aspects of the genetic architecture that are difficult if not impossible to ascertain in humans. Finally we discuss how knowledge gained from mouse models can be used in conjunction with comparative genomic methods and bioinformatic resources to inform human MetS research.

  19. Efficient Generation of Bispecific Murine Antibodies for Pre-Clinical Investigations in Syngeneic Rodent Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrijn, Aran F; Meesters, Joyce I; Bunce, Matthew; Armstrong, Anthony A; Somani, Sandeep; Nesspor, Tom C; Chiu, Mark L; Altintaş, Işil; Verploegen, Sandra; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I

    2017-05-30

    Therapeutic concepts exploiting tumor-specific antibodies are often established in pre-clinical xenograft models using immuno-deficient mice. More complex therapeutic paradigms, however, warrant the use of immuno-competent mice, that more accurately capture the relevant biology that is being exploited. These models require the use of (surrogate) mouse or rat antibodies to enable optimal interactions with murine effector molecules. Immunogenicity is furthermore decreased, allowing longer-term treatment. We recently described controlled Fab-arm exchange (cFAE) as an easy-to-use method for the generation of therapeutic human IgG1 bispecific antibodies (bsAb). To facilitate the investigation of dual-targeting concepts in immuno-competent mice, we now applied and optimized our method for the generation of murine bsAbs. We show that the optimized combinations of matched point-mutations enabled efficient generation of murine bsAbs for all subclasses studied (mouse IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b; rat IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG2c). The mutations did not adversely affect the inherent effector functions or pharmacokinetic properties of the corresponding subclasses. Thus, cFAE can be used to efficiently generate (surrogate) mouse or rat bsAbs for pre-clinical evaluation in immuno-competent rodents.

  20. The effect of single agent oral fusaric acid (FA) on the growth of subcutaneously xenografted SCC-1 cells in a nude mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruda, James M; Beus, Kirt S; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Wilson, Ronald P; Stack, Brendan C

    2006-09-01

    To determine whether oral administration of fusaric acid (FA) inhibits tumor growth in an animal model of head and neck cancer (HNSCC). In vivo murine model, two arm controlled study. Thirty-eight (38) 5-week-old athymic nude mice were randomly assigned to a fusaric acid treatment group (1 mg/mL) (n = 19) or a sterile saline group (n = 19). A left, lateral flank subcutaneous injection of 2.0 x 10(6) UM-SCC-1 cells were administered to all mice on day 1. Both groups were gavaged daily with either 0.25 mLs of oral FA or sterile saline throughout the experiment (32 days). Latency to a measurable tumor (> or =65 mm3), and tumor volumes were recorded after tumor xenografting. Tumor weights were recorded at the conclusion of the experiment. Tumor volume growth curves were modeled as polynomial functions of time with treatment interaction effects. Survivorship functions for time to measurable tumor were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator. Survival analysis showed mice treated with FA developed measurable tumors after a significantly longer interval post-xenografting than control mice (p = 0.00451). By Day 9, all mice in the control group had developed measurable tumors in comparison to only 78% of mice in the FA group. Likewise, estimated growth curves for both groups suggested that mice receiving FA demonstrated significantly slower tumor growth rates throughout the entire study period (p < 0.0001). At the conclusion of the experiment, tumor weights from both the control and FA groups were also significantly different (p = 0.0142). Single agent oral fusaric acid (1 mg/mL) is an inhibitor of UM-SCC-1 in a murine model. As an orally active agent, it may have a potential role in the treatment of human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

  1. Transforming growth factor-β signalling controls human breast cancer metastasis in a zebrafish xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabsch, Yvette; He, Shuning; Zhang, Long; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; ten Dijke, Peter

    2013-11-07

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling pathway is known to control human breast cancer invasion and metastasis. We demonstrate that the zebrafish xenograft assay is a robust and dependable animal model for examining the role of pharmacological modulators and genetic perturbation of TGF-β signalling in human breast tumour cells. We injected cancer cells into the embryonic circulation (duct of cuvier) and examined their invasion and metastasis into the avascular collagenous tail. Various aspects of the TGF-β signalling pathway were blocked by chemical inhibition, small interfering RNA (siRNA), or small hairpin RNA (shRNA). Analysis was conducted using fluorescent microscopy. Breast cancer cells with different levels of malignancy, according to in vitro and in vivo mouse studies, demonstrated invasive and metastatic properties within the embryonic zebrafish model that nicely correlated with their differential tumourigenicity in mouse models. Interestingly, MCF10A M2 and M4 cells invaded into the caudal hematopoietic tissue and were visible as a cluster of cells, whereas MDA MB 231 cells invaded into the tail fin and were visible as individual cells. Pharmacological inhibition with TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitors or tumour specific Smad4 knockdown disturbed invasion and metastasis in the zebrafish xenograft model and closely mimicked the results we obtained with these cells in a mouse metastasis model. Inhibition of matrix metallo proteinases, which are induced by TGF-β in breast cancer cells, blocked invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells. The zebrafish-embryonic breast cancer xenograft model is applicable for the mechanistic understanding, screening and development of anti-TGF-β drugs for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  2. New model of in-situ xenograft lymphangiogenesis by a human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian-Jun; Jing, Wei; Ni, Yan-Yan; Yuan, Xiao-Jian; Zhou, Hai-Hua; Fan, Yue-Zu

    2012-01-01

    To explore a new model of in-situ xenograft lymphangiogenesis of human colonic adenocarcinomas in nude mice. On the basis of establishing subcutaneous xenograft lymphangiogenesis model of human colonic adenocarcinoms, in-situ xenografts were established through the in situ growth of the HT-29 human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line in nude mice. The numbers of lymphangiogenic microvessels, the expression of lymphatic endothelial cell markers lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaloronic acid receptor-1 (LYVE-1), D2-40 and the lymphatic endothelial growth factors vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C), -D (VEGF-D) and receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) were compared by immunohistochemical staining, Western bolt and quantitative RT-PCR in xenograft in-situ models. Some microlymphatics with thin walls, large and irregular or collapsed cavities and increased LMVD, with strong positive of LYVE-1, D2-40 in immunohistochemistry, were observed, identical with the morphological characteristics of lymphatic vessels and capillaries. Expression of LYVE-1 and D2-40 proteins and mRNAs were significantly higher in xenografts in-situ than in the negative control group (both Pconformity with the signal regulation of the VEGF-C,-D/VEGFR-3 axis of tumor lymphangiogenesis. In-situ xenografts of a human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line demonstrate tumor lymphangiogenesis. This novel in-situ animal model should be useful for further studying mechanisms of lymph node metastasis, drug intervention and anti-metastasis therapy in colorectal cancer.

  3. Antiangiogenic effects of pazopanib in xenograft hepatocellular carcinoma models: evaluation by quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wei-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiangiogenesis is a promising therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but the effects are difficult to be evaluated. Pazopanib (GW786034B is a pan-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor, the antitumor effects or antiangiogenic effects haven't been investigated in HCC. Methods In vitro direct effects of pazopanib on human HCC cell lines and endothelial cells were evaluated. In vivo antitumor effects were evaluated in three xenograft nude mice models. In the subcutaneous HCCLM3 model, intratumoral blood perfusion was detected by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS, and serial quantitative parameters were profiled from the time-intensity curves of ultrasonograms. Results In vitro proliferation of various HCC cell lines were not inhibited by pazopanib. Pazopanib inhibited migration and invasion and induced apoptosis significantly in two HCC cell lines, HCCLM3 and PLC/PRF/5. Proliferation, migration, and tubule formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were inhibited by pazopanib in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited by pazopanib in HCCLM3, HepG2, and PLC/PRF/5 xenograft models. Various intratumoral perfusion parameters changed over time, and the signal intensity was significantly impaired in the treated tumors before the treatment efficacy on tumor size could be observed. Mean transit time of the contrast media in hotspot areas of the tumors was reversely correlated with intratumoral microvessel density. Conclusions Antitumor effects of pazopanib in HCC xenografts may owe to its antiangiogenic effects, and the in vivo antiangiogenic effects could be evaluated by quantitative CEUS.

  4. Hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft supports HCVreplication: A mouse model for evaluating antivirals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sidhartha Hazari; Henry J Hefler; Partha K Chandra; Bret Poat; Feyza Gunduz; Tara Ooms; Tong Wu; Luis A Balart; Srikanta Dash

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To develop a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) xenograft model for studying hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication in a mice, and antiviral treatment.METHODS: We developed a stable S3-green fluorescence protein (GFP) cell line that replicated the GFPtagged HCV sub-genomic RNA derived from a highlyefficient JFH1 virus. S3-GFP replicon cell line was injected subcutaneously into γ-irradiated SCID mice. We showed that the S3-GFP replicon cell line formed humanHCC xenografts in SCID mice. Cells were isolated from subcutaneous tumors and then serially passaged multiple times in SCID mice by culturing in growth medium supplemented with G-418. The mouse-adapted S3-GFP replicon cells were implanted subcutaneously and also into the liver of SCID mice via intrasplenic infusion to study the replication of HCV in the HCC xenografts. The tumor model was validated for antiviral testing after intraperitoneal injection of interferon-α (IFN-α).RESULTS: A highly tumorigenic S3-GFP replicon cell line was developed that formed subcutaneous tumors within 2 wk and diffuse liver metastasis within 4 wkin SCID mice. Replication of HCV in the subcutaneous and liver tumors was confirmed by cell colony assay, detection of the viral RNA by ribonuclease protectionassay and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. High-level replication of HCV sub-genomic RNA in the tumor could be visualized by GFP expression using fluorescence microscopy. IFN-α cleared HCV RNA replication in the subcutaneous tumors within 2 wk and 4 wk in the liver tumor model.

  5. The In Ovo Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane (CAM) Assay as an Efficient Xenograft Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Michael; Pathak, Ravi R; Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Friedman, Scott L; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Sikora, Andrew G

    2015-10-09

    The chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) begins to develop by day 7 after fertilization and matures by day 12. The CAM is naturally immunodeficient and highly vascularized, making it an ideal system for tumor implantation. Furthermore, the CAM contains extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, laminin, collagen, integrin alpha(v)beta3, and MMP-2, making it an attractive model to study tumor invasion and metastasis. Scientists have long taken advantage of the physiology of the CAM by using it as a model of angiogenesis. More recently, the CAM assay has been modified to work as an in vivo xenograft model system for various cancers that bridges the gap between basic in vitro work and more complex animal cancer models. The CAM assay allows for the study of tumor growth, anti-tumor therapies, and pro-tumor molecular pathways in a biologically relevant system that is both cost- and time-effective. Here, we describe the development of CAM xenograft model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with embryonic survival rates of up to 93% and reliable tumor take leading to growth of three-dimensional, vascularized tumors.

  6. Primary xenografts of human prostate tissue as a model to study angiogenesis induced by reactive stroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana P Montecinos

    Full Text Available Characterization of the mechanism(s of androgen-driven human angiogenesis could have significant implications for modeling new forms of anti-angiogenic therapies for CaP and for developing targeted adjuvant therapies to improve efficacy of androgen-deprivation therapy. However, models of angiogenesis by human endothelial cells localized within an intact human prostate tissue architecture are until now extremely limited. This report characterizes the burst of angiogenesis by endogenous human blood vessels in primary xenografts of fresh surgical specimens of benign prostate or prostate cancer (CaP tissue that occurs between Days 6-14 after transplantation into SCID mice pre-implanted with testosterone pellets. The wave of human angiogenesis was preceded by androgen-mediated up-regulation of VEGF-A expression in the stromal compartment. The neo-vessel network anastomosed to the host mouse vascular system between Days 6-10 post-transplantation, the angiogenic response ceased by Day 15, and by Day 30 the vasculature had matured and stabilized, as indicated by a lack of leakage of serum components into the interstitial tissue space and by association of nascent endothelial cells with mural cells/pericytes. The angiogenic wave was concurrent with the appearance of a reactive stroma phenotype, as determined by staining for α-SMA, Vimentin, Tenascin, Calponin, Desmin and Masson's trichrome, but the reactive stroma phenotype appeared to be largely independent of androgen availability. Transplantation-induced angiogenesis by endogenous human endothelial cells present in primary xenografts of benign and malignant human prostate tissue was preceded by induction of androgen-driven expression of VEGF by the prostate stroma, and was concurrent with and the appearance of a reactive stroma phenotype. Androgen-modulated expression of VEGF-A appeared to be a causal regulator of angiogenesis, and possibly of stromal activation, in human prostate xenografts.

  7. Assessment of Tumor Stiffness With Shear Wave Elastography in a Human Prostate Cancer Xenograft Implantation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiru; Yao, Binwei; Li, Hongfei; Zhang, Yan; Gao, Hanjing; Gao, Yabin; Peng, Ruiyun; Tang, Jie

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the stiffness of human prostate cancer in a xenograft implantation model using shear wave elastography and compare the pathologic features of tumors with varying elasticity. Human prostate cancer DU-145 cells were injected into 24 nude male mice. The mice were divided into 3 groups according to the time of transplantation (6, 8, and 10 weeks). The volume, elasticity, and Young modulus of tumors were recorded by 2-dimensional sonography and shear wave elastography. The tumors were collected for pathologic analyses: hematoxylin-eosin staining, Ponceau S, and aniline staining were used to stain collagen and elastic fibers, and picric acid-sirius red staining was used to indicate type I and III collagen. The area ratios of collagen I/III were calculated. The correlation between the Young modulus of the tumor and area ratio of collagen I/III were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry of vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin was performed. Nineteen tumors in 3 groups were collected. The volume and mean Young modulus increased with the time of transplantation. There were more collagen fibers in the stiff tumors, and there were significant differences in the area ratios of collagen I/III between groups 1 (mean ± SD, 0.50 ± 0.17) and 3 (1.97 ± 0.56; P prostate cancer xenograft implantation tumors. Collagen fibers, especially collagen type I, play a crucial role in the elasticity in the human prostate cancer xenograft implantation model. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  8. Patient-derived xenografts as models for personalized medicine research in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Perez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic research and clinical trials are essential components of the process of discovery and development of new drugs. The use of preclinical models is a key component in every aspect of drug development in cancer. Unfortunately, preclinical models often fail to capture the diverse heterogeneity of human malignancies, and the correlation between the antitumor activity of cytotoxic agents observed in these animal models and that observed in humans is poor. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the application of preclinical cancer models which can actually recapitulate the clinical disease, including patient-derived xenografts (PDXs. PDX models maintain the phenotypic, genetic, and molecular characteristics of the original tumor and reflect tumor pathology. This review discusses the limitation of the conventional strategy of developing new drugs in oncology and proposes the PDX models as a powerful technology for the biological study of tumors and to evaluate the antitumoral effect of new compounds.

  9. Development and rescue of human familial hypercholesterolaemia in a xenograft mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Wang, Lili; Legras, Xavier; Saha, Pradip K.; Chen, Leon; Bell, Peter; Pankowicz, Francis P.; Hill, Matthew C.; Barzi, Mercedes; Leyton, Claudia Kettlun; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Kruse, Robert L.; Himes, Ryan W.; Goss, John A.; Wilson, James M.; Chan, Lawrence; Lagor, William R.; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of lipid metabolism are a major cause of human morbidity, but no animal model entirely recapitulates human lipoprotein metabolism. Here we develop a xenograft mouse model using hepatocytes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolaemia caused by loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). Like familial hypercholesterolaemia patients, our familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice develop hypercholesterolaemia and a 'humanized‘ serum profile, including expression of the emerging drug targets cholesteryl ester transfer protein and apolipoprotein (a), for which no genes exist in mice. We go on to replace the missing LDLR in familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice using an adeno-associated virus 9-based gene therapy and restore normal lipoprotein profiles after administration of a single dose. Our study marks the first time a human metabolic disease is induced in an experimental animal model by human hepatocyte transplantation and treated by gene therapy. Such xenograft platforms offer the ability to validate human experimental therapies and may foster their rapid translation into the clinic. PMID:26081744

  10. Developmental exposure to estrogen alters differentiation and epigenetic programming in a human fetal prostate xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia M Saffarini

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequent non-cutaneous malignancy in men. There is strong evidence in rodents that neonatal estrogen exposure plays a role in the development of this disease. However, there is little information regarding the effects of estrogen in human fetal prostate tissue. This study explored early life estrogen exposure, with and without a secondary estrogen and testosterone treatment in a human fetal prostate xenograft model. Histopathological lesions, proliferation, and serum hormone levels were evaluated at 7, 30, 90, and 200-day time-points after xenografting. The expression of 40 key genes involved in prostatic glandular and stromal growth, cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, hormone receptors and tumor suppressors was evaluated using a custom PCR array. Epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed on whole tissue, and laser capture-microdissection (LCM isolated epithelial and stromal compartments of 200-day prostate xenografts. Combined initial plus secondary estrogenic exposures had the most severe tissue changes as revealed by the presence of hyperplastic glands at day 200. Gene expression changes corresponded with the cellular events in the KEGG prostate cancer pathway, indicating that initial plus secondary exposure to estrogen altered the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptosis inhibition and an increase in cell cycle progression. DNA methylation revealed that differentially methylated CpG sites significantly predominate in the stromal compartment as a result of estrogen-treatment, thereby providing new targets for future investigation. By using human fetal prostate tissue and eliminating the need for species extrapolation, this study provides novel insights into the gene expression and epigenetic effects related to prostate carcinogenesis following early life estrogen exposure.

  11. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  12. A zebrafish xenograft model for studying human cancer stem cells in distant metastasis and therapy response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Groenewoud, A; Tulotta, C; Zoni, E; Kruithof-de Julio, M; van der Horst, G; van der Pluijm, G; Ewa Snaar-Jagalska, B

    2017-01-01

    Lethal and incurable bone metastasis is one of the main causes of death in multiple types of cancer. A small subpopulation of cancer stem/progenitor-like cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells from heterogenetic cancer is considered to mediate bone metastasis. Although over the past decades numerous studies have been performed in different types of cancer, it is still difficult to track small numbers of CSCs during the onset of metastasis. With use of noninvasive high-resolution imaging, transparent zebrafish embryos can be employed to dynamically visualize cancer progression and reciprocal interaction with stroma in a living organism. Recently we established a zebrafish CSC-xenograft model to visually and functionally analyze the role of CSCs and their interactions with the microenvironment at the onset of metastasis. Given the highly conserved human and zebrafish genome, transplanted human cancer cells are able to respond to zebrafish cytokines, modulate the zebrafish microenvironment, and take advantage of the zebrafish stroma during cancer progression. This chapter delineates the zebrafish CSC-xenograft model as a useful tool for both CSC biological study and anticancer drug screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Establishment of canine hemangiosarcoma xenograft models expressing endothelial growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

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    Maruo Kouji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human hemangiosarcoma (HSA tends to have a poor prognosis; its tumorigenesis has not been elucidated, as there is a dearth of HSA clinical specimens and no experimental model for HSA. However, the incidence of spontaneous HSA is relatively high in canines; therefore, canine HSA has been useful in the study of human HSA. Recently, the production of angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in human and canine HSA has been reported. Moreover, the growth-factor environment of HSA is very similar to that of pathophysiological angiogenesis, which some homeobox genes regulate in the transcription of angiogenic molecules. In the present study, we established 6 xenograft canine HSA tumors and detected the expression of growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenic homeobox genes. Methods Six primary canine HSAs were xenografted to nude mice subcutaneously and serially transplanted. Subsequently, the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGF, flt-1 and flk-1 (receptors of VEGF-A, FGFR-1, and angiogenic homeobox genes HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 were investigated in original and xenograft tumors by histopathology, immunostaining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, using canine-specific primer sets. Results Histopathologically, xenograft tumors comprised a proliferation of neoplastic cells that were varied in shape, from spindle-shaped and polygonal to ovoid; some vascular-like structures and vascular clefts of channels were observed, similar to those in the original tumors. The expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF was detected in xenograft tumors by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Moreover, the expression of VEGF-A, bFGF, flt-1, flk-1, FGFR-1, HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 was detected in xenograft tumors. Interestingly, expressions of bFGF tended to be higher in 3 of the xenograft HSA tumors than in the

  14. Pre-clinical Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Prostate Cancer.

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    Shahryari, Varahram; Nip, Hannah; Saini, Sharanjot; Dar, Altaf A; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Colden, Melissa; Bucay, Nathan; Tabatabai, Laura Z; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir; Majid, Shahana

    2016-08-29

    To study the multifaceted biology of prostate cancer, pre-clinical in vivo models offer a range of options to uncover critical biological information about this disease. The human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model provides a useful alternative approach for understanding the specific interactions between genetically and molecularly altered tumor cells, their organ microenvironment, and for evaluation of efficacy of therapeutic regimens. This is a well characterized model designed to study the molecular events of primary tumor development and it recapitulates the early events in the metastatic cascade prior to embolism and entry of tumor cells into the circulation. Thus it allows elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying the initial phase of metastatic disease. In addition, this model can annotate drug targets of clinical relevance and is a valuable tool to study prostate cancer progression. In this manuscript we describe a detailed procedure to establish a human orthotopic prostate cancer xenograft mouse model.

  15. Predictive markers of efficacy for an angiopoietin-2 targeting therapeutic in xenograft models.

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    Gallen Triana-Baltzer

    Full Text Available The clinical efficacy of anti-angiogenic therapies has been difficult to predict, and biomarkers that can predict responsiveness are sorely needed in this era of personalized medicine. CVX-060 is an angiopoietin-2 (Ang2 targeting therapeutic, consisting of two peptides that bind Ang2 with high affinity and specificity, covalently fused to a scaffold antibody. In order to optimize the use of this compound in the clinic the construction of a predictive model is described, based on the efficacy of CVX-060 in 13 cell line and 2 patient-derived xenograft models. Pretreatment size tumors from each of the models were profiled for the levels of 27 protein markers of angiogenesis, SNP haplotype in 5 angiogenesis genes, and somatic mutation status for 11 genes implicated in tumor growth and/or vascularization. CVX-060 efficacy was determined as tumor growth inhibition (TGI% at termination of each study. A predictive statistical model was constructed based on the correlation of these efficacy data with the marker profiles, and the model was subsequently tested by prospective analysis in 11 additional models. The results reveal a range of CVX-060 efficacy in xenograft models of diverse tissue types (0-64% TGI, median = 27% and define a subset of 3 proteins (Ang1, EGF, Emmprin, the levels of which may be predictive of TGI by Ang2 blockade. The direction of the associations is such that better efficacy correlates with high levels of target and low levels of compensatory/antagonizing molecules. This effort has revealed a set of candidate predictive markers for CVX-060 efficacy that will be further evaluated in ongoing clinical trials.

  16. ANTITUMOR EFFECT OF SARCNU IN A 06-METHYLGUANINE-DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE POSITIVE HUMAN GLIOMA XENOGRAFT MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To assess whether novel analogue of nitrosoureas, 2-chloroethyl-3-sarcosinamide-1-nitrosourea (SarCNU), has antitumor effect to 06-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) positive tumors in vivo. Methods: MGMT positive human glioma cell line SF-767 xenografts in nude mice were treated with SarCNU. The antitumor efficacy of SarCNU was compared with the results of 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) treatment with or without 06-benzylguanine (06-BG) preadministration. Results: Since the SF-767 is MGMT strongly positive, BCNU treatment alone did not result in a satisfactory anticancer effect. As expected, 06-BG by depleting MGMT activity, significantly enhanced BCNU antitumor efficacy (p<0.001). More interestingly, SarCNU treatment alone had a better antitumor effect than 06-BG plus BCNU treatment (F=51.7, p=0.00036). Conclusion: Since SarCNU enters cells via extraneuronal monoamine transporter (EMT), the enhanced antitumor activity of SarCNU in this MGMT positive human tumor xenograft model may be due to the presence of EMT in SF-767.SarCNU may be used as an alternative treatment for MGMT positive tumors, specifically for tumors expressing EMT.

  17. Effect of grape procyanidins on tumor angiogenesis in liver cancer xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li-Li; Liu, Bing-Xia; Zhong, Jin-Yi; Sun, Li-Bin; Yu, Hong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    In recent years a wide variety of flavonoids or polyphenolic substances have been reported to possess substantial anti-carcinogenic and antimutagenic activities. Grape proanthocyanidins (GPC) are considered as good examples for which there is evidence of potential roles as anti-carcinogenic agents. A xenograft model was established using H22 cells subcutaneously injected into mice and used to assess different concentrations of grape proanthocyanidins (GPC) and Endostar. Treatments were maintained for 10 days, then levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and microvessel density (MVD) were examined by immunohistochemistry, while VEGF mRNA was determined by real-time PCR in tumor tissue. The expression of MVD and VEGF decreased gradually as the concentration of GPC increased.There was a significant positive correlation between MVD and VEGF. These results suggest that GPC restrains the growth of tumor, possibly by inhibiting tumour angiogenesis.

  18. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli induce attaching and effacing lesions and hemorrhagic colitis in human and bovine intestinal xenograft models

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    Lilach Golan

    2011-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 is an important cause of diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans worldwide. The two major virulence determinants of EHEC are the Shiga toxins (Stx and the type III secretion system (T3SS, including the injected effectors. Lack of a good model system hinders the study of EHEC virulence. Here, we investigated whether bovine and human intestinal xenografts in SCID mice can be useful for studying EHEC and host tissue interactions. Fully developed, germ-free human and bovine small intestine and colon were established by subcutaneous transplantation of human and bovine fetal gut into SCID mice. Xenografts were allowed to develop for 3–4 months and thereafter were infected by direct intraluminal inoculation of Stx-negative derivatives of EHEC O157:H7, strain EDL933. The small intestine and colon xenografts closely mimicked the respective native tissues. Upon infection, EHEC induced formation of typical attaching and effacing lesions and tissue damage that resembled hemorrhagic colitis in colon xenografts. By contrast, xenografts infected with an EHEC mutant deficient in T3SS remained undamaged. Furthermore, EHEC did not attach to or damage the epithelium of small intestinal tissue, and these xenografts remained intact. EHEC damaged the colon in a T3SS-dependent manner, and this model is therefore useful for studying the molecular details of EHEC interactions with live human and bovine intestinal tissue. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Stx and gut microflora are not essential for EHEC virulence in the human gut.

  19. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model.

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    Kiyoshi Takahara

    Full Text Available Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed.Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA; Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment.The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean ± SD 6.9 ± 1.5 vs 12.7 ± 4.0, p<0.05, while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment.This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa.

  20. Growth hormone receptor antagonism suppresses tumour regrowth after radiotherapy in an endometrial cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Angharad; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Liu, Dong-Xu; Wilson, William R; Perry, Jo K

    2016-08-28

    Human GH expression is associated with poor survival outcomes for endometrial cancer patients, enhanced oncogenicity of endometrial cancer cells and reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in vitro, suggesting that GH is a potential target for anticancer therapy. However, whether GH receptor inhibition sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo has not been tested. In the current study, we evaluated whether the GH receptor antagonist, pegvisomant (Pfizer), sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo in an endometrial tumour xenograft model. Subcutaneous administration of pegvisomant (20 or 100 mg/kg/day, s.c.) reduced serum IGF1 levels by 23% and 68%, respectively, compared to vehicle treated controls. RL95-2 xenografts grown in immunodeficient NIH-III mice were treated with vehicle or pegvisomant (100 mg/kg/day), with or without fractionated gamma radiation (10 × 2.5 Gy over 5 days). When combined with radiation, pegvisomant significantly increased the median time tumours took to reach 3× the pre-radiation treatment volume (49 days versus 72 days; p = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that 100 mg/kg pegvisomant every second day was sufficient to abrogate MAP Kinase signalling throughout the tumour. In addition, treatment with pegvisomant increased hypoxic regions in irradiated tumours, as determined by immunohistochemical detection of pimonidazole adducts, and decreased the area of CD31 labelling in unirradiated tumours, suggesting an anti-vascular effect. Pegvisomant did not affect intratumoral staining for HIF1α, VEGF-A, CD11b, or phospho-EGFR. Our results suggest that blockade of the human GH receptor may improve the response of GH and/or IGF1-responsive endometrial tumours to radiation.

  1. Cetuximab intensifies the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells in a nude mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xuechun; Chen, Rongming; Yin, Mingang; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, discovered ~40 years ago, are believed to be the most effective cytotoxic lymphocytes to counteract cancer; however, adoptive NK cell therapy in vivo has encountered certain limitations, including a lack of specificity. The drug cetuximab can mediate antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity through NK cells in vivo, and has been approved for the first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells, induced by cetuximab in a nude mouse CRC xenograft model, has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to explore the ADCC activity of cetuximab combined with adoptive NK cells in CRC xenograft models with various EGFR expressions. The nude mouse xenograft models were established by subcutaneously injecting LOVO or SW620 cells. The mice were then randomly divided into 6 groups: Phosphate-buffered saline, cetuximab, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), NK cells, hIgG plus NK cells and cetuximab plus NK cells. The ADCC antitumor activity was evaluated in these CRC models. The results indicated that the cetuximab plus NK cells group showed the greatest tumor inhibition effect compared with the NK cells group in LOVO xenograft tumor models with positive EGFR expression. However, the combination of cetuximab and NK cells did not show a stronger tumor inhibitory effect against the SW620 xenograft tumor models compared with the efficiency of NK cells. In conclusion, cetuximab could intensify the ADCC antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells towards CRC with an increased EGFR expression. The combination of cetuximab and NK cells may be a potential immunotherapy for metastatic CRC patients with positive EGFR expression. PMID:27602116

  2. Therapeutic Efficacy Assessment of CK6, a Monoclonal KIT Antibody, in a Panel of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Xenograft Models

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    Thomas Van Looy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the efficacy of CK6, a KIT monoclonal antibody, in a panel of human gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST xenograft models. Nude mice were bilaterally transplanted with human GIST xenografts (four patient derived and two cell line derived, treated for 3 weeks, and grouped as follows: control (untreated; CK6 (40 mg/kg, 3× weekly; imatinib (50 mg/kg, twice daily; sunitinib (40 mg/kg, once daily; imatinib + CK6; sunitinib + CK6 (same doses and schedules as in the single-agent treatments. Tumor volume assessment, Western blot analysis, and histopathology were used for evaluation of efficacy. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U (MWU and Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests. CK6 as a single agent only reduced tumor growth rate in the UZLX-GIST3 model (P = .053, MWU compared to control, while in none of the other GIST models an effect on tumor growth rate was observed. CK6 did not result in significant anti-proliferative or pro-apoptotic effects in any of the GIST models, and moreover, CK6 did not induce a remarkable inhibition of KIT activation. Furthermore, no synergistic effect of combining CK6 with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs was observed. Conversely, in certain GIST xenografts, anti-tumor effects seemed to be inferior under combination treatment compared to single-agent TKI treatment. In the GIST xenografts tested, the anti-tumor efficacy of CK6 was limited. No synergy was observed on combination of CK6 with TKIs in these GIST models. Our findings highlight the importance of using relevant in vivo human tumor xenograft models in the preclinical assessment of drug combination strategies.

  3. Radio-adjuvant effects of ginsan on murine breast carcinoma xenografted model

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    Shim, Ji Young; Son, Hyeog Jin; Kim, Hyung Doo; Han, Young Soo; Yun, Yeon Sook; Song, Jie Young [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In a number of studies, polysaccharide extracted from Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, ginsan has been demonstrated to be a potent promising biological response modifier (BRM), including proliferation of lymphocyte, generation of lymphokine activated killer cells, and production of several cytokines. Macrophages are the first line of defense to infections or pathogens in host innate immunity. In addition, it plays a prominent role as a professional antigen presenting cells to trigger cellular immunity. In the light of that, the current study was designed to evaluate whether ginsan exhibits anti-tumor effect as well as synergistic function with chemo- or radio-therapy.

  4. Xenografting as a Tool to Preserve Endangered Species: Outcomes and Challenges in Model Systems

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    Paula C. Mota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of testis tissue xenografting as a valuable tool to rescue endangered and genetically valuable individuals that die young or otherwise fail to produce sperm has been the subject of much interest. Although the technique has been successfully applied to a wide variety of species, little is known about what determines the outcome. Furthermore, to improve the applicability of xenografting, new methods to preserve and transport testis tissue from valuable animals are emerging. However, one major issue remains: the application of xenografting implies the development of subsequent ART techniques to produce offspring from the recovered material. This paper focuses on these three aspects of testis tissue xenografting as a tool for rescuing endangered and valuable genetic pools.

  5. Pharmacokinetic modeling of an induction regimen for in vivo combined testing of novel drugs against pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts.

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    Barbara Szymanska

    Full Text Available Current regimens for induction therapy of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, or for re-induction post relapse, use a combination of vincristine (VCR, a glucocorticoid, and L-asparaginase (ASP with or without an anthracycline. With cure rates now approximately 80%, robust pre-clinical models are necessary to prioritize active new drugs for clinical trials in relapsed/refractory patients, and the ability of these models to predict synergy/antagonism with established therapy is an essential attribute. In this study, we report optimization of an induction-type regimen by combining VCR, dexamethasone (DEX and ASP (VXL against ALL xenograft models established from patient biopsies in immune-deficient mice. We demonstrate that the VXL combination was synergistic in vitro against leukemia cell lines as well as in vivo against ALL xenografts. In vivo, VXL treatment caused delays in progression of individual xenografts ranging from 22 to >146 days. The median progression delay of xenografts derived from long-term surviving patients was 2-fold greater than that of xenografts derived from patients who died of their disease. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that systemic DEX exposure in mice increased 2-fold when administered in combination with VCR and ASP, consistent with clinical findings, which may contribute to the observed synergy between the 3 drugs. Finally, as proof-of-principle we tested the in vivo efficacy of combining VXL with either the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Bcl-w inhibitor, ABT-737, or arsenic trioxide to provide evidence of a robust in vivo platform to prioritize new drugs for clinical trials in children with relapsed/refractory ALL.

  6. Application of a Patient Derived Xenograft Model for Predicative Study of Uterine Fibroid Disease.

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    Martin Fritsch

    Full Text Available Human uterine fibroids, benign tumors derived from the smooth muscle layers of the uterus, impose a major health burden to up to 50% of premenopausal women in their daily life. To improve our understanding of this disease, we developed and characterized a patient-derived xenograft model by subcutaneous transplantation of pieces of human uterine fibroid tissue into three different strains of severe combined immunodeficient mice. Engrafted uterine fibroid tissue preserved the classical morphology with interwoven bundles of smooth muscle cells and an abundant deposition of collagenous matrix, similar to uterine fibroids in situ. The grafts expressed both estrogen receptor 1 and progesterone receptor. Additionally, both receptors were up-regulated by estrogen treatment. Growth of the fibroid grafts was dependent on 17β-estradiol and progesterone supplementation at levels similar to women with the disease and was studied for up to 60 days at maximum. Co-treatment with the antiprogestin mifepristone reduced graft growth (four independent donors, p<0.0001 two-sided t-test, as did treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin (three independent donors, p<0.0001 two-sided t-test. This in vivo animal model preserves the main histological and functional characteristics of human uterine fibroids, is amenable to intervention by pharmacological treatment, and can thus serve as an adequate model for the development of novel therapies.

  7. Antitumor activity of celastrol nanoparticles in a xenograft retinoblastoma tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanrong; Wu, Xianghua; Li, Jingguo; Yao, Lin; Sun, Limei; Shi, Yingying; Zhang, Wenxin; Lin, Jianxian; Liang, Dan; Li, Yongping

    2012-01-01

    Celastrol, a Chinese herbal medicine, has shown antitumor activity against various tumor cell lines. However, the effect of celastrol on retinoblastoma has not yet been analyzed. Additionally, the poor water solubility of celastrol restricts further therapeutic applications. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of celastrol nanoparticles (CNPs) on retinoblastoma and to investigate the potential mechanisms involved. Celastrol-loaded poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanopolymeric micelles were developed to improve the hydrophilicity of celastrol. The 2-(2-methoxy-4- nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulf-ophenyl)-2H tetrazolium monosodium salt (WST-8) assay was used to determine the inhibitory effect of CNPs on SO-Rb 50 cell proliferation in vitro. Immunofluorescence was used to evaluate the apoptotic effect of CNPs on nuclear morphology, and flow cytometry was used to quantify cellular apoptosis. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax, NF-κB p65, and phospo-NF-κB p65 proteins was assessed by Western blotting. A human retinoblastoma xenograft model was used to evaluate the inhibitory effects of CNPs on retinoblastoma in NOD-SCID mice. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to assess the apoptotic effects of CNPs on retinoblastoma. CNPs inhibit the proliferation of SO-Rb 50 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 17.733 μg/mL (celastrol-loading content: 7.36%) after exposure to CNPs for 48 hours. CNPs induce apoptosis in SO-Rb 50 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of Bcl-2, NF-κB p65, and phospo-NF-κB p65 proteins decreased after exposure to CNPs 54.4 μg/mL for 48 hours. Additionally, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio increased, whereas the expression of Bax itself was not significantly altered. CNPs inhibit the growth of retinoblastoma and induce apoptosis in retinoblastoma cells in mice. CNPs inhibit the growth of retinoblastoma in mouse xenograft model by inducing apoptosis in SO-Rb 50 cells, which may be

  8. Residual Disease in a Novel Xenograft Model of RUNX1-Mutated, Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

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    Umayal Sivagnanalingam

    Full Text Available Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML patients harboring RUNX1 mutations have a dismal prognosis with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy. We aimed to develop an in vivo model of RUNX1-mutated, CN-AML in which the nature of residual disease in this molecular disease subset could be explored. We utilized a well-characterized patient-derived, RUNX1-mutated CN-AML line (CG-SH. Tail vein injection of CG-SH into NOD scid gamma mice led to leukemic engraftment in the bone marrow, spleen, and peripheral blood within 6 weeks. Treatment of leukemic mice with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy resulted in clearance of disease from the spleen and peripheral blood, but persistence of disease in the bone marrow as assessed by flow cytometry and secondary transplantation. Whole exome sequencing of CG-SH revealed mutations in ASXL1, CEBPA, GATA2, and SETBP1, not previously reported. We conclude that CG-SH xenografts are a robust, reproducible in vivo model of CN-AML in which to explore mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance and novel therapeutic approaches.

  9. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model

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    Nasim Akhtar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy.

  10. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies

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    Jody E. Hooper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4 Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study.

  11. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

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    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  12. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P; O'Neill, Brian E; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard chemoradiation and quadrapeutics using identical drug and radiation doses. We applied liposomal cisplatin or doxorubicin, colloidal gold, near-infrared laser pulses and radiation, all at low safe doses. The final evaluation used a xenograft model of HNSCC. Quadrapeutics enhanced standard chemoradiation in vitro by reducing head and neck cancer cell proliferation by 1000-fold, inhibiting tumor growth in vivo by 34-fold and improving animal survival by 5-fold, and reducing the side effects to a negligible level. In quadrapeutics, we observed an "inversion" of the drug efficacy of two standard drugs: doxorubicin, a low efficacy drug for the cancers studied, was two times more efficient than cisplatin, the first choice drug in clinic for HNSCC. The radical therapeutic gain of quadrapeutics resulted from the intracellular synergy of the four components employed which we administered in a specific sequence, while the reduction in the toxicity was due to the low doses of all four components. The biodistribution, safety and efficacy data for quadrapeutics in HNSCC ensure its high translational potential and justify the possibility of clinical trials.

  13. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jody E.; Cantor, Emma L.; Ehlen, Macgregor S.; Banerjee, Avirup; Malempati, Suman; Stenzel, Peter; Woltjer, Randy L.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Goodwin, Neal C.; Yang, Yan; Kaur, Pali; Bult, Carol J.; Airhart, Susan D.; Keller, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4 Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study. PMID:26696773

  14. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jody E; Cantor, Emma L; Ehlen, Macgregor S; Banerjee, Avirup; Malempati, Suman; Stenzel, Peter; Woltjer, Randy L; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Goodwin, Neal C; Yang, Yan; Kaur, Pali; Bult, Carol J; Airhart, Susan D; Keller, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4 Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study.

  15. Mouse xenograft modeling of human adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia provides mechanistic insights into adult LIC biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Aditi; Castleton, Anna Z.; Schwab, Claire; Samuel, Edward; Sivakumaran, Janani; Beaton, Brendan; Zareian, Nahid; Zhang, Christie Yu; Rai, Lena; Enver, Tariq; Moorman, Anthony V.; Fielding, Adele K.

    2014-01-01

    The distinct nature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults, evidenced by inferior treatment outcome and different genetic landscape, mandates specific studies of disease-initiating mechanisms. In this study, we used NOD/LtSz-scid IL2Rγ nullc (NSG) mouse xenotransplantation approaches to elucidate leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) biology in primary adult precursor B (pre-B) ALL to optimize disease modeling. In contrast with xenografting studies of pediatric ALL, we found that modification of the NSG host environment using preconditioning total body irradiation (TBI) was indispensable for efficient engraftment of adult non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL, whereas t(4;11) pre-B ALL was successfully reconstituted without this adaptation. Furthermore, TBI-based xenotransplantation of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL enabled detection of a high frequency of LICs (<1:6900) and permitted frank leukemic engraftment from a remission sample containing drug-resistant minimal residual disease. Investigation of TBI-sensitive stromal-derived factor-1/chemokine receptor type 4 signaling revealed greater functional dependence of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL on this niche-based interaction, providing a possible basis for the differential engraftment behavior. Thus, our studies establish the optimal conditions for experimental modeling of human adult pre-B ALL and demonstrate the critical protumorogenic role of microenvironment-derived SDF-1 in regulating adult pre-B LIC activity that may present a therapeutic opportunity. PMID:24825861

  16. Comprehensive analysis of leukocytes, vascularization and matrix metalloproteinases in human menstrual xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; He, Bin; Xu, Xiangbo; Wang, Jiedong

    2011-02-17

    In our previous study, menstrual-like changes in mouse were provoked through the pharmacologic withdrawal of progesterone with mifepristone following induction of decidualization. However, mouse is not a natural menstruation animal, and the menstruation model using external stimuli may not truly reflect the occurrence and development of the human menstrual process. Therefore, we established a model of menstruation based on human endometrial xenotransplantation. In this model, human endometrial tissues were transplanted subcutaneously into SCID mice that were ovarectomized and supplemented with estrogen and progestogen by silastic implants with a scheme imitating the endocrinological milieu of human menstrual cycle. Morphology, hormone levels, and expression of vimentin and cytokeratin markers were evaluated to confirm the menstrual-like changes in this model. With 28 days of hormone treatment, transplanted human endometrium survived and underwent proliferation, differentiation and disintegration, similar to human endometrium in vivo. Human CD45+ cells showed a peak of increase 28 days post-transplantation. Three days after progesterone withdrawal, mouse CD45+ cells increased rapidly in number and were significantly greater than human CD45+ cell counts. Mouse CD31+ blood vascular-like structures were detected in both transplanted and host tissues. After progesterone withdrawal, the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 1, 2, and 9 were increased. In summary, we successfully established a human endometrial xenotransplantation model in SCID mice, based on the results of menstrual-like changes in which MMP-1, 2 and 9 are involved. We showed that leukocytes are originated from in situ proliferation in human xenografts and involved in the occurrence of menstruation. This model will help to further understand the occurrence, growth, and differentiation of the endometrium and the underlying mechanisms of menstruation.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of leukocytes, vascularization and matrix metalloproteinases in human menstrual xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Guo

    Full Text Available In our previous study, menstrual-like changes in mouse were provoked through the pharmacologic withdrawal of progesterone with mifepristone following induction of decidualization. However, mouse is not a natural menstruation animal, and the menstruation model using external stimuli may not truly reflect the occurrence and development of the human menstrual process. Therefore, we established a model of menstruation based on human endometrial xenotransplantation. In this model, human endometrial tissues were transplanted subcutaneously into SCID mice that were ovarectomized and supplemented with estrogen and progestogen by silastic implants with a scheme imitating the endocrinological milieu of human menstrual cycle. Morphology, hormone levels, and expression of vimentin and cytokeratin markers were evaluated to confirm the menstrual-like changes in this model. With 28 days of hormone treatment, transplanted human endometrium survived and underwent proliferation, differentiation and disintegration, similar to human endometrium in vivo. Human CD45+ cells showed a peak of increase 28 days post-transplantation. Three days after progesterone withdrawal, mouse CD45+ cells increased rapidly in number and were significantly greater than human CD45+ cell counts. Mouse CD31+ blood vascular-like structures were detected in both transplanted and host tissues. After progesterone withdrawal, the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP 1, 2, and 9 were increased. In summary, we successfully established a human endometrial xenotransplantation model in SCID mice, based on the results of menstrual-like changes in which MMP-1, 2 and 9 are involved. We showed that leukocytes are originated from in situ proliferation in human xenografts and involved in the occurrence of menstruation. This model will help to further understand the occurrence, growth, and differentiation of the endometrium and the underlying mechanisms of menstruation.

  18. Molecularly Characterised Xenograft Tumour Mouse Models: Valuable Tools for Evaluation of New Therapeutic Strategies for Secondary Liver Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To develop and evaluate new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human cancers, well-characterised preclinical model systems are a prerequisite. To this aim, we have established xenotransplantation mouse models and corresponding cell cultures from surgically obtained secondary human liver tumours. Established xenograft tumours were patho- and immunohistologically characterised, and expression levels of cancer-relevant genes were quantified in paired original and xenograft tumours and the derivative cell cultures applying RT-PCR-based array technology. Most of the characteristic morphological and immunohistochemical features of the original tumours were shown to be maintained. No differences were found concerning expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and oncogenesis. Interestingly, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase encoding genes appeared to be expressed differentially. Thus, the established models are closely reflecting pathohistological and molecular characteristics of the selected human tumours and may therefore provide useful tools for preclinical analyses of new antitumour strategies in vivo.

  19. Cellular characterization of ultrasound-stimulated microbubble radiation enhancement in a prostate cancer xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza A. Al-Mahrouki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor radiation resistance poses a major obstacle in achieving an optimal outcome in radiation therapy. In the current study, we characterize a novel therapeutic approach that combines ultrasound-driven microbubbles with radiation to increase treatment responses in a prostate cancer xenograft model in mice. Tumor response to ultrasound-driven microbubbles and radiation was assessed 24 hours after treatment, which consisted of radiation treatments alone (2 Gy or 8 Gy or ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles only, or a combination of radiation and ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles. Immunohistochemical analysis using in situ end labeling (ISEL and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL revealed increased cell death within tumors exposed to combined treatments compared with untreated tumors or tumors exposed to radiation alone. Several biomarkers were investigated to evaluate cell proliferation (Ki67, blood leakage (factor VIII, angiogenesis (cluster of differentiation molecule CD31, ceramide-formation, angiogenesis signaling [vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF], oxygen limitation (prolyl hydroxylase PHD2 and DNA damage/repair (γH2AX. Results demonstrated reduced vascularity due to vascular disruption by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles, increased ceramide production and increased DNA damage of tumor cells, despite decreased tumor oxygenation with significantly less proliferating cells in the combined treatments. This combined approach could be a feasible option as a novel enhancing approach in radiation therapy.

  20. Aggressiveness of human melanoma xenograft models is promoted by aneuploidy-driven gene expression deregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Véronique; Pirker, Christine; Schmidt, Wolfgang M; Spiegl-Kreinecker, Sabine; Lötsch, Daniela; Heffeter, Petra; Hegedus, Balazs; Grusch, Michael; Kiss, Robert; Berger, Walter

    2012-04-01

    Melanoma is a devastating skin cancer characterized by distinct biological subtypes. Besides frequent mutations in growth- and survival-promoting genes like BRAF and NRAS, melanomas additionally harbor complex non-random genomic alterations. Using an integrative approach, we have analysed genomic and gene expression changes in human melanoma cell lines (N=32) derived from primary tumors and various metastatic sites and investigated the relation to local growth aggressiveness as xenografts in immuno-compromised mice (N=22). Although the vast majority >90% of melanoma models harbored mutations in either BRAF or NRAS, significant differences in subcutaneous growth aggressiveness became obvious. Unsupervised clustering revealed that genomic alterations rather than gene expression data reflected this aggressive phenotype, while no association with histology, stage or metastatic site of the original melanoma was found. Genomic clustering allowed separation of melanoma models into two subgroups with differing local growth aggressiveness in vivo. Regarding genes expressed at significantly altered levels between these subgroups, a surprising correlation with the respective gene doses (>85% accordance) was found. Genes deregulated at the DNA and mRNA level included well-known cancer genes partly already linked to melanoma (RAS genes, PTEN, AURKA, MAPK inhibitors Sprouty/Spred), but also novel candidates like SIPA1 (a Rap1GAP). Pathway mining further supported deregulation of Rap1 signaling in the aggressive subgroup e.g. by additional repression of two Rap1GEFs. Accordingly, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of SIPA1 exerted significant effects on clonogenicity, adherence and migration in aggressive melanoma models. Together our data suggest that an aneuploidy-driven gene expression deregulation drives local aggressiveness in human melanoma.

  1. T Cell Integrin Overexpression as a Model of Murine Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Raymond L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrin adhesion molecules have important adhesion and signaling functions. They also play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Over the past few years we have described a T cell adoptive transfer model to investigate the role of T cell integrin adhesion molecules in the development of autoimmunity. This report summarizes the methods we used in establishing this murine model. By treating murine CD4+ T cells with DNA hypomethylating agents and by transfection we were able to test the in vitro effects of integrin overexpression on T cell autoreactive proliferation, cytotoxicity, adhesion and trafficking. Furthermore, we showed that the ability to induce in vivo autoimmunity may be unique to the integrin lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1.

  2. Tumour bed irradiation of human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model using a common X-ray tube

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V Tokalov; W Enghardt; N Abolmaali

    2010-06-01

    Studies that investigate the radiation of human tumour xenografts require an appropriate radiation source and highly standardized conditions during radiation. This work reports on the design of a standardized irradiation device using a commercially available X-ray tube with a custom constructed lead collimator with two circular apertures and an animal bed plate, permitting synchronous irradiation of two animals. Dosimetry and the corresponding methodology for radiotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft tumours transplanted to and growing subcutaneously on the right lower limb in a nude rat model were investigated. Procedures and results described herein prove the feasibility of use of the device, which is applicable for any investigation involving irradiation of non-tumorous and tumorous lesions in small animals.

  3. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immune Responses by Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with (177)Lu-DOTATATE in a Murine Model of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Yin; Pfeifer, Andreas Klaus; Myschetzky, Rebecca;

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a relatively new mode of internally targeted radiotherapy currently in clinical trials. In PRRT, ionizing radioisotopes conjugated to somatostatin analogues are targeted to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) via somatostatin receptors. Despite promising...... clinical results, very little is known about the mechanism of tumor control. By using NCI-H727 cells in an in vivo murine xenograft model of human NETs, we showed that 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT led to increased infiltration of CD86+ antigen presenting cells into tumor tissue. We also found that following...

  4. Antitumor activity of celastrol nanoparticles in a xenograft retinoblastoma tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li ZR

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhanrong Li,1,* Xianghua Wu,1,* Jingguo Li,2 Lin Yao,1 Limei Sun,1 Yingying Shi,1 Wenxin Zhang,1 Jianxian Lin,1 Dan Liang,1 Yongping Li1 1State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, 2School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Celastrol, a Chinese herbal medicine, has shown antitumor activity against various tumor cell lines. However, the effect of celastrol on retinoblastoma has not yet been analyzed. Additionally, the poor water solubility of celastrol restricts further therapeutic applications. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of celastrol nanoparticles (CNPs on retinoblastoma and to investigate the potential mechanisms involved.Methods: Celastrol-loaded poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly(ε-caprolactone nanopolymeric micelles were developed to improve the hydrophilicity of celastrol. The 2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl-3-(4-nitrophenyl-5-(2,4-disulf-ophenyl-2H tetrazolium monosodium salt (WST-8 assay was used to determine the inhibitory effect of CNPs on SO-Rb 50 cell proliferation in vitro. Immunofluorescence was used to evaluate the apoptotic effect of CNPs on nuclear morphology, and flow cytometry was used to quantify cellular apoptosis. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax, NF-κB p65, and phospo-NF-κB p65 proteins was assessed by Western blotting. A human retinoblastoma xenograft model was used to evaluate the inhibitory effects of CNPs on retinoblastoma in NOD-SCID mice. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to assess the apoptotic effects of CNPs on retinoblastoma.Results: CNPs inhibit the proliferation of SO-Rb 50 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with an IC50 of 17.733 µg/mL (celastrol-loading content: 7.36% after exposure to CNPs for 48 hours. CNPs induce apoptosis in SO-Rb 50 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of Bcl-2, NF-κB p65, and phospo-NF-κB p65

  5. Evaluation of a murine single-blood-injection SAH model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel A Kamp

    Full Text Available The molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH are poorly understood and continue to be a matter of debate. A valid murine SAH injection model is not yet available but would be the prerequisite for further transgenic studies assessing the mechanisms following SAH. Using the murine single injection model, we examined the effects of SAH on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF in the somatosensory (S1 and cerebellar cortex, neuro-behavioural and morphological integrity and changes in quantitative electrocorticographic and electrocardiographic parameters. Micro CT imaging verified successful blood delivery into the cisterna magna. An acute impairment of rCBF was observed immediately after injection in the SAH and after 6, 12 and 24 hours in the S1 and 6 and 12 hours after SAH in the cerebellum. Injection of blood into the foramen magnum reduced telemetric recorded total ECoG power by an average of 65%. Spectral analysis of ECoGs revealed significantly increased absolute delta power, i.e., slowing, cortical depolarisations and changes in ripples and fast ripple oscillations 12 hours and 24 hours after SAH. Therefore, murine single-blood-injection SAH model is suitable for pathophysiological and further molecular analysis following SAH.

  6. An orthotopic xenograft model of intraneural NF1 MPNST suggests a potential association between steroid hormones and tumor cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, George Q; Li, Hua; Fishbein, Lauren; Thomson, Susanne A; Hwang, Min S; Scarborough, Mark T; Yachnis, Anthony T; Wallace, Margaret R; Mareci, Thomas H; Muir, David

    2007-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are the most aggressive cancers associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Here we report a practical and reproducible model of intraneural NF1 MPNST, by orthotopic xenograft of an immortal human NF1 tumor-derived Schwann cell line into the sciatic nerves of female scid mice. Intraneural injection of the cell line sNF96.2 consistently produced MPNST-like tumors that were highly cellular and showed extensive intraneural growth. These xenografts had a high proliferative index, were angiogenic, had significant mast cell infiltration and rapidly dominated the host nerve. The histopathology of engrafted intraneural tumors was consistent with that of human NF1 MPNST. Xenograft tumors were readily examined by magnetic resonance imaging, which also was used to assess tumor vascularity. In addition, the intraneural proliferation of sNF96.2 cell tumors was decreased in ovariectomized mice, while replacement of estrogen or progesterone restored tumor cell proliferation. This suggests a potential role for steroid hormones in supporting tumor cell growth of this MPNST cell line in vivo. The controlled orthotopic implantation of sNF96.2 cells provides for the precise initiation of intraneural MPNST-like tumors in a model system suitable for therapeutic interventions, including inhibitors of angiogenesis and further study of steroid hormone effects on tumor cell growth.

  7. A membrane cofactor protein transgenic mouse model for the study of discordant xenograft rejection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Yannoutsos (Nikos); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); C. Harkes; F. Bonthuis (Fred); C-Y. Zhou; D. White; R.L.M. Marquet; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In recent years, interest has been revived in the possibility of transplanting organs into humans from a phylogenetically disparate species such as the pig (xenotransplantation). Such discordant xenografts, however, are subject to hyperacute rejection (HAR) and activation of

  8. Regulation of estrogen receptors α and β in human breast carcinoma by exogenous leptin in nude mouse xenograft model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wei; GU Jun-chao; LIU Jian-zhong; WANG Shao-hong; WANG Yu; ZHANG Zhong-tao; MA Xue-mei; SONG Mao-min

    2010-01-01

    Background It is essential to clarify the interactions of hormones during the progression of human breast cancer. This study examined the effects of exogenous human leptin on estrogen receptor (ER) α and β in human breast tumor tissue in a nude mouse xenograft model.Methods We created nude mice xenografts of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, and randomly divided them into an experimental group and a control group. The mice in experimental group were injected subcutaneously around tumors with human leptin, while the control group were injected with the same dose of normal saline. A real-time RT-PCR assay was developed to quantify the mRNA of Erα,β in the tumor tissues. Western blotting analyses were used to assess the relative quantities of the Erα,β proteins.Results Leptin-treated xenografted nude mice were successfully established. The amount of Era mRNA was significantly higher in the leptin group than in the control group (P<0.01), while the amount of Erβ mRNA was significantly lower in the leptin group than in the control group (P<0.01). Western blotting analyses revealed that the Erα protein level was significantly higher in the leptin group than in the control group (P<0.01), while the Erβ protein level was significantly lower in the leptin group than in the control group (P <0.01).Conclusions Nude mouse xenograft model can be safely and serviceably treated with human leptin by subcutaneous injections around tumor. Erα,β were both targets of leptin in breast cancer. Leptin can up-regulate the expression of Erα and down-regulate the expression of the Erβ in human breast tumor.

  9. Mitotane effects in a H295R xenograft model of adjuvant treatment of adrenocortical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhe, O; Skogseid, B

    2010-09-01

    Adrenocortical cancer is one of the most aggressive endocrine malignancies. Growth through the capsule or accidental release of cancer cells during surgery frequently results in metastatic disease. We investigated the antitumoral effect of 2 adrenocorticolytic compounds, O, P'-DDD and MeSO2-DDE, in the adrenocortical cell line H295R both in vitro and as a xenograft model in vivo. H295R cells were injected s. c. in nude mice. O, P'-DDD, MeSO2-DDE, or oil (control) was administered i. p., either simultaneously with cell injection at day 0 (mimicking adjuvant treatment), or at day 48 (established tumors). Accumulation of PET tracers [ (11)C]methionine (MET), [ (11)C] metomidate (MTO), 2-deoxy-2-[ (18)F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG), and [ (18)F]-l-tyrosine (FLT) in the aggregates were assessed +/- drug treatment in vitro. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited when O, P'-DDD was given at the same time as injection of tumor cells. No significant growth inhibition was observed after treatment with O, P'-DDD at day 48. A significant reduction in FLT uptake and an increased FDG uptake, compared to control, were observed following treatment with 15 microM O, P'-DDD (p<0.01) in vitro. MeSO2-DDE (15 microM) treatment gave rise to a reduced MET and an increased FLT uptake (p<0.01). Both compounds reduced the uptake of MTO compared to control (p<0.01). Treatment with O, P'-DDD simultaneously to inoculation of H295R cells in mice, imitating release of cells during surgery, gave a markedly better effect than treatment of established H295R tumors. We suggest that FLT may be a potential PET biomarker when assessing adrenocortical cancer treatment with O,P'-DDD. Further studies in humans are needed to investigate this.

