WorldWideScience

Sample records for multiple adult children

  1. Assessing Children's Multiplicative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Chris; Hurrell, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Multiplicative thinking is a "big idea" of mathematics that underpins much of the mathematics learned beyond the early primary school years. This paper reports on a current study that utilises an interview tool and a written quiz to gather data about children's multiplicative thinking. The development of the tools and some of the…

  2. The More the Merrier? Multiple Parent-Adult Child Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Russell A.; Spitze, Glenna; Deane, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Although parent-adult child ties are generally positive, most parents have multiple children whose relations may yield collective ambivalence combining higher and lower quality. Little research has investigated these multiple relations. NSFH respondents aged 50+ with adult children (N = 2,270) are used to assess patterns of quality and contact…

  3. Speech and language therapists' approaches to communication intervention with children and adults with profound and multiple learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbart, Juliet; Chadwick, Darren; Buell, Susan

    2014-11-01

    People with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PMLD) have communication impairments as one defining characteristic. To explore speech and language therapists' (SLTs) decision making in communication interventions for people with PMLD, in terms of the intervention approaches used, the factors informing the decisions to use specific interventions and the extent to which the rationales underpinning these decisions related to the components of evidence based practice (EBP), namely empirical evidence, clinical experience and client/carer views and values. A questionnaire on communication assessment and intervention for people with PMLD was sent to SLTs in the UK to elicit information on: the communication intervention approaches they used; their rationales for their intervention choices; their use of published evidence to inform decision making. Intensive interaction and objects of reference were the communication interventions most often used with people with PMLD, with some differences between children and adults evident. Rationales provided conformed somewhat to the EBP framework though extension of the existing framework and addition of practical and organizational considerations led to a revised typology of rationale for decision making. Rationales most frequently related to the empowerment, development and behavioural preferences of the person with PMLD. Empirical research evidence was seldom mentioned by SLTs as informing intervention decision making leading to very diverse practice. There is a need for further research on the effectiveness of commonly used but under-evaluated interventions. There is also a need to alert SLTs to the evidence base supporting other approaches, particularly switch-based, cause and effect approaches. © 2014 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  4. Staff attributions of the causes of challenging behaviour in children and adults with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppes, P.; van der Putten, A.A.J.; ten Brug, A.; Vlaskamp, C.

    A study has shown that staff do not generally perceive challenging behaviour in people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) as being of serious consequence. In this study we aimed to gain a better understanding of the causal explanations that direct care and support staff give

  5. Children of Deaf Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerde, B.; Baker, A.E.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    The hearing children of Deaf parents grow up in two cultures with two languages. They are similar to other bilingual, bicultural children in many ways but are special also. They can be in conflict between two worlds and often carry an extra burden of responsibility in functioning as a bridge between

  6. Maltreatment in multiple-birth children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Cathleen A; Cox, Matthew J; Flores, Glenn

    2013-12-01

    The rate of multiple births has increased over the last two decades. In 1982, an increased frequency of injuries among this patient population was noted, but few studies have evaluated the increased incidence of maltreatment in twins. The study aim was to evaluate the features of all multiple-birth children with substantiated physical abuse and/or neglect over a four-year period at a major children's hospital. A Retrospective chart review was conducted of multiple-gestation children in which at least one child in the multiple set experienced child maltreatment from January 2006 to December 2009. Data regarding the child, injuries, family, and perpetrators were abstracted. We evaluated whether family and child characteristics were associated with maltreatment, and whether types of injuries were similar within multiple sets. For comparison, data from the same time period for single-birth maltreated children also were abstracted, including child age, gestational age at birth, and injury type. There were 19 sets of multiple births in which at least one child had abusive injuries and/or neglect. In 10 of 19 sets (53%), all multiples were found to have a form of maltreatment, and all children in these multiple sets shared at least one injury type. Parents lived together in 63% of cases. Fathers and mothers were the alleged perpetrator in 42% of the cases. Multiple-gestation-birth maltreated children were significantly more likely than single-birth maltreated children to have abdominal trauma (13% vs. 1%, respectively; pchildren often, but not always, were abused. In sets with two maltreated children, children usually shared the same modes of maltreatment. Multiples are significantly more likely than singletons to be younger and experience fractures and abdominal trauma. The findings support the current standard practice of evaluating all children in a multiple set when one is found to be abused or neglected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use and Effectiveness of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) and Multiple Daily Insulin Injection Therapy (MIT) in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiel, R; Burgard, D; Perenthaler, T; Stein, G; Kramer, G; Steveling, A

    2016-02-01

    Today continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is frequently used in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The present cross-sectional trial aimed to document current practice, quality of diabetes control and incidence of acute complications in different age-groups under CSII vs. multiple daily insulin injection therapy (MIT). Moreover the survey analyzed socio-demographic backgrounds of the patients. A total of 901 patients (age 11.5±4.0, diabetes duration 4.0±3.6 years) was entered in the database. Clinical data, laboratory parameters and, using a standardized questionnaire, socio-demographic data were assessed. For age-related analyses patients were allocated to 4 groups: pre-school children (MIT. Patients with CSII vs. MIT had a longer diabetes duration, they used more frequently insulin analogues, performed more frequently blood-glucose self-tests and had a lower insulin dosage per kilogram body weight. In respect of HbA1c, the mean amplitude of blood-glucose excursions, but also of lipids, creatinine, microalbuminuria and blood pressure, there were no differences in neither age-group between patients with CSII and MIT. In patients with CSII and MIT, there was a tendency (pMIT there is an increase of HbA1c towards adolescence. It must also highlighted that CSII seems to be expansive and that CSII is more frequently used in patients with better educational levels and deriving from higher social classes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Multiple trauma in children: critical care overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Randall C; Burns, R Cartland

    2002-11-01

    Multiple trauma is more than the sum of the injuries. Management not only of the physiologic injury but also of the pathophysiologic responses, along with integration of the child's emotional and developmental needs and the child's family, forms the basis of trauma care. Multiple trauma in children also elicits profound psychological responses from the healthcare providers involved with these children. This overview will address the pathophysiology of multiple trauma in children and the general principles of trauma management by an integrated trauma team. Trauma is a systemic disease. Multiple trauma stimulates the release of multiple inflammatory mediators. A lethal triad of hypothermia, acidosis, and coagulopathy is the direct result of trauma and secondary injury from the systemic response to trauma. Controlling and responding to the secondary pathophysiologic sequelae of trauma is the cornerstone of trauma management in the multiply injured, critically ill child. Damage control surgery is a new, rational approach to the child with multiple trauma. The selection of children for damage control surgery depends on the severity of injury. Major abdominal vascular injuries and multiple visceral injuries are best considered for this approach. The effective management of childhood multiple trauma requires a combined team approach, consideration of the child and family, an organized trauma system, and an effective quality assurance and improvement mechanism.

  9. CHILDREN VERSUS ADULT LITERATURE IN ACHEBE AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tracie1

    Chike Okoye: The Quest for Paradigms: Children Versus Adult Literarture in Achebe and . ..... with the simulated Лlood and gore themed video games ... electronic media (children's favorite pastime) the .... and the Challenges of Social Change.

  10. Relationships with parents and adult children's substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reczek, Corinne; Thomeer, Mieke Beth; Kissling, Alexandra; Liu, Hui

    2017-02-01

    Previous research has indicated that parents impact minor children's health behaviors and adult children's self-rated health and psychological well-being. However, little is known about the long-term consequences of the parent-child relationship for adult children's substance (i.e., smoking levels, low to moderate alcohol use) as adult children age. The present study uses growth curve analysis on longitudinal survey data (Americans' Changing Lives, N=907) to examine how multiple dimensions of the parent-child tie influence adult children's substance use. Findings show that contact with mothers in adulthood has a health-enhancing effect on sons' smoking. Fathers' support is related to a decline in alcohol use for sons and daughters, but also an increase in smoking for sons only. Our findings for strain from parents are complex, suggesting that the ways in which adult children cope and manage strain with parents may result in multiple pathways of substance use. Our study raises new questions about whether and when family ties are "good" or "bad" for health and calls for a more multifaceted view of the long-lasting parent-child tie. We spotlight the need to look at the parent-child relationship as a dynamic social tie that changes over the life course and has consequences for health in adulthood. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Aphasia Handbook for Adults and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agranowitz, Aleen; McKeown, Milfred Riddle

    The occurance of aphasia in adults and children is discussed along with therapeutic measures. An orientation of what aphasia is and the problems it presents for adults is followed by a statement of present methods of retraining. Consideration is given to an evaluation of defects, attitudes and techniques in retraining, group therapy, and…

  12. Children's Witnessing of Adult Domestic Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edleson, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    Expands common definitions of how children witness adult domestic violence through a review of 31 research articles. A variety of behavioral, emotional, and cognitive-functioning problems among children were found to be associated with exposure to domestic violence. Factors that appear to moderate the impact of witnessing violence (child abuse,…

  13. Franklian psychotherapy with adults molested as children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, J; Lantz, J

    1992-12-01

    A Franklian approach to treatment with adults who were molested as children recognizes that the trauma client's experiences of trauma and terror as a child can be transformed to discover real meaning potentials in the adult's daily life. In this paper the authors present a five-stage treatment approach based upon the Logotherapy concepts of Viktor Frankl which they have found to be helpful with adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Case material is presented to illustrate the described intervention approach.

  14. "Children are from heaven" or how today children respect adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Vogrinec

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The starting point of the text is a returning to the patriarchal, which is not simply the one that we are witnessing today, in the time of so-called postmodern, postpatriarchal society in its (until now last form. It is a matter of returning to rules, of which the basic premise is that adults are subjects (transcendences, freedoms, activities and children are subjects that are objects for adults (imanences, non-freedoms, pasivities, but which notwithstanding differ from the oldfashioned rules from the past. We attempted to explain this returning, following the example of rules offered by the book Children Are From Heaven – a selfhelp book, published at the end of the nineties of the 20th century, which immediately became the world's bestseller. In addition, our aim was to answer the following questions: What has happened with rules of civilization and good manners, regulating the relations between children and adults today? How have they changed and what has happened with children's or adults's relation to these rules or their performings? How has this relation changed? Considering the mentioned basic premise which implies that children respect adults, we also tried to answer the question: What has happened with the respect, or, how do children respect adults today? Disscussion is presented in the framework of lacanian psychoanalysis.

  15. Adult mortality and children's transition into marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofya Krutikova

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult mortality due to HIV/AIDS and other diseases is posited to affect children through a number of pathways. On top of health and education outcomes, adult mortality can have significant effects on children by influencing demographic outcomes including the timing of marriage. This paper examines marriage outcomes for a sample of children interviewed in Tanzania in the early 1990s and re-interviewed in 2004. We find that while girls who became paternal orphans married at significantly younger ages, orphanhood had little effect on boys. On the other hand, non-parental deaths in the household affect the timing of marriage for boys.

  16. Task switching costs in preschool children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Anna; Kirkham, Natasha Z; Mareschal, Denis

    2018-08-01

    Past research investigating cognitive flexibility has shown that preschool children make many perseverative errors in tasks that require switching between different sets of rules. However, this inflexibility might not necessarily hold with easier tasks. The current study investigated the developmental differences in cognitive flexibility using a task-switching procedure that compared reaction times and accuracy in 4- and 6-year-olds with those in adults. The experiment involved simple target detection tasks and was intentionally designed in a way that the stimulus and response conflicts were minimal together with a long preparation window. Global mixing costs (performance costs when multiple tasks are relevant in a context), and local switch costs (performance costs due to switching to an alternative task) are typically thought to engage endogenous control processes. If this is the case, we should observe developmental differences with both of these costs. Our results show, however, that when the accuracy was good, there were no age differences in cognitive flexibility (i.e., the ability to manage multiple tasks and to switch between tasks) between children and adults. Even though preschool children had slower reaction times and were less accurate, the mixing and switch costs associated with task switching were not reliably larger for preschool children. Preschool children did, however, show more commission errors and greater response repetition effects than adults, which may reflect differences in inhibitory control. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Proximal processes of children with profound multiple disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Wilder, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis four empirical studies dealt with children with profound multiple disabilities and their parents with regard to: (a) how parents perceived interaction with their children (b) how observed child/parent interaction was linked to behavior style of the children as perceived by the parents (c) how parents of children with profound multiple disabilities perceived child/parent interaction and behavior style of their children in comparison to parents to children without disabilities ma...

  18. Where Adults Go: A Multiple Case Study of Adult Serving Undergraduate Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Williams, Shelley B.

    2010-01-01

    This research is an exploratory multiple case study of adult serving undergraduate colleges and universities. Using the Council of Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) Principles of Effective Practice for Serving Adult Learners, this study examines the differences of adult serving undergraduate colleges across the three sectors of higher…

  19. The Achilles heel of adults and children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, J.I.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the imaging and treatment of the Achilles heel of adults and children. The figurative and literal Achilles heel consists of a number of pathologies: ankle impingement, Achilles tendinopathy, retrocalcaneal bursitis and calcaneal apophysitis. Research as well as diagnosis and

  20. Adult Children's Divorce and Intergenerational Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitze, Glenna; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined effects of adult children's divorce on their relationships with parents, using local probability sample of 905 parents. In general, divorced daughters with child custody had more contact than married daughters and received more help from parents. Sons received more babysitting help when they were married than in other situations. Divorce…

  1. Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Renew CHADD Annual Conference Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD), is a national nonprofit organization ... ADHD community. © 2017 by Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD). All Rights Reserved. Press Privacy ...

  2. Willpower in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Houser, Daniel; Piovesan, Marco

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews key contributions to the psychology and economics literature on willpower. Understanding how willpower develops can shed important light on time-inconsistent economic decision making, a topic that has received substantial attention over recent decades. In particular, we argue...... enhancements not only to the child but also to the ultimate adult decision maker. Finally, we list a set of open questions that could be profitably addressed by the future research....

  3. Comparing children's and adults' cognitive advertising competences in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, E.; Buijzen, M.; Valkenburg, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the age at which children reach adult levels of cognitive advertising competences. In a computer-assisted survey of 294 children (8-12 years) and 198 adults (18-30 years), we investigate at what age children reach adult levels of (1) advertising recognition, and (2) understanding

  4. Racial Residential Segregation of School-Age Children and Adults: The Role of Schooling as a Segregating Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Owens

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neighborhoods are critical contexts for children’s well-being, but differences in neighborhood inequality among children and adults are understudied. I document racial segregation between neighborhoods among school-age children and adults in 2000 and 2010 and find that though the racial composition of children’s and adults’ neighborhoods is similar, exposure to own-age neighbors varies. Compared with adults’ exposure to other adults, children are exposed to fewer white and more minority, particularly Hispanic, children. This is due in part to compositional differences, but children are also more unevenly sorted across neighborhoods by race than adults. One explanation for higher segregation among children is that parents consider school options when making residential choices. Consistent with this hypothesis, I find that school district boundaries account for a larger proportion of neighborhood segregation among children than among adults. Future research on spatial inequality must consider the multiple contexts differentially contributing to inequality among children and adults.

  5. Life course of children with parental multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Julie Yoon

    2017-08-01

    The majority of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience onset of MS between the ages of 20 and 40. Since two-thirds of the persons with MS are young women of childbearing age, parenthood is an essential issue during this period of life. The potential influence of parental MS on children arises from the varied symptoms of the chronic illness, which affect physical and cognitive abilities. MS disabilities and fatigue can restrict daily life and result in less energy for activities or job loss and thus worse conditions for the family. This PhD thesis was designed to investigate whether parental MS influences children in different areas throughout the children's life course (i.e. education, employment, disability pension, and income) as well as to explore the experiences of having a parent with MS. We investigated the research question using two distinct METHODS: A quantitative method based on nationwide population-based Danish registers comparing a group of children with one biological parent with MS (termed 'MS offspring') with a matched group of children of parents without MS (termed 'reference cohort') up to 58 years of age (Papers I-II). A qualitative method based on phenomenological face-to-face interviews with young adults with parental MS (Paper III). The nationwide register-based epidemiological method complemented by a phenomenological interview method, the long time-span and the age groups of 'children' up to age 58 are original within this area of research. In Paper I, we investigated the educational achievements of 4,177 MS offspring compared with 33,416 reference children. MS off-spring achieved a higher grade point average in the final class of basic school, at age 15, although they achieved similar educational levels as did the reference children at ages 15 to 58. There was a trend toward more MS offspring women attaining health-related educations than did reference women at ages 21 to 58. In Paper II, we investigated employment and income of 2

  6. Strokes In Young Adults And Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Iranmanesh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is in second place on a mortality list in the world. Also, stroke is a leading cause of disability. Approximately 20% of all strokes occur in Children and young adults. The etiology of stroke in Children and young adults is different from that in older patients, and has an influence on diagnostic evaluation and treatment, so knowledge about older patients cannot always be applied to these patients. The list of stroke etiologies among young adults and children is extensive. Ischemic stroke are more frequent than hemorrhagic strokes in both groups. Stroke in young adults had been thought to be associated with   risk factors, including arterial (such as dissection, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, inflammatory arteritis ,moyamoya ,migraine - induced stroke, genetic or inherted arteriopathy, premature atherosclerosis cardiac (such as patent foramen ovale, cardiomyopathy , congenital heart disease and   hematologic (such as  deficiencies of protein S,protein C,or antithrombin;factor V lieden mutation . Common risk factors for stroke in children include: Sickle-cell disease, diseases of the arteries, abnormal blood clotting, head or neck trauma. There are no specific recommendations or guidelines for primary or secondary stroke prevention in young adults. Primary prevention focused on identifying and managing known vascular risk factors, such as hypertension, disorders of lipid metabolism, and diabetes, and non-drug strategies and lifestyle changes, including smoking, reducing body weight, increasing regular aerobic physical activity, and adopting a healthy diet with more fruit and vegetables and less salt. For secondary stroke prevention, identification of the etiologic mechanism of the initial stroke and the presence of any additional risk factors is most important. It consists of optimal treatment of vascular risk factors administering antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, and if indicated, invasive surgical or

  7. Multiple sclerosis in women having children by multiple partners. A population-based study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basso, Olga; Campi, Rita; Frydenberg, Morten

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether having children with multiple men is a risk factor for being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied a cohort of 151,328 women, of whom 64,704 had different men fathering their children and 86,624 the same partner for all births. Women were included if they had ...

  8. Multiple tobacco product use among US adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneji, Samir; Sargent, James; Tanski, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    To assess the extent to which multiple tobacco product use among adolescents and young adults falls outside current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory authority. We conducted a web-based survey of 1596 16-26-year-olds to assess use of 11 types of tobacco products. We ascertained current (past 30 days) tobacco product use among 927 respondents who ever used tobacco. Combustible tobacco products included cigarettes, cigars (little filtered, cigarillos, premium) and hookah; non-combustible tobacco products included chew, dip, dissolvables, e-cigarettes, snuff and snus. We then fitted an ordinal logistic regression model to assess demographic and behavioural associations with higher levels of current tobacco product use (single, dual and multiple product use). Among 448 current tobacco users, 54% were single product users, 25% dual users and 21% multiple users. The largest single use category was cigarettes (49%), followed by hookah (23%), little filtered cigars (17%) and e-cigarettes (5%). Most dual and multiple product users smoked cigarettes, along with little filtered cigars, hookah and e-cigarettes. Forty-six per cent of current single, 84% of dual and 85% of multiple tobacco product users consumed a tobacco product outside FDA regulatory authority. In multivariable analysis, the adjusted risk of multiple tobacco use was higher for males, first use of a non-combustible tobacco product, high sensation seeking respondents and declined for each additional year of age that tobacco initiation was delayed. Nearly half of current adolescent and young adult tobacco users in this study engaged in dual and multiple tobacco product use; the majority of them used products that fall outside current FDA regulatory authority. This study supports FDA deeming of these products and their incorporation into the national media campaign to address youth tobacco use. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  9. Assessing choice making among children with multiple disabilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Sigafoos, J; Dempsey, R

    1992-01-01

    Some learners with multiple disabilities display idiosyncratic gestures that are interpreted as a means of making choices. In the present study, we assessed the validity of idiosyncratic choice-making behaviors of 3 children with multiple disabilities. Opportunities for each child to choose between food and drink were provided under two conditions. In one condition, the children were given the food or drink item corresponding to their prior choice. In the other condition, the teacher delivere...

  10. Neurocognitive Dysfunction in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruebner, Rebecca L; Laney, Nina; Kim, Ji Young; Hartung, Erum A; Hooper, Stephen R; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Furth, Susan L

    2016-04-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is a known complication in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, less is known about putative mechanisms or modifiable risk factors. The objective of this study was to characterize and determine risk factors for cognitive dysfunction in children, adolescents, and young adults with CKD compared with controls. Cross-sectional study. The Neurocognitive Assessment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis of Children and Young Adults With Chronic Kidney Disease (NiCK) Study included 90 individuals aged 8 to 25 years with CKD compared with 70 controls. CKD versus control, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), ambulatory blood pressure. Performance on neurocognitive assessment with relevant tests grouped into 11 domains defined a priori by expert opinion. Results of tests were converted to age-normalized z scores. Each neurocognitive domain was analyzed through linear regression, adjusting for eGFR and demographic and clinical variables. For domains defined by multiple tests, the median z score of tests in that domain was used. We found significantly poorer performance in multiple areas of neurocognitive function among individuals with CKD compared with controls. Particular deficits were seen in domains related to attention, memory, and inhibitory control. Adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, we found lower performance in multiple domains with decreasing eGFRs (attention: β=0.053, P=0.02; visual spatial: β=0.062, P=0.02; and visual working memory: β=0.069, P=0.04). Increased diastolic load and decreased diastolic nocturnal dipping on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring were independently associated with impairments in neurocognitive performance. Unable to assess changes in neurocognitive function over time, and neurocognitive tests were grouped into predetermined neurocognitive domains. Lower eGFR in children, adolescents, and young adults is associated with poorer neurocognitive performance, particularly in

  11. Discrepancies between self- and adult-perceptions of social competence in children with neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuori, M; Autti-Rämö, I; Junttila, N; Vauras, M; Tuulio-Henriksson, A

    2017-09-01

    The present study examines discrepancies between self- and adult-perceptions of social competence in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and possible co-morbid disruptive behaviour disorders (DBD). Self-reported questionnaires were collected from multiple informants at the baseline of a multi-systemic family intervention programme for children (aged 5-12) with ADHD, ASD and possible co-morbid DBD. In total, out of the 154 families eligible for the study, information was received concerning children from 124 families (children n = 121; mothers n = 117; fathers n = 86; teachers n = 97). In addition to this, a comparison community sample of 318 school-aged children (approximately 10 years old) was utilized to examine the perceptions of children's social competence across intervention and population groups in more detail. Children's self-perceptions in the prosocial dimension of social competence (i.e. cooperating skills, empathy) did not differ between the intervention and comparison groups. Interestingly, the children in the intervention sample expressed more impulsivity and disruptiveness - the antisocial dimension of social competence - when compared with the children in the comparison sample. Adult ratings demonstrated that mothers, fathers and teachers reported decreased prosocial behaviour and increased antisocial behaviour across overall dimensions and sub-dimensions when compared with adults' ratings of elementary school children. Informant discrepancies between self-ratings and adult ratings across intervention groups yielded significant effect sizes (eta-squared) across all domains of social competence ranging from .09 to .25. Children's positive self-ratings of social competence relative to adult ratings increased within intervention sample when compared with population sample. The intervention sample children appeared to acknowledge their social competence deficits, yet self

  12. Multiple Contexts, Multiple Methods: A Study of Academic and Cultural Identity among Children of Immigrant Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdan, Tim; Munoz, Chantico

    2012-01-01

    Multiple methods were used to examine the academic motivation and cultural identity of a sample of college undergraduates. The children of immigrant parents (CIPs, n = 52) and the children of non-immigrant parents (non-CIPs, n = 42) completed surveys assessing core cultural identity, valuing of cultural accomplishments, academic self-concept,…

  13. Young Adult and Usual Adult Body Mass Index and Multiple Myeloma Risk: A Pooled Analysis in the International Multiple Myeloma Consortium (IMMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmann, Brenda M; Andreotti, Gabriella; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Camp, Nicola J; Chiu, Brian C H; Spinelli, John J; Becker, Nikolaus; Benhaim-Luzon, Véronique; Bhatti, Parveen; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Brown, Elizabeth E; Cocco, Pierluigi; Costas, Laura; Cozen, Wendy; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Foretová, Lenka; Giles, Graham G; Maynadié, Marc; Moysich, Kirsten; Nieters, Alexandra; Staines, Anthony; Tricot, Guido; Weisenburger, Dennis; Zhang, Yawei; Baris, Dalsu; Purdue, Mark P

    2017-06-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma risk increases with higher adult body mass index (BMI). Emerging evidence also supports an association of young adult BMI with multiple myeloma. We undertook a pooled analysis of eight case-control studies to further evaluate anthropometric multiple myeloma risk factors, including young adult BMI. Methods: We conducted multivariable logistic regression analysis of usual adult anthropometric measures of 2,318 multiple myeloma cases and 9,609 controls, and of young adult BMI (age 25 or 30 years) for 1,164 cases and 3,629 controls. Results: In the pooled sample, multiple myeloma risk was positively associated with usual adult BMI; risk increased 9% per 5-kg/m 2 increase in BMI [OR, 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.14; P = 0.007]. We observed significant heterogeneity by study design ( P = 0.04), noting the BMI-multiple myeloma association only for population-based studies ( P trend = 0.0003). Young adult BMI was also positively associated with multiple myeloma (per 5-kg/m 2 ; OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3; P = 0.0002). Furthermore, we observed strong evidence of interaction between younger and usual adult BMI ( P interaction adult BMI may increase multiple myeloma risk and suggest that healthy BMI maintenance throughout life may confer an added benefit of multiple myeloma prevention. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 876-85. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Dividing Attention Lowers Children's but Increases Adults' False Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otgaar, Henry; Peters, Maarten; Howe, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of divided attention on children's and adults' neutral and negative true and false memories in a standard Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm. Children (7- and 11-year-olds; n = 126) and adults (n = 52) received 5 neutral and 5 negative Deese/Roediger-McDermott word lists; half of each group also received a…

  15. Development of False Memories in Bilingual Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Mark L.; Gagnon, Nadine; Thouas, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    The effects of within- versus between-languages (English-French) study and test on rates of bilingual children's and adults' true and false memories were examined. Children aged 6 through 12 and university-aged adults participated in a standard Deese-Roediger-McDermott false memory task using free recall and recognition. Recall results showed…

  16. Multiple caregivers' touch interactions with young children among the Bofi foragers in Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Jung; Fouts, Hillary N

    2011-02-01

    The current study examined the use of three types of touch (caregiving, active social-affectionate, and passive social-affectionate) by caregivers with young children among the Bofi foragers, a seminomadic group of hunter-gatherers in Central Africa. With the purpose of providing a more holistic view of touch interactions in early childhood, compared to extant Western mother-centric views, this study documents stylistic touch patterns used by multiple caregivers (mother, father, adult relatives, and juvenile relatives) with Bofi forager children. Thirty-five Bofi forager children, between 18 and 59 months of age, and their various caregivers were naturalistically observed over 12 daylight hours using a focal child observational technique. Frequencies of each type of touch and the rank order of types of touch that children received were compared between caregivers and examined by child age and gender. Even though nonmaternal caregivers showed high physical involvement with children, mothers exemplified the highest level of involvement. Overall, passive social-affectionate touch was utilized the most by all types of caregivers. Mothers used more caregiving touch, and fathers and adult relatives had similar frequencies of caregiving touch and active social-affectionate touch. In contrast, juvenile relatives showed more active social-affectionate touch with focal children. This study highlights the importance of examining multiple caregivers and physical interactions when studying early childhood experiences. Furthermore, by focusing on multiple caregivers and multiple types of touch, this study provides a more thorough characterization of the touch experiences of young children than previous studies of touch. Finally, the current study exemplifies the value of considering non-Western populations when investigating touch interactions.

  17. Identification accuracy of children versus adults: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzulo, J D; Lindsay, R C

    1998-10-01

    Identification accuracy of children and adults was examined in a meta-analysis. Preschoolers (M = 4 years) were less likely than adults to make correct identifications. Children over the age of 5 did not differ significantly from adults with regard to correct identification rate. Children of all ages examined were less likely than adults to correctly reject a target-absent lineup. Even adolescents (M = 12-13 years) did not reach an adult rate of correct rejection. Compared to simultaneous lineup presentation, sequential lineups increased the child-adult gap for correct rejections. Providing child witnesses with identification practice or training did not increase their correct rejection rates. Suggestions for children's inability to correctly reject target-absent lineups are discussed. Future directions for identification research are presented.

  18. Aging Parents' Daily Support Exchanges With Adult Children Suffering Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Meng; Graham, Jamie L; Kim, Kyungmin; Birditt, Kira S; Fingerman, Karen L

    2017-06-17

    When adult children incur life problems (e.g., divorce, job loss, health problems), aging parents generally report providing more frequent support and experiencing poorer well-being. Yet, it is unclear how adult children's problems may influence aging parents' daily support exchanges with these children or the parents' daily mood. Aging parents from the Family Exchanges Study Wave 2 (N = 207, Mage = 79.86) reported providing and receiving emotional support, practical support, and advice from each adult child each day for 7 days. Parents also rated daily positive and negative mood. Multilevel models showed that aging parents were more likely to provide emotional and practical support to adult children incurring life problems than children not suffering problems. Parents were also more likely to receive emotional support and advice from these children with problems. Further, parents reported less negative mood on days when providing practical support to children with problems. Examining daily support exchanges adds to our understanding of how children's problems influence parent-child ties in late life. Prior research suggests that children's problems upset parents. In this study, however, it appears that supporting adult children who suffer problems may alleviate aging parents' distress regarding such children. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Adult Outcome of Children Reared for Long-Term Periods in Foster Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumaret, Annick-Camille; Coppel-Batsch, Marthe; Couraud, Simone

    1997-01-01

    Assessment of adult outcomes of 59 children from severely psychosocially dysfunctional families, who were placed in foster families for at least five years, found most had overcome their childhood adversities with 56% well-integrated socially and only 10% in situations of failure. Difficulties were linked to multiple family disturbances, traumatic…

  20. Reciprocal Imitation Following Adult Imitation by Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Ezell, Shauna; Nadel, Jacqueline; Grace, Ava; Allender, Susan; Siddalingappa, Vijaya

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of adult imitation and adult playfulness on the imitation, social attention and initiation of new behaviours by non-verbal preschoolers with autism. Videotapes taken from a previous study were recoded for the adult's imitation and playful behaviour and the children's imitation, social attention (looking at…

  1. Children with Autism Approach More Imitative and Playful Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadel, Jacqueline; Martini, Mary; Field, Tiffany; Escalona, Angelica; Lundy, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    Children with autism were selected to be in high-approach and low-approach groups based on a median split of their proximity-seeking behavior with adults (looking at, approaching and touching adults) during videotaped interactions. The same videotapes of those two sets of interactions were then coded and analyzed for the adult partners' behaviors.…

  2. Teaching preschool children to report suspicious packages to adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Michael E; Shayter, Ashley M; Schmick, Ayla; Barron, Becky; Doherty, Meghan; Johnson, Matthew

    2018-05-16

    Law enforcement agencies stress that public reporting of terror-related crime is the predominant means for disrupting these actions. However, schools may be unprepared because the majority of the populace may not understand the threat of suspicious materials or what to do when they are found on school grounds. The purpose of this study was to systematically teach preschool children to identify and report suspicious packages across three experiments. In the first experiment, we used multiple exemplar training to teach children to identify the characteristics of safe and unsafe packages. In the second experiment, we taught participants to identify the locations where packages should be considered unsafe. Finally, in the third experiment, we used behavioral skills training to teach participants to avoid touching unsafe packages, leave the area where they were located, and report their discovery to an adult. Results suggest the participants quickly developed these skills. Implications for safety skills in young school children are discussed. © 2018 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  3. The management of multiple sclerosis in children: a European view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Banwell, Brenda; Boyko, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    in the paediatric multiple sclerosis population has triggered the use of disease-modifying therapies that have been shown to reduce relapse rate, disease progression and cognitive decline in adult patients with multiple sclerosis. Hard evidence for the right treatment and its appropriate timing is scarce...... in the management of paediatric multiple sclerosis. One of the aims was to generate a common view on the management of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients. The result of this meeting is presented here to help standardize treatment and to support clinicians with less experience in this field.......About 3-5% of all patients with multiple sclerosis experience the onset of their disease under the age of 16. A significant proportion of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients develop significant cognitive disturbances and persistent physical disability. The high relapse rate and the morbidity...

  4. Adults' and Children's Understanding of How Expertise Influences Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovitch, Judith H; Shenouda, Christine K

    2018-01-01

    Adults and children use information about expertise to infer what a person is likely to know, but it is unclear whether they realize that expertise also has implications for learning. We explore adults' and children's understanding that expertise in a particular category supports learning about a closely related category. In four experiments, 5-year-olds and adults (n = 160) judged which of two people would be better at learning about a new category. When faced with an expert and a nonexpert, adults consistently indicated that expertise supports learning in a closely related category; however, children's judgments were inconsistent and were strongly influenced by the description of the nonexpert. The results suggest that although children understand what it means to be an expert, they may judge an individual's learning capacity based on different considerations than adults.

  5. Parental divorce and adult children's attachment representations and marital status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Judith A; Treboux, Dominique; Brockmeyer, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore adult attachment as a means of understanding the intergenerational transmission of divorce, that is, the propensity for the children of divorce to end their own marriages. Participants included 157 couples assessed 3 months prior to their weddings and 6 years later. Participants completed the Adult Attachment Interview and questionnaires about their relationships, and were videotaped with their partners in a couple interaction task. Results indicated that, in this sample, adult children of divorce were not more likely to divorce within the first 6 years of marriage. However, parental divorce increased the likelihood of having an insecure adult attachment status. For women, age at the time of their parents' divorce was related to adult attachment status, and the influence on attachment representations may be more enduring. Among adult children of divorce, those who were classified as secure in their attachment representations were less likely to divorce in the early years of marriage than insecure participants.

  6. Complex word reading in Dutch deaf children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoogmoed, Anne H; Knoors, Harry; Schreuder, Robert; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2013-03-01

    Children who are deaf are often delayed in reading comprehension. This delay could be due to problems in morphological processing during word reading. In this study, we investigated whether 6th grade deaf children and adults are delayed in comparison to their hearing peers in reading complex derivational words and compounds compared to monomorphemic words. The results show that deaf children are delayed in reading both derivational words and compounds as compared to hearing children, while both deaf and hearing adults performed equally well on a lexical decision task. However, deaf adults generally showed slower reaction times than hearing adults. For both deaf and hearing children, derivational words were more difficult than compounds, as reflected in hearing children's slower reaction times and in deaf children's lower accuracy scores. This finding likely reflects deaf children's lack of familiarity with the meaning of the bound morphemes attached to the stems in derivational words. Therefore, it might be beneficial to teach deaf children the meaning of bound morphemes and to train them to use morphology in word reading. Moreover, these findings imply that it is important to focus on both monomorphemic and polymorphemic words when assessing word reading ability in deaf children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Farm to Sensory Lab: Taste of Blueberry Fruit by Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennella, Julie A; Colquhoun, Thomas A; Bobowski, Nuala K; Olmstead, James W; Bartoshuk, Linda; Clark, Dave

    2017-07-01

    The average American child eats fewer fruits than recommended. Although taste is the primary motivator for food intake among children, little research has systematically measured children's liking of fruit and determined whether their preferences differ from adults. We phenotyped 49 children and their mothers to determine: (1) their liking of the taste of 3 blueberry cultivars ("Arcadia," "Keecrisp," and "Kestrel") from 2 harvests for which total soluble solids were determined using a handheld Brix refractometer; (2) the association between liking and blueberry sugar content; and (3) the most preferred level of fructose, one of the primary sugars in blueberry fruit. Multiple methods, identical for all participants, assessed which cultivar they liked best. Dietary intake, determined via 24-h dietary recall, revealed most children (73%) and adults (92%) did not meet dietary guidelines for fruit intake. We found that during the 1st harvest, Keecrisp was sweeter by 4° Brix than either Arcadia or Kestrel and was the cultivar most preferred by both children and adults. For the 2nd harvest, mothers liked each of the cultivars equally, but children preferred Arcadia, which was 2° Brix sweeter than the other 2 cultivars. Like other sugars, children's most preferred concentration of fructose was significantly higher than that of adults. In sum, children appear to be more sensitive to smaller variations in sweetness than are adults. Identifying drivers of fruit preference and assessing children's liking for whole fruits are important steps in developing strategies to increase fruit consumption among children. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  8. Spouses, Adult Children, and Children-in-Law as Caregivers of Older Adults: A Meta-Analytic Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Pinquart, Martin; Sörensen, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    The present meta-analysis integrates the results from 168 empirical studies on differences between caregiving spouses, adult children, and children-in-law. Spouses differ from children and children-in-law significantly with regard to sociodemographic variables; also, they provide more support but report fewer care recipient behavior problems. Spouse caregivers report more depression symptoms, greater financial and physical burden, and lower levels of psychological well-being. Higher levels of...

  9. [A comparison between adults and children tonsillectomy with monopolar electrocautery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Min; Deng, Jie; Gao, Lei; He, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most frequently applied operations in the ENT practice. This prospective study compared intraoperative records and postoperative clinical outcomes between adults and children patients following monopolar electrocautery tonsillectomy. Forty adult patients and Forty children patients with histories of recurrent tonsillitis or hypertrophic tonsillitis were enrolled. Intraoperative parameters and postoperative outcomes were compared. Children tonsillectomy with monopolar electrocautery was significantly faster to perform (P 0.05) than adults, but there was no significant difference in pain on the 14th postoperative day in two groups. There was no obvious postoperative hemorrhage in two groups. There was no significant difference in postoperative tonsillar fossa healing and postoperative temperature between the groups. Children and adults tonsillectomy with monopolar electrocautery had clinical characteristics respectively. Monopolar electrocautery tonsillectomy was safe and operated easily in both two groups.

  10. Evaluation of multiple intelligences in children aged 7 to 11 years through the implementation of an interactive software

    OpenAIRE

    Rebolledo Rodríguez, Rigel A.; Samaniego González, Euclides

    2017-01-01

    This document describes the evaluation project of multiple intelligences in children aged 7 to 11 years through the implementation of an interactive software, developed on Android for tablets, allowing parents, teachers, tutors, psy-chologists or other responsible adult, identifying the different types of intelligences that have children in order to know each other and develop their skills and their future potential. Similarly, research was developed to evaluate the effective-ness of the t...

  11. Food ordering for children in restaurants: multiple sources of influence on decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Iana A; Williams, Christine B; Madanat, Hala; Pickrel, Julie L; Jun, Hee-Jin; Zive, Michelle; Gahagan, Sheila; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2017-01-01

    Objective Restaurants are playing an increasingly important role in children’s dietary intake. Interventions to promote healthy ordering in restaurants have primarily targeted adults. Much remains unknown about how to influence ordering for and by children. Using an ecological lens, the present study sought to identify sources of influence on ordering behaviour for and by children in restaurants. Design A mixed-methods study was conducted using unobtrusive observations of dining parties with children and post-order interviews. Observational data included: child’s gender, person ordering for the child and server interactions with the dining party. Interview data included: child’s age, restaurant visit frequency, timing of child’s decision making, and factors influencing decision making. Setting Ten independent, table-service restaurants in San Diego, CA, USA participated. Subjects Complete observational and interview data were obtained from 102 dining parties with 150 children (aged 3–14 years). Results Taste preferences, family influences and menus impacted ordering. However, most children knew what they intended to order before arriving at the restaurant, especially if they dined there at least monthly. Furthermore, about one-third of children shared their meals with others and all shared meals were ordered from adult (v. children’s) menus. Parents placed most orders, although parental involvement in ordering was less frequent with older children. Servers interacted frequently with children but generally did not recommend menu items or prompt use of the children’s menu. Conclusions Interventions to promote healthy ordering should consider the multiple sources of influence that are operating when ordering for and by children in restaurants. PMID:27334904

  12. Different perceptual sensitivities for Chernoff's face between children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusawa, Reimi; Goto, Yoshinobu; Mitsudome, Akihisa; Nakashima, Taisuke; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences between children and adults in recognizing facial expressions of simple line drawings of "Chernoff's face". First, the angles of the eyebrows and mouth of Chernoff's face were changed in a stepwise way with a personal computer, and the emotional response of the subjects was evaluated by a questionnaire. Second, three drawings of non-target stimuli (neutral face, angry face, and wheelchair) and target stimuli were used to elicit event-related potentials (ERPs). Children had higher scores for the facial expressions than adults, and relied much more on the angles of the eyebrows and mouth. The major ERP findings were (1) the latencies of P100 and N170 were significantly longer in children than adults, (2) the amplitudes of P100 were significantly larger in children than adults, but the N170 amplitudes were not significantly different, and (3) a slow negative shift was recorded with a latency of 240-460ms at the posterior-temporal site for angry face compared with neutral face in adults but not in children. These results suggest that the differences in the electrophysiological recognition of facial expressions can be set at 240ms after appearance of the Chernoff's face in adults but not in children.

  13. Morphea in Adults and Children Cohort III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharamsi, Jennifer Warner; Victor, Sandra; Aguwa, Nancy; Ahn, Chul; Arnett, Frank; Mayes, Maureen D.; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Small studies have implicated the association of specific autoantibodies with morphea subtype or severity, but no large-scale studies have been conducted. This prospective case-control study confirmed the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) and other autoantibodies in morphea but found they are of limited significance. OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of ANAs, extractable nuclear antigens such as antihistone antibodies (AHAs), and anti–single-stranded DNA antibodies (ssDNA abs) in patients with morphea vs a healthy control population and their association with clinical measures of morphea severity. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Nested case-control study, conducted at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, and University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston. Study participants included individuals enrolled in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort and Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Prevalence of ANAs, AHAs, ssDNA abs in patients with morphea vs matched controls and association of the presence of autoantibodies with clinical indicators of morphea severity. RESULTS The prevalence of ANAs, AHAs, and ssDNA abs in patients with morphea was 34%, 12%, and 8%, respectively. Antinuclear antibodies and AHAs, but not ssDNA abs, were present more frequently in cases than in controls. There was no difference in ANA prevalence among morphea subtypes. Among patients with linear morphea, the presence of autoantibodies was associated with clinical indicators of severe morphea including functional limitation (ssDNA ab, P = .005; and AHA, P = .006), extensive body surface area involvement (ssDNA ab, P = .01; and ANA, P = .005), and higher skin scores (ANA, P = .004). The presence of autoantibodies was not associated with clinical measures of morphea activity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our results demonstrate that ANAs and AHAs are more prevalent among patients with morphea but are

  14. Double diabetes: an emerging disease in children and young adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Studies in most countries have shown an increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in children and young adults. Double diabetes is a newly recognized problem in children with different diagnostic and therapeutic measures. Methods: A review of over 30 literature obtained from Google, PUBMED search and ...

  15. Complex word reading in Dutch deaf children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, A.H. van; Knoors, H.E.T.; Schreuder, R.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2013-01-01

    Children who are deaf are often delayed in reading comprehension. This delay could be due to problems in morphological processing during word reading. In this study, we investigated whether 6th grade deaf children and adults are delayed in comparison to their hearing peers in reading complex

  16. Complex Word Reading in Dutch Deaf Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoogmoed, Anne H.; Knoors, Harry; Schreuder, Robert; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2013-01-01

    Children who are deaf are often delayed in reading comprehension. This delay could be due to problems in morphological processing during word reading. In this study, we investigated whether 6th grade deaf children and adults are delayed in comparison to their hearing peers in reading complex derivational words and compounds compared to…

  17. Malignant Progression in Two Children with Multiple Osteochondromas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Schmale

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Osteochondromas (MO is a disease of benign bony growths with a low incidence of malignant transformation. Secondary chondrosarcoma in children is rare even in children with MO. Making a diagnosis of malignancy in low-grade cartilage tumors is challenging and requires consideration of clinical, radiographic, and histopathological factors. We report two cases of skeletally immature patients with MO who presented with rapidly enlarging and radiographically aggressive lesions consistent with malignant transformation. Both underwent allograft reconstruction of the involved site with no signs of recurrence or metastatic disease at a minimum of four-year follow-up.

  18. Children's Perceptions of Adult Economic Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Eighty children between the ages of 6 and 13 were asked to indicate and compare the needs and earnings of doctors, bus drivers, waiters, and shopkeepers. Youngest children did not perceive that unmet needs existed. Older children recognized the needs but sharply disagreed about inequalities. (Author/DB)

  19. Helping children and adults cope with parental infidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusterman, Don-David

    2005-11-01

    This article addresses the impact of discovered marital infidelity on the couple's young children, adolescents, and adult children. It distinguishes between two types of infidelity, affairs and womanizing, and suggests differential treatments for each. Treatment must address the impact of the secrecy, which is always part of infidelity, and the boundary violations that occur when a child is directly involved in the infidelity or in its aftermath. Four clinical cases illustrate therapeutic interventions for children suffering from their parent's infidelity.

  20. The breadth of coarticulatory units in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Lisa; Smith, Anne; Heisler, Lori; Ho, Michael

    2008-12-01

    To assess, in children and adults, the breadth of coarticulatory movements associated with a single rounded vowel. Upper and lower lip movements were recorded from 8 young adults and 8 children (aged 4-5 years). A single rounded versus unrounded vowel was embedded in the medial position of pairs of 7-word/7-syllable sentences. Both children and adults produced movement trajectories associated with lip rounding that were very broad temporally (i.e., movement duration lasting 45% to 56% of the sentence). Some effects appeared to extend across the entire utterance. There were no differences between children and adults in the extent of the coarticulatory effect. However, children produced relatively variable movements associated with lip rounding. These data support the hypothesis that, for young children and adults, broad chunks of output have been planned by the onset of implementation of a sentence. This implies that, based on a change in a single phoneme, the motor commands to the muscles are altered for the production of the entire sentence.

  1. Stronger vection in junior high school children than in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Nobu; Imura, Tomoko; Tamura, Rio; Seno, Takeharu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that even elementary school-aged children (7 and 11 years old) experience visually induced perception of illusory self-motion (vection) (Lepecq et al., 1995, Perception, 24, 435-449) and that children of a similar age (mean age = 9.2 years) experience more rapid and stronger vection than do adults (Shirai et al., 2012, Perception, 41, 1399-1402). These findings imply that although elementary school-aged children experience vection, this ability is subject to further development. To examine the subsequent development of vection, we compared junior high school students' (N = 11, mean age = 14.4 years) and adults' (N = 10, mean age = 22.2 years) experiences of vection. Junior high school students reported significantly stronger vection than did adults, suggesting that the perceptual experience of junior high school students differs from that of adults with regard to vection and that this ability undergoes gradual changes over a relatively long period of development.

  2. Similar Responses of Intestinal T Cells From Untreated Children and Adults With Celiac Disease to Deamidated Gluten Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ráki, Melinda; Dahal-Koirala, Shiva; Yu, Hao; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R; Gyimesi, Judit; Castillejo, Gemma; Jahnsen, Jørgen; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-09-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic small intestinal inflammatory disorder mediated by an immune response to gluten peptides in genetically susceptible individuals. Celiac disease is often diagnosed in early childhood, but some patients receive a diagnosis late in life. It is uncertain whether pediatric celiac disease is distinct from adult celiac disease. It has been proposed that gluten-reactive T cells in children recognize deamidated and native gluten epitopes, whereas T cells from adults only recognize deamidated gluten peptides. We studied the repertoire of gluten epitopes recognized by T cells from children and adults. We examined T-cell responses against gluten by generating T-cell lines and T-cell clones from intestinal biopsies of adults and children and tested proliferative response to various gluten peptides. We analyzed T cells from 14 children (2-5 years old) at high risk for celiac disease who were followed for celiac disease development. We also analyzed T cells from 6 adults (26-55 years old) with untreated celiac disease. All children and adults were positive for HLA-DQ2.5. Biopsies were incubated with gluten digested with chymotrypsin (modified or unmodified by the enzyme transglutaminase 2) or the peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin (in native and deamidated forms) before T-cell collection. Levels of T-cell responses were higher to deamidated gluten than to native gluten in children and adults. T cells from children and adults each reacted to multiple gluten epitopes. Several T-cell clones were cross-reactive, especially clones that recognized epitopes from γ-and ω-gliadin. About half of the generated T-cell clones from children and adults reacted to unknown epitopes. T-cell responses to different gluten peptides appear to be similar between adults and children at the time of diagnosis of celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The multiple languages in the daily of the children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Januário Gonçalves

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The language permeates the work in the infantile education and with the game and the interaction, constitutes one of the axes of the pedagogic action close to the children. When we spoke in language it is common we send ourselves to the verbal language and writing that, without a doubt, is fundamental for the infantile development, however, some pedagogic proposals end up just prioritizing those two language forms in the work with the children, in detriment of another possibilities.So, they end up depriving them of new existences and new experiences that favor the amplification of their knowledge. In that sense, they exist proposed in infantile education that have been looking for to just overcome the most restricted understanding of language as oral and writing, trying to enlarge it face to the perception that the child communicates and expressed himself by means of multiple languages, “a hundred languages”, as writes Loris Malaguzzi in his poetry. The content of that article seeks to present and to promote the reflection on some of the multiple present languages in the children's expression. It approaches the importance and the possibilities of working those communication forms and expression as possible languages in the small children's education.

  4. Treatment issues for children with epilepsy transitioning to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabbout, Rima; Camfield, Carol S; Andrade, Danielle M; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Chiron, Catherine; Cramer, Joyce A; French, Jacqueline A; Kossoff, Eric; Mula, Marco; Camfield, Peter R

    2017-04-01

    This is the third of three papers that summarize the second symposium on Transition in Epilepsies held in Paris in June 2016. This paper focuses on treatment issues that arise during the course of childhood epilepsy and make the process of transition to adult care more complicated. Some AEDs used during childhood, such as stiripentol, vigabatrin, and cannabidiol, are unfamiliar to adult epilepsy specialists. In addition, new drugs are being developed for treatment of specific childhood onset epilepsy syndromes and have no indication yet for adults. The ketogenic diet may be effective during childhood but is difficult to continue in adult care. Regional adult epilepsy diet clinics could be helpful. Polytherapy is common for patients transitioning to adult care. Although these complex AED regimes are difficult, they are often possible to simplify. AEDs used in childhood may need to be reconsidered in adulthood. Rescue medications to stop prolonged seizures and clusters of seizures are in wide home use in children and can be continued in adulthood. Adherence/compliance is notoriously difficult for adolescents, but there are simple clinical approaches that should be helpful. Mental health issues including depression and anxiety are not always diagnosed and treated in children and young adults even though effective treatments are available. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and aggressive behavior disorders may interfere with transition and successful adulthood but these can be treated. For the majority, the adult social outcome of children with epilepsy is unsatisfactory with few proven interventions. The interface between pediatric and adult care for children with epilepsy is becoming increasingly complicated with a need for more comprehensive transition programs and adult epileptologists who are knowledgeable about special treatments that benefit this group of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Listening to Older Adult Parents of Adult Children with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Judith R.

    2012-01-01

    This article uses qualitative research and narrative analysis to examine the experience of women age 55 and older who are parents caring for adult children with mental illness. Knowledge about the conflicts of older parents with dependent children is underdeveloped. In this study, analysis of women's stories about parenting in later life reveal…

  6. Cardiometabolic Risks and Severity of Obesity in Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Asheley C; Perrin, Eliana M; Moss, Leslie A; Skelton, Joseph A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of severe obesity among children and young adults has increased over the past decade. Although the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors is relatively low among children and young adults who are overweight or obese, those with more severe forms of obesity may be at greater risk. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from overweight or obese children and young adults 3 to 19 years of age who were included in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 through 2012 to assess the prevalence of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors according to the severity of obesity. Weight status was classified on the basis of measured height and weight. We used standard definitions of abnormal values for total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin, and fasting glucose and report the prevalence of abnormal values in children and young adults according to weight status. Among 8579 children and young adults with a body-mass index at the 85th percentile or higher (according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts), 46.9% were overweight, 36.4% had class I obesity, 11.9% had class II obesity, and 4.8% had class III obesity. Mean values for some, but not all, cardiometabolic variables were higher with greater severity of obesity in both male and female participants, and the values were higher in male participants than in female participants; for HDL cholesterol, the mean values were lower with greater severity of obesity. Multivariable models that controlled for age, race or ethnic group, and sex showed that the greater the severity of obesity, the higher the risks of a low HDL cholesterol level, high systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and high triglyceride and glycated hemoglobin levels. Severe obesity in children and young adults was associated with an increased prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors

  7. Consistent Performance Differences between Children and Adults Despite Manipulation of Cue-Target Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie-Raye Bauer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Two behavioral experiments assessed the plasticity and short-term improvement of task switching in 215 children and adults. Specifically, we studied manipulations of cued attention to different features of a target stimulus as a way to assess the development of cognitive flexibility. Each experiment had multiple levels of difficulty via manipulation of number of cued features (2–4 and number of response options (2 or 4. Working memory demand was manipulated across the two experiments. Impact of memory demand and task level manipulations on task accuracy and response times were measured. There were three overall goals: First, these task manipulations (number of cued features, response choices, and working memory load were tested to assess the stability of group differences in performance between children ages 6–16 years and adults 18–27 years, with the goal of reducing age group differences. Second, age-related transitions to adult-level performance were examined within subgroups of the child sample. Third, short-term improvement from the beginning to the end of the study session was measured to probe whether children can improve with task experience. Attempts to use task manipulations to reduce age differences in cued task switching performance were unsuccessful: children performed consistently worse and were more susceptible to task manipulations than adults. However, across both studies, adult-like performance was observed around mid-adolescence, by ages 13-16 years. Certain task manipulations, especially increasing number of response options when working memory demand was low, produced differences from adults even in the oldest children. Interestingly, there was similar performance improvement with practice for both child and adult groups. The higher memory demand version of the task (Experiment 2 prompted greater short-term improvement in accuracy and response times than the lower memory demand version (Experiment 1. These results

  8. Scaling adult doses of antifungal and antibacterial agents to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Thomas H

    2012-06-01

    My general pharmacokinetic scaling theory is discussed for the important matter of determining pediatric dosing for existing and new therapeutic drugs when optimal, or near-optimal, dosing for adults is known. The basis for the scaling is the requirement of a time-scaled likeness of the free-drug concentration time histories of children and adults. Broad categories of single and periodic dosing are considered. The former involves the scaling of dosage, and the latter involves both the dosage and schedule. The validity of the scaling relations is demonstrated by using measurements from previously reported clinical trials with adults and children (with ages generally 1 year or older) for the relatively new antifungal agent caspofungin and for the relatively new antibacterial agent linezolid. Standard pharmacodynamic effectiveness criteria are shown to be satisfied for the scaled dosage and schedule for children to the same extent that they are for the referenced adult. Consideration of scaling from adults to children is discussed for the case of new agents where no pediatric data are available and needed parameters are determined from in vitro measurements and preclinical animal data. A connection is also made between the allometric representation of clearance data and the dosing formulas. Limitations of the scaling results for infants because of growth and maturational matters are discussed. The general conclusion from this work is that the scaling theory does indeed have application to pediatric dosing for children, for both confirmation and refinement of present practice and guidance in pediatric treatment with new therapeutic agents.

  9. Neuromuscular interactions around the knee in children, adults and elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Mademli, Lida; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kofotolis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Although injury and neuromuscular activation patterns may be common for all individuals, there are certain factors which differentiate neuromuscular activity responses between children, adults and elderly. The purpose of this study is to review recent evidence on age differences in neural activation and muscle balances around the knee when performing single joint movements. Particularly, current evidence indicates that there are some interesting similarities in the neuromuscular mechanisms by which children or the elderly differ compared with adults. Both children and elderly display a lower absolute muscle strength capacity than adults which cannot fully be explained by differences in muscle mass. Quadriceps activation failure is a common symptom of all knee injuries, irrespective of age but it is likely that its effect is more evident in children or adults. While one might expect that antagonist co-activation would differ between age categories, it appears that this is not the case. Although hamstring: quadriceps ratio levels are altered after knee injury, it is not clear whether this is an age specific response. Finally, evidence suggests that both children and the elderly display less stiffness of the quadriceps muscle-tendon unit than adults which affects their knee joint function. PMID:25232523

  10. Developmental reversals in recognition memory in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Julien; Gardiner, Beatrix; Hayne, Harlene

    2016-01-01

    Older members of a given species typically exhibit superior learning and memory abilities relative to younger members, however, the developmental difference does not always occur in this younger-to-older direction. Developmental reversals are thought to reflect adaptive responses to the unique challenges imposed by the infant's niche. In humans, identification of developmental reversals has largely been precluded because infants, children, and adults are rarely tested using the same experimental procedures. Here, we adapted the visual recognition memory task and tested 3-year-olds and adults using one set of child-oriented stimuli and one set of adult-orientated stimuli. When tested immediately, children and adults exhibited recognition memory for both stimuli. When tested after a 1-week delay, children exhibited recognition memory for the child-oriented stimuli, but not for the adult-oriented stimuli and adults exhibited recognition memory for the adult-oriented stimuli, but not for the child-oriented stimuli. These data have important implications for current theories of memory development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Orthography and Modality Influence Speech Production in Adults and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletta, Meredith; Goffman, Lisa; Hogan, Tiffany P

    2016-12-01

    The acquisition of literacy skills influences the perception and production of spoken language. We examined if orthography influences implicit processing in speech production in child readers and in adult readers with low and high reading proficiency. Children (n = 17), adults with typical reading skills (n = 17), and adults demonstrating low reading proficiency (n = 18) repeated or read aloud nonwords varying in orthographic transparency. Analyses of implicit linguistic processing (segmental accuracy and speech movement stability) were conducted. The accuracy and articulatory stability of productions of the nonwords were assessed before and after repetition or reading. Segmental accuracy results indicate that all 3 groups demonstrated greater learning when they were able to read, rather than just hear, the nonwords. Speech movement results indicate that, for adults with poor reading skills, exposure to the nonwords in a transparent spelling reduces the articulatory variability of speech production. Reading skill was correlated with speech movement stability in the groups of adults. In children and adults, orthography interacts with speech production; all participants integrate orthography into their lexical representations. Adults with poor reading skills do not use the same reading or speaking strategies as children with typical reading skills.

  12. Kinship Ties: Attachment Relationships that Promote Resilience in African American Adult Children of Alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Camille Hall

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available For many African Americans, the extended family has been the source of strength, resilience, and survival. Although changes in African American families, like changes in all families in the United States that have diluted the importance of kinship ties, many African Americans continue to place a high value on extended family members. Children of Africans and communities of African descent traditionally interact with multiple caregivers, consisting of kin, and fictive kin.Utilizing both attachment theory and risk and resilience literature, this paper discusses ways to better understand the resilient nature of African American families and how multiple attachment relationships assist at-risk African American children, specifically adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs.

  13. Incontinence in children, adolescents and adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gontard, Alexander; Niemczyk, Justine; Borggrefe-Moussavian, Sorina; Wagner, Catharina; Curfs, Leopold; Equit, Monika

    2016-11-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a microdeletion syndrome (chromosome 7q11.23) characterized by typical facial features, cardiovascular disease, behavioural symptoms, and mild intellectual disability (ID). The aim of this study was to assess the rates of incontinence and psychological problems in persons with WS. 231 individuals with WS were recruited through the German parent support group (52.0% male, mean age 19.4 years). Faecal incontinence (FI) was diagnosed from the age of 4 years and nocturnal enuresis (NE) and daytime urinary incontinence (DUI) of 5 years onwards. The Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence, the International-Consultation-on-Incontinence-Questionnaire-Pediatric LUTS (ICIQ-CLUTS), as well as the Developmental Behavior Checklist for parents (DBC-P) or for adults (DBC-A) were filled out by parents or caregivers. 17.8% of the sample had NE, 5.9% DUI and 7.6% FI. NE was present in 44.9% of children (4-12 years), 13.5% of teens (13-17y), 3.3% of young adults (18-30y) and in 3.6% of adults (> 30y). DUI (and FI) decreased from 17.9% (21.4%) in children to 0% in adults. 3.5% of the sample had an ICIQ-CLUTS score in the clinical range. 30.5% of children and 22.1% of adults had a clinical DBC score. Children and teens with clinically relevant DBC-P-scores had significantly higher DUI rates. Children with WS have high rates of incontinence and LUTS, which decrease with age. Most adults are continent. NE is the most common subtype. Except for DUI in children, incontinence is not associated with behavioural problems. Screening, assessment and treatment of incontinence in individuals with WS is recommended. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:1000-1005, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Developmental trajectory of time perspective: From children to older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Liu, Lu-Lu; Cui, Ji-Fang; Chen, Xing-Jie; Wang, Ya

    2016-12-01

    Time perspective is a fundamental dimension of the psychological time construct, with a pervasive and powerful influence on human behavior. However, the developmental trajectory of time perspective across a human lifespan remains unclear. The current study aimed to portray the developmental trajectory of all dimensions of time perspectives from children to older adults in a large sample. A total of 1,901 individuals (aged 9-84 years) completed measures of time perspective. They were then divided into five age groups: children, teenagers, young adults, middle-aged adults, and older adults. Results suggested that each time perspective showed a unique developmental pattern across the lifespan. Moreover, perceived economic situation and education were related to some dimensions of time perspective. © 2016 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Educational achievements of children of parents with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Julie Yoon; Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, N.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of parental multiple sclerosis (MS) on offspring’s educational attainment. The objective of the study was to examine educational achievements in offspring of parents with MS compared with matched children of parents without MS in a nationwide register-based cohort...... from the Civil Registration System without parental MS matched 8:1 to the MS offspring by sex and year of birth. Information about education was linked to the cohorts from nationwide educational registries. We included 4177 children of MS parents and 33,416 reference persons. Children of MS parents.......20). There was a trend toward more MS offspring attaining health-related educations (OR 1.10; 95 % CI 1.00–1.21; p = 0.06). In conclusion, children of MS parents showed a small advantage in grade point average in final examinations in basic school, and they more often tended toward health-related educations. This study...

  16. Transition to adult care for children with chronic neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camfield, Peter; Camfield, Carol

    2011-03-01

    Chronic neurological disorders in children have significant effects on adult medical and social function. Transition and then formal transfer of care from pediatric to adult services is a complex process, although there are virtually no objective data to inform physicians about the most effective approach. Some neurological disorders that start in children are a danger to society if poorly treated in adulthood, some disorders that were previously lethal in childhood now permit survival well into adulthood, and others are static in childhood but progressive in adulthood. Some disorders remit or are cured in childhood but continue to have serious comorbidity in adulthood, whereas others are similar and persistent in children and adults. Maturity, provision of information, and cognitive problems are confounders. We discuss several models of transition/transfer but prefer a joint pediatric/adult transition clinic. We make a series of suggestions about how to improve the transition/transfer process with the hope of better medical and social adult outcome for children with neurological disorders. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  17. Behavioral treatments for children and adults who stutter: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blomgren M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Blomgren Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Abstract: This paper provides a brief overview of stuttering followed by a synopsis of current approaches to treat stuttering in children and adults. Treatment is discussed in terms of multifactorial, operant, speech restructuring, and anxiolytic approaches. Multifactorial and operant treatments are designed for young children who stutter. Both of these approaches involve parent training and differ primarily in their focus on reducing demands on the child (multifactorial or in their use of response contingent stimulation (operant conditioning. Speech restructuring and anxiolytic approaches are used with adults who stutter. Speech restructuring approaches focus on the mechanics of speech production, and anxiolytic treatments tend to focus on the symptoms and social and vocational challenges of stuttering. The evidence base for these different approaches is outlined. Response contingent therapy (for children and speech restructuring therapy (for adults have the most robust empirical evidence base. Multifactorial treatments for children and stuttering management approaches for adults are popular but are based on theoretical models of stuttering; the evidence base is not robust and tends to be inferred from work in areas such as cognitive behavior therapy and desensitization. Comprehensive, or holistic, approaches to treating stuttering are also discussed. Comprehensive approaches for treating stuttering in adults address both improved speech fluency and stuttering management. Keywords: stuttering, treatment, stuttering management, speech restructuring, cognitive restructuring

  18. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Carol F.; Ratliff, Michelle L.; Powell, Rebecca; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development

  19. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Carol F., E-mail: carol-webb@omrf.org [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Immunobiology and Cancer Research, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ratliff, Michelle L., E-mail: michelle-ratliff@omrf.org [Immunobiology and Cancer Research, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Powell, Rebecca, E-mail: rebeccapowell@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R., E-mail: celeste-wirsig@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Lakiza, Olga, E-mail: olga-lakiza@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Obara, Tomoko, E-mail: tomoko-obara@ouhsc.edu [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  20. Employment, disability pension and income for children with parental multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Julie Yoon; Laursen, Bjarne; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Brødsgaard, Anne; Soelberg Sørensen, Per; Magyari, Melinda

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about the consequences of parental multiple sclerosis (MS) on offspring's socioeconomic circumstances. To investigate employment, disability pension and income in offspring of parents with MS compared with matched reference persons in a nationwide register-based cohort study. All Danish-born persons with onset of MS during 1950-1986 were retrieved from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. Their offspring were identified using the Civil Registration System. One random offspring from each sibship was matched by sex and year of birth with eight random reference persons. We included 2456 MS offspring and 19,648 reference persons. At age 30, employment was lower among MS offspring than reference children (odds ratio (OR): 0.89; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.84-0.95; p = 0.0003), and they more often received disability pension (OR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.15-1.50; p pension and low income in adult life.

  1. Predicting Parents' Experiences with Coresident Adult Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, William S.

    1991-01-01

    Examined likelihood of parent-adult child coresidence and implications of coresidence for quality of life as perceived by parents. Data from 1987-88 National Survey of Families and Households showed that positive home environment was strong selection factor in predicting probability of coresidence. Middle-class parents reported more negative…

  2. Cognitive Developmental Therapy: Aiding Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers, David A.

    The works of Kegan and Guidano have presented cognition and emotion as complementary modes of knowing that develop together. Cognition is conceived of as being concerned with the knowledge of reality, and emotions are conceptualized as people's system for knowing of their relationship to that reality. Adult children of dysfunctional families are a…

  3. Children's Physical Attractiveness and Sex as Determinants of Adult Punitiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Karen K.

    1974-01-01

    Two studies investigated the influence of a child's physical attractiveness and sex as potential elicitors of differential adult punitiveness. Assessed were the reactions of 40 women and 44 men. Results reveal differences in men's and women's reactions and suggest differences in their orientation towards children's task behavior. (Author/SDH)

  4. Postural Control in Children, Teenagers and Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoldi, Chiara; Galli, Manuela; Mainardi, Luca; Crivellini, Marcello; Albertini, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work was to analyze postural control in Down syndrome (DS) participants considering three different groups composed by children, teenagers and adults with DS. An analysis of the centre of pressure (COP) displacement during standing position was therefore performed for the three groups of subjects. The obtained signal of COP was…

  5. Use of the MMPI with Adult Children of Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Jones, Kelly

    This article provides a review of several studies, which used the Minnesota Multiphasis Personality Inventory (MMPI) to attempt to differentiate adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs). The studies focused on either non-clinical ACOAs or alcoholic ACOAs. Overall, the MMPI differentiated ACOAs, but the degree and patterns of elevations varied…

  6. Protecting Adults and Children from Blood-Borne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Nancy K.; Corning, Lisa L.

    2000-01-01

    Recommends universal precautions policies and procedures to minimize for children and adults in early childhood settings the risk of infection from exposure to blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis B or HIV. Outlines symptoms of hepatitis B and HIV/AIDS. Discusses legal and ethical implications related to inclusion. Lists resources for teachers…

  7. Short-Term Group Treatment for Adult Children of Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Alvin; McCormack, WIlliam A.

    1992-01-01

    Adult children of alcoholics (n=24) were tested on measures of loneliness, anxiety, hostility, depression, and interpersonal dependency before and after participation in short-term group therapy. Highly significant test score changes supported effectiveness of individual therapy in short-term groups. (Author/NB)

  8. Confidence Judgments in Children's and Adults' Event Recall and Suggestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebers, Claudia M.

    2002-01-01

    Three studies investigated the role of 8- and 10-year-olds' and adults' metacognitive monitoring and control processes for unbiased event recall tasks and suggestibility. Findings suggested strong tendencies to overestimate confidence regardless of age and question format. Children did not lack principal metacognitive competencies when questions…

  9. Neural correlates of autobiographical memory retrieval in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Patricia J; Pathman, Thanujeni; Inman, Cory; Campanella, Carolina; Hamann, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Autobiographical memory (AM) is a critically important form of memory for life events that undergoes substantial developmental changes from childhood to adulthood. Relatively little is known regarding the functional neural correlates of AM retrieval in children as assessed with fMRI, and how they may differ from adults. We investigated this question with 14 children ages 8-11 years and 14 adults ages 19-30 years, contrasting AM retrieval with semantic memory (SM) retrieval. During scanning, participants were cued by verbal prompts to retrieve previously selected recent AMs or to verify semantic properties of words. As predicted, both groups showed AM retrieval-related increased activation in regions implicated in prior studies, including bilateral hippocampus, and prefrontal, posterior cingulate, and parietal cortices. Adults showed greater activation in the hippocampal/parahippocampal region as well as prefrontal and parietal cortex, relative to children; age-related differences were most prominent in the first 8 sec versus the second 8 sec of AM retrieval and when AM retrieval was contrasted with semantic retrieval. This study is the first to characterise similarities and differences during AM retrieval in children and adults using fMRI.

  10. Consumption of whole grains in French children, adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellisle, France; Hébel, Pascale; Colin, Justine; Reyé, Béatrice; Hopkins, Sinead

    2014-11-28

    The consumption of whole grain foods is associated with many nutritional, health and weight control benefits. The present study assessed whole grain intake in France on the basis of a 7 d dietary survey in a representative sample of children, adolescents and adults (Comportements et Consommations Alimentaires en France 2010 survey). Special care was taken to identify and assess the intake of all whole grains. All foods consumed were considered, with no lower limit on whole grain content. For the majority of foods, details regarding the whole grain contents were obtained from brand information and quantitative nutrient declarations on food labels. Over half of the respondents reported never consuming any whole grain. In participants who did, consumption levels were very low (about 9·1 g/d in children and 14·4 g/d in adults). The main food sources of whole grains were breakfast cereals in children and adolescents and bread in adults. Consumers of whole grains had higher daily intakes of fibre and several vitamins and minerals than non-consumers. In adults but not in children, the OR for overweight/obesity decreased significantly as the level of whole grain consumption increased. Although a majority of French consumers comply with the national recommendation to consume a starchy food with each meal, they do so with minimal consumption of whole grain foods.

  11. Exploring Children's Picture Storybooks with Adult and Adolescent EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malu, Kathleen F.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical framework to support the use of children's picture storybooks in teaching EFL to adults and adolescents. The author presents ways to use these books, addresses the twin goals of teaching mechanics and culture, and includes a list of books and a wide variety of activities that EFL teachers can use to effectively…

  12. Comparison of tibial shaft ski fractures in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Tomo; Matsumoto, Kazu; Ishimaru, Daichi; Sumi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2014-09-01

    To examine whether child and adult skiers have different risk factors or mechanisms of injury for tibial shaft fractures. Descriptive epidemiological study. Prospectively analyzed the epidemiologic factors, injury types, and injury mechanisms at Sumi Memorial Hospital. This study analyzed information obtained from 276 patients with tibial fractures sustained during skiing between 2004 and 2012. We focused on 174 ski-related tibial shaft fractures with respect to the following factors: age, gender, laterality of fracture, skill level, mechanism of fracture (fall vs collision), scene of injury (steepness of slope), snow condition, and weather. Fracture pattern was graded according to Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) classification and mechanical direction [external (ER) or internal rotation (IR)]. Tibial shaft fractures were the most common in both children (89.3%) and adults (47.4%). There were no significant differences in gender, side of fracture, mechanism of fracture, snow condition, or weather between children and adults. Skill levels were significantly lower in children than in adults (P differences in some of these parameters, suggesting that child and adult skiers have different risk factors or mechanisms of injury for tibial shaft fractures.

  13. Pediatric cardiac emergencies: Children are not small adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazier Aisha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with adults, cardiac emergencies are infrequent in children and clinical presentation is often quite variable. In adults, cardiac emergencies are most commonly related to complications of coronary artery disease; however, in pediatric cases, the coronaries are only rarely the underlying problem. Pediatric cardiac emergencies comprise a range of pathology including but not limited to undiagnosed congenital heart disease in the infant; complications of palliated congenital heart disease in children; arrhythmias related to underlying cardiac pathology in the teenager and acquired heart disease. The emergency room physician and pediatric intensivist will usually be the first and second lines of care for pediatric cardiac emergencies and thus it is imperative that they have knowledge of the diverse presentations of cardiac disease in order to increase the likelihood of delivering early appropriate therapy and referral. The objective of this review is to outline cardiac emergencies in the pediatric population and contrast the presentation with adults.

  14. Young Adult Outcome of Hyperactive Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive functioning of 149 hyperactive (H group and 72 control children (CC group in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, followed for at least 13 years to young adulthood (mean 20 years, range 19-25, was evaluated by interviews with participants, employer ratings, and high school records, and reported by researchers from Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston; Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; and University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester.

  15. Chemical characterization of fingerprints from adults and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, M.V.; Asano, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bohanon, A. [Knoxville Police Dept., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Observation that children`s fingerprints disappear from surfaces more quickly than adults`, initiated a study to characterize the chemical components in fingerprints. Samples were obtained from about 50 individuals ranging in age from 3 to 64 by extracting chemicals from the fingertips using rubbing alcohol. Using combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, a wide range of compounds were identified. Samples from children contained higher levels of relatively volatile free fatty acids, while those from adults had higher levels of less volatile long chain esters of fatty acids. These esters are thought to originate from sebaceous glands located on the face and levels of these compounds increase substantially after puberty. Also, other compounds were observed that could be used to develop improved methods for fingerprint detection at a crime scene. Further, observation of specific compounds raises the possibility of being able to identify personal traits (gender, habits, diseases, etc. ) via analysis of components in fingerprints and/or skin.

  16. Attentional selection and suppression in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meirong; Wang, Encong; Huang, Jing; Zhao, Chenguang; Guo, Jialiang; Li, Dongwei; Sun, Li; Du, Boqi; Ding, Yulong; Song, Yan

    2018-05-15

    The fundamental role of covert spatial attention is to enhance the processing of attended items while simultaneously ignoring irrelevant items. However, relatively little is known about how brain electrophysiological activities associated with target selection and distractor suppression are involved as they develop and become fully functional. The current study aimed to identify the neurophysiological bases of the development of covert spatial attention, focusing on electroencephalographic (EEG) markers of attentional selection (N2pc) and suppression (P D ). EEG data were collected from healthy young adults and typically developing children (9-15 years old) as they searched for a shape singleton target in either the absence or the presence of a salient-but-irrelevant color singleton distractor. The ERP results showed that a lateral shape target elicited a smaller N2pc in children compared with adults regardless of whether a distractor was present or not. Moreover, the target-elicited N2pc was always followed by a similar positivity in both age groups. Counterintuitively, a lateral salient-but-irrelevant distractor elicited a large P D in children with low behavioral accuracy, whereas high-accuracy children exhibited a small and "adult-like" P D . More importantly, we found no evidence for a correlation between the target-elicited N2pc and the distractor-elicited P D in either age group. Our results provide neurophysiological evidence for the developmental differences between target selection and distractor suppression. Compared with adults, 9-15-year-old children deploy insufficient attentional selection resources to targets but use "adult-like" or even more attentional suppression resources to resist irrelevant distractors. A video abstract of this article can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhWapx0d75I. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Terror explosive injuries: a comparison of children, adolescents, and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Dena H; Peleg, Kobi

    2010-01-01

    We sought to characterize injuries and outcomes from terror explosions with specific attention to children (0-10 years) and adolescents (11-15 years) compared to adults (16-45 years). Terror explosions target vulnerable populations and result in multidimensional injuries that may vary according to age group. The relative dearth of information regarding terror-related injuries among children inhibits proper preparedness and optimum management during such an event. A retrospective study was performed using data from the national Israel Trauma Registry (October 2000 to December 2005). Included were civilians and nonactive military personnel hospitalized as a result of a terror explosion. During the 5.3-year study period, 49 children (0-10 years), 65 adolescents (11-15 years), and 723 adults (16-45 years) were hospitalized from terror explosions. Children were more likely than adults to sustain severe injuries (27% vs. 12%) and traumatic brain injury (35% vs. 20%) and less likely to sustain injuries to their extremities (35% vs. 57%) or open wounds (39% vs. 59%) (P profile was similar to that of adults, however, adolescents presented with less internal injuries, more contusions, and superficial wounds to extremities and were more likely to require surgery for mild to moderate wounds. Differences in hospital utilization and outcomes by age groups were observed when data were stratified by injury severity. Compared to adults, children, and adolescents exposed to terror explosions present with different injuries and hospital utilization and outcomes. These results further confirm that preparedness of a pediatric healthcare system is essential for effective management in the event of a future mass casualty incident.

  18. Do Children "DRM" Like Adults? False Memory Production in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Richard L.; Warren, Amye R.; Shelton, Jill T.; Price, Jodi; Reed, Andrea W.; Williams, Danny

    2008-01-01

    The Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm was used to investigate developmental trends in accurate and false memory production. In Experiment 1, DRM lists adjusted to be more consistent with children's vocabulary were used with 2nd graders, 8th graders, and college students. Accurate and false recall and recognition increased with age, but…

  19. CYTOKINES AND HERPESVIRUSES IN CHILDREN WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Zheleznikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It was determined earlier (G.P. Ivanova, 2012 that a chronic course of leukoencephalitis in teenagers caused by inadequate response of cytokine system to the combination of two herpesviruses (HV — EBV and HHV-6, leads to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS in 44% of cases. The research objective was to characterize the cytokine response in children with MS with simultaneous screening of the presence of active HV infections. 39 children with the diagnosis “MS” were under observation, 34 of them had relapsing-remitting (RR MS, and 5 children had a progressing course of MS (PMS. Concentration of cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFNα, IFNγ, and IL-4 was identified in blood serum and cerebrospinal liquid (CSF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, HV DNA was revealed by PCR. Cytokine status in children with MS had some differences depending on the phase of the disease, clinical severity of the relapse and the course of MS. The relapse phase of RRMS was associated with the accumulation of IL-8, IL-10, and IL-6 in the blood, and index IFNγ/IL-4 modulations in accordance with the clinical severity of the relapse. A severe aggravation of the disease in children with PMS was accompanied by the increase of IL-8 system response. HV DNA was revealed in 27 patients from 39 ones (69% in blood and in 17 patients (44% in CSF with the predominance of EBV (93%, frequently in combination with HHV-6. During an acute period the frequency of HV DNA identification increased 2–3 times to compare with the remission period. Unlike children with RRMS, a mixed-infection of 3–4 herpes viruses was revealed in all 5 patients with PMS. According to the results summary it is possible to make a conclusion that HV-infection has an important role in MS pathogenesis in teenagers, taking part in the aggravation and progression of the disease by its effect on the cytokine system response. EBV-infection dominates among HV, however the risk of MS development

  20. Defibrotide for children and adults with hepatic veno-occlusive disease post hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbacioglu, Selim; Richardson, Paul G

    2017-10-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS) is a complication that is typically associated with conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In patients with concomitant multi-organ dysfunction, mortality may be >80%. Recently, the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation established separate criteria for diagnosis and severity of VOD/SOS for adults and children, to better reflect current understanding of the disease. Areas covered: This review provides an overview of post-HSCT hepatic VOD/SOS and defibrotide, including its pharmacological, clinical, and regulatory profile. In children and adults following HSCT, defibrotide is approved for the treatment of hepatic VOD/SOS with concomitant renal or pulmonary dysfunction in the United States and for the treatment of severe hepatic VOD/SOS in the European Union. Day +100 survival rates with defibrotide are superior to those of historical controls receiving best supportive care only, and safety profiles are similar. Expert commentary: Defibrotide appears to act through multiple mechanisms to restore thrombo-fibrinolytic balance and protect endothelial cells, and there are promising data on the use of defibrotide for VOD/SOS prophylaxis in high-risk children undergoing HSCT. An ongoing randomized controlled trial in children and adults will better assess the clinical value of defibrotide as a preventive medication.

  1. Danish Focus group protocol for children & adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werther, Michelle Nadia; Pedersen, Dorthe; Sansolios, Sanne

    2010-01-01

    child (Heary & Hennessy, 2002). As in this particularly research it is decided to use the FG method to collect the dietary empiric, it must also be recognised that this method is not common to use with children at the age of 5, and therefore finding literature with best suitable ways to conduct......As one aim of the research was to gain knowledge about children’s perception on food and meals as well as physical activity, it was decided that a qualitative method would be most appropriate. In addition the use of FG as research method was chosen, as this method gives the researcher...

  2. Follow the Liar: The Effects of Adult Lies on Children's Honesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Chelsea; Carver, Leslie J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research shows that most adults admit they lie to children. We also know that children learn through modeling and imitation. To date there are no published studies that examine whether lying to children has an effect on children's honesty. We aimed to bridge the gap in this literature by examining the effects of adults' lies on…

  3. Emotional and Behavioural Problems in Children with Visual Impairment, Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimovic, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children with multiple impairments have more complex developmental problems than children with a single impairment. Method: We compared children, aged 4 to 11 years, with intellectual disability (ID) and visual impairment to children with single ID, single visual impairment and typical development on "Child Behavior Check…

  4. Trampoline-related injuries in children: a preliminary biomechanical model of multiple users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menelaws, Simon; Bogacz, Andrew R; Drew, Tim; Paterson, Brodie C

    2011-07-01

    The recent popularity of domestic trampolines has seen a corresponding increase in injured children. Most injuries happen on the trampoline mat when there are multiple users present. This study sought to examine and simulate the forces and energy transferred to a child's limbs when trampolining with another person of greater mass. The study used a computational biomechanical model. The simulation demonstrated that when two masses bounce out of phase on a trampoline, a transfer of kinetic energy from the larger mass to the smaller mass is likely to occur. It predicted that when an 80 kg adult is on a trampoline with a 25 kg child, the energy transfer is equivalent to the child falling 2.8 m onto a solid surface. Additionally, the rate of loading on the child's bones and ligaments is greater than that on the accompanying adult. Current guidelines are clear that more than one user on a trampoline at a time is a risk factor for serious injury; however, the majority of injuries happen in this scenario. The model predicted that there are high energy transfers resulting in serious fracture and ligamentous injuries to children and that this could be equated to equivalent fall heights. This provides a clear take-home message, which can be conveyed to parents to reduce the incidence of trampoline-related injuries.

  5. Urinary growth hormone excretion in 657 healthy children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, K; Philips, M; Jørgensen, M

    1991-01-01

    .0001) with maximum values in Tanner stage 3 for girls and 4 for boys. This corresponded to a peak in u-GH excretion between 11.5-14.5 years in girls and 12.5-16 years in boys. Additionally, u-GH excretion in adults was significantly higher than in prepubertal children (p less than 0.001). The day/night ratio of u......Urinary growth hormone (u-GH) excretion was measured in 547 healthy children and 110 adults by ELISA with a detection limit of 1.1 ng/l u-GH after prior concentration of the urine samples (20- to 30-fold). u-GH excretion values were significantly dependent on the pubertal stage (p less than 0...

  6. Estimating reproduction numbers for adults and children from case data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, K.; Mercer, G. N.; Nishiura, H.; McBryde, E. S.; Becker, N. G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method for estimating reproduction numbers for adults and children from daily onset data, using pandemic influenza A(H1N1) data as a case study. We investigate the impact of different underlying transmission assumptions on our estimates, and identify that asymmetric reproduction matrices are often appropriate. Under-reporting of cases can bias estimates of the reproduction numbers if reporting rates are not equal across the two age groups. However, we demonstrate that the estimate of the higher reproduction number is robust to disproportionate data-thinning. Applying the method to 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 data from Japan, we demonstrate that the reproduction number for children was considerably higher than that of adults, and that our estimates are insensitive to our choice of reproduction matrix. PMID:21345858

  7. The patent ductus arteriosus in term infants, children, and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Douglas J

    2012-04-01

    During fetal life, the ductus arteriosus is a normal and essential structure that connects the pulmonary artery to the distal aortic arch, permitting right ventricular ejection into the aorta. After birth, with commencement of pulmonary blood flow and a 2-ventricle circulation, a variety of physiological and biochemical signals normally result in complete closure of the ductus. Persistent patency of the ductus arteriosus may impair systemic cardiac output and result in deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system and lungs. Although surgery is still the treatment of choice for most premature infants with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), transcatheter techniques have largely supplanted surgery for closure of PDA in children and adults. This article is a review of the PDA in term infants, children, and adults, with focus on the clinical manifestations and management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging and clinical characteristics of children with multiple foci of microsusceptibility changes in the brain on susceptibility-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Tetsu [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Aida, Noriko; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Shishikura, Ayako [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Takahara, Taro; Kwee, Thomas C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Heidelberglaan 100, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Miyata, Daiki [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Circulation Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Inoue, Tomio [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Microsusceptibility changes in the brain are well known to correspond with microbleeds or micrometal fragments in adults, but this phenomenon has not been explored well in children. To assess imaging and clinical characteristics of children with multiple foci of microsusceptibility changes using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Between 2006 and 2008, 12 children with multiple foci of microsusceptibility on SWI without corresponding abnormal signal on conventional MRI were identified and were retrospectively assessed. The locations of foci of microsusceptibility included the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia, brainstem and cerebellar white matter, without any clear systematic anatomic distribution. CT (n = 5) showed no calcification at the locations corresponding to the microsusceptibility on SWI. Conventional MR imaging showed white matter volume loss (n = 5), delayed myelination (n = 2), acute infarction (n = 1), chronic infarction (n = 1), meningitis (n = 1), slight signal abnormality in the white matter (n = 1) and no abnormal findings (n = 1). Follow-up SWI (n = 3) showed no change of the microsusceptibility foci. Interestingly, all children had a history of heart surgery under extracorporeal circulation for congenital heart disease. Multiple foci of microsusceptibility can be seen in the brain on SWI in children with congenital heart disease who underwent heart surgery with extracorporeal circulation. (orig.)

  9. Basal ganglia lesions in children and adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika, E-mail: m.figatowska@mp.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Institute of Mother and Child, ul. Kasprzaka 17a, 01-211 Warsaw (Poland); Mierzewska, Hanna, E-mail: h.mierzewska@gmail.com [Department of Neurology of Children and Adolescents, Institute of Mother and Child, ul. Kasprzaka 17a, 01-211 Warsaw (Poland); Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta, E-mail: e-jurkiewicz@o2.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-05-15

    The term “basal ganglia” refers to caudate and lentiform nuclei, the latter composed of putamen and globus pallidus, substantia nigra and subthalamic nuclei and these deep gray matter structures belong to the extrapyramidal system. Many diseases may present as basal ganglia abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) – to a lesser degree – allow for detection of basal ganglia injury. In many cases, MRI alone does not usually allow to establish diagnosis but together with the knowledge of age and circumstances of onset and clinical course of the disease is a powerful tool of differential diagnosis. The lesions may be unilateral: in Rassmussen encephalitis, diabetes with hemichorea/hemiballism and infarction or – more frequently – bilateral in many pathologic conditions. Restricted diffusion is attributable to infarction, acute hypoxic–ischemic injury, hypoglycemia, Leigh disease, encephalitis and CJD. Contrast enhancement may be seen in cases of infarction and encephalitis. T1-hyperintensity of the lesions is uncommon and may be observed unilaterally in case of hemichorea/hemiballism and bilaterally in acute asphyxia in term newborns, in hypoglycemia, NF1, Fahr disease and manganese intoxication. Decreased signal intensity on GRE/T2*-weighted images and/or SWI indicating iron, calcium or hemosiderin depositions is observed in panthotenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy, Fahr disease (and other calcifications) as well as with the advancing age. There are a few papers in the literature reviewing basal ganglia lesions. The authors present a more detailed review with rich iconography from the own archive.

  10. Basal ganglia lesions in children and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika; Mierzewska, Hanna; Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    The term “basal ganglia” refers to caudate and lentiform nuclei, the latter composed of putamen and globus pallidus, substantia nigra and subthalamic nuclei and these deep gray matter structures belong to the extrapyramidal system. Many diseases may present as basal ganglia abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) – to a lesser degree – allow for detection of basal ganglia injury. In many cases, MRI alone does not usually allow to establish diagnosis but together with the knowledge of age and circumstances of onset and clinical course of the disease is a powerful tool of differential diagnosis. The lesions may be unilateral: in Rassmussen encephalitis, diabetes with hemichorea/hemiballism and infarction or – more frequently – bilateral in many pathologic conditions. Restricted diffusion is attributable to infarction, acute hypoxic–ischemic injury, hypoglycemia, Leigh disease, encephalitis and CJD. Contrast enhancement may be seen in cases of infarction and encephalitis. T1-hyperintensity of the lesions is uncommon and may be observed unilaterally in case of hemichorea/hemiballism and bilaterally in acute asphyxia in term newborns, in hypoglycemia, NF1, Fahr disease and manganese intoxication. Decreased signal intensity on GRE/T2*-weighted images and/or SWI indicating iron, calcium or hemosiderin depositions is observed in panthotenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy, Fahr disease (and other calcifications) as well as with the advancing age. There are a few papers in the literature reviewing basal ganglia lesions. The authors present a more detailed review with rich iconography from the own archive

  11. Sit less and move more: perspectives of adults with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian, Saeideh; Ezeugwu, Victor E; Motl, Robert W; Manns, Patricia J

    2017-12-20

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological disease with the highest prevalence in Canada. Replacing sedentary behavior with light activities may be a feasible approach to manage multiple sclerosis symptoms. This study explored the perspectives of adults with multiple sclerosis about sedentary behavior, physical activity and ways to change behavior. Fifteen adults with multiple sclerosis (age 43 ± 13 years; mean ± standard deviation), recruited through the multiple sclerosis Clinic at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, participated in semi-structured interviews. Interview audios were transcribed verbatim and coded. NVivo software was used to facilitate the inductive process of thematic analysis. Balancing competing priorities between sitting and moving was the primary theme. Participants were aware of the benefits of physical activity to their overall health, and in the management of fatigue and muscle stiffness. Due to fatigue, they often chose sitting to get their energy back. Further, some barriers included perceived fear of losing balance or embarrassment while walking. Activity monitoring, accountability, educational and individualized programs were suggested strategies to motivate more movement. Adults with multiple sclerosis were open to the idea of replacing sitting with light activities. Motivational and educational programs are required to help them to change sedentary behavior to moving more. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION One of the most challenging and common difficulties of multiple sclerosis is walking impairment that worsens because of multiple sclerosis progression, and is a common goal in the rehabilitation of people with multiple sclerosis. The deterioration in walking abilities is related to lower levels of physical activity and more sedentary behavior, such that adults with multiple sclerosis spend 8 to 10.5 h per day sitting. Replacing prolonged sedentary behavior with light physical activities, and incorporating education

  12. Comprehension and Generation of Metaphoric Language in Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasirer, Anat; Mashal, Nira

    2017-05-01

    Difficulties with figurative language comprehension were documented in adult dyslexia (DYS). In the present research, we investigated the comprehension and generation of metaphors in 37 children, 35 adolescents, and 34 adults with and without DYS. We also tested the contribution of executive function to metaphor processing. A multiple-choice questionnaire with conventional and novel metaphors was used to assess comprehension; a concept-explanation task was used to test conventional and novel metaphor generation (verbal creativity). The findings indicated differences between the dyslexic children and the control group in conventional metaphor comprehension. However, both groups performed similarly in the novel metaphor comprehension test. Furthermore, although children and adolescents with DYS showed similar performance in metaphor generation as their typically developing peers, adults with DYS generated more metaphors than controls. While scores on tests of verbal knowledge and mental flexibility contributed to the prediction of conventional metaphor comprehension, scores on non-verbal tests and mental flexibility contributed to the prediction of novel metaphor generation. Our findings suggest that individuals with DYS are not impaired in novel metaphor comprehension and metaphor generation and that metaphor comprehension and generation utilize different cognitive resources. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Comparison of children versus adults undergoing mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy: large-scale analysis of a single institution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Zeng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: As almost any version of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL was safely and efficiently applied for adults as well as children without age being a limiting risk factor, the aim of the study was to compare the different characteristics as well as the efficacy, outcome, and safety of the pediatric and adult patients who had undergone mini-PCNL (MPCNL in a single institution. METHODS: We retrospective reviewed 331 renal units in children and 8537 renal units in adults that had undergone MPCNL for upper urinary tract stones between the years of 2000-2012. The safety, efficacy, and outcome were analyzed and compared. RESULTS: The children had a smaller stone size (2.3 vs. 3.1 cm but had smilar stone distribution (number and locations. The children required fewer percutaneous accesses, smaller nephrostomy tract, shorter operative time and less hemoglobin drop. The children also had higher initial stone free rate (SFR (80.4% vs. 78.6% after single session of MPCNL (p0.05. Both groups had low rate of high grade Clavien complications. There was no grade III, IV, V complications and no angiographic embolization required in pediatric group. One important caveat, children who required multiple percutaneous nephrostomy tracts had significant higher transfusion rate than in adults (18.8% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.007. CONCLUSIONS: This contemporary largest-scale analysis confirms that the stone-free rate in pediatric patients is at least as good as in adults without an increase of complication rates. However, multiple percutaneous nephrostomy tracts should be practiced with caution in children.

  14. Music Therapy with Autistic Children: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, Jose Maria G., III; Sanchez, Celeste S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the researchers was to determine if there are alternative methods in treating children with autism. Children diagnosed with autism are currently attending special schools with a different type of curriculum. Many methods have been used by psychologists and psychiatrists to treat children diagnosed with autism. Children with mental or…

  15. Are Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families with Alcoholism Different from Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families without Alcoholism? A Look at Committed, Intimate Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Christine M.; Metzler, April E.

    1997-01-01

    Compared adult children from dysfunctional families (with and without alcoholism) and adult children of functional families to gauge current relationship satisfaction. No significant differences emerged between the two dysfunctional groups. Analyses connected dysfunction in the family of origin to global distress and to difficulties with…

  16. A Design Study to Develop Young Children's Understanding of Multiplication and Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknell, Brenda; Young-Loveridge, Jenny; Nguyen, Nhung

    2016-01-01

    This design study investigated the use of multiplication and division problems to help 5-year-old children develop an early understanding of multiplication and division. One teacher and her class of 15 5-year-old children were involved in a collaborative partnership with the researchers. The design study was conducted over two 4-week periods in…

  17. Engaging Preschool Children with Severe and Multiple Disabilities Using Books and iPad Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Coral; Stephenson, Jennifer; Cooper, Megan; Hodge, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    A single subject multiple treatment design was used to compare the engagement of 3 preschool children with severe and multiple disabilities, using 2 different stimuli: picture books and iPad apps matched for theme and content. Two of the 3 children had diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder in addition to their other disabilities. Sessions for each…

  18. Adults' Orientation of Children--And Children's Initiative to Pitch In--To Everyday Adult Activities in a Tsotsil Maya Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines how 2-year-old children attempt to actively participate in adult work in a Mayan community in Chiapas, Mexico, and how adults contribute and accommodate to the contributions. As children enter into activities and adults orient and reorient the activity to direct the children, teaching from expert to novice is generated by children's agency in co-participatory interactions. The chapter enriches the LOPI model by focusing on the structure of participation and communication, social and community organization, and the evaluation that occurs in the activity itself. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Leptin levels in children and adults with classic galactosaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Knerr, Ina

    2012-11-07

    Among the long-term complications of Classic Galactosaemia (Gal) is premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) in female patients with subtle abnormalities of reproductive function also reported in male patients. Leptin is a circulating hormone which reflects body energy stores and which affects the neuroendocrine reproductive axis and pubertal development.We measured serum leptin in 28 children (10 girls, 18 boys; mean age 7.6 years, range 0.5-17.9 years) and in 22 adults (10 females, 12 males; mean age 23.9 years, range 18-37 years) with Gal on a strict galactose-restricted diet in comparison with control data.Leptin levels (expressed as SDS for gender and pubertal stage) were lower in Gal children than controls (mean leptin-SDS = -0.71 for girls, p < 0.05, -0.97 for boys compared with SDS = 0 for controls, p < 0.05). In an age-related analysis, leptin levels did not correlate with age in children with Gal for both sexes as it did for matched controls.As expected, females had higher leptin levels than males in either group. In adults with Gal, leptin concentrations were within normal limits for both sexes when adjusted for gender and BMI. There was a linear relationship between log-leptin and BMI in children with Gal and in controls. For Gal women, log-leptin was also associated with BMI. However, for Gal men, and hence for the entire group of adult Gal patients, this association between log-leptin and BMI was not detectable. Our findings suggest that leptin dysregulation may play a role in fertility issues in individuals with Gal from an early age.

  20. Estimation of uranium GI absorption fractions for children and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Lariviere, D.; Timmins, R.; Verdecchia, K.