  10. DMU-212 inhibits tumor growth in xenograft model of human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Hanna; Myszkowski, Krzysztof; Abraszek, Joanna; Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Murias, Marek; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga

    2014-05-01

    DMU-212 has been shown to evoke a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in transformed fibroblasts and breast cancer. However, recently published data indicated the ability of DMU-212 to evoke apoptosis in both mitochondria- and receptor-mediated manner in two ovarian cancer cell lines, namely A-2780 and SKOV-3, which showed varied sensitivity to the compound tested. The pronounced cytotoxic effects of DMU-212 observed in A-2780 cells were related to the execution of extracellular apoptosis pathway and cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. In view of the great anticancer potential of DMU-212 against A-2780 cell line, the aim of the current study was to assess antiproliferative activity of DMU-212 in xenograft model of ovarian cancer. To evaluate in vitro metabolic properties of cells that were to be injected into SCID mice, uptake and decline of DMU-212 in A-2780 ovarian cancer cell line was investigated. It was found that the concentration of the test compound in A-2780 cells was growing within first eight hours, and then the gradual decline was observed. A-2780 cells stably transfected with pcDNA3.1/Zeo(-)-Luc vector were subcutaneously inoculated into the right flanks of SCID mice. After seven days of the treatment with DMU-212 (50mg/kg b.w), tumor growth appeared to be suppressed in the animals treated with the compound tested. At day 14 of the experiment, tumor burden in mice treated with DMU-212 was significantly lower, as compared to untreated controls. Our findings suggest that DMU-212 might be considered as a potential anticancer agent used in ovarian cancer therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  12. A novel, diffusely infiltrative xenograft model of human anaplastic oligodendroglioma with mutations in FUBP1, CIC, and IDH1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Klink

    Full Text Available Oligodendroglioma poses a biological conundrum for malignant adult human gliomas: it is a tumor type that is universally incurable for patients, and yet, only a few of the human tumors have been established as cell populations in vitro or as intracranial xenografts in vivo. Their survival, thus, may emerge only within a specific environmental context. To determine the fate of human oligodendroglioma in an experimental model, we studied the development of an anaplastic tumor after intracranial implantation into enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP positive NOD/SCID mice. Remarkably after nearly nine months, the tumor not only engrafted, but it also retained classic histological and genetic features of human oligodendroglioma, in particular cells with a clear cytoplasm, showing an infiltrative growth pattern, and harboring mutations of IDH1 (R132H and of the tumor suppressor genes, FUBP1 and CIC. The xenografts were highly invasive, exhibiting a distinct migration and growth pattern around neurons, especially in the hippocampus, and following white matter tracts of the corpus callosum with tumor cells accumulating around established vasculature. Although tumors exhibited a high growth fraction in vivo, neither cells from the original patient tumor nor the xenograft exhibited significant growth in vitro over a six-month period. This glioma xenograft is the first to display a pure oligodendroglioma histology and expression of R132H. The unexpected property, that the cells fail to grow in vitro even after passage through the mouse, allows us to uniquely investigate the relationship of this oligodendroglioma with the in vivo microenvironment.

  13. Gamma Knife Surgery as Monotherapy with Clinically Relevant Doses Prolongs Survival in a Human GBM Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Sandvei Skeie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Object. Gamma knife surgery (GKS may be used for recurring glioblastomas (GBMs. However, patients have then usually undergone multimodal treatment, which makes it difficult to specifically validate GKS independent of established treatments. Thus, we developed an experimental brain tumor model to assess the efficacy and radiotoxicity associated with GKS. Methods. GBM xenografts were implanted intracerebrally in nude rats, and engraftment was confirmed with MRI. The rats were allocated to GKS, with margin doses of 12 Gy or 18 Gy, or to no treatment. Survival time was recorded, tumor sections were examined, and radiotoxicity was evaluated in a behavioral open field test. Results. In the first series, survival from the time of implantation was 96 days in treated rats and 72 days in controls (P<0.001. In a second experiment, survival was 72 days in the treatment group versus 54 days in controls (P<0.006. Polynuclear macrophages and fibrosis was seen in groups subjected to GKS. Untreated rats with GBM xenografts displayed less mobility than GKS-treated animals in the open field test 4 weeks after treatment (P=0.04. Conclusion. GKS administered with clinically relevant doses prolongs survival in rats harboring GBM xenografts, and the associated toxicity is mild.

  14. Anticonvulsive evaluation of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole kindling model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Charlotte; Boddum, Kim; von Schoubye, Nadia L

    2017-01-01

    . Evaluation of THIP as a potential anticonvulsant has given contradictory results in different animal models and for this reason, we reevaluated the anticonvulsive properties of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. As loss of δ-GABAA R in the dentate gyrus has been associated...... the observed upregulation of δ-GABAA Rs. Even in the demonstrated presence of functional δ-GABAA Rs, THIP (0.5-4 mg/kg) showed no anticonvulsive effect in the PTZ kindling model using a comprehensive in vivo evaluation of the anticonvulsive properties....

  15. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD.

  16. Murine models of Streptococcus pyogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Samantha; Scott, June R; Husmann, Linda K; Zurawski, Christine A

    2006-09-01

    This unit describes procedures for testing virulence of Streptococcus pyogenes in mice. S. pyogenes is an important human pathogen and causes one of the most common childhood diseases. The syndromes that result from S. pyogenes infection are diverse, ranging from mild, superficial throat or skin infection to severe, invasive disea/se that is often lethal. Thus, a greater understanding of the virulence factors of this bacterium and development of modalities to prevent or relieve the infections it causes are important. Since S. pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen (with the exception of a single strain), the value of all animal models is limited. This unit describes a model for long-term throat colonization following the natural route of infection (inhalation), one for pneumonia and systemic dissemination following intratracheal inoculation, and one for systemic dissemination following the more natural route of skin infection. In addition, methods are presented for culturing S. pyogenes from tissues of the infected animal.

  17. Timing of chemotherapy and surgery in a murine osteosarcoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R S; Roth, Y F; Gebhardt, M C; Bell, D F; Rosenberg, A E; Mankin, H J; Suit, H D

    1988-10-01

    The sequential use of chemotherapy and surgery in the treatment of osteosarcoma developed in an empirical fashion without the benefit of investigations in animal models. The MGH-OGS murine osteosarcoma is a transplantable tumor that resembles the human disease with respect to histology, local invasiveness, metastatic characteristics, tumor ploidy, and its response to chemotherapy. We have used this tumor model to investigate the efficacy of preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative chemotherapy on the development of pulmonary metastases in three different experimental protocols. In each experimental design, perioperative chemotherapy demonstrated a significant advantage in preventing systemic relapse.

  18. Aggressiveness of human melanoma xenograft models is promoted by aneuploidy-driven gene expression deregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Véronique; Pirker, Christine; Schmidt, Wolfgang M.; Spiegl-Kreinecker, Sabine; Lötsch, Daniela; Heffeter, Petra; Hegedus, Balazs; Grusch, Michael; Kiss, Robert; Berger, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Melanoma is a devastating skin cancer characterized by distinct biological subtypes. Besides frequent mutations in growth- and survival-promoting genes like BRAF and NRAS, melanomas additionally harbor complex non-random genomic alterations. Using an integrative approach, we have analysed genomic and gene expression changes in human melanoma cell lines (N=32) derived from primary tumors and various metastatic sites and investigated the relation to local growth aggressiveness as xenografts in ...

  19. Blood vessel hyperpermeability and pathophysiology in human tumour xenograft models of breast cancer: a comparison of ectopic and orthotopic tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Karyn S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human tumour xenografts in immune compromised mice are widely used as cancer models because they are easy to reproduce and simple to use in a variety of pre-clinical assessments. Developments in nanomedicine have led to the use of tumour xenografts in testing nanoscale delivery devices, such as nanoparticles and polymer-drug conjugates, for targeting and efficacy via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect. For these results to be meaningful, the hyperpermeable vasculature and reduced lymphatic drainage associated with tumour pathophysiology must be replicated in the model. In pre-clinical breast cancer xenograft models, cells are commonly introduced via injection either orthotopically (mammary fat pad, MFP or ectopically (subcutaneous, SC, and the organ environment experienced by the tumour cells has been shown to influence their behaviour. Methods To evaluate xenograft models of breast cancer in the context of EPR, both orthotopic MFP and ectopic SC injections of MDA-MB-231-H2N cells were given to NOD scid gamma (NSG mice. Animals with matched tumours in two size categories were tested by injection of a high molecular weight dextran as a model nanocarrier. Tumours were collected and sectioned to assess dextran accumulation compared to liver tissue as a positive control. To understand the cellular basis of these observations, tumour sections were also immunostained for endothelial cells, basement membranes, pericytes, and lymphatic vessels. Results SC tumours required longer development times to become size matched to MFP tumours, and also presented wide size variability and ulcerated skin lesions 6 weeks after cell injection. The 3 week MFP tumour model demonstrated greater dextran accumulation than the size matched 5 week SC tumour model (for P  Conclusions Dextran accumulation and immunostaining results suggest that small MFP tumours best replicate the vascular permeability required to observe the EPR effect

  20. A murine model for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, G P; Sandberg, A A; Pontes, J E; Ochi, H; Yoshida, M; Williams, P D

    1984-01-01

    Growth characteristics, survival time, and various other parameters such as chromosome studies and DNA synthesis were evaluated in a transplantable transitional cell mouse bladder tumor induced by N-[4-5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl] formamide (FANFT). When the tumor was implanted subcutaneously, the mice were observed to survive mean 43 + 7 days (mean +/- SEM) with an average tumor burden of mean 8.45 +/- 0.60 gm (mean +/- SEM) of solid tumor tissue. In the tumor control animals, lung metastasis was noted in 3 animals at 42-49 days post implantation. The histological appearance of the primary tumor and the lung metastasis presented an undifferentiated anaplastic tumor with many spindle cells. The modal number of chromosome is 65 with several markers identifiable as abnormal in morphology. A significant decrease (p less than 0.001) in DNA synthesis was noted between 13 days and 20 days post implantation. In the evaluation of chemotherapy drugs, Cis-dichloro-trans-dihydroxy-bis-iso propylamine platinum IV (CHIP), Cis-diaminedichloroplatinum II (DDP), Cyclophosphamide (CTX) and Methotrexate (MTX) tumor growth was significantly retarded (p less than 0.005) in the DDP treated groups, however survival was not improved. Survival was significantly improved in the CTX treated group (p less than 0.001), although no significant decrease was noted in tumor growth. Lung metastasis was noted in all groups. This model has certain characteristics which make it a good model to study locally invasive bladder cancer.

  1. An orthotopic xenograft model with survival hindlimb amputation allows investigation of the effect of tumor microenvironment on sarcoma metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Seth D; Hayashi, Masanori; Albert, Catherine M; Jackson, Kyle W; Loeb, David M

    2015-10-01

    Overall survival rates for pediatric high-grade sarcoma have improved greatly in the past few decades, but prevention and treatment of distant metastasis remain the most compelling problems facing these patients. Traditional preclinical mouse models have not proven adequate to study the biology and treatment of spontaneous distant sarcoma metastasis. To address this deficit, we developed an orthotopic implantation/amputation model in which patient-derived sarcoma xenografts are surgically implanted into mouse hindlimbs, allowed to grow, then subsequently amputated and the animals observed for development of metastases. NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ-null mice were implanted with either histologically intact high grade sarcoma patient-derived xenografts or cell lines in the pretibial space and affected limbs were amputated after tumor growth. In contrast to subcutaneous flank tumors, we were able to consistently detect spontaneous distant spread of the tumors using our model. Metastases were seen in 27-90 % of animals, depending on the xenograft, and were repeatable and predictable. We also demonstrate the utility of this model for studying the biology of metastasis and present preliminary new insights suggesting the role of arginine metabolism and macrophage phenotype polarization in creating a tumor microenvironment that facilitates metastasis. Subcutaneous tumors express more arginase than inducible nitric oxide synthase and demonstrate significant macrophage infiltration, whereas orthotopic tumors express similar amounts of inducible nitric oxide synthase and arginase and have only a scant macrophage infiltrate. Thus, we present a model of spontaneous distant sarcoma metastasis that mimics the clinical situation and is amenable to studying the biology of the entire metastatic cascade.

  2. A murine model of myocardial microvascular thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Patricia D.; Edelberg, Jay M.; Picard, Michael H.; Foulkes, Andrea S.; Mamuya, Wilfred; Weiler-Guettler, Hartmut; Rubin, Robert H.; Gilbert, Peter; Rosenberg, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    Disorders of hemostasis lead to vascular pathology. Endothelium-derived gene products play a critical role in the formation and degradation of fibrin. We sought to characterize the importance of these locally produced factors in the formation of fibrin in the cardiac macrovasculature and microvasculature. This study used mice with modifications of the thrombomodulin (TM) gene, the tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) gene, and the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) gene. The results revealed that tPA played the most important role in local regulation of fibrin deposition in the heart, with lesser contributions by TM and uPA (least significant). Moreover, a synergistic relationship in fibrin formation existed in mice with concomitant modifications of tPA and TM, resulting in myocardial necrosis and depressed cardiac function. The data were fit to a statistical model that may offer a foundation for examination of hemostasis-regulating gene interactions. PMID:10487767

  3. Evidence for Feedback Regulation Following Cholesterol Lowering Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masko, Elizabeth M; Alfaqih, Mahmoud A; Solomon, Keith R; Barry, William T; Newgard, Christopher B; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Valilis, Nikolaos A; Phillips, Tameika E; Poulton, Susan H; Freedland, Alexis R; Sun, Stephanie; Dambal, Shweta K; Sanders, Sergio E; Macias, Everardo; Freeman, Michael R; Dewhirst, Mark W; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-04-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest cholesterol-lowering drugs may prevent the progression of prostate cancer, but not the incidence of the disease. However, the association of combination therapy in cholesterol reduction on prostate or any cancer is unclear. In this study, we compared the effects of the cholesterol lowering drugs simvastatin and ezetimibe alone or in combination on the growth of LAPC-4 prostate cancer in vivo xenografts. Proliferation assays were conducted by MTS solution and assessed by Student's t-test. 90 male nude mice were placed on a high-cholesterol Western-diet for 7 days then injected subcutaneously with 1 × 10(5) LAPC-4 cells. Two weeks post-injection, mice were randomized to control, 11 mg/kg/day simvastatin, 30 mg/kg ezetimibe, or the combination and sacrificed 42 days post-randomization. We used a generalized linear model with the predictor variables of treatment, time, and treatment by time (i.e., interaction term) with tumor volume as the outcome variable. Total serum and tumor cholesterol were measured. Tumoral RNA was extracted and cDNA synthesized from 1 ug of total RNA for quantitative real-time PCR. Simvastatin directly reduced in vitro prostate cell proliferation in a dose-dependent, cell line-specific manner, but ezetimibe had no effect. In vivo, low continuous dosing of ezetimibe, delivered by food, or simvastatin, delivered via an osmotic pump had no effect on tumor growth compared to control mice. In contrast, dual treatment of simvastatin and ezetimibe accelerated tumor growth. Ezetimibe significantly lowered serum cholesterol by 15%, while simvastatin had no effect. Ezetimibe treatment resulted in higher tumor cholesterol. A sixfold induction of low density lipoprotein receptor mRNA was observed in ezetimibe and the combination with simvastatin versus control tumors. Systemic cholesterol lowering by ezetimibe did not slow tumor growth, nor did the cholesterol independent effects of simvastatin and the combined

  4. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Tesh, Robert B.; Azar, Sasha R.; Muruato, Antonio E.; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Auguste, Albert J.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain–Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼107 plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  5. Modeling BCR-ABL and MLL-AF9 leukemia in a human bone marrow-like scaffold-based xenograft model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, P.; Carretta, M.; Jaques, J.; Brouwers-Vos, A. Z.; Lubbers-Aalders, L.; Yuan, H.; de Bruijn, J. D.; Martens, A. C. M.; Vellenga, E.; Groen, R. W. J.; Schuringa, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Although NOD-SCID IL2R gamma(-/-) (NSG) xenograft mice are currently the most frequently used model to study human leukemia in vivo, the absence of a human niche severely hampers faithful recapitulation of the disease. We used NSG mice in which ceramic scaffolds seeded with human mesenchymal stromal

  6. Appropriateness of using patient-derived xenograft models for pharmacologic evaluation of novel therapies for esophageal/gastro-esophageal junction cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorin Dodbiba

    Full Text Available The high morbidity and mortality of patients with esophageal (E and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ cancers, warrants new pre-clinical models for drug testing. The utility of primary tumor xenografts (PTXGs as pre-clinical models was assessed. Clinicopathological, immunohistochemical markers (p53, p16, Ki-67, Her-2/neu and EGFR, and global mRNA abundance profiles were evaluated to determine selection biases of samples implanted or engrafted, compared with the underlying population. Nine primary E/GEJ adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were further characterized for the spectrum and stability of gene/protein expression over passages. Seven primary esophageal adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were treated with individual or combination chemotherapy. Tumors that were implanted (n=55 in NOD/SCID mice had features suggestive of more aggressive biology than tumors that were never implanted (n=32. Of those implanted, 21/55 engrafted; engraftment was associated with poorly differentiated tumors (p=0.04 and older patients (p=0.01. Expression of immunohistochemical markers were similar between patient sample and corresponding xenograft. mRNA differences observed between patient tumors and first passage xenografts were largely due to loss of human stroma in xenografts. mRNA patterns of early vs late passage xenografts and of small vs large tumors of the same passage were similar. Complete resistance was present in 2/7 xenografts while the remaining tumors showed varying degrees of sensitivity, that remained constant across passages. Because of their ability to recapitulate primary tumor characteristics during engraftment and across serial passaging, PTXGs can be useful clinical systems for assessment of drug sensitivity of human E/GEJ cancers.

  7. A robust and rapid xenograft model to assess efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents for human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saland, E; Boutzen, H; Castellano, R; Pouyet, L; Griessinger, E; Larrue, C; de Toni, F; Scotland, S; David, M; Danet-Desnoyers, G; Vergez, F; Barreira, Y; Collette, Y; Récher, C; Sarry, J-E

    2015-03-20

    Relevant preclinical mouse models are crucial to screen new therapeutic agents for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Current in vivo models based on the use of patient samples are not easy to establish and manipulate in the laboratory. Our objective was to develop robust xenograft models of human AML using well-characterized cell lines as a more accessible and faster alternative to those incorporating the use of patient-derived AML cells. Five widely used AML cell lines representing various AML subtypes were transplanted and expanded into highly immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/LtSz-severe combined immunodeficiency IL2Rγc(null) mice (for example, cell line-derived xenografts). We show here that bone marrow sublethal conditioning with busulfan or irradiation has equal efficiency for the xenotransplantation of AML cell lines. Although higher number of injected AML cells did not change tumor engraftment in bone marrow and spleen, it significantly reduced the overall survival in mice for all tested AML cell lines. On the basis of AML cell characteristics, these models also exhibited a broad range of overall mouse survival, engraftment, tissue infiltration and aggressiveness. Thus, we have established a robust, rapid and straightforward in vivo model based on engraftment behavior of AML cell lines, all vital prerequisites for testing new therapeutic agents in preclinical studies.

  8. Investigation of Murine Models for Sleep, Wakefulness and Target Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    subjective day, 7pm-7am w R NR 0 50 100 150 200 250 state c o u n t s F2 Females F2 Males Different from humans, mice exhibit polyphasic sleep with many...early trends, e.g., in the 1p.m. (6 hrs of subjective night) group, became non-significant with additional mice tested • The polyphasic sleep ...REPORT Final report - Investigation of Murine Models for Sleep , Wakefulness and Target Discovery 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  9. Sexual transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marcelle; Nitz, Nadjar; Santana, Camilla; Moraes, Aline; Hagström, Luciana; Andrade, Rafael; Rios, Adriano; Sousa, Alessandro; Dallago, Bruno; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Hecht, Mariana

    2016-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is mainly transmitted by blood-sucking triatomines, but other routes also have epidemiological importance, such as blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Although the possibility of sexual transmission of T. cruzi has been suggested since its discovery, few studies have been published on this subject. We investigated acquisition of T. cruzi by sexual intercourse in an experimental murine model. Male and female mice in the chronic phase of Chagas disease were mated with naive partners. Parasitological, serological and molecular tests demonstrated the parasites in tissues and blood of partners. These results confirm the sexual transmission of T. cruzi in mice.

  10. Xenograft and genetically engineered mouse model systems of osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma: tumor models for cancer drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Valerie B; Kamara, Davida F; Kolb, E Anders

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There are > 75 histological types of solid tumors that are classified into two major groups: bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. These diseases are more prevalent in children, and pediatric sarcomas tend to be highly aggressive and rapidly progressive. Sarcomas in adults may follow a more indolent course, but aggressive tumors are also common. Sarcomas that are metastatic at diagnosis, or recurrent following therapy, remain refractory to current treatment options with dismal overall survival rates. A major focus of clinical trials, for patients with sarcoma, is to identify novel and more effective therapeutic strategies targeted to genomic or proteomic aberrations specific to the malignant cells. Critical to the understanding of the potential for targeted therapies are models of disease that are representative of clinical disease and predictive of relevant clinical responses. Areas covered In this article, the authors discuss the use of mouse xenograft models and genetically engineered mice in cancer drug discovery. The authors provide a special focus on models for the two most common bone sarcomas: osteosarcoma (OS) and Ewing's sarcoma (ES). Expert opinion Predicting whether a new anticancer agent will have a positive therapeutic index in patients with OS and ES remains a challenge. The use of mouse sarcoma models for understanding the mechanisms involved in the response of tumors to new treatments is an important step in the process of drug discovery and the development of clinically relevant therapeutic strategies for these diseases. PMID:23844615

  11. An isogenic model of murine mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sagar S; Weiss, Daniela M; Donneys, Alexis; Gallagher, Katherine K; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Sarhaddi, Deniz; Buchman, Steven R

    2013-03-01

    The advent of stem cell-based therapies makes current models of mandibular distraction osteogenesis unwieldy. We thereby designed an isogenic model of distraction osteogenesis whose purpose was to allow for the free transfer of cells and components between rats. As immune response plays a significant role in healing and prevention of infection, an immune-competent mode is desirable rather than an athymic rat/xenograft model. The purposes of this study were as follows: (1) to replicate established models of distraction osteogenesis in a rodent model using an isogenic rat strain, and (2) to characterize the differences between inbred, isogenic rats and outbred rats in mandibular distraction osteogenesis via radiomorphometry and biomechanical response analysis. We demonstrated successful distraction osteogenesis to 5.1 mm in all Lewis (isogenic) rat mandibles as well as all Sprague-Dawley (outbred) rat mandibles, with no significant difference in volume-normalized radiomorphometrics, trending difference in non-volume-normalized radiomorphometrics and significant differences in biomechanical response parameters. We attribute the differences demonstrated to the decreased size of the Lewis rat mandible in comparison to Sprague-Dawley mandibles. We also provide information with caring with the additional needs of the Lewis rat. Given these differences, we find that Lewis rats function as an excellent model for isogenic mandibular distraction osteogenesis, but data procured may not be comparable between isogenic and nonisogenic models.

  12. Intradermal Infection Model for Pathogenesis and Vaccine Studies of Murine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The levels of protection found in vaccine studies of murine visceral leishmaniasis are significantly lower than for cutaneous leishmaniasis; whether this is due to the high-challenge murine model employed and/or is a consequence of differences required in tissue-specific local immune responses is not understood. Consequently, an intradermal murine model of visceral leishmaniasis has been explored. Intradermal inoculation established a chronic infection in susceptible mice which was associated...

  13. Trastuzumab anti-tumor efficacy in patient-derived esophageal squamous cell carcinoma xenograft (PDECX mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xianhua

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trastuzumab is currently approved for the clinical treatment of breast and gastric cancer patients with HER-2 positive tumors, but not yet for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma patients, whose tumors typically show 5 ~ 35% HER-2 gene amplification and 0 ~ 56% HER-2 protein expression. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of Trastuzumab in patient-derived esophageal squamous cell carcinoma xenograft (PDECX mouse models. Methods PDECX models were established by implanting patient esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC tissues into immunodeficient (SCID/nude mice. HER-2 gene copy number (GCN and protein expression were determined in xenograft tissues and corresponding patient EC samples by FISH and IHC analysis. Trastuzumab anti-tumor efficacy was evaluated within these PDECX models (n = 8 animals/group. Furthermore, hotspot mutations of EGFR, K-ras, B-raf and PIK3CA genes were screened for in the PDECX models and their corresponding patient’s ESCC tissues. Similarity between the PDECX models and their corresponding patient’s ESCC tissue was confirmed by histology, morphology, HER-2 GCN and mutation. Results None of the PDECX models (or their corresponding patient’s ESCC tissues harbored HER-2 gene amplification. IHC staining showed HER-2 positivity (IHC 2+ in 2 PDECX models and negativity in 3 PDECX models. Significant tumor regression was observed in the Trastuzumab-treated EC044 HER-2 positive model (IHC 2+. A second HER-2 positive (IHC 2+ model, EC039, harbored a known PIK3CA mutation and showed strong activation of the AKT signaling pathway and was insensitive to Trastuzumab treatment, but could be resensitised using a combination of Trastuzumab and AKT inhibitor AZD5363. In summary, we established 5 PDECX mouse models and demonstrated tumor regression in response to Trastuzumab treatment in a HER-2 IHC 2+ model, but resistance in a HER-2 IHC 2+/PIK3CA mutated model. Conclusions

  14. Analysis of the anti-tumor effect of cetuximab using protein kinetics and mouse xenograft models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuo Teppei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of EGFR and its ligands leads to autophosphorylation of receptor tyrosine kinase as well as subsequent activation of signal transduction pathways that are involved in regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival. An EGFR inhibitor, cetuximab binds to EGFR and consequently blocks a variety of cellular processes. KRAS/BRAF mutations are known to be associated with a low response rate to cetuximab. In the present study, to clarify the anti-tumor mechanisms of cetuximab, we evaluated the KRAS/BRAF status, phosphorylation level of the EGFR pathway, and the tumor suppression effect in vivo, using a human colon cancer cell line HT29, which exhibited the highest EGFR expression in response to the cetuximab therapy among the 6 colorectal cancer cell lines tested. Findings The conventional growth suppression assay did not work efficiently with cetuximab. EGF, TGF-α, and IGF activated the EGFR/MAPK cell signaling pathway by initiating the phosphorylation of EGFR. Cetuximab partially inhibited the EGFR/MAPK pathway induced by EGF, TGF-α, and IGF. However, cetuximab exposure induced the EGFR, MEK, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation by itself. Mouse xenograft tumor growth was significantly inhibited by cetuximab and both cetuximab-treated and -untreated xenograft specimens exhibited phosphorylations of the EGFR pathway proteins. Conclusions We have confirmed that cetuximab inhibited the EGFR/MAPK pathway and reduced tumor growth in the xenografts while the remaining tumor showed EGFR pathway activation. These results suggest that: ( i The effect of cetuximab in growth signaling is not sufficient to induce complete growth suppression in vitro; ( ii time-course monitoring may be necessary to evaluate the effect of cetuximab because EGFR signaling is transmitted in a minute order; and ( iii cetuximab treatment may have cells acquired resistant selectively survived in the heterogeneous cancer population.

  15. Molecular Imaging of Bcr-Abl Phosphokinase in a Xenograft Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ji Yuan; David J. Yang; Angelo, Laura S.; Kohanim, Saady; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase can be assessed by gamma imaging using an 111Indium-labeled anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, and if the response to treatment with imatinib could be detected using this imaging technique. Anti-phosphotyrosine antibody (APT) was labeled with indium (111In) using ethylenedicysteine (EC) as a chelator. To determine if 111In-EC-APT could assess a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, xenografts of the human chronic myelogenous l...

  16. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone on growth of human gastric carcinoma xenograft model in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dao-Ming Liang; Jia-Yong Chen; Yi Zhang; Ping Gan; Jie Lin; An-Bao Chen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on growth of a human gastric carcinoma cell in vivo.METHODS: Experimental mice were divided into control group, rhGH group, oxaliplatin (L-OHP) group and rhGH+L-OHP group. Cultured human gastric carcinoma cells BGC823 were inoculated into right axilla of nude mice and carcinoma xenograft model wasestablished successfully. Inhibitory rate of xenograft tumor growth was estimated by measuring tumor volume; expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Bax and Bcl-2 proteins of xenograft tumor was detected using immunohistochemical S-P method.RESULTS: Tumor growth inhibitory rate, the positive expression rate of PCNA, Bax and Bcl-2 were 49.3%,58.2%, 65.2% and 59.2% in rhGH+L-OHP group respectively; 46.6%, 62.5%, 59.7% and 64.7% in L-OHP group; 5.0%, 82.7%, 23.2% and 82.2% in rhGH group and 0, 77.8%, 23.5% and 80.3% in control group. There was significant difference between rhGH+L-OHP group (or L-OHP group ) and control group or rhGH group (P <0.05), whereas there were no significant differences (P >0.05) between L-OHP group and rhGH+L-OHP group and between rhGH group and control group.CONCLUSION: rhGH does not accelerate the proliferation of human gastric cancer cell in vivo.

  17. Neurological Disorders in a Murine Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Chillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. However, data on the impact of CRF on the cerebral circulatory system are scarce—despite the fact that stroke is the third most common cause of cardiovascular death in people with CRF. In the present study, we examined the impact of CRF on behavior (anxiety, recognition and ischemic stroke severity in a well-defined murine model of CRF. We did not observe any significant increases between CRF mice and non-CRF mice in terms of anxiety. In contrast, CRF mice showed lower levels of anxiety in some tests. Recognition was not impaired (vs. controls after 6 weeks of CRF but was impaired after 10 weeks of CRF. Chronic renal failure enhances the severity of ischemic stroke, as evaluated by the infarct volume size in CRF mice after 34 weeks of CRF. Furthermore, neurological test results in non-CRF mice tended to improve in the days following ischemic stroke, whereas the results in CRF mice tended to worsen. In conclusion, we showed that a murine model of CRF is suitable for evaluating uremic toxicity and the associated neurological disorders. Our data confirm the role of uremic toxicity in the genesis of neurological abnormalities (other than anxiety.

  18. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Colin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26, multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlAm*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlAm* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced

  19. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes Internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-12-13

    Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26), multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlA m*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlA m* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced entry into human

  20. Pseudotyped AAV vector-mediated gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model: implications for in utero gene therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep G Keswani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung disease including airway infection and inflammation currently causes the majority of morbidities and mortalities associated with cystic fibrosis (CF, making the airway epithelium and the submucosal glands (SMG novel target cells for gene therapy in CF. These target cells are relatively inaccessible to postnatal gene transfer limiting the success of gene therapy. Our previous work in a human-fetal trachea xenograft model suggests the potential benefit for treating CF in utero. In this study, we aim to validate adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2 gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model and to compare transduction efficiencies of pseudotyping AAV2 vectors in fetal xenografts and postnatal xenograft controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human fetal trachea or postnatal bronchus controls were xenografted onto immunocompromised SCID mice for a four-week engraftment period. After injection of AAV2/2, 2/1, 2/5, 2/7 or 2/8 with a LacZ reporter into both types of xenografts, we analyzed for transgene expression in the respiratory epithelium and SMGs. At 1 month, transduction by AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in respiratory epithelium and SMG cells was significantly greater than that of AAV2/1, 2/5, and 2/7 in xenograft tracheas. Efficiency in SMG transduction was significantly greater in AAV2/8 than AAV2/2. At 3 months, AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 transgene expression was >99% of respiratory epithelium and SMG. At 1 month, transduction efficiency of AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 was significantly less in adult postnatal bronchial xenografts than in fetal tracheal xenografts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the effectiveness of AAV vectors in SMG transduction, our findings suggest the potential utility of pseudotyped AAV vectors for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The human fetal trachea xenograft model may serve as an effective tool for further development of fetal gene therapy strategies for the in utero treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  1. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Forsberg, Anya I; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-09-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 180μl/kg) and LF pulse-inversion SHI was performed with a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving at 8/4MHz in SHI mode) followed by HF imaging with a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada) using a MS250 linear array transmitting and receiving at 24MHz. The radiofrequency data was filtered using a 4th order IIR Butterworth bandpass filter (11-13MHz) to isolate the subharmonic signal. After the experiments, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Fractional tumor vascularity was calculated as contrast-enhanced pixels over all tumor pixels for SHI, while the relative area stained over total tumor area was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using linear regression analysis. Out of 19 rats, 16 showed tumor growth (84%) and 11 of them were successfully imaged. HF SHI demonstrated better resolution, but weaker signals than LF SHI (0.06±0.017 vs. 0.39±0.059; p<0.001). The strongest overall correlation in this breast cancer model was between HF SHI and VEGF (r=-0.38; p=0.03). In conclusion, quantifiable measures of tumor neovascularity derived from contrast-enhanced HF SHI appear to be a better method than LF SHI for monitoring angiogenesis in a murine xenograft model of breast cancer

  2. Activin type IB receptor signaling in prostate cancer cells promotes lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Masatoshi, E-mail: nomura@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Tanaka, Kimitaka; Wang, Lixiang; Goto, Yutaka; Mukasa, Chizu; Ashida, Kenji; Takayanagi, Ryoichi [Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling induces Snail and S100A4 expressions in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prostate cancer cell lines expressing an active form of ActRIB were established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling promotes EMT and lymph node metastasis in xenograft model. -- Abstract: Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-{beta} family, has been known to be a growth and differentiating factor. Despite its pluripotent effects, the roles of activin signaling in prostate cancer pathogenesis are still unclear. In this study, we established several cell lines that express a constitutive active form of activin type IB receptor (ActRIBCA) in human prostate cancer cells, ALVA41 (ALVA-ActRIBCA). There was no apparent change in the proliferation of ALVA-ActRIBCA cells in vitro; however, their migratory ability was significantly enhanced. In a xenograft model, histological analysis revealed that the expression of Snail, a cell-adhesion-suppressing transcription factor, was dramatically increased in ALVA-ActRIBCA tumors, indicating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Finally, mice bearing ALVA-ActRIBCA cells developed multiple lymph node metastases. In this study, we demonstrated that ActRIBCA signaling can promote cell migration in prostate cancer cells via a network of signaling molecules that work together to trigger the process of EMT, and thereby aid in the aggressiveness and progression of prostate cancers.

  3. Quercetin induces cell apoptosis of myeloma and displays a synergistic effect with dexamethasone in vitro and in vivo xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Donghua; Guo, Xing; Zhang, Enfan; Zi, Fuming; Chen, Jing; Chen, Qingxiao; Lin, Xuanru; Yang, Li; Li, Yi; Wu, Wenjun; Yang, Yang; He, Jingsong; Cai, Zhen

    2016-07-19

    Quercetin, a kind of dietary flavonoid, has shown its anticancer activity in many kinds of cancers including hematological malignancies (acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and MM) in vitro and in vivo. However, its effects on MM need further investigation. In this study, MM cell lines were treated with quercetin alone or in combination with dexamethasone. In order to observe the effects in vivo, a xenograft model of human myeloma was established. Quercetin inhibited proliferation of MM cells (RPMI8226, ARP-1, and MM.1R) by inducing cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and apoptosis. Western blot showed that quercetin downregulated c-myc expression and upregulated p21 expression. Quercetin also activated caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1. Caspase inhibitors partially blocked apoptosis induced by quercetin. Furthermore, quercetin combined with dexamethasone significantly increased MM cell apoptosis. In vivo xenograft models, quercetin obviously inhibited tumor growth. Caspase-3 was activated to a greater extent when quercetin was combined with dexamethasone. In conclusion, quercetin alone or in combination with dexamethasone may be an effective therapy for MM.

  4. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Department of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung 25457 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul 06973 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  5. Therapeutic effects of microbubble added to combined high-intensity focused ultrasound and chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Dept. of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  6. Quercetin induces cell apoptosis of myeloma and displays a synergistic effect with dexamethasone in vitro and in vivo xenograft models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Enfan; Zi, Fuming; Chen, Jing; Chen, Qingxiao; Lin, Xuanru; Yang, Li; Li, Yi; Wu, Wenjun; Yang, Yang; He, Jingsong; Cai, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a kind of dietary flavonoid, has shown its anticancer activity in many kinds of cancers including hematological malignancies (acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and MM) in vitro and in vivo. However, its effects on MM need further investigation. In this study, MM cell lines were treated with quercetin alone or in combination with dexamethasone. In order to observe the effects in vivo, a xenograft model of human myeloma was established. Quercetin inhibited proliferation of MM cells (RPMI8226, ARP-1, and MM.1R) by inducing cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and apoptosis. Western blot showed that quercetin downregulated c-myc expression and upregulated p21 expression. Quercetin also activated caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1. Caspase inhibitors partially blocked apoptosis induced by quercetin. Furthermore, quercetin combined with dexamethasone significantly increased MM cell apoptosis. In vivo xenograft models, quercetin obviously inhibited tumor growth. Caspase-3 was activated to a greater extent when quercetin was combined with dexamethasone. In conclusion, quercetin alone or in combination with dexamethasone may be an effective therapy for MM. PMID:27329589

  7. Antitumor activity and prolonged survival by carbon-nanotube-mediated therapeutic siRNA silencing in a human lung xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, Jennifer E; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T; Herrero, M Antonia; Tian, Bowen; Ali-Boucetta, Hanene; Hegde, Vikas; Bianco, Alberto; Prato, Maurizio; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2009-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes are novel nanomaterials that are thought to offer potential benefits to a variety of biomedical and clinical applications. In this study, the treatment of a human lung carcinoma model in vivo using siRNA sequences leading to cytotoxicity and cell death is carried out using either cationic liposomes (DOTAP:cholesterol) or amino-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT - NH(+)(3)). Validation for the most cytotoxic siRNA sequence using a panel of human carcinoma and murine cells reveals that the proprietary siTOX sequence is human specific and can lead to significant cytotoxic activities delivered both by liposome or MWNT - NH(+)(3) in vitro. A comparative study using both types of vector indicates that only MWNT - NH(+)(3):siRNA complexes administered intratumorally can elicit delayed tumor growth and increased survival of xenograft-bearing animals. siTOX delivery via the cationic MWNT - NH(+)(3) is biologically active in vivo by triggering an apoptotic cascade, leading to extensive necrosis of the human tumor mass. This suggests that carbon-nanotube-mediated delivery of siRNA by intratumoral administration leads to successful and statistically significant suppression of tumor volume, followed by a concomitant prolongation of survival of human lung tumor-bearing animals. The direct comparison between carbon nanotubes and liposomes demonstrates the potential advantages offered by carbon nanotubes for the intracellular delivery of therapeutic agents in vivo. The present work may act as the impetus for further studies to explore the therapeutic capacity of chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes to deliver siRNA directly into the cytoplasm of target cells and achieve effective therapeutic silencing in various disease indications where local delivery is feasible or desirable.

  8. Antitumor effects of FP3 in combination with capecitabine on PDTT xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma and related lymphatic and hepatic metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ketao; Lan, Huanrong; Xie, Bojian; He, Kuifeng; Xu, Zhenzhen; Li, Guangliang; Han, Na; Teng, Lisong; Cao, Feilin

    2012-07-01

    FP3 is an engineered protein which contains the extracellular domain 2 of VEGF receptor 1 (Flt-1) and extracellular domain 3 and 4 of VEGF receptor 2 (Flk-1, KDR) fused to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G 1. Previous studies demonstrated its antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo, and its antitumor activity in vivo. In this study, patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma and lymphatic and hepatic metastases were established for assessment of the antitumor activity of FP3 in combination with capecitabine. Xenografts were treated with FP3, capecitabine, alone or in combination. After tumor growth was confirmed, volume and microvessel density in tumors were evaluated. Levels of VEGF, and PCNA in the tumor were examined by immunohistonchamical staining, level of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) was examined by ELISA, and levels of related cell signaling pathways proteins expression were examined by western blotting. FP3 in combination with capecitabine showed significant antitumor activity in three xenograft models (primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic metastasis, and hepatic metastasis). The microvessel density in tumor tissues treated with FP3 in combination with capecitabine was lower than that of the control. Antitumor activity of FP3 in combination with capecitabine was significantly higher than that of each agent alone in three xenograft models (primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic metastasis, and hepatic metastasis). This study indicated that addition of FP3 to capecitabine significantly improved tumor growth inhibition in the PDTT xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma and lymphatic and hepatic metastases.

  9. Nanoshell-mediated photothermal therapy improves survival in a murine glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Emily S; Thompson, Patrick A; Zhang, Linna; Lewinski, Nastassja A; Ahmed, Nabil; Drezek, Rebekah A; Blaney, Susan M; West, Jennifer L

    2011-08-01

    We are developing a novel treatment for high-grade gliomas using near infrared-absorbing silica-gold nanoshells that are thermally activated upon exposure to a near infrared laser, thereby irreversibly damaging cancerous cells. The goal of this work was to determine the efficacy of nanoshell-mediated photothermal therapy in vivo in murine xenograft models. Tumors were induced in male IcrTac:ICR-Prkdc(SCID) mice by subcutaneous implantation of Firefly Luciferase-labeled U373 human glioma cells and biodistribution and survival studies were performed. To evaluate nanoparticle biodistribution, nanoshells were delivered intravenously to tumor-bearing mice and after 6, 24, or 48 h the tumor, liver, spleen, brain, muscle, and blood were assessed for gold content by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and histology. Nanoshell concentrations in the tumor increased for the first 24 h and stabilized thereafter. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by delivering saline or nanoshells intravenously and externally irradiating tumors with a near infrared laser 24 h post-injection. Success of treatment was assessed by monitoring tumor size, tumor luminescence, and survival time of the mice following laser irradiation. There was a significant improvement in survival for the nanoshell treatment group versus the control (P nanoshell treatment group remained tumor free at the end of the 90-day study period. By comparison, none of the mice in the control group survived beyond 24 days and mean survival was only 13.3 days. The results of these studies suggest that nanoshell-mediated photothermal therapy represents a promising novel treatment strategy for malignant glioma.

  10. Clinical perspectives and murine models of lichenoid tissue reaction/interface dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiyama, Naoko; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2015-06-01

    A set of histopathological elements, that is death of epidermal basal cell layer keratinocytes and inflammatory cell infiltration, distinguishes lichenoid tissue reaction (LTR)/interface dermatitis (IFD) from other inflammatory mucocutaneous diseases with histological findings of superficial perivascular dermatitis. The LTR/IFD is observed in inflammatory mucocutaneous diseases such as lichen planus, Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis, acute graft-versus-host disease, lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis. Clinical and basic researches have suggested that keratinocytes are antigen-presenting cells and mediate LTR/IFD reaction via production of cytokines/chemokines and inhibitory molecules such as programmed cell death (PD)-L1, and that cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells producing cytotoxic granules, perforin, granzyme B and granulysin are final effector cells to cause keratinocyte death. Because interferon-γ and FasL, which are produced by not only CD8(+) but also CD4(+) T cells, are candidates of the pathogenic molecules in LTR/IFD, CD4(+) T cells may also play a role to develop LTR/IFD. On the other hand, CD4(+) Treg cells accelerate the remission of LTR/IFD. Some murine models of LTR/IFD have been established. For example, LTR/IFD reactions were induced in keratinocyte-specific membrane-binding ovalbumin-transgenic (mOVA Tg) mice by adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cells with OVA-specific T-cell-receptor. It has also been shown that human CD8(+) T cells are pathogenic immune cells in human skin-xenografted mice. Various immunosuppressants are used to treat patients with mucocutaneous diseases with LTR/IFD. By analysis of the mOVA Tg mice, a JAK inhibitor was suggested to be a new candidate drug to inhibit not only pathogenic T cells but also keratinocyte death in LTR/IFD. More specific treatments for patients with LTR/IFD will be developed in future.

  11. A novel inexpensive murine model of oral chronic digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helber, Izo; Kanashiro, Rosemeire M; Alarcon, Ernesto A; Antonio, Ednei L; Tucci, Paulo J F

    2004-01-01

    A novel inexpensive murine model of oral administration of digitoxin (100 micro g/kg per day) added to routine chow is described. Serum digitoxin levels achieved after oral (n = 5; 116 +/- 14 ng/mL) and subcutaneous (n = 5; 124 +/- 11 ng/mL) administration were similar. A significant increase in the maximal left ventricular pressure rise of treated (n = 9) compared with control (n = 6) rats (dP/dt: 8956 +/- 233 vs 7980 +/- 234 mmHg/s, respectively; P = 0.01) characterized the positive inotropic action of digitoxin. In addition, no differences were observed in treated compared with control rats with regard to the electrocardiogram and systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressures.

  12. Tissue engineering of the intestine in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Erik R; Speer, Allison L; Levin, Daniel E; Sala, Frédéric G; Hou, Xiaogang; Torashima, Yasuhiro; Wigfall, Clarence M; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2012-12-01

    Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) has successfully been used to rescue Lewis rats after massive small bowel resection, resulting in return to preoperative weights within 40 days.(1) In humans, massive small bowel resection can result in short bowel syndrome, a functional malabsorptive state that confers significant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs including parenteral nutrition dependence, liver failure and cirrhosis, and the need for multivisceral organ transplantation.(2) In this paper, we describe and document our protocol for creating tissue-engineered intestine in a mouse model with a multicellular organoid units-on-scaffold approach. Organoid units are multicellular aggregates derived from the intestine that contain both mucosal and mesenchymal elements,(3) the relationship between which preserves the intestinal stem cell niche.(4) In ongoing and future research, the transition of our technique into the mouse will allow for investigation of the processes involved during TESI formation by utilizing the transgenic tools available in this species.(5)The availability of immunocompromised mouse strains will also permit us to apply the technique to human intestinal tissue and optimize the formation of human TESI as a mouse xenograft before its transition into humans. Our method employs good manufacturing practice (GMP) reagents and materials that have already been approved for use in human patients, and therefore offers a significant advantage over approaches that rely upon decellularized animal tissues. The ultimate goal of this method is its translation to humans as a regenerative medicine therapeutic strategy for short bowel syndrome.

  13. Efficacy of Ambruticin Analogs in a Murine Model of Coccidioidomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shubitz, Lisa F.; Galgiani, John N.; Tian, Zong-Qiang; Zhong, Ziyang; Timmermans, Pieter; Katz, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    Ambruticin S, an antifungal cyclopropyl-pyran acid, showed curative effects against murine coccidioidal infection. Two analogs of this compound with greater in vitro potency were tested against lethal murine Coccidioides infection. Both improved the survival of mice over that of controls; one resulted in near-sterilization of infection.

  14. A novel synthetic smoothened antagonist transiently inhibits pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin F Strand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hedgehog (Hh signaling is over-activated in several solid tumors where it plays a central role in cell growth, stroma recruitment and tumor progression. In the Hh signaling pathway, the Smoothened (SMO receptor comprises a primary drug target with experimental small molecule SMO antagonists currently being evaluated in clinical trials. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Shh-Light II (Shh-L2 and alkaline phosphatase (AP based screening formats on a "focused diversity" library we identified a novel small molecule inhibitor of the Hh pathway, MS-0022 (2-bromo-N-(4-(8-methylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-ylphenylbenzamide. MS-0022 showed effective Hh signaling pathway inhibition at the level of SMO in the low nM range, and Hh pathway inhibition downstream of Suppressor of fused (SUFU in the low µM range. MS-0022 reduced growth in the tumor cell lines PANC-1, SUIT-2, PC-3 and FEMX in vitro. MS-0022 treatment led to a transient delay of tumor growth that correlated with a reduction of stromal Gli1 levels in SUIT-2 xenografts in vivo. SIGNIFICANCE: We document the in vitro and in vivo efficacy and bioavailability of a novel small molecule SMO antagonist, MS-0022. Although MS-0022 primarily interferes with Hh signaling at the level of SMO, it also has a downstream inhibitory effect and leads to a stronger reduction of growth in several tumor cell lines when compared to related SMO antagonists.

  15. Evaluation of murine models of permanent focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席刚明; 汪华侨; 何国厚; 黄朝芬; 魏国耀

    2004-01-01

    Background To date murine models of permanent focal cerebral ischemia have not been well characterized. The purposes of this paper were to compare three different permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) models with or without craniectomy, and to identify an ideal mouse model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia.Methods Experiments were performed on 45 healthy adult male Kunming mice, weighing 28 to 42 g. The animals were randomly assigned to three groups (n=15 in every group) based on surgical procedure: MCAo via the external carotid artery (ECA), MCAo via the common carotid artery (CCA), and direct ligation of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Each day post-ischemia, the animals were scored using an eight-grade neurological function scale, and mortality was also recorded. Seven days post-ischemia, the brains were removed for lesion size determination using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Correlation analysis of lesion volume and neurological score was carried out. Results Mortality in the group receiving direct MCA ligation was lowest among the three groups, and there was a significant difference between the direct MCA ligation group and the two intraluminal occlusion groups (P0.7, P<0.05), suggesting good reproducibility of lesion volume in the three groups, but the infarct volume was more constant in the direct MCA ligation group. Conclusion The direct ligation model of MCAo provides an optimal means of studying permanent focal cerebral ischemia, and is preferable to the models using intraluminal sutures.

  16. Prolonged cardiac xenograft survival in guinea pig-to-rat model by a highly active cobra venom factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian-Yun; Chen, Gang; Guo, Hui; Chen, Shi; Wang, Wan-Yu; Xiong, Yu-Liang

    2003-09-01

    A highly active cobra venom factor (CVF) was isolated from the venom of Naja kaouthia by sequential column chromatography. It displays strong anticomplementary activity, and has 1515 U of anticomplementary activity per mg protein. A single dose of 0.1 mg/kg CVF given i.v. to rats completely abrogated complement activity for nearly 5 days. Given 0.02 mg/kg of CVF, the complement activity of rats was reduced by more than 96.5% in 6 h. In guinea pig-to-rat heart transplant model, rats treated with a single dose of 0.05 mg/kg CVF had significantly prolonged xenograft survival (56.12+/-6.27 h in CVF-treated rats vs. 0.19+/-0.07 h in control rats, P<0.001).

  17. Sonoporation with Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT®) induces transient tumour volume reduction in a subcutaneous xenograft model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotopoulis, Spiros; Stigen, Endre; Popa, Mihaela; Safont, Mireia Mayoral; Healey, Andrew; Kvåle, Svein; Sontum, Per; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Gilja, Odd Helge; McCormack, Emmet

    2017-01-10

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the deadliest cancers with survival averaging only 3months if untreated following diagnosis. A major limitation in effectively treating PDAC using conventional and targeted chemotherapeutic agents, is inadequate drug delivery to the target location, predominantly due to a poorly vascularised, desmoplastic tumour microenvironment. Ultrasound in combination with ultrasound contrast agents, i.e., microbubbles, that flow through the vasculature and capillaries can be used to disrupt such mechanical barriers, potentially allowing for a greater therapeutic efficacy. This phenomenon is commonly referred to as sonoporation. In an attempt to improve the efficacy of sonoporation, novel microbubble formulations are being developed to address the limitation of commercially produced clinical diagnostic ultrasound contrast agents. In our work here we evaluate the ability of a novel formulation; namely Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT®) to improve the therapeutic efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel, longitudinally in a xenograft model of PDAC. Results indicated that ACT® bubbles alone demonstrated no observable toxic effects, whilst ACT® in combination with paclitaxel can transiently reduce tumour volumes significantly, three days posttreatment (p=0.0347-0.0458). Quantitative 3D ultrasound validated the calliper measurements. Power Doppler ultrasound imaging indicated that ACT® in combination with paclitaxel was able to transiently sustain peak vasculature percentages as observed in the initial stages of tumour development. Nevertheless, there was no significant difference in tumour vasculature percentage at the end of treatment. The high vascular percentage correlated to the transient decrease and overall inhibition of the tumour volumes. In conclusion, ACT® improves the therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel in a PDAC xenograft model allowing for transient tumour volume reduction and sustained tumour vasculature

  18. An in vitro model of murine middle ear epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Mulay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM, or middle ear inflammation, is the most common paediatric disease and leads to significant morbidity. Although understanding of underlying disease mechanisms is hampered by complex pathophysiology it is clear that epithelial abnormalities underpin the disease. There is currently a lack of a well-characterised in vitro model of the middle ear (ME epithelium that replicates the complex cellular composition of the middle ear. Here, we report the development of a novel in vitro model of mouse middle ear epithelial cells (mMECs at an air–liquid interface (ALI that recapitulates the characteristics of the native murine ME epithelium. We demonstrate that mMECs undergo differentiation into the varied cell populations seen within the native middle ear. Proteomic analysis confirmed that the cultures secrete a multitude of innate defence proteins from their apical surface. We showed that the mMECs supported the growth of the otopathogen, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi, suggesting that the model can be successfully utilised to study host–pathogen interactions in the middle ear. Overall, our mMEC culture system can help to better understand the cell biology of the middle ear and improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of OM. The model also has the potential to serve as a platform for validation of treatments designed to reverse aspects of epithelial remodelling that underpin OM development.

  19. Dendritic Immunotherapy Improvement for an Optimal Control Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Rangel-Reyes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic protocols in immunotherapy are usually proposed following the intuition and experience of the therapist. In order to deduce such protocols mathematical modeling, optimal control and simulations are used instead of the therapist’s experience. Clinical efficacy of dendritic cell (DC vaccines to cancer treatment is still unclear, since dendritic cells face several obstacles in the host environment, such as immunosuppression and poor transference to the lymph nodes reducing the vaccine effect. In view of that, we have created a mathematical murine model to measure the effects of dendritic cell injections admitting such obstacles. In addition, the model considers a therapy given by bolus injections of small duration as opposed to a continual dose. Doses timing defines the therapeutic protocols, which in turn are improved to minimize the tumor mass by an optimal control algorithm. We intend to supplement therapist’s experience and intuition in the protocol’s implementation. Experimental results made on mice infected with melanoma with and without therapy agree with the model. It is shown that the dendritic cells’ percentage that manages to reach the lymph nodes has a crucial impact on the therapy outcome. This suggests that efforts in finding better methods to deliver DC vaccines should be pursued.

  20. Anti-inflammatory activities of mogrosides from Momordica grosvenori in murine macrophages and a murine ear edema model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Rong; Huang, Mou-Tuan; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2011-07-13

    Momordica grosvenori (Luo Han Guo), grown primarily in Guangxi province in China, has been traditionally used for thousands of years by the Chinese to make hot drinks for the treatment of sore throat and the removal of phlegm. The natural noncaloric sweetening triterpenoid glycosides (mogrosides) contained in the M. grosvenori fruits are also antioxidative, anticarcinogenic, and helpful in preventing diabetic complications. The aim of this study was to assess the anti-inflammatory properties of mogrosides in both murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells and a murine ear edema model. The results indicate that mogrosides can inhibit inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in RAW 264.7 cells by down-regulating the expression of key inflammatory genes iNOS, COX-2, and IL-6 and up-regulating some inflammation protective genes such as PARP1, BCL2l1, TRP53, and MAPK9. Similarly, in the murine ear edema model, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced inflammation was inhibited by mogrosides by down-regulating COX-2 and IL-6 and up-regulating PARP1, BCL2l1, TRP53, MAPK9, and PPARδ gene expression. This study shows that the anticancer and antidiabetic effects of M. grosvenori may result in part from its anti-inflammatory activity.

  1. Chick embryo xenograft model reveals a novel perineural niche for human adipose-derived stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid R. Cordeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSC are a heterogeneous cell population that contains adult multipotent stem cells. Although it is well established that hADSC have skeletal potential in vivo in adult organisms, in vitro assays suggest further differentiation capacity, such as into glia. Thus, we propose that grafting hADSC into the embryo can provide them with a much more instructive microenvironment, allowing the human cells to adopt diverse fates or niches. Here, hADSC spheroids were grafted into either the presumptive presomitic mesoderm or the first branchial arch (BA1 regions of chick embryos. Cells were identified without previous manipulations via human-specific Alu probes, which allows efficient long-term tracing of heterogeneous primary cultures. When grafted into the trunk, in contrast to previous studies, hADSC were not found in chondrogenic or osteogenic territories up to E8. Surprisingly, 82.5% of the hADSC were associated with HNK1+ tissues, such as peripheral nerves. Human skin fibroblasts showed a smaller tropism for nerves. In line with other studies, hADSC also adopted perivascular locations. When grafted into the presumptive BA1, 74.6% of the cells were in the outflow tract, the final goal of cardiac neural crest cells, and were also associated with peripheral nerves. This is the first study showing that hADSC could adopt a perineural niche in vivo and were able to recognize cues for neural crest cell migration of the host. Therefore, we propose that xenografts of human cells into chick embryos can reveal novel behaviors of heterogeneous cell populations, such as response to migration cues.

  2. The Effects of Vandetanib on Paclitaxel Tumor Distribution and Antitumor Activity in a Xenograft Model of Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cesca

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the effects of vandetanib, a small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptor, on paclitaxel (PTX tumor distribution and antitumor activity in xenograft models of human ovarian carcinoma. Nude mice bearing A2780-1A9 xenografts received daily (5, 10, or 15 days doses of vandetanib (50 mg/kg per os, combined with PTX (20 mg/kg intravenously. Morphologic and functional modifications associated with the tumor vasculature (CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin staining and Hoechst 33342 perfusion and PTX concentrations in plasma and tumor tissues were analyzed. Activity was evaluated as inhibition of tumor growth subcutaneously and spreading into the peritoneal cavity. Vandetanib treatment produced no significant change in tumor vessel density, although a reduced number of large vessels, an increased percentage of mature vessels, and diminished tumor perfusion were evident. Pretreatment with vandetanib led to decreased tumor PTX levels within 1 hour of PTX injection, although 24 hours later, tumor PTX levels were comparable with controls. In efficacy studies, the combination of vandetanib plus PTX improved antitumor activity compared with vandetanib or PTX alone, with greater effects being obtained when PTX was administered before vandetanib. The combination of PTX plus vandetanib reduced tumor burden in the peritoneal cavity of mice and significantly increased their survival. Analysis of vascular changes and PTX tumor uptake in vandetanib-treated tumors may help to guide the scheduling of vandetanib plus PTX combinations and may have implications for the design of clinical trials with these drugs.

  3. Activation of Src and Src-associated signaling pathways in relation to hypoxia in human cancer xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Nhu-An; Magalhaes, Joao M M M; Do, Trevor; Schwock, Joerg; Dhani, Neesha; Cao, Ping-Jiang; Hill, Richard P; Hedley, David W

    2009-01-15

    The hypoxic response in vitro involves alterations in signaling proteins, including Src, STAT3 and AKT that are considered to be broadly pro-survival. The involvement of these signaling proteins in the hypoxic microenviroments that occur in solid tumors was investigated by the use of multicolor fluorescence image analysis to colocalize signaling proteins and regions of hypoxia in 4 human tumor xenografts, pancreatic carcinoma BxPC3 and PANC1 and cervical squamous cell carcinoma ME180 and SiHa. Expression levels of total Src protein (mean intensity x labeled region fraction) were higher in hypoxic regions, identified using the nitroimidazole probe EF5, relative to non-EF5 regions in all 4 tumor models. This was associated with higher levels of phosphorylated (p-) Y419p-Src and its substrate Y861p-FAK in EF5 positive regions of BxPC3 tumors. This effect was also seen in tumor-bearing mice continuously breathing 7% oxygen for 3 hr which markedly increased the extent of EF5 positive labeling. In contrast, the hypoxia treatment resulted in a significant decrease in S727p-STAT3 in BxPC3 xenografts and suggested that STAT3 activity is responsive to acute hypoxia, whereas Src-FAK signaling is associated with predominantly chronically hypoxic EF5 positive regions. Src activity in both hypoxic and nonhypoxic BxPC3 tumor regions was suppressed when mice were treated with the Src inhibitor AZD0530 (25 mg/kg/day, 5 days), suggesting that both hypoxic and normoxic tumor regions are accessible to pharmacological Src inhibition. These results show that signaling pathways are responsive to tumor hypoxia in vivo, although the effects appear to differ between individual tumor types. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

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    Erik Munson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ- deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology.

  5. Kinetics and specificity of nickel hypersensitivity in the murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, G M; Seymour, G J

    1994-01-01

    Nickel contact dermatitis appears to be almost exclusively a disease of females despite the increasing exposure of males to nickel. Successful murine models of nickel allergic contact dermatitis have been described. The purpose of this study is to investigate the kinetics and specificity of the response in this model and to examine if any differences exist between male and female. Mice were sensitised epicutaneously with nickel sulphate in aqueous solution of varying concentration, volume and duration of application. Following intradermal challenge, dose dependent response kinetics which approximated linearity were demonstrated upto the point of toxicity. Sensitised mice were challenged with Cobaltous chloride, Chromic chloride and Cupric sulphate and demonstrated no evidence of cross sensitivity to cobalt or chrome. Copper produced an irritant response making interpretation difficult. Earlier and stronger responses were observed in female mice, however these differences fell short of statistical significance. The results of the present study therefore establishes a reliable model for nickel hypersensitivity, that demonstrates both specificity and dose dependent kinetics without significant sex differences.

  6. High-dose stabilized chlorite matrix WF10 prolongs cardiac xenograft survival in the hamster-to-rat model without inducing ultrastructural or biochemical signs of cardiotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A; Kemp, K; Kemp, E;

    2001-01-01

    of high dose WF10 as a single drug regimen in the hamster-to-rat xenotransplantation model and searched for possible cardiotoxic side effects. WF10 prolonged cardiac xenograft survival, but did not induce tolerence or inhibit pathological signs of acute rejection. Hamsters from the donor population...

  7. TALEN-mediated somatic mutagenesis in murine models of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuyuan; Li, Lin; Kendrick, Sara L; Gerard, Robert D; Zhu, Hao

    2014-09-15

    Cancer genome sequencing has identified numerous somatic mutations whose biologic relevance is uncertain. In this study, we used genome-editing tools to create and analyze targeted somatic mutations in murine models of liver cancer. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) were designed against β-catenin (Ctnnb1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc), two commonly mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to generate isogenic HCC cell lines. Both mutant cell lines exhibited evidence of Wnt pathway dysregulation. We asked whether these TALENs could create targeted somatic mutations after hydrodynamic transfection into mouse liver. TALENs targeting β-catenin promoted endogenous HCC carrying the intended gain-of-function mutations. However, TALENs targeting Apc were not as efficient in inducing in vivo homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesized that hepatocyte polyploidy might be protective against TALEN-induced loss of heterozygosity, and indeed Apc gene editing was less efficient in tetraploid than in diploid hepatocytes. To increase efficiency, we administered adenoviral Apc TALENs and found that we could achieve a higher mutagenesis rate in vivo. Our results demonstrate that genome-editing tools can enable the in vivo study of cancer genes and faithfully recapitulate the mosaic nature of mutagenesis in mouse cancer models. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5311-21. ©2014 AACR.

  8. Multi-Chemotherapeutic Schedules Containing the pan-FGFR Inhibitor ARQ 087 are Safe and Show Antitumor Activity in Different Xenograft Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilà, Rosaria; Hall G, Terence; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Broggini, Massimo; Damia, Giovanna

    2017-02-02

    ARQ 087 is a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent activity against the FGFR receptor family, currently in Phase I clinical studies for the treatment of advanced solid tumors. The compound has a very safe profile and induces tumor regressions in FGFR-driven models. The feasibility of combining ARQ 087 with chemotherapy was investigated in FGFR deregulated human xenografts. Nude mice were transplanted subcutaneously with H1581, and when tumor masses reached 150 mg, were randomized to receive vehicle, ARQ 087, paclitaxel, carboplatin as single agents or in combination. Similar experimental conditions were applied in nude mice bearing SNU16 and MFE296 xenografts, with the inclusion of capecitabine in the former xenograft model. In the different xenograft models, the drugs given as single agents ranged from very active to partially active. The double combinations were more active than the single ones, but the triple combinations were the most active. In particular, the combination of ARQ 087 + paclitaxel + carboplatin in H1581 bearing mice was able to induce tumor regression in all the mice, with 6/8 mice tumor free at day 140 after tumor transplant. Of note, no toxic deaths nor premature stopping or delaying of drug administration were observed. The data herein reported demonstrated the feasibility of using xenografts models for poli-chemotherapeutic trials mimicking the best standard of care in treatment of specific tumor type and that ARQ 087, a new pan-FGFR inhibitor, can be safely combined with standard cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drugs with apparently no sign of cumulative toxicity and an associated increased antitumor effect.

  9. Dystrophic spinal deformities in a neurofibromatosis type 1 murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D Rhodes

    Full Text Available Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice, with analogous histological features present in a human patient with dystrophic scoliosis. Intriguingly, 36-60% of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice exhibit segmental vertebral fusion anomalies with boney obliteration of the intervertebral disc (IVD. While analogous findings have not yet been reported in the NF1 patient population, we herein present two case reports of IVD defects and interarticular vertebral fusion in patients with NF1. Collectively, these data provide novel insights regarding the pathophysiology of dystrophic spinal anomalies in NF1, and provide impetus for future radiographic analyses of larger patient cohorts to determine whether IVD and vertebral fusion defects may have been previously overlooked or underreported in the NF1 patient population.

  10. Genomic characterization of patient-derived xenograft models established from fine needle aspirate biopsies of a primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and from patient-matched metastatic sites

    OpenAIRE

    Allaway, Robert J.; Fischer, Dawn A.; de Abreu, Francine B.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gordon, Stuart R.; Barth, Richard J.; Colacchio, Thomas A.; Wood, Matthew; Kacsoh, Balint Z.; Bouley, Stephanie J.; Cui, Jingxuan; Hamilton, Joanna; Choi, Jungbin A.; Lange, Joshua T.; Peterson, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    N-of-1 trials target actionable mutations, yet such approaches do not test genomically-informed therapies in patient tumor models prior to patient treatment. To address this, we developed patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies (FNA-PDX) obtained from primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) at the time of diagnosis. Here, we characterize PDX models established from one primary and two metastatic sites of one patient. We identified an activatin...

  11. Prolonged sulforaphane treatment does not enhance tumorigenesis in oncogenic K-ras and xenograft mouse models of lung cancer

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    Ponvijay Kombairaju

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sulforaphane (SFN, an activator of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2, is a promising chemopreventive agent which is undergoing clinical trial for several diseases. Studies have indicated that there is gain of Nrf2 function in lung cancer and other solid tumors because of mutations in the inhibitor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1. More recently, several oncogenes have been shown to activate Nrf2 signaling as the main prosurvival pathway mediating ROS detoxification, senescence evasion, and neoplastic transformation. Thus, it is important to determine if there is any risk of enhanced lung tumorigenesis associated with prolonged administration of SFN using mouse models of cancer. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the effect of prolonged SFN treatment on oncogenic K-ras (K-ras LSL-G12D -driven lung tumorigenesis. One week post mutant-K-ras expression, mice were treated with SFN (0.5 mg, 5 d/wk for 3 months by means of a nebulizer. Fourteen weeks after mutant K-ras expression (K-ras LSL-G12D , mice were sacrificed, and lung sections were screened for neoplastic foci. Expression of Nrf2-dependent genes was measured using real time RT-PCR. We also determined the effect of prolonged SFN treatment on the growth of preclinical xenograft models using human A549 (with mutant K-ras and Keap1 allele and H1975 [with mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR allele] nonsmall cell lung cancer cells. Results: Systemic SFN administration did not promote the growth of K-ras LSL-G12D -induced lung tumors and had no significant effect on the growth of A549 and H1975 established tumor xenografts in nude mice. Interestingly, localized delivery of SFN significantly attenuated the growth of A549 tumors in nude mice, suggesting an Nrf2-independent antitumorigenic activity of SFN. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that prolonged SFN treatment does not promote lung tumorigenesis in various mouse models of lung cancer.

  12. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX) of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis in a Zebrafish Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercatali, Laura; La Manna, Federico; Groenewoud, Arwin; Casadei, Roberto; Recine, Federica; Miserocchi, Giacomo; Pieri, Federica; Liverani, Chiara; Bongiovanni, Alberto; Spadazzi, Chiara; de Vita, Alessandro; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Giorgini, Andrea; Biagini, Roberto; Amadori, Dino; Ibrahim, Toni; Snaar-Jagalska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a complex process that needs to be better understood in order to help clinicians prevent and treat it. Xenografts using patient-derived material (PDX) rather than cancer cell lines are a novel approach that guarantees more clinically realistic results. A primary culture of bone metastasis derived from a 67-year-old patient with breast cancer was cultured and then injected into zebrafish (ZF) embryos to study its metastatic potential. In vivo behavior and results of gene expression analyses of the primary culture were compared with those of cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231). The MCF7 cell line, which has the same hormonal receptor status as the bone metastasis primary culture, did not survive in the in vivo model. Conversely, MDA-MB-231 disseminated and colonized different parts of the ZF, including caudal hematopoietic tissues (CHT), revealing a migratory phenotype. Primary culture cells disseminated and in later stages extravasated from the vessels, engrafting into ZF tissues and reaching the CHT. Primary cell behavior reflected the clinical course of the patient’s medical history. Our results underline the potential for using PDX models in bone metastasis research and outline new methods for the clinical application of this in vivo model. PMID:27556456

  13. Comprehensive characterization of chemotherapeutic efficacy on metastases in the established gastric neuroendocrine cancer patient derived xenograft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dawei; Pang, Liang; Guo, Sheng; Cai, Jie; Wery, Jean-Pierre; Li, Linda; Li, Henry Qixiang; Lin, Peter Ping

    2015-01-01

    The HuPrime® human gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma derived xenograft model GA0087 was established in this study. GA0087 PDX model showed high gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF)-A and B, and high potential of lung metastasis. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) with either large or small size, circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) and lung metastatic lesions were detected in GA0087 PDX mice. The number of CTC correlated to the number of metastatic nodules in lung. Both primary tumor growth and metastasis in terms of the number of dynamically monitored CTCs and metastatic nodules were effectively suppressed by Cisplatin. Diverse subtypes of CTCs in the context of sensitivity to Cisplatin were specifically identified by subtraction enrichment (SE) integrated with in situ Phenotyping of cytokeratin 18 (CK18) and Karyotyping of chromosome 8 (in situ PK CTC by CK-iFISH). All the CK18-/diploid and majority of CK18+/diploid CTC subtypes were chemosensitive, whereas a higher percentage of CK18+/multiploid subtype of CTC were Cisplatin-insensitive. Combined histopathological examination of metastatic lesion and in situ PK CTC in a metastatic PDX (mPDX) tumor model are of particular significance, and may provide an unique and robust platform for cancer research as well as pre-clinical evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:25909226

  14. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis in a Zebrafish Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mercatali

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastasis is a complex process that needs to be better understood in order to help clinicians prevent and treat it. Xenografts using patient-derived material (PDX rather than cancer cell lines are a novel approach that guarantees more clinically realistic results. A primary culture of bone metastasis derived from a 67-year-old patient with breast cancer was cultured and then injected into zebrafish (ZF embryos to study its metastatic potential. In vivo behavior and results of gene expression analyses of the primary culture were compared with those of cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231. The MCF7 cell line, which has the same hormonal receptor status as the bone metastasis primary culture, did not survive in the in vivo model. Conversely, MDA-MB-231 disseminated and colonized different parts of the ZF, including caudal hematopoietic tissues (CHT, revealing a migratory phenotype. Primary culture cells disseminated and in later stages extravasated from the vessels, engrafting into ZF tissues and reaching the CHT. Primary cell behavior reflected the clinical course of the patient’s medical history. Our results underline the potential for using PDX models in bone metastasis research and outline new methods for the clinical application of this in vivo model.

  15. [{sup 11}C]Choline as pharmacodynamic marker for therapy response assessment in a prostate cancer xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Bernd J.; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Herrmann, Ken; Weber, Axel W.; Buck, Andreas K.; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany); Schuster, Tibor [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Statistics (Germany); Nawroth, Roman; Treiber, Uwe [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Urology (Germany); Weirich, Gregor [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Pathology (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    [{sup 11}C]Choline has been established as a PET tracer for imaging prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether [{sup 11}C]choline can be used for monitoring the effects of therapy in a prostate cancer mouse xenograft model. The androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 was implanted subcutaneously into the flanks of 13 NMRI (nu/nu) mice. All mice were injected 4-6 weeks after xenograft implantation with 37 MBq [{sup 11}C]choline via a tail vein. Dynamic imaging was performed for 60 min with a small-animal PET/CT scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions). Six mice were subsequently injected intravenously with docetaxel twice (days 1 and 5) at a dose of 3 mg/kg body weight. Seven mice were treated with PBS as a control. [{sup 11}C]Choline imaging was performed prior to and 1, 2 and 3 weeks after treatment. To determine choline uptake the images were analysed in terms of tumour-to-muscle (T/M) ratios. Every week the size of the implanted tumour was determined with a sliding calliper. The PC-3 tumours could be visualized by [{sup 11}C]choline PET. Before treatment the T/M{sub mean} ratio was 1.6{+-}0.5 in the control group and 1.8{+-}0.4 in the docetaxel-treated group (p=0.65). There was a reduction in the mean [{sup 11}C]choline uptake after docetaxel treatment as early as 1 week after initiation of therapy (T/M ratio 1.8{+-}0.4 before treatment, 0.9{+-}0.3 after 1 week, 1.1{+-}0.3 after 2 weeks and 0.8{+-}0.2 after 3 weeks). There were no decrease in [{sup 11}C]choline uptake in the control group following treatment (T/M ratio 1.6{+-}0.5 before treatment, 1.7{+-}0.4 after 1 week, 1.8{+-}0.7 after 2 weeks and 1.7{+-}0.4 after 3 weeks). For analysis of the dynamic data, a generalized estimation equation model revealed a significant decrease in the T/M{sub dyn} ratios 1 week after docetaxel treatment, and the ratio remained at that level through week 3 (mean change -0.93{+-}0.24, p<0.001, after 1 week; -0.78{+-}0.21, p<0.001, after 2 weeks

  16. A murine model of muscle training by neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Ferrari, Ricardo; Distefano, Giovanna; Carvell, George

    2012-05-09

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a common clinical modality that is widely used to restore (1), maintain (2) or enhance (3-5) muscle functional capacity. Transcutaneous surface stimulation of skeletal muscle involves a current flow between a cathode and an anode, thereby inducing excitement of the motor unit and the surrounding muscle fibers. NMES is an attractive modality to evaluate skeletal muscle adaptive responses for several reasons. First, it provides a reproducible experimental model in which physiological adaptations, such as myofiber hypertophy and muscle strengthening (6), angiogenesis (7-9), growth factor secretion (9-11), and muscle precursor cell activation (12) are well documented. Such physiological responses may be carefully titrated using different parameters of stimulation (for Cochrane review, see (13)). In addition, NMES recruits motor units non-selectively, and in a spatially fixed and temporally synchronous manner (14), offering the advantage of exerting a treatment effect on all fibers, regardless of fiber type. Although there are specified contraindications to NMES in clinical populations, including peripheral venous disorders or malignancy, for example, NMES is safe and feasible, even for those who are ill and/or bedridden and for populations in which rigorous exercise may be challenging. Here, we demonstrate the protocol for adapting commercially available electrodes and performing a NMES protocol using a murine model. This animal model has the advantage of utilizing a clinically available device and providing instant feedback regarding positioning of the electrode to elicit the desired muscle contractile effect. For the purpose of this manuscript, we will describe the protocol for muscle stimulation of the anterior compartment muscles of a mouse hindlimb.

  17. A Murine Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Model: The DBA/2J Strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is attributed to mutations in genes that encode for the sarcomere proteins, especially Mybpc3 and Myh7. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies show significant variability in HCM phenotypes among affected individuals with identical causal mutations. Morphological changes and clinical expression of HCM are the result of interactions with modifier genes. With the exceptions of angiotensin converting enzyme, these modifiers have not been identified. Although mouse models have been used to investigate the genetics of many complex diseases, natural murine models for HCM are still lacking. In this study we show that the DBA/2J (D2 strain of mouse has sequence variants in Mybpc3 and Myh7, relative to widely used C57BL/6J (B6 reference strain and the key features of human HCM. Four-month-old of male D2 mice exhibit hallmarks of HCM including increased heart weight and cardiomyocyte size relative to B6 mice, as well as elevated markers for cardiac hypertrophy including β-myosin heavy chain (MHC, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, and skeletal muscle alpha actin (α1-actin. Furthermore, cardiac interstitial fibrosis, another feature of HCM, is also evident in the D2 strain, and is accompanied by up-regulation of type I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA-markers of fibrosis. Of great interest, blood pressure and cardiac function are within the normal range in the D2 strain, demonstrating that cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis are not secondary to hypertension, myocardial infarction, or heart failure. Because D2 and B6 strains have been used to generate a large family of recombinant inbred strains, the BXD cohort, the D2 model can be effectively exploited for in-depth genetic analysis of HCM susceptibility and modifier screens.

  18. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immune Responses by Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE in a Murine Model of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor

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    Michael Bzorek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT is a relatively new mode of internally targeted radiotherapy currently in clinical trials. In PRRT, ionizing radioisotopes conjugated to somatostatin analogues are targeted to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs via somatostatin receptors. Despite promising clinical results, very little is known about the mechanism of tumor control. By using NCI-H727 cells in an in vivo murine xenograft model of human NETs, we showed that 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT led to increased infiltration of CD86+ antigen presenting cells into tumor tissue. We also found that following treatment with PRRT, there was significantly increased tumor infiltration by CD49b+/FasL+ NK cells potentially capable of tumor killing. Further investigation into the immunomodulatory effects of PRRT will be essential in improving treatment efficacy.

  19. Antitumor activity of orally bioavailable farnesyltransferase inhibitor, ABT-100, is mediated by antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and antiangiogenic effects in xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Debra; Rodriguez, Luis E; Palma, Joann P; Refici, Marion; Jarvis, Kenneth; O'Connor, Jacqueline; Sullivan, Gerard M; Frost, David; Marsh, Kennan; Bauch, Joy; Zhang, Haiying; Lin, Nan-Horng; Rosenberg, Saul; Sham, Hing L; Joseph, Ingrid B J K

    2005-04-15

    To evaluate the preclinical pharmacokinetics, antitumor efficacy, and mechanism of action of a novel orally active farnesyltransferase inhibitor, ABT-100. In vitro sensitivity of a panel of human cell lines was determined using proliferation and clonogenic assays. In vivo efficacy of ABT-100 was evaluated in xenograft models (flank or orthotopic) by assessing angiogenesis, proliferation, and apoptosis in correlation with pharmacokinetics. Efficacy of the racemate of ABT-100 (A-367074) was also compared with R115777 (tipifarnib). ABT-100 inhibited proliferation of cells in vitro carrying oncogenic H-Ras (EJ-1 bladder; IC(50) 2.2 nmol/L), Ki-Ras (DLD-1 colon, MDA-MB-231 breast, HCT-116 colon, and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic; IC(50) range, 3.8-9.2 nmol/L), and wild-type Ras (PC-3 and DU-145; IC(50), 70 and 818 nmol/L, respectively) as well as clonogenic potential. ABT-100 shows 70% to 80% oral bioavailability in mice. ABT-100 regressed EJ-1 tumors (2-12.5 mg/kg/d s.c., every day for 21 days) and showed significant efficacy in DLD-1, LX-1, MiaPaCa-2, or PC-3 tumor-bearing mice (6.25-50 mg/kg/d s.c. once daily or twice daily orally). A-367074 showed equivalent efficacy to R115777 given at approximately one-fourth the total dose of R115777 for a shorter duration (EJ-1 and LX-1). Antitumor activity was associated with decreased cell proliferation (Ki-67), increased apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling), and decreased angiogenesis. A reduction in tumor angiogenic cytokine levels (vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin-8) correlated with a reduction in tumor vascularity (CD31). Overall, ABT-100 has an acceptable pharmacokinetic profile, is well tolerated, and possesses broad-spectrum antitumor activity against a series of xenograft models similar to farnesyltransferase inhibitors in clinical development; therefore, it is an attractive candidate for clinical evaluation.

  20. CF101, An Agonist to the A3 Adenosine Receptor, Enhances the Chemotherapeutic Effect of 5-Fluorouracil in a Colon Carcinoma Murine Model

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    Sara Bar-Yehuda

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available NF-κB and the upstream kinase PKB/Akt are highly expressed in chemoresistance tumor cells and may hamper the apoptotic pathway. CF101, a specific agonist to the A3 adenosine receptor, inhibits the development of colon carcinoma growth in cell cultures and xenograft murine models. Because CF101 has been shown to downregulate PKB/Akt and NF-κB protein expression level, we presumed that its combination with chemotherapy will enhance the antitumor effect of the cytotoxic drug. In this study, we utilized 3-[4,5Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT and colony formation assays and a colon carcinoma xenograft model. It has been shown that a combined treatment of CF101 and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU enhanced the cytotoxic effect of the latter on HCT-116 human colon carcinoma growth. Downregulation of PKB/Akt, NF-κB, and cyclin D1, and upregulation of caspase-3 protein expression level were observed in cells and tumor lesions on treatment with a combination of CF101 and 5-FU. Moreover, in mice treated with the combined therapy, myelotoxicity was prevented as was evidenced by normal white blood cell and neutrophil counts. These results show that CF101 potentiates the cytotoxic effect of 5-FU, thus preventing drug resistance. The myeloprotective effect of CF101 suggests its development as an add-on treatment to 5-FU.

  1. Intravenous Formulation of HET0016 Decreased Human Glioblastoma Growth and Implicated Survival Benefit in Rat Xenograft Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Meenu; Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha H.; Alsulami, Meshal; Shankar, Adarsh; Achyut, Bhagelu R.; Angara, Kartik; Rashid, Mohammad H.; Iskander, Asm; Borin, Thaiz F.; Wenbo, Zhi; Ara, Roxan; Ali, Meser M.; Lebedyeva, Iryna; Chwang, Wilson B.; Guo, Austin; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Arbab, Ali S.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a hypervascular primary brain tumor with poor prognosis. HET0016 is a selective CYP450 inhibitor, which has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth. Therefore, to explore novel treatments, we have generated an improved intravenous (IV) formulation of HET0016 with HPßCD and tested in animal models of human and syngeneic GBM. Administration of a single IV dose resulted in 7-fold higher levels of HET0016 in plasma and 3.6-fold higher levels in tumor at 60 min than that in IP route. IV treatment with HPßCD-HET0016 decreased tumor growth, and altered vascular kinetics in early and late treatment groups (p < 0.05). Similar growth inhibition was observed in syngeneic GL261 GBM (p < 0.05). Survival studies using patient derived xenografts of GBM811, showed prolonged survival to 26 weeks in animals treated with focal radiation, in combination with HET0016 and TMZ (p < 0.05). We observed reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67), decreased neovascularization (laminin and αSMA), in addition to inflammation and angiogenesis markers in the treatment group (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that HPßCD-HET0016 is effective in inhibiting tumor growth through decreasing proliferation, and neovascularization. Furthermore, HPßCD-HET0016 significantly prolonged survival in PDX GBM811 model. PMID:28139732

  2. Sabutoclax, a Mcl-1 Antagonist, Inhibits Tumorigenesis in Transgenic Mouse and Human Xenograft Models of Prostate Cancer

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    Roger S. Jackson, II

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to available therapeutic agents has been a common problem thwarting progress in treatment of castrate-resistant and metastatic prostate cancer (PCa. Overexpression of the Bcl-2 family members, including Mcl-1, in PCa cells is known to inhibit intracellular mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis. Here we report the development of a novel transgenic mouse model that spontaneously develops prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma by the inducible, conditional knockout of transforming growth factor β receptor type II in stromal fibroblastic cells (Tgfbr2ColTKO. The Tgfbr2ColTKO prostate epithelia demonstrated down-regulation of luminal and basal differentiation markers, as well as Pten expression and up-regulation of Mcl-1. However, unlike in men, Tgfbr2ColTKO prostates exhibited no regression acutely after castration. The administration of Sabutoclax (BI-97C1, a pan-active Bcl-2 protein family antagonist mediated apoptosis in castrate-resistant PCa cells of Tgfbr2ColTKO mice and human subcutaneous, orthotopic, and intratibial xenograft PCa models. Interestingly, Sabutoclax had little apoptotic effect on benign prostate tissue in Tgfbr2ColTKO and wild-type mice. Sabutoclax was able to block c-Met activation, a critical axis in PCa metastatic progression. Further, Sabutoclax synergistically sensitized PC-3 cells to the cytotoxic effects of docetaxel (Taxotere. Together, these data suggest that Sabutoclax inhibits castrate-resistant PCa alone at the primary and bone metastatic site as well as support sensitivity to docetaxel treatment.

  3. Nilotinib and imatinib are comparably effective in reducing growth of human eosinophil leukemia cells in a newly established xenograft model.

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    Daniel Wicklein

    Full Text Available We developed a xenograft model of human Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia (CEL to study disease progression and remission-induction under therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors using imatinib and nilotinib as examples. The FIP1L1/PDGFRA+ human CEL cell lineEOL-1 was injected intravenously into scid mice, and MR imaging and FACS analysis of mouse blood samples were performed to monitor disease development and the effects of imatinib and nilotinib. Organ infiltration was analyzed in detail by immunohistochemistry after sacrifice. All animals developed CEL and within one week of therapy, complete remissions were seen with both imatinib and nilotinib, resulting in reduced total tumor volumes by MR-imaging and almost complete disappearance of EOL-1 cells in the peripheral blood and in tissues. The new model system is feasible for the evaluation of new tyrosine kinase inhibitors and our data suggest that nilotinib may be a valuable additional targeted drug active in patients with FIP1L1/PDGFRA+ CEL.

  4. Murine model for congenital CMV infection and hearing impairment

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    Tao Liu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is the leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, and SNHL is the most frequent sequela of congenital CMV infection. But the pathogenic mechanism remains unknown, and there is no ideal CMV intrauterine infection animal model to study the mechanisms by which SNHL develops. Methods We established the congenital murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection model by directly injecting the virus into the placenta on day 12.5 of gestation. Then, we observed the development and the MCMV congenital infection rate of the fetuses on the day they were born. Furthermore, we detected the auditory functions, the conditions of the MCMV infection, and the histological change of the inner ears of 28-day-old and 70-day-old offspring. Results Both the fetal loss rate and the teratism rate of offspring whose placentas were inoculated with MCMV increased, and their body length, head circumference, and weight decreased. The hearing level of offspring both decreased at both 28- and 70-days post birth; the 70-day-old mice developed lower hearing levels than did the 28-day old mice. No significant inflammatory changes in the cochleae of the mice were observed. MCMV DNA signals were mainly detected in the spiral ganglion neurons and the endolymph area, but not in the perilymph area. The number of neurons decreased, and their ultrastructures changed. Moreover, with age, the number of neurons dramatically decreased, and the ultrastructural lesions of neurons became much more severe. Conclusions The results suggest that the direct injection of MCMV into the placenta may efficiently cause fetal infection and disturb the intrauterine development of the fetus, and placental inoculation itself has no obvious adverse effects on offspring. The reduction in the number of spiral ganglion neurons and the ultrastructural lesions of the neurons may be the major cause of congenital CMV infection-induced progressive SNHL.

  5. Biventricular remodeling in murine models of right ventricular pressure overload.

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    Navin K Kapur

    Full Text Available Right ventricular (RV failure is a major cause of mortality in acute or chronic lung disease and left heart failure. The objective of this study was to demonstrate a percutaneous approach to study biventricular hemodynamics in murine models of primary and secondary RV pressure overload (RVPO and further explore biventricular expression of two key proteins that regulate cardiac remodeling: calcineurin and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1.Adult, male mice underwent constriction of the pulmonary artery or thoracic aorta as models of primary and secondary RVPO, respectively. Conductance catheterization was performed followed by tissue analysis for changes in myocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis.Both primary and secondary RVPO decreased biventricular stroke work however RV instantaneous peak pressure (dP/dtmax and end-systolic elastance (Ees were preserved in both groups compared to controls. In contrast, left ventricular (LV dP/dtmax and LV-Ees were unchanged by primary, but reduced in the secondary RVPO group. The ratio of RV:LV ventriculo-arterial coupling was increased in primary and reduced in secondary RVPO. Primary and secondary RVPO increased RV mass, while LV mass decreased in primary and increased in the secondary RVPO groups. RV fibrosis and hypertrophy were increased in both groups, while LV fibrosis and hypertrophy were increased in secondary RVPO only. RV calcineurin expression was increased in both groups, while LV expression increased in secondary RVPO only. Biventricular TGFβ1 expression was increased in both groups.These data identify distinct effects of primary and secondary RVPO on biventricular structure, function, and expression of key remodeling pathways.

  6. Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Potential Utility in Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Katherine M.; Riedlinger, Gregory M.; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Ganesan, Shridar; Pine, Sharon R.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional preclinical studies of cancer therapeutics have relied on the use of established human cell lines that have been adapted to grow in the laboratory and, therefore, may deviate from the cancer they were meant to represent. With the emphasis of cancer drug development shifting from non-specific cytotoxic agents to rationally designed molecularly targeted therapies or immunotherapy comes the need for better models with predictive value regarding therapeutic activity and response in clinical trials. Recently, the diversity and accessibility of immunodeficient mouse strains has greatly enhanced the production and utility of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models for many tumor types, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Combined with next-generation sequencing, NSCLC PDX mouse models offer an exciting tool for drug development and for studying targeted therapies while utilizing patient samples with the hope of eventually aiding in clinical decision-making. Here, we describe NSCLC PDX mouse models generated by us and others, their ability to reflect the parental tumors’ histomorphological characteristics, as well as the effect of clonal selection and evolution on maintaining genomic integrity in low-passage PDXs compared to the donor tissue. We also raise vital questions regarding the practical utility of PDX and humanized PDX models in predicting patient response to therapy and make recommendations for addressing those questions. Once collaborations and standardized xenotransplantation and data management methods are established, NSCLC PDX mouse models have the potential to be universal and invaluable as a preclinical tool that guides clinical trials and standard therapeutic decisions. PMID:28154808

  7. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of the glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in combination with chemotherapy in xenograft models of human lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Herting, Frank; Friess, Thomas; Bader, Sabine; Muth, Gunter; Hölzlwimmer, Gabriele; Rieder, Natascha; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody in development for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We compared the anti-tumor activity of obinutuzumab and rituximab in preclinical studies using subcutaneous Z138 and WSU-DLCL2 xenograft mouse models. Obinutuzumab and rituximab were assessed alone and in combination with bendamustine, fludarabine, chlorambucil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide/vincristine. Owing to strong single-agent efficacy in these models, suboptimal doses of ob...

  8. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial uncoupling in a murine cancer cachexia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzika, A Aria; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely Cristine; Shestov, Alexander A; Constantinou, Caterina; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Righi, Valeria; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Busquets, Silvia; Lopez-Soriano, Francisco J; Milot, Sylvain; Lepine, Francois; Mindrinos, Michael N; Rahme, Laurence G; Argiles, Josep M

    2013-09-01

    Approximately half of all cancer patients present with cachexia, a condition in which disease-associated metabolic changes lead to a severe loss of skeletal muscle mass. Working toward an integrated and mechanistic view of cancer cachexia, we investigated the hypothesis that cancer promotes mitochondrial uncoupling in skeletal muscle. We subjected mice to in vivo phosphorous-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy and subjected murine skeletal muscle samples to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The mice used in both experiments were Lewis lung carcinoma models of cancer cachexia. A novel 'fragmented mass isotopomer' approach was used in our dynamic analysis of 13C mass isotopomer data. Our 31P NMR and GC/MS results indicated that the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux were reduced by 49% and 22%, respectively, in the cancer-bearing mice (p<0.008; t-test vs. controls). The ratio of ATP synthesis rate to the TCA cycle flux (an index of mitochondrial coupling) was reduced by 32% in the cancer-bearing mice (p=0.036; t-test vs. controls). Genomic analysis revealed aberrant expression levels for key regulatory genes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the muscle fiber, consistent with the presence of abnormal, giant mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggest that mitochondrial uncoupling occurs in cancer cachexia and thus point to the mitochondria as a potential pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cachexia. These findings may prove relevant to elucidating the mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle wasting observed in other chronic diseases, as well as in aging.

  9. Systemically administered AAV9-sTRAIL combats invasive glioblastoma in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft model

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    Matheus HW Crommentuijn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors expressing tumoricidal genes injected directly into brain tumors have shown some promise, however, invasive tumor cells are relatively unaffected. Systemic injection of AAV9 vectors provides widespread delivery to the brain and potentially the tumor/microenvironment. Here we assessed AAV9 for potential glioblastoma therapy using two different promoters driving the expression of the secreted anti-cancer agent sTRAIL as a transgene model; the ubiquitously active chicken β-actin (CBA promoter and the neuron-specific enolase (NSE promoter to restrict expression in brain. Intravenous injection of AAV9 vectors encoding a bioluminescent reporter showed similar distribution patterns, although the NSE promoter yielded 100-fold lower expression in the abdomen (liver, with the brain-to-liver expression ratio remaining the same. The main cell types targeted by the CBA promoter were astrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells, while expression by NSE promoter mostly occurred in neurons. Intravenous administration of either AAV9-CBA-sTRAIL or AAV9-NSE-sTRAIL vectors to mice bearing intracranial patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts led to a slower tumor growth and significantly increased survival, with the CBA promoter having higher efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the potential of systemic injection of AAV9 vector encoding a therapeutic gene for the treatment of brain tumors.

  10. Enhanced antitumor efficacy and reduced systemic toxicity of sulfatide-containing nanoliposomal doxorubicin in a xenograft model of colorectal cancer.

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    Jia Lin

    Full Text Available Sulfatide is a glycosphingolipid known to interact with several extracellular matrix proteins, such as tenascin-C which is overexpressed in many types of cancer including that of the colon. In view of the limited success of chemotherapy in colorectal cancer and high toxicity of doxorubicin (DOX, a sulfatide-containing liposome (SCL encapsulation approach was taken to overcome these barriers. This study assessed the in vitro cytotoxicity, biodistribution, therapeutic efficacy and systemic toxicity in vivo of sulfatide-containing liposomal doxorubicin (SCL-DOX using human colonic adenocarcinoma HT-29 xenograft as the experimental model. In vitro, SCL-DOX was shown to be delivered into the nuclei and displayed prolonged retention compared with the free DOX. The use of this nanodrug delivery system to deliver DOX for treatment of tumor-bearing mice produced a much improved therapeutic efficacy in terms of tumor growth suppression and extended survival in contrast to the free drug. Furthermore, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with SCL-DOX resulted in a lower DOX uptake in the principal sites of toxicity of the free drug, namely the heart and skin, as well as reduced myelosuppression and diminished cardiotoxicity. Such natural lipid-guided nanodrug delivery systems may represent a new strategy for the development of effective anticancer chemotherapeutics targeting the tumor microenvironment for both primary tumor and micrometastases.

  11. Antitumor activity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] in mouse xenograft model of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscella, A; Vetrugno, C; Migoni, D; Biagioni, F; Fanizzi, F P; Fornai, F; De Pascali, S A; Marsigliante, S

    2014-01-01

    The higher and selective cytotoxicity of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] toward cancer cell in both immortalized cell lines and in breast cancer cells in primary cultures, stimulated a pre-clinical study so as to evaluate its therapeutic potential in vivo. The efficacy of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was assessed using a xenograft model of breast cancer developed by injection of MCF-7 cells in the flank of BALB/c nude mice. Treatment of solid tumor-bearing mice with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] induced up to 50% reduction of tumor mass compared with an average 10% inhibition recorded in cisplatin-treated animals. Thus, chemotherapy with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was much more effective than cisplatin. We also demonstrated enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and tolerability of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] when compared with cisplatin administered in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics studies with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] revealed prolonged Pt persistence in systemic blood circulation and decreased nefrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, major target sites of cisplatin toxicity. Overall, [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] turned out to be extremely promising in terms of greater in vivo anticancer activity, reduced nephrotoxicity and acute toxicity compared with cisplatin. PMID:24457958

  12. Survivin-targeting Artificial MicroRNAs Mediated by Adenovirus Suppress Tumor Activity in Cancer Cells and Xenograft Models

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    Yudan Chi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivin is highly expressed in most human tumors and fetal tissue, and absent in terminally differentiated cells. It promotes tumor cell proliferation by negatively regulating cell apoptosis and facilitating cell division. Survivin's selective expression pattern suggests that it might be a suitable target for cancer therapy, which would promote death of transformed but not normal cells. This was tested using artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs targeting survivin. After screening, two effective amiRNAs, which knocked down survivin expression, were identified and cloned into a replication-defective adenoviral vector. Tumor cells infected with the recombinant vector downregulated expression of survivin and underwent apoptotic cell death. Further studies showed that apoptosis was associated with increases in caspase 3 and cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase, and activation of the p53 signaling pathway. Furthermore, amiRNA treatment caused blockade of mitosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. In vivo, survivin-targeting amiRNAs expressed by adenoviral vectors effectively delayed growth of hepatocellular and cervical carcinomas in mouse xenograft models. These results indicate that silencing of survivin by amiRNA has potential for treatment of cancer.

  13. Targeting FGF19 inhibits tumor growth in colon cancer xenograft and FGF19 transgenic hepatocellular carcinoma models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnoyers, L R; Pai, R; Ferrando, R E; Hötzel, K; Le, T; Ross, J; Carano, R; D'Souza, A; Qing, J; Mohtashemi, I; Ashkenazi, A; French, D M

    2008-01-03

    Although fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) can promote liver carcinogenesis in mice its involvement in human cancer is not well characterized. Here we report that FGF19 and its cognate receptor FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4) are coexpressed in primary human liver, lung and colon tumors and in a subset of human colon cancer cell lines. To test the importance of FGF19 for tumor growth, we developed an anti-FGF19 monoclonal antibody that selectively blocks the interaction of FGF19 with FGFR4. This antibody abolished FGF19-mediated activity in vitro and inhibited growth of colon tumor xenografts in vivo and effectively prevented hepatocellular carcinomas in FGF19 transgenic mice. The efficacy of the antibody in these models was linked to inhibition of FGF19-dependent activation of FGFR4, FRS2, ERK and beta-catenin. These findings suggest that the inactivation of FGF19 could be beneficial for the treatment of colon cancer, liver cancer and other malignancies involving interaction of FGF19 and FGFR4.

  14. Anticancer Effect of Nemopilema nomurai Jellyfish Venom on HepG2 Cells and a Tumor Xenograft Animal Model

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    Hyunkyoung Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of animal venoms and their components have been widely studied for potential therapeutic applications. This study evaluated whether Nemopilema nomurai jellyfish venom (NnV has anticancer activity. NnV strongly induced cytotoxicity of HepG2 cells through apoptotic cell death, as demonstrated by alterations of chromatic morphology, activation of procaspase-3, and an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Furthermore, NnV inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, PDK1, Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, and 4EBP1, whereas it enhanced the expression of p-PTEN. Interestingly, NnV also inactivated the negative feedback loops associated with Akt activation, as demonstrated by downregulation of Akt at Ser473 and mTOR at Ser2481. The anticancer effect of NnV was significant in a HepG2 xenograft mouse model, with no obvious toxicity. HepG2 cell death by NnV was inhibited by tetracycline, metalloprotease inhibitor, suggesting that metalloprotease component in NnV is closely related to the anticancer effects. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that NnV exerts highly selective cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells via dual inhibition of the Akt and mTOR signaling pathways, but not in normal cells.

  15. Porphysome nanoparticles for enhanced photothermal therapy in a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft cancer model: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.; Ding, Lili; Jin, Cheng; Cao, Pingjiang; Siddiqui, Iram; Hwang, David M.; Chen, Juan; Wilson, Brian C.; Zheng, Gang; Hedley, David W.

    2016-08-01

    Local disease control is a major challenge in pancreatic cancer treatment, because surgical resection of the primary tumor is only possible in a minority of patients and radiotherapy cannot be delivered in curative doses. Despite the promise of photothermal therapy (PTT) for focal ablation of pancreatic tumors, this approach remains underinvestigated. Using photothermal sensitizers in combination with laser light irradiation for PTT can result in more efficient conversion of light energy to heat and improved spatial confinement of thermal destruction to the tumor. Porphysomes are self-assembled nanoparticles composed mainly of pyropheophorbide-conjugated phospholipids, enabling the packing of ˜80,000 porphyrin photosensitizers per particle. The high-density porphyrin loading imparts enhanced photonic properties and enables high-payload tumor delivery. A patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft model was used to evaluate the feasibility of porphysome-enhanced PTT for pancreatic cancer. Biodistribution and tumor accumulation were evaluated using fluorescence intensity measurements from homogenized tissues and imaging of excised organs. Tumor surface temperature was recorded using IR optical imaging during light irradiation to monitor treatment progress. Histological analyses were conducted to determine the extent of PTT thermal damage. These studies may provide insight into the influence of heat-sink effect on thermal therapy dosimetry for well-perfused pancreatic tumors.

  16. Prediction of drug distribution in subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines and healthy tissues in mouse: application of the tissue composition-based model to antineoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Patrick; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Gould, Stephen E; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Messick, Kirsten; Oeh, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M

    2015-04-01

    Advanced tissue composition-based models can predict the tissue-plasma partition coefficient (Kp ) values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on healthy tissues and do not incorporate data from tumors. The objective of this study was to apply a tissue composition-based model to six marketed antineoplastic drugs (docetaxel, DOC; doxorubicin, DOX; gemcitabine, GEM; methotrexate, MTX; topotecan, TOP; and fluorouracil, 5-FU) to predict their Kp values in three human tumor xenografts (HCT-116, H2122, and PC3) as well as in healthy tissues (brain, muscle, lung, and liver) under steady-state in vivo conditions in female NCR nude mice. The mechanisms considered in the tissue/tumor composition-based model are the binding to lipids and to plasma proteins, but the transporter effect was also investigated. The method consisted of analyzing tissue composition, performing the pharmacokinetics studies in mice, and calculating the corresponding in vivo Kp values. Analyses of tumor composition indicated that the tumor xenografts contained no or low amounts of common transporters by contrast to lipids. The predicted Kp values were within twofold and threefold of the measured values in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively. However, predictions for brain for each drug, for liver for MTX, and for each tumor xenograft for GEM were disparate from the observed values, and, therefore, not well served by the model. Overall, this study is the first step toward the mechanism-based prediction of Kp values of small molecules in healthy and tumor tissues in mouse when no transporter and permeation limitation effect is evident. This approach will be useful in selecting compounds based on their abilities to penetrate human cancer xenografts with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, thereby increasing therapeutic index for chemotherapy in oncology study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American

  17. Ovarian tumor attachment, invasion and vascularization reflect unique microenvironments in the peritoneum:Insights from xenograft and mathematical models

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    Mara P. Steinkamp

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer relapse is often characterized by metastatic spread throughout the peritoneal cavity with tumors attached to multiple organs. In this study, interaction of ovarian tumor cells with the peritoneal tumor microenvironment was evaluated in a xenograft model based on intraperitoneal injection of fluorescent SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer cells. Intra-vital microscopy of mixed GFP-RFP cell populations injected into the peritoneum demonstrated that tumor cells aggregate and attach as mixed spheroids, emphasizing the importance of homotypic adhesion in tumor formation. Electron microscopy provided high resolution structural information about local attachment sites. Experimental measurements from the mouse model were used to build a three-dimensional cellular Potts ovarian tumor model (OvTM that examines ovarian tumor cell attachment, chemotaxis, growth and vascularization. OvTM simulations provide insight into the relative influence of tumor cell-cell adhesion, oxygen availability, and local architecture on tumor growth and morphology. Notably, tumors on the mesentery, omentum or spleen readily invade the open architecture, while tumors attached to the gut encounter barriers that restrict invasion and instead rapidly expand into the peritoneal space. Simulations suggest that rapid neovascularization of SKOV3.ip1 tumors is triggered by constitutive release of angiogenic factors in the absence of hypoxia. This research highlights the importance of cellular adhesion and tumor microenvironment in the seeding of secondary ovarian tumors on diverse organs within the peritoneal cavity. Results of the OvTM simulations indicate that invasion is strongly influenced by features underlying the mesothelial lining at different sites, but is also affected by local production of chemotactic factors. The integrated in vivo mouse model and computer simulations provide a unique platform for evaluating targeted therapies for ovarian cancer relapse.

  18. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

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    Natalia Makarova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV. RESULTS: Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  19. Human cytomegalovirus infection leads to elevated levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse aortic xenograft model.

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    Abele-Ohl, S; Leis, M; Wollin, M; Mahmoudian, S; Hoffmann, J; Müller, R; Heim, C; Spriewald, B M; Weyand, M; Stamminger, T; Ensminger, S M

    2012-07-01

    Recent findings emphasized an important role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (hu-PBL)/Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mouse-xenograft-model to investigate both immunological as well as viral effector mechanisms in the progression of transplant arteriosclerosis. For this, sidebranches from the internal mammary artery were recovered during coronary artery bypass graft surgery, tissue-typed and infected with HCMV. Then, size-matched sidebranches were implanted into the infrarenal aorta of Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice. The animals were reconstituted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) 7 days after transplantation. HCMV-infection was confirmed by Taqman-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. Arterial grafts were analyzed by histology on day 40 after transplantation. PBMC-reconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) animals showed splenic chimerism levels ranging from 1-16% human cells. After reconstitution, Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice developed human leukocyte infiltrates in their grafts and vascular lesions that were significantly elevated after infection. Cellular infiltration revealed significantly increased ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression after HCMV-infection of the graft. Arterial grafts from unreconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) recipients showed no vascular lesions. These data demonstrate a causative relationship between HCMV-infection as an isolated risk factor and the development of transplant-arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse arterial-transplant-model possibly by elevated ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression.

  20. A new ATL xenograft model and evaluation of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate as a potential ATL therapeutic agent.

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    Nakamura, Daisuke; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Kuroki, Ayako; Hachiman, Miho; Kamada, Yuhei; Ezinne, Chibueze C; Arai, Akihiko; Inoue, Hirosaka; Hamada, Heiichirou; Hayashida, Maiko; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Fujino, Satoshi; Arima, Naosuke; Arima, Mamiko; Tabuchi, Tomohisa; Okada, Seiji; Arima, Naomichi

    2015-11-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is caused by human T-lymphotrophic virus type 1 infection and is one of the most refractory malignant T-cell lymphomas. Improvement of ATL therapy options requires the establishment of appropriate ATL animal models. In this study, we successfully generated an ATL mouse model by xenotransplantation of primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from ATL patients (ATL cells) into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency/Jak3-null mice (NOJ mice). To generate the model, the ATL S1T cell line was subcutaneously injected into mice. Primary ATL cells were then transplanted subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or intravenously. ATL cells infiltrated multiple organs, and elevated human soluble interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) levels were detected in peripheral blood. Injection of one million primary ATL cells was needed for successful engraftment into host mice. Thawed cells, frozen long-term in liquid nitrogen, could also be transplanted; however, more cells were required to achieve similar results. The median mouse survival time was proportional to the number of cells injected. Successful secondary transplantation of ATL cells from one NOJ mouse into another was achieved and confirmed by T-cell receptor analysis. Finally, we examined the effects of the antioxide pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) as an antitumor agent in vivo. PDTC administration inhibited the increase of soluble IL-2R and improved mouse survival, suggesting that this compound has potential as an anti-ATL agent. We demonstrated that ATL cells could be stably xenotransplanted into NOJ mice using primary cells. This model will be useful in the establishment of novel therapies to treat ATL.

  1. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model

    OpenAIRE

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; O’Neill, Brian E.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard ch...

  2. High-Resolution Longitudinal Screening with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Murine Brain Cancer Model

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    Nicholas A. Bock

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main limitations of intracranial models of diseases is our present inability to monitor and evaluate the intracranial compartment noninvasively over time. Therefore, there is a growing need for imaging modalities that provide thorough neuropathological evaluations of xenograft and transgenic models of intracranial pathology. In this study, we have established protocols for multiple-mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to follow the growth and behavior of intracranial xenografts of gliomas longitudinally. We successfully obtained weekly images on 16 mice for a total of 5 weeks on a 7-T multiple-mouse MRI. T2- and Ti-weighted imaging with gadolinium enhancement of vascularity was used to detect tumor margins, tumor size, and growth. These experiments, using 3D whole brain images obtained in four mice at once, demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining repeat radiological images in intracranial tumor models and suggest that MRI should be incorporated as a research modality for the investigation of intracranial pathobiology.

  3. A human xenograft model for testing early events of epithelial neoplastic invasion

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    McCANDLESS, JOHN R.; CRESS, ANNE E.; RABINOVITZ, ISAAC; PAYNE, CLAIRE M.; BOWDEN, G. TIM; KNOX, J. DAVID; NAGLE, RAY B.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a model of human prostate tumor cell invasion using the SCID (severe combined immunodeficient) mouse diaphragm. Tumor cells were injected into SCID mice intraperitoneally and the diaphragms harvested three to five weeks later. Electron microscopy showed tumor cell penetration of the mesothelial cell layer and adhesion to the underlying basement membrane on the inferior surface of the mouse diaphragm, where colonies developed. Immunohistochemistry showed invasion by tumor cells through the basement membrane into the muscle of the diaphragm, presence of human tumor cells among the muscle cells and the presence of selected proteins on the invasion front of the tumor cells. Digital image analysis enabled quantitative comparison of events in the metastatic cascade by variants of the tumor cell line and evaluation of the effectiveness of a putative tumor inhibitor. Results suggest that the SCID mouse diaphragm model is a convenient, effective, easily oriented and reproducible in vivo model of the early events associated with human prostate tumor cell invasion. PMID:21533373

  4. The in ovo CAM-assay as a xenograft model for sarcoma.

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    Sys, Gwen M L; Lapeire, Lore; Stevens, Nikita; Favoreel, Herman; Forsyth, Ramses; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2013-07-17

    Sarcoma is a very rare disease that is heterogeneous in nature, all hampering the development of new therapies. Sarcoma patients are ideal candidates for personalized medicine after stratification, explaining the current interest in developing a reproducible and low-cost xenotransplant model for this disease. The chick chorioallantoic membrane is a natural immunodeficient host capable of sustaining grafted tissues and cells without species-specific restrictions. In addition, it is easily accessed, manipulated and imaged using optical and fluorescence stereomicroscopy. Histology further allows detailed analysis of heterotypic cellular interactions. This protocol describes in detail the in ovo grafting of the chorioallantoic membrane with fresh sarcoma-derived tumor tissues, their single cell suspensions, and permanent and transient fluorescently labeled established sarcoma cell lines (Saos-2 and SW1353). The chick survival rates are up to 75%. The model is used to study graft- (viability, Ki67 proliferation index, necrosis, infiltration) and host (fibroblast infiltration, vascular ingrowth) behavior. For localized grafting of single cell suspensions, ECM gel provides significant advantages over inert containment materials. The Ki67 proliferation index is related to the distance of the cells from the surface of the CAM and the duration of application on the CAM, the latter determining a time frame for the addition of therapeutic products.

  5. Porphyrin lipid nanoparticles for enhanced photothermal therapy in a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft cancer model

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    MacLaughlin, Christina M.; Ding, Lili; Jin, Cheng; Cao, Pingjiang; Siddiqui, Iram; Hwang, David M.; Chen, Juan; Wilson, Brian C.; Zheng, Gang; Hedley, David W.

    2016-03-01

    Local disease control is a major problem in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, because curative-intent surgery is only possible in a minority of patients, and radiotherapy cannot be delivered in curative doses. Despite the promise of photothermal therapy (PTT) for ablation of pancreatic tumors, this approach remains under investigated. Using photothermal sensitizers in combination with laser light for PTT can result in more efficient conversion of light energy to heat, and confinement of thermal destruction to the tumor, thus sparing adjacent organs and vasculature. Porphyrins have been previously employed as photosensitizers for PDT and PTT, however their incorporation in to "porphysomes", lipid-based nanoparticles each containing ~80,000 porphyrins through conjugation of pyropheophorbide to phospholipids, carries two distinct advantages: 1) high-density porphyrin packing imparts the nanoparticles with enhanced photonic properties for imaging and phototherapy; 2) the enhanced permeability and retention effect may be exploited for optimal delivery of porphysomes to the tumor region thus high payload porphyrin delivery. The feasibility of porphysome-enhanced PTT for pancreatic cancer treatment was investigated using a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft tumor model. Uptake of porphysomes at the orthotopic tumor site was validated using ex vivo fluorescence imaging of intact organs of interest. The accumulation of porphysomes in orthotopic tumor microstructure was also confirmed by fluorescence imaging of excised tissue slices. PTT progress was monitored as changes in tumor surface temperature using IR optical imaging. Histological analyses were conducted to examine microstructure changes in tissue morphology, and the viability of remaining tumor tissues following exposure to heat. These studies may also provide insight as to the contribution of heat sink in application of thermal therapies to highly vascularized pancreatic tumors.

  6. Anti-JAM-C therapy eliminates tumor engraftment in a xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doñate, Carmen; Vijaya Kumar, Archana; Imhof, Beat A; Matthes, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-C is a member of the JAM family, expressed by a variety of different cell types, including human B lymphocytes and some B-cell lymphoma subtypes-in particular, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Treatment with anti-JAM-C pAbs reduces homing of human B cells to lymphoid organs in a NOD/SCID mouse model. In the present study, the role of JAM-C in the engraftment of human lymphoma B cells in mice was investigated. Administration of novel anti-JAM-C mAbs reduced tumor growth of JAM-C(+) MCL cells in bone marrow, spleen, liver, and lymph nodes of mice. Treatment with anti-JAM-C antibodies significantly reduced the proliferation of JAM-C-expressing lymphoma B cells. Moreover, the binding of anti-JAM-C antibodies inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, without affecting other signaling pathways. The results identify for the first time the intracellular MAPK cascade as the JAM-C-driven signaling pathway in JAM-C(+) B cells. Targeting JAM-C could constitute a new therapeutic strategy reducing lymphoma B-cell proliferation and their capacity to reach supportive lymphoid microenvironments.

  7. Effect of Citrus bergamia juice on human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in metastatic xenograft models.

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    Navarra, M; Ursino, M R; Ferlazzo, N; Russo, M; Schumacher, U; Valentiner, U

    2014-06-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor with poor prognosis in children with disseminated stage of disease. A number of studies show that molecules largely distributed in commonly consumed fruits and vegetables may have anti-tumor activity. In this study we evaluate the effect of Citrus bergamia (bergamot) juice (BJ) in vitro and in a spontaneous metastatic neuroblastoma SCID mouse model. Qualitative and quantitative characterizations of BJ flavonoid fractions were performed by RP-HPLC/PDA/MS. We show that BJ significantly affects SK-N-SH and LAN-1 cell proliferation in vitro, but fails to reduce primary tumor weight in vivo. Moreover, BJ reduced cell adhesiveness and invasion of LAN-1 and SK-N-SH cells in vitro and the number of pulmonary metastases under consideration of the number of tumor cells in the blood in mice inoculated with LAN-1 cells in vivo. These effects without any apparent sign of systemic toxicity confirm the potential clinical interest of BJ and lay the basis for further investigation in cancer.

  8. In vivo evaluation of curcumin-loaded nanoparticles in a A549 xenograft mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hai-Tao; Zhang, De-Geng; Wu, Xiao-Li; Huang, Xin-En; Chen, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin (Cum) has been reported to have potential chemo-preventive and chemotherapeutic activity through influencing various processes, inducing cell cycle arrest, differentiation and apoptosis in a series of cancers. However, the poor solubility of Cum limits its further applications in the treatment of cancer. We have previously reported Cum-loaded nanoparticles (Cum-NPs) prepared with amphilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-polycaprolactone (mPEG-PCL) block copolymers. The current study demonstrated superior antitumor efficacy of Cum-NPs over free Cum in the treatment of lung cancer. In vivo evaluation further demonstrated superior anticancer effects of Cum-NPs by delaying tumor growth compared to free Cum in an established A549 transplanted mice model. Moreover, Cum-NPs showed little toxicity to normal tissues including bone marrow, liver and kidney at a therapeutic dose. These results suggest that Cum-NPs are effective to inhibit the growth of human lung cancer with little toxicity to normal tissues, and could provide a clinically useful therapeutic regimen. They thus merit more research to evaluate the feasibility of clinical application.

  9. Uptake of verteporfin by orthotopic xenograft pancreas models with different levels of aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Julia; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Hoopes, P. Jack; Rizvi, Imran; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis, usually treated with chemoradiation therapy. Interstitial photodynamic therapy is a potentially effective adjuvant treatment that is under development. In the current study, two orthotopic pancreatic cancer models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1), have been characterized with respect to growth rates, morphology and liposomal drug (Verteporfin) uptake and distribution in SCID mice. Fluorescence of Verteporfin was measured in liver and tumor in vivo using a PDT fluorescence dosimeter with measurements taken before and up to one hour after tail vein injection. Fluorescence reached a plateau by about 15 minutes and did not decrease over the first hour. At time points from 15 minutes to 24 hrs, the internal organs (kidney, spleen, pancreas, tumor, muscle, lung, liver, and skin were excised and scanned on a Typhoon imager. The ratio of fluorescence in tumor versus normal tissues was analyzed with image processing, calculated at each time point and compared to in vivo results. Tissue distribution of Verteporfin in relation to functional vasculature marked by DiOc7 was carried out on frozen sections. Final analysis will result in determination of the ideal time point to administer light to achieve maximum tumor destruction while preserving normal tissue.