    2011-01-01

    Uranium is ubiquitously found in drinking water and food. The gastrointestinal tract absorption fraction (f 1 ) is an important parameter in risk assessment of uranium burdens from ingestion. Although absorption of uranium from ingestion has been studied extensively in the past, human data concerning children and adults are still limited. In a previous study based on measurements of uranium concentration in 73 bone-ash samples collected by Health Canada, the absorption fractions for uranium ingestion were determined to be 0.093 ± 0.113 for infants, and 0.050 ± 0.032 for young children ranging from 1 to 7 y of age. To extend the study, a total of 69 bone-ash samples were selected for children and adults ranging from 7 to 25 y of age and residing in the same Canadian community that is known to have an elevated level of uranium in its drinking water supply. For each bone-ash sample, the total uranium concentration was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. To solve uranium transfer in the biokinetic model for uranium given in International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 69 with estimated daily uranium intake, the program WinSAAM v3.0.1 was used. The absorption fractions were determined to be 0.030 ± 0.022 for children (7-18 y) and 0.021 ± 0.015 for adults (18-25 y). For anyone more than 18 y of age, the estimated f 1 value for uranium agree well with the ICRP recommended value of 0.02. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the Canadian Government 2010. (authors)

  1. Incorporating pharmacokinetic differences between children and adults in assessing children's risks to environmental toxicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, Gary; Hattis, Dale; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2004-01-01

    Children's risks from environmental toxicant exposure can be affected by pharmacokinetic factors that affect the internal dose of parent chemical or active metabolite. There are numerous physiologic differences between neonates and adults that affect pharmacokinetics including size of lipid, and tissue compartments, organ blood flows, protein binding capacity, and immature function of renal and hepatic systems. These factors combine to decrease the clearance of many therapeutic drugs, which can also be expected to occur with environmental toxicants in neonates. The net effect may be greater or lesser internal dose of active toxicant depending upon how the agent is distributed, metabolized, and eliminated. Child/adult pharmacokinetic differences decrease with increasing postnatal age, but these factors should still be considered in any children's age group, birth through adolescence, for which there is toxicant exposure. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can simulate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics in both children and adults, allowing for a direct comparison of internal dose and risk across age groups. This review provides special focus on the development of hepatic cytochrome P-450 enzymes (CYPs) in early life and how this information, along with many factors unique to children, can be applied to PBPK models for this receptor population. This review describes a case study involving the development of neonatal PBPK models for the CYP1A2 substrates caffeine and theophylline. These models were calibrated with pharmacokinetic data in neonates and used to help understand key metabolic differences between neonates and adults across these two drugs

  2. Just the Two of Us? How Parents Influence Adult Children's Marital Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reczek, Corinne; Liu, Hui; Umberson, Debra

    2010-01-01

    We work from a life-course perspective to explore how relationships with parents affect adult children's marital quality. We further ask whether the effects of parents on adult children's marital quality depend on the adult child's gender, age, marital duration, and childhood family experiences. Growth-curve analysis of national, longitudinal data…

  3. Consequences of Parental Divorce for Adult Children's Support of Their Frail Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Fen

    2008-01-01

    Using three waves of data from the Health and Retirement Study, I examined the association of parental divorce and remarriage with the odds that biological, adult children give personal care and financial assistance to their frail parents. The analysis included 5,099 adult children in the mother sample and 4,029 children in the father sample.…

  4. The pros and cons of inclusive education for children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaarts, Sanne; de Boer, Anke; van der Putten, Annette; Minnaert, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Although children with disabilities have the right to be included into the school system, children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities (PIMD) are often not included. The aim of this study is to gather knowledge about inclusive education for children with PIMD by identifying

  5. IVC filter placements in children: nationwide comparison of practice patterns at adult and children's hospitals using the Kids' Inpatient Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Trivedi, Premal S; Ali, Sumera; Ryu, Robert K; Pezeshkmehr, Amir

    2018-02-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement in children has been described in literature, but there is variability with regard to their indications. No nationally representative study has been done to compare practice patterns of filter placements at adult and children's hospitals. To perform a nationally representative comparison of IVC filter placement practices in children at adult and children's hospitals. The 2012 Kids' Inpatient Database was searched for IVC filter placements in children filter insertion (38.7), IVC filter placements were identified. A small number of children with congenital cardiovascular anomalies codes were excluded to improve specificity of the code used to identify filter placement. Filter placements were further classified by patient demographics, hospital type (children's and adult), United States geographic region, urban/rural location, and teaching status. Statistical significance of differences between children's or adult hospitals was determined using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. A total of 618 IVC filter placements were identified in children filters were placed in the setting of venous thromboembolism in children's hospitals (40/44, 90%) compared to adult hospitals (246/573, 43%) (Pfilters comprised 327/573 (57%) at adult hospitals, with trauma being the most common indication (301/327, 92%). The mean length of stay for patients receiving filters was 24.5 days in children's hospitals and 18.4 days in adult hospitals. The majority of IVC filters in children are placed in adult hospital settings. Children's hospitals are more likely to place therapeutic filters for venous thromboembolism, compared to adult hospitals where the prophylactic setting of trauma predominates.

  6. Auditory phonological priming in children and adults during word repetition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Miranda; Schwartz, Richard G.

    2004-05-01

    Short-term auditory phonological priming effects involve changes in the speed with which words are processed by a listener as a function of recent exposure to other similar-sounding words. Activation of phonological/lexical representations appears to persist beyond the immediate offset of a word, influencing subsequent processing. Priming effects are commonly cited as demonstrating concurrent activation of word/phonological candidates during word identification. Phonological priming is controversial, the direction of effects (facilitating versus slowing) varying with the prime-target relationship. In adults, it has repeatedly been demonstrated, however, that hearing a prime word that rhymes with the following target word (ISI=50 ms) decreases the time necessary to initiate repetition of the target, relative to when the prime and target have no phonemic overlap. Activation of phonological representations in children has not typically been studied using this paradigm, auditory-word + picture-naming tasks being used instead. The present study employed an auditory phonological priming paradigm being developed for use with normal-hearing and hearing-impaired children. Initial results from normal-hearing adults replicate previous reports of faster naming times for targets following a rhyming prime word than for targets following a prime having no phonemes in common. Results from normal-hearing children will also be reported. [Work supported by NIH-NIDCD T32DC000039.

  7. Imaging of infectious spinal disorders in children and adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, S.L.J. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham B31 2AP (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jamesslj@email.com; Davies, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham B31 2AP (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: wendy.turner@roh.nhs.uk

    2006-04-15

    The aim of this review article is to outline the imaging of infectious disorders of the spine in adults and children. The clinical presentation, potential routes of infection and the pathogens commonly identified are discussed. The value of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis of spinal infection is presented including radiographic, CT, MR imaging and Nuclear Medicine including PET. The use of image guided techniques for diagnosis and subsequent treatment is briefly covered. The major differential diagnoses of infectious disorders of the spine are identified and contrasted with the typical findings in infection. The use of follow up imaging is evaluated.

  8. Cancer and non-cancer health effects from food contaminant exposures for children and adults in California: a risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt Rainbow

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the absence of current cumulative dietary exposure assessments, this analysis was conducted to estimate exposure to multiple dietary contaminants for children, who are more vulnerable to toxic exposure than adults. Methods We estimated exposure to multiple food contaminants based on dietary data from preschool-age children (2–4 years, n=207, school-age children (5–7 years, n=157, parents of young children (n=446, and older adults (n=149. We compared exposure estimates for eleven toxic compounds (acrylamide, arsenic, lead, mercury, chlorpyrifos, permethrin, endosulfan, dieldrin, chlordane, DDE, and dioxin based on self-reported food frequency data by age group. To determine if cancer and non-cancer benchmark levels were exceeded, chemical levels in food were derived from publicly available databases including the Total Diet Study. Results Cancer benchmark levels were exceeded by all children (100% for arsenic, dieldrin, DDE, and dioxins. Non-cancer benchmarks were exceeded by >95% of preschool-age children for acrylamide and by 10% of preschool-age children for mercury. Preschool-age children had significantly higher estimated intakes of 6 of 11 compounds compared to school-age children (p Conclusions Dietary strategies to reduce exposure to toxic compounds for which cancer and non-cancer benchmarks are exceeded by children vary by compound. These strategies include consuming organically produced dairy and selected fruits and vegetables to reduce pesticide intake, consuming less animal foods (meat, dairy, and fish to reduce intake of persistent organic pollutants and metals, and consuming lower quantities of chips, cereal, crackers, and other processed carbohydrate foods to reduce acrylamide intake.

  9. Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children 1 and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor Routine Recommendations for Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13) and Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPSV23) For children Administer PCV13 ...

  10. Nature and Specificity of Gestural Disorder in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Multiple Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orianne Costini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Praxis assessment in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD is usually based on tests of adult apraxia, by comparing across types of gestures and input modalities. However, the cognitive models of adult praxis processing are rarely used in a comprehensive and critical interpretation. These models generally involve two systems: a conceptual system and a production system. Heterogeneity of deficits is consistently reported in DCD, involving other cognitive skills such as executive or visual-perceptual and visuospatial functions. Surprisingly, few researches examined the impact of these functions in gestural production. Our study aimed at discussing the nature and specificity of the gestural deficit in DCD using a multiple case study approach.Method: Tasks were selected and adapted from protocols proposed in adult apraxia, in order to enable a comprehensive assessment of gestures. This included conceptual tasks (knowledge about tool functions and actions; recognition of gestures, representational (transitive, intransitive, and non-representational gestures (imitation of meaningless postures. We realized an additional assessment of constructional abilities and other cognitive domains (executive functions, visual-perceptual and visuospatial functions. Data from 27 patients diagnosed with DCD were collected. Neuropsychological profiles were classified using an inferential clinical analysis based on the modified t-test, by comparison with 100 typically developing children divided into five age groups (from 7 to 13 years old.Results: Among the 27 DCD patients, we first classified profiles that are characterized by impairment in tasks assessing perceptual visual or visuospatial skills (n = 8. Patients with a weakness in executive functions (n = 6 were then identified, followed by those with an impaired performance in conceptual knowledge tasks (n = 4. Among the nine remaining patients, six could be classified as having a visual

  11. The Role of the External Personal Assistants for Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities Working in the Children's Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Anna Karin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities need support to function in an optimal way. However, there is a limited knowledge about the role of external personal assistants working in the children's home. Materials and Methods: A mixed method study was performed including qualitative data from interviews with 11…

  12. Multiple DSM-5 substance use disorders: A national study of US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; West, Brady T; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Boyd, Carol J

    2017-09-01

    Our aim is to determine the lifetime and past-year prevalence estimates of multiple Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fifth edition (DSM-5) substance use disorders (SUDs) among U.S. adults. The 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions featured in-person interviews with a nationally representative sample of adults aged 18 and older. The majority of past-year nonalcohol DSM-5 SUDs had at least 1 other co-occurring past-year SUD, ranging from 56.8% (SE = 3.4) for past-year prescription opioid use disorder to 97.5% (SE = 2.7) for past-year hallucinogen use disorder. In contrast, only 15.0% (SE = 0.6) of past-year alcohol use disorders had a co-occurring past-year SUD. The odds of past-year multiple SUDs were greater among males, younger adults, African-Americans, and those with mood, personality, posttraumatic stress, or multiple psychiatric disorders. Assessment, diagnosis, and treatment often focus on individual substance-specific SUDs rather than multiple SUDs, despite evidence for substantial rates of polysubstance use in clinical and epidemiological studies. There are notable differences in the prevalence of multiple SUDs between alcohol use disorders and other nonalcohol SUDs that have important clinical implications; for example, multiple SUDs are more persistent than individual SUDs. These findings suggest that clinical assessment and diagnosis should screen for multiple SUDs, especially among adults with nonalcohol DSM-5 SUDs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Supporting Affect Regulation in Children With Multiple Disabilities During Psychotherapy: A Multiple Case Design Study of Therapeutic Attachment. [Miscellaneous Article

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuengel, C; Sterkenburg, P S; Jeczynski, P; Janssen, C G C; Jongbloed, G

    2009-01-01

    : In a controlled multiple case design study, the development of a therapeutic relationship and its role in affect regulation were studied in 6 children with visual disabilities, severe intellectual disabilities, severe challenging behavior, and prolonged social deprivation. In the 1st phase,

  14. Gender Effect According to Item Directionality on the Perceived Stress Scale for Adults with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitchel, W. Dent; Roessler, Richard T.; Turner, Ronna C.

    2011-01-01

    Assessment is critical to rehabilitation practice and research, and self-reports are a commonly used form of assessment. This study examines a gender effect according to item wording on the "Perceived Stress Scale" for adults with multiple sclerosis. Past studies have demonstrated two-factor solutions on this scale and other scales measuring…

  15. Schema therapy for personality disorders in older adults : A multiple-baseline study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, A.C.; van Alphen, S.P.J.; Van Royen, R.J.J.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; Rossi, G.; Arntz, A.

    2018-01-01

    No studies have been conducted yet into the effectiveness of treatment of personality disorders in later life. This study is a first test of the effectiveness of schema therapy for personality disorders in older adults. Multiple-baseline design with eight cluster C personality disorder patients,

  16. Effects of Functional Mobility Skills Training for Adults with Severe Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whinnery, Stacie B.; Whinnery, Keith W.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a functional mobility program on the functional standing and walking skills of five adults with developmental disabilities. The Mobility Opportunities Via Education (MOVE) Curriculum was implemented using a multiple-baseline across subjects design. Repeated measures were taken during baseline, intervention…

  17. How Television Fast Food Marketing Aimed at Children Compares with Adult Advertisements

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhardt, Amy M.; Wilking, Cara; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; Bergamini, Elaina; Marijnissen, Jill; Sargent, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Quick service restaurant (QSR) television advertisements for children?s meals were compared with adult advertisements from the same companies to assess whether self-regulatory pledges for food advertisements to children had been implemented. Methods All nationally televised advertisements for the top 25 US QSR restaurants from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010 were obtained and viewed to identify those advertising meals for children and these advertisements were compared with adult adv...

  18. On the adaptive function of children's and adults' false memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Mark L; Wilkinson, Samantha; Garner, Sarah R; Ball, Linden J

    2016-09-01

    Recent research has shown that memory illusions can successfully prime both children's and adults' performance on complex, insight-based problems (compound remote associates tasks or CRATs). The current research aimed to clarify the locus of these priming effects. Like before, Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) lists were selected to prime subsequent CRATs such that the critical lures were also the solution words to a subset of the CRATs participants attempted to solve. Unique to the present research, recognition memory tests were used and participants were either primed during the list study phase, during the memory test phase, or both. Across two experiments, primed problems were solved more frequently and significantly faster than unprimed problems. Moreover, when participants were primed during the list study phase, subsequent solution times and rates were considerably superior to those produced by those participants who were simply primed at test. Together, these are the first results to show that false-memory priming during encoding facilitates problem-solving in both children and adults.

  19. Neural correlates of fluid reasoning in children and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha B Wright

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluid reasoning, or the capacity to think logically and solve novel problems, is central to the development of human cognition, but little is known about the underlying neural changes. During the acquisition of event-related fMRI data, children aged 6-13 (N = 16 and young adults (N = 17 performed a task in which they were asked to identify semantic relationships between drawings of common objects. On semantic problems, participants indicated which of fi ve objects was most closely semantically related to a cued object. On analogy problems, participants solved a visual propositional analogy (e.g., shoe is to foot as glove is to…µ by indicating which of four objects would complete the problem; these problems required integration of two semantic relations, or relational integration. Our prior research on analogical reasoning in adults implicated left anterior ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC in the controlled retrieval of individual semantic relationships, and rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC in relational integration. In this study, age-related changes in the recruitment of VLPFC, temporal cortex, and other cortical regions were observed during the retrieval of individual semantic relations. In contrast, agerelated changes in RLPFC function were observed during relational integration. Children aged 6-13 engage RLPFC too late in the analogy trials to infl uence their behavioral responses, suggesting that important changes in RLPFC function take place during adolescence.

  20. Older Adult Spouses with Multiple Chronic Conditions: Challenges, Rewards, and Coping Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Shelley; Sethi, Bharati; Williams, Allison; Duggleby, Wendy; Bayly, Melanie; Swindle, Jenny; Ploeg, Jenny; Markle-Reid, Maureen

    2017-06-01

    There is a paucity of research exploring how spouses to older adults with multiple chronic conditions make meaning of their caregiving experience. For this study, we asked: What is the experience of spousal caregivers to persons with multiple chronic conditions? We applied Thorne's interpretive description approach, interviewing 18 spouses who provided a rich description of their caregiving experience; interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Themes were categorized according to challenges encountered, rewards gleaned, and sustaining strategies employed by participants in caregiving to their spouse with multiple chronic conditions. Unique findings relate to the challenges inherent in decision-making within the context of multiple chronic conditions. This article begins to address the gap in the literature regarding the caregiving experience within the context of multiple chronic conditions.

  1. Arsenic Metabolism in Children Differs From That in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skröder Löveborn, Helena; Kippler, Maria; Lu, Ying; Ahmed, Sultan; Kuehnelt, Doris; Raqib, Rubhana; Vahter, Marie

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic toxicity in adults is associated with methylation efficiency, influenced by factors such as gender, genetics, and nutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate influencing factors for arsenic metabolism in children. For 488 children (9 years), whose mothers participated in a study on arsenic exposure during pregnancy (nested into the MINIMat trial) in rural Bangladesh, we measured urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its metabolites methylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) by HPLC-HG-ICPMS. Methylation efficiency was assessed by relative amounts (%) of the metabolites. We evaluated the impact of factors such as maternal urinary metabolite pattern, arsenic exposure, gender, socioeconomic status, season of sampling, and nutritional factors, including erythrocyte selenium (Ery-Se), and plasma folate and vitamin B12.Children had higher %DMA and lower %iAs in urine compared to their mothers, unrelated to their lower exposure [median urinary arsenic (U-As) 53 vs 78 µg/l]. Surprisingly, selenium status (Ery-Se) was strongly associated with children's arsenic methylation; an increase in Ery-Se from the 5-95th percentile was associated with: +1.8 percentage points (pp) for %iAs (P  =  .001), +1.4 pp for %MMA (P  =  .003), and -3.2 pp for %DMA (P  41 µg/l, P  =  .026). As expected, plasma folate was inversely associated with %iAs (5-95th percentile: -1.9 pp, P  =  .001) and positively associated with %DMA (5-95th percentile: +2.2 pp, P  =  .008). Children methylated arsenic more efficiently than their mothers. Also influencing factors, mainly selenium and folate, differed. This warrants further research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology.

  2. Children's Eyewitness Memory for Multiple Real-Life Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, Timothy N.; Cooper, Crystal M.; Lampinen, James M.; Reyna, Valerie F.; Brainerd, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    The present research examined the influence of prior knowledge on children's free recall, cued recall, recognition memory, and source memory judgments for a series of similar real-life events. Forty children (5-12 years old) attended 4 thematic birthday parties and were later interviewed about the events that transpired during the parties using…

  3. Walking to the beat of their own drum: how children and adults meet timing constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone V Gill

    Full Text Available Walking requires adapting to meet task constraints. Between 5- and 7-years old, children's walking approximates adult walking without constraints. To examine how children and adults adapt to meet timing constraints, 57 5- to 7-year olds and 20 adults walked to slow and fast audio metronome paces. Both children and adults modified their walking. However, at the slow pace, children had more trouble matching the metronome compared to adults. The youngest children's walking patterns deviated most from the slow metronome pace, and practice improved their performance. Five-year olds were the only group that did not display carryover effects to the metronome paces. Findings are discussed in relation to what contributes to the development of adaptation in children.

  4. Children's expressions of negative emotions and adults' responses during routine cardiac consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatne, Torun M; Ruland, Cornelia M; Ørnes, Knut; Finset, Arnstein

    2012-03-01

    One function of expressing emotion is to receive support. The aim of this study was to assess how children with heart disease express negative emotions during routine consultations, and examine the interaction between children's expressions and adults' responses. Seventy children, aged 7-13 years, completed measures of anxiety and were videotaped during cardiology visits. Adult-child interactions were analyzed using the Verona Definitions of Emotional Sequences. Children expressed negative emotion, mainly in subtle ways; however, adults rarely recognized and responded to these expressions. The frequency of children's expressions and adults' responses were related to the child's age, level of anxiety, and verbal participation. Children do not openly express negative emotions frequently during routine cardiac consultations; they are more likely to provide subtle cues of negative emotion. When expression of negative emotions does occur, adults may consider using the opportunity to explore the child's emotional experiences.

  5. Comparison of Intelligibility Measures for Adults with Parkinson's Disease, Adults with Multiple Sclerosis, and Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipancic, Kaila L.; Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study obtained judgments of sentence intelligibility using orthographic transcription for comparison with previously reported intelligibility judgments obtained using a visual analog scale (VAS) for individuals with Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis and healthy controls (K. Tjaden, J. E. Sussman, & G. E. Wilding, 2014).…

  6. Prevention of alcohol misuse among children, youths and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczak, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite many activities to prevent risky alcohol consumption among adolescents and young adults there is an increase of alcohol intoxications in the group of ten to twenty year old juveniles. Objectives: This report gives an overview about the recent literature as well as the German federal prevention system regarding activities concerning behavioral and policy prevention of risky alcohol consumption among children, adolescents and young adults. Furthermore, effective components of prevention activities are identified and the efficiency and efficacy of ongoing prevention programs is evaluated. Methods: A systematic literature review is done in 34 databases using Bool’sche combinations of the key words alcohol, prevention, treatment, children, adolescents and young adults. Results: 401 studies were found and 59 studies were selected for the health technology assessment (HTA. Most of the studies are done in USA, nine in Germany. A family strengthening program, personalized computer based intervention at schools, colleges and universities, brief motivational interventions and policy elements like increase of prices and taxes proved effective. Discussion: Among the 59 studies there are three meta-analyses, 15 reviews, 17 randomized controlled trials (RCT and 18 cohort studies. Despite the overall high quality of the study design, many of them have methodological weaknesses (missing randomization, missing or too short follow-ups, not clearly defined measurement parameters. The transferability of US-results to the German context is problematic. Only a few prevention activities reach a sustainable reduction of frequency and/or amount of alcohol consumption. Conclusion: The HTA-report shows the need to develop specific and target group focused prevention activities for the German situation. Essential for that is the definition of target goals (reduction of consumption, change of behaviour as well as the definition and empirical validation

  7. Prevention of alcohol misuse among children, youths and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczak, Dieter; Steinhauser, Gerlinde; Dietl, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Despite many activities to prevent risky alcohol consumption among adolescents and young adults there is an increase of alcohol intoxications in the group of ten to twenty year old juveniles. This report gives an overview about the recent literature as well as the German federal prevention system regarding activities concerning behavioral and policy prevention of risky alcohol consumption among children, adolescents and young adults. Furthermore, effective components of prevention activities are identified and the efficiency and efficacy of ongoing prevention programs is evaluated. A systematic literature review is done in 34 databases using Bool'sche combinations of the key words alcohol, prevention, treatment, children, adolescents and young adults. 401 studies were found and 59 studies were selected for the health technology assessment (HTA). Most of the studies are done in USA, nine in Germany. A family strengthening program, personalized computer based intervention at schools, colleges and universities, brief motivational interventions and policy elements like increase of prices and taxes proved effective. Among the 59 studies there are three meta-analyses, 15 reviews, 17 randomized controlled trials (RCT) and 18 cohort studies. Despite the overall high quality of the study design, many of them have methodological weaknesses (missing randomization, missing or too short follow-ups, not clearly defined measurement parameters). The transferability of US-results to the German context is problematic. Only a few prevention activities reach a sustainable reduction of frequency and/or amount of alcohol consumption. The HTA-report shows the need to develop specific and target group focused prevention activities for the German situation. Essential for that is the definition of target goals (reduction of consumption, change of behaviour) as well as the definition and empirical validation of risky alcohol consumption. The efficacy of prevention activities should be proven

  8. MRI predictors of treatment response for perianal fistulizing Crohn disease in children and young adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenoy-Bhangle, Anuradha; Nimkin, Katherine; Gee, Michael S. [Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Goldner, Dana; Israel, Esther J. [Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Bradley, William F. [Analog Devices, Lyric Labs, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the imaging standard for diagnosis and characterization of perianal complications associated with Crohn disease in children and adults. To define MRI criteria that could act as potential predictors of treatment response in fistulizing Crohn disease in children, in order to guide more informed study interpretation. We performed a retrospective database query to identify all children and young adults with Crohn disease who underwent serial MRI studies for assessment of perianal symptoms between 2003 and 2010. We examined imaging features of perianal disease including fistula number, type and length, presence and size of associated abscess, and disease response/progression on follow-up MRI. We reviewed imaging studies and electronic medical records. Statistical analysis, including logistic regression, was performed to associate MR imaging features with treatment response and disease progression. We included 36 patients (22 male, 14 female; age range 8-21 years). Of these, 32 had a second MRI exam and 4 had clinical evidence of complete response, obviating the need for repeat imaging. Of the parameters analyzed, presence of abscess, type of fistula according to the Parks classification, and multiplicity were not predictors of treatment outcome. Maximum length of the dominant fistula and aggregate fistula length in the case of multiple fistulae were the best predictors of treatment outcome. Maximum fistula length <2.5 cm was a predictor of treatment response, while aggregate fistula length ≥2.5 cm was a predictor of disease progression. Perianal fistula length is an important imaging feature to assess on MRI of fistulizing Crohn disease. (orig.)

  9. MRI predictors of treatment response for perianal fistulizing Crohn disease in children and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenoy-Bhangle, Anuradha; Nimkin, Katherine; Gee, Michael S.; Goldner, Dana; Israel, Esther J.; Bradley, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the imaging standard for diagnosis and characterization of perianal complications associated with Crohn disease in children and adults. To define MRI criteria that could act as potential predictors of treatment response in fistulizing Crohn disease in children, in order to guide more informed study interpretation. We performed a retrospective database query to identify all children and young adults with Crohn disease who underwent serial MRI studies for assessment of perianal symptoms between 2003 and 2010. We examined imaging features of perianal disease including fistula number, type and length, presence and size of associated abscess, and disease response/progression on follow-up MRI. We reviewed imaging studies and electronic medical records. Statistical analysis, including logistic regression, was performed to associate MR imaging features with treatment response and disease progression. We included 36 patients (22 male, 14 female; age range 8-21 years). Of these, 32 had a second MRI exam and 4 had clinical evidence of complete response, obviating the need for repeat imaging. Of the parameters analyzed, presence of abscess, type of fistula according to the Parks classification, and multiplicity were not predictors of treatment outcome. Maximum length of the dominant fistula and aggregate fistula length in the case of multiple fistulae were the best predictors of treatment outcome. Maximum fistula length <2.5 cm was a predictor of treatment response, while aggregate fistula length ≥2.5 cm was a predictor of disease progression. Perianal fistula length is an important imaging feature to assess on MRI of fistulizing Crohn disease. (orig.)

  10. Choosing representative body sizes for reference adults and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.

    1992-01-01

    In 1975 the International Commission on Radiological Protection published a report on Reference Man (ICRP Publication 23), and a task group of the ICRP is now revising that report. Currently 'Reference Man [adult male] is defined as being between 20-30 years of age, weighing 70 kg, is 170 cm in height, is a Caucasian and is a Western European or North American in habitat and custom' (ICRP 23, p. 4). A reference adult female (58 kg, 160 cm) was also defined and data on the fetus and children were given, but with less detail and fewer specific reference values because the focus of the ICRP at that time was on young male radiation workers. The 70-kg Reference Man (earlier called Standard Man) has been used in radiation protection for 40 years, including the dosimetric schema for nuclear medicine, and this 70-kg reference has been used since at least the 1920's in physiological models. As is well known, humans in most parts of the world have increased in size (height and weight) since this standard was first adopted. Taking modern European populations as a reference and expanding the age range to 20-50 years, the author now suggests 176 cm height and 73-75 kg weight for adult males and 163 cm and about 60 kg for adult females would be more appropriate. The change in height is particularly important because many anatomical and physiological parameters - e.g., lean body mass, skeletal weight, total body water, blood volume, respiratory volumes - are correlated more closely with height than with weight. The difference in lean body mass between Asian and Caucasian persons, for example, is largely or wholly due to the difference in body height. Many equations for mean body water and other whole-body measures use body height as the only or the most important parameter, and so it is important that reference body height be chosen well

  11. The management of multiple sclerosis in children: a European view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghezzi, Angelo; Banwell, Brenda; Boyko, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    About 3-5% of all patients with multiple sclerosis experience the onset of their disease under the age of 16. A significant proportion of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients develop significant cognitive disturbances and persistent physical disability. The high relapse rate and the morbidity i...

  12. First Insights with a Vibrotactile Interface for Children with Multiple Disabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manresa-Yee, Cristina; Morrison, Ann; Jordi Muntaner, Joan

    2015-01-01

    for users with multiple disabilities. We developed V-Sense, a vibrotactile interface that encourages children with multiple disabilities to move their arms by using vibrations and exploiting the saltation perceptual illusion. In this paper we describe our initial experience evaluating the interface with 5...... children for 7 weeks and we discuss the first insights concerning the use of the interface and the difficulties encountered while conducting the evaluation sessions....

  13. Association of oxidative stress with arsenic methylation in chronic arsenic-exposed children and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yuanyuan; Wang Yi; Zheng Quanmei; Li Xin; Li Bing; Jin Yaping; Sun Xiance; Sun Guifan

    2008-01-01

    Though oxidative stress is recognized as an important pathogenic mechanism of arsenic, and arsenic methylation capacity is suggested to be highly involved in arsenic-related diseases, the association of arsenic methylation capacity with arsenic-induced oxidative stress remains unclear. To explore oxidative stress and its association with arsenic methylation, cross-sectional studies were conducted among 208 high and 59 low arsenic-exposed subjects. Levels of urinary arsenic species [inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylated arsenic (MMA) and dimethylated arsenic (DMA)] were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Proportions of urinary arsenic species, the first methylation ratio (FMR) and the secondary methylation ratio (SMR) were used as indicators for arsenic methylation capacity. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in whole blood were determined to reflect anti-oxidative status. The high arsenic-exposed children and adults were significantly increased in urinary 8-OHdG concentrations but decreased in blood GSH levels compared with the low exposed children and adults. In multiple linear regression models, blood GSH levels and urinary 8-OHdG concentrations of arsenic-exposed children and adults showed strong associations with the levels of urinary arsenic species. Arsenic-exposed subjects in the lower and the upper quartiles of proportions of urinary arsenic species, FMR or SMR were significantly different in urinary 8-OHdG, blood GSH and SOD. The associations of arsenic methylation capacity with 8-OHdG, GSH and SOD were also observed in multivariate regression analyses. These results may provide linkage between arsenic methylation capacity and oxidative stress in humans and suggest that adverse health effects induced by arsenic are related to arsenic methylation through oxidative stress

  14. Parent-Child Relations and Parent's Satisfaction with Living Arrangements When Adult Children Live at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, William S.; Supple, Khalil R.

    1991-01-01

    Used data from 1988 National Survey of Families and Households to explore influences on parents' satisfaction with having coresident adult children; the nature of parent-child relations in coresident households; and impact of children's adult role status on parent-child relations and satisfaction with coresidence. Majority of parents were highly…

  15. Daily interactions with aging parents and adult children: Associations with negative affect and diurnal cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birditt, Kira S; Manalel, Jasmine A; Kim, Kyungmin; Zarit, Steven H; Fingerman, Karen L

    2017-09-01

    Midlife adults report greater investment in their children than in their parents, and these ties have important implications for well-being. To date, little research has addressed daily experiences in these ties. The present study examines daily experiences (negative and positive) with aging parents and adult children and their associations with daily negative affect and diurnal cortisol rhythms. Participants were middle-aged adults (N = 156; 56% women) from Wave 2 of the Family Exchanges Study, conducted in 2013, who completed a 7-day daily diary study, which included assessments of daily negative and positive social encounters and negative affect, and 4 days of saliva collection, which was collected 3 times a day (upon waking, 30 min after waking, and at bedtime) and assayed for cortisol. Multilevel models revealed that individuals were more likely to have contact with adult children than with parents but more likely to have negative experiences (negative interactions, avoidance, negative thoughts) with parents than with adult children. Nevertheless, contact and negative experiences with adult children were more consistently associated with negative affect and daily cortisol patterns than were interactions with parents. Findings are consistent with the intergenerational stake hypothesis, which suggests that individuals have a greater stake in their children than in their parents. Indeed, negative experiences with adult children may be more salient because tensions with adult children occur less frequently than do tensions with parents. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Sensory Modality, Temperament, and the Development of Sustained Attention: A Vigilance Study in Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtindale, Lori; Laurie-Rose, Cynthia; Bennett-Murphy, Laura; Hull, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Applying optimal stimulation theory, the present study explored the development of sustained attention as a dynamic process. It examined the interaction of modality and temperament over time in children and adults. Second-grade children and college-aged adults performed auditory and visual vigilance tasks. Using the Carey temperament…

  17. Brazilian Children's Behavioural Differentiation between the Mother, Unfamiliar Adults and Professional Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingault, Jean-Baptiste

    2010-01-01

    This study took place in two organisations with opposite socio-economic characteristics which gather children (one to four years), their mothers (or nannies), unfamiliar adults and professional caregivers. Pursuant to attachment theory, the children clearly differentiated their mothers from unfamiliar adults according to proximity indicators and…

  18. Respect and Autonomy in Children's Observation and Participation in Adults' Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Fernando A

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines Peruvian Quechua children's learning by observing and pitching in. The children concentrate attentively when they observe the activities of the adults and they exercise autonomy in the context of adults' encouragement of measured behaviors while always showing respectful silence in the presence of their elders. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Spanish-English Speech Perception in Children and Adults: Developmental Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Alejandro E.; Gorman, Brenda K.; Leung, Cynthia B.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the developmental trends and phonetic category formation in bilingual children and adults. Participants included 30 fluent Spanish-English bilingual children, aged 8-11, and bilingual adults, aged 18-40. All completed gating tasks that incorporated code-mixed Spanish-English stimuli. There were significant differences in…

  20. Sweet and sour preferences in young children and adults: role of repeated exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, D.G.; Graaf, de C.

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated the influence of repeated exposure to orangeades with added sucrose and different concentrations of citric acid, on the taste preferences of 6- to-11-year-old children and young adults. During an intervention study of 8 days, 59 children (9.2±0.9 years) and 46 young adults

  1. Family Environment and Behavior Problems in Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jan S.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Baker, Jason K.; Smith, Leann E.; Warren, Steven F.; Brady, Nancy; Hong, Jinkuk

    2012-01-01

    We examine how the family environment is associated with aspects of the Fragile X syndrome phenotype during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Mothers of children (n = 48), adolescents (n = 85), and adults (n = 34) with Fragile X syndrome participated in a multisite study. For children and adults with Fragile X syndrome, the presence of warmth…

  2. Children with Multiple Stays at Refuges for Abused Women and Their Experiences of Teacher Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvik, Sabreen; Raaheim, Arild; Øverlien, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Numerous children around the world are forced to make multiple moves with their mothers in and out of refuges for abused women. Each time, they experience a sudden upheaval of their familiar environment. For these children, domestic violence and flight from violence is not an isolated event but part of their upbringing. Few statistics and little…

  3. How Children Living in Poor Areas of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania Perceive Their Own Multiple Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Pauline; Humble, Steve; Chan, David W.

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out with 1,857 poor children from 17 schools, living in low-income areas of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. All children took the "Student Multiple Intelligences Profile" (SMIP) questionnaire as part of a bigger project that gathered data around concepts and beliefs of talent. This paper sets out two aims, first to…

  4. Methylphenidate and Comorbid Anxiety Disorder in Children with both Chronic Multiple Tic Disorder and ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Nolan, Edith E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine if comorbid anxiety disorder is associated with differential response to immediate release methylphenidate (MPH-IR) in children with both ADHD and chronic multiple tic disorder (CMTD). Method: Children with (n = 17) and without (n = 37) diagnosed anxiety disorder (ANX) were evaluated in an 8-week, placebo-controlled trial…

  5. Adult Children of Gay Fathers: Parent-Child Relationship Quality and Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornello, Samantha L; Patterson, Charlotte J

    2018-01-01

    According to family systems theory, parent-child relationships are an important aspect of individual wellbeing. This study explored associations among parental disclosure, parent-child relationships, and wellbeing among 84 adult children with gay fathers. We explored associations between the adult children's wellbeing and the children's ages at sexual orientation disclosure, geographic distance, relationship quality, and closeness with their fathers. We found that when parental disclosure had occurred earlier in the adult child's life, participants reported feeling closer to fathers in adulthood. Those who reported closer relationships with their fathers reported greater wellbeing. Using a stepwise regression, we found that adult children's reports of closeness with fathers were the best predictors of adult children's wellbeing.

  6. Transition from children's to adult services for young adults with life-limiting conditions: A realist review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Helen; Price, Jayne; Nicholl, Honor; O'Halloran, Peter

    2017-11-01

    Improvements in care and treatment have led to more young adults with life-limiting conditions living beyond childhood, which means they must make the transition from children's to adult services. This has proved a challenging process for both young adults and service providers, with complex transition interventions interacting in unpredictable ways with local contexts. To explain how intervention processes interact with contextual factors to help transition from children's to adult services for young adults with life-limiting conditions. Systematic realist review of the literature. Literature was sourced from four electronic databases: Embase, MEDLINE, Science Direct and Cochrane Library from January 1995 to April 2016. This was supplemented with a search in Google Scholar and articles sourced from reference lists of included papers. Data were extracted using an adapted standardised data extraction tool which included identifying information related to interventions, mechanisms, contextual influences and outcomes. Two reviewers assessed the relevance of papers based on the inclusion criteria. Methodological rigor was assessed using the relevant Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tools. 78 articles were included in the review. Six interventions were identified related to an effective transition to adult services. Contextual factors include the need for children's service providers to collaborate with adult service providers to prepare an environment with knowledgeable staff and adequate resources. Mechanisms triggered by the interventions include a sense of empowerment and agency amongst all stakeholders. Early planning, collaboration between children's and adult service providers, and a focus on increasing the young adults' confidence in decision-making and engaging with adult services, are vital to a successful transition. Interventions should be tailored to their context and focused not only on organisational procedures but on equipping young adults, parents

  7. Growth hormone deficiency in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oświęcimska, Joanna; Roczniak, Wojciech; Mikołajczak, Agata; Szymlak, Agnieszka

    2016-09-13

    Growth hormone (GH) is a naturally occurring polypeptide hormone produced by somatotropic cells in the anterior pituitary. The main function of somatotropin is stimulation of linear growth, but it also affects carbohydrate metabolism, increases bone mass and has potent lipolytic, antinatriuretic and antidiuretic effects. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) may occur both in children and in adults. At the moment there is no gold standard for the diagnosis of GHD, and the diagnosis should take into account clinical, auxological, biochemical and radiological changes and, if necessary, genetic testing. Recent studies have highlighted that the biochemical diagnosis of GH deficiency is still imperfect. Stimuli used in the tests are non-physiological, and various substances are characterized by a different mechanism of action and potency. A few years ago it was thought that GHD treatment in children must be completed at the end of linear growth. Studies performed in the last two decades have shown that GHD deficiency in adults may result in complex clinical problems, and if untreated shortens the life expectancy and worsens its comfort. Discontinuation of GH therapy after the final height has been reached in fact negatively impacts the physiological processes associated with the transition phase, which is the period of human life between achieving the final height and 25-30 years of age. Given the adverse metabolic effects of GH treatment interruption after linear growth has been completed, the latest recommendations propose reassessment of GH secretion in the period at least one month after cessation of treatment and continuation of the therapy in case of persistent deficit.

  8. Growth hormone deficiency in children and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Oświęcimska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH is a naturally occurring polypeptide hormone produced by somatotropic cells in the anterior pituitary. The main function of somatotropin is stimulation of linear growth, but it also affects carbohydrate metabolism, increases bone mass and has potent lipolytic, antinatriuretic and antidiuretic effects. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD may occur both in children and in adults. At the moment there is no gold standard for the diagnosis of GHD, and the diagnosis should take into account clinical, auxological, biochemical and radiological changes and, if necessary, genetic testing. Recent studies have highlighted that the biochemical diagnosis of GH deficiency is still imperfect. Stimuli used in the tests are non-physiological, and various substances are characterized by a different mechanism of action and potency. A few years ago it was thought that GHD treatment in children must be completed at the end of linear growth. Studies performed in the last two decades have shown that GHD deficiency in adults may result in complex clinical problems, and if untreated shortens the life expectancy and worsens its comfort. Discontinuation of GH therapy after the final height has been reached in fact negatively impacts the physiological processes associated with the transition phase, which is the period of human life between achieving the final height and 25-30 years of age. Given the adverse metabolic effects of GH treatment interruption after linear growth has been completed, the latest recommendations propose reassessment of GH secretion in the period at least one month after cessation of treatment and continuation of the therapy in case of persistent deficit.

  9. Capturing Between- and Within-Family Differences in Parental Support to Adult Children: A Typology Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungmin; Fingerman, Karen L; Birditt, Kira S; Zarit, Steven H

    2016-11-01

    Families differ widely in the support they provide to adult offspring, both with regard to the overall level as well as the extent to which support is evenly distributed across offspring. This study addressed these dynamics by creating family profiles based on the average level and differentiation of support among children. We also examined demographic and psychological factors that predict typology membership. We utilized data from 431 middle-aged parents (aged 40-60) with at least two adult children. Parents provided separate ratings of support given to each child. Latent profile analysis was applied to two indicators of within-family support: mean level and differentiation among offspring. Latent profile analysis identified four patterns of parental support: (a) high support-low differentiation (52%), (b) medium support-high differentiation (26%), (c) low support-low differentiation (17%), and (d) low support-very high differentiation (5%). These patterns reflected distinct family characteristics, such as parental resources, parental beliefs (i.e., equal treatment, obligation), and offspring characteristics. Our findings emphasize the need to capture dynamics of support exchanges among multiple offspring at the level of family. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Outcome of total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation as treatment of secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism in children and adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, A.J.; Tinnemans, J.G.; Idu, M.M.; Groothoff, J.W.; Surachno, S.; Aronson, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment safety and effectiveness of total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation for secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism have been extensively proven in adults; the evidence for children, however, is scarce. Children and adolescents cannot simply be seen as young adults in

  11. Why Do Children from Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Families Suffer from Poor Health When They Reach Adulthood? A Life-Course Study. : Childhood socioeconomic disadvantage and adult disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Melchior , Maria; Moffitt , Terrie ,; Milne , Barry ,; Poulton , Richie; Caspi , Avshalom

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The authors investigated what risk factors contribute to an excess risk of poor adult health among children who experience socioeconomic disadvantage. Data came from 1,037 children born in Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1972-1973, who were followed from birth to age 32 years (2004-2005). Childhood socioeconomic status (SES) was measured at multiple points between birth and age 15 years. Risk factors evaluated included a familial liability to poor health, childhood/adolescent...

  12. Multiple perspectives on groupwork with children of battered women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, E; Edleson, J L

    1992-01-01

    As this century ends there continues to be little public attention devoted to child witnesses of woman abuse and few social programs exist to meet their needs. This article presents the findings of a qualitative evaluation of a group program for children of battered women. Interviews were conducted with 16 mothers, 5 fathers, 9 group leaders, and 30 children who participated in 8 groups. Data also included observations of one complete group process (10 groups and 3 family sessions). Both intended and unintended results are presented and recommendations for practice are discussed.

  13. Does early-onset multiple sclerosis differ from adult-onset form in Iranian people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Ashtari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have attempted to delineate the clinical profile of multiple Sclerosis (MS among people of Asia. This study sought to identify the characteristics of early-onset Multiple Sclerosis (EOMS comparison to adult-onset form (AOMS in Isfahan, IRAN. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 104 youths with multiple sclerosis beginning before the age of 16 years and 123 patients with adult-onset multiple sclerosis. Patients were observed for a mean period of 5 years. The common presenting symptoms, MRI finding, course of disease and disability score were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean onset age of disease in youths and adults were 14 ± 1.9 and 27.7 ± 8.06 years, respectively. Female/male ratio was 4.47:1 in EOMS and 3.92:1 in AOMS, this ratio was 7:1 in early childhood MS (≤ 10 year. The most common presenting symptom was optic neuritis in the EOMS group and paresthesia in AOMS. Optic neuritis was common in AOMS too, but brainstem/cerebellar signs were more common in EOMS than AOMS. Seizure occurred more frequently in EOMS than in the AOMS group (12.6% vs. 1.6%, respectively, p < 0.001. MRI showed that brainstem plaques were more prevalent in the EOMS compared with the AOMS group. Conclusions: It was concluded that early-onset MS does not significantly differ from adult form in terms of major clinical manifestation and course of disease, however Seizure is more common in EOMS, and brainstem and cerebellar symptoms as presenting symptom are more common.

  14. Health of adults caring for orphaned children in an HIV endemic community in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Caroline; Operario, Don

    2011-01-01

    In South Africa, an estimated 2.5 million children have been orphaned by AIDS and other causes of adult mortality. Although there is a growing body of research on the well-being of South African orphaned children, few research studies have examined the health of adult individuals caring for children in HIV endemic communities. The cross-sectional survey assessed prevalence of general health and functioning (based on Short-Form 36 version 2 scale), depression (based on Center for Epidemiologic...

  15. Decision-making Under Risk in Children, Adolescents, and Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePaulsen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents often make risky and impulsive decisions. Such behavior has led to the common assumption that a dysfunction in risk-related decision-making peaks during this age. Differences in how risk has been defined across studies, however, make it difficult to draw conclusions about developmental changes in risky decision-making. Here, we developed a non-symbolic economic decision-making task that can be used across a wide age span and that uses coefficient of variation (CV in reward as an index of risk. We found that young children showed the strongest preference for risky compared to sure bet options of equal expected value, adolescents were intermediate in their risk preference, and young adults showed the strongest risk aversion. Furthermore, children’s preference for the risky option increased for larger CVs, while adolescents and young adults showed the opposite pattern, favoring the sure bet more often as CV increased. Finally, when faced with two gambles in a risk-return tradeoff, all three age groups exhibited a greater preference for the option with the lower risk and return as the disparity in risk between the two options increased. These findings demonstrate clear age-related differences in economic risk preferences that vary with choice set and risk. Importantly, adolescence appears to represent an intermediate decision-making phenotype along the transition from childhood to adulthood, rather than an age of heightened preference for economic risk.

  16. The transition of young adults with lifelong urological needs from pediatric to adult services: An international children's continence society position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Wendy F; Christie, Deborah; DeGennaro, Mario; Latthe, Pallavi; Raes, Ann; Romao, Rodrigo L P; Taghizadeh, Arash; Wood, Dan; Woodhouse, Christopher R J; Bauer, Stuart B

    2017-03-01

    Children with urinary tract disorders managed by teams, or individual pediatricians, urologists, nephrologists, gastroenterologists, neurologists, psychologists, and nurses at some point move from child-centered to adult-centered health systems. The actual physical change is referred to as the transfer whilst the process preceding this move constitutes transition of care. Our aims are twofold: to identify management and health-service problems related to children with congenital or acquired urological conditions who advance into adulthood and the clinical implications this has for long-term health and specialist care; and, to understand the issues facing both pediatric and adult-care clinicians and to develop a systems-approach model that meets the needs of young adults, their families and the clinicians working within adult services. Information was gleaned from presentations at an International Children's Continence Society meeting with collaboration from the International Continence Society, that discussed problems of transfer and transitioning such children. Several specialists attending this conference finalized this document identifying issues and highlighting ways to ease this transition and transfer of care for both patients and practitioners. The consensus was, urological patients with congenital or other lifelong care needs, are now entering adulthood in larger numbers than previously, necessitating new planning processes for tailored transfer of management. Adult teams must become familiar with new clinical problems in multiple organ systems and anticipate issues provoked by adolescence and physical growth. During this period of transitional care the clinician or team assists young patients to build attitudes, skills and understanding of processes needed to maximize function of their urinary tract-thus taking responsibility for their own healthcare needs. Preparation must also address, negotiating adult health care systems, psychosocial, educational or

  17. Young Adult Children of Divorced Parents: Depression and the Perception of Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drill, Rebecca L.

    1986-01-01

    Examined long-term effects of divorce in young adult children by comparing young adults of divorce (N=104) and those of intact families (N=172). When non-custodial parent was perceived as "lost" the young adult was more depressed. After-divorce perception of non-custodial father changed negatively, while perception of mother remained…

  18. Multiple health behavior change in adults with or at risk for cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amanda C; Hayman, Laura L; Cooley, Mary E

    2015-05-01

    To identify components of efficacious interventions for multiple health behavior change (MHBC) in adult cancer survivors or adults at high risk for cancer. A systematic review of MHBC interventions was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses framework. Ten studies met inclusion criteria. Most studies changed at least 2 health behaviors. Diet, exercise, and smoking cessation were consistently changed with in-person interventions. Longer duration interventions using phone or mail contact had a positive association with changing diet and exercise. MHBC interventions positively influenced behavior change in adults with cancer and those at high risk for cancer. Future studies should focus on increasing dissemination and implementation of efficacious interventions.

  19. Impaired immune function in children and adults with Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kasiani C; Sauter, Sharon; Zhang, Xue; Bleesing, Jacob J; Davies, Stella M; Wells, Susanne I; Mehta, Parinda A; Kumar, Ashish; Marmer, Daniel; Marsh, Rebecca; Brown, Darron; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda

    2017-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by genome instability, bone marrow failure, and cancer predisposition. Previously, small studies have reported heterogeneous immune dysfunction in FA. We performed a detailed immunologic assessment in a large FA cohort who have not undergone bone marrow transplantation or developed malignancies. Comprehensive quantitative and functional immunologic assessment of 29 FA individuals was compared to healthy age-matched controls. Compared to non-FA persons of similar ages, FA individuals showed lower absolute total B cells (P candida (P = 0.019), were diminished in FA. Phytohemagglutinin responses and plasma cytokines were normal. Within FA subjects, adults and older children (≥10 years) exhibited higher CD8 + T cells than younger children (P = 0.004). Documented atypical infections were infrequent, although oral human papilloma virus (HPV) prevalence was higher (31% positive) in FA. Overall, these results demonstrate a high rate of significant humoral and cellular immune dysfunction. Continued longitudinal study of immune function is critical to understand evolution with age, bone marrow failure, and cancer development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Examining Multiple Parenting Behaviors on Young Children's Dietary Fat Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Christina M.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Crespo, Noe C.; Lopez, Nanette V.; Zive, Michelle Murphy; Corder, Kirsten; Wood, Christine; Elder, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To understand the association between parenting and children's dietary fat consumption, this study tested a comprehensive model of parenting that included parent household rules, parent modeling of rules, parent mediated behaviors, and parent support. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Baseline data from the "MOVE/me Muevo"…

  1. What do children with specific language impairment do with multiple forms of DO?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Mabel L; Blossom, Megan

    2013-02-01

    This study was designed to examine the early usage patterns of multiple grammatical functions of DO in children with and without specific language impairment (SLI). Children's use of this plurifunctional form is informative for evaluation of theoretical accounts of the deficit in SLI. Spontaneous uses of multiple functions of DO were analyzed in language samples from 89 children: 37 children with SLI, ages 5;0-5;6 (years;months); 37 age-equivalent children; and 15 language-equivalent children, ages 2;8-4;10. Proportion correct and types of errors produced were analyzed for each function of DO. Children with SLI had significantly lower levels of proportion correct auxiliary DO use compared to both control groups, with omissions of the DO form as the primary error type. Children with SLI had near-ceiling performance on lexical DO and elliptical DO, similar to both control groups. Plurifunctionality is not problematic: Children acquire each function of DO separately. Grammatical properties of the function, rather than surface properties of the form, dictate whether children with SLI will have difficulty using the word. Overall, these results support the extended optional infinitive account of SLI and the use of auxiliary DO omissions as part of a clinical marker for SLI.

  2. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide and multiple breath nitrogen washout in preschool healthy and asthmatic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, Lea; Buchvald, Frederik; Green, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Objectively assessing pulmonary disease is challenging in preschool children with asthma. We evaluated the feasibility of measuring fractional exhaled nitrogen oxide (FeNO) and multiple breath nitrogen washout (N2MBW) in children. We compared their capacities for discriminating between...... children with asthma and healthy controls. Methods We measured FeNO and N2MBW-derived indices of lung clearance (LCI2.5) and conductive and acinar ventilation heterogeneity (Scond and Sacin) in 65 preschool children; 35 with physician-diagnosed asthma and 30 healthy. FeNO was measured with a portable.......023), but similar FeNO, LCI2.5 and Sacinvalues. Conclusion The feasibility of measuring FeNO was highly age-dependent and not applicable in children under age 4. N2MBW was feasible in the majority of preschool children. Scond, but not FeNO, could discriminate between children with asthma and healthy controls....

  3. Authority and Moral Reasons: Parenting Style and Children's Perceptions of Adult Rule Justifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    The style of parenting of 100 children (mean age 11 years, 5 months) was established according to Baumrind's typology. Children were asked to indicate what they thought an adult would say to justify a moral rule in five different scenarios. Results indicated that parenting style did not relate to the number of justifications that children thought…

  4. Brain Cancer Stem Cells in Adults and Children: Cell Biology and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Antoun, Tamara J; Hale, James S; Lathia, Justin D; Dombrowski, Stephen M

    2017-04-01

    Brain tumors represent some of the most malignant cancers in both children and adults. Current treatment options target the majority of tumor cells but do not adequately target self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have been reported to resist the most aggressive radiation and chemotherapies, and give rise to recurrent, treatment-resistant secondary malignancies. With advancing technologies, we now have a better understanding of the genetic, epigenetic and molecular signatures and microenvironmental influences which are useful in distinguishing between distinctly different tumor subtypes. As a result, efforts are now underway to identify and target CSCs within various tumor subtypes based on this foundation. This review discusses progress in CSC biology as it relates to targeted therapies which may be uniquely different between pediatric and adult brain tumors. Studies to date suggest that pediatric brain tumors may benefit more from genetic and epigenetic targeted therapies, while combination treatments aimed specifically at multiple molecular pathways may be more effective in treating adult brain tumors which seem to have a greater propensity towards microenvironmental interactions. Ultimately, CSC targeting approaches in combination with current clinical therapies have the potential to be more effective owing to their ability to compromise CSCs maintenance and the mechanisms which underlie their highly aggressive and deadly nature.

  5. Aerobic fitness in children and young adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Astrid Hellerup; Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although aerobic fitness is regarded as an overall prognostic measure of morbidity and mortality, its evaluation in the chronic progressive sinopulmonary disease primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) has been infrequently and inconsistently reported. Here we assessed peak oxygen uptake (VO2...... multiple breath inert gas washout (N2 MBW) were assessed in a cross-sectional, single-occasion study of clinically stable children and young adults with PCD. We used a questionnaire including self-reported physical limitations in everyday life or in vigorous activities, and estimation of weekly hours...... patients. CONCLUSION: One-third of PCD patients exhibited substantially lower aerobic fitness than healthy subjects. Aerobic fitness correlated with FEV1, DLCO/VA and self-reported complaints of limitations in vigorous physical activity. These findings are most likely explained by PCD pulmonary disease...

  6. The complexities of complex span: explaining individual differences in working memory in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Donna M; Jarrold, Christopher; Gunn, Deborah M; Baddeley, Alan D

    2003-03-01

    Two studies are presented that investigated the constraints underlying working memory performance in children and adults. In each case, independent measures of processing efficiency and storage capacity are assessed to determine their relative importance in predicting performance on complex span tasks,which measure working memory capacity. Results show that complex span performance was independently constrained by individual differences in domain-general processing efficiency and domain-specific storage capacity. Residual variance, which may reflect the ability to coordinate storage and processing, also predicted academic achievement. These results challenge the view that complex span taps a limited-capacity resource pool shared between processing and storage operations. Rather, they are consistent with a multiple-component model in which separate resource pools support the processing and storage functions of working memory.

  7. Serum insulin-like growth factor-I in 1030 healthy children, adolescents, and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Bang, P; Hertel, Niels

    1994-01-01

    Serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) increase with age and pubertal development. The large variation in circulating IGF-I levels in adolescence makes it difficult to use the IGF-I value of a single child in the assessment of his growth status. In addition, the interference of IGF......-binding proteins in many IGF-I assays contributes to this problem. We measured IGF-I in acid-ethanol-extracted serum from 1030 healthy children, adolescents, and adults, employing a RIA that reduces interference of IGF-binding proteins by using monoiodinated Tyr31-[125I]des-(1-3)IGF-I as radioligand. Mean serum...... volume. Multiple regression analysis revealed that serum IGF-I levels predicted height velocity in the following year (r = 0.33; P

  8. Pegylated Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone Possesses a Promising Once-Weekly Treatment Profile, and Multiple Dosing Is Well Tolerated in Adult Patients with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Esben; Klose, Marianne Christina; Hansen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement therapy in children and adults currently requires daily sc injections for several years or lifelong, which may be both inconvenient and distressing for patients. NNC126-0083 is a pegylated rhGH developed for once-weekly administration. Objectives......: Our objective was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of multiple doses of NNC126-0083 in adult patients with GH deficiency (GHD). Subjects and Methods: Thirty-three adult patients with GHD, age 20-65 yr, body mass index 18.5-35.0 kg/m(2), and glycated...... to 240 h after the third dosing. Physical examination, antibodies, and local tolerability were assessed. Results: NNC126-0083 was well tolerated with no difference in local tolerability compared with placebo and with no signs of lipoatrophy. A more than dose-proportional exposure was observed...

  9. Clinical Manifestations of Multiple Sclerosis in Taiwanese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis (MS and onset before 18 years were treated over the past 22 years and their records retrospectively analyzed at the National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, and Min-Sheng General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

  10. Most important components of parenting for adults without children and for those with children and grandchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Jurič

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Childrearing is a process through which parents follow, co-shape and guide their children on their path to personal maturity. Aim of our research is to outline the components of childrearing that 94 participants, members of three generations (28 adults without children, 35 parents and 31 grandparents define as important, both in positive and negative sense. The data was obtained through half-structured interviews with 12 questions on parenting, analysed according to the principles of initial and axial coding of the grounded theory. Results suggest thirty eight components, seventeen positive and eighteen negative, namely. Positive components combined in wider components: cooperation with a child, clear setting of boundaries for a child, acceptance of a child, giving the child possibility for expression, helping the child to get the psychological autonomy and positive parenting. Negative components combined in wider components: uninvolved parenting, psychological pressure on the child, punishing child, lack of trust in a child and negative parenting.

  11. Children's understanding of facial expression of emotion: III. Adults' categorical and dimensional responses to children's drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moland, M; Whissell, C M

    1993-08-01

    49 adult subjects responded to 37 children's drawings of six emotions (happy, sad, angry, afraid, surprised, and disgusted) by naming the emotion depicted and by identifying the pleasantness and arousal status of each drawing. Various analyses indicated that assignment to categories could be predicted on the basis of ratings of pleasantness and arousal (the two key dimensions of a bipolar affect space). Data support the contention that emotional responses should not be assessed solely on the basis of literal accuracy but should rather be described in terms of their location in affect space.

  12. Gender Stereotypes of Children's Toys: Investigating the Perspectives of Adults Who Have and Do Not Have Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekee, Kristy; Brown, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Often certain types of toys are considered more appropriate either for boys or for girls to play with. Therapists often use toys to engage children in intervention activities to promote skill development. This study investigated the gender stereotype perspectives of children's toys held by adults who were and were not parents. Fifty-two…

  13. Recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax in young adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Dongsub; Lee, Sungsoo; Haam, Seok Jin; Paik, Hyo Chae; Lee, Doo Yun

    2015-08-01

    Although better nutritional support has improved the growth rates in children, the occurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax has also been increasing in children. The current study attempts to investigate the occurrence and recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax and the efficacy of surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in young adults and children. A total of 840 patients were treated for pneumothorax at our hospital from January 2006 to December 2010. Exclusion criteria for this study were age >25 or secondary, traumatic or iatrogenic pneumothorax, and a total of 517 patients were included. Patients were classified into three groups according to age at the first episode of primary spontaneous pneumothorax: Group A: ≤16 years; Group B: 17-18 years and Group C: ≥19 years. The study group was composed of 470 male and 47 female patients. There were 234 right-sided, 279 left-sided and 4 bilateral primary spontaneous pneumothoraces. Wedge resection by video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed in 285 patients, while 232 were managed by observation or closed thoracostomy. In the wedge resection group, 51 patients experienced recurrence. The recurrence rates after wedge resection were 27.9% in Group A, 16.5% in Group B and 13.2% in Group C (P = 0.038). The recurrence rates after observation or closed thoracostomy were 45.7% in Group A, 51.9% in Group B and 47.7% in Group C (P = 0.764). In the present study, postoperative recurrence rates were higher than those in the literature. Intense and long-term follow-up was probably one reason for the relatively high recurrence rate. The recurrence rate after wedge resection in patients aged ≤16 years was higher than that in older patients. There was no difference between the recurrence rates after observation or closed thoracostomy, regardless of age. These results suggest that wedge resection might be delayed in children. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  14. Imaging of renal medullary carcinoma in children and young adults: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, Jesse K.; Khanna, Geetika [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Mullen, Elizabeth A. [Children' s Hospital Boston/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Boston, MA (United States); Cajaiba, Mariana M.; Perlman, Elizabeth J. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Smith, Ethan A. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Servaes, Sabah [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Geller, James I. [University of Cincinnati, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Ehrlich, Peter F. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Surgery, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Surgery, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cost, Nicholas G. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Aurora, CO (United States); Dome, Jeffrey S. [Children' s National Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Washington, DC (United States); Fernandez, Conrad V. [Dalhousie University and IWK Health Centre, Department of Pediatrics, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2017-11-15

    majority of patients. The diagnosis of renal medullary carcinoma should be considered when a child or young adult presents with a poorly defined/infiltrative, centrally located renal mass, especially in the setting of known sickle cell hemoglobinopathy. Distant metastases are common at initial presentation in the lungs, distant lymph nodes and liver and often involve multiple sites simultaneously. Pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis, a distinctive and uncommon form of lung metastasis in children, is common in this patient population. (orig.)

  15. Imaging of renal medullary carcinoma in children and young adults: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, Jesse K.; Khanna, Geetika; Mullen, Elizabeth A.; Cajaiba, Mariana M.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Smith, Ethan A.; Servaes, Sabah; Geller, James I.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Cost, Nicholas G.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Fernandez, Conrad V.

    2017-01-01

    majority of patients. The diagnosis of renal medullary carcinoma should be considered when a child or young adult presents with a poorly defined/infiltrative, centrally located renal mass, especially in the setting of known sickle cell hemoglobinopathy. Distant metastases are common at initial presentation in the lungs, distant lymph nodes and liver and often involve multiple sites simultaneously. Pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis, a distinctive and uncommon form of lung metastasis in children, is common in this patient population. (orig.)

  16. Walking to the Beat of Their Own Drum: How Children and Adults Meet Timing Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Simone V.

    2015-01-01

    Walking requires adapting to meet task constraints. Between 5- and 7-years old, children’s walking approximates adult walking without constraints. To examine how children and adults adapt to meet timing constraints, 57 5- to 7-year olds and 20 adults walked to slow and fast audio metronome paces. Both children and adults modified their walking. However, at the slow pace, children had more trouble matching the metronome compared to adults. The youngest children’s walking patterns deviated most from the slow metronome pace, and practice improved their performance. Five-year olds were the only group that did not display carryover effects to the metronome paces. Findings are discussed in relation to what contributes to the development of adaptation in children. PMID:26011538

  17. The relationship between adenovirus-36 seropositivity, obesity and metabolic profile in Turkish children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamese, M; Altoparlak, U; Turgut, A; Aydogdu, S; Karamese, S Aksak

    2015-12-01

    Obesity potentially arising from viral infection is known as 'infectobesity'. The latest reports suggest that adenovirus-36 (Adv36) is related to obesity in adults and children. Our aim was not only to determine the Adv36 seropositivity in both obese and non-obese children and adults, but also to investigate correlations between antibody positivity and serum lipid profiles. Both Adv36 positivity and tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha, leptin and interleukin-6 levels were detected in blood samples collected from 146 children and 130 adults by ELISA. Fasting plasma triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels were also measured. Adv36 positivity was determined to be 27·1% and 6% in obese and non-obese children and 17·5% and 4% in obese and non-obese adults, respectively. There was no difference with regard to total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha and interleukin-6 levels (P > 0·05). However, there was a significant difference between groups in terms of leptin levels (P obese children and adults. Our results showed that Adv36 may be an obesity agent for both adults and children, parallel with current literature data. However, the available data on a possible relationship between Adv36 infection and obesity both in children and adults do not completely solve the problem.

  18. Assessment of pain experience in adults and children after bracket bonding and initial archwire insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio José da Silva Campos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ninety five percent of orthodontic patients routinely report pain, due to alterations in the periodontal ligament and surrounding soft tissues, with intensity and prevalence varying according to age. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess toothache and buccal mucosal pain in adults and children during two initial phases of the orthodontic treatment. METHODS: The intensity of toothache and buccal mucosal pain reported by 20 patients, 10 children (11-13 years and 10 adults (18-37 years was recorded with the aid of a Visual Analog Scale (VAS, during 14 days - 7 days with bonded brackets only and 7 days with the initial archwire inserted. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in pain intensity among adults and children. After bracket bonding, 50% of the children and 70% of the adults reported pain. 70% of both groups reported pain after initial archwire insertion. While adults reported constant, low intensity, buccal mucosal pain, the children showed great variation of pain intensity, but with a trend towards decreasing pain during the assessment period. After initial archwire insertion the peaks of toothache intensity and prevalence occurred 24 hours in children and 48 hours in adults. CONCLUSIONS: In general, children reported pain less frequently than adults did, though with greater intensity.

  19. Effects of analog and digital filtering on auditory middle latency responses in adults and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Hirabayashi, M; Kobayashi, K

    1984-01-01

    Effects of analog high pass (HP) filtering were compared with those of zero phase-shift digital filtering on the auditory middle latency responses (MLR) from nine adults and 16 young children with normal hearing. Analog HP filtering exerted several prominent effects on the MLR waveforms in both adults and young children, such as suppression of Po (ABR), enhancement of Nb, enhancement or emergence of Pb, and latency decrements for Pa and the later components. Analog HP filtering at 20 Hz produced more pronounced waveform distortions in the responses from young children than from adults. Much greater latency decrements for Pa and Nb were observed for young children than for adults in the analog HP-filtered responses at 20 Hz. A large positive peak (Pb) emerged at about 65 ms after the stimulus onset. From these results, the use of digital HP filtering at 20 Hz is strongly recommended for obtaining unbiased and stable MLR in young children.

  20. Is the perceived placebo effect comparable between adults and children? A meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiaud, Perrine; Cornu, Catherine; Lajoinie, Audrey; Djemli, Amina; Cucherat, Michel; Kassai, Behrouz

    2017-01-01

    A potential larger perceived placebo effect in children compared with adults could influence the detection of the treatment effect and the extrapolation of the treatment benefit from adults to children. This study aims to explore this potential difference, using a meta-epidemiological approach. A systematic review of the literature was done to identify trials included in meta-analyses evaluating a drug intervention with separate data for adults and children. The standardized mean change and the proportion of responders (binary outcomes) were used to calculate the perceived placebo effect. A meta-regression analysis was conducted to test for the difference between adults and children of the perceived placebo effect. For binary outcomes, the perceived placebo effect was significantly more favorable in children compared with adults (β = 0.13; P = 0.001). Parallel group trials (β = -1.83; P < 0.001), subjective outcomes (β = -0.76; P < 0.001), and the disease type significantly influenced the perceived placebo effect. The perceived placebo effect is different between adults and children for binary outcomes. This difference seems to be influenced by the design, the disease, and outcomes. Calibration of new studies for children should consider cautiously the placebo effect in children.

  1. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations in children/adolescents and adults. Part II: Differences in obliteration rates, treatment-obliteration intervals, and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolato, Antonio; Lupidi, Francesco; Sandri, Marco F. Dr. Econom.; Foroni, Roberto; Zampieri, Piergiuseppe; Mazza, Carlo; Pasqualin, Alberto; Beltramello, Alberto; Gerosa, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare obliteration rates (OBRs) and treatment-obliteration intervals (TOIs) for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (cAVMs) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery in children/adolescents and adults; and to determine factors predicting the OBR and TOI in these two populations. Methods and Materials: This study concerned 62 children/adolescents and 193 adults observed for ≥3 years. Fisher exact two-tailed and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, multiple logistics, and Cox proportional hazard models were used for statistical analysis. Results: The overall OBR was 85.5% in children/adolescents and 87.6% in adults (p 0.671), but children/adolescents showed higher 36-month actuarial OBRs (69.35%) and shorter median TOIs (25.7 months) than adults (66.84% and 28.2 months; p 0.006 and p = 0.017, respectively). In children/adolescents, lower Spetzler-Martin grades (p = 0.043) and younger age (p = 0.019) correlated significantly with OBRs, and lower Spetzler-Martin grades (p 0.024) and noneloquent cAVM locations (p = 0.046) with TOIs. In adults, low flow through the cAVM and 3 volume were associated with both OBR and TOI (p 0.012 and p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: The differences in OBRs within 3 years and TOIs, although slight, seem to show that pediatric cAVMs behave differently from those in adults after Gamma Knife radiosurgery

  2. Time use of parents raising children with severe or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijkx, J; van der Putten, A A J; Vlaskamp, C

    2017-07-01

    Raising children with severe or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) is expected to put extreme pressure on parental time use patterns. The aim of this study was to examine the total time use of mothers and fathers raising children with PIMD and compare it with the time use of parents of typically developing children. Twenty-seven fathers and 30 mothers raising children with PIMD completed a time use diary on a mobile phone or tablet app, as did 66 fathers and 109 mothers of typically developing children. Independent t-tests and Mann-Whitney tests were performed to compare mean time use. There are no differences in the time use of parents of children with PIMD on contracted time (paid work and educational activities) and necessary time (personal care, eating and drinking and sleeping) when compared with parents of typically developing children. There are significant differences between the parents of children with PIMD and the parents of typically developing children in terms of committed time (time for domestic work and the care and supervision of their children) and free time. The mothers of children with PIMD spend significantly less time on domestic work and more time on care and supervision than mothers of typically developing children. This study shows that the parents of children with PIMD have to spend a significant amount of time on care tasks and have on average 1.5 h less free time per day than parents of typically developing children. This is a striking difference, because leisure time can substantially contribute to well-being. Therefore, it is important not only to consider a child with PIMD's support needs but also to identify what parents need to continue their children's daily care and supervision. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Female children with incarcerated adult family members at risk for lifelong neurological decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer-Smyth, Kathleen; Pohlig, Ryan T; Bucurescu, Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    A secondary analysis of data from adult female prison inmates in the mid-Atlantic United States defined relationships between having incarcerated adult family members during childhood and neurological outcomes. Of 135 inmates, 99 (60%) had one or more incarcerated adult family members during childhood. Regression analyses revealed that having incarcerated adult family members was related to greater frequency and severity of childhood abuse and higher incidence of neurological deficits in adulthood, especially related to traumatic brain injuries, compared to those without incarcerated adult family members. Along with being role models, adult family members impact the neurological health of children throughout their life-span.

  4. Female children with incarcerated adult family members at risk for life-long neurological decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer-Smyth, Kathleen; Pohlig, Ryan T.; Bucurescu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    A secondary analysis of data from adult female prison inmates in the mid-Atlantic United States defined relationships between having incarcerated adult family members during childhood and neurological outcomes. Of 135 inmates, 99(73%) had one or more incarcerated adult family members during childhood. Regression analyses revealed that having incarcerated adult family members was related to greater frequency and severity of childhood abuse and higher incidence of neurological deficits in adulthood, especially related to traumatic brain injuries, compared to those without incarcerated adult family members. Along with being role models, adult family members impact the neurological health of children throughout their lifespan. PMID:26788781

  5. The treatment of H.pylori infected adults and children in Volgograd: pharmaco-epidemilological investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnitskaya O.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article represents results of pharmacoepidemiological research of H.pylori eradication treatment of adults and children in Volgograd. The aim was to determine H. pylori pharmacotherapy stereotypes and compare with international experts' recommendations. Material and Methods. There were analyzed CRFs of 94 adults and 132 children with H.pylori associated diseases in Volgograd region. Results. There were identified mistakes of treatment regimes and eradication control principles. Conclusion. The treatment of H.pylori infected adults and children in Volgograd does not match to international experts' recommendations.

  6. Management of obesity in children differs from that of adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoey, Hilary

    2014-11-01

    Obesity in childhood is a very common disorder with an increasing prevalence. It is one of the most serious public health challenges. The objectives of the present paper are to increase the awareness of the problem of obesity in childhood, its serious complications and the need for prevention. Overweight and obese children are likely to remain obese into adulthood and more likely to develop serious complications including health problems such as diabetes and CVD, as well as psychological and social challenges. Overweight and obesity are largely preventable. In adults it is difficult to reduce excessive weight gain once it has become established, thus children should be considered the priority population for intervention strategies and prevention. Nutrition, exercise, weight gain in infancy, genetic and environmental factors, all contribute to the aetiology. Prevention and treatment of obesity in childhood requires education and empowerment of families relating to diet and exercise, along with the regulation and control of food marketing and clear nutritional labelling. The eating and physical activity behaviour of a child is strongly influenced by environmental and social factors. Therefore treatment will have only limited success in an environment where adequate physical activity is inhibited and the consumption of high-energy food is stimulated. Government investment in a health promotion programme addressing the issue of obesity in the population as a whole, with particular emphasis on the prevention and management of obesity in childhood is vital. The family doctor and multidisciplinary team play an important role. Regular visits to the family doctor, including growth assessment, will help motivate the family to restrict energy intake and to increase exercise. Therefore the prevention of childhood obesity needs high priority.

  7. Children's representations of multiple family relationships: organizational structure and development in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermerhorn, Alice C; Cummings, E Mark; Davies, Patrick T

    2008-02-01

    The authors examine mutual family influence processes at the level of children's representations of multiple family relationships, as well as the structure of those representations. From a community sample with 3 waves, each spaced 1 year apart, kindergarten-age children (105 boys and 127 girls) completed a story-stem completion task, tapping representations of multiple family relationships. Structural equation modeling with autoregressive controls indicated that representational processes involving different family relationships were interrelated over time, including links between children's representations of marital conflict and reactions to conflict, between representations of security about marital conflict and parent-child relationships, and between representations of security in father-child and mother-child relationships. Mixed support was found for notions of increasing stability in representations during this developmental period. Results are discussed in terms of notions of transactional family dynamics, including family-wide perspectives on mutual influence processes attributable to multiple family relationships.

  8. Slow walking model for children with multiple disabilities via an application of humanoid robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ZeFeng; Peyrodie, Laurent; Cao, Hua; Agnani, Olivier; Watelain, Eric; Wang, HaoPing

    2016-02-01

    Walk training research with children having multiple disabilities is presented. Orthosis aid in walking for children with multiple disabilities such as Cerebral Palsy continues to be a clinical and technological challenge. In order to reduce pain and improve treatment strategies, an intermediate structure - humanoid robot NAO - is proposed as an assay platform to study walking training models, to be transferred to future special exoskeletons for children. A suitable and stable walking model is proposed for walk training. It would be simulated and tested on NAO. This comparative study of zero moment point (ZMP) supports polygons and energy consumption validates the model as more stable than the conventional NAO. Accordingly direction variation of the center of mass and the slopes of linear regression knee/ankle angles, the Slow Walk model faithfully emulates the gait pattern of children.

  9. Differences in the energy cost between children and adults during front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Ingjer, Frank; Madsen, Ørjan; Stallman, Robert Keig; Stray-Gundersen, James

    2004-04-01

    There is little information available about the swimming economy of children. The aim of this study was to examine any possible differences in swimming economy in children and adults, swimming front crawl submaximally. Swimming economy was compared in adults [ n=13, aged 21.4 (3.7) years] and children [n=10, aged 11.8 (0.8) years] tested at four submaximal 6-min workloads. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured with Douglas bags in a 25-m pool and pacer lights were used to control the velocities. Swimming economy was scaled to body size using mass (BM), body surface area (BSA) and body length (BL). Children had lower VO2 (litres per minute) at a given velocity than the adults, with 1.86 (0.28) and 2.39 (0.20) l min(-1) respectively (at 1.00 m s(-1)). When scaling for size, children had higher VO2 measured in litres per square metre per minute and millilitres per kilogram per minute (divided by BSA and BM) than adults. The VO2 divided by BL was found not to differ between the two groups. The O2 cost of swimming 1 m at a velocity of 1.00 m s(-1) was lower in the children [31.0 (4.6) ml m(-1)] than in the adults [39.9 (3.3) ml m(-1) Pswimming velocity cubed and VO2 exists as shown earlier for adults. It is concluded that, when scaling for BSA and BM, children are less economical than adults, when scaling for BL, children are equally economical, and when considering energy cost per metre and absolute VO2, children are more economical than the adults.

  10. Automatic classification of hyperactive children: comparing multiple artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavarian, Mona; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Dibajnia, Parvin

    2011-07-12

    Automatic classification of different behavioral disorders with many similarities (e.g. in symptoms) by using an automated approach will help psychiatrists to concentrate on correct disorder and its treatment as soon as possible, to avoid wasting time on diagnosis, and to increase the accuracy of diagnosis. In this study, we tried to differentiate and classify (diagnose) 306 children with many similar symptoms and different behavioral disorders such as ADHD, depression, anxiety, comorbid depression and anxiety and conduct disorder with high accuracy. Classification was based on the symptoms and their severity. With examining 16 different available classifiers, by using "Prtools", we have proposed nearest mean classifier as the most accurate classifier with 96.92% accuracy in this research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Disparities in untreated caries among children and adults in the U.S., 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Niodita; Vujicic, Marko; Yarbrough, Cassandra; Harrison, Brittany

    2018-03-06

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 increased dental coverage for children in the United States, (U.S.) but not for adults. Few studies in current scholarship make use of up-to-date, nationally representative data to examine oral health disparities in the U.S. The purpose of this study is to use nationally representative data to determine the prevalence of untreated caries among children and adults of different socioeconomic and racial/ethnic groups and to examine the factors associated with untreated caries among children and adults. This study used the 2011-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) demographic, oral health questionnaire, and oral health dentition examination data (n = 7008 for children; n = 9673 for adults). Participants that had a standardized oral health examination and at least one natural primary or permanent tooth considering 28 tooth spaces were included in this study. Our main outcome measure was untreated coronal caries defined as decay on the crown or enamel surface of a tooth that had not been treated or filled. Population estimates were calculated to determine the prevalence of untreated caries among children and adults in the United States. Frequencies and Pearson's chi-square tests were used to compare those with and without untreated caries. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate the factors associated with untreated caries. We conducted analyses among children and adults separately. From 2011 to 2014, 12.4 million children and 57.6 million adults in the United States had untreated caries. Age, family income level, recent dental visit, and financial and non-financial barriers were significantly associated with untreated caries in both children and adults. Race/ethnicity, gender and education level were also significantly associated with untreated caries among adults. The odds of untreated caries associated with financial barriers were 2.06 for children and 2.84 for adults while the

  12. Children Living with HIV-Infected Adults: Estimates for 23 Countries in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Susan E; Goldberg, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa many children live in extreme poverty and experience a burden of illness and disease that is disproportionately high. The emergence of HIV and AIDS has only exacerbated long-standing challenges to improving children's health in the region, with recent cohorts experiencing pediatric AIDS and high levels of orphan status, situations which are monitored globally and receive much policy and research attention. Children's health, however, can be affected also by living with HIV-infected adults, through associated exposure to infectious diseases and the diversion of household resources away from them. While long recognized, far less research has focused on characterizing this distinct and vulnerable population of HIV-affected children. Using Demographic and Health Survey data from 23 countries collected between 2003 and 2011, we estimate the percentage of children living in a household with at least one HIV-infected adult. We assess overlaps with orphan status and investigate the relationship between children and the adults who are infected in their households. The population of children living in a household with at least one HIV-infected adult is substantial where HIV prevalence is high; in Southern Africa, the percentage exceeded 10% in all countries and reached as high as 36%. This population is largely distinct from the orphan population. Among children living in households with tested, HIV-infected adults, most live with parents, often mothers, who are infected; nonetheless, in most countries over 20% live in households with at least one infected adult who is not a parent. Until new infections contract significantly, improvements in HIV/AIDS treatment suggest that the population of children living with HIV-infected adults will remain substantial. It is vital to on-going efforts to reduce childhood morbidity and mortality to consider whether current care and outreach sufficiently address the distinct vulnerabilities of these children.

  13. Children Living with HIV-Infected Adults: Estimates for 23 Countries in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E Short

    Full Text Available In sub-Saharan Africa many children live in extreme poverty and experience a burden of illness and disease that is disproportionately high. The emergence of HIV and AIDS has only exacerbated long-standing challenges to improving children's health in the region, with recent cohorts experiencing pediatric AIDS and high levels of orphan status, situations which are monitored globally and receive much policy and research attention. Children's health, however, can be affected also by living with HIV-infected adults, through associated exposure to infectious diseases and the diversion of household resources away from them. While long recognized, far less research has focused on characterizing this distinct and vulnerable population of HIV-affected children.Using Demographic and Health Survey data from 23 countries collected between 2003 and 2011, we estimate the percentage of children living in a household with at least one HIV-infected adult. We assess overlaps with orphan status and investigate the relationship between children and the adults who are infected in their households.The population of children living in a household with at least one HIV-infected adult is substantial where HIV prevalence is high; in Southern Africa, the percentage exceeded 10% in all countries and reached as high as 36%. This population is largely distinct from the orphan population. Among children living in households with tested, HIV-infected adults, most live with parents, often mothers, who are infected; nonetheless, in most countries over 20% live in households with at least one infected adult who is not a parent.Until new infections contract significantly, improvements in HIV/AIDS treatment suggest that the population of children living with HIV-infected adults will remain substantial. It is vital to on-going efforts to reduce childhood morbidity and mortality to consider whether current care and outreach sufficiently address the distinct vulnerabilities of these

  14. Musical learning in children and adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, M; Dykens, E

    2013-09-01

    There is recent interest in using music making as an empirically supported intervention for various neurodevelopmental disorders due to music's engagement of perceptual-motor mapping processes. However, little is known about music learning in populations with developmental disabilities. Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder whose characteristic auditory strengths and visual-spatial weaknesses map onto the processes used to learn to play a musical instrument. We identified correlates of novel musical instrument learning in WS by teaching 46 children and adults (7-49 years) with WS to play the Appalachian dulcimer. Obtained dulcimer skill was associated with prior musical abilities (r = 0.634, P learning strategies, but not visual or instructional strategies, predicted greater dulcimer skill beyond individual musical and visual-motor integration abilities (β = 0.285, sr(2) = 0.06, P = 0.019). These findings map onto behavioural and emerging neural evidence for greater auditory-motor mapping processes in WS. Results suggest that explicit awareness of task-specific learning approaches is important when learning a new skill. Implications for using music with populations with syndrome-specific strengths and weakness will be discussed. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  15. Association of multiple chronic conditions and pain among older black and white adults with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara A. Baker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging is often associated with the challenge of navigating daily tasks with a painful chronic medical illness. Yet, there is concern of the number of older adults impacted with more than one chronic condition. Despite the increasing number of adults diagnosed with diabetes and comorbid chronic illnesses, there remains a lack of understanding in how multiple illnesses relate to experiences of pain. To assess the association between multiple chronic conditions and pain, this study aimed to identify clusters of chronic medical conditions and their association with pain among a sample of older Black and White adults diagnosed with diabetes. Methods Two hundred and thirty-six participants responded to a series of questions assessing pain frequency and severity, as well as health and social characteristics. A factor analysis was used to categorize clusters of medical conditions, and multiple regression models were used to examine predictors of pain. Results Seven of the assessed chronic medical conditions loaded on three factors, and accounted for 57.2% of the total variance, with heart disease (factor 1 accounting for 21.9%, musculoskeletal conditions (factor 2 for another 18.4%, and factor 3 (microvascular diseases accounting for a final 16.9% of the variability among the chronic medical conditions. Covariate-adjusted models showed that fewer years of education and higher scores on the microvascular and musculoskeletal conditions factors were associated with higher pain frequency, with the musculoskeletal conditions factor being the strongest predictor. Conclusions Findings from this study compliment existent literature underscoring the prevalence and importance of comorbid diagnoses in relation to pain. Examining health-related factors beyond a single disease diagnosis also provides an opportunity to explore underlying disease co-occurrences that may persist beyond organ system classifications.

  16. UnAdulterated - children and adults' visual attention to healthy and unhealthy food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Astrid F; Hooge, Ignace T C; Maas, Josje; Evers, Catharine; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2015-04-01

    Visually attending to unhealthy food creates a desire to consume the food. To resist the temptation people have to employ self-regulation strategies, such as visual avoidance. Past research has shown that self-regulatory skills develop throughout childhood and adolescence, suggesting adults' superior self-regulation skills compared to children. This study employed a novel method to investigate self-regulatory skills. Children and adults' initial (bottom-up) and maintained (top-down) visual attention to simultaneously presented healthy and unhealthy food were examined in an eye-tracking paradigm. Results showed that both children and adults initially attended most to the unhealthy food. Subsequently, adults self-regulated their visual attention away from the unhealthy food. Despite the children's high self-reported attempts to eat healthily and importance of eating healthily, children did not self-regulate visual attention away from unhealthy food. Children remained influenced by the attention-driven desire to consume the unhealthy food whereas adults visually attended more strongly to the healthy food thereby avoiding the desire to consume the unhealthy option. The findings emphasize the necessity of improving children's self-regulatory skills to support their desire to remain healthy and to protect children from the influences of the obesogenic environment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Reading skills in children and adults with albinism: the role of visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, John T; Kutzbach, Beth R; Holleschau, Ann M; Wyckoff, Suzanne; Summers, C Gail

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether visual impairment in albinism contributes significantly to the acquisition of normal reading skills. The authors administered standardized reading tests to 41 children and 18 adults with albinism. The Young Children's Achievement Test was used for children between 4 and 6 years old and the Woodcock-Johnson III was used for children 7 years and older and adults. Parents of children and adult subjects also completed a questionnaire to document developmental, academic, and/or work experiences. The Spearman test was used to evaluate the relationship between binocular best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and reading test results. Standardized reading tests in both children and adults with albinism showed a normal distribution of scores. BCVA did not appear to play a significant role in the development of normal reading ability in these individuals who were visually impaired except for a mild correlation of decreased reading fluency on the Woodcock-Johnson III with decreased BCVA (r = 0.287, P = .046). Many young children with albinism had superior reading skills despite having a BCVA of 20/200 or worse (legal blindness). This study of cognitively normal children and adults with albinism demonstrates that impaired vision during childhood does not by itself significantly impede a child's ability to acquire normal reading skills. However, the lower reading fluency that occurs in the more visually impaired individuals suggests they would benefit, both in the school system and workplace, with an accommodation involving more time to complete reading tasks. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Staffs' documentation of participation for adults with profound intellectual disability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Lena; Gustafsson, Christine; Stier, Jonas; Wilder, Jenny

    2017-06-21

    This study investigated what areas of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health were documented in implementation plans for adults with profound intellectual disability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities with focus on participation. A document analysis of 17 implementation plans was performed and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health was used as an analytic tool. One hundred and sixty-three different codes were identified, especially in the components Activities and participation and Environmental factors. Participation was most frequently coded in the chapters Community, social and civic life and Self-care. Overall, the results showed that focus in the implementation plans concerned Self-care and Community, social and civic life. The other life areas in Activities and participation were seldom, or not at all, documented. A deeper focus on participation in the implementation plans and all life areas in the component Activities and participation is needed. It is important that the documentation clearly shows what the adult wants, wishes, and likes in everyday life. It is also important to ensure that the job description for staff contains both life areas and individual preferences so that staff have the possibility to work to fulfill social and individual participation for the target group. Implications for rehabilitation There is a need for functioning working models to increase participation significantly for adults with profound intellectual disability or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities. For these adults, participation is achieved through the assistance of others and support and services carried out must be documented in an implementation plan. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health can be used to support staff and ensure that information about the most important factors in an individual's functioning in their environment is not omitted in

  19. Mothers of young adults with intellectual disability: multiple roles, ethnicity and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhower, A; Blacher, J

    2006-12-01

    Two opposing perspectives--role strain and role enhancement--were considered as predictive of women's psychological and physical health. The authors examined the relation between multiple role occupancy (parenting, employment, marriage) and well-being (depression and health) among mothers of young adults with intellectual disability (ID). Participants were 226 mothers aged 35-70 years old caring for a young adult aged 16-26 years old with moderate to severe/profound ID. Mothers were of either Latino ethnicity (n=117) or Anglo (n=109). Mothers' ethnicity and degree of acculturation and young adults' adaptive behaviour and behaviour problems were examined as potential moderators. Mothers who were employed, married, or both reported better well-being than mothers who were both unemployed and unmarried, especially when their offspring had relatively higher adaptive functioning. This relationship between role occupancy and well-being was fully mediated by socio-economic status (SES) factors. Results did not suggest a role enhancement effect, but instead indicated a role shortage effect; unemployed, unmarried mothers experienced markedly poor well-being, while all other mothers experienced comparable well-being. Well-being scores were higher for Anglo than for Latino mothers; this relationship was entirely accounted for by SES. In Latina mothers, the relation between role occupancy and well-being was moderated by degree of acculturation. Findings suggest that multiple roles benefit mothers of young adults with ID primarily through their impact on socio-economic resources. For more acculturated Latina mothers, occupying more roles predicted better well-being even after controlling for SES. Latina mothers who were unemployed and unmarried had lower SES, and this group emerged as at particular risk. The latter group may benefit most from respite assistance and other interventions aimed at addressing their physical and mental health.

  20. EХPERIENCE IN INTERFERON β-1A USE FOR TREATMENT OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kuzenkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate the impact of subcutaneous interferon β-1a on matrix metalloproteinases 3, 8, 9 (MMP, cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α — TNF α, and transforming growth factor β1 — TGF β1 levels in serum of children with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Patients and methods: the results of treatment of 32 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis aged 12–18 years (22 girls and 10 boys were analyzed. Treatment efficacy was assessed by the number of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis exacerbations during 12 months, MRI data, MMP and cytokines dynamics in serum. Results: statistical evidence acquired for MMPs, their tissue inhibitor and cytokines levels decrease (p < 0,005 in patients receiving therapy with subcutaneous INF β-1a. Conclusions: subcutaneous interferon β-1а is highly efficient in treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in children and adolescents.

  1. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma presenting multiple lymphomatous polyposis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Hokama; Nobuyuki Takasu; Jiro Fujita; Takeaki Tomoyose; Yu-ichi Yamamoto; Takako Watanabe; Tetsuo Hirata; Fukunori Kinjo; Seiya Kato; Koichi Ohshima; Hiroshi Uezato

    2008-01-01

    Multiple lymphomatous polyposis (HLP) is an unusual form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract. It has been reported that most MLP are observed in cases with mantle cell lymphoma of B-cell type. We herein present a case of a 66-year-old man with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Colonoscopy revealed MLP throughout the colon and histopathological findings of ATLL cell infiltration. The patient died despite combination of chemotherapy. The literature of manifestations of colonic involvement of ATLL is reviewed and the importance of endoscopic evaluation to differentiate ATLL intestinal lesions from opportunistic infectious enterocolitis is discussed.

  2. Learning social attitudes: children's sensitivity to the nonverbal behaviors of adult models during interracial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Luigi; De Dea, Cristina; Nesdale, Drew

    2008-11-01

    White children show marked ingroup race preferences and a relative devaluation of Black people. The origin of these early interracial attitudes is to a large extent still unclear. The studies here test the possibility that preschool-aged children are particularly sensitive to the nonverbal behaviors performed by White adults during interracial interactions. In Study 1, children were shown a video displaying an interaction between a White and a Black adult. Across conditions, the White adult's verbal behaviors were either friendly or neutral, whereas his nonverbal behaviors showed either easiness (e.g., closeness, high eye contact) or uneasiness (e.g., distance, avoidance of eye contact). Results revealed that participants shaped their attitudes toward the Black target accordingly, independently from the White adults' verbal behaviors. Study 2 replicated the basic findings and demonstrated that the observed effects generalized to other Black targets. Results are discussed in relation to current approaches to understanding the formation of racial attitudes among children.

  3. [Treatment of adult congenital muscular torticollis by multiple sternocleidomastoid head amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ronggang; Yin, Xiuqing; Yu, Rong

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the therapeutic method and effectiveness of multiple sternocleidomastoid head amputation for adult congenital muscular torticollis. Between March 2009 and February 2011, 19 patients with congenital muscular torticollis were treated with multiple sternocleidomastoid head amputation. There were 13 males and 6 females, aged 16-32 years (mean, 23.5 years). The X-ray films showed that 12 cases were accompanied with some extent cervical lateral bending and wedge change. Ten patients were with ipsilateral facial bradygenesis. Four patients had received single sternocleidomastoid head amputation. All of the 19 patients were treated with multiple sternocleidomastoid head amputation, then plaster support and neck collar were used after operation for 3-6 months. The wounds of all the 19 patients healed primarily, without infection or hematoma. Sixteen patients were followed up 5 months to 2 years (mean, 8 months). The head and neck malformations were ameliorated significantly. The effectiveness was assessed 2 weeks later, in 7 patients without cervical vertebral malformation results were excellent; in 12 patients with cervical vertebral malformation, the results were excellent in 1 case, good in 7 cases, and fair in 4 cases. The length between mastoid process and sternoclavicular joints was elongated (1.88 +/- 0.30) cm significantly after operation in patients without cervical vertebral malformation (t = 6.24, P = 0.00), showing no significant difference when compared with normal value (t = 1.87, P = 0.11); the length was elongated (3.38 +/- 0.30) cm significantly (t = 11.37, P = 0.00) after operation in patients with cervical vertebral malformation, but it was significant shorter than normal value (t = 12.19, P = 0.00). Multiple sternocleidomastoid head amputation is a safe and effective method for adult congenital muscular torticollis, which can improve the neck rotation function.

  4. Multiple tobacco product use among adults in the United States: cigarettes, cigars, electronic cigarettes, hookah, smokeless tobacco, and snus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn O; Hebert, Christine J; Nonnemaker, James M; Kim, Annice E

    2014-05-01

    Noncigarette tobacco products are increasingly popular. Researchers need to understand multiple tobacco product use to assess the effects of these products on population health. We estimate national prevalence and examine risk factors for multiple product use. We calculated prevalence estimates of current use patterns involving cigarettes, cigars, electronic cigarettes, hookah, smokeless tobacco, and snus using data from the 2012 RTI National Adult Tobacco Survey (N=3627), a random-digit-dial telephone survey of adults aged 18 and over. Associations between use patterns (exclusive single product and multiple products) and demographic characteristics were examined using Pearson chi-square tests and logistic regression. 32.1% of adults currently use 1 or more tobacco products; 14.9% use cigarettes exclusively, and 6.6% use one noncigarette product exclusively, 6.9% use cigarettes with another product (dual use), 1.3% use two noncigarette products, and 2.4% use three or more products (polytobacco use). Smokers who are young adult, male, never married, reside in the West, and made prior quit attempts were at risk for multiple product use. Over 10% of U.S. adults use multiple tobacco products. A better understanding of multiple product use involving combustible products, like cigars and hookah, is needed. Multiple product use may be associated with past quit attempts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessing an Intergenerational Horticulture Therapy Program for Elderly Adults and Preschool Children

    OpenAIRE

    Predny, Mary Lorraine

    1999-01-01

    ASSESSING AN INTERGENERATIONAL HORTICULTURE THERAPY PROGRAM FOR ELDERLY ADULTS AND PRESCHOOL CHILDREN by Mary Lorraine Predny Dr. Diane Relf, Chair Horticulture Department ABSTRACT The goal of this research project was to determine if introducing intergenerational interactions would supplement or detract from the use of horticulture as a therapeutic tool when working with elderly adults and preschool children. The program was set up to compare ind...

  6. Safety of 100??g venom immunotherapy rush protocols in children compared to adults

    OpenAIRE

    Stoevesandt, Johanna; Hosp, Christine; Kerstan, Andreas; Trautmann, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of studies examining the safety of venom immunotherapy (VIT) in children. We aimed to assess the incidence of anaphylactic side effects during rush VIT in a cohort of pediatric patients and adult controls. Methods 72 consecutive cycles of VIT-buildup in 71 children/adolescents aged 7?17?years were retrospectively evaluated and compared to an adult control group (n?=?981) with regard to baseline parameters (sex, causative venom, severity of index sting reaction, r...

  7. Safety of 100 µg venom immunotherapy rush protocols in children compared to adults

    OpenAIRE

    Stoevesandt, Johanna; Hosp, Christine; Kerstan, Andreas; Trautmann, Axel

    2018-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of studies examining the safety of venom immunotherapy (VIT) in children. We aimed to assess the incidence of anaphylactic side effects during rush VIT in a cohort of pediatric patients and adult controls. Methods: 72 consecutive cycles of VIT-buildup in 71 children/adolescents aged 7–17 years were retrospectively evaluated and compared to an adult control group (n = 981) with regard to baseline parameters (sex, causative venom, severity of index sting ...

  8. Children's drawings of significant figures for a peer or an adult audience

    OpenAIRE

    Burkitt, Esther; Watling, Dawn; Murray, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    The present study assessed if children would present different information in their drawings of emotion eliciting stimuli when they believed that an adult or a child audience would view their drawings. Seventy-five 6-year-olds (44 boys and 31 girls) were allocated to three groups: the reference group, the child audience group and the adult audience group. All children completed a drawing session where they first drew a neutral uncharacterised figure, followed by drawings of a sad and a happy ...

  9. Surviving Parents' Influence on Adult Children's Depressive Symptoms Following the Death of a First Parent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Jeffrey E

    2016-10-01

    Parents and children are linked across the life course, and they share common experiences. This article focuses on the bereavement experience of adult children's loss of a first parent during adulthood and examines the downward influence of emotional closeness with a surviving parent on adult children's depressive symptoms following loss. Analyses are based on adult children who experienced the death of a first parent (N = 227), drawn from the Longitudinal Study of Generations, a study of three-and four-generation families from Southern California. Multilevel lagged dependent variable models indicate that an emotionally close relationship with a surviving parent is related with fewer post-bereavement depressive symptoms when a mother survives a father, but not vice versa. This analysis extends the theory of linked lives and highlights the mutual influence parents and children exert, as well as the complex role of gender in shaping family relationships. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Prevalence of Multiple Chronic Conditions Among US Adults: Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jeannine S.

    2013-01-01

    Preventing and ameliorating chronic conditions has long been a priority in the United States; however, the increasing recognition that people often have multiple chronic conditions (MCC) has added a layer of complexity with which to contend. The objective of this study was to present the prevalence of MCC and the most common MCC dyads/triads by selected demographic characteristics. We used respondent-reported data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to study the US adult civilian noninstitutionalized population aged 18 years or older (n = 27,157). We categorized adults as having 0 to 1, 2 to 3, or 4 or more of the following chronic conditions: hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, hepatitis, weak or failing kidneys, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or current asthma. We then generated descriptive estimates and tested for significant differences. Twenty-six percent of adults have MCC; the prevalence of MCC has increased from 21.8% in 2001 to 26.0% in 2010. The prevalence of MCC significantly increased with age, was significantly higher among women than men and among non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black adults than Hispanic adults. The most common dyad identified was arthritis and hypertension, and the combination of arthritis, hypertension, and diabetes was the most common triad. The findings of this study contribute information to the field of MCC research. The NHIS can be used to identify population subgroups most likely to have MCC and potentially lead to clinical guidelines for people with more common MCC combinations. PMID:23618545

  11. The neurodevelopmental differences of increasing verbal working memory demand in children and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Vogan

    2016-02-01

    We used fMRI and a 1-back verbal WM task with six levels of difficulty to examine the neurodevelopmental changes in WM function in 40 participants, twenty-four children (ages 9–15 yr and sixteen young adults (ages 20–25 yr. Children and adults both demonstrated an opposing system of cognitive processes with increasing cognitive demand, where areas related to WM (frontal and parietal regions increased in activity, and areas associated with the default mode network decreased in activity. Although there were many similarities in the neural activation patterns associated with increasing verbal WM capacity in children and adults, significant changes in the fMRI responses were seen with age. Adults showed greater load-dependent changes than children in WM in the bilateral superior parietal gyri, inferior frontal and left middle frontal gyri and right cerebellum. Compared to children, adults also showed greater decreasing activation across WM load in the bilateral anterior cingulate, anterior medial prefrontal gyrus, right superior lateral temporal gyrus and left posterior cingulate. These results demonstrate that while children and adults activate similar neural networks in response to verbal WM tasks, the extent to which they rely on these areas in response to increasing cognitive load evolves between childhood and adulthood.