  10. Raloxifene inhibits tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer

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    Li Zhong-Lian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of raloxifene, a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator, were studied in a mouse metastatic mammary cancer model expressing cytoplasmic ERα. Methods Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of syngeneic BALB/c mice with BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with raloxifene at 0, 18 and 27 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps. Results In vitro study demonstrated that the ERα in BJMC3879luc2 cells was smaller (between 50 and 64 kDa than the normal-sized ERα (66 kDa and showed cytoplasmic localization. A statistically significant but weak estradiol response was observed in this cell line. When BJMC3879luc2 tumors were implanted into mice, the ERα mRNA levels were significantly higher in females than in males. In vitro studies showed that raloxifene induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in the G1-phase and a decrease in the cell population in the S-phase. In animal experiments, tumor volumes were significantly suppressed in the raloxifene-treated groups. The multiplicity of lymph node metastasis was significantly decreased in the 27 mg/kg group. Levels of apoptosis were significantly increased in the raloxifene-treated groups, whereas the levels of DNA synthesis were significantly decreased in these groups. No differences in microvessel density in tumors were observed between the control and raloxifene-treated groups. The numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells were significantly reduced in mammary tumors in the raloxifene-treated groups. The levels of ERα mRNA in mammary tumors tended to be decreased in the raloxifene-treated groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the antimetastatic activity of raloxifene in mammary cancer expressing cytoplasmic ERα may be a crucial finding with clinical applications and that raloxifene may be useful as an adjuvant therapy and for the chemoprevention of breast cancer development.

  11. Utilization of quantitative in vivo pharmacology approaches to assess combination effects of everolimus and irinotecan in mouse xenograft models of colorectal cancer.

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    Erica L Bradshaw-Pierce

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is frequently dysregulated in cancers and inhibition of mTOR has demonstrated the ability to modulate pro-survival pathways. As such, we sought to determine the ability of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus to potentiate the antitumor effects of irinotecan in colorectal cancer (CRC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The combinatorial effects of everolimus and irinotecan were evaluated in vitro and in vivo in CRC cell lines harboring commonly found mutations in PIK3CA, KRAS and/or BRAF. Pharmacokinetically-directed dosing protocols of everolimus and irinotecan were established and used to assess the in vivo antitumor effects of the agents. At the end of treatment, 3-6 tumors per treatment arm were harvested for biomarker analysis by NMR metabolomics. RESULTS: Everolimus and irinotecan/SN38 demonstrated synergistic anti-proliferative effects in multiple CRC cell lines in vitro. Combination effects of everolimus and irinotecan were determined in CRC xenograft models using clinically-relevant dosing protocols. Everolimus demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition alone and when combined with irinotecan in HT29 and HCT116 tumor xenografts. Metabolomic analysis showed that HT29 tumors were more metabolically responsive than HCT116 tumors. Everolimus caused a decrease in glycolysis in both tumor types whilst irinotecan treatment resulted in a profound accumulation of lipids in HT29 tumors indicating a cytotoxic effect. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative analysis of tumor growth and metabolomic data showed that the combination of everolimus and irinotecan was more beneficial in the BRAF/PIK3CA mutant HT29 tumor xenografts, which had an additive effect, than the KRAS/PIK3CA mutant HCT116 tumor xenografts, which had a less than additive effect.

  12. Spontaneous transformation of murine oviductal epithelial cells: A model system to investigate the onset of fallopian-derived tumors

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    MIchael P. Endsley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC is the most lethal ovarian cancer histotype. The fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs are a proposed progenitor cell type. Genetically altered FTSECs form tumors in mice; however, a spontaneous HGSC model has not been described. Apart from a subpopulation of genetically predisposed women, most women develop ovarian cancer spontaneously, which is associated with aging and lifetime ovulations. A murine oviductal cell line (MOELOW was developed and continuously passaged in culture to mimic cellular aging (MOEHIGH. The MOEHIGH cellular model exhibited a loss of acetylated tubulin consistent with an outgrowth of secretory epithelial cells in culture. MOEHIGH cells proliferated significantly faster than MOELOW, and the MOEHIGH cells produced more 2D foci and 3D soft agar colonies as compared to MOELOW. MOEHIGH were xenografted into athymic female nude mice both in the subcutaneous and the intraperiteonal compartments. Only the subcutaneous grafts formed tumors that were negative for cytokeratin, but positive for oviductal markers such as oviductal glycoprotein 1 and Pax8. These tumors were considered to be poorly differentiated carcinoma. The differential molecular profiles between MOEHIGH and MOELOW were determined using RNA-Seq and confirmed by protein expression to uncover pathways important in transformation, like the p53 pathway, the FOXM1 pathway, WNT signaling, and splicing. MOEHIGH had enhanced protein expression of c-myc, Cyclin E, p53 and FOXM1 with reduced expression of p21. MOEHIGH were also less sensitive to cisplatin and DMBA, which induce lesions typically repaired by base-excision repair. A model of spontaneous tumorogenesis was generated starting with normal oviductal cells. Their transition to cancer involved alterations in pathways associated with high-grade serous cancer in humans.

  13. Protective effects of astaxanthin from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on murine gastric ulcer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenta; Oyagi, Atsushi; Takahira, Dai; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishibashi, Takashi; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of astaxanthin extracted from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on gastric mucosal damage in murine gastric ulcer models. Mice were pretreated with astaxanthin for 1 h before ulcer induction. Gastric ulcers were induced in mice by oral administration of hydrochloride (HCl)/ethanol or acidified aspirin. The effect of astaxanthin on lipid peroxidation in murine stomach homogenates was also evaluated by measuring the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS). The free radical scavenging activities of astaxanthin were also measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Astaxanthin significantly decreased the extent of HCl/ethanol- and acidified aspirin-induced gastric ulcers. Astaxanthin also decreased the level of TBARS. The ESR measurement showed that astaxanthin had radical scavenging activities against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and the superoxide anion radical. These results suggest that astaxanthin has antioxidant properties and exerts a protective effect against ulcer formation in murine models.

  14. Results of gal-knockout porcine thymokidney xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesemer, A D; Hirakata, A; Shimizu, A; Moran, S; Tena, A; Iwaki, H; Ishikawa, Y; Schule, P; Arn, J S; Robson, S C; Fishman, J A; Sykes, M; Sachs, D H; Yamada, K

    2009-12-01

    Clinical transplantation for the treatment of end-stage organ disease is limited by a shortage of donor organs. Successful xenotransplantation could immediately overcome this limitation. The development of homozygous alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GalT-KO) pigs removed hyperacute rejection as the major immunologic hurdle to xenotransplantation. Nevertheless, GalT-KO organs stimulate robust immunologic responses that are not prevented by immunosuppressive drugs. Murine studies show that recipient thymopoiesis in thymic xenografts induces xenotolerance. We transplanted life-supporting composite thymokidneys (composite thymus and kidneys) prepared in GalT-KO miniature swine to baboons in an attempt to induce tolerance in a preclinical xenotransplant model. Here, we report the results of seven xenogenic thymokidney transplants using a steroid-free immunosuppressive regimen that eliminated whole-body irradiation in all but one recipient. The regimen resulted in average recipient survival of over 50 days. This was associated with donor-specific unresponsiveness in vitro and early baboon thymopoiesis in the porcine thymus tissue of these grafts, suggesting the development of T-cell tolerance. The kidney grafts had no signs of cellular infiltration or deposition of IgG, and no grafts were lost due to rejection. These results show that xenogeneic thymus transplantation can support early primate thymopoiesis, which in turn may induce T-cell tolerance to solid organ xenografts.

  15. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  16. Host responses to sepsis vary in different low-lethality murine models.

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    Lori F Gentile

    Full Text Available Animal models for the study of sepsis are being increasingly scrutinized, despite their essential role for early translational research. In particular, recent studies have suggested that at the level of the leukocyte transcriptome, murine models of burns, trauma and endotoxemia markedly differ from their human equivalents, and are only weakly similar amongst themselves. We compared the plasma cytokine and leukocyte transcriptome responses between two different low-lethality murine models of polymicrobial intra-abdominal sepsis.Six to ten week male C57BL/6j mice underwent either the 'gold standard' cecal ligation and puncture (CLP model of intra-abdominal sepsis or administration of a cecal slurry (CS, where cecal contents are injected intraperitoneally. Surviving mice were euthanized at two hours, one or three days after sepsis.The murine leukocyte transcriptomic response to the CLP and CS models of sepsis was surprisingly dissimilar at two hours, one, and three days after sepsis. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the maximum change in expression for the entire leukocyte transcriptome that changed significantly over time (n = 19,071 was R = 0.54 (R2 = 0.297. The CS model resulted in greater magnitude of early inflammatory gene expression changes in response to sepsis with associated increased production of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Two hours after sepsis, CLP had more significant expression of genes associated with IL-10 signaling pathways, whereas CS had greater expression of genes related to CD28, apoptosis, IL-1 and T-cell receptor signaling. By three days, the changes in gene expression in both sepsis models were returning to baseline in surviving animals.These analyses reveal that the murine blood leukocyte response to sepsis is highly dependent on which model of intra-abdominal sepsis is employed, despite their similar lethality. It may be difficult to extrapolate findings from one murine model to another

  17. Discrepancy Between Tumor Antigen Distribution and Radiolabeled Antibody Binding in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model of Human Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Il; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key

    2017-04-01

    Biodistribution of antibodies is vital to successful immunoscintigraphy/immunotherapy, and it is assumed to be similar to antigen distribution. We measured and compared the binding pattern of radiolabeled antibody to tissue antigen distribution in a nude mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. We transplanted 10(7) FEM-XII human melanoma cells into the right flank of five nude mice. For the control, we transplanted 5 × 10(6) LS174T human colon cancer cells into the left flank. Two weeks later, 10 μCi of (131)I-labeled melanoma-associated 96.5 monoclonal antibody (targeting p97 antigen) was intravenously injected. Three days later, we sacrificed the mice and evaluated 96.5 antibody binding and concentration in the tumors by ex vivo quantitative autoradiography (QAR). Two months later, we incubated adjacent tumor tissue slices in various concentrations of (125)I-labeled 96.5 MoAb and evaluated the distribution/concentration of p97 antigen by in vitro QAR. p97 antigen distribution was homogeneous in the tumors (total antigen concentration [Bmax] = 17.36-38.36 pmol/g). In contrast, radiolabeled 96.5 antibody binding was heterogenous between location within the tumor (estimated bound antigen concentration = 0.7-6.6 pmol/g). No quantifiable parameters were found to be related with radiolabeled antibody binding and tumor antigen distribution. Antibody-bound tumor antigen to total antigen ratios ranged between 2% and 38%. Heterogeneous features of target antibody binding were observed in contrast to relatively homogenous feature of tumor antigen. We did not identify any correlations between p97 antigen distribution and 96.5 antibody binding in melanoma tissue. Radiolabeled 96.5 antibody binding patterns within melanoma cannot be predicted based on p97 antigen distribution in the tumor, which needs to be further studied with several other methods and more subjects in the future.

  18. The role of alpha 6 integrin in prostate cancer migration and bone pain in a novel xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara E King

    Full Text Available Of the estimated 565,650 people in the U.S. who will die of cancer in 2008, almost all will have metastasis. Breast, prostate, kidney, thyroid and lung cancers metastasize to the bone. Tumor cells reside within the bone using integrin type cell adhesion receptors and elicit incapacitating bone pain and fractures. In particular, metastatic human prostate tumors express and cleave the integrin A6, a receptor for extracellular matrix components of the bone, i.e., laminin 332 and laminin 511. More than 50% of all prostate cancer patients develop severe bone pain during their remaining lifetime. One major goal is to prevent or delay cancer induced bone pain. We used a novel xenograft mouse model to directly determine if bone pain could be prevented by blocking the known cleavage of the A6 integrin adhesion receptor. Human tumor cells expressing either the wildtype or mutated A6 integrin were placed within the living bone matrix and 21 days later, integrin expression was confirmed by RT-PCR, radiographs were collected and behavioral measurements of spontaneous and evoked pain performed. All animals independent of integrin status had indistinguishable tumor burden and developed bone loss 21 days after surgery. A comparison of animals containing the wild type or mutated integrin revealed that tumor cells expressing the mutated integrin resulted in a dramatic decrease in bone loss, unicortical or bicortical fractures and a decrease in the ability of tumor cells to reach the epiphyseal plate of the bone. Further, tumor cells within the bone expressing the integrin mutation prevented cancer induced spontaneous flinching, tactile allodynia, and movement evoked pain. Preventing A6 integrin cleavage on the prostate tumor cell surface decreased the migration of tumor cells within the bone and the onset and degree of bone pain and fractures. These results suggest that strategies for blocking the cleavage of the adhesion receptors on the tumor cell surface can

  19. Fetal wound healing using a genetically modified murine model: the contribution of P-selectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    During early gestation, fetal wounds heal with paucity of inflammation and absent scar formation. P-selectin is an adhesion molecule that is important for leukocyte recruitment to injury sites. We used a murine fetal wound healing model to study the specific contribution of P-selectin to scarless wo...

  20. TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE-INDUCED EOSINOPHILIA IN A MURINE MODEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE-INDUCED EOSINOPHILIA IN A MURINE MODEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA. J F Regal, ME Mohrman, E Boykin and D Sailstad. Dept. of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN, USA and NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.Trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is a small m...

  1. Partial Correction of Psoriasis upon Genetic Knock-Down of Human TNF-α by Lentivirus-Encoded shRNAs in a Xenograft Mouse Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Maria; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia

    reduced the amount of released TNF- more than 50% upon viral transduction, was selected for in vivo studies. In vivo studies were carried out in a xenograft mouse model in which human psoriatic plaques keratome skin biopsies were transplanted onto SCID mice. Initial studies using eGFP-encoding lentiviral...... vectors demonstrated efficient transduction of human psoriatic skin. Grafted psoriatic skin was exposed to viral vector-encoded TNF- shRNAs by a single intradermal injection of purified VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (150 l containing 46.4 ng p24/ l was injected at a single site). Biopsies were...

  2. Immune tolerance induction using fetal directed placental injection in rodent models: a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Takahashi

    Full Text Available Induction of the immune response is a major problem in replacement therapies for inherited protein deficiencies. Tolerance created in utero can facilitate postnatal treatment. In this study, we aimed to induce immune tolerance towards a foreign protein with early gestational cell transplantation into the chorionic villi under ultrasound guidance in the murine model.Pregnant C57BL/6 (B6 mice on day 10 of gestation were anesthetized and imaged by high resolution ultrasound. Murine embryos and their placenta were positioned to get a clear view in B-mode with power mode of the labyrinth, which is the equivalent of chorionic villi in the human. Bone marrow cells (BMCs from B6-Green Fluorescence Protein (B6GFP transgenic mice were injected into the fetal side of the placenta which includes the labyrinth with glass microcapillary pipettes. Each fetal mouse received 2 x 105 viable GFP-BMCs. After birth, we evaluated the humoral and cell-mediated immune response against GFP.Bone marrow transfer into fetal side of placenta efficiently distributed donor cells to the fetal mice. The survival rate of this procedure was 13.5%(5 out of 37. Successful engraftment of the B6-GFP donor skin grafts was observed in all recipient (5 out of 5 mice 6 weeks after birth. Induction of anti-GFP antibodies was completely inhibited. Cytotoxic immune reactivity of thymic cells against cells harboring GFP was suppressed by ELISPOT assay.In this study, we utilized early gestational placental injection targeting the murine fetus, to transfer donor cells carrying a foreign protein into the fetal circulation. This approach is sufficient to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune tolerance against the foreign protein.

  3. Castration induces up-regulation of intratumoral androgen biosynthesis and androgen receptor expression in an orthotopic VCaP human prostate cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuuttila, Matias; Yatkin, Emrah; Kallio, Jenny; Savolainen, Saija; Laajala, Teemu D; Aittokallio, Tero; Oksala, Riikka; Häkkinen, Merja; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Auriola, Seppo; Poutanen, Matti; Mäkelä, Sari

    2014-08-01

    Androgens are key factors involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and PCa growth can be suppressed by androgen deprivation therapy. In a considerable proportion of men receiving androgen deprivation therapy, however, PCa progresses to castration-resistant PCa (CRPC), making the development of efficient therapies challenging. We used an orthotopic VCaP human PCa xenograft model to study cellular and molecular changes in tumors after androgen deprivation therapy (castration). Tumor growth was monitored through weekly serum prostate-specific antigen measurements, and mice with recurrent tumors after castration were randomized to treatment groups. Serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations showed significant correlation with tumor volume. Castration-resistant tumors retained concentrations of intratumoral androgen (androstenedione, testosterone, and 5α-dihydrotestosterone) at levels similar to tumors growing in intact hosts. Accordingly, castration induced up-regulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis (CYP17A1, AKR1C3, and HSD17B6), as well as expression of full-length androgen receptor (AR) and AR splice variants (AR-V1 and AR-V7). Furthermore, AR target gene expression was maintained in castration-resistant xenografts. The AR antagonists enzalutamide (MDV3100) and ARN-509 suppressed PSA production of castration-resistant tumors, confirming the androgen dependency of these tumors. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that our VCaP xenograft model exhibits the key characteristics of clinical CRPC and thus provides a valuable tool for identifying druggable targets and for testing therapeutic strategies targeting AR signaling in CRPC.

  4. Gene expression profiling upon (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment in the LS-174T i.p. xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Kwon J; Milenic, Diane E; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Kim, Young-Seung; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that therapy with (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab resulted in (1) induction of apoptosis, (2) G2/M arrest, and (3) blockage of double-strand DNA damage repair in LS-174T i.p. (intraperitoneal) xenografts. To further understand the molecular basis of the cell killing efficacy of (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab, gene expression profiling was performed with LS-174T xenografts 24 h after exposure to (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab. DNA damage response genes (84) were screened using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction array (qRT-PCR array). Differentially regulated genes were identified following exposure to (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab. These included genes involved in apoptosis (ABL, GADD45α, GADD45γ, PCBP4, and p73), cell cycle (ATM, DDIT3, GADD45α, GTSE1, MKK6, PCBP4, and SESN1), and damaged DNA binding (DDB) and repair (ATM and BTG2). The stressful growth arrest conditions provoked by (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab were found to induce genes involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. The expression of genes involved in DDB and single-strand DNA breaks was also enhanced by (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab while no modulation of genes involved in double-strand break repair was apparent. Furthermore, the p73/GADD45 signaling pathway mediated by p38 kinase signaling may be involved in the cellular response, as evidenced by the enhanced expression of genes and proteins of this pathway. These results further support the previously described cell killing mechanism by (212) Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab in the same LS-174T i.p. xenograft. Insight into these mechanisms could lead to improved strategies for rational application of radioimmunotherapy using α-particle emitters.

  5. Membrane-dependent Activities of Human 15-LOX-2 and Its Murine Counterpart: IMPLICATIONS FOR MURINE MODELS OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Gunes; Schexnaydre, Erin E; Murphy, Robert C; Uhlson, Charis; Newcomer, Marcia E

    2016-09-01

    The enzyme encoded by the ALOX15B gene has been linked to the development of atherosclerotic plaques in humans and in a mouse model of hypercholesterolemia. In vitro, these enzymes, which share 78% sequence identity, generate distinct products from their substrate arachidonic acid: the human enzyme, a 15-S-hydroperoxy product; and the murine enzyme, an 8-S-product. We probed the activities of these enzymes with nanodiscs as membrane mimics to determine whether they can access substrate esterified in a bilayer and characterized their activities at the membrane interface. We observed that both enzymes transform phospholipid-esterified arachidonic acid to a 15-S-product. Moreover, when expressed in transfected HEK cells, both enzymes result in significant increases in the amounts of 15-hydroxyderivatives of eicosanoids detected. In addition, we show that 15-LOX-2 is distributed at the plasma membrane when the HEK293 cells are stimulated by the addition Ca(2+) ionophore and that cellular localization is dependent upon the presence of a putative membrane insertion loop. We also report that sequence differences between the human and mouse enzymes in this loop appear to confer distinct mechanisms of enzyme-membrane interaction for the homologues.

  6. Two-step amplification of the human PPT sequence provides specific gene expression in an immunocompetent murine prostate cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzojic, H; Cheng, W-S; Essand, M

    2007-03-01

    The recombinant prostate-specific PPT sequence comprises a prostate-specific antigen enhancer, a PSMA enhancer and a TARP promoter. It is transcriptionally active in human prostate cancer cells both in the presence and absence of testosterone. However, in experimental murine prostate cancer, it has no detectable transcriptional activity. Herein, we describe that the PPT sequence in combination with a two-step transcriptional amplification (TSTA) system becomes active also in murine prostate cancer cells. An adenovirus with TSTA-amplified PPT-controlled expression of the luciferase reporter gene, Ad[PPT/TSTA-Luc], has up to 100-fold higher prostate-specific transcriptional activity than a non-amplified PPT-based adenovirus, Ad[PPT-Luc], in human cells. In addition, Ad[PPT/TSTA-Luc] confers prostate-specific transgene expression in murine cells, with an activity that is approximately 23% of Ad[CMV-Luc] in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP)-C2 cells. Moreover, to visualize luciferase expression in living mice a charge-coupled device camera was used. Ad[PPT/TSTA-Luc] yielded approximately 30-fold higher transgene expression than Ad[PPT-Luc] in LNCaP tumor xenografts. Importantly, Ad[PPT/TSTA-Luc] also showed activity in murine TRAMP-C2 tumors, whereas Ad[PPT-Luc] activity was undetectable. These results highlight that the recombinant PPT sequence is active in murine prostate cancer cells when augmented by a TSTA system. This finding opens up for preclinical studies with prostate-specific therapeutic gene expression in immunocompetent mice.

  7. Decorin protein core affects the global gene expression profile of the tumor microenvironment in a triple-negative orthotopic breast carcinoma xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Buraschi

    Full Text Available Decorin, a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan gene family, exists and functions wholly within the tumor microenvironment to suppress tumorigenesis by directly targeting and antagonizing multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the EGFR and Met. This leads to potent and sustained signal attenuation, growth arrest, and angiostasis. We thus sought to evaluate the tumoricidal benefits of systemic decorin on a triple-negative orthotopic breast carcinoma xenograft model. To this end, we employed a novel high-density mixed expression array capable of differentiating and simultaneously measuring gene signatures of both Mus musculus (stromal and Homo sapiens (epithelial tissue origins. We found that decorin protein core modulated the differential expression of 374 genes within the stromal compartment of the tumor xenograft. Further, our top gene ontology classes strongly suggests an unexpected and preferential role for decorin protein core to inhibit genes necessary for immunomodulatory responses while simultaneously inducing expression of those possessing cellular adhesion and tumor suppressive gene properties. Rigorous verification of the top scoring candidates led to the discovery of three genes heretofore unlinked to malignant breast cancer that were reproducibly found to be induced in several models of tumor stroma. Collectively, our data provide highly novel and unexpected stromal gene signatures as a direct function of systemic administration of decorin protein core and reveals a fundamental basis of action for decorin to modulate the tumor stroma as a biological mechanism for the ascribed anti-tumorigenic properties.

  8. Differential response to EGFR- and VEGF-targeted therapies in patient-derived tumor tissue xenograft models of colon carcinoma and related metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ketao; Lan, Huanrong; Cao, Feilin; Han, Na; Xu, Zhenzhen; Li, Guangliang; He, Kuifeng; Teng, Lisong

    2012-08-01

    Heterogeneity in primary tumors and related metastases may result in failure of antitumor therapies, particularly in targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer. In this study, patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastases were used to evaluate the response to EGFR- and VEGF-targeted therapies. Our results showed that primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastases have a different response rate to anti-EGFR (cetuximab) and anti-VEGF (bevacizumab) therapies. However, the underlying mechanism of these types of phenomenon is still unclear. To investigate whether such phenomena may result from the heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and related metastases, we compared the expression levels of cell signaling pathway proteins using immunohistochemical staining and western blotting, and the gene status of KRAS using pyrosequencing in the same primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastatic tissues which were used for establishing the PDTT xenograft models. Our results showed that the expression levels of EGFR, VEGF, Akt/pAkt, ERK/pERK, MAPK/pMAPK, and mTOR/pmTOR were different in primary colon carcinoma and matched lymphatic and hepatic metastases although the KRAS gene status in all cases was wild-type. Our results indicate that the heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastases may result in differences in the response to dual-inhibition of EGFR and VEGF.

  9. Phenethyl isothiocyanate inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Silvia D; Singh, Shivendra V; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and it has a poor prognosis that points to an increased need to develop effective chemoprevention strategies for this disease. We examined the ability of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, to inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model. Exposure to PEITC inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of approximately 7 μmol/L. PEITC treatment induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, downregulated the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, upregulated the proapoptotic protein Bak, and suppressed Notch 1 and 2 levels. In addition, treatment with PEITC induced cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase and led to increased cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation and subdiploid (apoptotic) fraction in pancreatic cancer cells. Oral administration of PEITC suppressed the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in a MIAPaca2 xenograft animal model. Our data show that PEITC exerts its inhibitory effect on pancreatic cancer cells through several mechanisms, including G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis, and supports further investigation of PEITC as a chemopreventive agent for pancreatic cancer.

  10. Increased COX-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells of high mammographic density tissues and in a xenograft model of mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, G L; Huo, C W; Huang, D; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Frazer, H; Hopper, J L; Haviv, I; Henderson, M A; Britt, K; Thompson, E W

    2015-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest known risk factors for breast cancer. Given the high attributable risk of MD for breast cancer, chemoprevention with a safe and available agent that reduces MD and breast cancer risk would be beneficial. Cox-2 has been implicated in MD-related breast cancer risk, and was increased in stromal cells in high MD tissues in one study. Our study assessed differential Cox-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells in paired samples of high and low MD human breast tissue, and in a validated xenograft biochamber model of MD. We also examined the effects of endocrine treatment upon Cox-2 expression in high and low MD tissues in the MD xenograft model. Paired high and low MD human breast tissue samples were immunostained for Cox-2, then assessed for differential expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells. High and low MD human breast tissues were separately maintained in biochambers in mice treated with Tamoxifen, oestrogen or placebo implants, then assessed for percentage Cox-2 staining in epithelial and stromal cells. Percentage Cox-2 staining was greater for both epithelial (p = 0.01) and stromal cells (p tissues. In high MD biochamber tissues, percentage Cox-2 staining was greater in stromal cells of oestrogen-treated versus placebo-treated tissues (p = 0.05).

  11. As2 O3 combined with leflunomide prolongs heart xenograft survival via suppressing the response of Th1, Th2, and B cells in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Zhi-Xing; Leng, Yun; Xia, Jun-Jie; Wu, Hai-Qiao; Jin, Ning; Fu, Jia-Zhao; Cheng, Lian-Na; Wang, Jin-Hua; Ni, Shao-Bin; Qi, Zhong-Quan

    2016-05-01

    Xenotransplantation remits the severe shortage of human organs and tissues for transplantation, which is a problem that severely limits the application of transplantation to the treatment of human disease. However, severe immune rejection significantly limits the efficacy of xenotransplantation. In this study, we systematically investigated the immunosuppressive effect and mechanism of action of As2 O3 and leflunomide using a hamster-to-rat heart xenotransplantation model. We initially examined heart xenograft survival following As2 O3 and leflunomide treatment alone or combined treatment. We found that treatment with As2 O3 combined with leflunomide can significantly prolong the survival of heart xenograft by inhibiting Th1 and Th2 differentiation and reducing the production of IgG and IgM. Interestingly, As2 O3 and leflunomide showed low toxicity to the organs of the recipient. Taken together, these observations indicate that treatment with As2 O3 combined with leflunomide may be a promising immunosuppressive schedule for xenotransplantation.

  12. Effects of low-dose cyclophosphamide with piroxicam on tumour neovascularization in a canine oral malignant melanoma-xenografted mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choisunirachon, N; Jaroensong, T; Yoshida, K; Saeki, K; Mochizuki, M; Nishimura, R; Sasaki, N; Nakagawa, T

    2015-12-01

    Low-dose cyclophosphamide (CyLD) has shown promise in the treatment of several cancers; however, the effect of CyLD on canine oral malignant melanoma has never been explored. In this study, we investigated the effects of CyLD with or without piroxicam (Px) on tumour neovascularization and vascular normalization in a canine oral malignant melanoma-xenografted mice model. After treatment with CyLD, Px or a combination of both (CyPx), the growth of the tumour in the treatment groups was significantly suppressed compared to the control group at 30 days of treatment. Proliferation index was also significantly reduced by all treatments, only CyPx significantly lowered microvessel density and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Additionally, CyLD significantly reduced the proportion of normal vessels and caused an imbalance between VEGF and thrombospondin-1. These results suggested that CyPx has potent anti-angiogenic effects in terms of both the number and quality of blood vessels in xenografted canine oral malignant melanoma.

  13. An Immunomodulatory Peptide Confers Protection in an Experimental Candidemia Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Camila G; Lima, Stella M F; Freire, Mirna S; Cantuária, Ana Paula C; Júnior, Nelson G O; Santos, Tatiane S; Folha, Jéssica S; Ribeiro, Suzana M; Dias, Simoni C; Rezende, Taia M B; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Nicola, André M; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E W; Franco, Octávio L; Felipe, Maria Sueli S

    2017-08-01

    Fungal Candida species are commensals present in the mammalian skin and mucous membranes. Candida spp. are capable of breaching the epithelial barrier of immunocompromised patients with neutrophil and cell-mediated immune dysfunctions and can also disseminate to multiple organs through the bloodstream. Here we examined the action of innate defense regulator 1018 (IDR-1018), a 12-amino-acid-residue peptide derived from bovine bactenecin (Bac2A): IDR-1018 showed weak antifungal and antibiofilm activity against a Candida albicans laboratory strain (ATCC 10231) and a clinical isolate (CI) (MICs of 32 and 64 μg · ml(-1), respectively), while 8-fold lower concentrations led to dissolution of the fungal cells from preformed biofilms. IDR-1018 at 128 μg · ml(-1) was not hemolytic when tested against murine red blood cells and also has not shown a cytotoxic effect on murine monocyte RAW 264.7 and primary murine macrophage cells at the tested concentrations. IDR-1018 modulated the cytokine profile during challenge of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with heat-killed C. albicans (HKCA) antigens by increasing monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels, while suppressing tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 levels. Mice treated with IDR-1018 at 10 mg · kg(-1) of body weight had an increased survival rate in the candidemia model compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated mice, together with a diminished kidney fungal burden. Thus, IDR-1018 was able to protect against murine experimental candidemia and has the potential as an adjunctive therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Comparative distribution study of /sup 111/In-labelled DTPA and TTHA monoclonal antibody conjugates in a choriocarcinoma xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R.G.; Barnett, P.; Searle, F.; Pedley, R.; Boden, J.A.

    1986-11-01

    Conjugates of the chelating agents DTPA and TTHA with a monoclonal anti-HCG were prepared. The tissue distribution of the /sup 111/In-Labelled conjugates and also /sup 111/In-citrate was studied in mice bearing human choriocarcinoma xenografts. The antibody conjugates both gave high liver and spleen radionuclide accumulation. Elevated femur levels were observed for the TTHA conjugate and /sup 111/In-citrate. Generally the DTPA conjugate showed the highest tumor-tissue ratios, although its tumor/blood ratio was lower than the other two materials. The results infer that the DTPA conjugate has the greatest utility as an imaging agent but that it would require a background subtraction technique.

  15. Enhanced antitumor effect of anti-tissue factor antibody-conjugated epirubicin-incorporating micelles in xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Koga, Yoshikatsu; Tsumura, Ryo; Sato, Ryuta; Obonai, Toshihumi; Fuchigami, Hirobumi; Furuya, Fumiaki; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Harada, Mitsunori; Kato, Yasuki; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2015-05-01

    For the creation of a successful antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), both scientific and clinical evidence has indicated that highly toxic anticancer agents (ACA) should be conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to administer a reasonable amount of ADC to patients without compromising the affinity of the mAb. For ordinary ACA, the conjugation of a mAb to ACA-loaded micellar nanoparticles is clinically applicable. Tissue factor (TF) is often overexpressed in various cancer cells and tumor vascular endothelium. Accordingly, anti-TF-NC-6300, consisting of epirubicin-incorporating micelles (NC-6300) conjugated with the F(ab')2 of anti-TF mAb was developed. The in vitro and in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetics of anti-TF-NC-6300 were compared to NC-6300 using two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, BxPC3 (high TF expression) and SUIT2 (low TF expression), and a gastric cancer cell line, 44As3 (high TF expression). The intracellular uptake of epirubicin was faster and greater in BxPC3 cells treated with anti-TF-NC-6300, compared with NC-6300. Anti-TF-NC-6300 showed a superior antitumor activity in BxPC3 and 44As3 xenografts, compared with NC-6300, while the activities of both micelles were similar in the SUIT2 xenograft. A higher tumor accumulation of anti-TF-NC-6300 compared to NC-6300 was seen, regardless of the TF expression levels. However, anti-TF-NC-6300 appeared to be localized to the tumor cells with high TF expression. These results indicated that the enhanced antitumor effect of anti-TF-NC6300 may be independent of the tumor accumulation but may depend on the selective intratumor localization and the preferential internalization of anti-TF-NC-6300 into high TF tumor cells. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells.

  17. Diet and specific microbial exposure trigger features of environmental enteropathy in a novel murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric M; Wlodarska, Marta; Willing, Benjamin P; Vonaesch, Pascale; Han, Jun; Reynolds, Lisa A; Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Uhrig, Marco; Scholz, Roland; Partida, Oswaldo; Borchers, Christoph H; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Finlay, B Brett

    2015-08-04

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a subclinical chronic inflammatory disease of the small intestine and has a profound impact on the persistence of childhood malnutrition worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease remains unknown and no animal model exists to date, the creation of which would aid in understanding this complex disease. Here we demonstrate that early-life consumption of a moderately malnourished diet, in combination with iterative oral exposure to commensal Bacteroidales species and Escherichia coli, remodels the murine small intestine to resemble features of EE observed in humans. We further report the profound changes that malnutrition imparts on the small intestinal microbiota, metabolite and intraepithelial lymphocyte composition, along with the susceptibility to enteric infection. Our findings provide evidence indicating that both diet and microbes combine to contribute to the aetiology of EE, and describe a novel murine model that can be used to elucidate the mechanisms behind this understudied disease.

  18. Intrapulmonary posaconazole penetration at the infection site in an immunosuppressed murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis receiving oral prophylactic regimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyedmousavi Tasieh, S.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.; Mouton, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Adequate penetration to the infection/colonization site is crucial to attain optimal efficacy of posaconazole against Aspergillus fumigatus diseases. We evaluated posaconazole exposure in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. The posaconazole

  19. A modified murine model based on hydrodynamic injection for the analysis of chronic human hepatitis B virus infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    QIN, BO; TU, CHUNYU; ZHANG, BO; HE, TINGTING; FU, LIJUN; XU, WENYING

    2013-01-01

    ... to ~1 million deaths per year. In the present study, a conventional murine model was introduced based on the hydrodynamic injection of engineered replication-competent HBV DNA into the tail veins of C57BL/6 mice...

  20. Alternans in genetically modified Langendorff-perfused murine hearts modeling catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian N Sabir

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between alternans and arrhythmogenicity was studied in genetically modified murine hearts modeling catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT during Langendorff perfusion, before and after treatment with catecholamines and a β-adrenergic antagonist. Heterozygous (RyR2p/s and homozygous (RyR2s/s RyR2-P2328S hearts, and wild-type (WT controls, were studied before and after treatment with epinephrine (100 nM and 1 µM and propranolol (100 nM. Monophasic action potential recordings demonstrated significantly greater incidences of arrhythmia in RyR2s/p and RyR2s/s hearts as compared to WTs. Arrhythmogenicity in RyR2s/s hearts was associated with alternans, particularly at short baseline cycle lengths. Both phenomena were significantly accentuated by treatment with epinephrine and significantly diminished by treatment with propranolol, in full agreement with clinical expectations. These changes took place, however, despite an absence of changes in action potential durations, ventricular effective refractory periods or restitution curve characteristics. Furthermore pooled data from all hearts in which arrhythmia occurred demonstrated significantly greater alternans magnitudes, but similar restitution curve slopes, to hearts that did not demonstrate arrhythmia. These findings thus further validate the RyR2-P2328S murine heart as a model for human CPVT, confirming an alternans phenotype in common with murine genetic models of the Brugada syndrome and the congenital long-QT syndrome type 3. In contrast to these latter similarities, however, this report demonstrates the dissociation of alternans from changes in the properties of restitution curves for the first time in a murine model of a human arrhythmic syndrome.

  1. Metallothionein-1 and nitric oxide expression are inversely correlated in a murine model of Chagas disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, represents an endemic among Latin America countries. The participation of free radicals, especially nitric oxide (NO), has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of seropositive individuals with T. cruzi. In Chagas disease, increased NO contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and megacolon. Metallothioneins (MTs) are efficient free radicals scavengers of NO in vitro and in vivo. Here, we developed a murine model of the chronic phase of C...

  2. Efficacy of Orally Delivered Cochleates Containing Amphotericin B in a Murine Model of Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Delmas, G.; Park, S.; Chen, Z W; Tan, F.; Kashiwazaki, R.; Zarif, L.; Perlin, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) were administered orally at doses ranging from 0 to 40 mg/kg of body weight/day for 14 days in a murine model of systemic aspergillosis. The administration of oral doses of CAMB (20 and 40 mg/kg/day) resulted in a survival rate of 70% and a reduction in colony counts of more than 2 logs in lungs, livers, and kidneys. Orally administered CAMB shows promise for the treatment of aspergillosis.

  3. Efficacy of orally delivered cochleates containing amphotericin B in a murine model of aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, G; Park, S; Chen, Z W; Tan, F; Kashiwazaki, R; Zarif, L; Perlin, D S

    2002-08-01

    Cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) were administered orally at doses ranging from 0 to 40 mg/kg of body weight/day for 14 days in a murine model of systemic aspergillosis. The administration of oral doses of CAMB (20 and 40 mg/kg/day) resulted in a survival rate of 70% and a reduction in colony counts of more than 2 logs in lungs, livers, and kidneys. Orally administered CAMB shows promise for the treatment of aspergillosis.

  4. Simvastatin Treatment Improves Survival in a Murine Model of Burn Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Infection is the most common and most serious complication of a major burn injury related to burn size. Despite improvements in antimicrobial therapies sepsis still accounts for 50–60% of deaths in burn patients. Given the acute onset and unpredictable nature of sepsis, primary prevention was rarely attempted in its management. However, recent studies have demonstrated that statin treatment can decrease mortality is a murine model of sepsis by preservation of cardiac function and reversal of ...

  5. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of the glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in combination with chemotherapy in xenograft models of human lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herting, Frank; Friess, Thomas; Bader, Sabine; Muth, Gunter; Hölzlwimmer, Gabriele; Rieder, Natascha; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody in development for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We compared the anti-tumor activity of obinutuzumab and rituximab in preclinical studies using subcutaneous Z138 and WSU-DLCL2 xenograft mouse models. Obinutuzumab and rituximab were assessed alone and in combination with bendamustine, fludarabine, chlorambucil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide/vincristine. Owing to strong single-agent efficacy in these models, suboptimal doses of obinutuzumab were applied to demonstrate a combination effect. Obinutuzumab plus bendamustine achieved superior tumor growth inhibition versus rituximab plus bendamustine and showed a statistically significant effect versus the respective single treatments. Combinations of obinutuzumab with fludarabine, chlorambucil or cyclophosphamide/vincristine demonstrated significantly superior activity to rituximab-based treatment. Obinutuzumab monotherapy was at least as effective as rituximab plus chemotherapy in vivo, and obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy was superior to the respective monotherapies. These data support further clinical investigation of obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy.

  6. AZ17: a new bispecific drug targeting IL-6 and IL-23 with potential clinical use-improves psoriasis in a human xenograft transplantation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenderup, Karin; Kjeldsen, Cecilia Rosada; Shanebeck, K

    2015-01-01

    ; widely accepted to be associated with psoriasis. To meet the need for new therapeutics, we aimed to create a clinically relevant bispecific drug, by combining the inhibitory properties of anti-IL-6 and anti-IL-23 antibodies, exhibiting high affinity, high stability and the ability to be produced in high...... variables that were synthesized separately in Escherichia coli. To improve stability and extend pharmacokinetics, a flexible poly-ethylene glycol molecule was used as linker. In preclinical psoriasis models, AZ17 reduced IL-23-induced ear inflammation and improved psoriasis in a xenograft transplantation...... model where psoriasis skin is transplanted onto immune-deficient mice. The data presented here suggest AZ17 to be a promising drug candidate in psoriasis and other inflammatory diseases associated with Th17 cell development....

  7. Correlations of 3T DCE-MRI Quantitative Parameters with Microvessel Density in a Human-Colorectal-Cancer Xenograft Mouse Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung Jun; An, Chan Sik; Koom, Woong Sub; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    To investigate the correlation between quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters and microvascular density (MVD) in a human-colon-cancer xenograft mouse model using 3 Tesla MRI. A human-colon-cancer xenograft model was produced by subcutaneously inoculating 1 X 106 DLD-1 human-colon-cancer cells into the right hind limbs of 10 mice. The tumors were allowed to grow for two weeks and then assessed using MRI. DCE-MRI was performed by tail vein injection of 0.3 mmol/kg of gadolinium. A region of interest (ROI) was drawn at the midpoints along the z-axes of the tumors, and a Tofts model analysis was performed. The quantitative parameters (Ktrans, Kep and Ve) from the whole transverse ROI and the hotspot ROI of the tumor were calculated. Immunohistochemical microvessel staining was performed and analyzed according to Weidner's criteria at the corresponding MRI sections. Additional Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was performed to evaluate tumor necrosis. The Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's rho correlation analysis were performed to prove the existence of a correlation between the quantitative parameters, necrosis, and MVD. Whole transverse ROI of the tumor showed no significant relationship between the MVD values and quantitative DCE-MRI parameters. In the hotspot ROI, there was a difference in MVD between low and high group of Ktrans and Kep that had marginally statistical significance (ps = 0.06 and 0.07, respectively). Also, Ktrans and Kep were found to have an inverse relationship with MVD (r -0.61, p = 0.06 in Ktrans; r = -0.60, p = 0.07 in Kep). Quantitative analysis of T1-weighted DCE-MRI using hotspot ROI may provide a better histologic match than whole transverse section ROI. Within the hotspots, Ktrans and Kep tend to have a reverse correlation with MVD in this colon cancer mouse model.

  8. Therapeutic effect of the YH6 phage in a murine hemorrhagic pneumonia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Du, Chongtao; Gong, Pengjuan; Xia, Feifei; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Lei, Liancheng; Song, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Bin; Xiao, Feng; Yan, Xinwu; Cui, Ziyin; Li, Xinwei; Gu, Jingmin; Han, Wenyu

    2015-10-01

    The treatment, in farmed mink, of hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains has become increasingly difficult. This study investigated the potential use of phages as a therapy against hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa in a murine hemorrhagic pneumonia model. An N4-like phage designated YH6 was isolated using P. aeruginosa strain D9. YH6 is a virulent phage with efficient and broad host lytic activity against P. aeruginosa. No bacterial virulence- or lysogenesis-related ORF is present in the YH6 genome, making it eligible for use in phage therapy. In our murine experiments, a single intranasal administration of YH6 (2 × 10(7) PFU) 2 h after D9 intranasal injections at double minimum lethal dose was sufficient to protect mice against hemorrhagic pneumonia. The bacterial load in the lungs of YH6-protected mice was less than 10(3) CFU/g within 24 h after challenge and ultimately became undetectable, whereas the amount of bacteria in the lung tissue derived from unprotected mice was more than 10(8) CFU/g within 24 h after challenge. In view of its protective efficacy in this murine hemorrhagic pneumonia model, YH6 may serve as an alternative treatment strategy for infections caused by multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa.

  9. A novel orally available inhibitor of focal adhesion signaling increases survival in a xenograft model of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with central nervous system involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Rosa; Moreno, María José; Dieguez-Gonzalez, Rebeca; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Gallardo, Alberto; Trias, Manuel; Grañena, Albert; Sierra, Jorge; Casanova, Isolda; Mangues, Ramon

    2013-08-01

    Central nervous system dissemination is a relatively uncommon but almost always fatal complication in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients. Optimal therapy for central nervous involvement in this malignancy has not been established. In this paper, we aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of E7123, a celecoxib derivative that inhibits focal adhesion signaling, in a novel xenograft model of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with central nervous system involvement. Cells obtained after disaggregation of HT subcutaneous tumors (HT-SC cells) were intravenously injected in NOD/SCID mice. These mice received oral vehicle or 75 mg/kg of E7123 daily until they were euthanized for weight loss or signs of sickness. The antitumor effect of E7123 was validated in an independent experiment using a bioluminescent mouse model. Intravenously injected HT-SC cells showed higher take rate and higher central nervous system tropism (associated with increased expression of β1-integrin and p130Cas proteins) than HT cells. The oral administration of E7123 significantly increased survival time in 2 independent experiments using mice injected with unmodified or bioluminescent HT-SC cells. We have developed a new xenograft model of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with central nervous system involvement that can be used in the pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs for this malignancy. E7123 is a new, well-tolerated and orally available therapeutic agent that merits further investigation since it may improve current management of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients with central nervous system involvement.

  10. Minocycline, a putative neuroprotectant, co-administered with doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide chemotherapy in a xenograft model of triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Lauren E; Lustberg, Maryam B; DeVries, A Courtney; Poi, Ming; Chen, Ching-Shih; Kulp, Samuel K

    2016-10-01

    Minocycline is purported to have neuroprotective properties in experimental models of some human neurologic diseases, and has therefore been identified as a putative neuroprotectant for chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment (CICI) in breast cancer patients. However, because its mechanism of action is believed to be mediated through anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant pathways, co-administration of minocycline with chemotherapeutic agents has the potential to reduce the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of minocycline on the activity of the AC chemotherapeutic regimen (Adriamycin [doxorubicin], Cytoxan [cyclophosphamide]) in in vitro and in vivo models of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Clonogenic and methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assays were used to assess survival and viability in two TNBC cell lines treated with increasing concentrations of AC in the presence or absence of minocycline. Biomarkers of apoptosis, cell stress, and DNA damage were evaluated by western blot. The in vivo effects of AC and minocycline, each alone and in combination, were assessed in a xenograft model of TNBC in female athymic nude mice by weekly tumor volume measurement, body and organ weight measurement, and histopathology. Apoptosis and proliferation were characterized by immunohistochemistry in the xenografts tumors. Brains from tumor-bearing mice were evaluated for microglial activation, glial scars, and the proportion of neural progenitor cells. Data from these in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate that minocycline does not diminish the cytotoxic and tumor-suppressive effects of this chemotherapeutic drug combination in TNBC cells. Moreover, minocycline appeared to prevent the reduction in doublecortin-positive neural progenitor cells observed in AC-treated mice. We posit that minocycline may be useful clinically for its reported neuroprotective activity in breast cancer patients receiving AC without

  11. Cetuximab Inhibits T790M-Mediated Resistance to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor in a Lung Adenocarcinoma Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Petra; Stewart, Erin; Pham, Nhu-An; Mascaux, Celine; Panchal, Devang; Li, Ming; Kim, Lucia; Sakashita, Shingo; Wang, Dennis; Sykes, Jenna; Friess, Thomas; Shepherd, Frances A; Liu, Geoffrey; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2016-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain T790M (amino acid substitution at position 790 in EGFR from threonine [T] to methionine [M]) mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) results in resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We used a patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) model containing an EGFR exon 19 deletion/T790M mutation to assess response to the EGFR-directed antibody cetuximab. Changes in the EGFR signaling pathway and ligand expression after treatment were investigated. PDX were randomized into control and treatment arms. Pharmacodynamic studies were performed at 2 and 24 hours and at 4 days after a single administration of cetuximab, erlotinib, or dacomitinib. Changes in the EGFR signaling pathway were assessed using Western blot analysis, and baseline mRNA expression of EGFR ligands using microarray analysis. Relative changes after treatment were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The xenograft showed a dramatic response to cetuximab. A complete reduction of total EGFR and phosphorylated EGFR occurred after cetuximab treatment. The PDX had increased baseline levels of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) compared with other PDX models with or without EGFR mutations. Amphiregulin was significantly reduced 2 hours after treatment with cetuximab. Compared with control mice, cetuximab- and EGFR-TKI-treated mice had significantly reduced HB-EGF gene expression at 2 hours, however, by day 4 the level of HB-EGF expression was higher. The effect of cetuximab compared with EGFR TKI on HB-EGF gene expression levels differed significantly at 2 and 24 hours but not at 4 days. We showed a dramatic tumor response with cetuximab in an exon 19 deletion/T790M EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma PDX model, which suggests a role for the autocrine feedback loop in the mutant EGFR signaling pathway. Further investigation using cetuximab in NSCLC with T790M mutation is warranted. Copyright

  12. Ag85B DNA vaccine suppresses airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Xinglin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In allergic asthma, Th2 lymphocytes are believed to play important roles in orchestrating airway eosinophilia and inflammation. Resetting the Th1/Th2 imbalance may have a therapeutic role in asthma. The mycobacterium tuberculosis 30-kilodalton major secretory protein (antigen 85B, Ag85B can protect animals from M. tuberculosis infection by inducing a Th1-dominant response. Methods In this study, the Ag85B gene was cloned into pMG plasmids to yield the pMG-Ag85B plasmid. The expression of Ag85B gene in murine bronchial epithelia cells was detected by Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining after intranasal immunization with reconstructed pMG-Ag85B plasmids. The protective effect of pMG-Ag85B plasmids immunization in airway inflammation was evaluated by histological examination and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. IL-4 and IFN-γ levels in the BAL and supernatant from splenocyte culture were determined using ELISA kits. Results The Ag85B gene was successfully expressed in murine bronchial epithelia cells by intranasal immunization with reconstructed pMG-Ag85B plasmids. Using a murine model of asthma induced by ovalbumin (OVA, pMG-Ag85B immunization significantly inhibited cellular infiltration across the airway epithelium with a 37% decrease in the total number of cells (9.6 ± 2.6 × 105/ml vs. 15.2 ± 3.0 × 105/ml, p 5/ml vs. 5.4 ± 1.1 × 105/ml, p Conclusion In a murine model of asthma induced by OVA, intranasal immunization with pMG-Ag85B significantly reduced allergic airway inflammation with less eosinophil infiltration. This protective effect was associated with decreased IL-4 and increased IFN-γ production in the BAL fluid and in the supernatant of cultured splenocytes.

  13. A review of murine models of latent tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changhong; Shi, Jieran; Xu, Zhikai

    2011-12-01

    The mechanisms of latency and the causes of reactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remain poorly understood; an important reason for this gap in knowledge is the absence of a standardized animal model of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). A complete LTBI model should incorporate 2 aspects of LTBI: a persistent infection model with a low bacterial load and a latent infection model that is modified from the Cornell model. Many parameters must be carefully considered to establish an LTBI model, including the inoculating dose, the route of infection, the time interval between infection and the initiation of antibiotic therapy, and the genetic background of the host animal. The responsiveness of this mouse model of LTBI can be assessed through the integrated use of indices, including Karnofsky performance status, bacterial load in spleen and lungs, induced levels of interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha, expression of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-4 in tissues, specific antigen load in organs, time required for hormone-induced TB relapse, expression level of dormancy genes, and CD4 T-cell count.

  14. Angiogenesis inhibition using an oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing endostatin in a murine lung cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Jonathan M; Schmitt, Anthony D; McGinn, Christopher M; Fuchs, Bryan C; Kuruppu, Darshini; Tanabe, Kenneth K; Lanuti, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Herpes-mediated viral oncolysis alone is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors. In this study we used a replication conditional, endostatin-expressing herpes simplex virus-1 mutant (HSV-Endo) in a murine lung cancer model. We hypothesized that the anti-angiogenic action of endostatin would improve upon the oncolytic effect of HSV-1. HSV-Endo was evaluated in a pulmonary metastases and orthotopic flank model, where there was significantly less tumor burden and reduced microvessel density compared to a control virus. Endostatin expression appears to improve the anti-tumor effect of HSV-1 in a lung cancer model.

  15. Scanning Acoustic Microscopy—A Novel Noninvasive Method to Determine Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure in a Xenograft Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hofmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP is a prominent feature of solid tumors and hampers the transmigration of therapeutic macromolecules, for example, large monoclonal antibodies, from tumor-supplying vessels into the tumor interstitium. TIFP values of up to 40 mm Hg have been measured in experimental solid tumors using two conventional invasive techniques: the wick-in-needle and the micropuncture technique. We propose a novel noninvasive method of determining TIFP via ultrasonic investigation with scanning acoustic microscopy at 30-MHz frequency. In our experimental setup, we observed for the impedance fluctuations in the outer tumor hull of A431-vulva carcinoma–derived tumor xenograft mice. The gain dependence of signal strength was quantified, and the relaxation of tissue was calibrated with simultaneous hydrostatic pressure measurements. Signal patterns from the acoustical images were translated into TIFP curves, and a putative saturation effect was found for tumor pressures larger than 3 mm Hg. This is the first noninvasive approach to determine TIFP values in tumors. This technique can provide a potentially promising noninvasive assessment of TIFP and, therefore, can be used to determine the TIFP before treatment approach as well to measure therapeutic efficacy highlighted by lowered TFP values.

  16. Functional Ginger Extracts from Supercritical Fluid Carbon Dioxide Extraction via In Vitro and In Vivo Assays: Antioxidation, Antimicroorganism, and Mice Xenografts Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chen Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction technology was developed to gain the active components from a Taiwan native plant, Zingiber officinale (ginger. We studied the biological effects of ginger extracts via multiple assays and demonstrated the biofunctions in each platform. Investigations of ginger extracts indicated antioxidative properties in dose-dependant manners on radical scavenging activities, reducing powers and metal chelating powers. We found that ginger extracts processed moderate scavenging values, middle metal chelating levels, and slight ferric reducing powers. The antibacterial susceptibility of ginger extracts on Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sobrinus, S. mutans, and Escherichia coli was determined with the broth microdilution method technique. The ginger extracts had operative antimicroorganism potentials against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We further discovered the strong inhibitions of ginger extracts on lethal carcinogenic melanoma through in vivo xenograft model. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agents, pharmaceutical antibiotics, and food supplements.

  17. Functional ginger extracts from supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction via in vitro and in vivo assays: antioxidation, antimicroorganism, and mice xenografts models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Chen; Chiou, Li-Yu; Wang, Jheng-Yang; Chou, Sin-You; Lan, John Chi-Wei; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Huang, Kuo-Chuan; Wang, Hui-Min

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction technology was developed to gain the active components from a Taiwan native plant, Zingiber officinale (ginger). We studied the biological effects of ginger extracts via multiple assays and demonstrated the biofunctions in each platform. Investigations of ginger extracts indicated antioxidative properties in dose-dependant manners on radical scavenging activities, reducing powers and metal chelating powers. We found that ginger extracts processed moderate scavenging values, middle metal chelating levels, and slight ferric reducing powers. The antibacterial susceptibility of ginger extracts on Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sobrinus, S. mutans, and Escherichia coli was determined with the broth microdilution method technique. The ginger extracts had operative antimicroorganism potentials against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We further discovered the strong inhibitions of ginger extracts on lethal carcinogenic melanoma through in vivo xenograft model. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agents, pharmaceutical antibiotics, and food supplements.

  18. Expression of Prothrombinase/fibroleukin Gene fg12 in Lung Impairment in a Murine Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ming YAN; Jia-quan HUANG; Xiao-ping LUO; Qin NING

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the role of murine fibrinogen like protein 2 (mfgl2) /fibroleukin in lung impairment in Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a murine SARS model induced by Murine hepatitis virus strain 3 (MHV-3) through trachea was established. Impressively, all the animals developed interstitial pneumonia with extensive hyaline membranes formation within alveoli, and presence of micro-vascular thrombosis in the pulmonary vessels. MHV-3 nucleocapsid gene transcripts were identified in multiple organs including lungs, spleen etc. As a representative proinflammatory gene, mfgl2 prothrombinase expression was evident in terminal and respiratory bronchioles, alveolar epithelia and infiltrated cells in the lungs associated with fibrin deposition and micro-vascular thrombosis. In summary, the established murine SARS model could mimic the pathologic characteristics of lungs in patients with SARS. Besides the physical damages due to virus replication in organs, the up-regulation of novel gene mfgl2 in lungs may play a vital role in the development of SARS associated lung damage.

  19. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging of a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model Seen on a 7 Tesla Animal MR Scanner: Comparison of ADC Values and Pathologic Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Dae Chul [Severance Hospital,Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hak Jong; Park, So Yeon [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jin Won [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joo Hyuk; Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, In Hoo [National Cancer Center, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    To assess the relationship between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and pathologic measures of a tumor using a prostate cancer xenograft model. Eighteen athymic nude mice with 36 PC-3-induced tumors were sacrificed to obtain specimens immediately after MR imaging in order to compare the findings on MR images with those seen on pathological specimens. Using a high-field small-animal MR scanner, T1- and T2-weighted imaging and DW MR imaging was performed. Tumors were then processed for Hematoxylin and Eosin staining to evaluate tumor cellularity, intratumoral necrosis and immunostaining using antibodies directed against CD31 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to determine the levels of microvessel density (MVD). Mean ADC values that were measured on the solid portion within each tumor were compared with tumor volume, cellularity, degree of necrosis, VEGF expression, and MVD in the corresponding section of the pathological specimen. Mean ADC values of the solid portion within the PC-3-induced high-grade tumors were significantly correlated with the degree of intratumoral necrosis (r = 0.63, p < 0.0001) and MVD (r = -0.44, p = 0.008) on pathologic slides. The ADC values were not significantly correlated with tumor cellularity, VEGF expression, or tumor volume in high-grade prostate cancer tissues. In the xenografted prostate cancer model, the ADC values of the solid portion of the tumors are significantly correlated with tumor necrosis and MVD of the pathologic specimens. The ADC values may be utilized as surrogate markers for the noninvasive assessment of tumor necrosis and MVD in high-grade prostate cancer.