  12. Intraoperative Neural Response Telemetry and Neural Recovery Function: a Comparative Study between Adults and Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho, Bettina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neural response telemetry (NRT is a method of capturing the action potential of the distal portion of the auditory nerve in cochlear implant (CI users, using the CI itself to elicit and record the answers. In addition, it can also measure the recovery function of the auditory nerve (REC, that is, the refractory properties of the nerve. It is not clear in the literature whether the responses from adults are the same as those from children. Objective To compare the results of NRT and REC between adults and children undergoing CI surgery. Methods Cross-sectional, descriptive, and retrospective study of the results of NRT and REC for patients undergoing IC at our service. The NRT is assessed by the level of amplitude (microvolts and REC as a function of three parameters: A (saturation level, in microvolts, t0 (absolute refractory period, in seconds, and tau (curve of the model function, measured in three electrodes (apical, medial, and basal. Results Fifty-two patients were evaluated with intraoperative NRT (26 adults and 26 children, and 24 with REC (12 adults and 12 children. No statistically significant difference was found between intraoperative responses of adults and children for NRT or for REC's three parameters, except for parameter A of the basal electrode. Conclusion The results of intraoperative NRT and REC were not different between adults and children, except for parameter A of the basal electrode.

  13. How is adults' screen time behaviour influencing their views on screen time restrictions for children? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeppe, Stephanie; Rebar, Amanda L; Short, Camille E; Alley, Stephanie; Van Lippevelde, Wendy; Vandelanotte, Corneel

    2016-03-01

    High screen time in children and its detrimental health effects is a major public health problem. How much screen time adults think is appropriate for children remains little explored, as well as whether adults' screen time behaviour would determine their views on screen time restrictions for children. This study aimed to investigate how adults' screen time behaviour influences their views on screen time restrictions for children, including differences by gender and parental status. In 2013, 2034 Australian adults participated in an online survey conducted by the Population Research Laboratory at Central Queensland University, Rockhampton. Adult screen time behaviour was assessed using the Workforce Sitting Questionnaire. Adults reported the maximum time children aged between 5-12 years should be allowed to spend watching TV and using a computer. Ordinal logistic regression was used to compare adult screen time behaviour with views on screen time restrictions for children. Most adults (68%) held the view that children should be allowed no more than 2 h of TV viewing and computer use on school days, whilst fewer adults (44%) thought this screen time limit is needed on weekend days. Women would impose higher screen time restrictions for children than men (p 2 h on watching TV and using the computer at home on work days (66%) and non-work days (88%). Adults spending ≤ 2 h/day in leisure-related screen time were less likely to permit children > 2 h/day of screen time. These associations did not differ by adult gender and parental status. Most adults think it is appropriate to limit children's screen time to the recommended ≤ 2 h/day but few adults themselves adhere to this screen time limit. Adults with lower screen use may be more inclined to limit children's screen time. Strategies to reduce screen time in children may also need to target adult screen use.

  14. Retrospective reports of parenting received in their families of origin: relationships to adult attachment in adult children of alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michelle L; Nair, Veena; Rawlings, Tanaya; Cash, Thomas F; Steer, Kate; Fals-Stewart, William

    2005-09-01

    The present study examined general and romantic attachment and parenting students received in their families of origin among 401 college students who resided with an alcohol-abusing parent prior to age 16 years as compared to those who did not reside with alcohol-abusing parents. Participants completed the Children's Report of Parent Behavior Instrument [Schludermann, E. and Schludermann, S. (1970). Children's Report of Parent Behavior Inventory (CRPBI). Canada: University of Manitoba], Experiences in Close Relationships--Revised [Fraley, R. C., Waller, N. G., and Brennan, K. G. (2000). An item response theory analysis of self-report measures of adult attachment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78, 350-365], Relationship Scale Questionnaire [Griffin, D. W. and Bartholomew, K. (1994). Models of the self and other: Fundamental dimensions underlying measures of adult attachment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 67, 430-445], and the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test [Jones, J. W. (1983). The Children of Alcoholics Screening Test: Test manual. Chicago: Camelot]. Young adults who met criteria for ACOAs reported more anxious and avoidant behavior in romantic relationships and a more fearful style of general adult attachment. Parenting behavior in one's family of origin predicted anxious behavior in romantic relationships and a fearful overall style of attachment, whereas being an ACOA and parenting in one's family of origin predicted avoidant behavior in romantic relationships.

  15. Children's and adults' on-line processing of syntactically ambiguous sentences during reading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly S S L Joseph

    Full Text Available While there has been a fair amount of research investigating children's syntactic processing during spoken language comprehension, and a wealth of research examining adults' syntactic processing during reading, as yet very little research has focused on syntactic processing during text reading in children. In two experiments, children and adults read sentences containing a temporary syntactic ambiguity while their eye movements were monitored. In Experiment 1, participants read sentences such as, 'The boy poked the elephant with the long stick/trunk from outside the cage' in which the attachment of a prepositional phrase was manipulated. In Experiment 2, participants read sentences such as, 'I think I'll wear the new skirt I bought tomorrow/yesterday. It's really nice' in which the attachment of an adverbial phrase was manipulated. Results showed that adults and children exhibited similar processing preferences, but that children were delayed relative to adults in their detection of initial syntactic misanalysis. It is concluded that children and adults have the same sentence-parsing mechanism in place, but that it operates with a slightly different time course. In addition, the data support the hypothesis that the visual processing system develops at a different rate than the linguistic processing system in children.

  16. Fear of water in children and adults: etiology and familial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J; Gaffan, E A

    1997-02-01

    Water-fearful children (non-swimmers. 5-8 yrs and adults (non-swimmers or late learners, 23-73 yr) were compared with non-fearful controls of similar swimming ability. Parallel assessments were carried out with children and adults to investigate water-related experiences, water fear and competence in parents and siblings, and the relationship of water fear to other fear dimensions. Children were assessed behaviorally and by self and mother's report, adults by self-report. In neither children nor adults was there clear evidence that fearful and non-fearful groups differed in incidence of aversive water-related experience before fear onset. Parents usually believed that children's fear was present at first contact. In both samples, we found parent-offspring and sibling resemblances in fear. Analysis of details of children's contact with parents suggested that social learning within the family decreased water fear rather than increasing it; when both child and parent showed fear, that was as likely to reflect genetic influences as modeling. Young children's water fear forms part of a generic cluster, fear of the Unknown or Danger, while in adults it becomes independent of generic fears.

  17. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors in children and young adults: a clinicopathologic, molecular, and genomic study of 15 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Sonam; Sarran, Lisa; Socci, Nicholas; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Eisenstat, Jonathan; Greco, Alba M; Maki, Robert G; Wexler, Leonard H; LaQuaglia, Michael P; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2005-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are mesenchymal tumors of the intestinal tract that typically occur in adults over the age of 40 years. GISTs in younger patients are rare and not well characterized. The objective was to define the characteristics of GISTs in children and young adults (<30 years old). Clinicopathologic and molecular features, including KIT/PDGFRA genotype, in GISTs from 5 children and 10 young adults were analyzed. Gene expression analysis was performed on 5 gastric tumor samples from 2 children, 2 gastric tumors from young adults, and 10 gastric GISTs from older adults using an U133A Affymetrix platform (22,000 genes). All five pediatric GISTs occurred in girls, involved the stomach as multiple nodules, showed predominantly an epithelioid morphology, often involved lymph nodes, and lacked KIT or PDGFRA mutations. Although all five patients developed recurrence (four in the liver, three in the peritoneum, and two in both sites), four are still alive with disease. Of the 10 GISTs in young adults, half occurred in the small bowel and had spindle cell morphology, and one case had lymph node metastasis. KIT mutations were identified in seven cases, four in exon 11 and three in exon 9. Seven patients developed recurrence, and at last follow-up two patients had died of disease. Gene expression analysis showed high expression of PHKA1, FZD2, NLGN4, IGF1R, and ANK3 in the pediatric and young adult versus older adult cases. GISTs that occur in children are a separate clinicopathologic and molecular subset with predilection for girls, multifocal gastric tumors, and wild-type KIT/PDGFRA genotype. In contrast, GISTs in young adults are a more heterogeneous group, including cases that resemble either the pediatric or the older adult-type tumors. The distinct gene expression profile suggests avenues for investigation of pathogenesis and potential therapeutic strategies.

  18. Differences in axial segment reorientation during standing turns predict multiple falls in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rachel L; Peters, Derek M; Robinson, Paul D; Sitch, Alice J; Watt, Thomas N; Hollands, Mark A

    2012-07-01

    The assessment of standing turning performance is proposed to predict fall risk in older adults. This study investigated differences in segmental coordination during a 360° standing turn task between older community-dwelling fallers and non-fallers. Thirty-five older adults age mean (SD) of 71 (5.4) years performed 360° standing turns. Head, trunk and pelvis position relative to the laboratory and each other were recorded using a Vicon motion analysis system. Fall incidence was monitored by monthly questionnaire over the following 12 months and used to identify non-faller, single faller and multiple faller groups. Multiple fallers were found to have significantly different values, when compared to non-fallers, for pelvis onset (p=0.002); mean angular separation in the transverse plane between the head and trunk (p=0.018); peak angular separation in the transverse plane between the trunk and pelvis (p=0.013); and mean angular separation between the trunk and pelvis (pfalls show a simplified turning pattern to assist in balance control. This may be a predictor for those at increased risk of falling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for Urolithiasis Between Children and Adults: A Single Centre Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assad, Salman; Rahat Aleman Bhatti, Joshua; Hasan, Aisha; Shabbir, Muhammad Usman; Akhter, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for urolithiasis and compare the results between children and adults. Materials and methods From January 2011 to January 2015 (four years), ESWL was performed in 104 children and 300 adults for urolithiasis. MODULITH® SLX-F2 lithotripter (Storz Medical AG, Tägerwilen, Switzerland) equipment was used for ESWL. The stone-free rates, the number of ESWL sessions required, complication rates and ancillary procedures used were evaluated in a comparative manner. Results The mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of children was 7.84±4.22 years and of adults was a 40.22±1.57 years. Mean ± SD of the stone size was 1.28±61 cm in the adults while 1.08 ± 0.59 cm in the children. In adults, the complications included steinstrasse in six (1.98%) patients, fever in 15 (4.95%), hematuria in 19 (6.28%) and sepsis in six (1.98%) patients. In children, steinstrasse was observed in two (1.9%), mild fever in two (1.9%), hematuria in six (5.7%) and sepsis was seen in four (3.8%) patients. The overall complication rate in the adults and in the children, it was found to be 46/300 (15%) and in the children, it was seen to be 14/104 (13%). No statistical difference was found in post-ESWL complications between children and adults (P>0.05). Ancillary procedures including double J (DJ) stent were used in 13 (12.5%) children and 87 (29%) adults. There was a better stone clearance rate in children i.e. 79% as compared to 68% in adults (X2: P=0.036). Conclusion Children can achieve high stone-free rates after ESWL with a lower need for repeat ancillary procedures as compared to adults. However, there is a difference in the post-ESWL complications between these groups. PMID:27800291

  20. Children and adults use physical size and numerical alliances in third-party judgments of dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella F Lourenco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans and other social animals interact regularly with conspecifics as part of affiliative groups. Many of these interactions are cooperative, but many others involve competition for resources. Competitive exchanges are often resolved on the basis of dominance relationships, with higher-ranking individuals receiving priority access to desired goods. Although no single cue can establish permanent dominance relationships, there are some cues that predict dominance fairly reliably across context. In the present study, we focused on two such cues relevant to competing groups: (i the physical sizes of individual members, and (ii their relative number. Using a social competition task, we examined whether, and how, preschool-aged children and adults used differences in physical size and numerical alliances to judge which of two groups should prevail in a competitive exchange for a desired object. These judgments were made when either physical size or number differed between groups (Experiment 1, and when both were available but pitted against each other (Experiments 1 and 2. Our findings revealed that by 3 years of age, humans use multiple perceptible cues in third-party judgments of dominance. Our findings also revealed that 3-year-olds, like adults, weighted these cues flexibly according to the additional factor of overall group size, with the physical sizes of individuals determining dominance in smaller groups (e.g., 2 vs. 4 characters and the relative number of individuals determining dominance in larger groups (e.g., 15 vs. 30 characters. Taken together, our findings suggest that a basic formula for determining dominance in competitive exchanges, which weights physical size of individuals and numerical alliances as a function of overall group size, is available to young children and appears fairly stable through to adulthood.

  1. Children and Adults Use Physical Size and Numerical Alliances in Third-Party Judgments of Dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, Stella F; Bonny, Justin W; Schwartz, Bari L

    2015-01-01

    Humans and other social animals interact regularly with conspecifics as part of affiliative groups. Many of these interactions are cooperative, but many others involve competition for resources. Competitive exchanges are often resolved on the basis of dominance relationships, with higher-ranking individuals receiving priority access to desired goods. Although no single cue can establish permanent dominance relationships, there are some cues that predict dominance fairly reliably across context. In the present study, we focused on two such cues relevant to competing groups: (i) the physical sizes of individual members, and (ii) their relative number. Using a social competition task, we examined whether, and how, preschool-aged children and adults used differences in physical size and numerical alliances to judge which of two groups should prevail in a competitive exchange for a desired object. These judgments were made when either physical size or number differed between groups (Experiment 1), and when both were available but pitted against each other (Experiments 1 and 2). Our findings revealed that by 3 years of age, humans use multiple perceptible cues in third-party judgments of dominance. Our findings also revealed that 3-year-olds, like adults, weighted these cues flexibly according to the additional factor of overall group size, with the physical sizes of individuals determining dominance in smaller groups (e.g., 2 vs. 4 characters) and the relative number of individuals determining dominance in larger groups (e.g., 15 vs. 30 characters). Taken together, our findings suggest that a basic formula for determining dominance in competitive exchanges, which weights physical size of individuals and numerical alliances as a function of overall group size, is available to young children and appears fairly stable through to adulthood.

  2. Windows to the Soul: Children and Adults See the Eyes as the Location of the Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starmans, Christina; Bloom, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Where are we? In three experiments, we explore preschoolers' and adults' intuitions about the location of the self using a novel method that asks when an object is closet to a person. Children and adults judge objects near a person's eyes to be closer to her than objects near other parts of her body. This holds even when considering an alien…

  3. The Comparative Effects of Adults and Peer Group Influence on Children's Moral Judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, M.; Boyes, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, little support is found for Piaget's claim that with increasing peer group interaction adult authority becomes less legitimate to the child. It is suggested that the adult exerts increasing influence with age on children's moral judgment and, therefore, emphasis on peer-centered moral education may be misdirected. (Author/SJL)

  4. Notable Books in Spanish for Children and Young Adults from Spanish-Speaking Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Isabel

    1985-01-01

    Presents a bibliography of books recently published in Mexico, Spain, Argentina, and Peru for Spanish-speaking children and young adults. The books are grouped by the following levels: (1) preschool and primary grades; (2) grades 3 to 6; (3) junior high and up; and (4) young adult. (SED)

  5. The Role of Modality and Register in Imitation by Adults and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Nancy Ann

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that both adults and children will imitate acoustic properties of the speech around them. In fact, studies on adults have shown that this convergence occurs even when the subject simply sees, but does not hear, the interlocutor. Not only does visual speech elicit imitation on its own, but also imitation is greater for…

  6. Ego Is a Hurdle in Second Language Learning: A Contrastive Study between Adults and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Shumaila; Akhter, Javed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research paper is to find out by comparing and contrasting between the adults and children in second language learning process how language ego of adult learners affects them to learn second language, and how it becomes a barrier for them in second language learning process. Nowadays learning English as foreign and second language…

  7. Autonomy in an ascribed relationship: the case of adult children and elderly parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Stuifbergen (Marja); P.A. Dykstra (Pearl); K.N. Lanting (Katja); J.J.M. van Delden (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Demographic and cultural changes have given rise to the question of whether adult children will continue to provide support to their elderly parents. In a qualitative study among selected respondents from a large representative sample, we investigated the motivations of adult

  8. Children's and Adults' Recall of Sex-Stereotyped Toy Pictures: Effects of Presentation and Memory Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Isabelle D.

    2005-01-01

    Gender schema theories predict a memory bias toward sex-congruent information. The present study examined how presentation of stimuli and encoding conditions influence gender schematic processing in children and adults. One hundred and sixty 5- to 13-year olds and adult males and females viewed 36 sex-stereotyped toy pictures that were presented…

  9. Adult Children of Divorce and Intimate Relationships: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Teresa M.; Brooks, Morgan C.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research specific to the effects of parental divorce on adults in terms of relationship issues. Specific purposes of this review are to (a) explore research specific to intimacy and marital attitudes in adult children of divorce, (b) inform couple and family counselors of effects of parental divorce, and (c) relay implications for…

  10. Children-Adult Comparisons of VO2 and HR Kinetics during Submaximum Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sady, Stanley P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Oxygen uptake and heart rate kinetics for submaximum exercise (bicycle riding) were compared in prepubescent boys and adult men. Resulting data suggest that children and adults do not differ significantly in cardiorespiratory adjustments during low-intensity exercise. (Authors/PP)

  11. Training Teaching Staff to Facilitate Spontaneous Communication in Children with Autism: Adult Interactive Style Intervention (AISI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossyvaki, Lila; Jones, Glenys; Guldberg, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the way adults interact with children with autism can have a great impact on their spontaneous communication. However, to date, few studies have focused on modifying adults' behaviour and even fewer have been conducted in school settings which actively involve teaching staff in designing the intervention.…

  12. Moving close to parents and adult children in the Netherlands: the influence of support needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the extent to which support needs lead to moves of adult children (aged 30 and above) to within one kilometer of their parents and vice versa is examined. Using Netherlands population data from 2004 and 2005, it is found that the divorce of the adult child increases the likelihood of

  13. Implicit Racial Biases in Preschool Children and Adults from Asia and Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Miao K.; Heyman, Gail D.; Quinn, Paul C.; Messi, Francoise A.; Fu, Genyue; Lee, Kang

    2016-01-01

    This research used an Implicit Racial Bias Test to investigate implicit racial biases among 3- to 5-year-olds and adult participants in China (N = 213) and Cameroon (N = 257). In both cultures, participants displayed high levels of racial biases that remained stable between 3 and 5 years of age. Unlike adults, young children's implicit racial…

  14. Predicting Speech Intelligibility with a Multiple Speech Subsystems Approach in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimin; Hustad, Katherine C.; Weismer, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speech acoustic characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with a multiple speech subsystems approach; speech intelligibility was evaluated using a prediction model in which acoustic measures were selected to represent three speech subsystems. Method: Nine acoustic variables reflecting different subsystems, and…

  15. Helping Children Learn Mathematics through Multiple Intelligences and Standards for School Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Thomasenia Lott

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics 2000 process-oriented standards of problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication, connections, and representation as providing a framework for using the multiple intelligences that children bring to mathematics learning. Presents ideas for mathematics lessons and activities to…

  16. Supporting children when providing services to families experiencing multiple problems : Perspectives and evidence on programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knorth, Erik J.; Knot-Dickscheit, Jana; Thoburn, June

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest amongst researchers, practitioners and policy-makers in approaches to understanding and ways of helping parents, children and the communities in which they live to respond to ‘families experiencing multiple problems’ (FEMPs). There is a strong need for

  17. Influence of Number Size, Problem Structure and Response Mode on Children's Solutions of Multiplication Word Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Corte, E.; And Others

    One important finding from recent research on multiplication word problems is that children's performances are strongly affected by the nature of the multiplier (whether it is an integer, decimal larger than 1 or a decimal smaller than 1). On the other hand, the size of the multiplicand has little or no effect on problem difficulty. The aim of the…

  18. Pinch Strengths in Healthy Iranian Children and Young Adult Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Dianat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data on the physical strength capabilities are essential for design-ing safe and usable products and are useful in a wide range of clinical settings especially during treatment of disease affecting the function of the hand. The purpose of this study was to determine peak lateral pinch strength, key pinch strength, tip-to-tip pinch strength and three-jaw pinch strength exertions in a healthy Iranian children and young adult population.Methods: The study was conducted among 511 participants (242 males and 269 females aged 7-30 years. Measurements were carried out with both dominant and non-dominant hands in standard sitting posture using a B&L pinch gauge. Two repetitions of each strength measurement were recorded for each condition and the average value of the two trials was used in the subsequent analysis.Results: The results showed significant differences in the pinch strength data in terms of the age, gender and hand dominance. The lateral pinch strength, key pinch strength, tip-to-tip pinch strength and three-jaw pinch strength exertions by females were 68.4%, 68.8%, 78.8% and 81.8% of those exerted by males, respectively. Strength exertions with the non-dominant hand were 6.4%, 5.2%, 6.6% and 5.1% lower than strength exertions of the dominant hand for the lat-eral pinch strength, key pinch strength, tip-to-tip pinch strength and three-jaw pinch strength exertions, respectively.Conclusion: These findings can be used to fill the gaps in strength data for Iranian population.

  19. Optimal Dosing of Miltefosine in Children and Adults with Visceral Leishmaniasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorlo, Thomas P. C.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Beijnen, Jos H.; de Vries, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Only anecdotal data are available on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of miltefosine in children suffering from visceral leishmaniasis (VL). While failure rates were higher in children with VL, steady-state concentrations appeared lower than those seen with adults. We hypothesized that the current linear

  20. Children with Autism Detect Targets at Very Rapid Presentation Rates with Similar Accuracy as Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Carl Erick; Wyble, Bradley; Shea, Nicole; LeBlanc, Megan; Kates, Wendy R.; Russo, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced perception may allow for visual search superiority by individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but does it occur over time? We tested high-functioning children with ASD, typically developing (TD) children, and TD adults in two tasks at three presentation rates (50, 83.3, and 116.7 ms/item) using rapid serial visual presentation.…

  1. Building the bridge between rhabdomyosarcoma in children, adolescents and young adults : The road ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gaal, J. Carlijn; De Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Kaal, Suzanne E. J.; Versleijen-Jonkers, Yvonne; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a rare type of soft tissue sarcoma that mainly affects children, but also occurs in adolescents and (young) adults (AYA). Despite dramatic survival improvements reported by international study groups in children over the past decades, the awareness of a dismal outcome for

  2. Existence as a Psychological Problem: Object Permanence in Adults and Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotskii, E. V.

    1991-01-01

    Examines perceptions of adults compared with preschool children in assuming object permanence or discontinuity of existence when an object is removed from their immediate perceptual field. Results showed that a belief in the possibility of the discontinuity of material objects is not unique to the minds of preschool children but can also be…

  3. Children's and Adults' Predictions of Black, White, and Multiracial Friendship Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Steven O.; Williams, Amber D.; Gelman, Susan A.

    2017-01-01

    Cross-race friendships can promote the development of positive racial attitudes, yet they are relatively uncommon and decline with age. In an effort to further our understanding of the extent to which children expect cross-race friendships to occur, we examined 4- to 6-year-olds' (and adults') use of race when predicting other children's…

  4. Children's, Adolescents', and Adults' Judgments and Reasoning about Different Methods of Teaching Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helwig, Charles C.; Ryerson, Rachel; Prencipe, Angela

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated children's, adolescents', and young adults' judgments and reasoning about teaching two values (racial equality and patriotism) using methods that varied in provision for children's rational autonomy, active involvement, and choice. Ninety-six participants (7-8-, 10-11-, and 13-14-year-olds, and college students) evaluated…

  5. Relationships between fathers and adult children: The cumulative effects of divorce and repartnering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmijn, M.

    2015-01-01

    New data from a national Dutch survey are used to examine the effects of divorce and repartnering on the relationships that fathers have with their adult children. Compared with divorced fathers who live alone, repartnered fathers have less frequent contact with their children, they exchange less

  6. Relationships between fathers and adult children: the cumulative effects of divorce and repartnering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmijn, M.

    2015-01-01

    New data from a national Dutch survey are used to examine the effects of divorce and repartnering on the relationships that fathers have with their adult children. Compared with divorced fathers who live alone, repartnered fathers have less frequent contact with their children, they exchange less

  7. Language Proficiency and Executive Control in Proactive Interference: Evidence from Monolingual and Bilingual Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialystok, Ellen; Feng, Xiaojia

    2009-01-01

    Two studies are reported in which monolingual and bilingual children (Study 1) and adults (Study 2) completed a memory task involving proactive interference. In both cases, the bilinguals attained lower scores on a vocabulary test than monolinguals but performed the same on the proactive interference task. For the children, bilinguals made fewer…

  8. Nightmare Help: A Guide for Adults Working with Children (Slide Talk).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Ann Sayre

    This slide talk offers advice to adults to help children cope with nightmares. Children are encouraged (1) to assume power over the dream by drawing it; (2) separate the frightened part of the self from the problem-solving self; (3) let the picture describe the problem; (4) ask the picture to speak; (5) see how the dreamer's power matches the…

  9. Posttraumatic stress symptoms among adults caring for orphaned children in HIV-endemic South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Caroline; Reddy, Madhavi K; Operario, Don; Cluver, Lucie; Stein, Dan J

    2013-06-01

    There is growing evidence that mental health is a significant issue among families affected by AIDS-related parental deaths. The current study examined posttraumatic stress symptoms and identified risk factors among adults caring for AIDS-orphaned and other-orphaned children in an HIV-endemic South African community. A representative community sample of adults caring for children (N = 1,599) was recruited from Umlazi Township. Of the 116 participants who reported that a traumatic event was still bothering them, 19 % reported clinically significant posttraumatic stress symptoms. Of the 116 participants, caregivers of AIDS-orphaned and other-orphaned children were significantly more likely to meet threshold criteria for PTSD (28 %) compared to caregivers of non-orphaned children (10 %). Household receipt of an old age pension was identified as a possible protective factor for PTSD symptoms among caregivers of orphaned children. Services are needed to address PTSD symptoms among caregivers of orphaned children.

  10. Predictive genetic testing in children and adults: a study of emotional impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, S; Bobrow, M; Marteau, T M

    2001-08-01

    To determine whether, following predictive genetic testing for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), children or adults receiving positive results experience clinically significant levels of anxiety or depression, and whether children receiving positive results experience higher levels of anxiety or depression than adults receiving positive results. Two studies, one cross sectional and one prospective. 208 unaffected subjects (148 adults and 60 children) at risk for FAP who have undergone genetic testing since 1990. anxiety, depression; independent variables: test results, demographic measures, psychological resources (optimism, self-esteem). Study 1. In children receiving positive results, mean scores for anxiety and depression were within the normal range. There was a trend for children receiving positive results to be more anxious and depressed than those receiving negative results. In adults, mean scores for anxiety were within the normal range for those receiving negative results, but were in the clinical range for those receiving positive results, with 43% (95% CI 23-65) of the latter having scores in this range. Regardless of test result, adults were more likely to be clinically anxious if they were low in optimism or self-esteem. Children receiving positive or negative results did not experience greater anxiety or depression than adults. Study 2. For children receiving a positive test result, mean scores for anxiety, depression, and self-esteem were unchanged over the year following the result, while mean anxiety scores decreased and self-esteem increased after receipt of a negative test result over the same period of time. Children, as a group, did not show clinically significant distress over the first year following predictive genetic testing. Adults were more likely to be clinically anxious if they received a positive result or were low in optimism or self-esteem, with interacting effects. The association between anxiety, self-esteem, and optimism

  11. Do Multiple Forms of Social Capital Mediate the Relationship Between Parental Violence and Children's Maladaptive Behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwon; Lee, Yanghee

    2018-03-01

    Many things can harm children's well-being. Among them, exposure to parental violence makes children vulnerable and often leads to aggression and/or depression. However, not all children who have suffered parental violence show aggressive behavior or depressive mood. Social capital, defined as resources accruing from interpersonal relationships, was proposed to significantly mediate the relationships among adverse experiences and their negative impacts. In previous studies, social capital accrued from parents played a positive role for children in violent situations, but children exposed to parental violence need alternative sources of social capital. This study targeted fourth-grade Korean children and aimed to identify and test the role of various forms of social capital to help children overcome negative consequences from parental violence. Siblings, friends, teachers, neighbors, and online acquaintances were sources of social capital, and the results showed that social capital from siblings, teachers, neighbors, or online acquaintances mediated in the relationships between parental violence and aggressive behavior. In addition, social capital from siblings and online acquaintances mediated in the relationships between parental violence and depressive mood. The findings have implications in terms of intervention. It is suggested that multiple forms of social capital from children's immediate environments are helpful in their adaptation from exposure to parental violence, and thus, relationship-based interventions are recommended.

  12. Multiple-Breath Washout Outcomes Are Sensitive to Inflammation and Infection in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Foong, Rachel E; Grdosic, Jasmine; Harper, Alana; Skoric, Billy; Clem, Charles; Davis, Miriam; Turkovic, Lidija; Stick, Stephen M; Davis, Stephanie D; Ranganathan, Sarath C; Hall, Graham L

    2017-09-01

    The lung clearance index is a measure of ventilation distribution derived from the multiple-breath washout technique. The lung clearance index is increased in the presence of lower respiratory tract inflammation and infection in infants with cystic fibrosis; however, the associations during the preschool years are unknown. We assessed the ability of the lung clearance index to detect the presence and extent of lower respiratory tract inflammation and infection in preschool children with cystic fibrosis. Ventilation distribution outcomes were assessed at 82 visits with 58 children with cystic fibrosis and at 38 visits with 31 healthy children aged 3-6 years. Children with cystic fibrosis also underwent bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collection for detection of lower respiratory tract inflammation and infection. Associations between multiple-breath washout indices and the presence and extent of airway inflammation and infection were assessed using linear mixed effects models. Lung clearance index was elevated in children with cystic fibrosis (mean [SD], 8.00 [1.45]) compared with healthy control subjects (6.67 [0.56]). In cystic fibrosis, the lung clearance index was elevated in individuals with lower respiratory tract infections (difference compared with uninfected [95% confidence interval], 0.62 [0.06, 1.18]) and correlated with the extent of airway inflammation. These data suggest that the lung clearance index may be a useful surveillance tool for monitoring the presence and extent of lower airway inflammation and infection in preschool children with cystic fibrosis.

  13. Evaluation of a Multimedia Intervention for Children and Families Facing Multiple Military Deployments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flittner O'Grady, Allison; Thomaseo Burton, E; Chawla, Neelu; Topp, David; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley

    2016-02-01

    Repeated military deployments have been a common experience for many military families in the past 15 years. While there has been an increase in research and intervention focused on the effects on families of military deployments, much of this work has not focused specifically on the particular needs of young children. Talk, Listen, Connect: Multiple Deployments (TLC-II MD), a multimedia kit designed for home use, is among the first interventions directed toward young children. Created by Sesame Workshop and using popular Sesame Street characters, TLC-II MD was designed to support and equip families with young children with skills to address challenges associated with multiple deployments. This study utilized a randomized experimental design to evaluate the impact of TLC-II MD relative to a control condition using a Sesame Workshop multimedia kit not tailored to military families. Parents in both groups reported that children enjoyed the video overall and watched it repeatedly. Also in both groups, caregivers' depressive symptoms and children's aggressive behaviors declined significantly over time. Caregivers in the test group reported significantly larger increases in comfort discussing the deployment with their child and stronger perceptions that the DVD helped children to cope. Thus, the resilience-oriented materials were helpful to both groups, but those tailored to military families were significantly more likely to be perceived as helpful. Findings offer evidence regarding the ability of multimedia self-administered interventions to assist military families.

  14. How television fast food marketing aimed at children compares with adult advertisements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Bernhardt

    Full Text Available Quick service restaurant (QSR television advertisements for children's meals were compared with adult advertisements from the same companies to assess whether self-regulatory pledges for food advertisements to children had been implemented.All nationally televised advertisements for the top 25 US QSR restaurants from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010 were obtained and viewed to identify those advertising meals for children and these advertisements were compared with adult advertisements from the same companies. Content coding included visual and audio assessment of branding, toy premiums, movie tie-ins, and depictions of food. For image size comparisons, the diagonal length of the advertisement was compared with the diagonal length of salient food and drink images.Almost all of the 92 QSR children's meal advertisements that aired during the study period were attributable to McDonald's (70% or Burger King (29%; 79% of 25,000 television placements aired on just four channels (Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, Disney XD, and Nicktoons. Visual branding was more common in children's advertisements vs. adult advertisements, with food packaging present in 88% vs. 23%, and street view of the QSR restaurant present in 41% vs. 12%. Toy premiums or giveaways were present in 69% vs. 1%, and movie tie-ins present in 55% vs. 14% of children's vs. adult advertisements. Median food image diagonal length was 20% of the advertisement diagonal for children's and 45% for adult advertisements. The audio script for children's advertisements emphasized giveaways and movie tie-ins whereas adult advertisements emphasized food taste, price and portion size.Children's QSR advertisements emphasized toy giveaways and movie tie-ins rather than food products. Self-regulatory pledges to focus on actual food products instead of toy premiums were not supported by this analysis.

  15. How television fast food marketing aimed at children compares with adult advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Amy M; Wilking, Cara; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M; Bergamini, Elaina; Marijnissen, Jill; Sargent, James D

    2013-01-01

    Quick service restaurant (QSR) television advertisements for children's meals were compared with adult advertisements from the same companies to assess whether self-regulatory pledges for food advertisements to children had been implemented. All nationally televised advertisements for the top 25 US QSR restaurants from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010 were obtained and viewed to identify those advertising meals for children and these advertisements were compared with adult advertisements from the same companies. Content coding included visual and audio assessment of branding, toy premiums, movie tie-ins, and depictions of food. For image size comparisons, the diagonal length of the advertisement was compared with the diagonal length of salient food and drink images. Almost all of the 92 QSR children's meal advertisements that aired during the study period were attributable to McDonald's (70%) or Burger King (29%); 79% of 25,000 television placements aired on just four channels (Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, Disney XD, and Nicktoons). Visual branding was more common in children's advertisements vs. adult advertisements, with food packaging present in 88% vs. 23%, and street view of the QSR restaurant present in 41% vs. 12%. Toy premiums or giveaways were present in 69% vs. 1%, and movie tie-ins present in 55% vs. 14% of children's vs. adult advertisements. Median food image diagonal length was 20% of the advertisement diagonal for children's and 45% for adult advertisements. The audio script for children's advertisements emphasized giveaways and movie tie-ins whereas adult advertisements emphasized food taste, price and portion size. Children's QSR advertisements emphasized toy giveaways and movie tie-ins rather than food products. Self-regulatory pledges to focus on actual food products instead of toy premiums were not supported by this analysis.

  16. Children's Stereotypes of Older Adults: Evaluating Contributions of Cognitive Development and Social Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineweaver, Tara T.; Roy, Ashley; Horth, Madison

    2017-01-01

    Past research has investigated the development of stereotypes surrounding race and gender in children; however, there is a lack of literature examining the development of children's stereotypes of older adults. In this study, 163 children from four grades: first (n = 44), fourth (n = 49), fifth (n = 35), and eighth (n = 35) completed a new…

  17. ADHD and maturation of brain white matter: A DTI study in medication naive children and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheima Bouziane

    2018-01-01

    In contrast to prior studies conducted in medicated ADHD children, we did not find WM alterations in stimulant treatment naïve children, only treatment-naïve adults. Thus, our findings suggest that the reported developmental delay in WM might appear after childhood, and that previously reported differences between ADHD children and normal developing peers could have been attributed to prior ADHD medications, and/or other factors that affect WM development, such as age and gender.

  18. Correlates of self-reported quality of life in adults and children from the Morphea in Adults and Children cohort I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shinjita; Bernstein, Ira; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Background Determining a disease's impact on life quality is important in clinical decision making, research, and resource allocation. Determinants of quality of life (QOL) in morphea are poorly understood. Objective We sought to ascertain demographic and clinical variables correlated with negative impact on self-reported QOL in morphea. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of the Morphea in Adults and Children cohort. Results Symptoms (pruritus and pain) and functional impairment were correlated with decreased QOL in children and adults. This was true in both sexes and was independent of subtype and age. Patient-reported QOL correlated with physician-based measures of disease severity in adults, but not in children. Patients with linear and generalized morphea had the greatest impact on QOL. Limitations Small sample size is a limitation. Conclusion Symptoms and functional impairment were determinants of impaired life quality in both children and adults independent of morphea subtype. These results suggest that clinicians should consider suppressing the accumulation of new lesions (when rapidly accumulating) and symptoms (pain and pruritus) in the treatment of patients with morphea. PMID:24534655

  19. Sex differences in parents' estimations of their own and their children's multiple intelligences: a Portuguese replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Félix; Furnham, Adrian

    2011-05-01

    In this study, 148 Portuguese adults (M = 45.4 years) rated themselves and their children on overall IQ and on H. Gardner (1999) 10 intelligence subtypes. Men's self-estimates were not significantly higher than women's on any of the 11 estimates. The results were in line with previous studies, in that both sexes rated the overall intelligence of their first male children higher than the first female children. Higher parental IQ self-estimates correspond with higher IQ estimates for children. Globally parents estimated that their sons had significantly higher IQs than their daughters. In particular, parents rated their son's spiritual intelligence higher than those of their daughters. Children's age and sex, and parents' age and sex were all non-significant predictors of the overall "g" score estimates of the first two children. Participants thought verbal, mathematical, and spatial intelligence were the best indicators of the overall intelligence for self and children. There were no sex differences in experience of, or attitudes towards, intelligence testing. Results are discussed in terms of the growing literature in the self-estimates of intelligence, as well as limitations of that approach.

  20. Research Priorities to Advance the Health and Health Care of Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisminetzky, Mayra; Bayliss, Elizabeth A; Magaziner, Jay S; Allore, Heather G; Anzuoni, Kathryn; Boyd, Cynthia M; Gill, Thomas M; Go, Alan S; Greenspan, Susan L; Hanson, Leah R; Hornbrook, Mark C; Kitzman, Dalane W; Larson, Eric B; Naylor, Mary D; Shirley, Benjamin E; Tai-Seale, Ming; Teri, Linda; Tinetti, Mary E; Whitson, Heather E; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2017-07-01

    To prioritize research topics relevant to the care of the growing population of older adults with multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). Survey of experts in MCC practice, research, and policy. Topics were derived from white papers, funding announcements, or funded research projects relating to older adults with MCCs. Survey conducted through the Health Care Systems Research Network (HCSRN) and Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Centers (OAICs) Advancing Geriatrics Infrastructure and Network Growth Initiative, a joint endeavor of the HCSRN and OAICs. Individuals affiliated with the HCSRN or OAICs and national MCC experts, including individuals affiliated with funding agencies having MCC-related grant portfolios. A "top box" methodology was used, counting the number of respondents selecting the top response on a 5-point Likert scale and dividing by the total number of responses to calculate a top box percentage for each of 37 topics. The highest-ranked research topics relevant to the health and healthcare of older adults with MCCs were health-related quality of life in older adults with MCCs; development of assessment tools (to assess, e.g., symptom burden, quality of life, function); interactions between medications, disease processes, and health outcomes; disability; implementation of novel (and scalable) models of care; association between clusters of chronic conditions and clinical, financial, and social outcomes; role of caregivers; symptom burden; shared decision-making to enhance care planning; and tools to improve clinical decision-making. Study findings serve to inform the development of a comprehensive research agenda to address the challenges relating to the care of this "high-need, high-cost" population and the healthcare delivery systems responsible for serving it. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. NEUROPHYSIOLOGY PARAMETERS IN DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS AND ACUTE DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Voitenkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our research objective was to evaluate the importance of neurophysiological methods in diagnosing the state of visual, somatosensory and motor pathways condition in the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM in children.Materials and methods. Twenty-four children with a debut of multiple sclerosis, 15 children with debute of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and 20 neurologically healthy children of the comparison group were examined. All patients were evaluated by neurologist, brain MRI and CSF analysis (isoelectrofocusing to oligoclonal IgG, oligoclonal bands test, visual evoked potentials (VEP, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP.Results. In children with MS asymmetry of the conduction along the motor pathways on the spinal level was higher than in patients with ADEM and controls, functional state of somatosensory cortex neurons was lower and conduction along somatosensory pathways on the spinal level was slower – all differences significant. According to the visual evoked potentials, in more than half of the cases, there was an increase in the latency of the P100 peak. Also in MS group there was a significant disruption of the visual pathway in 54% of the cases. Neurophysiological changes in 58% of cases were demyelinating, and violations of the axonal type occurred in 37% of cases.Conclusions. Neurophysiological diagnostic methods such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, visual evoked potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials are highly informative for the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. More pronounced spinal lesions in early stages of MS than in ADEM in children may be the cause of the neurophysiologic differences, and prevalence of the sensory system involvement at this stage may be the reason behind more extended SSEP abnormalities comparing with TMS. VEP changes may reflect primary

  2. Children Have the Capacity to Think Multiplicatively, as long as …

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Hurst

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiplicative thinking has been widely accepted as a critically important ‘big idea’ of mathematics and one which underpins much mathematical understanding beyond the primary years of schooling. It is therefore of importance to consider the capacity of children to think multiplicatively but also to consider the capacity of their teachers to teach multiplicative thinking in a conceptual manner. This article focusses specifically on the conceptual links between the multiplicative array, the notion of numbers of equal groups in the multiplicative situation, factors and multiples, the commutative property of multiplication, and the inverse relationship between multiplication and division. A study involving a large sample of primary school students found that whilst most students demonstrated an understanding of some of the aforementioned elements, hardly any of the students were able to connect the ideas or to explain them in terms of each other. As a consequence of the findings, the impact of teacher knowledge on children’s capacity to think multiplicatively was considered.

  3. Examining the trajectories of children providing care for adults in rural Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovdal, Morten

    2011-01-01

    whom they have cared for over time and explore the different pathways that lead to their caregiving at different stages of their lives. The study reports on qualitative data collected from 48 caregiving children and 10 adults in the Bondo district of western Kenya in 2007. A multi-method approach...... family and community members for varying periods of time and intensities. Although their living arrangements and life circumstances often gave them little choice but to care, a social recognition of children's capacity to provide care for fragile adults, helped the children construct an identity, which...

  4. Children's and adults' judgments of the certainty of deductive inferences, inductive inferences, and guesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillow, Bradford H; Pearson, Raeanne M; Hecht, Mary; Bremer, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Children and adults rated their own certainty following inductive inferences, deductive inferences, and guesses. Beginning in kindergarten, participants rated deductions as more certain than weak inductions or guesses. Deductions were rated as more certain than strong inductions beginning in Grade 3, and fourth-grade children and adults differentiated strong inductions, weak inductions, and informed guesses from pure guesses. By Grade 3, participants also gave different types of explanations for their deductions and inductions. These results are discussed in relation to children's concepts of cognitive processes, logical reasoning, and epistemological development.

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging study comparing rhythmic finger tapping in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guio, François; Jacobson, Sandra W; Molteno, Christopher D; Jacobson, Joseph L; Meintjes, Ernesta M

    2012-02-01

    This study compared brain activation during unpaced rhythmic finger tapping in 12-year-old children with that of adults. Subjects pressed a button at a pace initially indicated by a metronome (12 consecutive tones), and then continued for 16 seconds of unpaced tapping to provide an assessment of their ability to maintain a steady rhythm. These analyses focused on the superior vermis of the cerebellum, which is known to play a key role in timing. Twelve adults and 12 children performed this rhythmic finger tapping task in a 3 T scanner. Whole-brain analyses were performed in Brain Voyager, with a random-effects analysis of variance using a general linear model. A dedicated cerebellar atlas was used to localize cerebellar activations. As in adults, unpaced rhythmic finger tapping in children demonstrated activations in the primary motor cortex, premotor cortex, and cerebellum. However, overall activation was different, in that adults demonstrated much more deactivation in response to the task, particularly in the occipital and frontal cortices. The other main differences involved the additional recruitment of motor and premotor areas in children compared with adults, and increased activity in the vermal region of the cerebellum. These findings suggest that the timing component of the unpaced rhythmic finger tapping task is less efficient and automatic in children, who need to recruit the superior vermis more intensively to maintain the rhythm, although they performed somewhat more poorly than adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Colour preference between adults and children during a dental treatment session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner Ozdas, Didem; Kazak, Magrur

    2017-02-01

    It is evidently shown that colour has physical, psychological and sociological effects on human beings. There are many studies showing the effects of colours on brain activity. Colour preferences may change from childhood to adulthood and are significantly different in various age groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adults and children in their preference for mouthrinses in various colours under stress condition during a dental treatment session. 240 adults and 263 children were included in the study. Three transparent cups were filled with water, two of which were coloured green/pink rinsing by dissolving a tablet in the water. Cups were placed near the dental unit. During dental treatment sessions, patients were told to rinse their mouth with whichever cup they preferred. Preferred colour of cup, gender and age of patient, number of sessions were recorded. Data were statistically analysed by SPSS 15.0 programme and chi-square tests. Half of all cases preferred water. In adults, while females statistically significantly preferred water, males chose cups with coloured contents (pcoloured contents in multi-dental treatment sessions, children regularly preferred water (pcolours of cups affected choices made by adults and children. Female adults and children were not interested in trying colourful mouthrinses, while male adults were curious about trying colourful mouthrinses during dental treatment sessions under stress condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Predicting remembering and forgetting of autobiographical memories in children and adults: a 4-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Patricia J; Larkina, Marina

    2016-11-01

    Preservation and loss to forgetting of autobiographical memories is a focus in both the adult and developmental literatures. In both, there are comparative arguments regarding rates of forgetting. Children are assumed to forget autobiographical memories more rapidly than adults, and younger children are assumed to forget more rapidly than older children. Yet few studies can directly inform these comparisons: few feature children and adults, and few prospectively track the survival of specific autobiographical memories over time. In a 4-year prospective study, we obtained autobiographical memories from children 4, 6, and 8 years, and adults. We tested recall of different subsets of the events after 1, 2, and 3 years. Accelerated rates of forgetting were apparent among all child groups relative to adults; within the child groups, 4- and 6-year-olds had accelerated forgetting relative to 8-year-olds. The differences were especially pronounced in open-ended recall. The thematic coherence of initial memory reports also was a significant predictor of the survival of specific memories. The pattern of findings is consistent with suggestions that the adult distribution of autobiographical memories is achieved as the quality of memory traces increases (here measured by thematic coherence) and the rate of forgetting decreases.

  8. Predicting remembering and forgetting of autobiographical memories in children and adults: A 4-year prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Larkina, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Preservation and loss to forgetting of autobiographical memories is a focus in both the adult and developmental literatures. In both, there are comparative arguments regarding rates of forgetting. Children are assumed to forget autobiographical memories more rapidly than adults, and younger children are assumed to forget more rapidly than older children. Yet few studies can directly inform these comparisons: few feature children and adults, and few prospectively track the survival of specific autobiographical memories over time. In a 4-year prospective study, we obtained autobiographical memories from children 4, 6, and 8 years, and adults. We tested recall of different subsets of the events after 1, 2, and 3 years. Accelerated rates of forgetting were apparent among all child groups relative to adults; within the child groups, 4- and 6-year-olds had accelerated forgetting relative to 8-year-olds. The differences were especially pronounced in open-ended recall. The thematic coherence of initial memory reports also was a significant predictor of the survival of specific memories. The pattern of findings is consistent with suggestions that the adult distribution of autobiographical memories is achieved as the quality of memory traces increases (here measured by thematic coherence) and the rate of forgetting decreases. PMID:26566236

  9. Developmental aspects of fear: Comparing the acquisition and generalization of conditioned fear in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Miriam A; Reinhard, Julia; Reif, Andreas; Domschke, Katharina; Romanos, Marcel; Deckert, Jürgen; Pauli, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Most research on human fear conditioning and its generalization has focused on adults whereas only little is known about these processes in children. Direct comparisons between child and adult populations are needed to determine developmental risk markers of fear and anxiety. We compared 267 children and 285 adults in a differential fear conditioning paradigm and generalization test. Skin conductance responses (SCR) and ratings of valence and arousal were obtained to indicate fear learning. Both groups displayed robust and similar differential conditioning on subjective and physiological levels. However, children showed heightened fear generalization compared to adults as indexed by higher arousal ratings and SCR to the generalization stimuli. Results indicate overgeneralization of conditioned fear as a developmental correlate of fear learning. The developmental change from a shallow to a steeper generalization gradient is likely related to the maturation of brain structures that modulate efficient discrimination between danger and (ambiguous) safety cues. © 2016 The Authors. Developmental Psychobiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Perceptual Learning of Intonation Contour Categories in Adults and 9- to 11-Year-Old Children: Adults Are More Narrow-Minded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapatsinski, Vsevolod; Olejarczuk, Paul; Redford, Melissa A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on rapid perceptual learning of intonation contour categories in adults and 9- to 11-year-old children. Intonation contours are temporally extended patterns, whose perception requires temporal integration and therefore poses significant working memory challenges. Both children and adults form relatively abstract representations of…

  11. Systematic review of nutrient intake and growth in children with multiple IgE-mediated food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sova, Cassandra; Feuling, Mary Beth; Baumler, Megan; Gleason, Linda; Tam, Jonathan S; Zafra, Heidi; Goday, Praveen S

    2013-12-01

    Food allergies affect up to 8% of American children. The current recommended treatment for food allergies is strict elimination of the allergens from the diet. Dietary elimination of nutrient-dense foods may result in inadequate nutrient intake and impaired growth. The purpose of this review was to critically analyze available research on the effect of an elimination diet on nutrient intake and growth in children with multiple food allergies. A systematic review of the literature was conducted and a workgroup was established to critically analyze each relevant article. The findings were summarized and a conclusion was generated. Six studies were analyzed. One study found that children with food allergies are more likely to be malnourished than children without food allergies. Three studies found that children with multiple food allergies were shorter than children with 1 food allergy. Four studies assessed nutrient intake of children with multiple food allergies, but the inclusion and comparison criteria were different in each of the studies and the findings were conflicting. One study found that children with food allergies who did not receive nutrition counseling were more likely to have inadequate intake of calcium and vitamin D. Children with multiple food allergies have a higher risk of impaired growth and may have a higher risk of inadequate nutrient intake than children without food allergies. Until more research is available, we recommend monitoring of nutrition and growth of children with multiple food allergies to prevent possible nutrient deficiencies and to optimize growth.