  20. Restriction of dietary protein decreases mTORC1 in tumors and somatic tissues of a tumor-bearing mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamming, Dudley W; Cummings, Nicole E; Rastelli, Antonella L; Gao, Feng; Cava, Edda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Spelta, Francesco; Pili, Roberto; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-10-13

    Reduced dietary protein intake and intermittent fasting (IF) are both linked to healthy longevity in rodents, and are effective in inhibiting cancer growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic protein restriction (PR) and IF are unclear, but may be mediated in part by a down-regulation of the IGF/mTOR pathway. In this study we compared the effects of PR and IF on tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. We also investigated the effects of PR and IF on the mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, inhibition of which extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. The mTOR protein kinase is found in two distinct complexes, of which mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) is responsive to acute treatment with amino acids in cell culture and in vivo. We found that both PR and IF inhibit tumor growth and mTORC1 phosphorylation in tumor xenografts. In somatic tissues, we found that PR, but not IF, selectively inhibits the activity of the amino acid sensitive mTORC1, while the activity of the second mTOR complex, mTORC2, was relatively unaffected by PR. In contrast, IF resulted in increased S6 phosphorylation in multiple metabolic tissues. Our work represents the first finding that PR may reduce mTORC1 activity in tumors and multiple somatic tissues, and suggest that PR may represent a highly translatable option for the treatment not only of cancer, but also other age-related diseases.

  1. Effects of exogenous human leptin on heat shock protein 70 expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and breast carcinoma of nude mice xenograft model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Rong-quan; GU Jun-chao; YU Wei; WANG Yu; ZHANG Zhong-tao; MA Xue-mei

    2012-01-01

    Background It is important to identify the multiple sites of leptin activity in obese women with breast cancer.In this study,we examined the effect of exogenous human leptin on heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and in a breast carcinoma xenograft model of nude mice.Methods We cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and established nude mice bearing xenograffs of these cells,and randomly divided them into experimental and control groups.The experimental group was treated with human leptin,while the control group was treated with the same volume of normal saline.A real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed to quantify the mRNA expression of HSP70 in the MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and in tumor tissues.Western blotting analysis was applied to quantify the protein expression of HSP70 in the MCF-7 cells.Immunohistochemical staining was done to assess the positive rate of HSP70 expression in the tumor tissues.Results Leptin activated HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner in vitro:leptin upregulated significantly the expression of HSP70 at mRNA and protein levels in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (P <0.001).There was no significant difference in expression of HSP70 mRNA in the implanted tumors between the leptin-treated group and the control group (P>0.05).Immunohistochemical staining revealed no significant difference in tumor HSP70 expression between the leptin-treated group and the control group (P>0.05).Conclusions A nude mouse xenograft model can be safely and efficiently treated with human leptin by subcutaneous injections around the tumor.HSP70 may be target of leptin in breast cancer.Leptin can significantly upregulate the expression of HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner in vitro.

  2. Anti-CD45 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy using Bismuth-213: High Rates of Complete Remission and Long-Term Survival in a Mouse Myeloid Leukemia Xenograft Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagel, John M; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Back, Tom; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Fisher, Darrell R; Park, Steven I; Frayo, Shani; Axtman, Amanda; Orgun, Nural; Orozoco, Johnnie; Shenoi, Jaideep; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, Ajay K; Green, Damian J; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Press, Oliver W

    2011-07-21

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) using an anti-CD45 antibody (Ab)-streptavidin (SA) conjugate and DOTA-biotin labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored as a strategy to decrease relapse and toxicity. α-emitting radionuclides exhibit high cytotoxicity coupled with a short path-length, potentially increasing the therapeutic index and making them an attractive alternative to β-emitting radionuclides for patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Accordingly, we have used 213Bi in mice with human leukemia xenografts. Results demonstrated excellent localization of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin to tumors with minimal uptake into normal organs. After 10 minutes, 4.5 ± 1.1% of the injected dose of 213Bi was delivered per gram of tumor. α imaging demonstrated uniform radionuclide distribution within tumor tissue 45 minutes after 213Bi-DOTA-biotin injection. Radiation absorbed doses were similar to those observed using a β-emitting radionuclide (90Y) in the same model. We conducted therapy experiments in a xenograft model using a single-dose of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin given 24 hours after anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate. Among mice treated with anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate followed by 800 μCi of 213Bi- or 90Y-DOTA-biotin, 80% and 20%, respectively, survived leukemia-free for >100 days with minimal toxicity. These data suggest that anti-CD45 PRIT using an α-emitting radionuclide may be highly effective and minimally toxic for treatment of AML.

  3. AN IN VITRO MODEL FOR MURINE URETERIC EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents a model developed to study growth and differentiation of primary cultures of ureteric epithelial cells from embryonic C57BL/6N mouse urinary tracts. Single cells were resuspended in medium and plated onto transwells coated with collagen IV and laminin. Basa...

  4. Gynostemma pentaphyllum decreases allergic reactions in a murine asthmatic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Chung; Kuo, Ming-Ling; Li, Ming-Liang; Yang, Rong-Chi; Liou, Chian-Jiun; Shen, Jiann-Jong

    2008-01-01

    The increasing incidence of asthma in developing countries emphasizes the importance of identifying more effective treatments that have low cost. Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb.) Makino (Cucurbitaceae), a common herbal tea in China, has been used to treat lung inflammation. Since the Th2 cytokines are the major mediators in the pathogenesis of asthma, Th1-biased immune responses caused by G. pentaphyllum might have the potential to relieve asthmatic symptoms. We hypothesized that oral administration of G. pentaphyllum extracts might suppress Th2 cytokine-induced airway inflammation responses in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitive mice. BALB/c mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal injection and challenged 3 times with OVA inhalation (IH) (the IH3 model). G. pentaphyllum was orally administered for 7 consecutive days before the end of the OVA challenge. In the IH5 model, 2 more OVA challenges were administered to mimic the encounter with an allergen after drug treatment. G. pentaphyllum extracts significantly attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inhibited eosinophil infiltration in mice in both models. Serum OVA-specific antibodies were also reduced with the treatment. Decreased Th2-type cytokines and increased IFN-gamma were detected in the cultures of OVA-activated splenocytes from treated mice. Our results suggest that G. pentaphyllum extracts might be beneficial for asthma airway inflammation through the suppression of Th2 activity.

  5. Contaminated open fracture and crush injury:a murine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shawn R Gilbert; Justin Camara; Richard Camara; Lynn Duffy; Ken Waites; Hyunki Kim; Kurt Zinn

    2015-01-01

    Modern warfare has caused a large number of severe extremity injuries, many of which become infected. In more recent conflicts, a pattern of co-infection with Acinetobacter baumannii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged. We attempted to recreate this pattern in an animal model to evaluate the role of vascularity in contaminated open fractures. Historically, it has been observed that infected bones frequently appear hypovascular, but vascularity in association with bone infection has not been examined in animal models. Adult rats underwent femur fracture and muscle crush injury followed by stabilization and bacterial contamination with A. baumannii complex and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Vascularity and perfusion were assessed by microCT angiography and SPECT scanning, respectively, at 1, 2 and 4 weeks after injury. Quantitative bacterial cultures were also obtained. Multi-bacterial infections were successfully created, with methicillin-resistant S. aureus predominating. There was overall increase in blood flow to injured limbs that was markedly greater in bacteria-inoculated limbs. Vessel volume was greater in the infected group. Quadriceps atrophy was seen in both groups, but was greater in the infected group. In this animal model, infected open fractures had greater perfusion and vascularity than non-infected limbs.

  6. A Murine Model for Escherichia coli Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Thomas J; Hunstad, David A

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections of humans. The mouse provides an excellent and tractable model system for cystitis and pyelonephritis caused by Escherichia coli and other uropathogens. Using a well-established model of experimental cystitis in which the bladders of female mice are infected via transurethral catheterization, the molecular details of the pathogenesis of bacterial cystitis have been substantially illuminated in the last decade. Uropathogenic E. coli attach to bladder epithelium (both in human and mouse) via adhesive type 1 pili, establish a replicative niche within epithelial cell cytoplasm, and form intracellular bacterial communities that are protected from antibiotic effects and immune clearance. The use of different inbred and mutant mouse strains offers the opportunity to study outcomes of infection, including resolution, formation of quiescent intracellular bacterial reservoirs, chronic bacterial cystitis, and recurrent infections. Urine, bladder, and kidney tissues can be analyzed by bacterial culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescent and confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, and flow cytometry, while a broad array of soluble markers (e.g., cytokines) can also be profiled in serum, urine, and tissue homogenates by ELISA, Western blotting, multiplex bead array, and other approaches. This model promises to afford continued opportunity for discovery of pathogenic mechanisms and evaluation of therapeutic and preventive strategies for acute, chronic, and recurrent UTI.

  7. Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models as determined by global transcriptomic profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, David Adrian; Noda, Shinji; Oliva, Margeaux

    2017-01-01

    /Nga, and oxazolone-challenged mice show the largest homology with our human meta-analysis derived AD (MADAD) transcriptome (37%, 18%, 17%, respectively). Similar to human AD, robust Th1, Th2, and also Th17 activation are seen in IL-23-injected and NC/Nga mice, with similar, but weaker, inflammation in ovalbumin......-challenged mice. Oxazolone-challenged mice show a Th1-centered reaction and flaky-tail mice demonstrate a strong Th17 polarization. Flg-mutated mice display FLG down-regulation without significant inflammation. No single murine model fully captures all aspects of the AD profile; instead, each model reflects...

  8. Human Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Xenografts Improve Cognitive Decline and Reduce the Amyloid Burden in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutajangout, Allal; Noorwali, Abdulwahab; Atta, Hazem; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. The search for new treatments is made more urgent given its increasing prevalence resulting from the aging of the global population. Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to both study and potentially treat neurodegenerative diseases. Several investigators reported a beneficial effect of different types of stem or progenitor cells on the pathology and cognitive function in AD models. Mouse models are one of the most important research tools for finding new treatment for AD. We aimed to explore the possible therapeutic potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell xenografts in a transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD. APP/PS1 Tg AD model mice received human umbilical cord stem cells, directly injected into the carotid artery. To test the efficacy of the umbilical cord stem cells in this AD model, behavioral tasks (sensorimotor and cognitive tests) and immunohistochemical quantitation of the pathology was performed. Treatment of the APP/PS1 AD model mice, with human umbilical cord stem cells, produced a reduction of the amyloid beta burden in the cortex and the hippocampus which correlated with a reduction of the cognitive loss. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells appear to reduce AD pathology in a transgenic mouse model as documented by a reduction of the amyloid plaque burden compared to controls. This amelioration of pathology correlates with improvements on cognitive and sensorimotor tasks.

  9. Human Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Xenografts Improve Cognitive Decline and Reduce the Amyloid Burden in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutajangout, Allal; Noorwali, Abdulwahab; Atta, Hazem; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. The search for new treatments is made more urgent given its increasing prevalence resulting from the aging of the global population. Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to both study and potentially treat neurodegenerative diseases. Several investigators reported a beneficial effect of different types of stem or progenitor cells on the pathology and cognitive function in AD models. Mouse models are one of the most important research tools for finding new treatment for AD. We aimed to explore the possible therapeutic potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell xenografts in a transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD. Methods APP/PS1 Tg AD model mice received human umbilical cord stem cells, directly injected into the carotid artery. To test the efficacy of the umbilical cord stem cells in this AD model, behavioral tasks (sensorimotor and cognitive tests) and immunohistochemical quantitation of the pathology was performed. Results Treatment of the APP/PS1 AD model mice, with human umbilical cord stem cells, produced a reduction of the amyloid beta burden in the cortex and the hippocampus which correlated with a reduction of the cognitive loss. Conclusion Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells appear to reduce AD pathology in a transgenic mouse model as documented by a reduction of the amyloid plaque burden compared to controls. This amelioration of pathology correlates with improvements on cognitive and sensorimotor tasks. PMID:27719629

  10. Mycobacterium abscessus morphotype comparison in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caverly, Lindsay J; Caceres, Silvia M; Fratelli, Cori; Happoldt, Carrie; Kidwell, Kelley M; Malcolm, Kenneth C; Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infections with Mycobacterium abscessus (M. abscessus) are increasingly prevalent in patients with lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. M. abscessus exists in two morphotypes, smooth and rough, but the impact of morphotype on virulence is unclear. We developed an immune competent mouse model of pulmonary M. abscessus infection and tested the differences in host inflammatory response between the morphotypes of M. abscessus. Smooth and rough morphotypes of M. abscessus were isolated from the same American Type Culture Collection strain. Wild type and cystic fibrosis mice were intratracheally inoculated with known quantities of M. abscessus suspended in fibrin plugs. At the time of sacrifice lung and splenic tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected and cultured. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for leukocyte count, differential and cytokine expression. Pulmonary infection with M. abscessus was present at both 3 days and 14 days post-inoculation in all groups at greater levels than systemic infection. Inoculation with M. abscessus rough morphotype resulted in more bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophils compared to smooth morphotype at 14 days post-inoculation in both wild type (p = 0.01) and cystic fibrosis (pmorphotype occurred in 12/57 (21%) of mice. These mice trended towards greater weight loss than mice in which morphotype conversion did not occur. In the described fibrin plug model of M. abscessus infection, pulmonary infection with minimal systemic dissemination is achieved with both smooth and rough morphotypes. In this model M. abscessus rough morphotype causes a greater host inflammatory response than the smooth based on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophil levels.

  11. 5α-Reductase Inhibition Suppresses Testosterone-Induced Initial Regrowth of Regressed Xenograft Prostate Tumors in Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Ramos Garcia, Raquel; Pascal, Laura E.; Wang, Yujuan; Ma, Hei M.; O'Malley, Katherine; Eisermann, Kurtis; Shevrin, Daniel H.; Nguyen, Holly M.; Vessella, Robert L.; Nelson, Joel B.; Parikh, Rahul A.

    2013-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment for patients with prostate-specific antigen progression after treatment for localized prostate cancer. An alternative to continuous ADT is intermittent ADT (IADT), which allows recovery of testosterone during off-cycles to stimulate regrowth and differentiation of the regressed prostate tumor. IADT offers patients a reduction in side effects associated with ADT, improved quality of life, and reduced cost with no difference in overall survival. Our previous studies showed that IADT coupled with 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI), which blocks testosterone conversion to DHT could prolong survival of animals bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was fixed. To further investigate this clinically relevant observation, we measured the time course of testosterone-induced regrowth of regressed LuCaP35 and LNCaP xenograft tumors in the presence or absence of a 5ARI. 5α-Reductase inhibitors suppressed the initial regrowth of regressed prostate tumors. However, tumors resumed growth and were no longer responsive to 5α-reductase inhibition several days after testosterone replacement. This finding was substantiated by bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 staining of LuCaP35 tumors, which showed inhibition of prostate tumor cell proliferation by 5ARI on day 2, but not day 14, after testosterone replacement. 5α-Reductase inhibitors also suppressed testosterone-stimulated proliferation of LNCaP cells precultured in androgen-free media, suggesting that blocking testosterone conversion to DHT can inhibit prostate tumor cell proliferation via an intracrine mechanism. These results suggest that short off-cycle coupled with 5α-reductase inhibition could maximize suppression of prostate tumor growth and, thus, improve potential survival benefit achieved in combination with IADT. PMID:23671262

  12. Effects of Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors in Combination with Taxol on Expression of Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 in a Xenograft Model of Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the effects of cyclooxygenase (COX inhibitors in combination with taxol on the expression of cyclin D1 and Ki-67 in human ovarian SKOV-3 carcinoma cells xenograft-bearing mice. The animals were treated with 100 mg/kg celecoxib (a COX-2 selective inhibitor alone, 3 mg/kg SC-560 (a COX-1 selective inhibitor alone by gavage twice a day, 20 mg/kg taxol alone by intraperitoneally (i.p. once a week, or celecoxib/taxol, SC-560/celecoxib, SC-560/taxol or SC-560/celecoxib/taxol, for three weeks. To test the mechanism of the combination treatment, the index of cell proliferation and expression of cyclin D1 in tumor tissues were determined by immunohistochemistry. The mean tumor volume in the treated groups was significantly lower than control (p < 0.05, and in the three-drug combination group, tumor volume was reduced by 58.27% (p < 0.01; downregulated cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression were statistically significant compared with those of the control group (both p < 0.01. This study suggests that the effects of COX selective inhibitors on the growth of tumors and decreased cell proliferation in a SKOV-3 cells mouse xenograft model were similar to taxol. The three-drug combination showing a better decreasing tendency in growth-inhibitory effect during the experiment may have been caused by suppressing cyclin D1 expression.

  13. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging in a Human CD276 Expression-Modulated Murine Ovarian Cancer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Amelie M.; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Drescher, Charles W.; Pysz, Marybeth A.; Willmann, Jürgen K.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a mouse ovarian cancer model that allows modulating the expression levels of human vascular targets in mouse xenograft tumors and to test whether expression of CD276 during tumor angiogenesis can be visualized by molecularly targeted ultrasound in vivo. Materials and Methods CD276-expressing MS-1 mouse endothelial cells were engineered and used for co-injection with 2008 human ovarian cancer cells for subcutaneous xenograft tumor induction in 15 nude mice. Fourteen control mice were injected with 2008 cells only. After confirming their binding specificity in flow chamber cell attachment studies, anti CD276 antibody-functionalized contrast microbubbles were used for in vivo CD276-targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. Results CD276-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was significantly higher (P=0.006) in mixed MS1/2008 tumors compared to control tumors. Compared to control microbubbles the ultrasound signal using CD276-targeted microbubbles was significantly higher (P=0.002) and blocking with purified anti-CD276 antibody significantly decreased (P=0.0096) the signal in mixed MS-1/2008 tumors. Immunofluorescence analysis of the tumor tissue confirmed higher quantitative immunofluorescence signal in mixed MS-1/2008 tumors than in control 2008 only tumors, but showed not significantly different (P=0.54) microvessel density. Conclusion Our novel small animal model allows for modulating the expression of human tumor-associated vascular endothelial imaging targets in a mouse host and these expression differences can be visualized non-invasively by ultrasound molecular imaging. The animal model can be applied to other human vascular targets and may facilitate the preclinical development of new imaging probes such as microbubbles targeted at human vascular markers not expressed in mice. PMID:24389327

  14. Testing the Role of p21-Activated Kinases in Schwannoma Formation Using a Novel Genetically Engineered Murine Model that Closely Phenocopies Human NF2 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Kinases in Schwannoma Formation Using a Novel Genetically Engineered Murine Model that Closely Phenocopies Human NF2 Disease The views, opinions and...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Testing the Role of p21-Activated Kinases in Schwannoma Formation Using a Novel Genetically Engineered Murine Model that Closely...1.20 calendar Testing the Role of p21 Activated Kinases in Schwannoma Formation Using a Novel Genetically Engineered Murine Model that Closely

  15. Thrombospondin-1 in a Murine Model of Colorectal Carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenaida P Lopez-Dee

    Full Text Available Colorectal Cancer (CRC is one of the late complications observed in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Carcinogenesis is promoted by persistent chronic inflammation occurring in IBD. Understanding the mechanisms involved is essential in order to ameliorate inflammation and prevent CRC. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1 is a multidomain glycoprotein with important roles in angiogenesis. The effects of TSP-1 in colonic tumor formation and growth were analyzed in a model of inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. WT and TSP-1 deficient mice (TSP-1-/- of the C57BL/6 strain received a single injection of azoxymethane (AOM and multiple cycles of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS to induce chronic inflammation-related cancers. Proliferation and angiogenesis were histologically analyzed in tumors. The intestinal transcriptome was also analyzed using a gene microarray approach. When the area containing tumors was compared with the entire colonic area of each mouse, the tumor burden was decreased in AOM/DSS-treated TSP-1-/- versus wild type (WT mice. However, these lesions displayed more angiogenesis and proliferation rates when compared with the WT tumors. AOM-DSS treatment of TSP-1-/- mice resulted in significant deregulation of genes involved in transcription, canonical Wnt signaling, transport, defense response, regulation of epithelial cell proliferation and metabolism. Microarray analyses of these tumors showed down-regulation of 18 microRNAs in TSP-1-/- tumors. These results contribute new insights on the controversial role of TSP-1 in cancer and offer a better understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of CRC.

  16. microRNA-222 modulates liver fibrosis in a murine model of biliary atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wen-jun; Dong, Rui; Chen, Gong, E-mail: chengongzlp@hotmail.com; Zheng, Shan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • The RRV infected group showed cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. • miR-222 was highly expressed, and PPP2R2A was inhibited in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 might represent a potential target for improving biliary atresia prognosis. - Abstract: microRNA-222 (miR-222) has been shown to initiate the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of miR-22 in a mouse model of biliary atresia (BA) induced by Rhesus Rotavirus (RRV) infection. New-born Balb/c mice were randomized into control and RRV infected groups. The extrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated. The experimental group was divided into BA group and negative group based on histology. The expression of miR-222, protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B alpha (PPP2R2A), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phospho-Akt were detected. We found that the experimental group showed signs of cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. No abnormalities were found in the control group. In the BA group, miR-222, PCNA and Akt were highly expressed, and PPP2R2A expression was significantly inhibited. Our findings suggest that miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine BA model, which might represent a potential target for improving BA prognosis.

  17. Gene therapy for osteoporosis: evaluation in a murine ovariectomy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, A W; Whalen, J D; Wooley, P; Latterman, C; Truchan, L M; Robbins, P D; Evans, C H

    2001-12-01

    Various cytokines and cytokine antagonists hold promise as new therapeutic agents for osteoporosis, but their application is hindered by delivery problems. Gene transfer offers an attractive technology with which to obviate these restrictions. Its utility was evaluated in an animal model of osteoporosis. Disease was induced by surgical ovariectomy and monitored by measuring bone weight after 12 days, and by histomorphometry after 5 weeks. Genes were transferred to the mice by intramedullary injection of adenoviral vectors. LacZ and luciferase marker genes were used to identify the bone marrow cells transduced by this procedure, and to track the possible spread of transgenes to other organs. The effect on bone loss of transferring a cDNA encoding the human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) was then evaluated. The intramedullary injection of adenoviral vectors transduced lining osteoblasts, osteocytes and cells within the bone marrow. Luciferase activity persisted within the injected femora and adjacent musculature for at least 3 weeks, and in the draining lymph nodes for 2 weeks. Transient, low level expression was present in the liver, but no luciferase was detected at any time in the lung or spleen. Intramedullary introduction of the IL-1Ra gene resulted in circulation of the corresponding protein at concentrations that peaked on day 3, and returned to baseline by day 12. Transfer of the IL-1Ra gene strongly reduced the early loss of bone mass occurring in response to ovariectomy. Furthermore, it completely inhibited the loss of matrix detected by histomorphometry at 5 weeks. The protective effect of this gene was not restricted to bones receiving intramedullary injection of the vector, but occurred in all bones that were evaluated. This proof of concept encourages further development of gene therapy approaches to the treatment of osteoporosis.

  18. Effect of coadministration of moxifloxacin and rifampin on Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a murine aerosol infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, V; Solapure, S; Gaonkar, S; Mahesh Kumar, K N; Shandil, R K; Deshpande, Abhijeet; Kumar, Naveen; Vishwas, K G; Panduga, Vijender; Reddy, Jitendar; Ganguly, Samit; Louie, A; Drusano, G L

    2012-06-01

    Coadministration of moxifloxacin and rifampin was evaluated in a murine model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pulmonary infection to determine whether the finding of antagonism documented in a hollow-fiber infection model could be recapitulated in vivo. Colony counts were followed in a no-treatment control group, groups administered moxifloxacin or rifampin monotherapy, and a group administered a combination of the two agents. Following 18 days of once-daily oral administration to mice infected with M. tuberculosis, there was a reduction in the plasma exposure to rifampin that decreased further when rifampin was coadministered with moxifloxacin. Pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated a mild antagonistic interaction between moxifloxacin and rifampin with respect to cell kill in the mouse model for tuberculosis (TB). No emergence of resistance was noted over 28 days of therapy, even with monotherapy. This was true even though one of the agents in the combination (moxifloxacin) induces error-prone replication. The previously noted antagonism with respect to cell kill shown in the hollow-fiber infection model was recapitulated in the murine TB lung model, although to a lesser extent.

  19. Rapamycin enhances docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity in a androgen-independent prostate cancer xenograft model by survivin downregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yasuyuki, E-mail: yasu-m@med.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Urology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maeabshi, Gunma 3718511 (Japan); Koike, Hidekazu; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazuto; Suzuki, Kazuhiro [Department of Urology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maeabshi, Gunma 3718511 (Japan)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapamycin (RPM) enhances the susceptibility of PC3 cells to docetaxel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dosage of docetaxel (DTX) did not reduce survivin expression levels in PC3 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination treatment of RPM with DTX suppressed the expression of surviving. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiRNA against survivin enhanced the susceptibility of PC3 cells to DTX. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RPM and DTX cotreatment inhibited PC3 cell growth and decreased surviving in vivo. -- Abstract: Background: Docetaxel is a first-line treatment choice in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the management of CRPC remains an important challenge in oncology. There have been many reports on the effects of rapamycin, which is an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in the treatment of carcinogenesis. We assessed the cytotoxic effects of the combination treatment of docetaxel and rapamycin in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the relationship between these treatments and survivin, which is a member of the inhibitory apoptosis family. Methods: Prostate cancer cells were cultured and treated with docetaxel and rapamycin. The effects on proliferation were evaluated with the MTS assay. In addition, we evaluated the effect on proliferation of the combination treatment induced knockdown of survivin expression by small interfering RNA transfection and docetaxel. Protein expression levels were assayed using western blotting. PC3 cells and xenograft growth in nude mice were used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of docetaxel and its combination with rapamycin. Results: In vitro and in vivo, the combination of rapamycin with docetaxel resulted in a greater inhibition of proliferation than treatment with rapamycin or docetaxel alone. In addition, in vitro and in vivo, rapamycin decreased basal surviving levels, and cotreatment with docetaxel further decreased these levels

  20. Longitudinal evaluation of the metabolic response of a tumor xenograft model to single fraction radiation therapy using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, A. G.; Yahya, A.; Larocque, M. P.; Fallone, B. G.; Syme, A.

    2014-09-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to evaluate the metabolic profile of human glioblastoma multiform brain tumors grown as xenografts in nude mice before, and at multiple time points after single fraction radiation therapy. Tumors were grown over the thigh in 16 mice in this study, of which 5 served as untreated controls and 11 had their tumors treated to 800 cGy with 200 kVp x-rays. Spectra were acquired within 24 h pre-treatment, and then at 3, 7 and 14 d post-treatment using a 9.4 T animal magnetic resonance (MR) system. For the untreated control tumors, spectra (1-2 per mouse) were acquired at different stages of tumor growth. Spectra were obtained with the PRESS pulse sequence using a 3  ×  3 × 3 mm3 voxel. Analysis was performed with the LCModel software platform. Six metabolites were profiled for this analysis: alanine (Ala), myo-inositol (Ins), taurine (Tau), creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr + PCr), glutamine and glutamate (Glu + Gln), and total choline (glycerophosphocholine + phosphocholine) (GPC + PCh). For the treated cohort, most metabolite/water concentration ratios were found to decrease in the short term at 3 and 7 d post-treatment, followed by an increase at 14 d post-treatment toward pre-treatment values. The lowest concentrations were observed at 7 d post-treatment, with magnitudes (relative to pre-treatment concentration ratios) of: 0.42  ±  24.6% (Ala), 0.43  ±  15.3% (Ins), 0.68  ±  27.9% (Tau), 0.52  ±  14.6% (GPC+PCh), 0.49  ±  21.0% (Cr + PCr) and 0.78  ±  24.5% (Glu + Gln). Control animals did not demonstrate any significant correlation between tumor volume and metabolite concentration, indicating that the observed kinetics were the result of the therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using MRS to follow multiple metabolic markers over time for the purpose of evaluating therapeutic response of tumors to radiation therapy. This study provides

  1. A novel 99mTc-labeled molecular probe for tumor angiogenesis imaging in hepatoma xenografts model: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhao

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Visualization of tumor angiogenesis using radionuclide targeting provides important diagnostic information. In previous study, we proved that an arginine-arginine-leucine (RRL peptide should be a tumor endothelial cell specific binding sequence. The overall aim of this study was to evaluate whether (99mTc-radiolabeled RRL could be noninvasively used for imaging of malignant tumors in vivo, and act as a new molecular probe targeting tumor angiogenesis. METHODS: The RRL peptide was designed and radiosynthesized with (99mTc by a one-step method. The radiolabeling efficiency and radiochemical purity were then characterized in vitro. (99mTc-RRL was injected intravenously in HepG2 xenograft-bearing BALB/c nude mice. Biodistribution and in vivo imaging were performed periodically. The relationship between tumor size and %ID uptake of (99mTc-RRL was also explored. RESULTS: The labeling efficiencies of (99mTc-RRL reached 76.9% ± 4.5% (n = 6 within 30-60 min at room temperature, and the radiochemical purity exceeded 96% after purification. In vitro stability experiment revealed the radiolabeled peptide was stable. Biodistribution data showed that (99mTc-RRL rapidly cleared from the blood and predominantly accumulated in the kidneys and tumor. The specific uptake of (99mTc-RRL in tumor was significantly higher than that of unlabeled RRL blocking and free pertechnetate control test after injection (p<0.05. The ratio of the tumor-to-muscle exceeded 6.5, tumor-to-liver reached 1.98 and tumor-to-blood reached 1.95. In planar gamma imaging study, the tumors were imaged clearly at 2-6 h after injection of (99mTc-RRL, whereas the tumor was not imaged clearly in blocking group. The tumor-to-muscle ratio of images with (99mTc-RRL was comparable with that of (18F-FDG PET images. Immunohistochemical analysis verified the excessive vasculature of tumor. There was a linear relationship between the tumor size and uptake of (99mTc-RRL with R(2 = 0

  2. CMV infection attenuates the disease course in a murine model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Pirko

    Full Text Available Recent evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS suggests that active CMV infection may result in more benign clinical disease. The goal of this pilot study was to determine whether underlying murine CMV (MCMV infection affects the course of the Theiler's murine encephalitis virus (TMEV induced murine model of MS. A group of eight TMEV-infected mice were co-infected with MCMV at 2 weeks prior to TMEV infection while a second group of TMEV-infected mice received MCMV two weeks post TMEV. We also used 2 control groups, where at the above time points MCMV was replaced with PBS. Outcome measures included (1 monthly monitoring of disability via rotarod for 8 months; (2 in vivo MRI for brain atrophy studies and (3 FACS analysis of brain infiltrating lymphocytes at 8 months post TMEV infection. Co-infection with MCMV influenced the disease course in mice infected prior to TMEV infection. In this group, rotarod detectable motor performance was significantly improved starting 3 months post-infection and beyond (p≤0.024. In addition, their brain atrophy was close to 30% reduced at 8 months, but this was only present as a trend due to low power (p = 0.19. A significant reduction in the proportion of brain infiltrating CD3+ cells was detected in this group (p = 0.026, while the proportion of CD45+ Mac1+ cells significantly increased (p = 0.003. There was also a strong trend for a reduced proportion of CD4+ cells (p = 0.17 while CD8 and B220+ cell proportion did not change. These findings support an immunomodulatory effect of MCMV infection in this MS model. Future studies in this co-infection model will provide insight into mechanisms which modulate the development of demyelination and may be utilized for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  3. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munck, Estefanía; Palomo, Valle; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Perez, Daniel I; Gómez-Miguel, Begoña; Solas, M Teresa; Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS.

  4. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munck, Estefanía; Palomo, Valle; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Perez, Daniel I.; Gómez-Miguel, Begoña; Solas, M. Teresa; Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS. PMID:27631495

  5. Prophylactic uses of integrin CD18-βA peptide in a murine polymicrobial peritonitis model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwong-Fai; Wong; Jana; Wo; David; Ho; Ronnie; T; Poon; José; M; Casasnovas; John; M; Luk

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the prophylactic properties of integrin CD18-βA peptide in a murine model of abdominal polymicrobial peritonitis and sepsis.METHODS:Bacterial sepsis was induced in Institute of Cancer Research(ICR) mice by cecal ligation and puncture(CLP) surgery.Inflicted mice were then injected with either sterile saline or CD18-βA peptide intraperitoneally at 2 h after surgery,and were sacrificed at 12 and 24 h after surgery.Blood samples were immediately collected,and analyzed for endotoxin activity and ...

  6. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies augment bacterial clearance in a murine pneumonia model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K.; Christophersen, L.; Bjarnsholt, T.

    2016-01-01

    -P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies on bacterial eradication in a murine pneumonia model. Methods: P. aeruginosa pneumonia was established in Balb/c mice and the effects of prophylactic IgY administration on lung bacteriology, clinical parameters and subsequent inflammation were compared to controls. Results......Background: Oral prophylactic therapy by gargling with pathogen-specific egg yolk immunoglobulins (IgY) may reduce the initial airway colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. IgY antibodies impart passive immunization and we investigated the effects of anti...

  7. Efficacy of ceftobiprole Medocaril against Enterococcus faecalis in a murine urinary tract infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kavindra V; Murray, Barbara E

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated ceftobiprole against the well-characterized Enterococcus faecalis strain OG1RF (with and without the β-lactamase [Bla] plasmid pBEM10) in a murine urinary tract infection (UTI) model. Ceftobiprole was equally effective for Bla(+) and Bla(-) OG1 strains, while ampicillin was moderately to markedly (depending on the inoculum) less effective against Bla(+) than Bla(-) OG1 strains. These data illustrate an in vivo effect on ampicillin of Bla production by E. faecalis and the stability and efficacy of ceftobiprole in experimental UTI.

  8. Peginterferon Beta-1a Shows Antitumor Activity as a Single Agent and Enhances Efficacy of Standard of Care Cancer Therapeutics in Human Melanoma, Breast, Renal, and Colon Xenograft Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Antonio; Virata, Cyrus; Lindner, Daniel; English, Nicki; Pathan, Nuzhat; Brickelmaier, Margot; Hu, Xiao; Gardner, Jennifer L; Peng, Liaomin; Wang, Xinzhong; Zhang, Xiamei; Yang, Lu; Perron, Keli; Yco, Grace; Kelly, Rebecca; Gamez, James; Scripps, Thomas; Bennett, Donald; Joseph, Ingrid B; Baker, Darren P

    2017-01-01

    Because of its tumor-suppressive effect, interferon-based therapy has been used for the treatment of melanoma. However, limited data are available regarding the antitumor effects of pegylated interferons, either alone or in combination with approved anticancer drugs. We report that treatment of human WM-266-4 melanoma cells with peginterferon beta-1a induced apoptotic markers. Additionally, peginterferon beta-1a significantly inhibited the growth of human SK-MEL-1, A-375, and WM-266-4 melanoma xenografts established in immunocompromised mice. Peginterferon beta-1a regressed large, established WM-266-4 xenografts in nude mice. Treatment of SK-MEL-1 tumor-bearing mice with a combination of peginterferon beta-1a and the MEK inhibitor PD325901 ((R)-N-(2,3-dihydroxypropoxy)-3,4-difluoro-2-(2-fluoro-4-iodophenylamino)benzamide) significantly improved tumor growth inhibition compared with either agent alone. Examination of the antitumor activity of peginterferon beta-1a in combination with approved anticancer drugs in breast and renal carcinomas revealed improved antitumor activity in these preclinical xenograft models, as did the combination of peginterferon beta-1a and bevacizumab in a colon carcinoma xenograft model.

  9. Immune response to bovine pericardium implanted into α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mice: feasibility as an animal model for testing efficacy of anticalcification treatments of xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheul; Ahn, Hyuk; Kim, Soo Hwan; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Yong Jin

    2012-07-01

    Glutaraldehyde (GA)-fixed xenografts are prone to calcification after implantation in humans and there is evidence that immune reaction to the Galα1,3-Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (α-Gal) antigen may play a part in this process. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the immune response of α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (α-Gal KO) mice to bovine pericardium and to evaluate the effect of various anticalcification treatments on bovine pericardium using mouse subcutaneous implantation model. Bovine pericardial tissues were divided into eight groups according to the method of anticalcification treatments. Prepared tissues were subcutaneously implanted into the α-Gal KO and wild-type mice for 2 months, and anti-α-Gal antibodies were measured at 2 weeks and 2 months after implantation. Explanted tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry and calcium contents of the explanted tissues were measured. Titres of IgM and IgG antibodies in the α-Gal KO mice increased significantly according to the duration of implantation, whereas titres of IgM and IgG antibodies in the wild-type mice increased until 2 weeks after implantation without further increase thereafter. Titres of IgG antibodies measured at 2 months after implantation were significantly higher in the α-Gal KO mice than in the wild-type mice. Immunohistochemistry revealed macrophages surrounding the pericardial tissues irrespective of the mouse type into which the tissues implanted, whereas T-cells could only be observed in the tissues implanted into the α-Gal KO mice. Except the high-concentration GA-treated group, calcium contents of anticalcification-treated groups were all significantly lower or tended to be lower than that of the control group, irrespective of the mouse type. Calcium contents of the control group were significantly higher in the α-Gal KO mice than in the wild-type mice. Bovine pericardium implanted into the α-Gal KO mice caused significant increase in anti-α-Gal antibodies, showed

  10. Exploring the translational disconnect between the murine and human inflammatory response: analysis of LPS dose–response relationship in murine versus human cell lines and implications for translation into murine models of sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarron EP

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Eamon P McCarron,1 Dominic P Williams,1 Daniel J Antoine,1 Anja Kipar,2 Jana Lemm,3 Sebastian Stehr,3 Ingeborg D Welters,4 1Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Centre for Drug Safety Science, Institute of Translational Medicine, 2Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; 3Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany; 4Department of Obesity and Endocrinology, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK Background: Inflammation forms an important part of the human innate immune system and is largely dependent on the activation of the "classical" NF-κB pathway through Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Understanding this has allowed researchers to explore roles of therapeutic targets in managing conditions such as sepsis. Recapitulating an inflammatory response using lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a "sterile" technique, can provide information that is dissimilar to the clinical condition. By examining NF-κB activation (through immunoblotting of the p65 subunit in two separate cell lines (murine and human and analyzing two murine models of sepsis (intraperitoneal [IP] LPS and IP stool inoculation, an evaluation of the translational disconnect between experimental and clinical sepsis can be made. Methods: THP-1 (human cells and RAW 264.7 (murine cells were dosed with concentrations of LPS (human, 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL; murine, 30 pg/mL to 1,000 ng/mL and nuclear actin and p65 were immunoblotted to measure changes in nuclear density. In vivo, C57BL/6 mice received either IP injection of stool suspension (5 µL/g or LPS (25 mg/kg or saline (1 mL/kg. Animals were culled at 6 hours and tissues were analyzed. Results: An increase in basal p65:actin density in THP-1 cells (mean 0.214, standard error of the mean 0.024 was seen at doses as small as 0.1 ng/mL (0.519±0.064. In contrast to RAW 264.7 cells, basal increases (0.170±0

  11. Preliminary characterization of a murine model for 1-bromopropane neurotoxicity: Role of cytochrome P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Cai; Garner, C Edwin; Huang, Chinyen; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Lingyi; Chang, Jie; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ito, Hidenori; Kato, Masashi; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Ichihara, Sahoko; Ichihara, Gaku

    2016-09-06

    Neurotoxicity of 1-bromopropane (1-BP) has been reported in both human cases and animal studies. To date, neurotoxicity of 1-BP has been induced in rats but not in mice due to the lethal hepatotoxicity of 1-BP. Oxidization by cytochromes P450 and conjugation with glutathione (GSH) are two critical metabolism pathways of 1-BP and play important roles in toxicity of 1-BP. The aim of the present study was to establish a murine model of 1-BP neurotoxicity, by reducing the hepatotoxicity of 1-BP with 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT); a commonly used nonspecific P450s inhibitor. The results showed that subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection of 1-ABT at 50mg/kg body weight BID (100mg/kg BW/day) for 3days, inhibited about 92-96% of hepatic microsomal CYP2E1 activity, but only inhibited about 62-64% of CYP2E1 activity in brain microsomes. Mice treated with 1-ABT survived even after exposure to 1200ppm 1-BP for 4 weeks and histopathological studies showed that treatment with 1-ABT protected mice from 1-BP-induced hepatic necrosis, hepatocyte degeneration, and hemorrhage. After 4-week exposure to 1-BP, the brain weight of 1-ABT(+)/1200ppm 1-BP group was decreased significantly. In 1-ABT-treated groups, expression of hippocampal Ran protein and cerebral cortical GRP78 was dose-dependently increased by exposure to 1-BP. We conclude that the control of hepatic P450 activity allows the observation of effects of 1-BP on the murine brain at a higher concentration by reduction of hepatotoxicity. The study suggests that further experiments with liver-specific control of P450 activity using gene technology might provide better murine models for 1-bromopropane-induced neurotoxicity.

  12. The resistance of delayed xenograft rejection to alpha(1,3)-galactosyltransferase gene inactivation and CD4 depletion in a mouse-to-rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Alastair B; Kirkeby, Svend; Aasted, Bent

    2003-01-01

    Critical to the prevention of xenograft loss is the prevention of delayed xenograft rejection (DXR), due to its resistance to conventional immunosuppression. The role of the carbohydrate galactose-alpha1,3-galactose (alpha1,3Gal) has been a matter of great debate and it has been proposed that the......Critical to the prevention of xenograft loss is the prevention of delayed xenograft rejection (DXR), due to its resistance to conventional immunosuppression. The role of the carbohydrate galactose-alpha1,3-galactose (alpha1,3Gal) has been a matter of great debate and it has been proposed...... by ELISA. All recipients developed DXR with no differences among the groups. DXR was related to thrombosis with IgG and IgM desposition in vessel walls, as well as macrophage and granulocyte accumulation in the myocardium. No complement C3, CD4 cells or NK cells were found. Flow cytometric analysis...

  13. Ube3a reinstatement identifies distinct developmental windows in a murine Angelman syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santos, Sara; van Woerden, Geeske M; Bruinsma, Caroline F; Mientjes, Edwin; Jolfaei, Mehrnoush Aghadavoud; Distel, Ben; Kushner, Steven A; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-05-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that results from loss of function of the maternal ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) allele. Due to neuron-specific imprinting, the paternal UBE3A copy is silenced. Previous studies in murine models have demonstrated that strategies to activate the paternal Ube3a allele are feasible; however, a recent study showed that pharmacological Ube3a gene reactivation in adulthood failed to rescue the majority of neurocognitive phenotypes in a murine AS model. Here, we performed a systematic study to investigate the possibility that neurocognitive rescue can be achieved by reinstating Ube3a during earlier neurodevelopmental windows. We developed an AS model that allows for temporally controlled Cre-dependent induction of the maternal Ube3a allele and determined that there are distinct neurodevelopmental windows during which Ube3a restoration can rescue AS-relevant phenotypes. Motor deficits were rescued by Ube3a reinstatement in adolescent mice, whereas anxiety, repetitive behavior, and epilepsy were only rescued when Ube3a was reinstated during early development. In contrast, hippocampal synaptic plasticity could be restored at any age. Together, these findings suggest that Ube3a reinstatement early in development may be necessary to prevent or rescue most AS-associated phenotypes and should be considered in future clinical trial design.

  14. Shigella mediated depletion of macrophages in a murine breast cancer model is associated with tumor regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Galmbacher

    Full Text Available A tumor promoting role of macrophages has been described for a transgenic murine breast cancer model. In this model tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent a major component of the leukocytic infiltrate and are associated with tumor progression. Shigella flexneri is a bacterial pathogen known to specificly induce apotosis in macrophages. To evaluate whether Shigella-induced removal of macrophages may be sufficient for achieving tumor regression we have developed an attenuated strain of S. flexneri (M90TDeltaaroA and infected tumor bearing mice. Two mouse models were employed, xenotransplantation of a murine breast cancer cell line and spontanous breast cancer development in MMTV-HER2 transgenic mice. Quantitative analysis of bacterial tumor targeting demonstrated that attenuated, invasive Shigella flexneri primarily infected TAMs after systemic administration. A single i.v. injection of invasive M90TDeltaaroA resulted in caspase-1 dependent apoptosis of TAMs followed by a 74% reduction in tumors of transgenic MMTV-HER-2 mice 7 days post infection. TAM depletion was sustained and associated with complete tumor regression.These data support TAMs as useful targets for antitumor therapy and highlight attenuated bacterial pathogens as potential tools.

  15. Dendritic cell-based vaccination in cancer: therapeutic implications emerging from murine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad eMac Keon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel T there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts towards an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment.

  16. Diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction in a murine model of pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumsoo Ahn

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH causes loss of body weight and inspiratory (diaphragm muscle dysfunction. A model of PH induced by drug (monocrotaline, MCT has been extensively used in mice to examine the etiology of PH. However, it is unclear if PH induced by MCT in mice reproduces the loss of body weight and diaphragm muscle dysfunction seen in patients. This is a pre-requisite for widespread use of mice to examine mechanisms of cachexia and diaphragm abnormalities in PH. Thus, we measured body and soleus muscle weight, food intake, and diaphragm contractile properties in mice after 6-8 weeks of saline (control or MCT (600 mg/kg injections. Body weight progressively decreased in PH mice, while food intake was similar in both groups. PH decreased (P<0.05 diaphragm maximal isometric specific force, maximal shortening velocity, and peak power. Protein carbonyls in whole-diaphragm lysates and the abundance of select myofibrillar proteins were unchanged by PH. Our findings show diaphragm isometric and isotonic contractile abnormalities in a murine model of PH induced by MCT. Overall, the murine model of PH elicited by MCT mimics loss of body weight and diaphragm muscle weakness reported in PH patients.

  17. Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccination in Cancer: Therapeutic Implications Emerging from Murine Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Keon, Soledad; Ruiz, María Sol; Gazzaniga, Silvina; Wainstok, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel-T), there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts toward an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment. PMID:26042126

  18. Murine Model Imitating Chronic Wound Infections for Evaluation of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fila, Grzegorz; Kasimova, Kamola; Arenas, Yaxal; Nakonieczna, Joanna; Grinholc, Mariusz; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Lilge, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the age of antibiotics could come to an end, due to their widespread, and inappropriate use. Particularly for chronic wounds alternatives are being thought. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (APDT) is a potential candidate, and while approved for some indications, such as periodontitis, chronic sinusitis and other niche indications, its use in chronic wounds is not established. To further facilitate the development of APDT in chronic wounds we present an easy to use animal model exhibiting the key hallmarks of chronic wounds, based on full-thickness skin wounds paired with an optically transparent cover. The moisture-retaining wound exhibited rapid expansion of pathogen colonies up to 8 days while not jeopardizing the host survival. Use of two bioluminescent pathogens; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa permits real time monitoring of the pathogens. The murine model was employed to evaluate the performance of four different photosensitizers as mediators in Photodynamic Therapy. While all four photosensitizers, Rose Bengal, porphyrin TMPyP, New Methylene Blue, and TLD1411 demonstrated good to excellent antimicrobial efficacy in planktonic solutions at 1 to 50 μM concentrations, whereas in in vivo the growth delay was limited with 24–48 h delay in pathogen expansion for MRSA, and we noticed longer growth suppression of P. aeruginosa with TLD1411 mediated Photodynamic Therapy. The murine model will enable developing new strategies for enhancement of APDT for chronic wound infections. PMID:27555843

  19. Safety and antidiarrheal activity of Priva adhaerens aqueous leaf extract in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nansunga, Miriam; Barasa, Ambrose; Abimana, Justus; Alele, Paul E.; Kasolo, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Priva adhaerens (Forssk.) Chiov., a wildly growing plant, is reported in central Uganda to be an effective traditional remedy for diarrhea. The objective of this study was to provide a scientific basis for the ethnopharmacological utility of this plant whose aqueous leaf and shoot extract was evaluated for acute toxicity and antidiarrheal activity using a murine model. Materials and methods Acute toxicity of the aqueous leaf and shoot extract was assessed after determining the major phytochemicals present in the extract. The aqueous leaf and shoot extract was assayed against castor oil-induced diarrhea, transit time, and enteropooling, in comparison to loperamide, a standard drug. Results The oral LD50 value obtained for Priva adhaerens aqueous extract was greater than 5000 mg/kg in rats; the aqueous leaf and shoot extract possessed several important phytochemicals. Furthermore, the aqueous extract significantly, and dose-dependently, reduced frequency of stooling in castor oil-induced diarrhea, intestinal motility, and castor oil-induced enteropooling in rats. Conclusion This murine model shows that it is relatively safe to orally use the aqueous leaf and shoot extract of Priva adhaerens . The aqueous extract contains phytochemicals that are active for the treatment of diarrhea in a rat model. PMID:25304198

  20. Antitumor effect of FGFR inhibitors on a novel cholangiocarcinoma patient derived xenograft mouse model endogenously expressing an FGFR2-CCDC6 fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Ding, Xiwei; Wang, Shaoqing; Moser, Catherine D; Shaleh, Hassan M; Mohamed, Essa A; Chaiteerakij, Roongruedee; Allotey, Loretta K; Chen, Gang; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; McNulty, Melissa S; Ndzengue, Albert; Barr Fritcher, Emily G; Knudson, Ryan A; Greipp, Patricia T; Clark, Karl J; Torbenson, Michael S; Kipp, Benjamin R; Zhou, Jie; Barrett, Michael T; Gustafson, Michael P; Alberts, Steven R; Borad, Mitesh J; Roberts, Lewis R

    2016-09-28

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a highly lethal cancer with limited therapeutic options. Recent genomic analysis of cholangiocarcinoma has revealed the presence of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) fusion proteins in up to 13% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA). FGFR fusions have been identified as a novel oncogenic and druggable target in a number of cancers. In this study, we established a novel cholangiocarcinoma patient derived xenograft (PDX) mouse model bearing an FGFR2-CCDC6 fusion protein from a metastatic lung nodule of an iCCA patient. Using this PDX model, we confirmed the ability of the FGFR inhibitors, ponatinib, dovitinib and BGJ398, to modulate FGFR signaling, inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis in cholangiocarcinoma tumors harboring FGFR2 fusions. In addition, BGJ398 appeared to be superior in potency to ponatinib and dovitinib in this model. Our findings provide a strong rationale for the investigation of FGFR inhibitors, particularly BGJ398, as a therapeutic option for cholangiocarcinoma patients harboring FGFR2 fusions.

  1. Immunotherapeutic targeting of shared melanoma-associated antigens in a murine glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Robert M; Odesa, Sylvia K; Liau, Linda M

    2003-12-01

    Immune-based treatments for central nervous system gliomas have traditionally lagged behind those of more immunogenic tumors such as melanoma. The relative paucity of defined glioma-associated antigens that can be targeted by the immune system may partially account for this situation. Antigens present on melanomas have been extensively characterized, both in humans and in murine preclinical models. Melanocytes and astrocytes are both derived embryologically from the neural ectoderm. Their neoplastic counterparts, malignant melanomas and gliomas, have been shown in humans to share common antigens at the RNA level. However, little is known concerning whether gliomas can be targeted by immune-based strategies that prime T cells to epitopes from melanoma-associated antigens (MAAs). In this study, we provide evidence that two common murine glioma cell lines (GL26 and GL261) express the melanoma antigens gp100 and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2). To understand the immunogenicity of murine gliomas to CD8(+) T cells, we examined the ability of a MAA-specific CTL cell line to lyse the glioma cells, as well as the in vivo expansion of MAA-specific CD8(+) T cells in animals harboring gliomas. Both glioma cell lines were lysed by a human gp100-specific CTL cell line in vitro. Mice harboring s.c. GL26 gliomas possessed TRP-2-specific CD8(+) T cells, providing further evidence that these gliomas express the protein products in the context of MHC class I. Furthermore, MAA peptide-pulsed dendritic cells could prime T cells that specifically recognize GL26 glioma cells in vitro. Lastly, mice that were prevaccinated with human gp100 and TRP-2 peptide-pulsed dendritic cells had significantly extended survival when challenged with tumor cells in the brain, resulting in >50% long-term survival. These results suggest that shared MAAs on gliomas can be targeted immunotherapeutically, pointing the way to a new potential treatment option for patients with malignant gliomas.

  2. Multivariate modelling with 1H NMR of pleural effusion in murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Soumita

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral malaria is a clinical manifestation of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Although brain damage is the predominant pathophysiological complication of cerebral malaria (CM, respiratory distress, acute lung injury, hydrothorax/pleural effusion are also observed in several cases. Immunological parameters have been assessed in pleural fluid in murine models; however there are no reports of characterization of metabolites present in pleural effusion. Methods 1H NMR of the sera and the pleural effusion of cerebral malaria infected mice were analyzed using principal component analysis, orthogonal partial least square analysis, multiway principal component analysis, and multivariate curve resolution. Results It has been observed that there was 100% occurrence of pleural effusion (PE in the mice affected with CM, as opposed to those are non-cerebral and succumbing to hyperparasitaemia (NCM/HP. An analysis of 1H NMR and SDS-PAGE profile of PE and serum samples of each of the CM mice exhibited a similar profile in terms of constituents. Multivariate analysis on these two classes of biofluids was performed and significant differences were detected in concentrations of metabolites. Glucose, creatine and glutamine contents were high in the PE and lipids being high in the sera. Multivariate curve resolution between sera and pleural effusion showed that changes in PE co-varied with that of serum in CM mice. The increase of glucose in PE is negatively correlated to the glucose in serum in CM as obtained from the result of multiway principal component analysis. Conclusions This study reports for the first time, the characterization of metabolites in pleural effusion formed during murine cerebral malaria. The study indicates that the origin of PE metabolites in murine CM may be the serum. The loss of the components like glucose, glutamine and creatine into the PE may worsen the situation of patients, in conjunction with the enhanced

  3. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Weibin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Meiling, E-mail: meilingzhou2012@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Jia, Dongwei, E-mail: jiadongwei@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  4. Oral treatment with Bifidobacterium longum 51A reduced inflammation in a murine experimental model of gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, A T; Galvão, I; Amaral, F A; Teixeira, M M; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an acute inflammatory disease characterised by the presence of uric acid crystals in the joint. This event promotes neutrophil infiltration and activation that leads to tissue damage. We investigated here whether the oral administration of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum 5(1A) (BL) could ameliorate monosodium urate crystal (MSU)-induced inflammation in a murine model of gout. Mice received oral administration of BL or saline daily for 7 days and then were injected with MSU in the knee cavity. Treatment with BL significantly alleviated the inflammatory parameters, as seen by reduced hypernociception, reduced neutrophil accumulation in the joint and myeloperoxidase activity in periarticular tissue. There was inhibition of the production of CXCL1 and interleukin(IL)-1β in joints. Levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were significantly higher in the knee tissue of mice treated with than control mice injected with MSU. In conclusion, oral BL treatment reduced the inflammatory response in an experimental murine model of gout, suggesting it may be useful as an adjuvant treatment in patients with gout.

  5. In vivo measurement of epidermal thickness changes associated with tumor promotion in murine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Samatham, Ravikant; Choudhury, Niloy; Gladish, James C.; Thuillier, Philippe; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-07-01

    The characterization of tissue morphology in murine models of pathogenesis has traditionally been carried out by excision of affected tissues with subsequent immunohistological examination. Excision-based histology provides a limited two-dimensional presentation of tissue morphology at the cost of halting disease progression at a single time point and sacrifice of the animal. We investigate the use of noninvasive reflectance mode confocal scanning laser microscopy (rCSLM) as an alternative tool to biopsy in documenting epidermal hyperplasia in murine models exposed to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). An automated technique utilizing average axial rCSLM reflectance profiles is used to extract epidermal thickness values from rCSLM data cubes. In comparisons to epidermal thicknesses determined from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections, we find no significant correlation to rCSLM-derived thickness values. This results from method-specific artifacts: physical alterations of tissue during H&E preparation in standard histology and specimen-induced abberations in rCSLM imaging. Despite their disagreement, both histology and rCSLM methods reliably measure statistically significant thickness changes in response to TPA exposure. Our results demonstrate that in vivo rCSLM imaging provides epithelial biologists an accurate noninvasive means to monitor cutaneous pathogenesis.

  6. Oroxylin A Inhibits Allergic Airway Inflammation in Ovalbumin (OVA)-Induced Asthma Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, De-Gang; Diao, Bao-Zhong; Zhou, Wen; Feng, Jia-Long

    2016-04-01

    Oroxylin A, a natural flavonoid isolated from the medicinal herb Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanism of oroxylin A on allergic inflammation in OVA-induced asthma murine model. BABL/c mice were sensitized and airway-challenged with OVA to induce asthma. Oroxylin A (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 1 h before the OVA treatment on day 21 to 23. The results showed that oroxylin A attenuated OVA-induced lung histopathologic changes, airway hyperresponsiveness, and the number of inflammatory cells. Oroxylin A also inhibited the levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and OVA-specific IgE in BALF. Furthermore, oroxylin A significantly inhibited OVA-induced NF-κB activation. In conclusion, these results suggested that oroxylin A inhibited airway inflammation in OVA-induced asthma murine model by inhibiting NF-κB activation. These results suggested that oroxylin A was a potential therapeutic drug for treating allergic asthma.

  7. Murine model of disseminated fusariosis: evaluation of the fungal burden by traditional CFU and quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gloria M; Márquez, Jazmín; Treviño-Rangel, Rogelio de J; Palma-Nicolás, José P; Garza-González, Elvira; Ceceñas, Luis A; Gerardo González, J

    2013-10-01

    Systemic disease is the most severe clinical form of fusariosis, and the treatment involves a challenge due to the refractory response to antifungals. Treatment for murine Fusarium solani infection has been described in models that employ CFU quantitation in organs as a parameter of therapeutic efficacy. However, CFU counts do not precisely reproduce the amount of cells for filamentous fungi such as F. solani. In this study, we developed a murine model of disseminated fusariosis and compared the fungal burden with two methods: CFU and quantitative PCR. ICR and BALB/c mice received an intravenous injection of 1 × 10(7) conidia of F. solani per mouse. On days 2, 5, 7, and 9, mice from each mice strain were killed. The spleen and kidneys of each animal were removed and evaluated by qPCR and CFU determinations. Results from CFU assay indicated that the spleen and kidneys had almost the same fungal burden in both BALB/c and ICR mice during the days of the evaluation. In the qPCR assay, the spleen and kidney of each mouse strain had increased fungal burden in each determination throughout the entire experiment. The fungal load determined by the qPCR assay was significantly greater than that determined from CFU measurements of tissue. qPCR could be considered as a tool for quantitative evaluation of fungal burden in experimental disseminated F. solani infection.