  12. Scapular positioning and motor control in children and adults: a laboratory study using clinical measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Filip; Nijs, Jo; Horsten, Stijn; Mottram, Sarah; Truijen, Steven; Meeusen, Romain

    2011-04-01

    The scapular muscular system is the major determinant of scapular positioning. In addition, strength and muscular endurance develops from childhood through adolescence. It is not known whether differences in scapular positioning and motor control between adults and children may exist. Ninety-two shoulders of 46 adults (mean = 39.4; 18-86 years; SD = 22.5), and 116 shoulders of 59 children (mean = 11.6; 6-17 years; SD = 3.5), were included in the study. Scapular positioning data were collected using a clinical assessment protocol including visual observation of titling and winging, measurement of forward shoulder posture, measurement of scapular upward rotation, and the Kinetic Medial Rotation Test (KMRT). The observation protocol for scapular winging and tilting did not show significant differences between adults and children. After controlling for height, forward shoulder posture (relaxed (0.28 cm/cm (0.06) vs. 0.31 cm/cm (0.07) and retracted (0.15 cm/cm (0.05) vs. 0.20 cm/cm (0.06)) were significantly smaller in children than in adults (P < 0.01). In addition, children showed greater scapular upward rotation (18.6°; SD 9.6°) than adults (14.5°; SD 10.9°) at 90° shoulder abduction. No significant differences were seen between children (19% positive test) and adults (24% positive test) using the KMRT. Children and adults show significant but small differences in scapular upward rotation and forward shoulder posture. These data provide useful reference values using a clinical protocol. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Morphea in Adults and Children Cohort VI: A cross-sectional comparison of outcomes between adults with pediatric-onset and adult-onset morphea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condie, Daniel; Grabell, Daniel; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Few studies have looked at outcomes of adults with pediatric-onset morphea. The objective of the present study was to compare clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life in adults with pediatric-onset morphea to those of patients with adult-onset morphea. Methods Participants in the study were drawn from the Morphea in Adults and Children Cohort and included 68 adults with pediatric-onset morphea and 234 patients with adult-onset morphea. Outcome measures included the Localized Scleroderma Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT), physical exam findings, and quality of life questionnaires. Results Adults with pediatric-onset morphea were younger, had longer disease duration, and were more likely to have the linear subtype of morphea. Patients with pediatric-onset disease were less likely to have active disease. Among patients with active disease, those with pediatric-onset morphea had less disease activity as measured by the LoSCAT. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had higher disease damage as measured by the Physician Global Assessment of Damage, but similar disease damage as measured by the Localized Scleroderma Skin Damage Index. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had more favorable quality of life scores for all measures that reached statistical significance. Conclusion Adults with pediatric-onset morphea differ from patients with adult-onset disease with respect to subtype, disease activity, disease damage, and health-related quality of life. PMID:25156342

  14. Brain function differences in language processing in children and adults with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Diane L; Cherkassky, Vladimir L; Mason, Robert A; Keller, Timothy A; Minshew, Nancy J; Just, Marcel Adam

    2013-08-01

    Comparison of brain function between children and adults with autism provides an understanding of the effects of the disorder and associated maturational differences on language processing. Functional imaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging) was used to examine brain activation and cortical synchronization during the processing of literal and ironic texts in 15 children with autism, 14 children with typical development, 13 adults with autism, and 12 adult controls. Both the children and adults with autism had lower functional connectivity (synchronization of brain activity among activated areas) than their age and ability comparison group in the left hemisphere language network during irony processing, and neither autism group had an increase in functional connectivity in response to increased task demands. Activation differences for the literal and irony conditions occurred in key language-processing regions (left middle temporal, left pars triangularis, left pars opercularis, left medial frontal, and right middle temporal). The children and adults with autism differed from each other in the use of some brain regions during the irony task, with the adults with autism having activation levels similar to those of the control groups. Overall, the children and adults with autism differed from the adult and child controls in (a) the degree of network coordination, (b) the distribution of the workload among member nodes, and (3) the dynamic recruitment of regions in response to text content. Moreover, the differences between the two autism age groups may be indicative of positive changes in the neural function related to language processing associated with maturation and/or educational experience. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Neurological manifestations of influenza infection in children and adults: results of a National British Surveillance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenka, Anu; Michael, Benedict D; Ledger, Elizabeth; Hart, Ian J; Absoud, Michael; Chow, Gabriel; Lilleker, James; Lunn, Michael; McKee, David; Peake, Deirdre; Pysden, Karen; Roberts, Mark; Carrol, Enitan D; Lim, Ming; Avula, Shivaram; Solomon, Tom; Kneen, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    The emergence of influenza A(H1N1) 2009 was met with increased reports of associated neurological manifestations. We aimed to describe neurological manifestations of influenza in adults and children in the United Kingdom that presented at this time. A 2-year surveillance study was undertaken through the British adult and pediatric neurological surveillance units from February 2011. Patients were included if they met clinical case definitions within 1 month of proven influenza infection. Twenty-five cases were identified: 21 (84%) in children and 4 (16%) in adults. Six (29%) children had preexisting neurological disorders. Polymerase chain reaction of respiratory secretions identified influenza A in 21 (81%; 20 of which [95%] were H1N1) and influenza B in 4 (15%). Twelve children had encephalopathy (1 with movement disorder), 8 had encephalitis, and 1 had meningoencephalitis. Two adults had encephalopathy with movement disorder, 1 had encephalitis, and 1 had Guillain-Barré syndrome. Seven individuals (6 children) had specific acute encephalopathy syndromes (4 acute necrotizing encephalopathy, 1 acute infantile encephalopathy predominantly affecting the frontal lobes, 1 hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy, 1 acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy). Twenty (80%) required intensive care, 17 (68%) had poor outcome, and 4 (16%) died. This surveillance study described a cohort of adults and children with neurological manifestations of influenza. The majority were due to H1N1. More children than adults were identified; many children had specific encephalopathy syndromes with poor outcomes. None had been vaccinated, although 8 (32%) had indications for this. A modified classification system is proposed based on our data and the increasing spectrum of recognized acute encephalopathy syndromes.

  16. Multiple sclerosis in children: an update on clinical diagnosis, therapeutic strategies, and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Amy; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bar-Or, Amit; Mikaeloff, Yann; Tardieu, Marc; Banwell, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    The clinical features, diagnostic challenges, neuroimaging appearance, therapeutic options, and pathobiological research progress in childhood—and adolescent—onset multiple sclerosis have been informed by many new insights in the past 7 years. National programmes in several countries, collaborative research efforts, and an established international paediatric multiple sclerosis study group have contributed to revised clinical diagnostic definitions, identified clinical features of multiple sclerosis that differ by age of onset, and made recommendations regarding the treatment of paediatric multiple sclerosis. The relative risks conveyed by genetic and environmental factors to paediatric multiple sclerosis have been the subject of several large cohort studies. MRI features have been characterised in terms of qualitative descriptions of lesion distribution and applicability of MRI aspects to multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria, and quantitative studies have assessed total lesion burden and the effect of the disease on global and regional brain volume. Humoral-based and cell-based assays have identified antibodies against myelin, potassium-channel proteins, and T-cell profiles that support an adult-like T-cell repertoire and cellular reactivity against myelin in paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. Finally, the safety and efficacy of standard first-line therapies in paediatric multiple sclerosis populations are now appreciated in more detail, and consensus views on the future conduct and feasibility of phase 3 trials for new drugs have been proposed. PMID:25142460

  17. Education of adult children and mortality of their elderly parents in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Zachary; Martin, Linda G; Ofstedal, Mary Beth; Chuang, Yi-Li

    2007-05-01

    In societies in which families are highly integrated, the education of family members may be linked to survival. Such may be the case in Taiwan, where there are large gaps in levels of education across generations and high levels of resource transfers between family members. This study employs 14 years of longitudinal data from Taiwan to examine the combined effects of the education of older adults and their adult children on the mortality outcomes of older adults. We use nested Gompertz hazard models to evaluate the importance of the education of an older adult and his or her highest-educated child after controlling for socioeconomic, demographic, and health characteristics at baseline. To gain further insight, we fit additional models based on the sample stratified by whether older adults report serious diseases at baseline. The results indicate that the educational levels of both older adults and children are associated with older adult mortality, but children's education appears more important when we examine the mortality of only those older adults who already report a serious disease. This finding suggests that there may be different roles for education in the onset versus the progression of a health problem that may lead to death.

  18. Protein substitute for children and adults with phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sarah H L; Singh, Rani H

    2015-02-27

    Phenylketonuria is an inherited metabolic disorder characterised by an absence or deficiency of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. The aim of treatment is to lower blood phenylalanine concentrations to the recommended therapeutic range to prevent developmental delay and support normal growth. Current treatment consists of a low-phenylalanine diet in combination with a protein substitute which is free from or low in phenylalanine. Guidance regarding the use, dosage, and distribution of dosage of the protein substitute over a 24-hour period is unclear, and there is variation in recommendations among treatment centres. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2005, and previously updated in 2008. To assess the benefits and adverse effects of protein substitute, its dosage, and distribution of dose in children and adults with phenylketonuria who are adhering to a low-phenylalanine diet. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which consists of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and hand searches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted manufacturers of the phenylalanine-free and low-phenylalanine protein substitutes for any data from published and unpublished randomised controlled trials.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register: 03 April 2014. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing: any dose of protein substitute with no protein substitute; an alternative dosage; or the same dose, but given as frequent small doses throughout the day compared with the same total daily dose given as larger boluses less frequently. Both authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Three trials (69 participants) are included in this review. One trial investigated the use of protein substitute in 16 participants, while a further two trials investigated the

  19. Management of the pediatric nuclear medicine patient (or children are not small adults)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieffer, C.T.; Suto, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    The first of a four-part continuing education series on pediatric nuclear medicine is presented. Included are: (1) clinical indications for performing nuclear medicine studies in children; (2) comparison of nuclear medicine procedures for adult and pedicatric patients; (3) appropriate radiopharmaceuticals for performing pediatric studies; (4) radiation protection techniques (5) the principles of pediatric radiopharmaceutical dose calculation and common calculation methods; (6) possible injection sites and administration methods (7) radiopharmaceutical clearance times and imaging times in adults and children; (8) the collimators of choice for most procedures performed in children; (9) certain behaviors exhibited by children according to their stage of emotional development and children's response to the hospital setting; and (10) patient immobilization techniques and advantages of physical restraint over sedation

  20. Spirometry effects on conventional and multiple flow exhaled nitric oxide in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Sandrah P; Linn, William S; Salam, Muhammad T; Bastain, Theresa M; Zhang, Yue; Rappaport, Edward B; Liu, Meng; Berhane, Kiros

    2015-03-01

    Clinical and research settings often require sequencing multiple respiratory tests in a brief visit. Guidelines recommend measuring the concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) before spirometry, but evidence for a spirometry carryover effect on FeNO is mixed. Only one study has investigated spirometry carryover effects on multiple flow FeNO analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate evidence for carryover effects of recent spirometry on three exhaled NO summary measures: FeNO at 50 ml/s, airway wall NO flux [J'awNO] and alveolar NO concentration [CANO] in a population-based sample of schoolchildren. Participants were 1146 children (191 with asthma), ages 12-15, from the Southern California Children's Health Study who performed spirometry and multiple flow FeNO on the same day. Approximately, half the children performed spirometry first. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate differences in exhaled NO summary measures associated with recent spirometry testing, adjusting for potential confounders. In the population-based sample, we found no evidence of spirometry carryover effects. However, for children with asthma, there was a suggestion that exhaled NO summary measures assessed ≤6 min after spirometry were lower (FeNO: 25.8% lower, 95% CI: -6.2%, 48.2%; J'awNO: 15.1% lower 95% CI: -26.5%, 43.0%; and CANO 0.43 parts per billion lower, 95% CI: -0.12, 0.98). In clinical settings, it is prudent to assess multiple flow FeNO before spirometry. In studies of healthy subjects, it may not be necessary to assess FeNO first.

  1. Differences among children, adolescents and adults with severe leptospirosis: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E F Daher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a zoonosis of global importance caused by Leptospira interrogans. The aim of this study was to compare the data between children, adolescents and adults with leptospirosis. This is a retrospective study including a total of 373 consecutive patients with leptospirosis, admitted to tertiary hospitals in Northeast of Brazil, from May 1985 to August 2010. The patients were divided into two groups (age ≤21 years and >21 years. The adults were 304 (81.5% of the population, with a mean ge of 41 ± 13 (range 22-84 years. The pediatric group was 16 ± 3 (range 9-21 years. Signs and symptoms where similar between the groups, excepting arrhythmia, which was more frequent in adults and vomiting, more common in children (16% vs. 0%, P = 0.04 and 65% vs. 79%, P = 0.02, respectively. Adult group presented with higher serum urea (137 vs. 97 mg/dl, P = 0.002 and creatinine (4.3 vs. 3.0 mg/dl, P = 0.007. Acute kidney injury (AKI was observed in 80%, mainly in adults (83% vs. 70% P < 0.005. Adults required renal replacement therapy more frequently than children (38% vs. 11%, P < 0.0001. Mortality was higher in adults (14.8% vs. 2.8%, P = 0.005 and in adults with AKI (93% vs. 7%, P < 0.05. There are important differences between the adults and children with leptospirosis. AKI was more frequent in adults and it was associated with increased mortality.

  2. Prevalence and predictors of exposure to multiple metals in preschool children from Montevideo, Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordas, Katarzyna; Queirolo, Elena I.; Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Wright, Robert O.; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J.

    2010-01-01

    The extent of children's exposure to multiple toxic metals is not well described in many developing countries. We examined metal exposures in young children (6-37 months) from Montevideo, Uruguay and their mothers (15-47 years) participating in a community-based study. Hair samples collected from 180 children and their mothers were analyzed for: lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), and arsenic (As) concentration using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Median metal levels (μg/g) were: Pb 13.69, Mn 1.45, Cd 0.17, and As 0.09 for children and Pb 4.27, Mn 1.42, Cd 0.08, and As 0.02 for mothers. Of the child and maternal samples, 1.7% and 2.9% were below the limit of detection (LOD) for Cd, and 21.3% and 38.5% were below the LOD for As, respectively. Correlations between maternal and child levels ranged 0.38-0.55 (p < 0.01). Maternal hair metal levels were the strongest predictors of metal concentrations in children's hair. Girls had significantly lower As levels than boys (p < 0.01) but did not differ on other metals. In addition, in bivariate logistic regressions predicting the likelihood that the child would be exposed to multiple metals, hemoglobin < 10.5 g/dL (OR = 2.12, p < 0.05), blood lead (OR = 1.17, p < 0.01), and the mother being exposed to two or more metals (OR = 3.34, p < 0.01) were identified as significant predictors of increased likelihood of multiple metal exposure. Older child age (OR = 0.96, p < 0.05), higher maternal education (OR = 0.35, p < 0.01), and higher number of household possessions (OR = 0.83, p < 0.01) were significantly associated with decreased likelihood of multiple metal exposure. Preschool children in Uruguay are exposed to multiple metals at levels that in other studies have been associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits. Sources of exposure, as well as cognitive and behavioral consequences of multiple metal exposure, should be investigated in this population.

  3. Prevalence and predictors of exposure to multiple metals in preschool children from Montevideo, Uruguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordas, Katarzyna, E-mail: Kxk48@psu.edu [Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, 110 Chandlee Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Queirolo, Elena I. [Center for Research, Catholic University of Uruguay, Montevideo (Uruguay); Clinic for Environmental Contaminants, Pereira Rossell Hospital, Montevideo (Uruguay); Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Wright, Robert O. [Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Stoltzfus, Rebecca J. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-09-15

    The extent of children's exposure to multiple toxic metals is not well described in many developing countries. We examined metal exposures in young children (6-37 months) from Montevideo, Uruguay and their mothers (15-47 years) participating in a community-based study. Hair samples collected from 180 children and their mothers were analyzed for: lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), and arsenic (As) concentration using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Median metal levels ({mu}g/g) were: Pb 13.69, Mn 1.45, Cd 0.17, and As 0.09 for children and Pb 4.27, Mn 1.42, Cd 0.08, and As 0.02 for mothers. Of the child and maternal samples, 1.7% and 2.9% were below the limit of detection (LOD) for Cd, and 21.3% and 38.5% were below the LOD for As, respectively. Correlations between maternal and child levels ranged 0.38-0.55 (p < 0.01). Maternal hair metal levels were the strongest predictors of metal concentrations in children's hair. Girls had significantly lower As levels than boys (p < 0.01) but did not differ on other metals. In addition, in bivariate logistic regressions predicting the likelihood that the child would be exposed to multiple metals, hemoglobin < 10.5 g/dL (OR = 2.12, p < 0.05), blood lead (OR = 1.17, p < 0.01), and the mother being exposed to two or more metals (OR = 3.34, p < 0.01) were identified as significant predictors of increased likelihood of multiple metal exposure. Older child age (OR = 0.96, p < 0.05), higher maternal education (OR = 0.35, p < 0.01), and higher number of household possessions (OR = 0.83, p < 0.01) were significantly associated with decreased likelihood of multiple metal exposure. Preschool children in Uruguay are exposed to multiple metals at levels that in other studies have been associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits. Sources of exposure, as well as cognitive and behavioral consequences of multiple metal exposure, should be investigated in this population.

  4. Efficacy and safety limitations of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder pharmacotherapy in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigal, Sharon B

    2009-01-01

    There have been major advances in the treatment and understanding of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the last decade. Among these are the availability of newer stimulant formulations, an appreciation of the combined effects of medication and behavioural therapies, and a better understanding of the neurobiology of the disorder in children (aged 6-12 years), adolescents and adults. This article focuses on the evaluation of the efficacy and safety profiles of medications used for the management of ADHD. In assessing the various medical treatments for ADHD, certain issues and analyses have become important to address. The diagnosis, characterization and quantification of ADHD symptoms are crucial to assessing treatment effectiveness. A standardized setting for measuring the severity of ADHD symptoms is the laboratory school protocol, which simulates a school environment with tightly controlled timing of measurements. This method has been adapted successfully to the adult workplace environment to help with the evaluation of adult ADHD symptoms. Statistical analyses, such as effect size and number needed to treat, may aid in the comparison and interpretation of ADHD study results. Although an objective approach to evaluating the efficacy and safety profiles of the available medications provides necessary details about the medical options, typical clinical decisions are often based on trial and error and may be individualized based on a patient's daily routine, comorbidities and risk factors. Stimulants remain the US FDA-approved medical treatment of choice for patients with ADHD and are associated with an exceptional response rate. Findings of the Multimodal Treatment of Children With ADHD study suggest that the combination of behavioural and medical therapy may benefit most patients. Nonstimulant agents, such as atomoxetine (FDA-approved), and several non-approved agents, bupropion, guanfacine and clonidine, may offer necessary alternatives to the

  5. Association of Genetic Predisposition With Solitary Schwannoma or Meningioma in Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathmanaban, Omar N; Sadler, Katherine V; Kamaly-Asl, Ian D; King, Andrew T; Rutherford, Scott A; Hammerbeck-Ward, Charlotte; McCabe, Martin G; Kilday, John-Paul; Beetz, Christian; Poplawski, Nicola K; Evans, D Gareth; Smith, Miriam J

    2017-09-01

    Meningiomas and schwannomas are usually sporadic, isolated tumors occurring in adults older than 60 years and are rare in children and young adults. Multiple schwannomas and/or meningiomas are more frequently associated with a tumor suppressor syndrome and, accordingly, trigger genetic testing, whereas solitary tumors do not. Nevertheless, apparently sporadic tumors in young patients may herald a genetic syndrome. To determine the frequency of the known heritable meningioma- or schwannoma-predisposing mutations in children and young adults presenting with a solitary meningioma or schwannoma. Using the database of the Manchester Centre for Genomic Medicine, this cohort study analyzed lymphocyte DNA from young individuals prospectively referred to the clinic for genetic testing between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2016, on presentation with a single meningioma (n = 42) or schwannoma (n = 135) before age 25 years. Sequencing data were also examined from an additional 39 patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 who were retrospectively identified as having a solitary tumor before age 25 years. Patients with schwannoma were screened for NF2, SMARCB1, and LZTR1 gene mutations, while patients with meningioma were screened for NF2, SMARCB1, SMARCE1, and SUFU. The type of underlying genetic mutation, or lack of a predisposing mutation, was associated with the presenting tumor type and subsequent development of additional tumors or other features of known schwannoma- and meningioma-predisposing syndromes. In 2 cohorts of patients who presented with an isolated meningioma (n = 42; median [range] age, 11 [1-24] years; 22 female) or schwannoma (n = 135; median [range] age, 18 [0.2-24] years; 60 female) before age 25 years, 16 of 42 patients (38%) had a predisposing mutation to meningioma and 27 of 135 patients (20%) to schwannoma, respectively. In the solitary meningioma cohort, 34 of 63 patients (54%) had a constitutional mutation in a known meningioma

  6. Pathways of Adult Children Providing Care to Older Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Amanda E.

    2013-01-01

    Guided by life course and stress process theory, this study investigated pathways of adult child caregivers' family (caregiving, marital, parenting) and nonfamily (employment) roles. Eight waves of data from the Health and Retirement Study were analyzed for 1,300 adult child caregivers. Latent class analysis provided strong evidence for a 4-class…

  7. Treatment Effects for Dysphagia in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Dalal; Ballard, Kirrie; Bogaardt, Hans

    2016-10-01

    Dysphagia or swallowing difficulties have been reported to be a concern in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). This problem can result in several complications including aspiration pneumonia, reduced quality of life and an increase in mortality rate. No previous systematic reviews on treatment effects for dysphagia in MS have been published. The main objective of this study is to summarise and qualitatively analyse published studies on treatment effects for dysphagia in MS. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were applied to conduct a systematic search of seven databases, using relevant key words, and subsequent analysis of the identified studies. The studies were required to meet all three inclusion criteria of including a statement on intention to treat, or measure the effects of treatment for dysphagia in adults with MS and data on treatment outcomes for at least one adult diagnosed with MS. Retained studies were evaluated by two independent reviewers using a critical appraisal tool. This study has not been registered. A total of 563 studies were identified from the database searches. After screening and assessment of full articles for eligibility, five studies were included in the review. Three examined electrical stimulation and two examined the use of botulinum toxin. One study testing electrical stimulation was a randomised controlled trial, two were well-designed case series and two were case series lacking experimental control. All studies reported some positive effects on dysphagia; however, treatments that involved the use of electrical stimulation showed larger effect sizes. There is a paucity of evidence to guide treatment of dysphagia in MS, with only electrical stimulation and botulinum toxin treatment represented in the literature search conducted here. While both treatments show initial promise for reducing the swallowing impairment, they require further research using well-controlled experimental

  8. On the interrelation of multiplication and division in secondary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eHuber

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiplication and division are conceptually inversely related: Each division problem can be transformed into as a multiplication problem and vice versa. Recent research has indicated strong developmental parallels between multiplication and division in primary school children. In this study, we were interested in (i whether these developmental parallels persist into secondary school, (ii whether similar developmental parallels can be observed for simple and complex problems, (iii whether skill level modulates this relationship, and (iv whether the correlations are specific and not driven by general cognitive or arithmetic abilities.Therefore, we assessed performance of 5th and 6th graders attending two secondary school types of the German educational system in simple and complex multiplication as well as division while controlling for nonverbal intelligence, short-term memory, and other arithmetic abilities. Accordingly, we collected data from students differing in skills levels due to either age (5th and 6th grade or school type (general and intermediate secondary school.We observed moderate to strong bivariate and partial correlations between multiplication and division with correlations being higher for simple tasks but nevertheless reliable for complex tasks. Moreover, the association between simple multiplication and division depended on students’ skill levels as reflected by school types, but not by age. Partial correlations were higher for intermediate than for general secondary school children.In sum, these findings emphasize the importance of the inverse relationship between multiplication and division which persists into later developmental stages. However, evidence for skill-related differences in the relationship between multiplication and division was restricted to the differences for school types.

  9. Spectral entropy monitoring for adults and children undergoing general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Anjolie; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari; Srivastava, Anurag; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Kalaivani, Mani; Paranjape, Saloni

    2016-03-14

    Anaesthetic drugs during general anaesthesia are titrated according to sympathetic or somatic responses to surgical stimuli. It is now possible to measure depth of anaesthesia using electroencephalography (EEG). Entropy, an EEG-based monitor can be used to assess the depth of anaesthesia using a strip of electrodes applied to the forehead, and this can guide intraoperative anaesthetic drug administration. The primary objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of entropy monitoring in facilitating faster recovery from general anaesthesia. We also wanted to assess mortality at 24 hours, 30 days, and one year following general anaesthesia with entropy monitoring.The secondary objectives were to assess the effectiveness of the entropy monitor in: preventing postoperative recall of intraoperative events (awareness) following general anaesthesia; reducing the amount of anaesthetic drugs used; reducing cost of the anaesthetic as well as in reducing time to readiness to leave the postanaesthesia care unit (PACU). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE via Ovid SP (1990 to September 2014) and EMBASE via Ovid SP (1990 to September 2014). We reran the search in CENTRAL, MEDLINE via Ovid SP and EMBASE via Ovid SP in January 2016. We added one potential new study of interest to the list of 'Studies awaiting Classification' and we will incorporate this study into the formal review findings during the review update. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in adults and children (aged greater than two years of age), where in one arm entropy monitoring was used for titrating anaesthesia, and in the other standard practice (increase in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, lacrimation, movement in response to noxious surgical stimuli) was used for titrating anaesthetic drug administration. We also included trials with an additional third arm, wherein another EEG monitor, the Bispectral index

  10. Multiple traumas and resilience among street children in Haiti: Psychopathology of survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cénat, Jude Mary; Derivois, Daniel; Hébert, Martine; Amédée, Laetitia Mélissande; Karray, Amira

    2018-05-01

    In Haiti, as in several developing countries, the phenomenon of street children has become a major public health issue. These children are often victims of traumas and adverse life events. This article aimed to investigate traumas experienced by street children and their coping and resilience strategies used to deal with adversities in a logic of survival, relying on a mixed method approach. A group of 176 street children, aged 7-18 (n = 21 girls), recruited in Port-au-Prince, completed measures assessing PTSD, social support and resilience. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to document traumatic experiences, factors related to resilience and coping strategies. After performing statistical analyses to evaluate prevalence and predictors associated with PTSD, and level of social support satisfaction and resilience, qualitative analysis using a grounded theory approach was conducted. Results showed that street children experienced multiple traumas such as neglect, maltreatment, psychological, physical and sexual abuse. However, they also showed self-efficacy to face their traumatic experiences and few of them (less than 15%) obtained scores reaching clinical rates of PTSD, while a large majority presented a level of resilience between moderate to very high. A socio-ecological model of multiple traumas and a model of coping, survival and resilience strategies are conceptualized. Data provide a better understanding of the traumas experienced by street children, their coping and resilience strategies. Results underscore ways to develop practices to offer psychological support, social and vocational integration based on the real needs of these children, in a perspective of social justice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Self-reports of psychosocial functioning among children and young adults with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Orlagh; Burden, Donald; Hepper, Peter; Stevenson, Mike; Johnston, Chris

    2006-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was employed to determine the psychosocial effects of cleft lip and/or palate among children and young adults, compared with a control group of children and young adults without cleft lip and palate. The study comprised 160 children and young adults with cleft lip and/or palate and 113 children and young adults without cleft lip and/or palate. All participants were between 8 and 21 years of age. Psychological functioning (anxiety, self-esteem, depression, and behavioral problems) was assessed using validated psychological questionnaires. Happiness with facial appearance was rated using a visual analog scale. Social functioning, including experience of teasing/bullying and satisfaction with speech, was assessed using a semistructured interview. Participants with cleft lip and/or palate reported greater behavioral problems (p palate and subjects without cleft lip and/or palate in terms of anxiety (p > .05) or self-esteem (p > .05). Having been teased was a significant predictor of poor psychological functioning, more so than having a cleft lip and/or palate per se (p palate and it was a significant predictor of poorer psychosocial functioning. Children and young adults with cleft lip and/or palate require psychological assessment, specifically focusing on their experience of teasing, as part of their routine cleft care.

  12. Eliminating age differences in children's and adults' suggestibility and memory conformity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; Brackmann, Nathalie; van Helvoort, Daniël H J

    2017-05-01

    We examined whether typical developmental trends in suggestion-induced false memories (i.e., age-related decrease) could be changed. Using theoretical principles from the spontaneous false memory field, we adapted 2 often-used false memory procedures: misinformation (Experiment 1) and memory conformity (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, 7- to 9-year-old children (n = 33) and adults (n = 39) received stories containing associatively related details. They then listened to misinformation in the form of short narratives preserving the meaning of the story. Children and adults were equally susceptible to the misinformation effect. In Experiment 2, younger (7- to 8-year-olds, n = 30) and older (11- to 12-year-olds, n = 30) children and adults (n = 30) viewed pictures containing associatively related details. They viewed these pictures in pairs. Although the pictures differed, participants believed they had viewed the same pictures. Participants had to report what they could recollect during collaborative and individual recall tests. Children and adults were equally susceptible to memory conformity effects. When correcting for response bias, adults' false memory scores were even higher than children's. Our results show that age trends in suggestion-induced false memories are not developmentally invariant. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Adults Matter: Protecting Children from the Negative Impacts of Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners-Burrow, Nicola A.; Johnson, Danya L.; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; McKelvey, Lorraine; Gargus, Regina A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the degree to which support from parents and teachers buffers the level of depression for four groups of children involved in bullying (victim, bully, bully-victims, or not involved children). Nine hundred and seventy-seven 5th-, 9th-, and 11th-grade students in the rural South completed questionnaires on bullying, social…

  14. Social cohesion and the smoking behaviors of adults living with children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, Héctor E; Sharif, Mienah Z; Albert, Stephanie L

    2016-02-01

    The smoking behavior of adults can negatively impact children through exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and by modeling this unhealthy behavior. Little research has examined the role of the social environment in smoking behaviors of adults living with children. The present study specifically analyzed the relationship between social cohesion and smoking behaviors of adults living with children. Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey, a random-digit dial cross-sectional survey of California Adults, were used. Adults living with children reported their levels of social cohesion and smoking behaviors (N=13,978). Logistic regression models were used to predict odds of being a current smoker or living in a household in which smoking was allowed, from social cohesion. Overall, 13% of the sample was current smokers and 3.74% lived in households in which smoking was allowed. Logistic regression models showed that each one-unit increase in social cohesion is associated with reduced odds of being a current smoker (AOR=0.92; 95% CI=0.85-0.99) and reduced odds of living in a household in which smoking is allowed (AOR=0.84; 95% CI=0.75-0.93), after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. Among adults living with children, higher social cohesion is associated with a lower likelihood of both being and smoker and living in a home where smoking is allowed. Thus, future research is needed to better understand mechanisms that explain the relationship between social cohesion and smoking-related behavior in order to prevent smoking-related health consequences and smoking initiation among children and adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Long-term outcome after arterial ischemic stroke in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeggel Simonetti, Barbara; Cavelti, Ariane; Arnold, Marcel; Bigi, Sandra; Regényi, Mária; Mattle, Heinrich P; Gralla, Jan; Fluss, Joel; Weber, Peter; Hackenberg, Annette; Steinlin, Maja; Fischer, Urs

    2015-05-12

    To compare long-term outcome of children and young adults with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) from 2 large registries. Prospective cohort study comparing functional and psychosocial long-term outcome (≥2 years after AIS) in patients who had AIS during childhood (1 month-16 years) or young adulthood (16.1-45 years) between January 2000 and December 2008, who consented to follow-up. Data of children were collected prospectively in the Swiss Neuropediatric Stroke Registry, young adults in the Bernese stroke database. Follow-up information was available in 95/116 children and 154/187 young adults. Median follow-up of survivors was 6.9 years (interquartile range 4.7-9.4) and did not differ between the groups (p = 0.122). Long-term functional outcome was similar (p = 0.896): 53 (56%) children and 84 (55%) young adults had a favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale 0-1). Mortality in children was 14% (13/95) and in young adults 7% (11/154) (p = 0.121) and recurrence rate did not differ (p = 0.759). Overall psychosocial impairment and quality of life did not differ, except for more behavioral problems among children (13% vs 5%, p = 0.040) and more frequent reports of an impact of AIS on everyday life among adults (27% vs 64%, p Stroke Scale/NIH Stroke Scale score was the most important predictor of favorable outcome (p young adults for mortality, disability, quality of life, psychological, or social variables. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. The neurodevelopmental differences of increasing verbal working memory demand in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogan, V M; Morgan, B R; Powell, T L; Smith, M L; Taylor, M J

    2016-02-01

    Working memory (WM) - temporary storage and manipulation of information in the mind - is a key component of cognitive maturation, and structural brain changes throughout development are associated with refinements in WM. Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown that there is greater activation in prefrontal and parietal brain regions with increasing age, with adults showing more refined, localized patterns of activations. However, few studies have investigated the neural basis of verbal WM development, as the majority of reports examine visuo-spatial WM. We used fMRI and a 1-back verbal WM task with six levels of difficulty to examine the neurodevelopmental changes in WM function in 40 participants, twenty-four children (ages 9-15 yr) and sixteen young adults (ages 20-25 yr). Children and adults both demonstrated an opposing system of cognitive processes with increasing cognitive demand, where areas related to WM (frontal and parietal regions) increased in activity, and areas associated with the default mode network decreased in activity. Although there were many similarities in the neural activation patterns associated with increasing verbal WM capacity in children and adults, significant changes in the fMRI responses were seen with age. Adults showed greater load-dependent changes than children in WM in the bilateral superior parietal gyri, inferior frontal and left middle frontal gyri and right cerebellum. Compared to children, adults also showed greater decreasing activation across WM load in the bilateral anterior cingulate, anterior medial prefrontal gyrus, right superior lateral temporal gyrus and left posterior cingulate. These results demonstrate that while children and adults activate similar neural networks in response to verbal WM tasks, the extent to which they rely on these areas in response to increasing cognitive load evolves between childhood and adulthood. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Speech Rate Entrainment in Children and Adults With and Without Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Camille J; Borrie, Stephanie A; Sellers, Tyra P

    2018-05-03

    Conversational entrainment, a phenomenon whereby people modify their behaviors to match their communication partner, has been evidenced as critical to successful conversation. It is plausible that deficits in entrainment contribute to the conversational breakdowns and social difficulties exhibited by people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study examined speech rate entrainment in children and adult populations with and without ASD. Sixty participants including typically developing children, children with ASD, typically developed adults, and adults with ASD participated in a quasi-conversational paradigm with a pseudoconfederate. The confederate's speech rate was digitally manipulated to create slow and fast speech rate conditions. Typically developed adults entrained their speech rate in the quasi-conversational paradigm, using a faster rate during the fast speech rate conditions and a slower rate during the slow speech rate conditions. This entrainment pattern was not evident in adults with ASD or in children populations. Findings suggest that speech rate entrainment is a developmentally acquired skill and offers preliminary evidence of speech rate entrainment deficits in adults with ASD. Impairments in this area may contribute to the conversational breakdowns and social difficulties experienced by this population. Future work is needed to advance this area of inquiry.

  18. An fMRI study of finger tapping in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turesky, Ted K; Olulade, Olumide A; Luetje, Megan M; Eden, Guinevere F

    2018-04-02

    Functional brain imaging studies have characterized the neural bases of voluntary movement for finger tapping in adults, but equivalent information for children is lacking. When contrasted to adults, one would expect children to have relatively greater activation, reflecting compensation for an underdeveloped motor system combined with less experience in the execution of voluntary movement. To test this hypothesis, we acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data on 17 healthy right-handed children (7.48 ± 0.66 years) and 15 adults (24.9 ± 2.9 years) while they performed an irregularly paced finger-tapping task in response to a visual cue (left- and right-hand examined separately). Whole-brain within-group analyses revealed that finger tapping in either age group and for either hand activated contralateral SM1, SMA, ipsilateral anterior cerebellum, and occipital cortices. We used an ANOVA factorial design to test for main effects of Age Group (children vs adults), Hand (left vs. right), and their interactions. For main effects of Age Group, children showed relatively greater activity in left SM1 (extending into bilateral SMA), and, surprisingly, adults exhibited relatively greater activity in right pre-SMA/SMA (extending into left pre-SMA/SMA), right lateral globus pallidus, left putamen, and right anterior cerebellum. The interaction of Age Group × Hand revealed that while both groups activated right SM1 during left finger tapping and exhibited signal decreases (i.e., below fixation baseline) during right finger tapping, both these responses were attenuated in children relative to adults. These data provide an important foundation by which to study children with motor disorders. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cognitive processing speed is related to fall frequency in older adults with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Balantrapu, Swathi; Pilutti, Lara A; Sandroff, Brian M; Morrison, Steven; Motl, Robert W

    2013-08-01

    To examine mobility, balance, fall risk, and cognition in older adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) as a function of fall frequency. Retrospective, cross-sectional design. University research laboratory. Community-dwelling persons with MS (N=27) aged between 50 and 75 years were divided into 2 groups-single-time (n=11) and recurrent (n=16; >2 falls/12 mo) fallers-on the basis of fall history. Not applicable. Mobility was assessed using a variety of measures including Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12, walking speed (Timed 25-Foot Walk test), endurance (6-Minute Walk test), and functional mobility (Timed Up and Go test). Balance was assessed with the Berg Balance Scale, posturography, and self-reported balance confidence. Fall risk was assessed with the Physiological Profile Assessment. Cognitive processing speed was quantified with the Symbol Digit Modalities Test and the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test. Recurrent fallers had slower cognitive processing speed than single-time fallers (P ≤.01). There was no difference in mobility, balance, or fall risk between recurrent and single-time fallers (P>.05). Results indicated that cognitive processing speed is associated with fall frequency and may have implications for fall prevention strategies targeting recurrent fallers with MS. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Different Electrophysiological Responses to Informative Value of Feedback Between Children and Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Du

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to learn from feedback is important for children’s adaptive behavior and school learning. Feedback has two main components, informative value and valence. How to disentangle these two components and what is the developmental neural correlates of using the informative value of feedback is still an open question. In this study, 23 children (7–10 years old and 19 adults (19–22 years old were asked to perform a rule induction task, in which they were required to find a rule, based on the informative value of feedback. Behavioral results indicated that the likelihood of correct searching behavior under negative feedback was low for children. Event-related potentials showed that (1 the effect of valence was processed in a wide time window, particularly in the N2 component; (2 the encoding process of the informative value of negative feedback began later for children than for adults; (3 a clear P300 was observed for adults; for children, however, P300 was absent in the frontal region; and (4 children processed the informative value of feedback chiefly in the left sites during the P300 time window, whereas adults did not show this laterality. These results suggested that children were less sensitive to the informative value of negative feedback possibly because of the immature brain.

  1. The Impact of Divorce on the Lives of Children: Alleviating the Trauma of the Divorce Experience Through Adult Intervention Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Denise

    This paper reviews current literature pertaining to the effects of divorce on children and makes suggestions regarding general ways in which parents and other adults may assist children in coping with divorce. The population of children towards which this study is directed includes preschool through latency age children. All inferences made in…

  2. Symptom profile of delirium in children and adolescent--does it differ from adults and elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Kate, Natasha; Malhotra, Savita; Chakrabarti, Subho; Mattoo, Surendra Kumar; Avasthi, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the phenomenology, etiology and outcome of delirium in children and adolescents (8-18 years of age) seen in a consultation-liaison psychiatric service in India. Additionally, an attempt was made to compare the phenomenology with adult and elderly patients with delirium. Thirty children and adolescents (age 8-18 years) diagnosed with delirium by the consultation-liaison psychiatry team were rated on the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DRS-R-98) and compared with DRS-R-98 data on 120 adults and 109 elderly patients. The commonly observed symptoms in children and adolescents with delirium were disturbance in attention, orientation, sleep-wake cycle disturbances, fluctuation of symptoms, disturbance of short-term memory and motor agitation. The least commonly seen symptoms included delusions and motor retardation. Compared to adults, children and adolescents had lower frequency of long-term memory and visuospatial disturbances. Compared to the elderly, children and adolescents had higher frequency of lability of affect. For severity of symptoms, compared to adults, the children and adolescents had lower severity of sleep-wake disturbances, abnormality of thought, motor agitation, orientation, attention, short-term memory, long-term memory and visuospatial abilities. When compared to elderly patients, children and adolescents had higher severity of lability of affect and lower severity of language disturbances, short-term memory and visuospatial abilities. In general, phenomenology, of delirium in children and adolescents (age 8-18 years) is similar to that seen in adults and elderly patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Language profiles in young children with autism spectrum disorder: A community sample using multiple assessment instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevill, Rose; Hedley, Darren; Uljarević, Mirko; Sahin, Ensu; Zadek, Johanna; Butter, Eric; Mulick, James A

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated language profiles in a community-based sample of 104 children aged 1-3 years who had been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.) diagnostic criteria. Language was assessed with the Mullen scales, Preschool Language Scale, fifth edition, and Vineland-II parent-report. The study aimed to determine whether the receptive-to-expressive language profile is independent from the assessment instrument used, and whether nonverbal cognition, early communicative behaviors, and autism spectrum disorder symptoms predict language scores. Receptive-to-expressive language profiles differed between assessment instruments and reporters, and Preschool Language Scale, fifth edition profiles were also dependent on developmental level. Nonverbal cognition and joint attention significantly predicted receptive language scores, and nonverbal cognition and frequency of vocalizations predicted expressive language scores. These findings support the administration of multiple direct assessment and parent-report instruments when evaluating language in young children with autism spectrum disorder, for both research and in clinical settings. Results also support that joint attention is a useful intervention target for improving receptive language skills in young children with autism spectrum disorder. Future research comparing language profiles of young children with autism spectrum disorder to children with non-autism spectrum disorder developmental delays and typical development will add to our knowledge of early language development in children with autism spectrum disorder.

  4. [Children with Multiple Risk Factor Exposition Benefit from the German "Strengthening Families Program"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröning, Sonja; Sack, Peter-Michael; Thomsen, Monika; Thomasius, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Children with Multiple Risk Factor Exposition Benefit from the German "Strengthening Families Program" The German adaptation of the substance use-preventive family-based Strengthening Families Program 10-14 (SFP, Iowa version) was evaluated in a longitudinal two-year follow-up trial. Participants were N = 292 children with a mean age of twelve years at baseline, and N = 292 parents. We employed a multi-centric, randomized-controlled, two-armed (SFP vs. minimal control condition) study design. Following a "risk moderation hypothesis", we assumed that children with an elevated risk-exposition R(+) would benefit more than children with a low risk-exposition R(-) irrespective of the preventive intervention, and that R(+) under SFP would benefit more than R(+) under the minimal control condition. "Risk-exposition" was measured in correspondence with the Communities That Care Youth Survey-questionnaire. A total of 28 % of children were classified with an elevated risk level. Children's reports confirmed our hypothesis: R(+) report a total of eleven improvements, four of these being significantly more distinct than in the other groups (Anxiety-Depressivity, Punitive Parenting of mother, Punitive Parenting of father, Unbalanced family functioning). In three measures an improvement appears solely in R(+) under SFP (Satisfaction with family functioning, School Attachment and Peer Relationship Quality, Quality of Life). Parents' reports showed a similar tendency, but were less pronounced.

  5. [The multiple social roles of female lay caretakers of hospitalized children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Wiliam; Pedro, Eva Neri Rubim

    2010-06-01

    This is a qualitative, descriptive, exploratory, and interventionist research carried out with nine female lay caretakers of children undergoing oncologic treatment. The objectives were to present the multiple social roles performed by female lay caretakers of children with cancer and to discuss the caretaker's role in society. The study was carried out between March and April, 2007, at Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The data collection was performed with the focal group technique. The results were examined through the analysis of thematic content, which evidenced the multiple social roles performed by women, the main group of caretakers in society, regardless of the context. Final considerations enhance a discussion in the educational, political and social levels about the redistribution of social roles, particularly family responsibility between men and women. The participation of the nursing staff can take place through the comprehension of those roles imposed by the context and facilitate family inclusion in the care relationship.

  6. Life Events and Black-White Differences in Adult Children's Financial Assistance to Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung S

    2017-05-23

    Parents who experience life events with negative economic consequences may rely on adult children for financial assistance. This study provided national estimates of Black and White mothers' financial help from adult children. It also examined whether the Black-White difference in the likelihood of a mother's receipt of financial assistance persisted after accounting for life events reflecting parental need and children's ability to provide help. The Health and Retirement Study was used to examine late middle aged (51-70) Black and White mothers' financial help from adult children. Cross-sectional point estimates of financial help from noncoresident and coresident children were based on pooling these data. Random effects logistic regression at the mother-wave level was used to estimate the likelihood of receipt of financial assistance from noncoresident children. On average, 9% (8%) of Blacks and 3% (4%) of Whites reported help from noncoresident (coresident) children in a given interview wave, but Blacks received lower amounts. Changes signifying greater parental financial need and noncoresident children's greater resources were positively associated with receiving financial help from noncoresident children. After accounting for these factors, race differences remained. Black mothers are more likely to rely on children for financial help than Whites. Since this help hinges on the ability of their children to provide, the strength of Blacks' economic safety net as they age also depends on the socioeconomic well-being of the younger generation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Interactive programs with preschool children bring smiles and conversation to older adults: time-sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Minako

    2013-10-18

    Keeping older adults healthy and active is an emerging challenge of an aging society. Despite the importance of personal relationships to their health and well-being, changes in family structure have resulted in a lower frequency of intergenerational interactions. Limited studies have been conducted to compare different interaction style of intergenerational interaction. The present study aimed to compare the changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation in older adults brought about by a performance-based intergenerational (IG) program and a social-oriented IG program to determine a desirable interaction style for older adults. The subjects of this study were 25 older adults who participated in intergenerational programs with preschool children aged 5 to 6 years at an adult day care centre in Tokyo. We used time sampling to perform a structured observation study. The 25 older participants of intergenerational programs were divided into two groups based on their interaction style: performance-based IG program (children sing songs and dance) and social-oriented IG program (older adults and children play games together). Based on the 5-minute video observation, we compared changes in visual attention, facial expression, engagement/behaviour, and intergenerational conversation between the performance-based and social-oriented IG programs. Constructive behaviour and intergenerational conversation were significantly higher in the social-oriented IG programming group than the performance-based IG programming group (pprogramming group than the performance-based IG programming (pprogramming group than the social-oriented IG programming group (pprograms with preschool children brought smiles and conversation to older adults. The social-oriented IG program allowed older adults to play more roles than the performance-based IG program. The intergenerational programs provide opportunities to fulfil basic human needs and

  8. INCLUSION OF CHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL AND MULTIPLE DISABILITIES: A COMMUNITY-BASED REHABILITATION APPROACH, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram LAKHAN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inclusion of children with intellectual disabilities (ID and multiple disabilities (MD in regular schools in India is extremely poor. One of the key objectives of community-based rehabilitation (CBR is to include ID & MD children in regular schools. This study attempted to find out association with age, ID severity, poverty, gender, parent education, population, and multiple disabilities comprising one or more disorders cerebral palsy, epilepsy and psychiatric disorders with inclusion among 259 children in Barwani Block of Barwani District in the state of Madhya Pradesh, India.Aim: Inclusion of children with intellectual and multiple disabilities in regular schools through CBR approach in India.Method: Chi square test was conducted to investigate association between inclusion and predictor variables ID categories, age, gender, poverty level, parent education, population type and multiple disabilities. Result: Inclusion was possible for borderline 2(66.4%, mild 54(68.3%, moderate 18(18.2%, and age range from 5 to 12 years 63 (43%. Children living in poor families 63 (30.6%, not poor 11(18.9%, parental edu­ca­ti­on none 52 (26%, primary level 11 (65%, midd­le school 10 (48% high school 0 (0% and bachelor degree 1(7%, female 34 (27.9%, male 40 (29.2%, tribal 40 (28.7%, non-tribal 34(28.3% and multiple disabled with cerebral palsy 1(1.2%, epilepsy 3 (4.8% and psychiatry disorders 12 (22.6% were able to receive inclusive education. Sig­ni­ficant difference in inclusion among ID ca­te­gories (c2=99.8, p < 0.001, poverty (c2=3.37, p 0.044, parental education (c2=23.7, p < 0.001, MD CP (c2=43.9, p < 0.001 and epilepsy (c2=22.4, p < 0.001 were seen.Conclusion: Inclusion through CBR is feasible and acceptable in poor rural settings in India. CBR can facilitate inclusion of children with borderline, mild and moderate categories by involving their parents, teachers and community members.

  9. Comparison of Parenting Style in Single Child and Multiple Children Families

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Alidosti; Seyedeh Leila Dehghani; Akbar Babaei-Heydarabadi; Elahe Tavassoli

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Family is the first and the most important structure in human civilization in which social lifestyles, mutual understanding, and compatibility is learned. Studies have shown that parenting style, is one the most important and fundamental factors in personality development. The purpose of this study was comparison of parenting style in single child and multiple children families. Materials and Methods: This study, in total, 152 mothers from Andimeshk city, Iran, wer...

  10. False memories in children and adults: age, distinctiveness, and subjective experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghetti, Simona; Qin, Jianjian; Goodman, Gail S

    2002-09-01

    This study investigated developmental trends associated with the Deese/Roediger-McDermott false-memory effect, the role of distinctive information in false-memory formation, and participants' subjective experience of true and false memories. Children (5- and 7-year-olds) and adults studied lists of semantically associated words. Half of the participants studied words alone, and half studied words accompanied by pictures. There were significant age differences in recall (5-year-olds evinced more false memories than did adults) but not in recognition of critical lures. Distinctive information reduced false memory for all age groups. Younger children provided with distinctive information, and older children and adults regardless of whether they viewed distinctive information, expressed higher levels of confidence in true than in false memories. Source attributions did not significantly differ between true and false memories. Implications for theories of false memory and memory development are discussed.