  8. Cell therapy in the treatment of bronchiolitis obliterans in a murine model

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    Julio de Oliveira Espinel

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of stem cells derived from adipose tissue in reducing graft inflammation in a murine model of allogeneic heterotopic tracheal transplant.METHODS: We performed a heterotopic tracheal allografting in dorsal subcutaneous pouch and systemically injected 5x105 mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue. The animals were divided into two groups according to the time of sacrifice: T7 and T21. We also carried out histological analysis and digital morphometry.RESULTS: The T7 animals treated with cell therapy had median obstructed graft area of 0 versus 0.54 of controls (p = 0.635. The treated T21 subjects had median obstructed graft area of 0.25 versus 0 in controls (p = 0.041.CONCLUSION: The systemically injected cell therapy in experimental murine model of bronchiolitis obliterans did not reduce the severity of the allograft inflammation in a statistically significant way in seven days; Conversely, in 21 days, it increased the allograft inflammatory process.

  9. Mechanism-based model of parasite growth and dihydroartemisinin pharmacodynamics in murine malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kashyap; Batty, Kevin T; Moore, Brioni R; Gibbons, Peter L; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Kirkpatrick, Carl M

    2013-01-01

    Murine models are used to study erythrocytic stages of malaria infection, because parasite morphology and development are comparable to those in human malaria infections. Mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) models for antimalarials are scarce, despite their potential to optimize antimalarial combination therapy. The aim of this study was to develop a mechanism-based growth model (MBGM) for Plasmodium berghei and then characterize the parasiticidal effect of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) in murine malaria (MBGM-PK-PD). Stage-specific (ring, early trophozoite, late trophozoite, and schizont) parasite density data from Swiss mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei were used for model development in S-ADAPT. A single dose of intraperitoneal DHA (10 to 100 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered 56 h postinoculation. The MBGM explicitly reflected all four erythrocytic stages of the 24-hour P. berghei life cycle. Merozoite invasion of erythrocytes was described by a first-order process that declined with increasing parasitemia. An efflux pathway with subsequent return was additionally required to describe the schizont data, thus representing parasite sequestration or trapping in the microvasculature, with a return to circulation. A 1-compartment model with zero-order absorption described the PK of DHA, with an estimated clearance and distribution volume of 1.95 liters h(-1) and 0.851 liter, respectively. Parasite killing was described by a turnover model, with DHA inhibiting the production of physiological intermediates (IC(50), 1.46 ng/ml). Overall, the MBGM-PK-PD described the rise in parasitemia, the nadir following DHA dosing, and subsequent parasite resurgence. This novel model is a promising tool for studying malaria infections, identifying the stage specificity of antimalarials, and providing insight into antimalarial treatment strategies.

  10. An In Vitro Murine Model of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelynack, Kristen J; Holt, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is seen ubiquitously in aging blood vessels and prematurely in disease states like renal failure. It is thought to be driven by a number of systemic and local factors that lead to extra-osseous deposition of mineral in the vascular wall and valves as a common endpoint. The response of resident vascular smooth muscle cell to these dystrophic signals appears to be important in this process. Whilst in vivo models allow the observation of global changes in a pro-calcific environment, identifying the specific cells and mechanisms involved has been largely garnered from in vitro experiments, which provide added benefits in terms of reproducibility, cost, and convenience. Here we describe a 7-21 day cell culture model of calcification developed using immortalized murine vascular smooth muscle cells (MOVAS-1). This model provides a method by which vascular smooth muscle cell involvement and manipulation within a mineralizing domain can be studied.

  11. Detection of Talaromyces marneffei from Fresh Tissue of an Inhalational Murine Pulmonary Model Using Nested PCR.

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    Yinghui Liu

    Full Text Available Penicilliosis marneffei, often consecutive to the aspiration of Talaromyces marneffei (Penicillium marneffei, continues to be one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients in endemic regions such as Southeast Asia. Improving the accuracy of diagnosing this disease would aid in reducing the mortality of associated infections. In this study, we developed a stable and reproducible murine pulmonary model that mimics human penicilliosis marneffei using a nebulizer to deliver Talaromyces marneffei (SUMS0152 conidia to the lungs of BALB/c nude mice housed in exposure chamber. Using this model, we further revealed that nested PCR was sensitive and specific for detecting Talaromyces marneffei in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and fresh tissues. This inhalation model may provide a more representative analysis tool for studying the development of penicilliosis marneffei, in addition to revealing that nested PCR has a predictive value in reflecting pulmonary infection.

  12. Experimental parameters differentially affect the humoral response of the cholera-toxin-based murine model of food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroghsbo, S.; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have developed a murine model of IgE-mediated food allergy based on oral coadministration of antigen and cholera toxin (CT) to establish a maximal response for studying immunopathogenic mechanisms and immunotherapeutic strategies. However, for studying subtle immunomodu......Background: Recent studies have developed a murine model of IgE-mediated food allergy based on oral coadministration of antigen and cholera toxin (CT) to establish a maximal response for studying immunopathogenic mechanisms and immunotherapeutic strategies. However, for studying subtle...

  13. Enhanced transmission of malaria parasites to mosquitoes in a murine model of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpour, Nazzy; Cheung, Kong Wai; Luckhart, Shirley

    2016-04-21

    More than half of the world's population is at risk of malaria and simultaneously, many malaria-endemic regions are facing dramatic increases in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Studies in murine malaria models have examined the impact of malaria infection on type 2 diabetes pathology, it remains unclear how this chronic metabolic disorder impacts the transmission of malaria. In this report, the ability type 2 diabetic rodents infected with malaria to transmit parasites to Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes is quantified. The infection prevalence and intensity of An. stephensi mosquitoes that fed upon control or type 2 diabetic C57BL/6 db/db mice infected with either lethal Plasmodium berghei NK65 or non-lethal Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL murine malaria strains were determined. Daily parasitaemias were also recorded. A higher percentage of mosquitoes (87.5 vs 61.5 % for P. yoelii and 76.9 vs 50 % for P. berghei) became infected following blood feeding on Plasmodium-infected type 2 diabetic mice compared to mosquitoes that fed on infected control animals, despite no significant differences in circulating gametocyte levels. These results suggest that type 2 diabetic mice infected with malaria are more efficient at infecting mosquitoes, raising the question of whether a similar synergy exists in humans.

  14. Approaching Biomarkers of Membranous Nephropathy from a Murine Model to Human Disease

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    Chia-Chao Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Membranous glomerulonephropathy (MN is the most prevalent cause of nephrotic syndrome in adult humans. However, the specific biomarkers of MN have not been fully elucidated. We examined the alterations in gene expression associated with the development of MN. Methods. Murine MN was induced by cationic bovine serum albumin (cBSA. After full-blown MN, cDNA microarray analysis was performed to identify gene expression changes, and highly expressed genes were evaluated as markers both in mice and human kidney samples. Results. MN mice revealed clinical proteinuria and the characteristic diffuse thickening of the glomerular basement membrane. There were 175 genes with significantly different expressions in the MN kidneys compared with the normal kidneys. Four genes, metallothionein-1 (Mt1, cathepsin D (CtsD, lymphocyte 6 antigen complex (Ly6, and laminin receptor-1 (Lamr1, were chosen and quantified. Mt1 was detected mainly in tubules, Lamr1 was highly expressed in glomeruli, and CtsD was detected both in tubules and glomeruli. The high expressions of Lamr1 and CtsD were also confirmed in human kidney biopsies. Conclusion. The murine MN model resembled the clinical and pathological features of human MN and may provide a tool for investigating MN. Applying cDNA microarray analysis may help to identify biomarkers for human MN.

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of posaconazole against Candida glabrata in a murine model of vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gloria M; Elizondo, Mariana; Garza-González, Elvira; González, J Gerardo

    2011-03-01

    The frequency of mucosal infections caused by Candida glabrata has increased significantly. Candida glabrata infections are often resistant to many azole antifungal agents, especially fluconazole. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacies of posaconazole (PSC) and fluconazole (FLC) in the treatment of experimental C. glabrata vaginitis caused by isolates with different FLC susceptibilities. A battery of 36 vaginal isolates of C. glabrata was tested against PSC and FLC to determine their in vitro susceptibilities. The 48-h geometric mean MICs for all isolates tested were 0.156 and 4.238 μg ml(-1) for PSC and FLC respectively. Two strains of C. glabrata for which FLC MICs were different were selected for in vivo study. The treatment regimens for the vaginal murine infection model were PSC or FLC at 10 or 20 mg kg(-1) of body weight/day and 20 mg kg(-1) twice a day. Regimens with PSC at 20 mg kg(-1) once or twice a day were effective in reducing the load of both the FLC-susceptible and -resistant isolates of C. glabrata. FLC at 20 mg kg(-1) twice a day was effective in reducing the load of both the isolates of C. glabrata. PSC displayed a more effective in vivo activity than FLC in the treatment of murine C. glabrata vaginitis. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Resveratrol inhibits mucus overproduction and MUC5AC expression in a murine model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhen-Hua; Tang, Ji-Hong; Chen, Guo; Lai, Yi-Min; Chen, Qing-Ge; Li, Zao; Yang, Wei; Luo, Xu-Min; Wang, Xiong-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that resveratrol is able to significantly inhibit the upregulation of mucin 5AC (MUC5AC), a major component of mucus; thus indicating that resveratrol may have potential in regulating mucus overproduction. However, there have been few studies regarding the resveratrol‑mediated prevention of MUC5AC overproduction in vivo, and the mechanisms by which resveratrol regulates MUC5AC expression have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, an ovalbumin (OVA)‑challenged murine model of asthma was used to assess the effects of resveratrol treatment on mucus production in vivo. The results demonstrated that resveratrol significantly inhibited OVA‑induced airway inflammation and mucus production. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression levels of MUC5AC were increased in the OVA‑challenged mice, whereas treatment with resveratrol significantly inhibited this effect. The expression levels of murine calcium‑activated chloride channel (mCLCA)3, an important key mediator of MUC5AC production, were also reduced following resveratrol treatment. Furthermore, in vitro studies demonstrated that resveratrol significantly inhibited human (h)CLCA1 and MUC5AC expression in a dose‑dependent manner. These results indicated that resveratrol was effective in preventing mucus overproduction and MUC5AC expression in vivo, and its underlying mechanism may be associated with regulation of the mCLCA3/hCLCA1 signaling pathway.

  17. Development of a preclinical orthotopic xenograft model of ewing sarcoma and other human malignant bone disease using advanced in vivo imaging.

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    Britta Vormoor

    Full Text Available Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma represent the two most common primary bone tumours in childhood and adolescence, with bone metastases being the most adverse prognostic factor. In prostate cancer, osseous metastasis poses a major clinical challenge. We developed a preclinical orthotopic model of Ewing sarcoma, reflecting the biology of the tumour-bone interactions in human disease and allowing in vivo monitoring of disease progression, and compared this with models of osteosarcoma and prostate carcinoma. Human tumour cell lines were transplanted into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NSG and Rag2(-/-/γc(-/- mice by intrafemoral injection. For Ewing sarcoma, minimal cell numbers (1000-5000 injected in small volumes were able to induce orthotopic tumour growth. Tumour progression was studied using positron emission tomography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and bioluminescent imaging. Tumours and their interactions with bones were examined by histology. Each tumour induced bone destruction and outgrowth of extramedullary tumour masses, together with characteristic changes in bone that were well visualised by computed tomography, which correlated with post-mortem histology. Ewing sarcoma and, to a lesser extent, osteosarcoma cells induced prominent reactive new bone formation. Osteosarcoma cells produced osteoid and mineralised "malignant" bone within the tumour mass itself. Injection of prostate carcinoma cells led to osteoclast-driven osteolytic lesions. Bioluminescent imaging of Ewing sarcoma xenografts allowed easy and rapid monitoring of tumour growth and detection of tumour dissemination to lungs, liver and bone. Magnetic resonance imaging proved useful for monitoring soft tissue tumour growth and volume. Positron emission tomography proved to be of limited use in this model. Overall, we have developed an orthotopic in vivo model for Ewing sarcoma and other primary and secondary human bone malignancies, which

  18. Suppression of tumor growth in lung cancer xenograft model mice by poly(sorbitol-co-PEI)-mediated delivery of osteopontin siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Young; Hong, Seong-Ho; Singh, Bijay; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Lee, Somin; Lee, Ah Young; Gankhuyag, Nomundelger; Kim, Ji-Eun; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Park, Young-Chan; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-08-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a promising strategy for treating diseases such as cancer; however, specific gene silencing requires an effective delivery system to overcome the instability and low transfection efficiency of siRNAs. To address this issue, a polysorbitol-based transporter (PSOT) was prepared by low molecular weight branched polyethylenimine (bPEI) crosslinked with sorbitol diacrylate (SDA). Osteopontin (OPN) gene, which is highly associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was targeted by siRNA therapy using siRNA targeting OPN (siOPN). Characterization study confirmed that PSOT formed compact complexes with siOPN and protected siOPN against degradation by RNase. PSOT/siOPN complexes demonstrated low cytotoxicity and enhanced transfection efficiency in vitro, suggesting that this carrier may be suitable for gene silencing. In the A549 and H460 lung cancer cell lines, PSOT/siOPN complexes demonstrated significant silencing efficiency at both RNA and protein levels. To study in vivo tumor growth suppression, two lung cancer cell-xenograft mouse models were prepared and PSOT/siOPN complexes were delivered into the mice through intravenous injection. The siOPN-treated groups demonstrated significantly reduced OPN expression at both the RNA and protein levels as well as suppression of tumor volume and weight. Taken together, siOPN delivery using PSOT may present an effective and novel therapeutic system for lung cancer treatment.

  19. Garlic extract in bladder cancer prevention: Evidence from T24 bladder cancer cell xenograft model, tissue microarray, and gene network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Tae; Seo, Sung-Pil; Byun, Young Joon; Kang, Ho-Won; Kim, Yong-June; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Jeong, Pildu; Seo, Yoonhee; Choe, Soo Young; Kim, Dong-Joon; Kim, Seon-Kyu; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Choi, Yung-Hyun; Lee, Geun Taek; Kim, Isaac Yi; Yun, Seok Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2017-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of naturally occurring agents in cancer prevention. This study investigated the garlic extract affects in bladder cancer (BC) prevention. The effect of garlic extract in cancer prevention was evaluated using the T24 BC BALB/C-nude mouse xenograft model. Microarray analysis of tissues was performed to identify differences in gene expression between garlic extract intake and control diet, and gene network analysis was performed to assess candidate mechanisms of action. Furthermore, we investigated the expression value of selected genes in the data of 165 BC patients. Compared to the control group, significant differences in tumor volume and tumor weight were observed in the groups fed 20 mg/kg (p2 and ptissue microarray analysis. A gene network analysis of 279 of these genes (p<0.01) was performed using Cytoscape/ClueGo software: 36 genes and 37 gene ontologies were mapped to gene networks. Protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway including AKAP12, RDX, and RAB13 genes were identified as potential mechanisms for the activity of garlic extract in cancer prevention. In BC patients, AKAP12 and RDX were decreased but, RAB13 was increased. Oral garlic extract has strong cancer prevention activity in vivo and an acceptable safety profile. PKA signaling process, especially increasing AKAP12 and RDX and decreasing RAB13, are candidate pathways that may mediate this prevention effect.

  20. C7a, a Biphosphinic Cyclopalladated Compound, Efficiently Controls the Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Adult T Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Figueiredo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is a highly aggressive disease that occurs in individuals infected with the human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1. Patients with aggressive ATLL have a poor prognosis because the leukemic cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. We have investigated the therapeutic efficacy of a biphosphinic cyclopalladated complex {Pd2 [S(−C2, N-dmpa]2 (μ-dppeCl2}, termed C7a, in a patient-derived xenograft model of ATLL, and investigated the mechanism of C7a action in HTLV-1-positive and negative transformed T cell lines in vitro. In vivo survival studies in immunocompromised mice inoculated with human RV-ATL cells and intraperitoneally treated with C7a led to significantly increased survival of the treated mice. We investigated the mechanism of C7a activity in vitro and found that it induced mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, caspase activation, nuclear condensation and DNA degradation. These results suggest that C7a triggers apoptotic cell death in both HTLV-1 infected and uninfected human transformed T-cell lines. Significantly, C7a was not cytotoxic to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy donors and HTLV-1-infected individuals. C7a inhibited more than 60% of the ex vivo spontaneous proliferation of PBMC from HTLV-1-infected individuals. These results support a potential therapeutic role for C7a in both ATLL and HTLV-1-negative T-cell lymphomas.

  1. Autophagy induction by leptin contributes to suppression of apoptosis in cancer cells and xenograft model: involvement of p53/FoxO3A axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Saroj; Kim, Mi Jin; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Sang Hyun; Sohn, Dong-Hwan; Lee, Sung Hee; Song, Kyung; Choi, Dong Young; Lee, Eung Seok; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2015-03-30

    Leptin, a hormone mainly produced from adipose tissue, has been shown to induce proliferation of cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying leptin-induced tumor progression have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of autophagy in leptin-induced cancer cell proliferation using human hepatoma (HepG2) and breast cancer cells (MCF-7), and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Herein, we showed that leptin treatment caused autophagy induction as assessed by increase in expression of autophagy-related genes, including beclin-1, Atg5 and LC3 II, further induction of autophagosome formation and autophagic flux. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagic process by treatment with inhibitors and LC3B gene silencing blocked leptin-induced increase in cell number and suppression of apoptosis, indicating a crucial role of autophagy in leptin-induced tumor progression. Moreover, gene silencing of p53 or FoxO3A prevented leptin-induced LC3 II protein expression, suggesting an involvement of p53/FoxO3A axis in leptin-induced autophagy activation. Leptin administration also accelerated tumor growth in BALB/c nude mice, which was found to be autophagy dependent. Taken together, our results demonstrate that leptin-induced tumor growth is mediated by autophagy induction and autophagic process would be a promising target to regulate development of cancer caused by leptin production.

  2. Systemic siRNA Delivery via Peptide-Tagged Polymeric Nanoparticles, Targeting PLK1 Gene in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Malhotra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric nanoparticles were developed from a series of chemical reactions using chitosan, polyethylene glycol, and a cell-targeting peptide (CP15. The nanoparticles were complexed with PLK1-siRNA. The optimal siRNA loading was achieved at an N : P ratio of 129.2 yielding a nanoparticle size of >200 nm. These nanoparticles were delivered intraperitoneally and tested for efficient delivery, cytotoxicity, and biodistribution in a mouse xenograft model of colorectal cancer. Both unmodified and modified chitosan nanoparticles showed enhanced accumulation at the tumor site. However, the modified chitosan nanoparticles showed considerably, less distribution in other organs. The relative gene expression as evaluated showed efficient delivery of PLK1-siRNA (0.5 mg/kg with 50.7±19.5% knockdown (P=0.031 of PLK1 gene. The in vivo data reveals no systemic toxicity in the animals, when tested for systemic inflammation and liver toxicity. These results indicate a potential of using peptide-tagged nanoparticles for systemic delivery of siRNA at the targeted tumor site.

  3. Autophagy induction by leptin contributes to suppression of apoptosis in cancer cells and xenograft model: Involvement of p53/FoxO3A axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Saroj; Kim, Mi Jin; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Sang Hyun; Sohn, Dong-Hwan; Lee, Sung Hee; Song, Kyung; Choi, Dong Young; Lee, Eung Seok; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Leptin, a hormone mainly produced from adipose tissue, has been shown to induce proliferation of cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying leptin-induced tumor progression have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of autophagy in leptin-induced cancer cell proliferation using human hepatoma (HepG2) and breast cancer cells (MCF-7), and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Herein, we showed that leptin treatment caused autophagy induction as assessed by increase in expression of autophagy-related genes, including beclin-1, Atg5 and LC3 II, further induction of autophagosome formation and autophagic flux. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagic process by treatment with inhibitors and LC3B gene silencing blocked leptin-induced increase in cell number and suppression of apoptosis, indicating a crucial role of autophagy in leptin-induced tumor progression. Moreover, gene silencing of p53 or FoxO3A prevented leptin-induced LC3 II protein expression, suggesting an involvement of p53/FoxO3A axis in leptin-induced autophagy activation. Leptin administration also accelerated tumor growth in BALB/c nude mice, which was found to be autophagy dependent. Taken together, our results demonstrate that leptin-induced tumor growth is mediated by autophagy induction and autophagic process would be a promising target to regulate development of cancer caused by leptin production. PMID:25704884

  4. Thermosensitive liposomal cisplatin in combination with local hyperthermia results in tumor growth delay and changes in tumor microenvironment in xenograft models of lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yannan Nancy; Dunne, Michael; Huang, Huang; Mckee, Trevor; Chang, Martin C; Jaffray, David A; Allen, Christine

    2016-11-01

    Treatment efficacy of a heat-activated thermosensitive liposome formulation of cisplatin (CDDP), known as HTLC, was determined in xenograft models of non-small-cell lung carcinoma. The short-term impact of local hyperthermia (HT) on tumor morphology, microvessel density and local inflammatory response was also evaluated. The HTLC formulation in combination with local HT resulted in a significant advantage in therapeutic effect in comparison with free drug and a non-thermosensitive liposome formulation of CDDP (i.e. Lipoplatin(TM)) when administered at their maximum tolerated doses. Local HT-induced widespread cell necrosis and a significant reduction in microvessel density in the necrotic regions of tumors. CD11b-expressing innate leukocytes were demonstrated to infiltrate and reside preferentially at the necrotic rim of tumors, likely as a means to phagocytose-damaged tissue. Colocalization of CD11b with a marker of DNA damage (i.e. γH2AX) revealed a small portion of CD11b-expressing leukocytes that were possibly undergoing apoptosis as a result of HT-induced damage and/or the short lifespan of leukocytes. Overall, HT-induced tissue damage (i.e. at 24-h post-treatment) alone did not result in significant improvements in treatment effect, rather, the enhancement in tumor drug availability was correlated with improved therapeutic outcomes.

  5. Optical metabolic imaging measures early drug response in an allograft murine breast cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has shown that cellular-level Optical Metabolic Imaging (OMI) of organoids derived from human breast cancer cell-line xenografts accurately and rapidly predicts in vivo response to therapy. To validate OMI as a predictive measure of treatment response in an immune-competent model, we used the polyomavirus middle-T (PyVmT) transgenic mouse breast cancer model. The PyVmT model includes intra-tumoral heterogeneity and a complex tumor microenvironment that can influence treatment responses. Three-dimensional organoids generated from primary PyVmT tumor tissue were treated with a chemotherapy (paclitaxel) and a PI3K inhibitor (XL147), each alone or in combination. Cellular subpopulations of response were measured using the OMI Index, a composite endpoint of metabolic response comprised of the optical redox ratio (ratio of the fluorescence intensities of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H to FAD) as well as the fluorescence lifetimes of NAD(P)H and FAD. Combination treatment significantly decreased the OMI Index of PyVmT tumor organoids (padaptive immunity. Thus, this method is promising for use in humans to predict long-term treatment responses accurately and rapidly, and could aid in clinical treatment planning.

  6. A microelectronic portal imaging device for image guided conformal microirradiation of murine cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Samantha G; Silvius, Alexander A; Izaguirre, Enrique W

    2014-01-01

    Image guided conformal small animal orthovoltage microirradiators are currently under development to perform radiobiological experiments with preclinical cancer models. An important component of these instruments is the treatment delivery image guidance system, a microelectronic portal imaging device (μEPID). Here, we present the design and implementation of a μEPID, specifically designed and constructed for small animal orthovoltage microirradiators. The μEPID can acquire images in the range of 60 kVp to 320 kVp x-ray photon energies and can endure high doses from orthovoltage beams without radiation damage. The μEPID can acquire 200 μm resolution images at a rate of 17 frames per second for online in vivo co-registration between irradiation beams and small animal anatomy. An exposure with less than 1% of a 2 Gy treatment field is required for imaging, which is an adequate ratio between imaging dose and treatment dose to avoid undesired irradiation of healthy tissue or alteration of the preclinical cancer model. The μEPID was calibrated for microdosimetry with a precision of 4.1% with respect to an ion chamber, used as a gold standard. To validate the in vivo device performance, irradiations of lung, brain, and xenograft breast cancer preclinical models were performed and analyzed.

  7. Stretching Reduces Skin Thickness and Improves Subcutaneous Tissue Mobility in a Murine Model of Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Urso, Katia; Olenich, Sara; Muskaj, Igla; Badger, Gary J; Aliprantis, Antonios; Lafyatis, Robert; Langevin, Helene M

    2017-01-01

    Although physical therapy can help preserve mobility in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), stretching has not been used systematically as a treatment to prevent or reverse the disease process. We previously showed in rodent models that stretching promotes the resolution of connective tissue inflammation and reduces new collagen formation after injury. Here, we tested the hypothesis that stretching would impact scleroderma development using a mouse sclerodermatous graft-versus-host disease (sclGvHD) model. The model consists in the adoptive transfer (allogeneic) of splenocytes from B10.D2 mice (graft) into Rag2(-/-) BALB/c hosts (sclGvHD), resulting in skin inflammation followed by fibrosis over 4 weeks. SclGvHD mice and controls were randomized to stretching in vivo for 10 min daily versus no stretching. Weekly ultrasound measurements of skin thickness and subcutaneous tissue mobility in the back (relative tissue displacement during passive trunk motion) successfully captured the different phases of the sclGvHD model. Stretching reduced skin thickness and increased subcutaneous tissue mobility compared to no stretching at week 3. Stretching also reduced the expression of CCL2 and ADAM8 in the skin at week 4, which are two genes known to be upregulated in both murine sclGvHD and the inflammatory subset of human SSc. However, there was no evidence that stretching attenuated inflammation at week 2. Daily stretching for 10 min can improve skin thickness and mobility in the absence of any other treatment in the sclGvHD murine model. These pre-clinical results suggest that a systematic investigation of stretching as a therapeutic modality is warranted in patients with SSc.

  8. Severe combined immunodeficiency mouse-psoriatic human skin xenograft model: A modern tool connecting bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti Kundu-Raychaudhuri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disease. Research into the pathogenesis of this disease is hindered by the lack of a proper animal model. Over the past two decades, many scientists were involved in the development of animal models that nearly mirror the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. One such model, which has opened doors to the study of molecular complexities of psoriasis as well as its treatment, is the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse-human skin chimera model. This model not only mirrors the clinical and histopathological features of psoriasis but also help in the study of cell proliferation, angiogenesis, function of T cells, neurogenic inflammation and cytokines involved in inflammatory reactions. In this article, we have reviewed the prospects and the limitations of the SCID mouse model of psoriasis.

  9. Icodextrin enhances survival in an intraperitoneal ovarian cancer murine model utilizing gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocconi, Rodney P; Numnum, Michael T; Zhu, Zeng B; Lu, Baogen; Wang, Minghui; Rivera, Angel A; Stoff-Khalili, Mariam; Alvarez, Ronald D; Curiel, David T; Makhija, Sharmila

    2006-12-01

    Icodextrin, a novel glucose polymer solution utilized for peritoneal dialysis, has been demonstrated to have prolonged intraperitoneal (IP) instillation volumes in comparison to standard PBS solutions. In an animal model of ovarian cancer, we explored whether a survival advantage exists utilizing icodextrin rather than PBS as a delivery solution for an infectivity enhanced virotherapy approach. Initial experiments evaluated whether icodextrin would adversely affect replication of a clinical grade infectivity enhanced conditionally replicative adenovirus (Delta24-RGD). Virus was added to prepared blinded solutions of PBS or icodextrin (20%) and then evaluated in vitro in various human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3.ip1, PA-1, and Hey) and in vivo in a SKOV3.ip1 human ovarian cancer IP murine model. Viral replication was measured by detecting adenovirus E4 gene levels utilizing QRT-PCR. Survival was subsequently evaluated in a separate SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer IP murine model. Cohorts of mice were treated in blinded fashion with PBS alone, icodextrin alone, PBS+Delta24-RGD, or icodextrin+Delta24-RGD. Survival data were plotted on Kaplan-Meier curve and statistical calculations performed using the log-rank test. There was no adverse affect of icodextrin on vector replication in the ovarian cancer cell lines nor murine model tumor samples evaluated. Median survival in the IP treated animal cohorts was 23 days for the PBS group, 40 days for the icodextrin group, 65 days for the PBS+Delta24-RGD group, and 105 days for icodextrin+Delta24-RGD (p=0.023). Of note, 5 of the 10 mice in the icodextrin+Delta24-RGD group were alive at the end of the study period, all without evidence of tumor (120 days). These experiments suggest that the use of dialysates such as icodextrin may further enhance the therapeutic effects of novel IP virotherapy and other gene therapy strategies for ovarian cancer. Phase I studies utilizing icodextrin-based virotherapy for ovarian cancer are

  10. Complex and Multidimensional Lipid Raft Alterations in a Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease

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    Wayne Chadwick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD have been created to assist our appreciation of AD pathophysiology, as well as aid development of novel therapeutic strategies. Despite the discovery of mutated proteins that predict the development of AD, there are likely to be many other proteins also involved in this disorder. Complex physiological processes are mediated by coherent interactions of clusters of functionally related proteins. Synaptic dysfunction is one of the hallmarks of AD. Synaptic proteins are organized into multiprotein complexes in high-density membrane structures, known as lipid rafts. These microdomains enable coherent clustering of synergistic signaling proteins. We have used mass analytical techniques and multiple bioinformatic approaches to better appreciate the intricate interactions of these multifunctional proteins in the 3xTgAD murine model of AD. Our results show that there are significant alterations in numerous receptor/cell signaling proteins in cortical lipid rafts isolated from 3xTgAD mice.

  11. Combination Treatment with the GSK-3 Inhibitor 9-ING-41 and CCNU Cures Orthotopic Chemoresistant Glioblastoma in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models

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    Andrey Ugolkov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to chemotherapy remains a major challenge in the treatment of human glioblastoma (GBM. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β, a positive regulator of NF-κB–mediated survival and chemoresistance of cancer cells, has been identified as a potential therapeutic target in human GBM. Our objective was to determine the antitumor effect of GSK-3 inhibitor 9-ING-41 in combination with chemotherapy in patient-derived xenograft (PDX models of human GBM. We utilized chemoresistant PDX models of GBM, GBM6 and GBM12, to study the effect of 9-ING-41 used alone and in combination with chemotherapy on tumor progression and survival. GBM6 and GBM12 were transfected by reporter constructs to enable bioluminescence imaging, which was used to stage animals prior to treatment and to follow intracranial GBM tumor growth. Immunohistochemical staining, apoptosis assay, and immunoblotting were used to assess the expression of GSK-3β and the effects of treatment in these models. We found that 9-ING-41 significantly enhanced 1-(2-chloroethyl-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU antitumor activity in staged orthotopic GBM12 (no response to CCNU and GBM6 (partial response to CCNU PDX models, as indicated by a decrease in tumor bioluminescence in mouse brain and a significant increase in overall survival. Treatment with the combination of CCNU and 9-ING-41 resulted in histologically confirmed cures in these studies. Our results demonstrate that the GSK-3 inhibitor 9-ING-41, a clinical candidate currently in Investigational New Drug (IND-enabling development, significantly enhances the efficacy of CCNU therapy for human GBM and warrants consideration for clinical evaluation in this difficult-to-treat patient population.

  12. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts

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    Julian Biau

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery.

  13. Interest of a treatment combined by radioimmunotherapy and Avastin 1 in a murine model of thyroid medullary carcinoma; Interet d'un traitement combine par radioimmunotherapie et Avastin1 dans un modele murin de carcinome medullaire de la thyroide

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    Salaun, P.Y.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Paris, F.; Frampas, E.; Sai Maurel, C.; Faivre Chauvet, A.; Barbet, J.; Kraeber Bodere, F. [Unite Inserm U892, Brest, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and the toxicity of the association radioimmunotherapy and bevacizumab on a murine model grafted by the human line T.T. of thyroid medullar cancer. After results it appears that in pretreatment, bevacizumab (Avastin) improves the efficiency of radioimmunotherapy without increasing the toxicity face the radioimmunotherapy alone. (N.C.)

  14. Intrastriatal injection of autologous blood or clostridial collagenase as murine models of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Beilei; Sheng, Huaxin; Wang, Haichen; Lascola, Christopher D; Warner, David S; Laskowitz, Daniel T; James, Michael L

    2014-07-03

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a common form of cerebrovascular disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Lack of effective treatment and failure of large clinical trials aimed at hemostasis and clot removal demonstrate the need for further mechanism-driven investigation of ICH. This research may be performed through the framework provided by preclinical models. Two murine models in popular use include intrastriatal (basal ganglia) injection of either autologous whole blood or clostridial collagenase. Since, each model represents distinctly different pathophysiological features related to ICH, use of a particular model may be selected based on what aspect of the disease is to be studied. For example, autologous blood injection most accurately represents the brain's response to the presence of intraparenchymal blood, and may most closely replicate lobar hemorrhage. Clostridial collagenase injection most accurately represents the small vessel rupture and hematoma evolution characteristic of deep hemorrhages. Thus, each model results in different hematoma formation, neuroinflammatory response, cerebral edema development, and neurobehavioral outcomes. Robustness of a purported therapeutic intervention can be best assessed using both models. In this protocol, induction of ICH using both models, immediate post-operative demonstration of injury, and early post-operative care techniques are demonstrated. Both models result in reproducible injuries, hematoma volumes, and neurobehavioral deficits. Because of the heterogeneity of human ICH, multiple preclinical models are needed to thoroughly explore pathophysiologic mechanisms and test potential therapeutic strategies.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of rebamipide eyedrop administration on ocular lesions in a murine model of primary Sjogren's syndrome.

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    Rieko Arakaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Topical therapy is effective for dry eye, and its prolonged effects should help in maintaining the quality of life of patients with dry eye. We previously reported that the oral administration of rebamipide (Reb, a mucosal protective agent, had a potent therapeutic effect on autoimmune lesions in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome (SS. However, the effects of topical treatment with Reb eyedrops on the ocular lesions in the murine model of SS are unknown. METHODS AND FINDING: Reb eyedrops were administered to the murine model of SS aged 4-8 weeks four times daily. Inflammatory lesions of the extraorbital and intraorbital lacrimal glands and Harderian gland tissues were histologically evaluated. The direct effects of Reb on the lacrimal glands were analyzed using cultured lacrimal gland cells. Tear secretions of Reb-treated mice were significantly increased compared with those of untreated mice. In addition to the therapeutic effect of Reb treatment on keratoconjunctivitis, severe inflammatory lesions of intraorbital lacrimal gland tissues in this model of SS were resolved. The mRNA expression levels of IL-10 and mucin 5Ac in conjunctival tissues from Reb-treated mice was significantly increased compared with those of control mice. Moreover, lactoferrin production from lacrimal gland cells was restored by Reb treatment. CONCLUSION: Topical Reb administration had an anti-inflammatory effect on the ocular autoimmune lesions in the murine model of SS and a protective effect on the ocular surfaces.

  16. Development of induced glioblastoma by implantation of a human xenograft in Yucatan minipig as a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevis, Mehrdad; Carozzo, Claude; Bonnefont-Rebeix, Catherine; Belluco, Sara; Leveneur, Olivia; Chuzel, Thomas; Pillet-Michelland, Elodie; Dreyfus, Matthieu; Roger, Thierry; Berger, François; Ponce, Frédérique

    2017-04-15

    Glioblastoma is the most common and deadliest primary brain tumor for humans. Despite many efforts toward the improvement of therapeutic methods, prognosis is poor and the disease remains incurable with a median survival of 12-14.5 months after an optimal treatment. To develop novel treatment modalities for this fatal disease, new devices must be tested on an ideal animal model before performing clinical trials in humans. A new model of induced glioblastoma in Yucatan minipigs was developed. Nine immunosuppressed minipigs were implanted with the U87 human glioblastoma cell line in both the left and right hemispheres. Computed tomography (CT) acquisitions were performed once a week to monitor tumor growth. Among the 9 implanted animals, 8 minipigs showed significant macroscopic tumors on CT acquisitions. Histological examination of the brain after euthanasia confirmed the CT imaging findings with the presence of an undifferentiated glioma. Yucatan minipig, given its brain size and anatomy (gyrencephalic structure) which are comparable to humans, provides a reliable brain tumor model for preclinical studies of different therapeutic METHODS: in realistic conditions. Moreover, the short development time, the lower cyclosporine and caring cost and the compatibility with the size of commercialized stereotactic frames make it an affordable and practical animal model, especially in comparison with large breed pigs. This reproducible glioma model could simulate human anatomical conditions in preclinical studies and facilitate the improvement of novel therapeutic devices, designed at the human scale from the outset. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of antithrombotic activity of thrombin DNA aptamers by a murine thrombosis model.

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    Elena Zavyalova

    Full Text Available Aptamers are nucleic acid based molecular recognition elements with a high potential for the theranostics. Some of the aptamers are under development for therapeutic applications as promising antithrombotic agents; and G-quadruplex DNA aptamers, which directly inhibit the thrombin activity, are among them. RA-36, the 31-meric DNA aptamer, consists of two thrombin binding pharmacophores joined with the thymine linker. It has been shown earlier that RA-36 directly inhibits thrombin in the reaction of fibrinogen hydrolysis, and also it inhibits plasma and blood coagulation. Studies of both inhibitory and anticoagulation effects had indicated rather high species specificity of the aptamer. Further R&D of RA-36 requires exploring its efficiency in vivo. Therefore the development of a robust and adequate animal model for effective physiological studies of aptamers is in high current demand. This work is devoted to in vivo study of the antithrombotic effect of RA-36 aptamer. A murine model of thrombosis has been applied to reveal a lag and even prevention of thrombus formation when RA-36 was intravenous bolus injected in high doses of 1.4-7.1 µmol/kg (14-70 mg/kg. A comparative study of RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin reveals that both direct thrombin inhibitors have similar antithrombotic effects for the murine model of thrombosis; though in vitro bivalirudin has anticoagulation activity several times higher compared to RA-36. The results indicate that both RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin are direct thrombin inhibitors of different potency, but possible interactions of the thrombin-inhibitor complex with other components of blood coagulation cascade level the physiological effects for both inhibitors.

  18. Evaluation of antithrombotic activity of thrombin DNA aptamers by a murine thrombosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavyalova, Elena; Samoylenkova, Nadezhda; Revishchin, Alexander; Golovin, Andrey; Pavlova, Galina; Kopylov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are nucleic acid based molecular recognition elements with a high potential for the theranostics. Some of the aptamers are under development for therapeutic applications as promising antithrombotic agents; and G-quadruplex DNA aptamers, which directly inhibit the thrombin activity, are among them. RA-36, the 31-meric DNA aptamer, consists of two thrombin binding pharmacophores joined with the thymine linker. It has been shown earlier that RA-36 directly inhibits thrombin in the reaction of fibrinogen hydrolysis, and also it inhibits plasma and blood coagulation. Studies of both inhibitory and anticoagulation effects had indicated rather high species specificity of the aptamer. Further R&D of RA-36 requires exploring its efficiency in vivo. Therefore the development of a robust and adequate animal model for effective physiological studies of aptamers is in high current demand. This work is devoted to in vivo study of the antithrombotic effect of RA-36 aptamer. A murine model of thrombosis has been applied to reveal a lag and even prevention of thrombus formation when RA-36 was intravenous bolus injected in high doses of 1.4-7.1 µmol/kg (14-70 mg/kg). A comparative study of RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin reveals that both direct thrombin inhibitors have similar antithrombotic effects for the murine model of thrombosis; though in vitro bivalirudin has anticoagulation activity several times higher compared to RA-36. The results indicate that both RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin are direct thrombin inhibitors of different potency, but possible interactions of the thrombin-inhibitor complex with other components of blood coagulation cascade level the physiological effects for both inhibitors.

  19. Membrane configuration optimization for a murine in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Diane M; Wing, Allison M; Lee, Kelvin H

    2013-01-30

    A powerful experimental tool used to study the dynamic functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an in vitro cellular based system utilizing cell culture inserts in multi-well plates. Currently, usage of divergent model configurations without explanation of selected variable set points renders data comparisons difficult and limits widespread understanding. This work presents for the first time in literature a comprehensive screening study to optimize membrane configuration, with aims to unveil influential membrane effects on the ability of cerebral endothelial cells to form a tight monolayer. First, primary murine brain endothelial cells and astrocytes were co-cultured in contact and non-contact orientations on membranes of pore diameter sizes ranging from 0.4 μm to 8.0 μm, and the non-contact orientation and smallest pore diameter size were shown to support a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Then, membranes made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) purchased from three different commercial sources were compared, and PET membranes purchased from two manufacturers facilitated a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Models were characterized by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), sodium fluorescein permeability, and immunocytochemical labeling of tight junction proteins. Finally, a murine brain endothelial cell line, bEnd.3, was grown on the different membranes, and similar results were obtained with respect to optimal membrane configuration selection. The results and methodology presented here on high throughput 24-well plate inserts can be translated to other BBB systems to advance model understanding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased Cerebral Tff1 Expression in Two Murine Models of Neuroinflammation

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    Eva B Znalesniak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The trefoil factor family (TFF peptide TFF1 is a typical secretory product of the gastric mucosa and a very low level of expression occurs in nearly all regions of the murine brain. TFF1 possesses a lectin activity and binding to a plethora of transmembrane glycoproteins could explain the diverse biological effects of TFF1 (e.g., anti-apoptotic effect. It was the aim to test whether TFF expression is changed during neuroinflammation. Methods: Expression profiling was performed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR analyses in two murine models of neuroinflammation, i.e. Toxoplasma gondii-induced encephalitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the latter being the most common animal model of multiple sclerosis. Tff1 expression was also localized using RNA in situ hybridization histochemistry. Results: We report for the first time on a significant transcriptional induction in cerebral Tff1 expression in both T. gondii-induced encephalitis and EAE. In contrast, Tff2 and Tff3 expression were not altered. Tff1 transcripts were predominantly localized in the internal granular layer of the cerebellum indicating neuronal expression. Furthermore, also glial cells are expected to express Tff1. Characterization of both experimental models by expression profiling (e.g., inflammasome sensors, inflammatory cytokines, microglial marker Iba1, ependymin related protein 1 revealed differences concerning the expression of the inflammasome sensor Nlrp1 and interleukin 17a. Conclusion: The up-regulated expression of Tff1 is probably the result of a complex inflammatory process as its expression is induced by tumor necrosis factor α as well as interleukins 1β and 17. However on the transcript level, Tff1KO mice did not show any significant signs of an altered immune response after infection with T. gondii in comparison with the wild type animals.

  1. Adipose Tissue Drives Response to Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in a Murine Pressure Sore Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Madeleine J; Hong, Seok Jong; Fang, Robert C; Lanier, Steven T; Buck, Donald W; Nuñez, Jennifer M; Jia, Shengxian; Park, Eugene D; Galiano, Robert D; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2017-05-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of chronic wounds such as pressure sores and diabetic foot ulcers. The authors' laboratory has previously developed a cyclical murine ischemia-reperfusion injury model. The authors here use this model to determine factors underlying tissue response to ischemia-reperfusion injury. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cycles of ischemia-reperfusion that varied in number (one to four cycles) and duration of ischemia (1 to 2 hours). For each ischemia-reperfusion condition, the following variables were analyzed: (1) digital photographs for area of necrosis; (2) hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrate; and (3) expression of inflammatory markers by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, human adipocytes and fibroblasts were cultured in vitro under conditions of hypoxia and reoxygenation, and expression of inflammatory markers was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Increases in both ischemia-reperfusion cycle number and ischemia duration correlated with increased areas of epithelial necrosis both grossly and histologically, and with an increase in cellularity and neutrophil density. This increased inflammatory infiltrate and a significant increase in the expression of proinflammatory markers (Hmox1, interleukin-6, interleukin-1, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) was observed in adipose tissue subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury, but not in dermis. These results were mirrored in human adipose tissue. The authors further characterize a novel, reproducible murine model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. The results of their study indicate that adipose tissue is less tolerant of ischemia-reperfusion than dermal tissue. Rather than being an "innocent bystander," adipose tissue plays an active role in driving the inflammatory response to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  2. A MURINE MODEL FOR LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT CHEMICALS: DIFFERENTIATION OF RESPIRATORY SENSITIZERS (TMA) FROM CONTACT SENSITIZERS (DNFB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to low molecular weight (LMW) chemicals contributes to both dermal and respiratory sensitization and is an important occupational health problem. Our goal was to establish an in vivo murine model for hazard identification of LMW chemicals that have the potential to indu...

  3. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

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    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Back, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani; Hylarides, Mark; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-05-15

    Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy using an Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide 211At Combined with Bone Marrow Transplantation Prolongs Survival in a Disseminated Murine Leukemia Model ABSTRACT Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using antibodies (Ab) labeled primarily with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse.

  4. Altered mucosal immune response after acute lung injury in a murine model of Ataxia Telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickmeier, Olaf; Kim, Su Youn; Herrmann, Eva; Döring, Constanze; Duecker, Ruth; Voss, Sandra; Wehner, Sibylle; Hölscher, Christoph; Pietzner, Julia; Zielen, Stefan; Schubert, Ralf

    2014-05-29

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare but devastating and progressive disorder characterized by cerebellar dysfunction, lymphoreticular malignancies and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. In A-T, disease of the respiratory system causes significant morbidity and is a frequent cause of death. We used a self-limited murine model of hydrochloric acid-induced acute lung injury (ALI) to determine the inflammatory answer due to mucosal injury in Atm (A-T mutated)- deficient mice (Atm(-/-)). ATM deficiency increased peak lung inflammation as demonstrated by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils and lymphocytes and increased levels of BALF pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-6, TNF). Furthermore, bronchial epithelial damage after ALI was increased in Atm(-/-) mice. ATM deficiency increased airway resistance and tissue compliance before ALI was performed. Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a key role in inflammatory response after airway mucosal injury.

  5. Excretory-secretory antigens: a suitable candidate for immunization against ocular toxoplasmosis in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzpour Deilami, Kiumars; Daryani, Ahmad; Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Sharif, Mehdi; Dadimoghaddam, Yousef; Sarvi, Shahabeddin; Alizadeh, Ahad

    2014-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis, responsible for ocular impairment, is caused by Toxoplasma gondii. We investigated the effect of Toxoplasma excretory-secretory antigens (ESA) on parasite load and distribution in the eye tissue of a murine model. Case and control groups were immunized with ESA and PBS, respectively. Two weeks after the second immunization, the mice were challenged intraperitoneally with virulent RH strain of Toxoplasma; eye tissue samples of both groups were collected daily (days 1, 2, 3, and the last day before death). Parasite load was determined using real-time quantitative PCR targeted at the B1 gene. Compared to the control group, infected mice that received ESA vaccine presented a considerable decrease in parasite load in the eye tissue, demonstrating the effect of ESA on parasite load and distribution. Diminution of parasite load in mouse eye tissue indicated that ESA might help control disease-related complications and could be a valuable immunization candidate against ocular toxoplasmosis.

  6. Comparison of histopathology and PCR based assay for detection of experimentally induced toxoplasmosis in murine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vikrant Sudan; A K Tewari; R Singh; Harkirat Singh

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To compare histopathology and PCR based detection in diagnosis of experimentally induced toxoplasmosis of RH human strain of the parasite in murine models. Methods:A comparison of histopathology and PCR based detection was done to diagnose experimentally induced toxoplasmosis in ten inbred swiss albino mice after intraperitoneal inoculation of 100 tachyzoites of laboratory mantained human RH strain of the parasite. Tissue samples from lung, liver, spleen, brain, heart and kidney were taken and processed for histopathological examination while all the samples also were subjected to PCR, using primers directed to the multicopy of SAG 3 gene, in dublicates. Results: Histopathology revealed presence of tachyzoites only in liver while along with lung, liver, spleen and brain tissue yielded desired positive PCR amplicons. Conclusions:The SAG 3 based PCR is able to diagnose toxoplasmosis in those tissues which are declared negative by histopathological assay.

  7. Cardiac conduction system anomalies and sudden cardiac death: insights from murine models

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    Amelia Eva Aranega

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac conduction system (CCS is a series of specialized tissues in the heart responsible for the initiation and co-ordination of the heartbeat. Alterations in the CCS, especially the His-Purkinje system, have been identified as an important player in the generation of lethal arrhythmias. Unstable arrhythmias secondary to channelopathies highly increase the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD. Sudden cardiac death is a major contributor to mortality in industrialized nations, and most cases of SCD in the young are related to inherited ion channel diseases. In this review we examine how murine transgenic models have contributed to understanding that a broad variety of cardiac arrhythmias involve the cardiac specialized conduction system and may lead to sudden cardiac death.

  8. Pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 kinase activity blocks the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells but has no effect on breast cancer brain metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

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    Kun Hyoe Rhoo

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis of breast cancer is an important clinical problem, with few therapeutic options and a poor prognosis. Recent data have implicated mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3 in controlling the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, as well as the metastasis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells from the mammary fat pad to distant lymph nodes in a mouse xenograft model. We therefore set out to test whether MLK3 plays a role in brain metastasis of breast cancer cells. To address this question, we used a novel, brain penetrant, MLK3 inhibitor, URMC099. URMC099 efficiently inhibited the migration of breast cancer cells in an in vitro cell monolayer wounding assay, and an in vitro transwell migration assay, but had no effect on in vitro cell growth. We also tested the effect of URMC099 on tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer brain metastasis. This analysis showed that URMC099 had no effect on the either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases. We conclude that pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 by URMC099 can reduce the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, but that it has no effect on either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases, in a mouse xenograft model.

  9. The CRISPR/Cas9 system efficiently reverts the tumorigenic ability of BCR/ABL in vitro and in a xenograft model of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Tuñón, Ignacio; Hernández-Sánchez, María; Ordoñez, José Luis; Alonso-Pérez, Veronica; Álamo-Quijada, Miguel; Benito, Rocio; Guerrero, Carmen; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús María; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel

    2017-02-09

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to abrogate p210 oncoprotein expression in the Boff-p210 cell line, a pro-B line derived from interlukin-3-dependent Baf/3, that shows IL-3-independence arising from the constitutive expression of BCR-ABL p210. Using this approach, pools of Boff-p210-edited cells and single edited cell-derived clones were obtained and functionally studied in vitro. The loss of p210 expression in Boff-p210 cells resulted in the loss of ability to grow in the absence of IL-3, as the Baf/3 parental line, showing significantly increased apoptosis levels. Notably, in a single edited cell-derived clone carrying a frame-shift mutation that prevents p210 oncoprotein expression, the effects were even more drastic, resulting in cell death. These edited cells were injected subcutaneously in immunosuppressed mice and tumor growth was followed for three weeks. BCR/ABL-edited cells developed smaller tumors than those originating from unedited Boff-p210 parental cells. Interestingly, the single edited cell-derived clone was unable to develop tumors, similar to what is observed with the parental Baf/3 cell line.CRISPR/Cas9 genomic editing technology allows the ablation of the BCR/ABL fusion gene, causing an absence of oncoprotein expression, and blocking its tumorigenic effects in vitro and in the in vivo xenograft model of CML. The future application of this approach in in vivo models of CML will allow us to more accurately assess the value of CRISPR/Cas9 technology as a new therapeutic tool that overcomes resistance to the usual treatments for CML patients.

  10. Preclinical activity of the type II CD20 antibody GA101 (obinutuzumab) compared with rituximab and ofatumumab in vitro and in xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Sylvia; Herting, Frank; Mundigl, Olaf; Waldhauer, Inja; Weinzierl, Tina; Fauti, Tanja; Muth, Gunter; Ziegler-Landesberger, Doris; Van Puijenbroek, Erwin; Lang, Sabine; Duong, Minh Ngoc; Reslan, Lina; Gerdes, Christian A; Friess, Thomas; Baer, Ute; Burtscher, Helmut; Weidner, Michael; Dumontet, Charles; Umana, Pablo; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Bacac, Marina; Klein, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We report the first preclinical in vitro and in vivo comparison of GA101 (obinutuzumab), a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 monoclonal antibody, with rituximab and ofatumumab, the two currently approved type I CD20 antibodies. The three antibodies were compared in assays measuring direct cell death (AnnexinV/PI staining and time-lapse microscopy), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP), and internalization. The models used for the comparison of their activity in vivo were SU-DHL4 and RL xenografts. GA101 was found to be superior to rituximab and ofatumumab in the induction of direct cell death (independent of mechanical manipulation required for cell aggregate disruption formed by antibody treatment), whereas it was 10 to 1,000 times less potent in mediating CDC. GA101 showed superior activity to rituximab and ofatumumab in ADCC and whole-blood B-cell depletion assays, and was comparable with these two in ADCP. GA101 also showed slower internalization rate upon binding to CD20 than rituximab and ofatumumab. In vivo, GA101 induced a strong antitumor effect, including complete tumor remission in the SU-DHL4 model and overall superior efficacy compared with both rituximab and ofatumumab. When rituximab-pretreated animals were used, second-line treatment with GA101 was still able to control tumor progression, whereas tumors escaped rituximab treatment. Taken together, the preclinical data show that the glyoengineered type II CD20 antibody GA101 is differentiated from the two approved type I CD20 antibodies rituximab and ofatumumab by its overall preclinical activity, further supporting its clinical investigation.

  11. Combining Bevacizumab with Temozolomide Increases the Antitumor Efficacy of Temozolomide in a Human Glioblastoma Orthotopic Xenograft Model

    OpenAIRE

    Véronique Mathieu; Nancy De Nève; Marie Le Mercier; Janique Dewelle; Jean-François Gaussin; Mischael Dehoux; Robert Kiss; Florence Lefranc

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of the present work were to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antiangiogenic effects of chronic temozolomide treatment on various glioma models and to demonstrate whether bevacizumab (Avastin) increased the therapeutic benefits contributed by temozolomide in glioma. Experimental Design: The expression levels of various antiangiogenic factors in four glioma cell lines were evaluated after chronic in vitro treatment with temozolomide by Western blot. Proliferation and migra...

  12. Characterization of a Murine Model of Bioequivalent Bladder Wound Healing and Repair Following Subtotal Cystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Zarifpour

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous work demonstrated restoration of a bioequivalent bladder within 8 weeks of removing the majority of the bladder (subtotal cystectomy or STC in rats. The goal of the present study was to extend our investigations of bladder repair to the murine model, to harness the power of mouse genetics to delineate the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the observed robust bladder regrowth. Female C57 black mice underwent STC, and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-STC, bladder repair and function were assessed via cystometry, ex vivo pharmacologic organ bath studies, and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Histology was also performed to measure bladder wall thickness. We observed a time-dependent increase in bladder capacity (BC following STC, such that 8 and 12 weeks post-STC, BC and micturition volumes were indistinguishable from those of age-matched non-STC controls and significantly higher than observed at 4 weeks. MRI studies confirmed that bladder volume was indistinguishable within 3 months (11 weeks post-STC. Additionally, bladders emptied completely at all time points studied (i.e., no increases in residual volume, consistent with functional bladder repair. At 8 and 12 weeks post-STC, there were no significant differences in bladder wall thickness or in the different components (urothelium, lamina propria, or smooth muscle layers of the bladder wall compared with age-matched control animals. The maximal contractile response to pharmacological activation and electrical field stimulation increased over time in isolated tissue strips from repaired bladders but remained lower at all time points compared with controls. We have established and validated a murine model for the study of de novo organ repair that will allow for further mechanistic studies of this phenomenon after, for example, genetic manipulation.

  13. Altered gut microbiota and activity in a murine model of autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Theije, Caroline G M; Wopereis, Harm; Ramadan, Mohamed; van Eijndthoven, Tiemen; Lambert, Jolanda; Knol, Jan; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Oozeer, Raish

    2014-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous group of complex neurodevelopmental disorders with evidence of genetic predisposition. Intestinal disturbances are reported in ASD patients and compositional changes in gut microbiota are described. However, the role of microbiota in brain disorders is poorly documented. Here, we used a murine model of ASD to investigate the relation between gut microbiota and autism-like behaviour. Using next generation sequencing technology, microbiota composition was investigated in mice in utero exposed to valproic acid (VPA). Moreover, levels of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and lactic acid in caecal content were determined. Our data demonstrate a transgenerational impact of in utero VPA exposure on gut microbiota in the offspring. Prenatal VPA exposure affected operational taxonomic units (OTUs) assigned to genera within the main phyla of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes and the order of Desulfovibrionales, corroborating human ASD studies. In addition, OTUs assigned to genera of Alistipes, Enterorhabdus, Mollicutes and Erysipelotrichalis were especially associated with male VPA-exposed offspring. The microbial differences of VPA in utero-exposed males deviated from those observed in females and was (i) positively associated with increased levels of caecal butyrate as well as ileal neutrophil infiltration and (ii) inversely associated with intestinal levels of serotonin and social behaviour scores. These findings show that autism-like behaviour and its intestinal phenotype is associated with altered microbial colonization and activity in a murine model for ASD, with preponderance in male offspring. These results open new avenues in the scientific trajectory of managing neurodevelopmental disorders by gut microbiome modulation.

  14. Activated complement classical pathway in a murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Ying; Tao; Shi-Jie; Zheng; Bo; Lei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the complement system is involved in a murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy(OIR).METHODS: Forty C57BL/6J newborn mice were divided randomly into OIR group and control group. OIR was induced by exposing mice to 75% ±2% oxygen from postnatal 7d(P7) to P12 and then recovered in room air.For the control group, the litters were raised in room air.At the postnatal 17d(P17), gene expressions of the complement components of the classical pathway(CP),the mannose-binding lectin(MBL) pathway and the alternative pathway(AP) in the retina were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). Retinal protein expressions of the key components in the CP were examined by Western blotting.· RESULTS: Whole mounted retina in the OIR mice showed area of central hypoperfusion in both superficial and deep layers and neovascular tufts in the periphery.The expressions of C1 qb and C4 b genes in the OIR retina were significantly higher than those of the controls. The expression of retinal complement factor B(CFB) gene in OIR mice was significantly lower than those of the controls. However, the expressions of C3 and complement factor H(CFH) genes were higher. The protein synthesis of the key components involved in the CP(C1q, C4 and C3) were also significantly higher in OIR mouse retina. Although MBL-associated serine protease 1(MASP1) and MASP2 were detected in both the OIR and the control groups, the expressions were weak and the difference between the two groups was not significant.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that the complement system CP is activated during the pathogenesis of murine model of OIR.

  15. CXCR3 and its ligands in a murine model of obliterative bronchiolitis: regulation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medoff, Benjamin D; Wain, John C; Seung, Edward; Jackobek, Ryan; Means, Terry K; Ginns, Leo C; Farber, Joshua M; Luster, Andrew D

    2006-06-01

    Lung transplantation remains the only effective therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease, but survival is limited by the development of obliterative bronchiolitis (OB). The chemokine receptor CXCR3 and two of its ligands, CXCL9 and CXCL10, have been identified as important mediators of OB. However, the relative contribution of CXCL9 and CXCL10 to the development of OB and the mechanism of regulation of these chemokines has not been well defined. In this study, we demonstrate that CXCL9 and CXCL10 are up-regulated in unique patterns following tracheal transplantation in mice. In these experiments, CXCL9 expression peaked 7 days posttransplant, while CXCL10 expression peaked at 1 day and then again 7 days posttransplant. Expression of CXCL10 was also up-regulated in a novel murine model of lung ischemia, and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid taken from human lungs 24 h after lung transplantation. In further analysis, we found that 3 h after transplantation CXCL10 is donor tissue derived and not dependent on IFN-gamma or STAT1, while 24 h after transplantation CXCL10 is from recipient tissue and regulated by IFN-gamma and STAT1. Expression of both CXCL9 and CXCL10 7 days posttransplant is regulated by IFN-gamma and STAT1. Finally, we demonstrate that deletion of CXCR3 in recipients reduces airway obliteration. However, deletion of either CXCL9 or CXCL10 did not affect airway obliteration. These data show that in this murine model of obliterative bronchiolitis, these chemokines are differentially regulated following transplantation, and that deletion of either chemokine alone does not affect the development of airway obliteration.

  16. Anti-IL-20 Monoclonal Antibody Suppresses Prostate Cancer Growth and Bone Osteolysis in Murine Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsiang Hsu

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-20 is a proinflammatory cytokine in the IL-10 family. IL-20 is associated with tumor promotion in the pathogenesis of oral, bladder, and breast cancer. However, little is known about the role of IL-20 in prostate cancer. We hypothesize that IL-20 promotes the growth of prostate cancer cells. Immunohistochemical staining showed that IL-20 and its receptors were expressed in human PC-3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines and in prostate tumor tissue from 40 patients. In vitro, IL-20 upregulated N-cadherin, STAT3, vimentin, fibronectin, RANKL, cathepsin G, and cathepsin K, and increased the migration and colony formation of prostate cancer cells via activated p38, ERK1/2, AKT, and NF-κB signals in PC-3 cells. We investigated the effects of anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody 7E on prostate tumor growth in vivo using SCID mouse subcutaneous and intratibial xenograft tumor models. In vivo, 7E reduced tumor growth, suppressed tumor-mediated osteolysis, and protected bone mineral density after intratibial injection of prostate cancer cells. We conclude that IL-20 is involved in the cell migration, colony formation, and tumor-induced osteolysis of prostate cancer. Therefore, IL-20 might be a novel target for treating prostate cancer.

  17. Combining Bevacizumab with Temozolomide Increases the Antitumor Efficacy of Temozolomide in a Human Glioblastoma Orthotopic Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Mathieu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aims of the present work were to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antiangiogenic effects of chronic temozolomide treatment on various glioma models and to demonstrate whether bevacizumab (Avastin increased the therapeutic benefits contributed by temozolomide in glioma. Experimental Design: The expression levels of various antiangiogenic factors in four glioma cell lines were evaluated after chronic in vitro treatment with temozolomide by Western blot. Proliferation and migration assays were performed on human endothelial cells incubated with supernatants of glioma cells treated with and without temozolomide. Orthotopic glioma models were used to evaluate the antiangiogenic effects of temozolomide in vivo and the therapeutic benefits of different temozolomide treatment schedules used alone or in combination with bevacizumab. Results: Temozolomide, a proautophagic and proapoptotic drug, decreased the expression levels of HIF-1α, ID-1, ID-2, and cMyc in the glioma models investigated, all of which playing major roles in angiogenesis and the switch to hypoxic metabolism. These changes could be, at least partly, responsible for the impairment of angiogenesis observed in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, combining bevacizumab with temozolomide increased the survival of glioma-bearing mice in comparison to each compound administered alone. Conclusions: In addition to the numerous mechanisms of action already identified for temozolomide, we report here that it also exerts antitumor effects by impairing angiogenic processes. We further emphasize that bevacizumab, which is an antiangiogenic drug with a different mechanism of action, could be useful in combination with temozolomide to increase the latter's therapeutic benefit in glioma patients.

  18. Characterization of the arterial anatomy of the murine hindlimb: functional role in the design and understanding of ischemia models.

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    Takashi Kochi

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Appropriate ischemia models are required for successful studies of therapeutic angiogenesis. While collateral routes are known to be present within the innate vasculature, there are no reports describing the detailed vascular anatomy of the murine hindlimb. In addition, differences in the descriptions of anatomical names and locations in the literature impede understanding of the circulation and the design of hindlimb ischemia models. To understand better the collateral circulation in the whole hindlimb, clarification of all the feeding arteries of the hindlimb is required. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to reveal the detailed arterial anatomy and collateral routes in murine hindlimb to enable the appropriate design of therapeutic angiogenesis studies and to facilitate understanding of the circulation in ischemia models. METHODS AND RESULTS: Arterial anatomy in the murine hindlimb was investigated by contrast-enhanced X-ray imaging and surgical dissection. The observed anatomy is shown in photographic images and in a schema. Previously unnoticed but relatively large arteries were observed in deep, cranial and lateral parts of the thigh. The data indicates that there are three collateral routes through the medial thigh, quadriceps femoris, and the biceps femoris muscles. Furthermore, anatomical variations were found at the origins of the three feeding arteries. CONCLUSIONS: The detailed arterial anatomy of murine hindlimb and collateral routes deduced from the anatomy are described. Limitations on designs of ischemia models in view of anatomical variations are proposed. These observations will contribute to the development of animal studies of therapeutic angiogenesis using murine hindlimb ischemia models.

  19. Responsiveness of human prostate carcinoma bone tumors to interleukin-2 therapy in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocheril, S V; Grignon, D J; Wang, C Y; Maughan, R L; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J e; Hillman, G G

    1999-01-01

    We have tested an immunotherapy approach for the treatment of metastatic prostate carcinoma using a bone tumor model. Human PC-3 prostate carcinoma tumor cells were heterotransplanted into the femur cavity of athymic Balb/c nude mice. Tumor cells replaced marrow cells in the bone cavity, invaded adjacent bone and muscle tissues, and formed a palpable tumor at the hip joint. PC-3/IF cell lines, generated from bone tumors by serial in vivo passages, grew with faster kinetics in the femur and metastasized to inguinal lymph nodes. Established tumors were treated with systemic interleukin-2 (IL-2) injections. IL-2 significantly inhibited the formation of palpable tumors and prolonged mouse survival at nontoxic low doses. Histologically IL-2 caused vascular damage and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes in the tumor as well as necrotic areas with apoptotic cells. These findings suggest destruction of tumor cells by systemic IL-2 therapy and IL-2 responsiveness of prostate carcinoma bone tumors.

  20. Neuroblastoma patient-derived orthotopic xenografts reflect the microenvironmental hallmarks of aggressive patient tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braekeveldt, Noémie; Wigerup, Caroline; Tadeo, Irene; Beckman, Siv; Sandén, Caroline; Jönsson, Jimmie; Erjefält, Jonas S; Berbegall, Ana P; Börjesson, Anna; Backman, Torbjörn; Øra, Ingrid; Navarro, Samuel; Noguera, Rosa; Gisselsson, David; Påhlman, Sven; Bexell, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of high-risk childhood neuroblastoma is a clinical challenge which has been hampered by a lack of reliable neuroblastoma mouse models for preclinical drug testing. We have previously established invasive and metastasising patient-derived orthotopic xenografts (PDXs) from high-risk neuroblastomas that retained the genotypes and phenotypes of patient tumours. Given the important role of the tumour microenvironment in tumour progression, metastasis, and treatment responses, here we analysed the tumour microenvironment of five neuroblastoma PDXs in detail. The PDXs resembled their parent tumours and retained important stromal hallmarks of aggressive lesions including rich blood and lymphatic vascularisation, pericyte coverage, high numbers of cancer-associated fibroblasts, tumour-associated macrophages, and extracellular matrix components. Patient-derived tumour endothelial cells occasionally formed blood vessels in PDXs; however, tumour stroma was, overall, of murine origin. Lymphoid cells and lymphatic endothelial cells were found in athymic nude mice but not in NSG mice; thus, the choice of mouse strain dictates tumour microenvironmental components. The murine tumour microenvironment of orthotopic neuroblastoma PDXs reflects important hallmarks of aggressive and metastatic clinical neuroblastomas. Neuroblastoma PDXs are clinically relevant models for preclinical drug testing.

  1. Disparate in vivo efficacy of FTY720 in xenograft models of Philadelphia positive and negative B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

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    Craig T Wallington-Beddoe

    Full Text Available Most patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL respond well to standard chemotherapy-based treatments. However a significant proportion of patients, particularly adult patients, relapse with the majority dying of leukemia. FTY720 is an immunosuppressive drug that was recently approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and is currently under pre-clinical investigation as a therapy for a number of hematological malignancies. Using human ALL xenografts in NOD/SCIDγc(-/- mice, we show for the first time that three Ph(+ human ALL xenografts responded to FTY720 with an 80 ± 12% (p = 0.048 reduction in overall disease when treatment was commenced early. In contrast, treatment of mice with FTY720 did not result in reduced leukemia compared to controls using four separate human Ph(- ALL xenografts. Although FTY720 reactivated PP2A in vitro, this reactivation was not required for death of Ph(- ALL cells. The plasma levels of FTY720 achieved in the mice were in the high nanomolar range. However, the response seen in the Ph(+ ALL xenografts when treatment was initiated early implies that in vivo efficacy may be obtained with substantially lower drug concentrations than those required in vitro. Our data suggest that while FTY720 may have potential as a treatment for Ph(+ ALL it will not be a useful agent for the treatment of Ph(- B-ALL.

  2. A novel, selective inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor receptors that shows a potent broad spectrum of antitumor activity in several tumor xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Genshi; Li, Wei-Ying; Chen, Daohong; Henry, James R; Li, Hong-Yu; Chen, Zhaogen; Zia-Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Bloem, Laura; Zhai, Yan; Huss, Karen; Peng, Sheng-Bin; McCann, Denis J

    2011-11-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) are tyrosine kinases that are present in many types of endothelial and tumor cells and play an important role in tumor cell growth, survival, and migration as well as in maintaining tumor angiogenesis. Overexpression of FGFRs or aberrant regulation of their activities has been implicated in many forms of human malignancies. Therefore, targeting FGFRs represents an attractive strategy for development of cancer treatment options by simultaneously inhibiting tumor cell growth, survival, and migration as well as tumor angiogenesis. Here, we describe a potent, selective, small-molecule FGFR inhibitor, (R)-(E)-2-(4-(2-(5-(1-(3,5-Dichloropyridin-4-yl)ethoxy)-1H-indazol-3yl)vinyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)ethanol, designated as LY2874455. This molecule is active against all 4 FGFRs, with a similar potency in biochemical assays. It exhibits a potent activity against FGF/FGFR-mediated signaling in several cancer cell lines and shows an excellent broad spectrum of antitumor activity in several tumor xenograft models representing the major FGF/FGFR relevant tumor histologies including lung, gastric, and bladder cancers and multiple myeloma, and with a well-defined pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship. LY2874455 also exhibits a 6- to 9-fold in vitro and in vivo selectivity on inhibition of FGF- over VEGF-mediated target signaling in mice. Furthermore, LY2874455 did not show VEGF receptor 2-mediated toxicities such as hypertension at efficacious doses. Currently, this molecule is being evaluated for its potential use in the clinic.

  3. Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Growth of Pancreatic Cancer by Silencing of Carbohydrate Sulfotransferase 15 In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model.

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    Kazuki Takakura

    Full Text Available Chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E, a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan, is known to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Because the presence of CS-E is detected in both tumor and stromal cells in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC, multistage involvement of CS-E in the development of PDAC has been considered. However, its involvement in the early stage of PDAC progression is still not fully understood. In this study, to clarify the direct role of CS-E in tumor, but not stromal, cells of PDAC, we focused on carbohydrate sulfotransferase 15 (CHST15, a specific enzyme that biosynthesizes CS-E, and investigated the effects of the CHST15 siRNA on tumor cell proliferation in vitro and growth in vivo. CHST15 mRNA is highly expressed in the human pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Capan-1 and Capan-2. CHST15 siRNA significantly inhibited the expression of CHST15 mRNA in these four cells in vitro. Silencing of the CHST15 gene in the cells was associated with significant reduction of proliferation and up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor-related gene p21CIP1/WAF1. In a subcutaneous xenograft tumor model of PANC-1 in nude mice, a single intratumoral injection of CHST15 siRNA almost completely suppressed tumor growth. Reduced CHST15 protein signals associated with tumor necrosis were observed with the treatment with CHST15 siRNA. These results provide evidence of the direct action of CHST15 on the proliferation of pancreatic tumor cells partly through the p21CIP1/WAF1 pathway. Thus, CHST15-CS-E axis-mediated tumor cell proliferation could be a novel therapeutic target in the early stage of PDAC progression.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Tracking of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Labeled with Alkyl-Polyethylenimine 2 kDa/Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide in a Mouse Lung Carcinoma Xenograft Model

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    Cong Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential of using endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in novel anticancer therapy and the repair of vascular injury has been increasingly recognized. In the present study, EPCs were labeled with N-alkyl-polyethylenimine 2 kDa (PEI2k-stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO to facilitate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of EPCs in a mouse lung carcinoma xenograft model. EPCs derived from human peripheral blood were labeled with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO. The viability and activity of labeled cells were evaluated using proliferation, migration, and tubulogenesis assays. Alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO-labeled EPCs were injected intravenously (group 1 or mixed and injected together with A549 cells subcutaneously (group 2 into groups of six mice with severe combined immunodeficiency. The labeling efficiency with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO at 7 mg Fe/mL concentration was approximately 100%. Quantitative analysis of cellular iron was 6.062 ± 0.050 pg/cell. No significant effects on EPC proliferation, migration, or tubulogenesis were seen after labeling. Seventesla micro-MRI showed the presence of schistic or linear hypointense regions at the tumor margins starting from days 7 to 8 after EPC administration. This gradually extended into the inner tumor layers in group 1. In group 2, tumor growth was accompanied by dispersion of low-signal intensity regions inside the tumor. Iron-positive cells identified by Prussian blue dye were seen at the sites identified using MRI. Human CD31-positive cells and mouse CD31-positive cells were present in both groups. Labeling EPCs with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO allows noninvasive magnetic resonance investigation of EPC involvement in tumor neovasculature and is associated with excellent biocompatibility and MRI sensitivity.

  5. [{sup 186}Re]Liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil): in vitro stability, pharmacokinetics, imaging and biodistribution in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soundararajan, Anuradha [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Bao Ande [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Phillips, William T.; Perez, Ricardo [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Goins, Beth A. [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States)], E-mail: goins@uthscsa.edu

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of radiolabeling liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) for cancer chemoradionuclide therapy by directly loading the therapeutic radionuclide rhenium-186 ({sup 186}Re) into the liposome interior. The pharmacokinetics, imaging and biodistribution of [{sup 186}Re]Doxil (555 MBq/kg) and control [{sup 186}Re]polyethylene glycol (PEG) liposomes (555 MBq/kg) were determined after intravenous administration in a head and neck cancer xenograft model in nude rats. [{sup 186}Re]Doxil and [{sup 186}Re]PEG liposomes were radiolabeled using [{sup 186}Re]N,N-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-N',N'-diethylethylenediamine. {sup 186}Re labeling efficiency was 76.1{+-}8.3% with Doxil. The in vitro serum stability of [{sup 186}Re]Doxil at 37{sup o}C was 38.06{+-}12.13% at 24 h. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that [{sup 186}Re]Doxil had a two-phase blood clearance with half clearance times of 0.8 and 28.2 h. Images acquired over 120 h showed that [{sup 186}Re]Doxil had slow blood clearance, low liver accumulation and increasing spleen accumulation. The biodistribution study at 120 h indicated that the percentage of injected dose (%ID) in the blood and tumor for [{sup 186}Re]Doxil was 20-fold higher than that of [{sup 186}Re]PEG liposomes. The %ID values in the kidney and liver were not significantly different between [{sup 186}Re]Doxil and [{sup 186}Re]PEG liposomes. These results suggest that the long circulation and prolonged bioavailability of [{sup 186}Re]Doxil could potentially deliver high concentrations of both doxorubicin and {sup 186}Re to tumor when encapsulated in the same liposome vehicle.

  6. Generation of human/rat xenograft animal model for the study of human donor stem cell behaviors in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Sun; Dong Xiao; Xing-Hua Pan; Ruo-Shuang Zhang; Guang-Hui Cui; Xi-Gu Chen

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To accurately and realistically elucidate human stem cell behaviors In vivo and the fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in vivo, which is urgently required in regenerative medicine and treatments for some human diseases, a surrogate human-rat chimera model was developed.METHODS: Human-rat chimeras were achieved by in utero transplanting low-density mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood into the fetal rats at 9-11 d of gestation, and subsequently, a variety of methods, including flow cytometry, PCR as well as immunohistochemical assay, were used to test the human donor contribution in the recipients.RESULTS: Of 29 live-born recipients, 19 had the presence of human CD45+ cells in peripheral blood (PB) detected by flow cytometry, while PCR analysis on genomic DNA from 11 different adult tissues showed that 14 selected from flow cytometry-positive 19 animals possessed of donor-derived human cell engraftment in multiple tissues (i.e. liver, spleen, thymus, heart, kidney, blood, lung, muscle, gut and skin) examined at the time of tissue collection, as confirmed by detecting human β2-microglobulin expression using immunohistochemistry.In this xenogeneic system, the engrafted donor-derived human cells persisted in multiple tissues for at least 6 mo after birth. Moreover, transplanted human donor cells underwent site-specific differentiation into CK18-positive human cells in chimeric liver and CD45-positive human cells in chimeric spleen and thymus of recipients.CONCLUSION: Taken together, these findings suggest that we successfully developed human-rat chimeras, in which xenogeneic human cells exist up to 6 mo later. This humanized small animal model, which offers an in vivo environment more closely resembling to the situations in human, provides an invaluable and effective approach for in vivo investigating human stem cell behaviors, and further in vivo examining fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in the future

  7. Pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 promote breast cancer cell growth in bone in a murine xenograft model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bones are the most common sites of breast cancer metastasis. Upon arrival within the bone microenvironment, breast cancer cells coordinate the activities of stromal cells, resulting in an increase in osteoclast activity and bone matrix degradation. In late stages of bone metastasis, breast cance...

  8. Pancreatic stellate cells are an important source of MMP-2 in human pancreatic cancer and accelerate tumor progression in a murine xenograft model and CAM assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderhan, Wilhelm; Diaz, Fredy; Fundel, Martin; Zhou, Shaoxia; Siech, Marco; Hasel, Cornelia; Möller, Peter; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Seufferlein, Thomas; Gress, Thomas; Adler, Guido; Bachem, Max G

    2007-02-01

    The effect of the characteristic desmoplastic reaction of pancreatic cancer on tumor progression is largely unknown. We investigated whether pancreatic stellate cells, which are responsible for the desmoplastic reaction, support tumor progression. Immunohistology revealed that matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), which is suggested to promote pancreatic cancer progression, is present in stellate cells adjacent to cancer cells. In vitro, stellate cells exhibited a much higher basal expression of MMP-2 compared with cancer cells. Panc1-, MiaPaCa2- and SW850-conditioned media stimulated MMP-2 release of stellate cells as detected by zymography. Cancer cells expressed and released basigin [BSG, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), CD147], a glycoprotein that is known to stimulate MMP-2 in mesenchymal cells, as detected by immunostaining, western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Tumor cell-conditioned medium and BSG purified by affinity chromatography from supernatants of cancer cells, but not supernatants depleted from BSG, stimulated expression of MMP-1 and MMP-2 of stellate cells as demonstrated by western blot and zymography. Moreover, the interaction of stellate cells and cancer cells promoted the invasiveness of Panc-1 cells in the chorioallantoic membrane assay and increased the weight of tumors induced by all carcinoma cell lines in nude mice by 2.1-3.7-fold. Our findings support the assumption that the interaction of stellate cells and cancer cells promotes progression of pancreatic cancer.

  9. A xenograft model of macrophage activation syndrome amenable to anti-CD33 and anti–IL-6R treatment

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    Wunderlich, Mark; Devarajan, Mahima; Ravishankar, Navin; Sexton, Christina; Kumar, Ashish R.; Mizukawa, Benjamin; Mulloy, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic expression of key myelosupportive human cytokines in immune-deficient mice corrects for the lack of cross-species activities of stem cell factor (SCF), IL-3, and GM-CSF. When engrafted with human umbilical cord blood (UCB), these triple-transgenic mice produce BM and spleen grafts with much higher myeloid composition, relative to nontransgenic controls. Shortly after engraftment with UCB, these mice develop a severe, fatal macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) characterized by a progressive drop in rbc numbers, increased reticulocyte counts, decreased rbc half-life, progressive cytopenias, and evidence of chronic inflammation, including elevated human IL-6. The BM becomes strikingly hypocellular, and spleens are significantly enlarged with evidence of extramedullary hematopoiesis and activated macrophages engaged in hemophagocytosis. This manifestation of MAS does not respond to lymphocyte-suppressive therapies such as steroids, i.v. immunoglobulin, or antibody-mediated ablation of human B and T cells, demonstrating a lymphocyte-independent mechanism of action. In contrast, elimination of human myeloid cells using gemtuzumab ozogamicin (anti-CD33) completely reversed the disease. Additionally, the IL-6R antibody tocilizumab delayed progression and prolonged lifespan. This new model of MAS provides an opportunity for investigation of the mechanisms driving this disease and for the testing of directed therapies in a humanized mouse. PMID:27699249

  10. Neonatal umbilical cord blood transplantation halts skeletal disease progression in the murine model of MPS-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azario, Isabella; Pievani, Alice; Del Priore, Federica; Antolini, Laura; Santi, Ludovica; Corsi, Alessandro; Cardinale, Lucia; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Kubaski, Francyne; Gentner, Bernhard; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Riminucci, Mara; Tomatsu, Shunji; Aiuti, Alessandro; Biondi, Andrea; Serafini, Marta

    2017-08-25

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a promising source of stem cells to use in early haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) approaches for several genetic diseases that can be diagnosed at birth. Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS-I) is a progressive multi-system disorder caused by deficiency of lysosomal enzyme α-L-iduronidase, and patients treated with allogeneic HSCT at the onset have improved outcome, suggesting to administer such therapy as early as possible. Given that the best characterized MPS-I murine model is an immunocompetent mouse, we here developed a transplantation system based on murine UCB. With the final aim of testing the therapeutic efficacy of UCB in MPS-I mice transplanted at birth, we first defined the features of murine UCB cells and demonstrated that they are capable of multi-lineage haematopoietic repopulation of myeloablated adult mice similarly to bone marrow cells. We then assessed the effectiveness of murine UCB cells transplantation in busulfan-conditioned newborn MPS-I mice. Twenty weeks after treatment, iduronidase activity was increased in visceral organs of MPS-I animals, glycosaminoglycans storage was reduced, and skeletal phenotype was ameliorated. This study explores a potential therapy for MPS-I at a very early stage in life and represents a novel model to test UCB-based transplantation approaches for various diseases.

  11. Evaluating dynamic contrast-enhanced and photoacoustic CT to assess intra-tumor heterogeneity in xenograft mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liu, Bo; Cao, Minsong; Reinecke, Dan; Dzemidzic, Mario; Liang, Yun; Kruger, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate photoacoustic CT spectroscopy (PCT-S) and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) ability to measure parameters - oxygen saturation and vascular physiology - associated with the intra-tumor oxygenation status. Material and Methods: Breast (VEGF165 enhance MCF-7) and ovarian (SKOV3x) cancer cells were implanted into the fat pads and flanks of immune deficient mice and allowed to grow to a diameter of 8-15 mm. CT was used to determine physiological parameters by acquiring a sequence of scans over a 10 minute period after an i.v. injection of a radio-opaque contrast agent (Isovue). These time-dependent contrast-enhanced curves were fit to a two-compartmental model determining tumor perfusion, fractional plasma volume, permeability-surface area produce, and fractional interstitial volume on a voxel-by-voxel basis. After which, the tumors were imaged using photoacoustic CT (Optosonics, Inc., Indianapolis, IN 46202). The near infrared spectra (700-910 nm) within the vasculature was fit to linear combination of measured oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin blood samples to obtain oxygen saturation levels (SaO II). Results: The PCT-S scanner was first calibrated using different samples of oxygenated blood, from which a statistical error ranging from 2.5-6.5% was measured and a plot of the hemoglobin dissociation curve was consistent with empirical formula. In vivo determination of tumor vasculature SaO II levels were measurably tracked, and spatially correlated to the periphery of the tumor. Tumor depend variations in SaO II - 0.32 (ovarian) and 0.60 (breast) - and in vascular physiology - perfusion, 1.03 and 0.063 mL/min/mL, and fractional plasma volume, 0.20 and 0.07 - were observed. Conclusion: Combined, PCT-S and CED-CT has the potential to measure intra-tumor levels of tumor oxygen saturation and vascular physiology, key parameters associated with hypoxia.

  12. Total lymphoid irradiation and discordant cardiac xenografts

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    Kaplan, E.; Dresdale, A.R.; Diehl, J.T.; Katzen, N.A.; Aronovitz, M.J.; Konstam, M.A.; Payne, D.D.; Cleveland, R.J. (Tufts Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation can prolong concordant cardiac xenografts. The effects of total lymphoid irradiation in a discordant xenograft model (guinea pig to rat) were studied with and without adjuvant pharmacologic immunosuppression. Inbred Lewis rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups. Group 1 (n = 6) served as a control group and rats received no immunosuppression. Group 2 (n = 5) received triple-drug therapy that consisted of intraperitoneal azathioprine (2 mg/kg), cyclosporine (20 mg/kg), and methylprednisolone (1 mg/kg) for 1 week before transplantation. Group 3 animals (n = 5) received 15 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation in 12 divided doses over a 3-week period. Group 4 (n = 6) received both triple-drug therapy and total lymphoid irradiation as described for groups 2 and 3. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay was performed to determine if a correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and rejection-free interval existed. Rejection was defined as cessation of graft pulsation and was confirmed by histologic test results. Only groups 1 and 2 showed a difference in survival (group 1, 6.9 +/- 1.0 minutes; group 2, 14.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, p = 0.02). Although total lymphoid irradiation did decrease complement-dependent cytotoxicity, linear regression revealed no correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and graft survival (coefficient of correlation, 0.30). Unlike concordant cardiac xenografts, total lymphoid irradiation with or without triple-drug therapy does not prolong graft survival.

  13. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Klassen, Henry;

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the host response to murine retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) following transplantation to the subretinal space (SRS) of the pig. RPCs from GFP mice were transplanted subretinally in 18 nonimmunosuppressed normal or laser-treated pigs. Evaluation of the SRS was performed on hematoxylin...... inflammatory cells in the choroid near the transplantation site. Large choroidal infiltrates were evident at 2-5 weeks. Serum from naive and RPC-xenografted pigs contained significant levels of preformed IgG and IgM antibodies against murine antigens. Xenogeneic RPCs transplanted to the porcine SRS induced...... mononuclear infiltration in the choroid with graft rejection occurring over 2-5 weeks. Serum analysis confirmed that mice and pigs are discordant species; however, a cell-mediated acute mechanism appears to be responsible, rather than an antibody-mediated rejection....

  14. Herpes Murine Model as a Biological Assay to Test Dialyzable Leukocyte Extracts Activity

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    Nohemí Salinas-Jazmín

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Transferon, we standardized and validated a murine model of cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Using this model, we evaluated the activity of 27 Transferon batches. All batches improved the survival of HSV-1-infected mice, wherein average survival rose from 20.9% in control mice to 59.6% in Transferon-treated mice. The activity of Transferon correlated with increased serum levels of IFN-γ and reduced IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations. Our results demonstrate that (i this mouse model of cutaneous herpes can be used to examine the activity of DLEs, such as Transferon; (ii the assay can be used as a routine test for batch release; (iii Transferon is produced with high homogeneity between batches; (iv Transferon does not have direct virucidal, cytoprotective, or antireplicative effects; and (v the protective effect of Transferon in vivo correlates with changes in serum cytokines.

  15. Herpes Murine Model as a Biological Assay to Test Dialyzable Leukocyte Extracts Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemí; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Becerril-García, Miguel Angel; Limón-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Vázquez-Leyva, Said; Pavón, Lenin; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia Mayra

    2015-01-01

    Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs) are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Transferon, we standardized and validated a murine model of cutaneous HSV-1 infection. Using this model, we evaluated the activity of 27 Transferon batches. All batches improved the survival of HSV-1-infected mice, wherein average survival rose from 20.9% in control mice to 59.6% in Transferon-treated mice. The activity of Transferon correlated with increased serum levels of IFN-γ and reduced IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations. Our results demonstrate that (i) this mouse model of cutaneous herpes can be used to examine the activity of DLEs, such as Transferon; (ii) the assay can be used as a routine test for batch release; (iii) Transferon is produced with high homogeneity between batches; (iv) Transferon does not have direct virucidal, cytoprotective, or antireplicative effects; and (v) the protective effect of Transferon in vivo correlates with changes in serum cytokines. PMID:25984538

  16. FASN Inhibition and Taxane Treatment Combine to Enhance Anti-tumor Efficacy in Diverse Xenograft Tumor Models through Disruption of Tubulin Palmitoylation and Microtubule Organization and FASN Inhibition-Mediated Effects on Oncogenic Signaling and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Timothy S; Ventura, Richard; Mordec, Kasia; Lai, Julie; Fridlib, Marina; Buckley, Douglas; Kemble, George

    2017-02-01

    Palmitate, the enzymatic product of FASN, and palmitate-derived lipids support cell metabolism, membrane architecture, protein localization, and intracellular signaling. Tubulins are among many proteins that are modified post-translationally by acylation with palmitate. We show that FASN inhibition with TVB-3166 or TVB-3664 significantly reduces tubulin palmitoylation and mRNA expression. Disrupted microtubule organization in tumor cells is an additional consequence of FASN inhibition. FASN inhibition combined with taxane treatment enhances inhibition of in vitro tumor cell growth compared to treatment with either agent alone. In lung, ovarian, prostate, and pancreatic tumor xenograft studies, FASN inhibition and paclitaxel or docetaxel combine to inhibit xenograft tumor growth with significantly enhanced anti-tumor activity. Tumor regression was observed in 3 of 6 tumor xenograft models. FASN inhibition does not affect cellular taxane concentration in vitro. Our data suggest a mechanism of enhanced anti-tumor activity of the FASN and taxane drug combination that includes inhibition of tubulin palmitoylation and disruption of microtubule organization in tumor cells, as well as a sensitization of tumor cells to FASN inhibition-mediated effects that include gene expression changes and inhibition of β-catenin. Together, the results strongly support investigation of combined FASN inhibition and taxane treatment as a therapy for a variety of human cancers. Copyright © 2016 3-V Biosciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. FASN Inhibition and Taxane Treatment Combine to Enhance Anti-tumor Efficacy in Diverse Xenograft Tumor Models through Disruption of Tubulin Palmitoylation and Microtubule Organization and FASN Inhibition-Mediated Effects on Oncogenic Signaling and Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy S. Heuer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Palmitate, the enzymatic product of FASN, and palmitate-derived lipids support cell metabolism, membrane architecture, protein localization, and intracellular signaling. Tubulins are among many proteins that are modified post-translationally by acylation with palmitate. We show that FASN inhibition with TVB-3166 or TVB-3664 significantly reduces tubulin palmitoylation and mRNA expression. Disrupted microtubule organization in tumor cells is an additional consequence of FASN inhibition. FASN inhibition combined with taxane treatment enhances inhibition of in vitro tumor cell growth compared to treatment with either agent alone. In lung, ovarian, prostate, and pancreatic tumor xenograft studies, FASN inhibition and paclitaxel or docetaxel combine to inhibit xenograft tumor growth with significantly enhanced anti-tumor activity. Tumor regression was observed in 3 of 6 tumor xenograft models. FASN inhibition does not affect cellular taxane concentration in vitro. Our data suggest a mechanism of enhanced anti-tumor activity of the FASN and taxane drug combination that includes inhibition of tubulin palmitoylation and disruption of microtubule organization in tumor cells, as well as a sensitization of tumor cells to FASN inhibition-mediated effects that include gene expression changes and inhibition of β-catenin. Together, the results strongly support investigation of combined FASN inhibition and taxane treatment as a therapy for a variety of human cancers.

  18. Immunogenic multistage recombinant protein vaccine confers partial protection against experimental toxoplasmosis mimicking natural infection in murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaprak Gedik

    2016-01-01

    To generate a protective vaccine against toxoplasmosis, multistage vaccines and usage of challenging models mimicking natural route of infection are critical cornerstones. In this study, we generated a BAG1 and GRA1 multistage vaccine that induced strong immune response in which the protection was not at anticipated level. In addition, the murine model was orally challenged with tissue cysts to mimic natural route of infection.

  19. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Evelyn E.; Peters, Brian M.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans). Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation. PMID:26807975

  20. Excisional wound healing is delayed in a murine model of chronic kidney disease.

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    Akhil K Seth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 15% of the United States population suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD, often demonstrating an associated impairment in wound healing. This study outlines the development of a surgical murine model of CKD in order to investigate the mechanisms underlying this impairment. METHODS: CKD was induced in mice by partial cauterization of one kidney cortex and contralateral nephrectomy, modifying a previously published technique. After a minimum of 6-weeks, splinted, dorsal excisional wounds were created to permit assessment of wound healing parameters. Wounds were harvested on postoperative days (POD 0, 3, 7, and 14 for histological, immunofluorescent, and quantitative PCR (qPCR. RESULTS: CKD mice exhibited deranged blood chemistry and hematology profiles, including profound uremia and anemia. Significant decreases in re-epithelialization and granulation tissue deposition rates were found in uremic mice wounds relative to controls. On immunofluorescent analysis, uremic mice demonstrated significant reductions in cellular proliferation (BrdU and angiogenesis (CD31, with a concurrent increase in inflammation (CD45 as compared to controls. CKD mice also displayed differential expression of wound healing-related genes (VEGF, IL-1β, eNOS, iNOS on qPCR. CONCLUSIONS: These findings represent the first reported investigation of cutaneous healing in a CKD animal model. Ongoing studies of this significantly delayed wound healing phenotype include the establishment of renal failure model in diabetic strains to study the combined effects of CKD and diabetes.

  1. Dysfunctional cardiac mitochondrial bioenergetic, lipidomic, and signaling in a murine model of Barth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiebish, Michael A; Yang, Kui; Liu, Xinping; Mancuso, David J; Guan, Shaoping; Zhao, Zhongdan; Sims, Harold F; Cerqua, Rebekah; Cade, W Todd; Han, Xianlin; Gross, Richard W

    2013-05-01

    Barth syndrome is a complex metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the mitochondrial transacylase tafazzin. Recently, an inducible tafazzin shRNA knockdown mouse model was generated to deconvolute the complex bioenergetic phenotype of this disease. To investigate the underlying cause of hemodynamic dysfunction in Barth syndrome, we interrogated the cardiac structural and signaling lipidome of this mouse model as well as its myocardial bioenergetic phenotype. A decrease in the distribution of cardiolipin molecular species and robust increases in monolysocardiolipin and dilysocardiolipin were demonstrated. Additionally, the contents of choline and ethanolamine glycerophospholipid molecular species containing precursors for lipid signaling at the sn-2 position were altered. Lipidomic analyses revealed specific dysregulation of HETEs and prostanoids, as well as oxidized linoleic and docosahexaenoic metabolites. Bioenergetic interrogation uncovered differential substrate utilization as well as decreases in Complex III and V activities. Transgenic expression of cardiolipin synthase or iPLA2γ ablation in tafazzin-deficient mice did not rescue the observed phenotype. These results underscore the complex nature of alterations in cardiolipin metabolism mediated by tafazzin loss of function. Collectively, we identified specific lipidomic, bioenergetic, and signaling alterations in a murine model that parallel those of Barth syndrome thereby providing novel insights into the pathophysiology of this debilitating disease.

  2. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn E Nash

    Full Text Available Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC, particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans. Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation.

  3. Novel murine B-cell lymphoma/leukemia model to study BCL2-driven oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijerink, Jules P P; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Beverloo, H Berna; Van Drunen, Ellen; Mensink, Ewald J B M; Macville, Merryn; Pieters, Rob

    2005-05-10

    The BCL-2 family has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various hematopoietic malignancies, including follicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. To identify genes that act synergistically in BCL2-enforced leukemogenesis, we developed a murine B-cell lymphoma/leukemia model based on the IL-3-dependent Balb/C pro-B line (FL5.12). FL5.12 cells were stably transfected with antiapoptotic BCL-2 alone or in combination with proapoptotic BAX or nonfunctional mutant BAX, thereby creating various levels of imbalance within the BCL-2 family. Transfectants were intravenously injected into normal Balb/C mice. Whereas FL5.12 cells did not provoke leukemia, mice injected with stable transfectants died of leukemia over time. Disease incidence and latency time depended on the degree of imbalance in the BCL-2 family, supporting a model whereby BCL2 drives tumorigenesis. All mice presented with hepatosplenomegaly and leukemic FL5.12 cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow compartments. Leukemic conversion was accompanied by secondary genetic aberrations leading to clonal IL-3-responsive leukemia. Cellular transformation was independent of alterations in c-Myc or downstream apoptotic pathway. Leukemic clones retained a normal DNA damage response leading to elevated P53 and P21 levels and cell cycle arrest upon irradiation. In conclusion, our mouse model may prove a valuable tool to identify genes that cooperate in BCL2-enforced lymphoma/leukemogenesis.

  4. Characterization of the inflammatory response to four commercial bone graft substitutes using a murine biocompatibility model

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    Markel DC

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available David C Markel1, S Trent Guthrie2, Bin Wu3, Zheng Song4, Paul H Wooley41Department of Orthopaedics, Providence Hospital and Medical Centers, Southfield, MI, 2Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, 4Orthopaedic Research Institute, Wichita, KS, USAAbstract: Bone grafting is utilized in nearly all orthopedic subspecialties and in most anatomic regions. Bone graft substitutes have the potential to offer similar efficacy as autogenous grafts without the morbidity of harvest. Several studies have noted the efficacy of new-generation bone substitute products, but few studies have evaluated their safety. This study characterizes and quantifies the inflammatory reaction to four different commercially available bone graft substitutes, which were examined using the in vivo murine air pouch biocompatibility model. One coralline hydroxyapatite product was chosen as an example of a purely osteoconductive material. Three demineralized bone matrix products were chosen to represent products that are both osteoconductive and osteoinductive. Samples were implanted in a murine air pouch and harvested after 14 days in situ. Pouch fluid was extracted, mRNA isolated, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions carried out to detect interleukin-1 gene expression as a marker for inflammation. In addition, multiple histological characteristics were examined to quantify cellular responses to the implanted materials. All bone graft substitutes induced a significant inflammatory response compared with negative controls. Histology and polymerase chain reaction data indicated that the level of inflammatory reaction was elevated in materials with a higher demineralized bone matrix to carrier proportion. The hydroxyapatite product generated a low inflammatory reaction. In conclusion, this study used an in vivo model of biocompatibility to demonstrate that a significant inflammatory reaction occurs

  5. Interleukin-17A and Neutrophils in a Murine Model of Bird-Related Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

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    Masahiro Ishizuka

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP is an immune mediated lung disease induced by the repeated inhalation of a wide variety of antigens. Bird-related hypersensitivity pneumonitis (BRHP is one of the most common forms of HP in human and results from the inhalation of avian antigens. The findings of a recent clinical analysis suggest that in addition to Th1 factors, the levels of interleukin(IL-17 and IL-17-associated transcripts are increased in the setting of HP, and that both IL-17A and neutrophils are crucial for the development of pulmonary inflammation in murine models of HP. Our objectives were to investigate the roles of IL-17A and neutrophils in granuloma-forming inflammation in an acute HP model. We developed a mouse model of acute BRHP using pigeon dropping extract. We evaluated the process of granuloma formation and the roles of both IL-17A and neutrophils in a model. We found that the neutralization of IL-17A by the antibody attenuated granuloma formation and the recruitment of neutrophils, and also decreased the expression level of chemokine(C-X-C motif ligand 5 (CXCL5 in the acute HP model. We confirmed that most of the neutrophils in the acute HP model exhibited immunoreactivity to the anti-IL-17 antibody. We have identified the central roles of both IL-17A and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of granuloma formation in acute HP. We have also assumed that neutrophils are an important source of IL-17A in an acute HP model, and that the IL-17A-CXCL5 pathway may be responsible for the recruitment of neutrophils.

  6. Divergent effects of RIP1 or RIP3 blockade in murine models of acute liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, M; Graffeo, C S; Rokosh, R; Pansari, M; Ochi, A; Levie, E M; Van Heerden, E; Tippens, D M; Greco, S; Barilla, R; Tomkötter, L; Zambirinis, C P; Avanzi, N; Gulati, R; Pachter, H L; Torres-Hernandez, A; Eisenthal, A; Daley, D; Miller, G

    2015-05-07

    Necroptosis is a recently described Caspase 8-independent method of cell death that denotes organized cellular necrosis. The roles of RIP1 and RIP3 in mediating hepatocyte death from acute liver injury are incompletely defined. Effects of necroptosis blockade were studied by separately targeting RIP1 and RIP3 in diverse murine models of acute liver injury. Blockade of necroptosis had disparate effects on disease outcome depending on the precise etiology of liver injury and component of the necrosome targeted. In ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis, RIP3 deletion was protective, whereas RIP1 inhibition exacerbated disease, accelerated animal death, and was associated with increased hepatocyte apoptosis. Conversely, in acetaminophen-mediated liver injury, blockade of either RIP1 or RIP3 was protective and was associated with lower NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our work highlights the fact that diverse modes of acute liver injury have differing requirements for RIP1 and RIP3; moreover, within a single injury model, RIP1 and RIP3 blockade can have diametrically opposite effects on tissue damage, suggesting that interference with distinct components of the necrosome must be considered separately.

  7. Murine and Human Model Systems for the Study of Dendritic Cell Immunobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, Kristian M

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a population of innate immune cells that possess their own effector functions as well as numerous regulatory properties that shape the activity of other innate and adaptive cells of the immune system. Following their development from either lymphoid or myeloid progenitors, the function of dendritic cells is tightly linked to their maturation and activation status. Differentiation into specialized subsets of dendritic cells also contributes to the diverse immunologic functions of these cells. Because of the key role played by dendritic cells in the regulation of both immune tolerance and activation, significant efforts have been focused on understanding dendritic cell biology. This review highlights the model systems currently available to study dendritic cell immunobiology and emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages to each system in both murine and human settings. In particular, in vitro cell culture systems involving immortalized dendritic cell lines, ex vivo systems for differentiating and expanding dendritic cells from their precursor populations, and systems for expanding, ablating, and manipulating dendritic cells in vivo are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the contribution of these systems to our current understanding of the development, function, and immunotherapeutic applications of dendritic cells, and insights into how these models might be extended in the future to answer remaining questions in the field are discussed.

  8. Flucytosine + fluconazole association in the treatment of a murine experimental model of cryptococcosis

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    A. J. Bava

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of flucytosine (5-FC and fluconazole (FLU association in the treatment of a murine experimental model of cryptococcosis, was evaluated. Seven groups of 10 Balb C mice each, were intraperitoneally inoculated with 10(7 cells of Cryptococcus neoformans. Six groups were allocated to receive 5-FC (300 mg/kg and FLU (16 mg/ kg, either combined and individually, by daily gavage beginning 5 days after the infection, for 2 and 4 weeks. One group received distilled water and was used as control. The evaluation of treatments was based on: survival time; macroscopic examination of brain, lungs, liver and spleen at autopsy; presence of capsulated yeasts in microscopic examination of wet preparations of these organs and cultures of brain homogenate. 5-FC and FLU, individually or combined, significantly prolonged the survival time of the treated animals with respect to the control group (p<0.01. Animals treated for 4 weeks survived significantly longer than those treated for 2 weeks (p<0.01. No significant differences between the animals treated with 5-FC and FLU combined or separately were observed in the survival time and morphological parameters. The association of 5-FC and FLU does not seem to be more effective than 5-FC or FLU alone, in the treatment of this experimental model of cryptococcosis.

  9. Neuroprotective pentapeptide CN-105 improves functional and histological outcomes in a murine model of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Beilei; James, Michael L; Liu, Ji; Zhou, Guanen; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Lascola, Christopher D; Acheson, Shawn K; Dubois, Laura G; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Wang, Haichen

    2016-10-07

    Presently, no pharmacological treatments have been demonstrated to improve long-term functional outcomes following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Clinical evidence associates apolipoprotein E (apoE) genotype with ICH incidence and outcome. While apoE modifies neuroinflammatory responses through its adaptive role in glial downregulation, intact apoE holoprotein is too large to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therefore, we developed a 5-amino acid peptide - CN-105 - that mimics the polar face of the apoE helical domain involved in receptor interactions. In the current study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of CN-105 in a mouse model of ICH. Three doses of CN-105 (0.05 mg/kg) was administered by tail vein injection within 24 hours after ICH induction. Functional assessment showed durable improvement in vestibulomotor performance after CN-105 treatment, as quantified by increased Rotarod latencies on Days 1-5 post-ICH, and long-term improvement in neurocognitive performance, as quantified by reduced Morris water maze latencies on Days 29-32 post-ICH. Further, brain water content was significantly reduced, neuroinflammation was decreased and hippocampal CA3 neuronal survival was increased, although hemorrhage volume was not affected by CN-105. We concluded, therefore, that pentapeptide CN-105 improved short- and long-term neurobehavioral outcomes in a murine model of ICH, suggesting therapeutic potential for patients with acute ICH.

  10. Ultrastructural study on experimental infection of rotavirus in a murine heterologous model

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    Selma Majerowicz

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available Viral replication, histopathological and ultrastructural changes were observed for a period of nine days in the small intestine of suckling mice infected with a simian rotavirus (SA11. Samples taken from duodenum, jejunun and ileum were prepared for light microscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Histopathologic effect could be detected within 8 hr post-infection, when only a few altered cells were observed. Damage was extensive after 16 hr post-infection, showing swollen enterocytes and reduced and irregularly oriented microvilli at intestinal villi tips. Virus particles were detected at 16 and 48 hr post-infection, budding from the viroplasm into the rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae in ileum enterocytes. Clear evidence of viral replication, observed by electron microscopy was not described before in heterologous murine models. Regeneration of the intestinal villi began at the third day post-infection. Despite some differences observed in clinical symptoms and microscopic analysis of homologous and heterologous rotavirus infections, we concluded that mechanisms of heterologous rotavirus infection in mice follow similar patterns to those observed in the homologous models.

  11. Hippocampal abnormalities and enhanced excitability in a murine model of human lissencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, M W; Hirotsune, S; Gambello, M J; Phillips-Tansey, E; Suares, G; Mervis, R F; Wynshaw-Boris, A; McBain, C J

    2000-04-01

    Human cortical heterotopia and neuronal migration disorders result in epilepsy; however, the precise mechanisms remain elusive. Here we demonstrate severe neuronal dysplasia and heterotopia throughout the granule cell and pyramidal cell layers of mice containing a heterozygous deletion of Lis1, a mouse model of human 17p13.3-linked lissencephaly. Birth-dating analysis using bromodeoxyuridine revealed that neurons in Lis1+/- murine hippocampus are born at the appropriate time but fail in migration to form a defined cell layer. Heterotopic pyramidal neurons in Lis1+/- mice were stunted and possessed fewer dendritic branches, whereas dentate granule cells were hypertrophic and formed spiny basilar dendrites from which the principal axon emerged. Both somatostatin- and parvalbumin-containing inhibitory neurons were heterotopic and displaced into both stratum radiatum and stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Mechanisms of synaptic transmission were severely disrupted, revealing hyperexcitability at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses and depression of mossy fiber-CA3 transmission. In addition, the dynamic range of frequency-dependent facilitation of Lis1+/- mossy fiber transmission was less than that of wild type. Consequently, Lis1+/- hippocampi are prone to interictal electrographic seizure activity in an elevated [K(+)](o) model of epilepsy. In Lis1+/- hippocampus, intense interictal bursting was observed on elevation of extracellular potassium to 6.5 mM, a condition that resulted in only minimal bursting in wild type. These anatomical and physiological hippocampal defects may provide a neuronal basis for seizures associated with lissencephaly.

  12. Photothermal therapy in a murine colon cancer model using near-infrared absorbing gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Glenn P.; Bao, Lili; Gill-Sharp, Kelly; Sang, Krystina L.; Wang, James; Payne, J. Donald

    2010-01-01

    The photothermal ablation of solid tumors using exogenous, near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing nanoparticles has been previously investigated using various preclinical models and is currently being evaluated in the clinic. Here, we evaluate the circulation kinetics, preliminary toxicity, and efficacy of photothermal ablation of solid tumors using gold nanorods systemically delivered and passively accumulated in a murine subcutaneous colon cancer model. Tumored animals were infused with nanorods followed by the percutaneous illumination of the tumor with an 808-nm laser. Control groups consisted of laser-only, nanorod-only, and untreated tumored animals. The survival of the treated and control groups were monitored for 60 days post-treatment. The survival of the photothermally treated group was statistically longer than the control groups, with approximately 44% tumor free through the evaluation period. Histopathology of the major organs of animals infused with nanorods did not indicate any significant toxicity at 60 days post-treatment. Particle biodistribution was evaluated by elemental analysis of the major organs of untumored mice at 1, 7, and 30 days after infusion with nanorods. Elemental analysis indicates nanorod clearance from the blood and retention by the reticuloendothelial system. This study indicates that gold nanorods are promising agents for photothermal ablation of solid tumors.

  13. Simvastatin Treatment Improves Survival in a Murine Model of Burn Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beffa, David C; Fischman, Alan J.; Fagan, Shawn P.; Hamrahi, Victoria F.; Kaneki, Masao; Yu, Yong-Ming; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Carter, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Infection is the most common and most serious complication of a major burn injury related to burn size. Despite improvements in antimicrobial therapies sepsis still accounts for 50–60% of deaths in burn patients. Given the acute onset and unpredictable nature of sepsis, primary prevention was rarely attempted in its management. However, recent studies have demonstrated that statin treatment can decrease mortality is a murine model of sepsis by preservation of cardiac function and reversal of inflammatory alterations. In addition, it has been shown that treatment with statins is associated with reduced incidence of sepsis in human patients. In the current study groups of CD1 male mice (n=12) were anesthetized and subjected to a dorsal 30% TBSA scald burn injury. Starting 2 hours post burn, the animals were divided into a treatment group receiving 0.2 µ/g simvastatin or a sham group receiving placebo. Simvastatin and placebo were administered by intraperitoneal injection with two dosing regimens; once daily and every 12 hours. On Post burn day 7 cecal ligation and puncture with a 21-gauge needle was performed under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia and the two different dosing schedules were continued. A simvastatin dose dependant improvement in survival was observed in the burn sepsis model. PMID:21145172

  14. Cryptococcus neoformans hyperfilamentous strain is hypervirulent in a murine model of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feretzaki, Marianna; Hardison, Sarah E; Wormley, Floyd L; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a human fungal pathogen that causes lethal infections of the lung and central nervous system in immunocompromised individuals. C. neoformans has a defined bipolar sexual life cycle with a and α mating types. During the sexual cycle, which can occur between cells of opposite mating types (bisexual reproduction) or cells of one mating type (unisexual reproduction), a dimorphic transition from yeast to hyphal growth occurs. Hyphal development and meiosis generate abundant spores that, following inhalation, penetrate deep into the lung to enter the alveoli, germinate, and establish a pulmonary infection growing as budding yeast cells. Unisexual reproduction has been directly observed only in the Cryptococcus var. neoformans (serotype D) lineage under laboratory conditions. However, hyphal development has been previously associated with reduced virulence and the serotype D lineage exhibits limited pathogenicity in the murine model. In this study we show that the serotype D hyperfilamentous strain XL280α is hypervirulent in an animal model. It can grow inside the lung of the host, establish a pulmonary infection, and then disseminate to the brain to cause cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. Surprisingly, this hyperfilamentous strain triggers an immune response polarized towards Th2-type immunity, which is usually observed in the highly virulent sibling species C. gattii, responsible for the Pacific Northwest outbreak. These studies provide a technological advance that will facilitate analysis of virulence genes and attributes in C. neoformans var. neoformans, and reveal the virulence potential of serotype D as broader and more dynamic than previously appreciated.

  15. Evaluation of VT-1161 for Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis in Murine Infection Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubitz, Lisa F; Trinh, Hien T; Galgiani, John N; Lewis, Maria L; Fothergill, Annette W; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Barker, Bridget M; Lewis, Eric R G; Doyle, Adina L; Hoekstra, William J; Schotzinger, Robert J; Garvey, Edward P

    2015-12-01

    Coccidioidomycosis, or valley fever, is a growing health concern endemic to the southwestern United States. Safer, more effective, and more easily administered drugs are needed especially for severe, chronic, or unresponsive infections. The novel fungal CYP51 inhibitor VT-1161 demonstrated in vitro antifungal activity, with MIC50 and MIC90 values of 1 and 2 μg/ml, respectively, against 52 Coccidioides clinical isolates. In the initial animal study, oral doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg VT-1161 significantly reduced fungal burdens and increased survival time in a lethal respiratory model in comparison with treatment with a placebo (P < 0.001). Oral doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg VT-1161 were similarly efficacious in the murine central nervous system (CNS) model compared to placebo treatment (P < 0.001). All comparisons with the positive-control drug, fluconazole at 50 mg/kg per day, demonstrated either statistical equivalence or superiority of VT-1161. VT-1161 treatment also prevented dissemination of infection from the original inoculation site to a greater extent than fluconazole. Many of these in vivo results can be explained by the long half-life of VT-1161 leading to sustained high plasma levels. Thus, the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of VT-1161 are attractive characteristics for long-term treatment of this serious fungal infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. IL-10 is critical for Th2 responses in a murine model of allergic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laouini, Dhafer; Alenius, Harri; Bryce, Paul; Oettgen, Hans; Tsitsikov, Erdyni; Geha, Raif S

    2003-10-01

    We found that mechanical injury to mouse skin, which can be caused by tape stripping, results in rapid induction of IL-10 mRNA. IL-10-/- mice were used to examine the role of IL-10 in a mouse model of allergic dermatitis induced by epicutaneous (EC) sensitization with OVA on tape-stripped skin. Skin infiltration by eosinophils and expression of eotaxin, IL-4, and IL-5 mRNA in OVA-sensitized skin sites were severely diminished in IL-10-/- mice. Following in vitro stimulation with OVA, splenocytes from EC-sensitized IL-10-/- mice secreted significantly less IL-4, but significantly more IFN-gamma, than splenocytes from WT controls. A similar skewing in cytokine secretion profile was observed in the splenocytes of IL-10-/- mice immunized intraperitoneally with OVA. IL-10-/- APCs skewed the in vitro response of OVA T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic T cells towards Th1. Examination of the Th response of WT and IL-10-/- mice immunized with OVA-pulsed WT or IL-10-/- DCs revealed that both DCs and T cells participate in IL-10 skewing of the Th2 response in vivo. These results suggest that IL-10 plays an important role in the Th2 response to antigen and in the development of skin eosinophilia in a murine model of allergic dermatitis.

  17. Transcutaneous photodynamic therapy delays the onset of paralysis in a murine multiple sclerosis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, David W. C.; Leong, Simon; Levy, Julia G.; Chan, Agnes H.

    1995-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD, Verteporfin) and whole body irradiation, can affect the course of adoptively transferred experimental allergic (autoimmune) encephalomyelitis (EAE) in PL mice. Murine EAE is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease which serves as a model for human multiple sclerosis. Using a novel disease induction protocol, we found that mice characteristically developed EAE within 3 weeks of receipt of myelin basic protein (MBP)-sensitized, in vitro-cultured spleen or lymph node cells. However, if animals were treated with PDT (1 mg BPD/kg bodyweight and exposed to whole body 15 Joules cm2 of LED light) 24 hours after receiving these cells, disease onset time was significantly delayed. PDT-treated mice developed disease symptoms 45 +/- 3 days following cell administration whereas untreated controls were affected within 23 +/- 2 days. In contrast, application of PDT 48 or 120 hours following injection of the pathogenic cells had no significant effect upon the development of EAE. Experiments are in progress to account for the protective effect of PDT in this animal model. These studies should provide evidence on the feasibility of PDT as a treatment for human autoimmune disease.

  18. Correlation of Brain Atrophy, Disability, and Spinal Cord Atrophy in a Murine Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz Soldán, M Mateo; Raman, Mekala R; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Lohrey, Anne K; Chen, Yi; Pirko, Istvan; Johnson, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Disability progression in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains incompletely understood. Unlike lesional measures, central nervous system atrophy has a strong correlation with disability. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection in SJL/J mice is an established model of progressive MS. We utilized in vivo MRI to quantify brain and spinal cord atrophy in this model and analyzed the temporal relationship between atrophy and disability. Infected and control mice were followed for 12 months. Disability was assessed periodically using rotarod assay. Volumetric MRI datasets were acquired at 7 Tesla. Ventricular volume and C4-5 spinal cord cross-sectional area measurements were performed using Analyze 10. At 3 months, brain atrophy reached statistical significance (P = .005). In contrast, disability did not differ until 4 months post-infection (P = .0005). Cord atrophy reached significance by 9 months (P = 0.009). By 12 months, brain atrophy resulted in 111.8% increased ventricular volume (P = .00003), while spinal cord cross-sectional area was 25.6% reduced (P = .001) among cases. Our results suggest that significant brain atrophy precedes and predicts the development of disability, while spinal cord atrophy occurs late and correlates with severe disability. The observed temporal relationship establishes a framework for mechanisms of disability progression and enables further investigations of their underlying substrate. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  19. Cryptococcus neoformans hyperfilamentous strain is hypervirulent in a murine model of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Feretzaki

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a human fungal pathogen that causes lethal infections of the lung and central nervous system in immunocompromised individuals. C. neoformans has a defined bipolar sexual life cycle with a and α mating types. During the sexual cycle, which can occur between cells of opposite mating types (bisexual reproduction or cells of one mating type (unisexual reproduction, a dimorphic transition from yeast to hyphal growth occurs. Hyphal development and meiosis generate abundant spores that, following inhalation, penetrate deep into the lung to enter the alveoli, germinate, and establish a pulmonary infection growing as budding yeast cells. Unisexual reproduction has been directly observed only in the Cryptococcus var. neoformans (serotype D lineage under laboratory conditions. However, hyphal development has been previously associated with reduced virulence and the serotype D lineage exhibits limited pathogenicity in the murine model. In this study we show that the serotype D hyperfilamentous strain XL280α is hypervirulent in an animal model. It can grow inside the lung of the host, establish a pulmonary infection, and then disseminate to the brain to cause cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. Surprisingly, this hyperfilamentous strain triggers an immune response polarized towards Th2-type immunity, which is usually observed in the highly virulent sibling species C. gattii, responsible for the Pacific Northwest outbreak. These studies provide a technological advance that will facilitate analysis of virulence genes and attributes in C. neoformans var. neoformans, and reveal the virulence potential of serotype D as broader and more dynamic than previously appreciated.