  11. Results of early thyroidectomy for medullary thyroid carcinoma in children with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telander, R L; Zimmerman, D; van Heerden, J A; Sizemore, G W

    1986-12-01

    Children with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) often develop medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MCT) or its precursor, C-cell hyperplasia. Survival results are improved if malignancy is diagnosed early from the results of plasma immunoreactive calcitonin (iCT) measurement. The effect of early detection and thyroidectomy in children with MEN2 syndrome was determined by reviewing the experience between 1975 and 1985. Seventeen children with MEN2 who were 12 years old or younger underwent a total thyroidectomy for MCT or C-cell hyperplasia. iCT was measured in all patients preoperatively and postoperatively. Of the 17 children, 14 (82%) had MEN2a and 3 (18%) had MEN2b. There were 14 (82%) female and three (18%) male patients; their mean age was 6.97 years (range 1.5 to 12 years). In all patients, the diagnosis of MCT was made from initial elevated levels of iCT after stimulation with pentagastrin. Three patients had clinical evidence of disease preoperatively. All patients underwent a total thyroidectomy and lymph nodes were removed from the central zone; a neck dissection was performed in the three with clinically obvious disease. MCT with C-cell hyperplasia was found in 11 children and C-cell hyperplasia alone in six. Of the 11 with carcinoma, eight had bilateral disease and three unilateral. Six children had bilateral C-cell hyperplasia. All 17 children were alive and feeling well at the time of this report; however, three had evidence of metastatic disease according to iCT measurements. None of the children had recurrent nerve injuries; one had evidence of hypoparathyroidism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. DOES VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY CONTRIBUTE TO THE SEVERITY OF ASTHMA IN CHILDREN AND ADULTS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Zaryab; Jaleel, Anila; Hameed, Kamran; Qazi, Salman; Suleman, Ahsan

    2015-01-01

    Role of vitamin D in the health of bones has been well established for over decades; It was known that its deficiency caused rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Later it was discovered that these can be corrected by giving vitamin D. Researchers discovered that vitamin D can be synthesized by exposure to sun. Hence it was also named "the sunshine vitamin". As time passed it was observed that low levels of vitamin D were associated with multiple diseases. This sparked the interest of the scientific community to further the research on vitamin D which led to the studies that started associating vitamin D with various diseases like cancers (prostate, colon and breast), autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis), infectious diseases (tuberculosis, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV), cardiovascular diseases, mental illnesses (schizophrenia), diabetes mellitus (type 1, type 2 and gestational) and allergic conditions like asthma. With time, more studies were carried out relating levels of vitamin D to development of asthma, asthma exacerbations and risk factors leading to development of asthma like respiratory tract infections with positive associations. A number of studies were carried out which tried to explain the possible molecular mechanisms relating deficiency of vitamin D in pathogenesis of asthma. This review summarizes the role of vitamin D in development of asthma and probable mechanisms relating vitamin D to the pathogenesis of asthma.

  13. Does vitamin d deficiency contribute to the severity of asthma in children and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.Z.A.; Hameed, K.; Jaleel, A.

    2015-01-01

    Role of vitamin D in the health of bones has been well established for over decades. It was known that its deficiency caused rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Later it was discovered that these can be corrected by giving vitamin D. Researchers discovered that vitamin D can be synthesized by exposure to sun. Hence it was also named t he sunshine vitamin . As time passed it was observed that low levels of vitamin D were associated with multiple diseases. This sparked the interest of the scientific community to further the research on vitamin D which led to the studies that started associating vitamin D with various diseases like cancers (prostate, colon and breast), autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis), infectious diseases (tuberculosis, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV), cardiovascular diseases, mental illnesses (schizophrenia), diabetes mellitus (type 1, type 2 and gestational) and allergic conditions like asthma. With time, more studies were carried out relating levels of vitamin D to development of asthma, asthma exacerbations and risk factors leading to development of asthma like respiratory tract infections with positive associations. A number of studies were carried out which tried to explain the possible molecular mechanisms relating deficiency of vitamin D in pathogenesis of asthma. This review summarizes the role of vitamin D in development of asthma and probable mechanisms relating vitamin D to the pathogenesis of asthma. (author)

  14. Clinical characteristics and outcomes between children and adults with anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi; Wu, Yuan; Qin, Rongfa; Wei, Xing; Ma, Meigang

    2016-12-01

    Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an acute neurological disorder affecting children and adults. We aimed to compare the clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes between children and adults with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and to assess the probable risk factors. In this observational study, patients who tested positive for anti-NMDAR antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid were enrolled. The patients were divided into children and adults group on the basis of age (whether <16 or not). Clinical outcomes were assessed at onset, 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the patients received treatment and were scored based on whether they required hospitalization and intensive care. A total of 15 children and 14 adults were examined. The adults more likely manifested status epilepticus, central hypoventilation, and pneumonia but less likely exhibited movement disorder than the children did. All of the patients were subjected to corticosteroid treatment, 11 children and 9 adults were treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, and only the adults received plasma exchange or cyclophosphamide. The children recovered faster than the adults, especially in the first 6 months. Risk factors included age, status epilepticus, changes in consciousness, central hypoventilation, and pneumonia. Adults exhibit worse outcomes than children mostly because of status epilepticus.

  15. Insiders' Perspectives: A Children's Rights Approach to Involving Children in Advising on Adult-Initiated Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Consulting with children is widely recognised as an essential element in building understanding about children's lives. From a children's rights perspective, it is also a legal requirement on professionals working with children. However, translating the rhetoric into research and practice is still evolving. Previous studies report on working with…

  16. Ankle muscle activity modulation during single-leg stance differs between children, young adults and seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Eduard; Faude, Oliver; Roth, Ralf; Zahner, Lukas; Donath, Lars

    2018-02-01

    Incomplete maturation and aging-induced declines of the neuromuscular system affect postural control both in children and older adults and lead to high fall rates. Age-specific comparisons of the modulation of ankle muscle activation and behavioral center of pressure (COP) indices during upright stance have been rarely conducted. The objective of the present study was to quantify aging effects on a neuromuscular level. Thus, surface electromyography (SEMG) modulation and co-activity of ankle muscles during single-leg standing was compared in healthy children, young adults and seniors. Postural steadiness (velocity and mean sway frequency of COP), relative muscle activation (SEMG modulation) and co-activation of two ankle muscles (tibialis anterior, TA; soleus, SO) were examined during single-leg stance in 19 children [age, 9.7 (SD 0.5) years], 30 adults [23.3 (1.5) years] and 29 seniors [62.7 (6.1) years]. Velocity of COP in medio-lateral and anterior-posterior directions, mean sway frequency in anterior-posterior direction, relative muscle activation (TA and SO) and co-activation revealed large age effects (P  0.14). Post-hoc comparisons indicated higher COP velocities, anterior-posterior frequencies, relative SO activation and co-activation in children and seniors when compared with adults. Relative TA activation was higher in children and adults compared with seniors (P seniors seems to be counteracted with higher TA/SO co-activity and SO modulation. However, TA modulation is higher in children and adults, whereas seniors' TA modulation capacity is diminished. An aging-induced decline of TA motor units might account for deteriorations of TA modulation in seniors.

  17. The Effects of Spatial Enclosure on Social Interaction Between Older Adults With Dementia and Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Minyoung S; Shepley, Mardelle M

    2016-04-01

    To examine the impact of spatial enclosures on social interaction between older adults with early stage dementia and young children. Intergenerational interaction through meaningful activities can promote positive affects and behaviors of children and older adults. The development of social interaction is closely related to the physical environment in association with personal competence of older adults with dementia and young children. However, minimal attention has been given to the role of physical environment in influencing intergenerational interaction. A quasi-experiment examined the functional relationship between the amount of spatial enclosure and the types of social behaviors of older adults with dementia and young children. Semi-structured interviews, aided by a photographic simulation, were developed to explore the participants' perceptions of and experiences with the different degrees of spatial enclosure. Findings showed that the semienclosed spatial plan impacted both prosocial and antisocial behaviors of older adults with dementia in their interactions with young children. This apparent discrepancy was associated with two conflicting perceptions: a sense of openness and the lack of control due to distraction created by the loose visual boundary. There was no correlation between the elder-child neutral behaviors and the degrees of spatial enclosure. This study suggests that spaces with moderate openness without visual and acoustic distraction are the most desirable to promote prosocial behaviors of older adults with dementia and young children. Additionally, elder-child prosocial behaviors were likely facilitated by specific design features such as adequate personal space, the perception of openness, and possible spaces that provide both prospect and refuge in relation to spatial enclosure. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Cancer in children and young adults born after assisted reproductive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundh, Karin Jerhamre; Henningsen, Anna-Karina A; Källen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Do children and young adults born after assisted reproductive technology (ART) have an increased risk of cancer? SUMMARY ANSWER: Children born after ART showed no overall increase in the rate of cancer when compared with children born as a result of spontaneous conception. WHAT...... IS KNOWN ALREADY: Children born after ART have more adverse perinatal outcomes, i.e. preterm births, low birthweights and birth defects. Previous studies have shown divergent results regarding the risk of cancer among children born after ART. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A retrospective Nordic population...... group of children born after spontaneous conception. This control group was almost 4-fold the size of the ART group (n = 358 419) and matched for parity, year of birth and country. Data on perinatal outcomes and cancer were obtained from the National Medical Birth Registries, the Cancer Registries...

  19. The clinical implication of drug dependency in children and adults with inflammatory bowel disease: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duricova, Dana; Pedersen, Natalia; Lenicek, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Drug dependency in adult and paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is described and the significance of this response pattern in clinical practice discussed in this review. Dependent patients maintain remission while on the treatment, but they relapse shortly after drug...... corticosteroid dependency. Infliximab dependency was described in 42-66% of children and 29% of adults with Crohn's disease. The risk of surgery 50 and 40 months after treatment start was 10% and 23% in infliximab dependent children and adults, respectively. Maintenance of infliximab in dependent patients...... was suggested to postpone if not avoid the need of surgery. Lastly, mesalazine dependency was identified in 23% of adults with Crohn's disease. These patients were characterized by mild disease course and lower surgical risk compared to non-responders to mesalazine (32 vs. 61%). Identification of drug...

  20. Effect of generalized joint hypermobility on knee function and muscle activation in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Olesen, Annesofie T.; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated muscle activation strategy and performance of knee extensor and flexor muscles in children and adults with generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) and compared them with controls. Methods: Muscle activation, torque steadiness, electromechanical delay, and muscle strength...... were evaluated in 39 children and 36 adults during isometric knee extension and flexion. Subjects performed isometric maximum contractions, submaximal contractions at 25% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and explosive contractions. Results: Agonist activation was reduced, and coactivation ratio...... was greater in GJH during knee flexion compared with controls. Torque steadiness was impaired in adults with GJH during knee flexion. No effect of GJH was found on muscle strength or electromechanical delay. Correlation analysis revealed an association between GJH severity and function in adults. Conclusions...

  1. Tuberculosis risk factors in children with smear-positive tuberculosis adult as household contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Hajarsjah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Children in household contact of adults with smear-positive tuberculosis (TB are at higher risk of TB infection. Screening of these children is a main strategy for eliminating childhood TB. Objective To determine risk factors of TB among children in household contact with smear-positive adult TB patients. Methods This case-control study was conducted in 5 public health centers at Batu Bara District, North Sumatera. We studied children from birth to 18 year-old living in the same house as adults with smear-positive TB. A tuberculosis scoring system was used to diagnosis TB in the children. Associations between risk factors and the incidence of TB were analyzed using Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U, and logistic regression tests. Results We enrolled 145 children who had household contact with smear-positive adult TB patients. Subjects were allocated to either the case group [TB score >6; 61 subjects (42.0%] or the control group [TB score <6; 84 subjects (58.0%]. Bivariate analysis revealed that nutritional status, immunization status, number of people in the house, sleeping in the same bed, and duration of household contact had significant associations with the incidence of TB. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, nutritional status and duration of household contact were significant risk factors for TB, with OR 5.89 and 8.91, respectively. Conclusion Malnutrition and duration of household contact with smear-positive adult TB patients of more than 6 hours per day were risk factors for TB among children.

  2. Joint dynamics and intra-subject variability during countermovement jumps in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter C; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated lower limb joint work, lower limb joint energy transport and intra-subject variation of the joint dynamics during countermovement jumps in children and adults. Twelve healthy men and eleven healthy boys performed ten maximal countermovement jumps. Three dimensional...... kinematics and kinetics were recorded in synchrony. Hip, knee and ankle joint eccentric and concentric work, joint energy transfer, intra-subject variation of joint moment, joint power and joint moment components were calculated. The children had lower eccentric and concentric hip work and lower eccentric...... work, hip joint moment and hip and knee joint power. Higher intra-subject variation was observed in horizontal joint reaction force components for the children and higher intra-subject variation in the segment angular inertia components was observed for the adults. The joint dynamics of children during...

  3. Psychological essentialism among Korean children and adults: a modified replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geunyoung

    2013-01-01

    Developmental psychologists have shown interest in the development of psychological essentialism among children; that is, a belief that certain psychological characteristics (such as personality) are relatively stable and unchanging. Although previous studies have shown that children are essentialistic about human traits, and the coherence among various essentialism dimensions increases with age, moderating cultural factors in the development of essentialism, especially among Asian children, have received little attention. Using the methodologies of Gelman, Heyman, and Legare (2007), levels of psychological essentialism among Korean children and adults were measured, and compared with the original US data. Results demonstrated cross-cultural similarity in the development of coherence in essentialistic thought, and difference in the level of essentialism among adult participants. The present findings imply that different cultural values between Asians and Westerners can play a role in the developmental trajectory of psychological essentialism.

  4. Algodystrophy in children and young adults with isotopic bony hypofixation. A propos of 5 observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doury, P.; Pattin, S.; Eulry, F.; Granier, R.; Gaillard, F.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report 5 observations of young adults 3 teen-agers and 2 children suffering from algodystrophy, and in whom isotopic exploration of the skeleton disclosed a clear bony hypofixation during the entire evolution. These observations confirm their 1981 work concerning a young adult suffering from algodystrophy with isotopic bony hypofixation. Recent Canadian and American studies emphasize also the frequency of isotopic hypofixation in children algodystrophy. It seems, therefore, that isotopic bony hypofixation (linked perhaps to a decreased blood flow), is rather specific of algodystrophy in young subjects [fr

  5. Diseases of the circulatory system among adult people diagnosed with infantile autism as children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research dealing with adult people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) noticeably lags behind studies of children and young individuals with ASD. AIMS: The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence and types of diseases of the circulatory system in a clinical sample of 118...... adult people diagnosed with infantile autism (IA) as children with 336 sex and age matched controls from the general population. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: All participants were screened through the nationwide Danish National Hospital Register. The average observation time of both groups was 37.2 years...

  6. "That never happened": adults' discernment of children's true and false memory reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Stephanie D; Shestowsky, Donna; Segovia, Daisy A; Goodman, Gail S; Schaaf, Jennifer M; Alexander, Kristen Weede

    2012-10-01

    Adults' evaluations of children's reports can determine whether legal proceedings are undertaken and whether they ultimately lead to justice. The current study involved 92 undergraduates and 35 laypersons who viewed and evaluated videotaped interviews of 3- and 5-year-olds providing true or false memory reports. The children's reports fell into the following categories based on a 2 (event type: true vs. false) × 2 (child report: assent vs. denial) factorial design: accurate reports, false reports, accurate denials, and false denials. Results revealed that adults were generally better able to correctly judge accurate reports, accurate denials, and false reports compared with false denials: For false denials, adults were, on average, "confident" that the event had not occurred, even though the event had in fact been experienced. Participant age predicted performance. These findings underscore the greater difficulty adults have in evaluating young children's false denials compared with other types of reports. Implications for law-related situations in which adults are called upon to evaluate children's statements are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. The bleeding time may be longer in children than in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J M; Holtkamp, C A; Buchanan, G R

    1990-01-01

    The bleeding time, the most frequently performed test reflecting in vivo platelet function, is the duration of blood flow from a standardized incision on the volar surface of the forearm. Normal values have been determined in adult subjects, but with the exception of neonates, data on the range of bleeding time values in pediatric patients are unavailable. Standard hematology textbooks imply that bleeding time values in children are similar to those of adults. We have reviewed our 9 years of experience with 137 children (mean age 6.5 years) who were referred for diagnostic evaluation of a bleeding disorder but whose history and physical examination were felt by us to be inconsistent with an abnormality of hemostasis. Bleeding time values in these individuals (mean 6.0 min, 95th percentile 9.0 min) were compared with those of 85 normal adult volunteers (mean 4.4 min, 95th percentile 6.5 min). The Simplate-I disposable device and vertical (perpendicular to elbow crease) incision direction were used in both groups. This difference between the pediatric and adult bleeding time values is statistically significant (p less than 0.0001). Neither age nor sex had a significant effect on the pediatric bleeding time measurements. We conclude that the bleeding time, when performed as described, is longer in children than in adults and that pediatric standards for bleeding time should be used in order to avoid a spurious diagnosis of a primary hemostatic disorder in some normal children.

  8. Vicarious Learning and Reduction of Fear in Children via Adult and Child Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Güler; Askew, Chris

    2017-06-01

    Children can learn to fear stimuli vicariously, by observing adults' or peers' responses to them. Given that much of school-age children's time is typically spent with their peers, it is important to establish whether fear learning from peers is as effective or robust as learning from adults, and also whether peers can be successful positive models for reducing fear. During a vicarious fear learning procedure, children (6 to 10 years; N = 60) were shown images of novel animals together with images of adult or peer faces expressing fear. Later they saw their fear-paired animal again together with positive emotional adult or peer faces. Children's fear beliefs and avoidance for the animals increased following vicarious fear learning and decreased following positive vicarious counterconditioning. There was little evidence of differences in learning from adults and peers, demonstrating that for this age group peer models are effective models for both fear acquisition and reduction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Predictive saccades in children and adults: A combined fMRI and eye tracking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Lukasova

    Full Text Available Saccades were assessed in 21 adults (age 24 years, SD = 4 and 15 children (age 11 years, SD = 1, using combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and eye-tracking. Subjects visually tracked a point on a horizontal line in four conditions: time and position predictable task (PRED, position predictable (pPRED, time predictable (tPRED and visually guided saccades (SAC. Both groups in the PRED but not in pPRED, tPRED and SAC produced predictive saccades with latency below 80 ms. In task versus group comparisons, children's showed less efficient learning compared to adults for predictive saccades (adults = 48%, children = 34%, p = 0.05. In adults brain activation was found in the frontal and occipital regions in the PRED, in the intraparietal sulcus in pPRED and in the frontal eye field, posterior intraparietal sulcus and medial regions in the tPRED task. Group-task interaction was found in the supplementary eye field and visual cortex in the PRED task, and the frontal cortex including the right frontal eye field and left frontal pole, in the pPRED condition. These results indicate that, the basic visuomotor circuitry is present in both adults and children, but fine-tuning of the activation according to the task temporal and spatial demand mature late in child development.

  10. In Need of Creative Mobile Service Ideas? Forget Adults and Ask Young Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Kuzmickaja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well acknowledged that innovation is a key success factor in the mobile service domain. Having creative ideas is the first critical step in the innovation process. Many studies suggest that customers are a valuable source of creative ideas. However, the literature also shows that adults may be constrained by existing technology frames, which are known to hinder creativity. Instead young children (aged 7-12 are considered digital natives yet are free from existing technology frames. This led us to study them as a potential source for creative mobile service ideas. A set of 41,000 mobile ideas obtained from a research project in 2006 granted us a unique opportunity to study the mobile service ideas from young children. We randomly selected two samples of ideas (N = 400 each; one contained the ideas from young children, the other from adults (aged 17-50. These ideas were evaluated by several evaluators using an existing creativity framework. The results show that the mobile service ideas from the young children are significantly more original, transformational, implementable, and relevant than those from the adults. Therefore, this study shows that young children are better sources of novel and quality ideas than adults in the mobile services domain. This study bears significant contributions to the creativity and innovation research. It also indicates a new and valuable source for the companies that seek creative ideas for innovative products and services.

  11. Comparison of normal adult and children brain SPECT imaging using statistical parametric mapping(SPM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myoung Hoon; Yoon, Seok Nam; Joh, Chul Woo; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung

    2002-01-01

    This study compared rCBF pattern in normal adult and normal children using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The purpose of this study was to determine distribution pattern not seen visual analysis in both groups. Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT was performed in 12 normal adults (M:F=11:1, average age 35 year old) and 6 normal control children (M:F=4:2, 10.5±3.1y) who visited psychiatry clinic to evaluate ADHD. Their brain SPECT revealed normal rCBF pattern in visual analysis and they were diagnosed clinically normal. Using SPM method, we compared normal adult group's SPECT images with those of 6 normal children subjects and measured the extent of the area with significant hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion (p<0.001, extent threshold=16). The areas of both angnlar gyrus, both postcentral gyrus, both superior frontal gyrus, and both superior parietal lobe showed significant hyperperfusion in normal adult group compared with normal children group. The areas of left amygdala gyrus, brain stem, both cerebellum, left globus pallidus, both hippocampal formations, both parahippocampal gyrus, both thalamus, both uncus, both lateral and medial occipitotemporal gyrus revealed significantly hyperperfusion in the children. These results demonstrated that SPM can say more precise anatomical area difference not seen visual analysis

  12. Comparison of normal adult and children brain SPECT imaging using statistical parametric mapping(SPM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Hoon; Yoon, Seok Nam; Joh, Chul Woo; Lee, Dong Soo [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung [Seoul national University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    This study compared rCBF pattern in normal adult and normal children using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The purpose of this study was to determine distribution pattern not seen visual analysis in both groups. Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT was performed in 12 normal adults (M:F=11:1, average age 35 year old) and 6 normal control children (M:F=4:2, 10.5{+-}3.1y) who visited psychiatry clinic to evaluate ADHD. Their brain SPECT revealed normal rCBF pattern in visual analysis and they were diagnosed clinically normal. Using SPM method, we compared normal adult group's SPECT images with those of 6 normal children subjects and measured the extent of the area with significant hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion (p<0.001, extent threshold=16). The areas of both angnlar gyrus, both postcentral gyrus, both superior frontal gyrus, and both superior parietal lobe showed significant hyperperfusion in normal adult group compared with normal children group. The areas of left amygdala gyrus, brain stem, both cerebellum, left globus pallidus, both hippocampal formations, both parahippocampal gyrus, both thalamus, both uncus, both lateral and medial occipitotemporal gyrus revealed significantly hyperperfusion in the children. These results demonstrated that SPM can say more precise anatomical area difference not seen visual analysis.

  13. Multiple Types of Memory and Everyday Functional Assessment in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Jenna

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective Current proxy measures for assessing everyday functioning (e.g., questionnaires, performance-based measures, and direct observation) show discrepancies in their rating of functional status. The present study investigated the relationship between multiple proxy measures of functional status and content memory (i.e., memory for information), temporal order memory, and prospective memory in an older adult sample. Method A total of 197 community-dwelling older adults who did (n = 45) or did not meet (n = 152) criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), completed six different assessments of functional status (two questionnaires, two performance-based tasks, and two direct observation tasks) as well as experimental measures of content memory, prospective memory, and temporal order memory. Results After controlling for demographics and content memory, the temporal order and prospective memory measures explained a significant amount of variance in all proxy functional status measures. When all variables were entered into the regression analyses, content memory and prospective memory were found to be significant predictors of all measures of functional status, whereas temporal order memory was a significant predictor for the questionnaire and direct observation measures, but not performance-based measures. Conclusion The results suggest that direct observation and questionnaire measures may be able to capture components of everyday functioning that require context and temporal sequencing abilities, such as multi-tasking, that are not as well captured in many current laboratory performance-based measures of functional status. Future research should aim to inform the development and use of maximally effective and valid proxy measures of functional ability. PMID:28334170

  14. Multiple Types of Memory and Everyday Functional Assessment in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Jenna; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2017-06-01

    Current proxy measures for assessing everyday functioning (e.g., questionnaires, performance-based measures, and direct observation) show discrepancies in their rating of functional status. The present study investigated the relationship between multiple proxy measures of functional status and content memory (i.e., memory for information), temporal order memory, and prospective memory in an older adult sample. A total of 197 community-dwelling older adults who did (n = 45) or did not meet (n = 152) criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), completed six different assessments of functional status (two questionnaires, two performance-based tasks, and two direct observation tasks) as well as experimental measures of content memory, prospective memory, and temporal order memory. After controlling for demographics and content memory, the temporal order and prospective memory measures explained a significant amount of variance in all proxy functional status measures. When all variables were entered into the regression analyses, content memory and prospective memory were found to be significant predictors of all measures of functional status, whereas temporal order memory was a significant predictor for the questionnaire and direct observation measures, but not performance-based measures. The results suggest that direct observation and questionnaire measures may be able to capture components of everyday functioning that require context and temporal sequencing abilities, such as multi-tasking, that are not as well captured in many current laboratory performance-based measures of functional status. Future research should aim to inform the development and use of maximally effective and valid proxy measures of functional ability. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Is Divorce More Painful When Couples Have Children? Evidence From Long-Term Panel Data on Multiple Domains of Well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Thomas; Kalmijn, Matthijs

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical models of the divorce process suggest that marital breakup is more painful in the presence of children, yet little is known about the role of children as a moderator of divorce effects on adult well-being. The present study addresses this gap of research based on long-term panel data from Germany (SOEP). Following individuals over several years before and after divorce, we investigated whether the impact of divorce on multiple measures of well-being varied by the presence and age of children before marital breakup. Three central findings emerged from the analysis. First, declines in well-being were sharper in the presence of children, and these moderator effects were larger if children were younger. Second, domain-specific measures of well-being revealed gender differences in the moderating role of children. Mothers sustained deeper drops in economic well-being than did fathers; the reverse was true for family well-being. Third, most of these disproportionate declines in the well-being of divorced parents did not persist in the long term given that higher rates of adaptation leveled out the gaps compared with childless divorcees.

  16. Methylphenidate and comorbid anxiety disorder in children with both chronic multiple tic disorder and ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D; Nolan, Edith E

    2011-04-01

    To determine if comorbid anxiety disorder is associated with differential response to immediate release methylphenidate (MPH-IR) in children with both ADHD and chronic multiple tic disorder (CMTD). Children with (n = 17) and without (n = 37) diagnosed anxiety disorder (ANX) were evaluated in an 8-week, placebo-controlled trial with rating scales and laboratory measures. The +ANX group obtained more severe parent, teacher, and child ratings of anxiety and more severe parent ratings of depression, tics, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and peer aggression than the -ANX group. Treatment with short-term MPH-IR was associated with improvement in ADHD, ODD, and peer aggression in the +ANX group. When controlling for ODD severity, there were no apparent group differences in therapeutic response to MPH-IR in children ±ANX. There was little evidence that MPH-IR contributed to improvement in anxiety or depression symptoms in the +ANX group. There was some indication that children with comorbid anxiety may differentially experience greater increase in systolic blood pressure (0.5 mg/kg of MPH-IR > placebo). Findings suggest that the co-occurrence of diagnosed CMTD+ADHD+ANX represents a particularly troublesome clinical phenotype, at least in the home setting. Comorbid anxiety disorder was not associated with a less favorable response to MPH-IR in children with ADHD+CMTD, but replication with larger samples is warranted before firm conclusions can be drawn about potential group differences.

  17. Short-term cardiorespiratory adaptation to high altitude in children compared with adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriemler, S; Radtke, T; Bürgi, F; Lambrecht, J; Zehnder, M; Brunner-La Rocca, H P

    2016-02-01

    As short-term cardiorespiratory adaptation to high altitude (HA) exposure has not yet been studied in children, we assessed acute mountain sickness (AMS), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) at rest and maximal exercise capacity (CPET) at low altitude (LA) and HA in pre-pubertal children and their fathers. Twenty father-child pairs (11 ± 1 years and 44 ± 4 years) were tested at LA (450 m) and HA (3450 m) at days 1, 2, and 3 after fast ascent (HA1/2/3). HVR was measured at rest and CPET was performed on a cycle ergometer. AMS severity was mild to moderate with no differences between generations. HVR was higher in children than adults at LA and increased at HA similarly in both groups. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) relative to body weight was similar in children and adults at LA and decreased significantly by 20% in both groups at HA; maximal heart rate did not change at HA in children while it decreased by 16% in adults (P < 0.001). Changes in HVR and VO2 peak from LA to HA were correlated among the biological child-father pairs. In conclusion, cardiorespiratory adaptation to altitude seems to be at least partly hereditary. Even though children and their fathers lose similar fractions of aerobic capacity going to high altitude, the mechanisms might be different. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A cross-sectional study examining multiple mobility device use and fall status among middle-aged and older adults with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Marcia L; Peterson, Elizabeth W; Asano, Miho

    2014-01-01

    To document the prevalence of multiple mobility device use among adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) (≥ 55 years) and examine the association between falls status (faller/non-faller) and the number of mobility devices used. Cross-sectional data generated through telephone interviews with 353 participants was used for this secondary analysis. Descriptive statistics were used to address the first study purpose. Multiple device use was measured by the number of devices used, which ranged from 0 (never use a cane, walker, manual wheelchair, or power wheelchair/scooter) to 4 (use all four mobility devices at least some of the time). Logistic regression analysis was used to address the second purpose, with fall status used as the dependent variable (non-fallers [falls, this association requires further research to determine directionality.

  19. Resistance Training in Children and Young Adults: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Shenouda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance training is a method used by many athletes to increase their levels of performance. The benefits of this method are known to be increased strength, power and endurance. Resistance training in children has been a topic that has been long debated and there are some widely accepted beliefs and principles that guide clinicians involved in the discipline of sport and exercise medicine. While weight training is a form of resistance training that has proven beneficial effects on health and wellbeing, powerlifting and heavy weight training should be avoided, as lifting maximal weights through various ranges of motion as fast as possible can lead to serious limb injuries. In order to determine the risks and benefits of resistance training in children and adolescents, it is important to review the literature to find a clear consensus. Further prospective research should be completed to determine the long-term sequelae of resistance training in children in comparison to the general population.

  20. Identification of exposure to environmental chemicals in children and older adults using human biomonitoring data sorted by age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Judy; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Mizrak, Seher

    2017-01-01

    /classes of chemicals with potentially higher body burden in children or older adults. Children appear to have higher body burden of bisphenol A (BPA), some phytoestrogens, perchlorate, and some metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and benzene. On the other hand, older adults appear to have higher body...

  1. Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder as Behavior Technicians for Young Children with Autism: Outcomes of a Behavioral Skills Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Hawkins, Lynn; Hillman, Conrad; Shireman, Molly; Nissen, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who were interested in working as behavior technicians for young children with autism, participated in 2 experiments. Participants included 5 adults with Asperger syndrome or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, 19 to 23 years old, and 11 children with autism, 3 to 7 years old. In…

  2. The Other Side of Caring: Adult Children with Mental Illness as Supports to Their Mothers in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jan Steven

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the role of adult children with serious mental illness as a source of support to their aging parents. Most mothers reported that their mentally-ill children provided at least some ongoing help with daily living tasks. The adult child's assistance related significantly to lower levels of maternal subjective burden. (RJM)

  3. Outcome of Total Parathyroidectomy and Autotransplantation as Treatment of Secondary and Tertiary Hyperparathyroidism in Children and Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, A. J.; Tinnemans, J. G. M.; Idu, M. M.; Groothoff, J. W.; Surachno, S.; Aronson, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment safety and effectiveness of total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation for secondary and tertiary hyperparathyroidism have been extensively proven in adults; the evidence for children, however, is scarce. Children and adolescents cannot simply be seen as young adults in the case of

  4. Subcortical brain volume differences in participants with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogman, Martine; Bralten, Janita; Hibar, Derrek P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuroimaging studies have shown structural alterations in several brain regions in children and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Through the formation of the international ENIGMA ADHD Working Group, we aimed to address weaknesses of previous imaging studies...... and adults for the pallidum (p=0·79) or thalamus (p=0·89). Case-control differences in adults were non-significant (all p>0·03). Psychostimulant medication use (all p>0·15) or symptom scores (all p>0·02) did not influence results, nor did the presence of comorbid psychiatric disorders (all p>0...

  5. Home Kitchen Safety Lessons for Children and Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wingfield, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design a series of lessons introducing food safety concepts and hand washing to children ages three to five, which is a group that is considered an ‘at risk’ population with food safety regards. There are other curriculum that reach this audience, but the intent of this one is to target stay-at-home mothers, whose children are not in preschool. The project goal is to teach the mother and child food safety concepts while simultaneously using hands on cooking ...

  6. Acquiring variation in an artificial language: Children and adults are sensitive to socially conditioned linguistic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Anna; Smith, Kenny; Brown, Helen; Wonnacott, Elizabeth

    2017-05-01

    Languages exhibit sociolinguistic variation, such that adult native speakers condition the usage of linguistic variants on social context, gender, and ethnicity, among other cues. While the existence of this kind of socially conditioned variation is well-established, less is known about how it is acquired. Studies of naturalistic language use by children provide various examples where children's production of sociolinguistic variants appears to be conditioned on similar factors to adults' production, but it is difficult to determine whether this reflects knowledge of sociolinguistic conditioning or systematic differences in the input to children from different social groups. Furthermore, artificial language learning experiments have shown that children have a tendency to eliminate variation, a process which could potentially work against their acquisition of sociolinguistic variation. The current study used a semi-artificial language learning paradigm to investigate learning of the sociolinguistic cue of speaker identity in 6-year-olds and adults. Participants were trained and tested on an artificial language where nouns were obligatorily followed by one of two meaningless particles and were produced by one of two speakers (one male, one female). Particle usage was conditioned deterministically on speaker identity (Experiment 1), probabilistically (Experiment 2), or not at all (Experiment 3). Participants were given tests of production and comprehension. In Experiments 1 and 2, both children and adults successfully acquired the speaker identity cue, although the effect was stronger for adults and in Experiment 1. In addition, in all three experiments, there was evidence of regularization in participants' productions, although the type of regularization differed with age: children showed regularization by boosting the frequency of one particle at the expense of the other, while adults regularized by conditioning particle usage on lexical items. Overall, results

  7. Obesity and rhinitis in a nationwide study of children and adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yueh-Ying; Forno, Erick; Gogna, Mudita; Celedón, Juan C

    2016-05-01

    Obesity has been associated with higher risk of asthma and asthma severity both in children and adults. However, studies evaluating the relation between obesity and rhinitis have yielded conflicting results. We performed a cross-sectional study of obesity indicators and rhinitis using data from 8165 participants in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Allergic rhinitis was defined as physician-diagnosed hay fever or allergy, the presence of symptoms in the past 12 months, and at least 1 positive allergen-specific IgE level. Nonallergic rhinitis was defined as a physician's diagnosis and symptoms but no positive allergen-specific IgE levels. Multivariate regression was used to assess the relationship between obesity and rhinitis in children and adults. In adults, overweight or obesity was associated with increased odds of nonallergic rhinitis (adjusted odds ratio, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.06-1.93; P = .02). Similarly, central obesity was associated with increased odds of nonallergic rhinitis in adults (adjusted odds ratio, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.20-2.16; P obesity, or central obesity were not associated with allergic rhinitis in adults. In children, central obesity was associated with reduced odds of allergic rhinitis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.19-0.64; P children. In adults, obesity is associated with increased odds of nonallergic rhinitis, particularly in male subjects. In children, central obesity is associated with reduced odds of allergic rhinitis, regardless of sex. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of growth hormone therapy on adult height of children with idiopathic short stature: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deodati, Annalisa; Cianfarani, Stefano

    2011-03-11

    To systematically determine the impact of growth hormone therapy on adult height of children with idiopathic short stature. Systematic review. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, and the bibliographic references from retrieved articles of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials from 1985 to April 2010. Height in adulthood (standard deviation score) and overall gain in height (SD score) from baseline measurement in childhood. Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials with height measurements for adults. Inclusion criteria were initial short stature (defined as height >2 SD score below the mean), peak growth hormone responses >10 μg/L, prepubertal stage, no previous growth hormone therapy, and no comorbid conditions that would impair growth. Adult height was considered achieved when growth rate was growth hormone treated children exceeded that of the controls by 0.65 SD score (about 4 cm). The mean height gain in treated children was 1.2 SD score compared with 0.34 SD score in untreated children. A slight difference of about 1.2 cm in adult height was observed between the two growth hormone dose regimens. In the seven non-randomised controlled trials the adult height of the growth hormone treated group exceeded that of the controls by 0.45 SD score (about 3 cm). Growth hormone therapy in children with idiopathic short stature seems to be effective in partially reducing the deficit in height as adults, although the magnitude of effectiveness is on average less than that achieved in other conditions for which growth hormone is licensed. The individual response to therapy is highly variable, and additional studies are needed to identify the responders.

  9. Validation of SenseWear Armband in children, adolescents, and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, G A; Brønd, J C; Andersen, L B; Dencker, M; Arvidsson, D

    2018-02-01

    SenseWear Armband (SW) is a multisensor monitor to assess physical activity and energy expenditure. Its prediction algorithms have been updated periodically. The aim was to validate SW in children, adolescents, and adults. The most recent SW algorithm 5.2 (SW5.2) and the previous version 2.2 (SW2.2) were evaluated for estimation of energy expenditure during semi-structured activities in 35 children, 31 adolescents, and 36 adults with indirect calorimetry as reference. Energy expenditure estimated from waist-worn ActiGraph GT3X+ data (AG) was used for comparison. Improvements in measurement errors were demonstrated with SW5.2 compared to SW2.2, especially in children and for biking. The overall mean absolute percent error with SW5.2 was 24% in children, 23% in adolescents, and 20% in adults. The error was larger for sitting and standing (23%-32%) and for basketball and biking (19%-35%), compared to walking and running (8%-20%). The overall mean absolute error with AG was 28% in children, 22% in adolescents, and 28% in adults. The absolute percent error for biking was 32%-74% with AG. In general, SW and AG underestimated energy expenditure. However, both methods demonstrated a proportional bias, with increasing underestimation for increasing energy expenditure level, in addition to the large individual error. SW provides measures of energy expenditure level with similar accuracy in children, adolescents, and adults with the improvements in the updated algorithms. Although SW captures biking better than AG, these methods share remaining measurements errors requiring further improvements for accurate measures of physical activity and energy expenditure in clinical and epidemiological research. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Books on Atomic Energy for Adults and Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1969-01-01

    This booklet contains two lists of atomic energy books, one for students and one for adults. The student list has grade annotations. The lists are not all-inclusive but comprise selected basic books on atomic energy and closely related subjects.

  11. Estimated use of abacavir among adults and children enrolled in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In South Africa, abacavir (ABC) is currently recommended as part of first- and second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-positive paediatric patients. Concerns about overprescribing of the drug, particularly to adults, led to an analysis of ABC use in public sector ART programmes. We investigated current prescription of ...

  12. Fear of blushing : Relations with personality among children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P.H.; Buwalda, Femke

    Despite the common nature of blushing and the feelings of discomfort that often accompany it, to date. no studies have yet examined the relationship between personality characteristics and the fear of blushing. The present study fills this gap in the literature, by examining, in a sample of adults

  13. Epidemiology of constipation in children and adults: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugie, Suzanne M.; Benninga, Marc A.; Di Lorenzo, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to review the published literature regarding the epidemiology of constipation in the general paediatric and adult population and to assess its geographic, gender and age distribution, and associated factors. A search of the Medline database was performed. Study selection criteria included:

  14. Should adolescents with glomerulopathies be treated as children or adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requião-Moura, Lúcio R; Veras de S Freitas, Tainá; Franco, Marcello F; Pereira, Aparecido B; Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna

    2008-01-01

    Glomerular diseases are an important cause of end-stage renal disease, especially among young adults. However, clinical and epidemiological surveys involving adolescent populations are scarce. To determine the pattern of glomerulopathies (GP) in adolescents submitted to renal biopsy. A retrospective study of patients' records of the Glomerulopathy Section, UNIFESP (Brazil), was performed Among 72 adolescents (12-18 years) with GP, 15.6 +/- 1.5 years, 58.3% females, the most frequent clinical manifestation was nephrotic syndrome (NS, 71%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) was the main histological pattern (24%), followed by minimal change disease (MCD, 19.5%). After comparing the main causes of NS in adolescents with those of adults, we found no statistically significant differences in clinical presentation or outcome. Renal failure-free survival of 1 and 5 years for all GP corresponded to 87.9 and 73.6%, respectively (88.5 and 76.3% for NS). NS was the main manifestation; FSGS and MCD were the most common histological diagnoses. Our data suggest the GP and particularly the NS pattern in adolescents is similar to that of adults, pointing to the need for an adaptation in diagnostic and treatment protocols for this age group, a pattern which corresponds more closely to that of adults. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition performance in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph J; Gontkovsky, Samuel T; Kreiner, David S; Tree, Heather A

    2012-01-01

    Forty patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) completed the 10 core Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) subtests. Means for age and education were 42.05 years (SD = 9.94) and 14.33 years (SD = 2.40). For all participants, the native language was English. The mean duration of MS diagnosis was 8.17 years (SD = 7.75), and the mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS; Kurtzke, 1983 ) score was 3.73 (SD = 1.41) with a range from 2.0 to 6.5. A control group of healthy individuals with similar demographic characteristics also completed the WAIS-IV and were provided by the test publisher. Compared to controls, patients with MS earned significantly lower subtest and composite scores. The patients' mean scores were consistently in the low-average to average range, and the patterns of performance across groups did not differ significantly, although there was a trend towards higher scores on the Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) and lower scores on the Processing Speed Index (PSI). Approximately 78% of patients had actual Full Scale IQs that were significantly lower than preillness, demographically based IQ estimates.

  16. Regulating Emotions-Young Children's Views on What Adults Can Do

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand the emotion regulation experience of young children, aged three to four, attending a nursery school of a Local Authority. This study aimed to reveal young children’s perspectives on emotion regulation and in particular on the way the children see adults playing a part in the children’s emotion regulation. It also aimed to explore ways of engaging young children and eliciting their views.\\ud A sample size of 6 participants together with a...

  17. Becoming an adult; the training of children in Ghana | Ampofo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although parents believed that giving rewards is effective in ensuring that children practiced or pursued certain household chores, gender related roles and adopted family life values, it appeared ... D'après les parents, la méthode de formation communément utilisée consistait à donner des consignes verbales aux enfants.

  18. Hypercholesterolaemia in children and young adults – current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    seven months of age in children at risk for hypercholesterolaemia.5-7. This is supported by the ... intima-media thickness, both which are surrogate markers of ... Limit sedentary behaviours, with no more than one or two hours per day of video ... Have regular family meals to promote social interaction and role model food-.

  19. Adult Agendas in Publishing South African Folktales for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Elwyn

    2002-01-01

    Considers how translations of indigenous folktales form a large proportion of South African children's books. Notes that at first those who published them were influenced by Social Darwinism, and later the folktales played a role in promoting the ideology of apartheid, but they were mainly the product of white paternalism. Notes that the folktales…

  20. How Can Adult Children Influence Parents’ Long-Term Care Insurance Purchase Decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voils, Corrine I.; Coe, Norma B.; Konetzka, R. Tamara; Boles, Jillian; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of the Study: Long-term care (LTC) poses a significant strain on public health insurance financing. In response, there is policy interest in bolstering the private long-term care insurance (LTCI) market. Although families are central to LTC provision, their role in LTCI demand remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to obtain in-depth information concerning: (a) How do older parents evaluate the need for LTCI, (b) what role do adult children play? and (c) How do families communicate about parents’ LTC preferences and plans, including LTCI purchase? Design and Methods: We conducted focus groups with older parents and adult children in diverse markets. Two groups were conducted with older parents who had purchased LTCI and two with parents who had not purchased LTCI. Four groups were conducted with adult children, mixed as to whether their parents had purchased LTCI. Probes were informed by published reasons for purchasing or not purchasing LTCI. We analyzed transcriptions using directed content analysis and constant comparative method. Results: Older parents valued autonomy for themselves and their children. Older parent purchasers regarded LTCI as supporting this value while nonpurchasers perceived limitations. Adult children described unstated expectations that they would care for their parents. Though discussions between parents and children about LTCI were rare, successful influence occurred when children appealed to shared values, specifically avoiding burden and remaining home. Implications: Messages that emphasize autonomy over LTC decisions and interventions that start the LTC conversation among families, with attention to shared values, could increase private LTCI uptake. PMID:25209446

  1. How Can Adult Children Influence Parents' Long-Term Care Insurance Purchase Decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, Nina R; Voils, Corrine I; Coe, Norma B; Konetzka, R Tamara; Boles, Jillian; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold

    2017-04-01

    Long-term care (LTC) poses a significant strain on public health insurance financing. In response, there is policy interest in bolstering the private long-term care insurance (LTCI) market. Although families are central to LTC provision, their role in LTCI demand remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to obtain in-depth information concerning: (a) How do older parents evaluate the need for LTCI, (b) what role do adult children play? and (c) How do families communicate about parents' LTC preferences and plans, including LTCI purchase? We conducted focus groups with older parents and adult children in diverse markets. Two groups were conducted with older parents who had purchased LTCI and two with parents who had not purchased LTCI. Four groups were conducted with adult children, mixed as to whether their parents had purchased LTCI. Probes were informed by published reasons for purchasing or not purchasing LTCI. We analyzed transcriptions using directed content analysis and constant comparative method. Older parents valued autonomy for themselves and their children. Older parent purchasers regarded LTCI as supporting this value while nonpurchasers perceived limitations. Adult children described unstated expectations that they would care for their parents. Though discussions between parents and children about LTCI were rare, successful influence occurred when children appealed to shared values, specifically avoiding burden and remaining home. Messages that emphasize autonomy over LTC decisions and interventions that start the LTC conversation among families, with attention to shared values, could increase private LTCI uptake. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Education-Related Parameters in High Myopia: Adults versus School Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost B Jonas

    Full Text Available Since high myopia in the younger generation may differ etiologically from high myopia in older generations, we examined whether education-related parameters differ between high myopia in today´s school children and high pathological myopia in today´s elderly generation.The investigation included the adult populations of the population-based Beijing Eye Study (BES (3468 adults;mean age:64.6±9.8years;range:50-93years and Central India Eye and Medical Study (CIEMS (4711 adults;age:49.±13.2years;range:30-100years, and the children and teenager populations of the Shandong Children Eye Study (SCES (6026 children;age:9.7±3.3years;range:4-18years;cycloplegic refractometry, Gobi Desert Children Eye Study (1565;age:11.9±3.5years;range:6-21 years;cycloplegic refractometry, Beijing Pediatric Eye Study (681 children;age:7.7±1.6years;range:5-13 years;non-cycloplegic refractometry,calculation of axial length to corneal curvature radius ratio, Beijing Children Eye Study (15066 children;age:13.2±3.4years;range:7-18years;non-cycloplegic refractometry, Beijing High School Teenager Eye Study (4677 children;age:16.9±0.7years;range:16-18years;non-cycloplegic refractometry.In the BES and CIEMS, educational level did not differ significantly between, or was significantly lower in the highly myopic group (myopic refractive error ≥6 diopters than in the non-highly myopic group. In all non-adult study populations, higher prevalence of high myopia was significantly associated with higher degree of education related parameters such as attendance of high-level schools, and more time spent for indoors near work versus time spent outdoors.Comparing associations of old or genetic high myopia in adults with new or acquired high myopia in school children revealed that education-related parameters did not show a clear association with old or genetic high myopia, while in contrast, new high myopia showed strong associations with education. It confirms previous studies

  3. Adults with autism spectrum disorder as behavior technicians for young children with autism: Outcomes of a behavioral skills training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Dorothea C; Hawkins, Lynn; Hillman, Conrad; Shireman, Molly; Nissen, Melissa A

    2015-01-01

    Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who were interested in working as behavior technicians for young children with autism, participated in 2 experiments. Participants included 5 adults with Asperger syndrome or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, 19 to 23 years old, and 11 children with autism, 3 to 7 years old. In Experiment 1, training of the adults focused on the implementation of mand training via incidental teaching. Experiment 2 focused on teaching participants to use discrete-trial training (DTT) with children who exhibited problem behavior. Both experiments showed that behavioral skills training was effective for teaching the adult participants the behavioral procedures needed to teach children with autism. In addition, the children acquired skills as a result of training. Results of Experiment 2 further demonstrated that the DTT skills generalized across untrained targets and children. Social validity ratings suggested that some participants' teaching was indistinguishable from that of individuals without ASD. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  4. Real-world volatile organic compound emission rates from seated adults and children for use in indoor air studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stönner, C; Edtbauer, A; Williams, J

    2018-01-01

    Human beings emit many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of both endogenous (internally produced) and exogenous (external source) origin. Here we present real-world emission rates of volatile organic compounds from cinema audiences (50-230 people) as a function of time in multiple screenings of three films. The cinema location and film selection allowed high-frequency measurement of human-emitted VOCs within a room flushed at a known rate so that emissions rates could be calculated for both adults and children. Gas-phase emission rates are analyzed as a function of time of day, variability during the film, and age of viewer. The average emission rates of CO 2 , acetone, and isoprene were lower (by a factor of ~1.2-1.4) for children under twelve compared to adults while for acetaldehyde emission rates were equivalent. Molecules influenced by exogenous sources such as decamethylcyclopentasiloxanes and methanol tended to decrease over the course of day and then rise for late evening screenings. These results represent average emission rates of people under real-world conditions and can be used in indoor air quality assessments and building design. Averaging over a large number of people generates emission rates that are less susceptible to individual behaviors. © 2017 The Authors. Indoor Air published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families: Treatment from a Disenfranchised Grief Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanick, Corinne E.