  20. Interleukin-13 receptor α2 DNA prime boost vaccine induces tumor immunity in murine tumor models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri Raj K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA vaccines represent an attractive approach for cancer treatment by inducing active T cell and B cell immune responses to tumor antigens. Previous studies have shown that interleukin-13 receptor α2 chain (IL-13Rα2, a tumor-associated antigen is a promising target for cancer immunotherapy as high levels of IL-13Rα2 are expressed on a variety of human tumors. To enhance the effectiveness of DNA vaccine, we used extracellular domain of IL-13Rα2 (ECDα2 as a protein-boost against murine tumor models. Methods We have developed murine models of tumors naturally expressing IL-13Rα2 (MCA304 sarcoma, 4T1 breast carcinoma and D5 melanoma tumors transfected with human IL-13Rα2 in syngeneic mice and examined the antitumor activity of DNA vaccine expressing IL-13Rα2 gene with or without ECDα2 protein mixed with CpG and IFA adjuvants as a boost vaccine. Results Mice receiving IL-13Rα2 DNA vaccine boosted with ECDα2 protein were superior in exhibiting inhibition of tumor growth, compared to mice receiving DNA vaccine alone, in both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine settings. In addition, prime-boost vaccination significantly prolonged the survival of mice compared to DNA vaccine alone. Furthermore, ECDα2 booster vaccination increased IFN-γ production and CTL activity against tumor expressing IL-13Rα2. The immunohistochemical analysis showed the infiltration of CD4 and CD8 positive T cells and IFN-γ-induced chemokines (CXCL9 and CXCL10 in regressing tumors of immunized mice. Finally, the prime boost strategy was able to reduce immunosuppressive CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs in the spleen and tumor of vaccinated mice. Conclusion These results suggest that immunization with IL-13Rα2 DNA vaccine followed by ECDα2 boost mixed with CpG and IFA adjuvants inhibits tumor growth in T cell dependent manner. Thus our results show an enhancement of efficacy of IL-13Rα2 DNA vaccine with ECDα2 protein boost and offers an

  1. Modeling Synergistic Drug Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Growth in Murine Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    synergistic drug inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth in murine macrophagesw Xin Fang, Anders Wallqvist and Jaques Reifman* Received 15th...inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in murine macrophage cells. We used it to simulate ex vivo bacterial growth inhibition due to 3-nitropropionate (3...is felt worldwide, with 9.4 million new cases and 1.8 million deaths in 2008.1,2 The causative agent of the disease, Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  2. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 is a key molecular target for mithramycin A-induced apoptosis in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells and a tumor xenograft animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Jung, Ji-Youn; Lee, Jin-Seok; Park, Jong-Hwan; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Cho, Sung-Dae

    2013-01-01

    Mithramycin A (Mith) is a natural polyketide that has been used in multiple areas of research including apoptosis of various cancer cells. Here, we examined the critical role of Mith in apoptosis and its molecular mechanism in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells and tumor xenografts. Mith decreased cell growth and induced apoptosis in DU145 and PC-3 cells. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) was over-expressed in both cell lines compared to RWPE1 cells. Mith inhibited Mcl-1 protein expression in both cells, but only altered Mcl-1 mRNA levels in PC-3 cells. We also found that Mith reduced Mcl-1 protein levels through both proteasome-dependent protein degradation and the inhibition of protein synthesis in DU145 cells. Studies using siRNA confirmed that the knockdown of Mcl-1 induced apoptosis. Mith significantly suppressed TPA-induced neoplastic cell transformation through the down-regulation of the Mcl-1 protein in JB6 cells, and suppressed the transforming activity of both cell types. Mith also inhibited tumor growth and Mcl-1 levels, in addition to inducing apoptosis, in athymic nude mice bearing DU145 cell xenografts without affecting five normal organs. Therefore, Mith inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis by suppressing Mcl-1 in both prostate cancer cells and xenograft tumors, and thus is a potent anticancer drug candidate for prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Murine AIDS: a model for the human disease or a distinct entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnigham, R K; Thacore, H R; Zhou, P; Terzian, R; Nakeeb, S; Zaleski, M B

    1994-01-01

    The LP-BM5 mixture of murine retroviruses elicits a disease in mice referred to as murine immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS) that is considered by some to be an animal homologue of human AIDS. In this article, we present and discuss some recent findings on the pathogenesis of the murine disease and their implications for the proposed homology between murine and human syndromes. The murine disease seems to display as many similarities to as it does differences from human AIDS. Among the latter are: definitive and exclusive viral etiology, a strong genetic effect on susceptibility to infection, expansion of the CD4+ cell population in spleen and peripheral blood, consistent transmissibility by a single transfusion of the minute amounts of blood or plasma from infected donors, and striking similarity between virus-induced alteration of the in vitro spleen cell proliferation and those caused by treatment with a protein kinase inhibitor K252a. With this in mind, the use of the noncommittal term retrovirus-induced murine lymphoproliferative disease instead of MAIDS appears to be more appropriate at this time.

  4. The soluble EP2 receptor FuEP2/Ex2 suppresses endometrial cancer cell growth in an orthotopic xenograft model in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Izumi, Keisuke; Uehara, Hisanori

    2011-07-01

    Endometrial cancer is one of the most common gynecologic malignancies and many factors influence in its growth and development. As in many other types of cancer, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is thought to be an accelerator of cell proliferation and endometrial cancer progression. In this study, we examined the effect of FuEP2/Ex2, a soluble decoy receptor for PGE(2) on growth of endometrial cancer cells. A stable transfectant expressing FuEP2/Ex2 was established from human endometrial cancer Ishikawa cells (Ish-FuEP2/Ex2). Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 cells expressed FuEP2/Ex2 mRNA and protein. Expression levels of E-prostanoid receptor 1 (EP1), EP2, EP3, EP4, and F-prostanoid receptor (FP) were almost the same in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 and vector control cells. Growth rates of Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 under normal culture conditions were also similar to vector control cells, although PGE(2)-induced growth stimulation was completely inhibited in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 or by Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 culture medium. Moreover, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclin D1, and c-fos mRNA by PGE(2) were not observed in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 and Ish-FuEP2/Ex2 culture medium-treated vector control cells, although they were found when treated with prostaglandin F(2α). An orthotopic xenograft model in athymic nude mice revealed that Ish-FuEP2/Ex2-injected mice had significantly decreased mean tumor area. The proportion of Ki-67-positive cells in the tumor lesion was also significantly lower in Ish-FuEP2/Ex2-injected mice. These findings suggest that an EP-targeting strategy using FuEP2/Ex2 may be of use in the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  5. The Use of L-sIDOL Transgenic Mice as a Murine Model to Study Hypercholesterolemia and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerenturk, Eser J; Calkin, Anna C

    2017-01-01

    There are many advantages to the use of mice as a model to study the regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Common models of hypercholesterolemia include low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLR -/-) mice and apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE) -/- mice. Herein, we describe the recently generated mouse model, L-sIDOL Tg mice, which express a dominant active form of Inducible Degrader Of the Low-density lipoprotein receptor (IDOL) in a liver-specific manner. This murine model offers significant advantages over previously established models for the study of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis.

  6. Quantification of collagen and proteoglycan deposition in a murine model of airway remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Geoffrey J

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-epithelial extracellular matrix deposition is a feature of asthmatic airway remodelling associated with severity of disease, decline in lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness. The composition of, and mechanisms leading to, this increase in subepithelial matrix, and its importance in the pathogenesis of asthma are unclear. This is partly due to limitations of the current models and techniques to assess airway remodelling. Methods In this study we used a modified murine model of ovalbumin sensitisation and challenge to reproduce features of airway remodelling, including a sustained increase in sub-epithelial matrix deposition. In addition, we have established techniques to accurately and specifically measure changes in sub-epithelial matrix deposition, using histochemical and immunohistochemical staining in conjunction with digital image analysis, and applied these to the measurement of collagen and proteoglycans. Results 24 hours after final ovalbumin challenge, changes similar to those associated with acute asthma were observed, including inflammatory cell infiltration, epithelial cell shedding and goblet cell hyperplasia. Effects were restricted to the bronchial and peribronchial regions with parenchymal lung of ovalbumin sensitised and challenged mice appearing histologically normal. By 12 days, the acute inflammatory changes had largely resolved and increased sub-epithelial staining for collagen and proteoglycans was observed. Quantitative digital image analysis confirmed the increased deposition of sub-epithelial collagen (33%, p Conclusion This animal model reproduces many of the features of airway remodelling found in asthma and allows accurate and reproducible measurement of sub-epithelial extra-cellular matrix deposition. As far as we are aware, this is the first demonstration of increased sub-epithelial proteoglycan deposition in an animal model of airway remodelling. This model will be useful for

  7. Lin28b is sufficient to drive liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Liem H; Robinton, Daisy A; Seligson, Marc T; Wu, Linwei; Li, Lin; Rakheja, Dinesh; Comerford, Sarah A; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Parikh, Monisha S; Yang, Erin H; Powers, John T; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar P; Hammer, Robert E; Daley, George Q; Zhu, Hao

    2014-08-11

    Lin28a/b are RNA-binding proteins that influence stem cell maintenance, metabolism, and oncogenesis. Poorly differentiated, aggressive cancers often overexpress Lin28, but its role in tumor initiation or maintenance has not been definitively addressed. We report that LIN28B overexpression is sufficient to initiate hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma in murine models. We also detected Lin28b overexpression in MYC-driven hepatoblastomas, and liver-specific deletion of Lin28a/b reduced tumor burden, extended latency, and prolonged survival. Both intravenous siRNA against Lin28b and conditional Lin28b deletion reduced tumor burden and prolonged survival. Igf2bp proteins are upregulated, and Igf2bp3 is required in the context of LIN28B overexpression to promote growth. Therefore, multiple murine models demonstrate that Lin28b is both sufficient to initiate liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Mucocutaneous diseases and murine models with death of keratinocytes induced by lichenoid tissue reaction/interface dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiyama, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    A set of histopathological elements with death of epidermal basal cell layer keratinocytes along with inflammatory cell infiltration distinguishes lichenoid tissue reaction (LTR)/interface dermatitis (IFD) from other inflammatory mucocutaneous diseases. The LTR/IFD can be seen in skin disorders like as lichen planus, acute graft-versus-host disease, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, and toxic epidermal necrolysis/Stevesn-Johnson syndrome. Clinical and basic researches suggested that cytotoxic CD8 T cells producing interferon-γ and FasL are final effector cells to cause apoptosis of keratinocyte. Some murine models of LTR/IFD have been established, for example, LTR/IFD reactions of keratinocyte-specific ovalbumin (OVA)-transgenic mice after OVA-specific T-cell-receptor(+)CD8 T cells. By analysis of the murine model, a new class of immunosuppressant, a JAK inhibitor, has been suggested as a new candidate for treatment of LTR/IFD.

  9. Retinal Inhibition of CCR3 Induces Retinal Cell Death in a Murine Model of Choroidal Neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    Full Text Available Inhibition of chemokine C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3 signaling has been considered as treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, CCR3 is expressed in neural retina from aged human donor eyes. Therefore, broad CCR3 inhibition may be harmful to the retina. We assessed the effects of CCR3 inhibition on retina and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs that develop into choroidal neovascularization (CNV. In adult murine eyes, CCR3 colocalized with glutamine-synthetase labeled Műller cells. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, CCR3 immunolocalized not only to lectin-stained cells in CNV lesions but also to the retina. Compared to non-lasered controls, CCR3 mRNA was significantly increased in laser-treated retina. An intravitreal injection of a CCR3 inhibitor (CCR3i significantly reduced CNV compared to DMSO or PBS controls. Both CCR3i and a neutralizing antibody to CCR3 increased TUNEL+ retinal cells overlying CNV, compared to controls. There was no difference in cleaved caspase-3 in laser-induced CNV lesions or in overlying retina between CCR3i- or control-treated eyes. Following CCR3i, apoptotic inducible factor (AIF was significantly increased and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2 decreased in the retina; there were no differences in retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. In cultured human Műller cells exposed to eotaxin (CCL11 and VEGF, CCR3i significantly increased TUNEL+ cells and AIF but decreased BCL2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, without affecting caspase-3 activity or VEGF. CCR3i significantly decreased AIF in RPE/choroids and immunostaining of phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (p-VEGFR2 in CNV with a trend toward reduced VEGF. In cultured CECs treated with CCL11 and/or VEGF, CCR3i decreased p-VEGFR2 and increased BCL2 without increasing TUNEL+ cells and AIF. These findings suggest that inhibition of retinal CCR3 causes retinal cell death and that targeted inhibition of CCR3 in CECs may be a safer if CCR3

  10. Locomotion and muscle mass measures in a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartog Anita

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterized by chronic poly-arthritis, synovial hyperplasia, erosive synovitis, progressive cartilage and bone destruction accompanied by a loss of body cell mass. This loss of cell mass, known as rheumatoid cachexia, predominates in the skeletal muscle and can in part be explained by a decreased physical activity. The murine collagen induced arthritis (CIA model has been proven to be a useful model in RA research since it shares many immunological and pathological features with human RA. The present study explored the interactions between arthritis development, locomotion and muscle mass in the CIA model. Methods CIA was induced in male DBA/1 mice. Locomotion was registered at different time points by a camera and evaluated by a computerized tracing system. Arthritis severity was detected by the traditionally used semi-quantitative clinical scores. The muscle mass of the hind-legs was detected at the end of the study by weighing. A methotrexate (MTX intervention group was included to study the applicability of the locomotion and muscle mass for testing effectiveness of interventions in more detail. Results There is a strong correlation between clinical arthritis and locomotion. The correlations between muscle mass and locomotion or clinical arthritis were less pronounced. MTX intervention resulted in an improvement of disease severity accompanied by an increase in locomotion and muscle mass. Conclusion The present data demonstrate that registration of locomotion followed by a computerized evaluation of the movements is a simple non invasive quantitative method to define disease severity and evaluate effectiveness of therapeutic agents in the CIA model.

  11. An Improved Syngeneic Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Breast Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Omar M.; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Methods Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous injection in the area of the nipple (OP), or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. Results ODV produced less variable sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. Conclusions ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development. PMID:25200444

  12. Exenatide improves glucose homeostasis and prolongs survival in a murine model of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Kalla Vyas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing awareness of secondary insulin resistance and alterations in myocardial glucose utilization in congestive heart failure. Whether therapies that directly target these changes would be beneficial is unclear. We previously demonstrated that acute blockade of the insulin responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 precipitates acute decompensated heart failure in mice with advanced dilated cardiomyopathy. Our current objective was to determine whether pharmacologic enhancement of insulin sensitivity and myocardial glucose uptake preserves cardiac function and survival in the setting of primary heart failure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The GLP-1 agonist exenatide was administered twice daily to a murine model of dilated cardiomyopathy (TG9 starting at 56 days of life. TG9 mice develop congestive heart failure and secondary insulin resistance in a highly predictable manner with death by 12 weeks of age. Glucose homeostasis was assessed by measuring glucose tolerance at 8 and 10 weeks and tissue 2-deoxyglucose uptake at 75 days. Exenatide treatment improved glucose tolerance, myocardial GLUT4 expression and 2-deoxyglucose uptake, cardiac contractility, and survival over control vehicle-treated TG9 mice. Phosphorylation of AMP kinase and AKT was also increased in exenatide-treated animals. Total myocardial GLUT1 levels were not different between groups. Exenatide also abrogated the detrimental effect of the GLUT4 antagonist ritonavir on survival in TG9 mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In heart failure secondary insulin resistance is maladaptive and myocardial glucose uptake is suboptimal. An incretin-based therapy, which addresses these changes, appears beneficial.

  13. Anti-cancer activity of Annexin V in murine melanoma model by suppressing tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuerui; Huo, Lina; Jin, Haibo; Han, Yuheng; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yanjun; Lai, Xinghuan; Le, Ziwei; Zhang, Jing; Hua, Zichun

    2017-06-27

    Annexin V, a protein with high affinity to phosphatidylserine (PS) in a calcium dependent manner, has been widely used to probe apoptosis. Annexin V in inhibiting engulfment of apoptotic cells by macrophages had been reported to increase the immunogenicity of tumor cells undergoing apoptosis. However, far less is known about its multiple properties, especially in cancer therapies. Here we found that Annexin V had a good anti-tumor activity in murine melanomaxenograft model. Treatment with Annexin V showed significant reduction in tumor size and remarkable tumor necrosis areas. The serum level of VEGF was downregualted by Annexin V both in normal mice and mice bearing tumor, suggesting that its new role on impeding tumor angiogenesis. In Silico analysis using Oncomine database, we also found the negative correlation of AnnexinV and VEGF both in skin and melanoma. The decreased Annexin V expression shows linearity relation with the elevated VEGF expression. These data provided a possibility that Annexin V can be used as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor in tumor therapy.

  14. Differences in Host Innate Responses among Coccidioides Isolates in a Murine Model of Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Eric R G; David, Victoria R; Doyle, Adina L; Rajabi, Khadijeh; Kiefer, Jeffrey A; Pirrotte, Patrick; Barker, Bridget M

    2015-10-01

    Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are soil-dwelling fungi and the causative agents of coccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic to certain semiarid regions in the Americas. The most common route of infection is by inhalation of airborne Coccidioides arthroconidia. Once a susceptible host inhales the conidia, a transition to mature endosporulated spherules can occur within the first 5 days of infection. For this study, we examined the host response in a murine model of coccidioidomycosis during a time period of infection that has not been well characterized. We collected lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from BALB/c mice that were infected with a C. immitis pure strain, a C. immitis hybrid strain, or a C. posadasii strain as well as uninfected mice. We compared the host responses to the Coccidioides strains used in this study by assessing the level of transcription of selected cytokine genes in lung tissues and characterized host and fungal proteins present in BALF. Host response varied depending on the Coccidioides strain that was used and did not appear to be overly robust. This study provides a foundation to begin to dissect the host immune response early in infection, to detect abundant Coccidioides proteins, and to develop diagnostics that target these early time points of infection.

  15. Combined therapy of interleukin-12 and interleukin-18 against cryptococcus neoformans infection in a murine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore adverse effects of combined treatment of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) against cryptococcosis in a murine model.Methods Infected mice were treated with a combination of IL-12 and IL-18. Their body weight and intake of water and food were observed and recorded. Serum levels of leptin were detected with an enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA).Results In the combined treatment group, the intake volume of water and food were reduced, leading to weight loss and undetectable levels of leptin in the serum. These adverse effects were more profound in mice that had received higher doses of cytokines, which sometimes led to a fatal outcome. There was a significant difference compared with the control group. Neutralization of endogenous tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by its specific mAb did not alter the wasting effect of this treatment.Conclusions The combined IL-12/IL-18 treatment may cause a number of adverse effects independent of TNF-α and leptin synthesis. Further investigations for resolving these adverse effects are required before clinical application of these cytokines.

  16. Heat Shock Response Associated with Hepatocarcinogenesis in a Murine Model of Hereditary Tyrosinemia Type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Angileri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1 is a metabolic liver disease caused by genetic defects of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH, an enzyme necessary to complete the breakdown of tyrosine. The severe hepatic dysfunction caused by the lack of this enzyme is prevented by the therapeutic use of NTBC (2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethylbenzoyl] cyclohexane-1,3-dione. However despite the treatment, chronic hepatopathy and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC are still observed in some HT1 patients. Growing evidence show the important role of heat shock proteins (HSPs in many cellular processes and their involvement in pathological diseases including cancer. Their survival-promoting effect by modulation of the apoptotic machinery is often correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in a number of cancers. Here, we sought to gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with liver dysfunction and tumor development in a murine model of HT1. Differential gene expression patterns in livers of mice under HT1 stress, induced by drug retrieval, have shown deregulation of stress and cell death resistance genes. Among them, genes coding for HSPB and HSPA members, and for anti-apoptotic BCL-2 related mitochondrial proteins were associated with the hepatocarcinogenetic process. Our data highlight the variation of stress pathways related to HT1 hepatocarcinogenesis suggesting the role of HSPs in rendering tyrosinemia-affected liver susceptible to the development of HCC.

  17. Hepatic Differentiation of Murine Disease-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Allows Disease Modelling In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Eggenschwiler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent cells by retrovirus-mediated expression of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and C-MYC is a promising approach to derive disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. In this study, we focused on three murine models for metabolic liver disorders: the copper storage disorder Wilson's disease (toxic-milk mice, tyrosinemia type 1 (fumarylacetoacetate-hydrolase deficiency, FAH−/− mice, and alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (PiZ mice. Colonies of iPSCs emerged 2-3 weeks after transduction of fibroblasts, prepared from each mouse strain, and were maintained as individual iPSC lines. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated the expression of endogenous pluripotency markers. Hepatic precursor cells could be derived from these disease-specific iPSCs applying an in vitro differentiation protocol and could be visualized after transduction of a lentiviral albumin-GFP reporter construct. Functional characterization of these cells allowed the recapitulation of the disease phenotype for further studies of underlying molecular mechanisms of the respective disease.

  18. Efficacy of single large doses of caspofungin in a neutropenic murine model against the "psilosis" group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berényi, Réka; Kovács, Renátó; Domán, Marianna; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Kardos, Gábor; Juhász, Béla; Perlin, David; Majoros, László

    2014-07-01

    We compared the in vivo efficacy of single large dose of caspofungin to that of daily smaller caspofungin doses (with same cumulative doses) against C. albicans (echinocandin susceptible and resistant isolates) and the “psilosis� group in a neutropenic murine model. Seven treatment groups were formed for C. orthopsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. albicans (no treatment, 1, 2 and 3 mg/kg caspofungin daily for five days; single 5, 10 and 15 mg/kg caspofungin doses). For C. parapsilosis there were five treatment groups (no treatment, 3 and 4 mg/kg caspofungin daily for five days; single 15 and 20 mg/kg caspofungin). Tissue burdens of C. orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis were significantly decreased by daily 3 mg/kg and 10 or 15 mg/kg single caspofungin doses (Pcaspofungin doses (Pcaspofungin were comparable or sometimes superior to the lower, daily-dose regimen against the “psilosis� group supporting further studies with this therapeutic strategy.

  19. High-Dose Menaquinone-7 Supplementation Reduces Cardiovascular Calcification in a Murine Model of Extraosseous Calcification

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    Daniel Scheiber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular calcification is prevalent in the aging population and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and diabetes mellitus, giving rise to substantial morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla-protein (MGP is an important inhibitor of calcification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of high-dose menaquinone-7 (MK-7 supplementation (100 µg/g diet on the development of extraosseous calcification in a murine model. Calcification was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy combined with high phosphate diet in rats. Sham operated animals served as controls. Animals received high or low MK-7 diets for 12 weeks. We assessed vital parameters, serum chemistry, creatinine clearance, and cardiac function. CKD provoked increased aortic (1.3 fold; p < 0.05 and myocardial (2.4 fold; p < 0.05 calcification in line with increased alkaline phosphatase levels (2.2 fold; p < 0.01. MK-7 supplementation inhibited cardiovascular calcification and decreased aortic alkaline phosphatase tissue concentrations. Furthermore, MK-7 supplementation increased aortic MGP messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA expression (10-fold; p < 0.05. CKD-induced arterial hypertension with secondary myocardial hypertrophy and increased elastic fiber breaking points in the arterial tunica media did not change with MK-7 supplementation. Our results show that high-dose MK-7 supplementation inhibits the development of cardiovascular calcification. The protective effect of MK-7 may be related to the inhibition of secondary mineralization of damaged vascular structures.

  20. Antitumor effect of pharmacologic ascorbate in the B16 murine melanoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Oscar K; Parrow, Nermi L; Violet, Pierre-Christian; Yang, Jacqueline; Zornjak, Jennifer; Basseville, Agnes; Levine, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Because 5-year survival rates for patients with metastatic melanoma remain below 25%, there is continued need for new therapeutic approaches. For some tumors, pharmacologic ascorbate treatment may have a beneficial antitumor effect and may work synergistically with standard chemotherapeutics. To investigate this possibility in melanoma, we examined the effect of pharmacologic ascorbate on B16-F10 cells. Murine models were employed to compare tumor size following treatment with ascorbate, and the chemotherapeutic agents dacarbazine or valproic acid, alone or in combination with ascorbate. Results indicated that nearly all melanoma cell lines were susceptible to ascorbate-mediated cytotoxicity. Compared to saline controls, pharmacologic ascorbate decreased tumor size in both C57BL/6 (P ascorbate was superior or equivalent to dacarbazine as an antitumor agent. Synergy was not apparent when ascorbate was combined with either dacarbazine or valproic acid; the latter combination may have additional toxicities. Pharmacologic ascorbate induced DNA damage in melanoma cells, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of the histone variant, H2A.X. Differences were not evident in tumor samples from C57BL/6 mice treated with pharmacologic ascorbate compared to tumors from saline-treated controls. Together, these results suggest that pharmacologic ascorbate has a cytotoxic effect against melanoma that is largely independent of lymphocytic immune functions and that continued investigation of pharmacologic ascorbate in cancer treatment is warranted.

  1. Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamic correlations of fluconazole in murine model of cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Julliana Ribeiro Alves; César, Isabela Costa; Costa, Marliete Carvalho; Ribeiro, Noelly Queiroz; Holanda, Rodrigo Assunção; Ramos, Lais Hott; Freitas, Gustavo José Cota; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Pianetti, Gerson Antônio; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2016-09-20

    The emergence of fluconazole-resistant Cryptococcus gattii is a global concern, since this azole is the main antifungal used worldwide to treat patients with cryptococcosis. Although pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) indices are useful predictive factors for therapeutic outcomes, there is a scarcity of data regarding PK/PD analysis of antifungals in cryptococcosis caused by resistant strains. In this study, PK/PD parameters were determined in a murine model of cryptococcosis caused by resistant C. gattii. We developed and validated a suitable liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for PK studies of fluconazole in the serum, lungs, and brain of uninfected mice. Mice were infected with susceptible or resistant C. gattii, and the effects of different doses of fluconazole on the pulmonary and central nervous system fungal burden were determined. The peak levels in the serum, lungs, and brain were achieved within 0.5h. The AUC/MIC index (area under the curve/minimum inhibitory concentration) was associated with the outcome of anti-cryptococcal therapy. Interestingly, the maximum concentration of fluconazole in the brain was lower than the MIC for both strains. In addition, the treatment of mice infected with the resistant strain was ineffective even when high doses of fluconazole were used or when amphotericin B was tested, confirming the cross-resistance between these drugs. Altogether, our novel data provide the correlation of PK/PD parameters with antifungal therapy during cryptococcosis caused by resistant C. gattii.

  2. Antidiabetic Properties of Azardiracta indica and Bougainvillea spectabilis: In Vivo Studies in Murine Diabetes Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Menakshi; Kothiwale, Sandeepkumar K; Tirmale, Amruta R; Bhargava, Shobha Y; Joshi, Bimba N

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic syndrome characterized by an increase in the blood glucose level. Treatment of diabetes is complicated due to multifactorial nature of the disease. Azadirachta indica Adr. Juss and Bougainvillea spectabilis are reported to have medicinal values including antidiabetic properties. In the present study using invivo diabetic murine model, A. indica and B. spectabilis chloroform, methanolic and aqueous extracts were investigated for the biochemical parameters important for controlling diabetes. It was found that A. indica chloroform extract and B. spectabilis aqueous, methanolic extracts showed a good oral glucose tolerance and significantly reduced the intestinal glucosidase activity. Interestingly, A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous extracts showed significant increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and hepatic, skeletal muscle glycogen content after 21 days of treatment. In immunohistochemical analysis, we observed a regeneration of insulin-producing cells and corresponding increase in the plasma insulin and c-peptide levels with the treatment of A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous, methanolic extracts. Analyzing the results, it is clear that A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous extracts are good candidates for developing new neutraceuticals treatment for diabetes.

  3. Antidiabetic Properties of Azardiracta indica and Bougainvillea spectabilis: In Vivo Studies in Murine Diabetes Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menakshi Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic syndrome characterized by an increase in the blood glucose level. Treatment of diabetes is complicated due to multifactorial nature of the disease. Azadirachta indica Adr. Juss and Bougainvillea spectabilis are reported to have medicinal values including antidiabetic properties. In the present study using in vivo diabetic murine model, A. indica and B. spectabilis chloroform, methanolic and aqueous extracts were investigated for the biochemical parameters important for controlling diabetes. It was found that A. indica chloroform extract and B. spectabilis aqueous, methanolic extracts showed a good oral glucose tolerance and significantly reduced the intestinal glucosidase activity. Interestingly, A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous extracts showed significant increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and hepatic, skeletal muscle glycogen content after 21 days of treatment. In immunohistochemical analysis, we observed a regeneration of insulin-producing cells and corresponding increase in the plasma insulin and c-peptide levels with the treatment of A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous, methanolic extracts. Analyzing the results, it is clear that A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous extracts are good candidates for developing new neutraceuticals treatment for diabetes.

  4. Cutaneous and systemic pathogenicity of a clinical isolate of Cladosporium sphaerospermum in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyan, X-H; Yang, Y-P; Fan, Y-M; Huang, W-M; Li, W; Zhou, Y

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenicity of a clinical isolate of Cladosporium sphaerospermum was determined in a murine model. BALB/c mice were given two intraperitoneal injections of 150 mg/kg cyclophosphamide or normal saline on days 4 and 1 preinoculation, and were then challenged with 0.2 ml of C. sphaerospermum inoculum (2 × 10(7) CFU/ml) by topical application on an abrasive wound or by subcutaneous or intravenous injection. Histopathology and inverse fungal culture were performed on the skin lesions and viscera, and pulmonary fungal burden was also determined. Inoculated skin developed localized infections after dermabrasive or subcutaneous challenge in all mice, but the maximum area and number of positive cultures from skin lesions were higher for immunocompromised mice. In the intravenously inoculated mice, all immunocompetent animals survived for the 4-week period of the experiment, while 60% of immunocompromised animals died by 5 days postinoculation. The incidence of disseminated infection and the pulmonary fungal burden of immunosuppressed mice were higher than those of immunocompetent animals. Cutaneous and systemic infections can be established by subcutaneous and intravenous challenge with C. sphaerospermum in BALB/c mice, with the lungs being the most susceptible tissue in systemic infection.

  5. Metallothionein-1 and nitric oxide expression are inversely correlated in a murine model of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elba Gonzalez-Mejia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, represents an endemic among Latin America countries. The participation of free radicals, especially nitric oxide (NO, has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of seropositive individuals with T. cruzi. In Chagas disease, increased NO contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and megacolon. Metallothioneins (MTs are efficient free radicals scavengers of NO in vitro and in vivo. Here, we developed a murine model of the chronic phase of Chagas disease using endemic T. cruzi RyCH1 in BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups: infected non-treated (Inf, infected N-monomethyl-L-arginine treated (Inf L-NAME, non-infected L-NAME treated and non-infected vehicle-treated. We determined blood parasitaemia and NO levels, the extent of parasite nests in tissues and liver MT-I expression levels. It was observed that NO levels were increasing in Inf mice in a time-dependent manner. Inf L-NAME mice had fewer T. cruzi nests in cardiac and skeletal muscle with decreased blood NO levels at day 135 post infection. This affect was negatively correlated with an increase of MT-I expression (r = -0.8462, p < 0.0001. In conclusion, we determined that in Chagas disease, an unknown inhibitory mechanism reduces MT-I expression, allowing augmented NO levels.

  6. In vivo characterization of neutrophil extracellular traps in various organs of a murine sepsis model.

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    Koji Tanaka

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs represent extracellular microbial trapping and killing. Recently, it has been implicated in thrombogenesis, autoimmune disease, and cancer progression. The aim of this study was to characterize NETs in various organs of a murine sepsis model in vivo and to investigate their associations with platelets, leukocytes, or vascular endothelium. NETs were classified as two distinct forms; cell-free NETs that were released away from neutrophils and anchored NETs that were anchored to neutrophils. Circulating cell-free NETs were characterized as fragmented or cotton-like structures, while anchored NETs were characterized as linear, reticular, membranous, or spot-like structures. In septic mice, both anchored and cell-free NETs were significantly increased in postcapillary venules of the cecum and hepatic sinusoids with increased leukocyte-endothelial interactions. NETs were also observed in both alveolar space and pulmonary capillaries of the lung. The interactions of NETs with platelet aggregates, leukocyte-platelet aggregates or vascular endothelium of arterioles and venules were observed in the microcirculation of septic mice. Microvessel occlusions which may be caused by platelet aggregates or leukocyte-platelet aggregates and heterogeneously decreased blood flow were also observed in septic mice. NETs appeared to be associated with the formation of platelet aggregates or leukocyte-platelet aggregates. These observational findings may suggest the adverse effect of intravascular NETs on the host during a sepsis.

  7. Immunoreactivity evaluation of a new recombinant chimeric protein against Brucella in the murine model

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    Abbas Abdollahi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Brucellosis is an important health problem in developing countries and no vaccine is available for the prevention of infection in humans. Because of clinically infectious diseases and their economic consequences in human and animals, designing a proper vaccine against Brucella is desirable. In this study, we evaluated the immune responses induced by a designed recombinant chimera protein in murine model.Materials and Methods: Three immunodominant antigens of Brucella have been characterized as potential immunogenic and protective antigens including: trigger factor (TF, Omp31 and Bp26 were fused together by EAAAK linkers to produce a chimera (structure were designed in silico, which was synthesized, cloned, and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3. The purification of recombinant protein was performed using Ni-NTA agarose. SDS-PAGE and anti-His antibody was used for confirmation purified protein (Western blot. BALB/c immunization was performed by purified protein and adjuvant, and sera antibody levels were measured by ELISA. otted.Results: SDS-PAGE and Western blotting results indicated the similarity of in silico designing and in vitro experiments. ELISA result proved that the immunized sera of mice contain high levels of antibodies (IgG against recombinant chimeric protein.Conclusion: The recombinant chimeric protein could be a potential antigen candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine against Brucella. Keywords: Brucella, Vaccine, Immunity, Recombinant

  8. Polyopes affinis alleviates airway inflammation in a murine model of allergic asthma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dae-Sung Lee; Won Sun Park; Soo-Jin Heo; Seon-Heui Cha; Daekyung Kim; You-Jin Jeon; Sae-Gwang Park; Su-Kil Seo; Jung Sik Choi; Sung-Jae Park; Eun Bo Shim; Il-Whan Choi; Won-Kyo Jung

    2011-12-01

    Marine algae have been utilized in food as well as medicine products for a variety of purposes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an ethanol extract of Polyopes affinis (P.affinis) can inhibit the pathogenesis of T helper 2 (Th2)-mediated allergen-induced airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma. Mice that were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) evidenced typical asthmatic reactions such as the following: an increase in the number of eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid; a marked influx of inflammatory cells into the lung around blood vessels and airways as well as the narrowing of the airway luminal; the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR); the presence of pulmonary Th2 cytokines; and the presence of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the serum. The successive intraperitoneal administration of P. affinis ethanolic extracts before the last airway OVA-challenge resulted in a significant inhibition of all asthmatic reactions. These data suggest that P. affinis ethanolic extracts possess therapeutic potential for the treatment of pulmonary allergic disorders such as allergic asthma.

  9. Metallothionein-1 and nitric oxide expression are inversely correlated in a murine model of Chagas disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mejia, Martha Elba; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Porchia, Leonardo M; Salgado, Hilda Rosas; Totolhua, José-Luis; Ortega, Arturo; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa Clara Regina; Ruiz-Vivanco, Guadalupe; Báez-Duarte, Blanca G; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, represents an endemic among Latin America countries. The participation of free radicals, especially nitric oxide (NO), has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of seropositive individuals with T. cruzi. In Chagas disease, increased NO contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and megacolon. Metallothioneins (MTs) are efficient free radicals scavengers of NO in vitro and in vivo. Here, we developed a murine model of the chronic phase of Chagas disease using endemic T. cruzi RyCH1 in BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups: infected non-treated (Inf), infected N-monomethyl-L-arginine treated (Inf L-NAME), non-infected L-NAME treated and non-infected vehicle-treated. We determined blood parasitaemia and NO levels, the extent of parasite nests in tissues and liver MT-I expression levels. It was observed that NO levels were increasing in Inf mice in a time-dependent manner. Inf L-NAME mice had fewer T. cruzi nests in cardiac and skeletal muscle with decreased blood NO levels at day 135 post infection. This affect was negatively correlated with an increase of MT-I expression (r = -0.8462, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, we determined that in Chagas disease, an unknown inhibitory mechanism reduces MT-I expression, allowing augmented NO levels. PMID:24676665

  10. Hepatoprotective Effect of ψ-Glutathione in a Murine Model of Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Swati S; Nugent, Jaime; Vartak, Ashish P; Nye, Steffan M; Vince, Robert

    2017-03-20

    Ψ-Glutathione (ψ-GSH) is an orally bioavailable and metabolism-resistant glutathione analogue that has been shown previously to substitute glutathione in most of its biochemical roles. Described here in its entirety is the preclinical evaluation of ψ-GSH as a rescue agent for acetaminophen (APAP) overdose: an event where time is of essence. By employing a murine model, four scenarios commonly encountered in emergency medicine are reconstructed. ψ-GSH is juxtaposed against N-acetylcysteine (NAC), the sole clinically available drug, in each of the scenarios. While both agents appear to be equally efficacious when timely administered, ψ-GSH partly retains its efficacy even in the face of substantial delay in administration. Thus, implied is the ability of ψ-GSH to intercept secondary toxicology following APAP insult. Oral availability and complete lack of toxicity as evaluated by liver function tests and survival analysis underscored ψ-GSH as a safer and more efficacious alternative to NAC. Finally, the pharmacodynamic mimicry of GSH by ψ-GSH is illustrated through the isolation and chemical characterization of an entity that can arise only through direct encounter of ψ-GSH with N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine, the primary toxic metabolite of APAP.

  11. Inhaled Liposomal Ciprofloxacin Protects against a Lethal Infection in a Murine Model of Pneumonic Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Karleigh A.; Armstrong, Stuart J.; Barnes, Kay B.; Davies, Carwyn; Laws, Thomas; Blanchard, James D.; Harding, Sarah V.; Atkins, Helen S.

    2017-01-01

    Inhalation of Yersinia pestis can lead to pneumonic plague, which without treatment is inevitably fatal. Two novel formulations of liposome-encapsulated ciprofloxacin, ‘ciprofloxacin for inhalation’ (CFI, Lipoquin®) and ‘dual release ciprofloxacin for inhalation’ (DRCFI, Pulmaquin®) containing CFI and ciprofloxacin solution, are in development. These were evaluated as potential therapies for infection with Y. pestis. In a murine model of pneumonic plague, human-like doses of aerosolized CFI, aerosolized DRCFI or intraperitoneal (i.p.) ciprofloxacin were administered at 24 h (representing prophylaxis) or 42 h (representing treatment) post-challenge. All three therapies provided a high level of protection when administered 24 h post-challenge. A single dose of CFI, but not DRCFI, significantly improved survival compared to a single dose of ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, single doses of CFI and DRCFI reduced bacterial burden in lungs and spleens to below the detectable limit at 60 h post-challenge. When therapy was delayed until 42 h post-challenge, a single dose of CFI or DRCFI offered minimal protection. However, single doses of CFI or DRCFI were able to significantly reduce the bacterial burden in the spleen compared to empty liposomes. A three-day treatment regimen of ciprofloxacin, CFI, or DRCFI resulted in high levels of protection (90–100% survival). This study suggests that CFI and DRCFI may be useful therapies for Y. pestis infection, both as prophylaxis and for the treatment of plague. PMID:28220110

  12. Vascular Permeability Drives Susceptibility to Influenza Infection in a Murine Model of Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Oguin, Thomas H.; Meliopoulos, Victoria; Iverson, Amy; Broadnax, Alexandria; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Pestina, Tamara; Thomas, Paul; Webby, Richard; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Rosch, Jason W.

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a major global health concern. Patients with SCD experience disproportionately greater morbidity and mortality in response to influenza infection than do others. Viral infection is one contributing factor for the development of Acute Chest Syndrome (ACS), a major cause of morbidity and mortality in SCD patients. We determined whether the heightened sensitivity to influenza infection could be reproduced in the two different SCD murine models to ascertain the underlying mechanisms of increased disease severity. In agreement with clinical observations, we found that both genetic and bone marrow-transplanted SCD mice had greater mortality in response to influenza infection than did wild-type animals. Despite similar initial viral titers and inflammatory responses between wild-type and SCD animals during infection, SCD mice continued to deteriorate and failed to resolve the infection, resulting in increased mortality. Histopathology of the lung tissues revealed extensive pulmonary edema and vascular damage following infection, a finding confirmed by heightened vascular permeability following virus challenge. These findings implicate the development of exacerbated pulmonary permeability following influenza challenge as the primary factor underlying heightened mortality. These studies highlight the need to focus on prevention and control strategies against influenza infection in the SCD population. PMID:28256526

  13. Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-2 Inhibition Improves Skeletal Muscle Regeneration in a Male Murine Model of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indranil Sinha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity leads to a loss of muscle mass and impaired muscle regeneration. In obese individuals, pathologically elevated levels of prolyl hydroxylase domain enzyme 2 (PHD2 limit skeletal muscle hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression. Loss of local VEGF may further impair skeletal muscle regeneration. We hypothesized that PHD2 inhibition would restore vigorous muscle regeneration in a murine model of obesity. Adult (22-week-old male mice were fed either a high-fat diet (HFD, with 60% of calories derived from fat, or a regular diet (RD, with 10% of calories derived from fat, for 16 weeks. On day 5 following cryoinjury to the tibialis anterior muscle, newly regenerated muscle fiber cross-sectional areas were significantly smaller in mice fed an HFD as compared to RD, indicating an impaired regenerative response. Cryoinjured gastrocnemius muscles of HFD mice also showed elevated PHD2 levels (twofold higher and reduced VEGF levels (twofold lower as compared to RD. Dimethyloxalylglycine, a cell permeable competitive inhibitor of PHD2, restored VEGF levels and significantly improved regenerating myofiber size in cryoinjured mice fed an HFD. We conclude that pathologically increased PHD2 in the obese state drives impairments in muscle regeneration, in part by blunting VEGF production. Inhibition of PHD2 over activity in the obese state normalizes VEGF levels and restores muscle regenerative potential.

  14. Pretreatment of Cisplatin in Recipients Attenuates Post-Transplantation Pancreatitis in Murine Model

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    Sheng Yan, Yuan Ding, Fei Sun, Zhongjie Lu, Liang Xue, Xiangyan Liu, Mingqi Shuai, Chen Fang, Yan Wang, Hui Cheng, Lin Zhou, Ming H Zheng, Shusen Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreas transplantation is the definite treatment for type 1 diabetes that enables the achievement of long-term normoglycemia and insulin independence. However Post-Transplantation Pancreatitis (PTP due to ischemia reperfusion (IR injury and preservation is a major complication in pancreas transplantation. Owning the potential anti-inflammatory effect of Cisplatin (Cis in liver IR injury, we have examined if Cis could attenuate PTP using a murine model. We found that Cis is able to prevent inflammatory response in PTP. Pretreatment of Cis in recipient mice reduce the impairments of the grafts and hyperamylasimea in the recipients. We documented that the protective mechanism of Cis in PTP involves improvement of microcirculation, reduction of the mononuclear cellular infiltration and apoptosis, suppression of inflammatory cytokine-cascade and inhibition of translocation of high-motility group box protein-1 (HMGB-1 from nucleus to cytoplasm. In short, our study demonstrated that pretreatment of Cis in recipients may reduce the onset of PTP in pancreas transplantation.

  15. Effect of Anapsos® in a murine model of experimental trichomoniasis

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    Nogal-Ruiz J.J.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Immunomodulator effect of Anapsos® (Polypodium leucotomos extract in NMRI (US Naval Medical Research Institute outbred mice infected by the intraperitoneal route with 107 Trichomonas vaginalis has been tested. Gross histopathologic changes in abdominal organs and mortality rate, as a consequence of the pathogenicity of the protozoa and the immune response of the host, were evaluated. Among the different treatment regimes assayed, Anapsos® at doses of 20 mg/Kg/day administered for 10 days before infection decreases the parasite pathogenicity index (PI in the treated animals when compared to those of the untreated control group. The immunosuppresor treatments with azathioprine (100 mg/Kg/day x 1, cyclophosphamide (100 mg/Kg/day x 1, and FK-506 (10 mg/Kg/day x 10 significantly decreased the PI, while an immunostimulant treatment with glycophosphopeptical (13 mg/Kg/day x 10 increased it. These assays have shown the usefulness of the murine model of experimental trichomoniasis for the study of immunomodulator activity of natural or synthetic drugs.

  16. Antimalarial properties of Artemisia vulgaris L. ethanolic leaf extract in a Plasmodium berghei murine malaria model

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    Gayan S. Bamunuarachchi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Artemisinin isolated from Artemisia annua is the most potent antimalarial drug against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Artemisia vulgaris, an invasive weed, is the only Artemisia species available in Sri Lanka. A pilot study was undertaken to investigate the antiparasitic activity of an A. vulgaris ethanolic leaf extract (AVELE in a P. berghei ANKA murine malaria model that elicits pathogenesis similar to falciparum malaria. Methods: A 4-day suppressive and the curative assays determined the antiparasitic activity of AVELE using four doses (250, 500, 750 and 1000 mg/kg, Coartem® as the positive control and 5% ethanol as the negative control in male ICR mice infected with P. berghei. Results: The 500, 750 and 1000 mg/kg doses of AVELE significantly (p ≤0.01 inhibited parasitaemia by 79.3, 79.6 and 87.3% respectively, in the 4-day suppressive assay, but not in the curative assay. Chronic administration of the high dose of AVELE ruled out overt signs of toxicity and stress as well as hepatotoxicity, renotoxicity and haematotoxicity. Interpretation & conclusion: The oral administration of a crude ethonolic leaf extract of A. vulgaris is non-toxic and possesses potent antimalarial properties in terms of antiparasitic activity.

  17. Gene Therapy Prolongs Survival and Restores Function in Murine and Canine Models of Myotubular Myopathy

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    Childers, Martin K; Joubert, Romain; Poulard, Karine; Moal, Christelle; Grange, Robert W; Doering, Jonathan A; Lawlor, Michael W; Rider, Branden E.; Jamet, Thibaud; Danièle, Nathalie; Martin, Samia; Rivière, Christel; Soker, Thomas; Hammer, Caroline; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Lockard, Mandy; Guan, Xuan; Goddard, Melissa; Mitchell, Erin; Barber, Jane; Williams, J. Koudy; Mack, David L; Furth, Mark E; Vignaud, Alban; Masurier, Carole; Mavilio, Fulvio; Moullier, Philippe; Beggs, Alan H; Buj-Bello, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the myotubularin gene (MTM1) cause X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a fatal, congenital pediatric disease that affects the entire skeletal musculature. Systemic administration of a single dose of a recombinant serotype-8 adeno-associated virus (AAV8) vector expressing murine myotubularin to Mtm1-deficient knockout mice at the onset or at late stages of the disease resulted in robust improvement in motor activity and contractile force, corrected muscle pathology and prolonged survival throughout a 6-month study. Similarly, single-dose intravascular delivery of a canine AAV8-MTM1 vector in XLMTM dogs markedly improved severe muscle weakness and respiratory impairment, and prolonged lifespan to more than one year in the absence of toxicity, humoral and cell-mediated immune response. These results demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of AAV-mediated gene therapy for myotubular myopathy in small and large animal models, and provide proof of concept for future clinical trials in XLMTM patients. PMID:24452262

  18. Curcumin increases the pathogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in murine model.

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    Sandhya A Marathe

    Full Text Available Curcumin has gained immense importance for its vast therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Contrary to this, our study reveals that it regulates the defense pathways of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium to enhance its pathogenicity. In a murine model of typhoid fever, we observed higher bacterial load in Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph node, spleen and liver, when infected with curcumin-treated Salmonella. Curcumin increased the resistance of S. Typhimurium against antimicrobial agents like antimicrobial peptides, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This increased tolerance might be attributed to the up-regulation of genes involved in resistance against antimicrobial peptides--pmrD and pmrHFIJKLM and genes with antioxidant function--mntH, sodA and sitA. We implicate that iron chelation property of curcumin have a role in regulating mntH and sitA. Interestingly, we see that the curcumin-mediated modulation of pmr genes is through the PhoPQ regulatory system. Curcumin downregulates SPI1 genes, required for entry into epithelial cells and upregulates SPI2 genes required to intracellular survival. Since it is known that the SPI1 and SPI2 system can be regulated by the PhoPQ system, this common regulator could explain curcumin's mode of action. This data urges us to rethink the indiscriminate use of curcumin especially during Salmonella outbreaks.

  19. Gap junction remodeling and cardiac arrhythmogenesis in a murine model of oculodentodigital dysplasia.

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    Kalcheva, Nellie; Qu, Jiaxiang; Sandeep, Nefthi; Garcia, Luis; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Zhiyong; Lampe, Paul D; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Spray, David C; Fishman, Glenn I

    2007-12-18

    Gap junction channels are required for normal cardiac impulse propagation, and gap junction remodeling is associated with enhanced arrhythmic risk. Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is a multisystem syndrome due to mutations in the connexin43 (Cx43) gap junction channel gene. To determine the effects of a human connexin channelopathy on cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis, we generated a murine model of ODDD by introducing the disease-causing I130T mutant allele into the mouse genome. Cx43 abundance was markedly reduced in mutant hearts with preferential loss of phosphorylated forms that interfered with trafficking and assembly of gap junctions in the junctional membrane. Dual whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed significantly lower junctional conductance between neonatal cell pairs from mutant hearts, and optical mapping of isolated-perfused hearts with voltage-sensitive dyes demonstrated significant slowing of conduction velocity. Programmed electrical stimulation revealed a markedly increased susceptibility to spontaneous and inducible ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In summary, our data demonstrate that the I130T mutation interferes with Cx43 posttranslational processing, resulting in diminished cell-cell coupling, slowing of impulse propagation, and a proarrhythmic substrate.

  20. Detection of Spontaneous Schwannomas by MRI in a Transgenic Murine Model of Neurofibromatosis Type 2

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    S.M. Messerli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous schwannomas were detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in a transgenic murine model of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 expressing a dominant mutant form of merlin under the Schwann cell-specific PO promoter. Approximately 85% of the investigated mice showed putative tumors by 24 months of age. Specifically, 21% of the mice showed tumors in the intercostal muscles, 14% in the limb muscles, 7% in the spinal cord and spinal ganglia, 7% in the external ear, 14% in the muscle of the abdominal region, and 7% in the intestine; 66% of the female mice had uterine tumors. Multiple tumors were detected by MRI in 21% of mice. The tumors were isointense with muscle by T1-weighted MRI, showed strong enhancement following administration of gadolinium-DTPA, and were markedly hyperintense by T2-weighted MRI, all hallmarks of the clinical manifestation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumors consisted of schwannomas and Schwann cell hyperplasias. The lesions stained positively for S-100 protein and a marker antigen for the mutated transgenic NF2 protein, confirming that the imaged tumors and areas of hyperplasia were of Schwann cell origin and expressed the mutated NF2 protein. Tumors were highly infectable with a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 vector, hrR3, which contains the reporter gene, lacZ. The ability to develop schwannoma growth with a noninvasive imaging technique will allow assessment of therapeutic interventions.

  1. Effects of resveratrol in pregnancy using murine models with reduced blood supply to the uterus.

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    Rajan Poudel

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE and fetal growth restriction (FGR contribute significantly to fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Although the causes of PE and FGR are not fully understood, both conditions are known to be associated with impaired uterine artery blood flow. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in a number of plants, has been shown to induce relaxation of uterine arteries in vitro as well as improve many pathological conditions associated with PE and FGR. We hypothesized that treatment of endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice (eNOS⁻/⁻ and catechol-O-methyltransferase knockout mice (COMT⁻/⁻ with resveratrol during pregnancy would improve uterine artery blood flow and therefore ameliorate the PE-like phenotype and FGR in these murine models. Pregnant C57BL/6J, eNOS⁻/⁻ and COMT⁻/⁻ mice received either resveratrol supplemented diet (4 g/kg diet or control diet between gestational day (GD 0.5 and GD 18.5. Resveratrol supplementation significantly increased uterine artery blood flow velocity and fetal weight in COMT⁻/⁻ but not in eNOS⁻/⁻ mice. There were no effects of resveratrol on litter size and placental weight among the groups. In conclusion, resveratrol increased uterine artery blood flow velocity and fetal weight in COMT⁻/⁻ mice, suggesting potential as a therapeutic strategy for PE and FGR.

  2. The Metabolic Syndrome and Microvascular Complications in a Murine Model of Type 2 Diabetes.

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    Hur, Junguk; Dauch, Jacqueline R; Hinder, Lucy M; Hayes, John M; Backus, Carey; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kretzler, Matthias; Brosius, Frank C; Feldman, Eva L

    2015-09-01

    To define the components of the metabolic syndrome that contribute to diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we treated the BKS db/db mouse, an established murine model of T2DM and the metabolic syndrome, with the thiazolidinedione class drug pioglitazone. Pioglitazone treatment of BKS db/db mice produced a significant weight gain, restored glycemic control, and normalized measures of serum oxidative stress and triglycerides but had no effect on LDLs or total cholesterol. Moreover, although pioglitazone treatment normalized renal function, it had no effect on measures of large myelinated nerve fibers, specifically sural or sciatic nerve conduction velocities, but significantly improved measures of small unmyelinated nerve fiber architecture and function. Analyses of gene expression arrays of large myelinated sciatic nerves from pioglitazone-treated animals revealed an unanticipated increase in genes related to adipogenesis, adipokine signaling, and lipoprotein signaling, which likely contributed to the blunted therapeutic response. Similar analyses of dorsal root ganglion neurons revealed a salutary effect of pioglitazone on pathways related to defense and cytokine production. These data suggest differential susceptibility of small and large nerve fibers to specific metabolic impairments associated with T2DM and provide the basis for discussion of new treatment paradigms for individuals with T2DM and DPN.

  3. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Eliminates Clostridium difficile in a Murine Model of Relapsing Disease.

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    Seekatz, Anna M; Theriot, Casey M; Molloy, Caitlyn T; Wozniak, Katherine L; Bergin, Ingrid L; Young, Vincent B

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is of particular concern among health care-associated infections. The role of the microbiota in disease recovery is apparent given the success of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for recurrent CDI. Here, we present a murine model of CDI relapse to further define the microbiota recovery following FMT. Cefoperazone-treated mice were infected with C. difficile 630 spores and treated with vancomycin after development of clinical disease. Vancomycin treatment suppressed both C. difficile colonization and cytotoxin titers. However, C. difficile counts increased within 7 days of completing treatment, accompanied by relapse of clinical signs. The administration of FMT immediately after vancomycin cleared C. difficile and decreased cytotoxicity within 1 week. The effects of FMT on the gut microbiota community were detectable in recipients 1-day posttransplant. Conversely, mice not treated with FMT remained persistently colonized with high levels of C. difficile, and the gut microbiota in these mice persisted at low diversity. These results suggest that full recovery of colonization resistance against C. difficile requires the restoration of a specific community structure. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Treatment of Murine Tumor Models of Breast Adenocarcinoma by Continuous Dual-Frequency Ultrasound

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    Amir Hoshang Barati

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acoustic transient cavitation is the primary mechanism of sonochemical reaction and has potential use for tumor treatment. In this study, the in vivo anti-tumor effect of simultaneous dual-frequency ultrasound at low-level intensity (ISATA < 6 W/cm2 was investigated in a spontaneous murine model of breast adenocarcinoma in Balb/c mice. Materials and Methods: Forty tumor bearing mice were divided into four groups (10 in each group. The treated groups received 15 or 30 minutes of combined dual-frequency ultrasound in continuous mode (1 MHzcon + 150 kHzcon respectively. The control and the sham groups contained the untreated mice. The tumor growth delay parameters including tumor volume, relative tumor volume, T5 and T2 (the needed time for each tumor to reach 5 and 2 times the initial tumor volume, respectively, survival period and percent of tumor growth inhibition ratio were measured on different days after treatment. Results: The results showed that the 30 min treatment was effective in tumor growth delay and percent of tumor growth inhibitory ratio compared to the sham and the control groups. The tumor volume growth and relative volume of tumors in the same treated group showed an anti-tumor effect relative to the sham and the control groups. There was a significant difference in tumor volume growth between this 30 min treatment group and the sham group 12 days after treatment (p-value

  5. Nonessential Role for the NLRP1 Inflammasome Complex in a Murine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Thomas Brickler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI elicits the immediate production of proinflammatory cytokines which participate in regulating the immune response. While the mechanisms of adaptive immunity in secondary injury are well characterized, the role of the innate response is unclear. Recently, the NLR inflammasome has been shown to become activated following TBI, causing processing and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLR, caspase-1, and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC. ASC is upregulated after TBI and is critical in coupling the proteins during complex formation resulting in IL-1β cleavage. To directly test whether inflammasome activation contributes to acute TBI-induced damage, we assessed IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 expression, contusion volume, hippocampal cell death, and motor behavior recovery in Nlrp1−/−, Asc−/−, and wild type mice after moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI injury. Although IL-1β expression is significantly attenuated in the cortex of Nlrp1−/− and Asc−/− mice following CCI injury, no difference in motor recovery, cell death, or contusion volume is observed compared to wild type. These findings indicate that inflammasome activation does not significantly contribute to acute neural injury in the murine model of moderate CCI injury.

  6. Intraventricular injections of mesenchymal stem cells activate endogenous functional remyelination in a chronic demyelinating murine model

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    Cruz-Martinez, P; González-Granero, S; Molina-Navarro, M M; Pacheco-Torres, J; García-Verdugo, J M; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Jones, J; Martinez, S

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for demyelinating diseases are generally only capable of ameliorating the symptoms, with little to no effect in decreasing myelin loss nor promoting functional recovery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown by many researchers to be a potential therapeutic tool in treating various neurodegenerative diseases, including demyelinating disorders. However, in the majority of the cases, the effect was only observed locally, in the area surrounding the graft. Thus, in order to achieve general remyelination in various brain structures simultaneously, bone marrow-derived MSCs were transplanted into the lateral ventricles (LVs) of the cuprizone murine model. In this manner, the cells