    1994-01-01

    Generalizes concept of disenfranchised grief to understanding of recovery process for adult children of dysfunctional families. Describes recovery process of this population as parallel to grief process. Identifies two layers of unrecognized loss: loss of one's childhood and loss of one's fantasized and idealized parent. Suggests specific…

  6. Children and Adults Use Gender and Age Stereotypes in Ownership Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Sarah; Defeyter, Margaret A.; Friedman, Ori

    2014-01-01

    In everyday life, we are often faced with the problem of judging who owns an object. The current experiments show that children and adults base ownership judgments on group stereotypes, which relate kinds of people to kinds of objects. Moreover, the experiments show that reliance on stereotypes can override another means by which people make…

  7. Myocardial delayed-enhancement CT: initial experience in children and young adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Clinical utility of myocardial delayed enhancement CT has not been reported in children and young adults. To describe initial experience of myocardial delayed enhancement CT regarding image quality, radiation dose and identification of myocardial lesions in children and young adults. Between August 2013 and November 2016, 29 consecutive children and young adults (median age 16 months) with suspected coronary artery or myocardial abnormality underwent arterial- and delayed-phase cardiac CT at our institution. We measured CT densities in normal myocardium, left ventricular cavity, and arterial and delayed hypo-enhancing and delayed hyperenhancing myocardial lesions. We then compared the extent of delayed hyperenhancing lesions with delayed-enhancement MRI or thallium single-photon emission CT. Normal myocardium and left ventricular cavity showed significantly higher CT numbers on arterial-phase CT than on delayed-phase CT (t-test, P<0.0001). Contrast-to-noise ratios of the arterial and delayed hypo-enhancing and delayed hyperenhancing lesions on CT were 26.7, 17.6 and 18.7, respectively. Delayed-phase CT findings were equivalent to those of delayed-enhancement MRI in all cases (7/7) and to those of thallium single-photon emission CT in 70% (7/10). Myocardial delayed-enhancement CT can be added to evaluate myocardial lesions in select children and young adults with suspected coronary artery or myocardial abnormality. (orig.)

  8. Myocardial delayed-enhancement CT: initial experience in children and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2017-01-01

    Clinical utility of myocardial delayed enhancement CT has not been reported in children and young adults. To describe initial experience of myocardial delayed enhancement CT regarding image quality, radiation dose and identification of myocardial lesions in children and young adults. Between August 2013 and November 2016, 29 consecutive children and young adults (median age 16 months) with suspected coronary artery or myocardial abnormality underwent arterial- and delayed-phase cardiac CT at our institution. We measured CT densities in normal myocardium, left ventricular cavity, and arterial and delayed hypo-enhancing and delayed hyperenhancing myocardial lesions. We then compared the extent of delayed hyperenhancing lesions with delayed-enhancement MRI or thallium single-photon emission CT. Normal myocardium and left ventricular cavity showed significantly higher CT numbers on arterial-phase CT than on delayed-phase CT (t-test, P<0.0001). Contrast-to-noise ratios of the arterial and delayed hypo-enhancing and delayed hyperenhancing lesions on CT were 26.7, 17.6 and 18.7, respectively. Delayed-phase CT findings were equivalent to those of delayed-enhancement MRI in all cases (7/7) and to those of thallium single-photon emission CT in 70% (7/10). Myocardial delayed-enhancement CT can be added to evaluate myocardial lesions in select children and young adults with suspected coronary artery or myocardial abnormality. (orig.)

  9. Iron Supplementation Effects on Redox Status following Aseptic Skeletal Muscle Trauma in Adults and Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chariklia K. Deli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced skeletal muscle microtrauma is characterized by loss of muscle cell integrity, marked aseptic inflammatory response, and oxidative stress. We examined if iron supplementation would alter redox status after eccentric exercise. In a randomized, double blind crossover study, that was conducted in two cycles, healthy adults (n=14 and children (n=11 received daily either 37 mg of elemental iron or placebo for 3 weeks prior to and up to 72 h after an acute eccentric exercise bout. Blood was drawn at baseline, before exercise, and 72 h after exercise for the assessment of iron status, creatine kinase activity (CK, and redox status. Iron supplementation at rest increased iron concentration and transferrin saturation (p<0.01. In adults, CK activity increased at 72 h after exercise, while no changes occurred in children. Iron supplementation increased TBARS at 72 h after exercise in both adults and children; no changes occurred under placebo condition. Eccentric exercise decreased bilirubin concentration at 72 h in all groups. Iron supplementation can alter redox responses after muscle-damaging exercise in both adults and children. This could be of great importance not only for healthy exercising individuals, but also in clinical conditions which are characterized by skeletal muscle injury and inflammation, yet iron supplementation is crucial for maintaining iron homeostasis. This study was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02374619.

  10. Developmental differences in aversive conditioning, extinction, and reinstatement: A study with children, adolescents, and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Allison M; Theresiana, Cindy; Neumann, David L; Craske, Michelle G

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated developmental differences in aversive conditioning, extinction, and reinstatement (i.e., the recovery of conditioned aversive associations following reexposure to the unconditioned stimulus [US] post-extinction). This study examined these mechanisms in children (M age =8.8years), adolescents (M age =16.1years), and adults (M age =32.3years) using differential aversive conditioning with a geometric shape conditional stimulus (CS+) paired with an aversive sound US and another shape (CS-) presented alone. Following an extinction phase in which both CSs were presented alone, half of the participants in each age group received three US exposures (reinstatement condition) and the other half did not (control condition), followed by all participants completing an extinction retest phase on the same day. Findings indicated (a) significant differences in generalizing aversive expectancies to safe stimuli during conditioning and extinction that persisted during retest in children relative to adults and adolescents, (b) significantly less positive CS reevaluations during extinction that persisted during retest in adolescents relative to adults and children, and (c) reinstatement of US expectancies to the CS+ relative to the CS- in all age groups. Results suggest important differences in stimulus safety learning in children and stimulus valence reevaluation in adolescents relative to adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Contemporary Ghost Stories: Cyberspace in Fiction for Children and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Marla

    2005-01-01

    This essay identifies a genre of popular fiction for children and young adults, prevalent in the 1990s and continuing into the early twenty-first century, that incorporates computers and the internet, e-mails and chat rooms, into its plots. However, along with a focus on technology, this fiction frequently features the supernatural. So, too,…

  12. Feeling Caught between Parents: Adult Children's Relations with Parents and Subjective Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Paul R.; Afifi, Tamara D.

    2006-01-01

    Research on divorce has found that adolescents' feelings of being caught between parents are linked to internalizing problems and weak parent-child relationships. The present study estimates the effects of marital discord, as well as divorce, on young adult offspring's feelings of being caught in the middle (N=632). Children with parents in…

  13. Nutritional interventions to reduce symptoms in children and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben; Bjerrum, Merete; Larsen, Palle

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective of this scoping review is to examine and map reported nutritional interventions and their outcomes in relieving symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the daily lives of children and adults. A further objective is to determine...

  14. Adaptive Memory: Survival Processing Increases Both True and False Memory in Adults and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otgaar, Henry; Smeets, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that processing information in a survival context can enhance the information's memorability. The current study examined whether survival processing can also decrease the susceptibility to false memories and whether the survival advantage can be found in children. In Experiment 1, adults rated semantically related words in a…

  15. Reference values for acoustic rhinometry in decongested school children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straszek, Sune P; Schlünssen, Vivi; Sigsgaard, Torben

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Only a limited reference material for acoustic rhinometry (AR) exists for school children most often calculated as the minimum cross-sectional area (MCA) in the non-decongested nose. We want to establish a set of reference values for MCA and nasal volumes for both adults and childre...

  16. The use of exploratory procedures by blind and sighted adults and children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withagen, A.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Vervloed, M.P.J.; Knoors, H.; Verhoeven, L.

    2013-01-01

    The study examined exploratory procedures (EPs) of congenitally blind and sighted children and adults on a haptic match-to-sample task. The aim was to examine the influence of age, visual status, and familiarity on the use of EPs when people haptically examine the object properties of weight, size,

  17. The Life Course of Children Born to Unmarried Mothers: Childhood Living Arrangements and Young Adult Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, William S.

    1996-01-01

    Explored living arrangements among children born to unmarried mothers and the impact of childhood living arrangements on the young adult's life course. Analyses showed that living arrangement patterns after birth to a single mother influenced the likelihood of high school completion, post secondary education, and other conditions. (RJM)

  18. Prevalence of family violence in adults and children : Estimates using the capture-recapture method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterlee, A.; Vink, R.M.; Smit, F.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Reliable prevalence estimates of family violence in adults and children are difficult to obtain. Most are based on surveys or registration counts, whose research designs and methods are often questionable, making the results difficult to compare. This article presents an alternative

  19. Online Emotional Inferences in Written and Auditory Texts: A Study with Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diergarten, Anna Katharina; Nieding, Gerhild

    2016-01-01

    Emotional inferences are conclusions that a reader draws about the emotional state of a story's protagonist. In this study, we examined whether children and adults draw emotional inferences while reading short stories or listening to an aural presentation of short stories. We used an online method that assesses inferences during reading with a…

  20. Adult children's relationships with married parents, divorced parents, and stepparents: biology, marriage or residence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmijn, M.

    2013-01-01

    The author compared the strength of the relationships that adult children have with different types of parents: biological parents who remained married, stepparents, and biological parents who divorced. He analyzed Dutch life history data containing detailed measures of living arrangements and used

  1. Additional effective dose equivalent for adults and children in Poland as the result of mushroom consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasinska, H.; Kozak, K.; Mietelski, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental data of caesium radioactivity in samples of various mushrooms collected all over Poland from 1986 to 1989 are presented. Nearly 80 samples from Poland and a few samples from Austria and USSR were analysed. The effective dose equivalents for adults and children caused by the consumption of one mass unit of dried mushrooms for each sample were estimated. (author)

  2. A measurement instrument for bone mineral content of adult and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shaofang

    1996-01-01

    The γ radiation source was used in bone mineral content measurement analysis of adult and children and a new instrument is developed successfully. It's precision is +2%. The advantage of this instrument is light, cheap and reliable. It can be used widely in medical science and clinic for diagnosis on certain diseases and research work

  3. Physical exercise and executive functions in preadolescent children, adolescents and young adults: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburgh, L.; Konigs, M.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this meta-analysis was to aggregate available empirical studies on the effects of physical exercise on executive functions in preadolescent children (6-12 years of age), adolescents (13-17 years of age) and young adults (18-35 years of age). Method: The electronic databases

  4. Physical exercise and executive functions in preadolescent children, adolescents and young adults: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburgh, L.; Konigs, M.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this meta-analysis was to aggregate available empirical studies on the effects of physical exercise on executive functions in preadolescent children (6-12 years of age), adolescents (13-17 years of age) and young adults (18-35 years of age). Method: The electronic databases

  5. Brief Report: Bone Fractures in Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeyer, Ann M.; O'Rourke, Julia A.; Massa, Alexandra; Lee, Hang; Lawson, Elizabeth A.; McDougle, Christopher J.; Misra, Madhusmita

    2015-01-01

    Peripubertal boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have lower bone mineral density (BMD) than typically developing controls. However, it is not clear whether lower BMD in ASD results in an increased fracture rate. This study examined the rate of fractures in children and adults with and without ASD using a national database of emergency room…

  6. Assessment of Selective Attention with CSCWT (Computerized Stroop Color-Word Test) among Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsaneh, Zarghi; Alireza, Zali; Mehdi, Tehranidost; Farzad, Ashrafi; Reza, Zarindast Mohammad; Mehdi, Moazzezi; Mojtaba, Khodadadi Seyed

    2012-01-01

    The SCWT (Stroop Color-Word Test) is a quick and frequently used measure for assessing selective attention and cognitive flexibility. This study determines age, sex and education level influence on attention and cognitive flexibility by CSCWT (Computerized Stroop Color-Word Test) among healthy Iranian children and adults. There were 78 healthy…

  7. Masking Release in Children and Adults with Hearing Loss When Using Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Marc; McCreery, Ryan; Kopun, Judy; Lewis, Dawna; Alexander, Joshua; Stelmachowicz, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared masking release for adults and children with normal hearing and hearing loss. For the participants with hearing loss, masking release using simulated hearing aid amplification with 2 different compression speeds (slow, fast) was compared. Method: Sentence recognition in unmodulated noise was compared with recognition…

  8. Commentary: Listening Can Be Exhausting--Fatigue in Children and Adults with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, Fred H.; Hornsby, Benjamin W.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Anecdotal reports of fatigue after sustained speech-processing demands are common among adults with hearing loss; however, systematic research examining hearing loss-related fatigue is limited, particularly with regard to fatigue among children with hearing loss (CHL). Many audiologists, educators, and parents have long suspected that CHL…

  9. Do we manage incontinence in children and adults with special needs adequately? ICI-RS 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Gontard, Alexander; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Rantell, Angie; Nieuwhof-Leppink, Anka; Badawi, Jasmin Katrin; Cardozo, Linda

    2016-01-01

    To review studies on the associations of incontinence and special needs in children and adults and to outline future directions in research and clinical care. A review of literature was conducted. Open questions and future directions were discussed during the ICI-RS meeting in 2014. Special needs

  10. Is grip strength a predictor for total muscle strength in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anne E.; Takken, Tim; Helders, Paul J. M.; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine whether grip strength is related to total muscle strength in children, adolescents, and young adults. The second purpose was to provide reference charts for grip strength, which could be used in the clinical and research setting. This cross-sectional

  11. A Model of Depression in Adult Children of Alcoholics and Nonalcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lease, Suzanne H.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the relationships between levels of depression in a sample of adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs) and non-ACOAs and patterns of parental drinking behaviors, intergenerational family interactions, attachment behaviors, and self-esteem. Drinking behaviors directly influenced family processes and indirectly influenced self-esteem but…

  12. The Association between Overparenting, Parent-Child Communication, and Entitlement and Adaptive Traits in Adult Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segrin, Chris; Woszidlo, Alesia; Givertz, Michelle; Bauer, Amy; Murphy, Melissa Taylor

    2012-01-01

    What is colloquially referred to as "helicopter parenting" is a form of overparenting in which parents apply overly involved and developmentally inappropriate tactics to their children who are otherwise able to assume adult responsibilities and autonomy. Overparenting is hypothesized to be associated with dysfunctional family processes…

  13. Training and Transfer Effects of Response Inhibition Training in Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Chen, Ling; Maes, Joseph H. R.

    2018-01-01

    Response inhibition is crucial for mental and physical health but studies assessing the trainability of this type of inhibition are rare. Thirty-nine children aged 10-12 years and 46 adults aged 18-24 years were assigned to an adaptive go/no-go inhibition training condition or an active control condition. Transfer of training effects to…

  14. Old Dogs, Children, and Watermelon Wine: Focus on the Older Adult Learner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasworm, Carol E.

    1978-01-01

    Three significant elements should be considered in offering educational programs for the older learner: acceptance (old dogs); support (God bless little children while they're too young to hate); and dependability (watermelon wine). Guidelines are offered for the teacher entering the classroom composed of adult learners. (KC)

  15. Correlates of self-reported quality of life in adults and children with morphea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shinjita; Bernstein, Ira; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-05-01

    Determining a disease's impact on life quality is important in clinical decision making, research, and resource allocation. Determinants of quality of life (QOL) in morphea are poorly understood. We sought to ascertain demographic and clinical variables correlated with negative impact on self-reported QOL in morphea. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of the Morphea in Adults and Children cohort. Symptoms (pruritus and pain) and functional impairment were correlated with decreased QOL in children and adults. This was true in both sexes and was independent of subtype and age. Patient-reported QOL correlated with physician-based measures of disease severity in adults, but not in children. Patients with linear and generalized morphea had the greatest impact on QOL. Small sample size is a limitation. Symptoms and functional impairment were determinants of impaired life quality in both children and adults independent of morphea subtype. These results suggest that clinicians should consider suppressing the accumulation of new lesions (when rapidly accumulating) and symptoms (pain and pruritus) in the treatment of patients with morphea. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Encopresis, Soiling and Constipation in Children and Adults with Developmental Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; LoVullo, Santino V.

    2009-01-01

    Children and adults with developmental disabilities are more likely to evince encopresis, soiling and constipation than the general population. This set of related behaviors can produce a great deal of stress and can be a major restriction in independent living. This paper provides a review of the current state of knowledge on the prevalence,…

  17. Children's Drawings of Significant Figures for a Peer or an Adult Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkitt, Esther; Watling, Dawn; Murray, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    The present study assessed if children would present different information in their drawings of emotion eliciting stimuli when they believed that an adult or a child audience would view their drawings. Seventy-five 6-year-olds (44 boys and 31 girls) were allocated to three groups: the reference group, the child audience group and the adult…

  18. Adult Children of Alcoholics: Characteristics of Students in a University Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Judith P.; Kinnick, Bernard C.

    1995-01-01

    Characteristics of adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs) among traditional-age college students were investigated. Personality characteristics were examined based on birth order, gender of alcoholic parent, and honor society membership. Differences between ACOAs and non-ACOAs are discussed. (Author)

  19. The use of Exploratory Procedures by blind and sighted adults and children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withagen, A.J.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Vervloed, M.P.J.; Knoors, H.E.T.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2013-01-01

    The study examined exploratory procedures (EPs) of congenitally blind and sighted children and adults on a haptic match-to-sample task. The aim was to examine the influence of age, visual status, and familiarity on the use of EPs when people haptically examine the object properties of weight, size,

  20. Lived Experiences of Adult Children Who Have a Parent Diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Amy; Hodgson, Jennifer; Lamson, Angela; Dosser, David

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the experience among adult children who have a parent with Parkinson's Disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to explore, appreciate, and describe their experiences using a phenomenological methodology. Narratives were collected from seven participants who have a parent diagnosed with PD and analyzed according to…

  1. ANALYSIS OF THE VARIETY OF EYE IMPAIRMENTS IN GLAUCOMA CASES IN CHILDREN AND ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetomir Dimitrov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a disease, which results in definitive vision reduction. The aim of this study is an analysis of the differences in eye impairments in connection with the progression of glaucoma in different age groups (children and adults. A documentary method of investigation of scientific sources, based on clinical practice, is applied. The methodology of the study comprises investigation of causes and manifestations of the disease and its typology. The specific variety in the manifestation of glaucoma is established in children and adults. Excavation of the optic nerve occurs in the adult persons, because the eyeball is already thickened, and collagen is dense. The eye begins to swell in children because the tissues are more loose; the eyeball becomes bigger, and enlargement of cornea and sclera occurs. Children and adults with the diagnosis of glaucoma have a different way of eye impairment. The early establishment and identification of symptoms prevent from the progression of the losses in the visual field, and from blindness, by means of appropriate treatment.

  2. Evaluation of 28 years of surgical treatment of children and young adults with familial adenomatous polyposis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, Klaske A. C.; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.; Taminiau, Jan A. J. M.; ten Kate, Fibo J. W.; Slors, J. Frederick M.; Tabbers, Merit M.; Aronson, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In this retrospective study, 28 years of surgical treatment of children and young adults with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) was analyzed. Methods: Forty-three patients were operated on before the age of 26 years. Endoscopic aspects, operative data, and complications were analyzed,

  3. Evaluation of 28 years of surgical treatment of children and young adults with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, K.A.; Mathus-Vliegen, E.M.H.; Taminiau, J.A.; Kate, F.J. ten; Slors, J.F.M.; Tabbers, M.M.; Aronson, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this retrospective study, 28 years of surgical treatment of children and young adults with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) was analyzed. METHODS: Forty-three patients were operated on before the age of 26 years. Endoscopic aspects, operative data, and complications were analyzed,

  4. Calcemic response to burns differs between adults and children: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon L. Klein

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: These results support the hypothesis that the difference between pediatric and adult victims is consistent with an age-related CaSR response to cytokine stimulation and may be consistent with a lower level of inflammation in children. Ionized Ca and PTH might serve as possible therapeutic targets to lower the inflammatory response in burn victims.

  5. Alcohol and Drug Use among College Student Adult Children of Alcoholics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitman, Abby L.; Kelley, Michelle L.; Ladage, Jessica; Schroeder, Valarie; Gumienny, Leslie A.; Morrow, Jennifer A.; Klostermann, Keith

    2009-01-01

    The present paper compared drinking and drug use in Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACOAs), compared to non-ACOAs, among college students. Participants were 572 undergraduates. ACOAs were more likely to be current drug users than non-ACOAs. ACOAs reported initiating alcohol use earlier than non-ACOAs; however, ACOAs did not drink more often or more…

  6. [Investigation and comparison of behaviours of adults and children in swimming pools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, M; Bodina, A; Bonali, D; Bascucci, B; Pellino, P; Castaldi, S

    2011-01-01

    The swimmers health's protection must be achieved through the implementation of structures that respect safety standards, the best management of the structures and the users'compliance with rules that minimize the potential risks to health, now clearly identified by the World Health Organization in specific guidelines and by the national and regional legislation. An anonymous questionnaire has been used in order to detect the level of knowledge of hygienic risks and the behaviour of costumers (adults and children) of swimming pool. Comparing the answers, statistically significant differences in the behaviours of adults and children were found in order to protect their own and others' health. In particular children do shower and go through footbath before entering the swimming pool more than adults (respectively 89.2% versus 77.4% and 89.2% versus 79.4%). No differences in the behaviours of the two groups were found in the use of dedicated footwear and caps. Children are predisposed to follow the rules because they are more loyal to duty, while adults comply with the rules only when it is clear the advantage to protect their health. This paper underline the importance of health education programs that can help people to understand the importance of adopting certain behaviours in order to prevent risks and promote health for the benefit of all.

  7. Comparison of Parenting Style in Single Child and Multiple Children Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Alidosti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Family is the first and the most important structure in human civilization in which social lifestyles, mutual understanding, and compatibility is learned. Studies have shown that parenting style, is one the most important and fundamental factors in personality development. The purpose of this study was comparison of parenting style in single child and multiple children families. Materials and Methods: This study, in total, 152 mothers from Andimeshk city, Iran, were selected by random sampling. Data were collected from a health-care center was chosen randomly, mothers who had 5-7 years old children were enrolled in this study. The data collecting tool was the questionnaire which investigates permissive, authoritative, and authoritarian parenting styles in parents. After data entry in SPSS software, the collected data were analyzed by ANOVA, independent t-test, and Pearson correlation test. Results: The mean age of the participants was 32.71 ± 5.39 years old participated in this study. 69 mothers (45.4% had one child, 53 (34.9% had 2 children, and 30 mothers (19.7% had 3 and more children. The mean score of permissive parenting style was 19.97 ± 5.13 in single child families; the mean score of authoritative (19.56 ± 4.70 and authoritarian parenting style (34.50 ± 2.81 that difference was significantly (P < 0.050. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, it seems that having more children would make parents more logical and paves the way for upbringing children. Therefore, it is recommended to plan some educational programs about this issue for parents.

  8. [Psychological distress of children with progressive diseases and multiple disabilities: A crossed analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perifano, A; Scelles, R

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present the results of research conducted on the psychological distress of lysosomal-disease-affected children. Lysosomal diseases are rare genetic diseases most often leading to severe disabilities, both psychological and physiological. As frequently reported by their relatives, affected children experience nervous breakdowns, which are sometimes treated with antidepressant prescriptions. However, mental impairment as well physical disabilities can prevent children from making their pain noticed and identified by their relatives. This raises a new research question: when disabilities are severe, how should the psychological distress of affected children be identified? Recent studies on the care of children with multiple disabilities (San Salavadour 2000; Scelles 2003; Camelio 2006; Pautrel, 2009) have used the children's family and caregivers to access their feelings, considered to be translators of children's feelings because they understand their nonverbal language (Camelio, 2006). Using this methodology, four parents from the French not-for-profit association called "VML" (Vaincre les maladies lysosomales) and four professionals were involved in semi-structured interviews. The goal of these interviews was to identify signs of possible psychological suffering, the context in which those signs were expressed, the meaning and the value attributed to it by the family and caregivers, and the reaction as well as an evaluation of that reaction. Thirteen children were involved, 12 of whom were described as having shown signs of psychological distress. Six lysosomal diseases were represented. Two types of signs were reported: active signs (e.g., agitation, screaming, crying) and passive signs (e.g., no communication, withdrawal, lack of facial expression). Most of the time, passive signs were interpreted by the family and caregivers as evidence of deep psychological distress. The meanings of both types of sign were the following: fear, anxiety

  9. What Can Lexical Tone Training Studies in Adults Tell Us about Tone Processing in Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Antoniou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies on the acquisition of lexical tone by adult learners have revealed that factors such as language background, musical experience, cognitive abilities, and neuroanatomy all play a role in determining tone learning success. On the basis of these findings, it has been argued that the effectiveness of tone learning in adulthood depends on individual differences in these factors. However, it is not clear whether similar individual differences play an analogous role in tone learning in childhood. Indeed, relatively few studies have made comparisons between how adults and children learn lexical tones. Here, we review recent developments for tone learning in both adults and children. The review covers tone training in a range of contexts, including in naive listeners, in native speakers of other tone languages, in listeners with varying levels of musical experience, and in individuals with speech and hearing disorders. Finally, we discuss the parallels between adult and child tone learning, and provide recommendations concerning how findings in adult tone training can provide insights into tone learning for children by accommodating the needs of individual learners.

  10. Analysis of RF exposure in the head tissues of children and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiart, J; Hadjem, A; Wong, M F; Bloch, I

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the radio frequencies (RF) exposure in the head tissues of children using a cellular handset or RF sources (a dipole and a generic handset) at 900, 1800, 2100 and 2400 MHz. Based on magnetic resonance imaging, child head models have been developed. The maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) over 10 g in the head has been analyzed in seven child and six adult heterogeneous head models. The influence of the variability in the same age class is carried out using models based on a morphing technique. The SAR over 1 g in specific tissues has also been assessed in the different types of child and adult head models. Comparisons are performed but nevertheless need to be confirmed since they have been derived from data sets of limited size. The simulations that have been performed show that the differences between the maximum SAR over 10 g estimated in the head models of the adults and the ones of the children are small compared to the standard deviations. But they indicate that the maximum SAR in 1 g of peripheral brain tissues of the child models aged between 5 and 8 years is about two times higher than in adult models. This difference is not observed for the child models of children above 8 years old: the maximum SAR in 1 g of peripheral brain tissues is about the same as the one in adult models. Such differences can be explained by the lower thicknesses of pinna, skin and skull of the younger child models

  11. Most children with eosinophilic esophagitis have a favorable outcome as young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, M; Jacobs, J W; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Wo, J M

    2017-01-01

    The disease progression of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) from childhood into adulthood is unclear. To determine the clinical outcome of patients who were diagnosed with EoE as children, and who now are young adults. Children (adults (≥18 years old) were identified, and a structured telephone interview was conducted to obtain follow-up data on symptom prevalence (dysphagia to solids and liquids, nausea/vomiting, abdominal pain, and heartburn/regurgitation), food impaction, medication usage, health-care utilization, and resolution of atopy/food allergies. A favorable outcome was defined if EoE symptoms were resolved or improved by subjects' assessment. Unfavorable outcomes was defined as symptoms same or worse. Clinical variables that predicted a favorable outcome as an adult were examined. Mayo Dysphagia Scale (MDQ-30: scored 0-100) was administered to validate the outcome assessment. Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio and unpaired t-test were used. Fifty-eight subjects (64% male) who met study criteria were enrolled. Mean age at diagnosis was 12 years (range 4-17) and mean duration of follow-up was 8.3 years (2-16). As children, the most common presenting symptoms were abdominal pain (54%), dysphagia (33%), and vomiting (24%). As young adults, 47 subjects (81%) had a favorable outcome. Total MDQ-30 scores were 4.6 (0-30) and 14.1 (0-50) in subjects with favorable outcome and unfavorable outcome, respectively (P = 0.015). Two-thirds of subjects did not use steroids or proton pump inhibitors in the preceeding 12 months. Male children with EoE were four times more likely to have a favorable outcome as young adults compared with female children. Females were more likely to report nausea/vomiting as young adults (odds ratio 3.23, CI 0.97-10.60). Of all presenting symptoms in EoE children, dysphagia was the most likely to persist into adulthood (odds ratio 6.29, CI 1.85-21.38). Eighty one percent of EoE children had a favorable outcome as young adults. Most patients

  12. Familial occurrence of epilepsy in children with newly diagnosed multiple seizures : Dutch study of epilepsy in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Geerts, AT; Arts, WFM; van Donselaar, CA; Peters, A.C. Boudewyn; Stroink, H; Brouwer, OF

    Purpose: To study the familial occurrence of epilepsy in children with newly diagnosed multiple unprovoked seizures. Methods: Between August 1988 and September 1992, 462 children with two or more unprovoked seizures were included in the prospective Dutch Study of Epilepsy in Childhood. Seizures and

  13. Comparative Study of Children with ADHD Only, Autism Spectrum Disorder + ADHD, and Chronic Multiple Tic Disorder + ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Schneider, Jayne

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Identification of differences among children with ADHD only, autism spectrum disorder (ASD)+ADHD, and chronic multiple tic disorder (CMTD)+ADHD may lead to better understanding of clinical phenotypes. Method: Children were evaluated using the parent- and teacher-completed questionnaires. Results: All three groups were highly similar in…

  14. iStimulation: Apple iPad Use with Children Who Are Visually Impaired, Including Those with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campaña, Laura V.; Ouimet, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Since its creation in the early 1980s, Light Box, a product developed by the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) that is designed for working on functional vision tasks with children who have visual impairments or multiple disabilities, has been an effective tool to help teach children with visual impairments to locate and track items…

  15. A novel sidestream ultrasonic flow sensor for multiple breath washout in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Sturz, J; Junge, S; Ballmann, M; Gappa, M

    2008-08-01

    Inert gas multiple breath washout (MBW) for measuring Lung Clearance Index using mass spectrometry and 4% sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) as the tracer gas has been shown to be sensitive for detecting early Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease. However, mass spectrometry requires bulky equipment and is expensive to buy and maintain. A novel sidestream ultrasonic device may overcome this problem. The aims of this study were to assess the feasibility and clinical validity of measuring lung volume (functional residual capacity, FRC) and the LCI using the sidestream ultrasonic flow sensor in children and adolescents with CF in relation to spirometry and plain chest radiographs. MBW using the sidestream ultrasonic device and conventional spirometry were performed in 26 patients with CF and 22 healthy controls. In the controls (4.7-17.7 years) LCI was similar to that reported using mass spectrometry (mean (SD) 6.7 (0.5)). LCI was elevated in 77% of the CF children (6.8-18.9 years), whereas spirometry was abnormal in only 38.5%, 61.5%, and 26.9% for FEV(1), MEF(25), and FEV(1)/FVC, respectively. This was more marked in children ultrasonic MBW is a valid and simple alternative to mass spectrometry for assessing ventilation homogeneity in children. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Hepatitis B serologic survey and review of immunization records of children, adolescents and adults in Fiji, 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukakoshi, Tatsuhiko; Samuela, Josaia; Rafai, Eric V; Rabuatoka, Uraia; Honda, Sumihisa; Kamiya, Yasuhiko; Buerano, Corazon C; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-03-03

    In Fiji, hepatitis B (HB) vaccine was introduced into childhood immunization program in 1989 and has been administered as a pentavalent since 2006. This study aimed to: (i) survey and examine the extent to which HB infection continue to occur in children, adolescents and adults in Fiji, and (ii) determine HB coverage rates and timeliness of vaccine administration to children. Serum samples of children, adolescents and adults (aged 6 months to Fiji's HB vaccine control program is achieving its objectives.

  17. Distracted driving behaviors of adults while children are in the car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, Linda; Violano, Pina; Klaus, Greg; Lofthouse, Rebecca; Dziura, James

    2013-10-01

    Cell phone use while driving is common and can result in driver distraction. However, data on the frequency of this behavior with other occupants in the vehicle are lacking. This study investigates whether adult drivers engage in cell phone use with passengers in the car and determines whether the frequency of these behaviors was modified if the passenger was a child. Subjects (N = 539) who have driven children during the previous 30 days were recruited to complete a survey regarding their cell phone usage while driving. The inclusion criteria of participants were as follows: 18 years or older with a valid driver's license, owns/uses a cell phone, drives with children, and reads English. Results were reported on a 4-point Likert scale (always, often, rarely, and never). Eighty percent of respondents reported cell phone use in some way while driving with children. As compared with similar behaviors when driving alone or with adult passengers, the odds of reporting "always" compared with "often, rarely, or never" of holding a cell phone in hand was 0.66 when driving with children. No significant differences were noted for the following variables: use of a blue tooth device or use of a cell phone to speak or text when parked. Cell phone use while driving is common. Distracted driving behaviors, although less frequent, persist when children are passengers in the vehicle. Further research into the effect of cell phone-related distracted driving behaviors of adults with child passengers is needed to address this public health concern.

  18. Locating Common Ground: An Exploration of Adult Educator Practices that Support Parent Involvement for School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Catherine Dunn

    2013-01-01

    This article explores linkages between adult educator practices and the parent involvement needs of adult students with school-age children. A comparative case study examined the knowledge, experiential, self-efficacy, and social capital dimensions of adult educator practices that inform parent involvement efforts. One English as a Second Language…

  19. Multiple Intelligences Profiles of Children with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder in Comparison with Nonattention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Mostafa; Akouchekian, Shahla; Ghaderi, Alireza; Mahaki, Behzad; Rezaei, Mariam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common psychological problem during childhood. This study aimed to evaluate multiple intelligences profiles of children with ADHD in comparison with non-ADHD. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive analytical study was done on 50 children of 6–13 years old in two groups of with and without ADHD. Children with ADHD were referred to Clinics of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Isfahan University of Medical Scie...

  20. Rifapentine Pharmacokinetics and Tolerability in Children and Adults Treated Once Weekly With Rifapentine and Isoniazid for Latent Tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Marc; Savic, Radojka M; Kenzie, William R Mac; Wing, Diane; Peloquin, Charles A; Engle, Melissa; Bliven, Erin; Prihoda, Thomas J; Gelfond, Jonathan A L; Scott, Nigel A; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Kearns, Gregory L; Burman, William J; Sterling, Timothy R; Villarino, M Elsa

    2014-06-01

    In a phase 3, randomized clinical trial (PREVENT TB) of 8053 people with latent tuberculosis infection, 12 once-weekly doses of rifapentine and isoniazid had good efficacy and tolerability. Children received higher rifapentine milligram per kilogram doses than adults. In the present pharmacokinetic study (a component of the PREVENT TB trial), rifapentine exposure was compared between children and adults. Rifapentine doses in children ranged from 300 to 900 mg, and adults received 900 mg. Children who could not swallow tablets received crushed tablets. Sparse pharmacokinetic sampling was performed with 1 rifapentine concentration at 24 hours after drug administration (C24). Rifapentine area under concentration-time curve (AUC) was estimated from a nonlinear, mixed effects regression model (NLME). There were 80 children (age: median, 4.5 years; range, 2-11 years) and 77 adults (age: median, 40 years; all ≥18 years) in the study. The geometric mean rifapentine milligram per kilogram dose was greater in children than in adults (children, 23 mg/kg; adults, 11 mg/kg). Rifapentine geometric mean AUC and C24 were 1.3-fold greater in children (all children combined) than in adults. Children who swallowed whole tablets had 1.3-fold higher geometric mean AUC than children who received crushed tablets, and children who swallowed whole tablets had a 1.6-fold higher geometric mean AUC than adults. The higher rifapentine doses in children were well tolerated. To obtain rifapentine exposures comparable in children to adults, dosing algorithms modeled by NLME were developed. A 2-fold greater rifapentine dose for all children resulted in a 1.3-fold higher AUC compared to adults administered a standard dose. Use of higher weight-adjusted rifapentine doses for young children are warranted to achieve systemic exposures that are associated with successful treatment of latent tuberculosis infection in adults. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious

  1. [A study on incidence of injury and its socio-economic loss in children and young adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Guo, C; Zhang, G; Lu, G; Li, L; Lin, H; Fan, C; Huang, G; Zhou, C; Lu, Y

    2000-07-01

    To study the current status of incidence of injury among children and young adults and the causes of common injuries, and to estimate its socio-economic loss and extent of harmfulness. Pupils in 19 primary and middle schools aged 7 to 18 years, totaling 14,533, were recruited with stratified cluster sampling during 1998 to 1999 in Guangzhou, Maoming, Jiangmen and Shantou. Judgement for injury was based on the following criteria: (1) diagnosed and treated in hospitals or school clinics, (2) a half-day off or more due to injury, and (3) emergency management by pupils' parents or teachers. There were 6 941 pupils suffered from varied injures during the year, with an incidence rate of 47.76% (50.08% for boys and 45.02% for girls). Incidence rate of injury was higher in the middle school pupils (13 - 18 years old, 58.49%) than that in the primary school pupils (7 - 12 years old, 40.08%). The incidence increased significantly with age, with a peak at ages of 13 - 15. Major causes of injuries resulted from falls, injury by sharp articles, collision, traffic injuries and burn/scalds, etc, which usually occurred due to carelessness in sports, playing, walking, bike-riding and working. Frequency of multiple injuries related to the educational level of parents and depended on whether or not an only-child in family. There were 2,173 injured pupils (accounting for 31.3% of the total) visited clinics or emergency department in hospitals and 627 (9.0%) hospitalized for treatment. Twenty-eight percent of the injured pupils were absent from school, with an average absenteeism of 5.6 days. There were 154 injured pupils with transient disability and 53 with permanent disability, with a disability rate of 410.47 per 100,000. Cost for their medical care averaged 81.5 yuan RMB per injured pupil. Injury was a common and frequently-happened incident among children and young adults and could seriously affect their health, development and growth, studying and their future of children and

  2. Immediate movement history influences reach-to-grasp action selection in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Samuel W; Wilson, Andrew D; Plumb, Mandy S; Williams, Justin H G; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Action selection is subject to many biases. Immediate movement history is one such bias seen in young infants. Is this bias strong enough to affect adult behavior? Adult participants reached and grasped a cylinder positioned to require either pronation or supination of the hand. Successive cylinder positions changed either randomly or systematically between trials. Random positioning led to optimized economy of movement. In contrast, systematic changes in position biased action selection toward previously selected actions at the expense of movement economy. Thus, one switches to a new movement only when the savings outweigh the costs of the switch. Immediate movement history had an even larger influence on children aged 7-15 years. This suggests that switching costs are greater in children, which is consistent with their reduced grasping experience. The presence of this effect in adults suggests that immediate movement history exerts a more widespread and pervasive influence on patterns of action selection than researchers had previously recognized.

  3. AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN CHILDREN WITH SEVERE RESISTANT MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. I. Kirgizov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unique experience of high-dose chemotherapy with consequent autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with severe resistant multiple sclerosis (n=7 is shown in this article. At present time there is enough data on chemotherapy with consequent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with severe resistant multiple sclerosis. This method was proved to be efficient and safe with immunoablative conditioning chemotherapy regimen. In patients included in this study the mean rate according to the Expanded Disability Status Scale was 5,94±0,2 (from 3 to 9 points. All the patients had disseminated demyelination loci, accumulating the contrast substance, in the brain and the spinal cord. After cyclophosphamide treatment in combination with anti-monocytes globulin the fast stabilization of the condition and prolonged (the observation period was 3-36 moths clinical and radiologic as well as immunophenotypic remission with marked positive dynamics according to the Expanded Disability Status Scale were noted. No pronounced side-effects and infectious complications were mentioned. The maximal improvement according to the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS was 5,5 points, the mean — 2,7±0,1 (from 2 to 5,5 points accompanied with positive dynamics on the magneto-resonance imaging.  The efficacy of the treatment was also proved by the positive changes in the lymphocytes subpopulation status in peripheral blood. The timely performed high-dose chemotherapy with consequent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective and safe method to slowdown the autoimmune inflammatory process. This method can be recommended to use in treatment of children with severe resistant multiple sclerosis. 

  4. Seeing odors in color: Cross-modal associations in children and adults from two cultural environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubet, Nathalie; Durand, Karine; Schaal, Benoist; McCall, Daniel D

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the occurrence and underlying processes of odor-color associations in French and American 6- to 10-year-old children (n = 386) and adults (n = 137). Nine odorants were chosen according to their familiarity to either cultural group. Participants matched each odor with a color, gave hedonic and familiarity judgments, and identified each odor. By 6 years of age, children displayed culture-specific odor-color associations, but age differences were noted in the type of associations. Children and adults in both cultural groups shared common associations and formed associations that were unique to their environment, underscoring the importance of exposure learning in odor-color associations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional results after Bonebridge implantation in adults and children with conductive and mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahne, Torsten; Seiwerth, Ingmar; Götze, Gerrit; Heider, Cornelia; Radetzki, Florian; Herzog, Michael; Plontke, Stefan K

    2015-11-01

    In patients with conductive hearing loss caused by middle ear disorders or atresia of the ear canal, a Bonebridge implantation can improve hearing by providing vibratory input to the temporal bone. The expected results are improved puretone thresholds and speech recognition. In the European Union, approval of the Bonebridge implantation was recently extended to children. We evaluated the functional outcome of a Bonebridge implantation for eight adults and three children. We found significant improvement in the puretone thresholds, with improvement in the air-bone gap. Speech recognition after surgery was significantly higher than in the best-aided situation before surgery. The Bonebridge significantly improved speech recognition in noisy environments and sound localization. In situations relevant to daily life, hearing deficits were nearly completely restored with the Bonebridge implantation in both adults and children.

  6. Measurement of the specific airway resistance by plethysmography in young children accompanied by an adult

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, B; Bisgaard, H

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a procedure for measurement of specific airway resistance (sRaw) by whole body plethysmography in young awake children accompanied by an adult. sRaw was measured by a single-step procedure, omitting the measurement of the thoracic gas volume. The frequency...... dependency of sRaw was investigated and the accuracy of simulating body temperature, atmospheric pressure and saturation with water vapour (BTPS) conditions by electronic compensation was assessed. One hundred and thirty one children with asthma were studied. In 57 children (mean (SD) age 5.6 (1.8) yrs) who....... In conclusion, the use of electronic compensation for simulating body temperature, atmospheric pressure and saturation with water vapour introduces a bias that affects the accuracy of the estimate of specific airway resistance. Nevertheless, plethysmographic measurements with and without an accompanying adult...

  7. Contribution of Common Genetic Variants to Obesity and Obesity-Related Traits in Mexican Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos-Comparán, Marisela; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; López-Contreras, Blanca; Gutiérrez-Vidal, Roxana; Vega-Badillo, Joel; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Posadas-Romeros, Carlos; Canizalez-Román, Adrián; Río-Navarro, Blanca Del; Campos-Pérez, Francisco; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have identified multiple obesity-associated loci mainly in European populations. However, their contribution to obesity in other ethnicities such as Mexicans is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine 26 obesity-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in a sample of Mexican mestizos. Methods 9 SNPs in biological candidate genes showing replications (PPARG, ADRB3, ADRB2, LEPR, GNB3, UCP3, ADIPOQ, UCP2, and NR3C1), and 17 SNPs in or near genes associated with obesity in first, second and third wave GWAS (INSIG2, FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, FAIM2/BCDIN3, BDNF, SH2B1, GNPDA2, NEGR1, KCTD15, SEC16B/RASAL2, NPC1, SFRF10/ETV5, MAF, PRL, MTCH2, and PTER) were genotyped in 1,156 unrelated Mexican-Mestizos including 683 cases (441 obese class I/II and 242 obese class III) and 473 normal-weight controls. In a second stage we selected 12 of the SNPs showing nominal associations with obesity, to seek associations with quantitative obesity-related traits in 3 cohorts including 1,218 Mexican Mestizo children, 945 Mexican Mestizo adults, and 543 Indigenous Mexican adults. Results After adjusting for age, sex and admixture, significant associations with obesity were found for 6 genes in the case-control study (ADIPOQ, FTO, TMEM18, INSIG2, FAIM2/BCDIN3 and BDNF). In addition, SH2B1 was associated only with class I/II obesity and MC4R only with class III obesity. SNPs located at or near FAIM2/BCDIN3, TMEM18, INSIG2, GNPDA2 and SEC16B/RASAL2 were significantly associated with BMI and/or WC in the combined analysis of Mexican-mestizo children and adults, and FTO locus was significantly associated with increased BMI in Indigenous Mexican populations. Conclusions Our findings replicate the association of 8 obesity-related SNPs with obesity risk in Mexican adults, and confirm the role of some of these SNPs in BMI in Mexican adults and children. PMID:23950976

  8. Mental rotation and the human body: Children's inflexible use of embodiment mirrors that of adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Markus; Ebersbach, Mirjam

    2017-12-25

    Adults' mental rotation performance with body-like stimuli is enhanced if these stimuli are anatomically compatible with a human body, but decreased by anatomically incompatible stimuli. In this study, we investigated these effects for kindergartners and first-graders: When asked to mentally rotate cube configurations attached with human body parts in an anatomically compatible way, allowing for the projection of a human body, children performed better than with pure cube combinations. By contrast, when body parts were attached in an anatomically incompatible way, disallowing the projection of a human body, children performed worse than with pure combinations. This experiment is of specific interest against the background of two different theoretical approaches concerning imagery and the motor system in development: One approach assumes an increasing integration of motor processes and imagery over time that enables older children and adults to requisition motor resources for imagery processes, while the other postulates that imagery stems from early sensorimotor processes in the first place, and is disentangled from it over time. The finding that children of the two age groups tested show exactly the same effects as adults when mentally rotating anatomically compatible and incompatible stimuli is interpreted in favour of the latter approach. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? In mental rotation, adults perform better when rotating anatomically possible stimuli as compared to rotating standard cube combinations. Performance is worse when rotating anatomically impossible stimuli. What does this study add? The present study shows that children's mental transformations mirror those of adults in these respects. In case of the anatomically impossible stimuli, this highlights an inflexible use of embodiment in both age groups. This is in line with the Piagetian assumption of imagery being based on sensorimotor processes. © 2017 The British

  9. Severe bleeding events in adults and children with primary immune thrombocytopenia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neunert, C; Noroozi, N; Norman, G; Buchanan, G R; Goy, J; Nazi, I; Kelton, J G; Arnold, D M

    2015-03-01

    The burden of severe bleeding in adults and children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) has not been established. To describe the frequency and severity of bleeding events in patients with ITP, and the methods used to measure bleeding in ITP studies. We performed a systematic review of all prospective ITP studies that enrolled 20 or more patients. Two reviewers searched Medline, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane registry up to May 2014. Overall weighted proportions were estimated using a random effects model. Measurement properties of bleeding assessment tools were evaluated. We identified 118 studies that reported bleeding (n = 10 908 patients). Weighted proportions for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) were 1.4% for adults (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.9-2.1%) and 0.4% for children (95% CI, 0.2-0.7%; P bleeding was 9.6% for adults (95% CI, 4.1-17.1%) and 20.2% for children (95% CI, 10.0-32.9%; P bleeding were highly variable in primary studies. Two bleeding assessment tools (Buchanan 2002 for children; Page 2007 for adults) demonstrated adequate inter-rater reliability and validity in independent assessments. ICH was more common in adults and tended to occur during chronic ITP; other severe bleeds were more common in children and occurred at all stages of disease. Reporting of non-ICH bleeding was variable across studies. Further attention to ITP-specific bleeding measurement in clinical trials is needed to improve standardization of this important outcome for patients. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  10. Employment, disability pension and income for children with parental multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Julie Yoon; Laursen, Bjarne; Koch-Henriksen, N.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the consequences of parental multiple sclerosis (MS) on offspring's socioeconomic circumstances. OBJECTIVE: To investigate employment, disability pension and income in offspring of parents with MS compared with matched reference persons in a nationwide register......-based cohort study. METHODS: All Danish-born persons with onset of MS during 1950-1986 were retrieved from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. Their offspring were identified using the Civil Registration System. One random offspring from each sibship was matched by sex and year of birth with eight random...... reference persons. RESULTS: We included 2456 MS offspring and 19,648 reference persons. At age 30, employment was lower among MS offspring than reference children (odds ratio (OR): 0.89; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.84-0.95; p = 0.0003), and they more often received disability pension (OR: 1.31; 95% CI...

  11. Safety of 100 µg venom immunotherapy rush protocols in children compared to adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoevesandt, Johanna; Hosp, Christine; Kerstan, Andreas; Trautmann, Axel

    2017-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies examining the safety of venom immunotherapy (VIT) in children. We aimed to assess the incidence of anaphylactic side effects during rush VIT in a cohort of pediatric patients and adult controls. 72 consecutive cycles of VIT-buildup in 71 children/adolescents aged 7-17 years were retrospectively evaluated and compared to an adult control group (n = 981) with regard to baseline parameters (sex, causative venom, severity of index sting reaction, results of allergy testing, comorbidities) and the incidence of anaphylactic adverse reactions. Compared to adults, severe index sting-induced anaphylaxis was significantly less common in children ( P  = .001). Children were more likely to suffer from bee venom allergy ( P  bee venom-specific IgE ( P  = .013), but lower serum tryptase concentrations ( P  = .014). The overall rate of VIT-induced anaphylactic reactions was higher in children than in adults (6.9% vs 2.5%, P  = .046 by univariate analysis). In the final binary logistic regression model, however, only bee VIT ( P  = .039; odds ratio 2.25; confidence interval 1.04-4.87) and 5-day compared to 3-day buildup protocols ( P  = .011; odds ratio 2.64; confidence interval 1.25-5.57) were associated with an increased risk of treatment-induced anaphylaxis. All pediatric patients finally reached and tolerated the target maintenance dose of 100 µg. The higher anaphylactic reaction rate observed in pediatric patients may be attributed to a greater prevalence of bee venom allergy. VIT-induced anaphylaxis in children is usually mild and does not affect further updosing and maintenance of VIT.

  12. Different profiles of immune reconstitution in children and adults with HIV-infection after highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Manuel

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in characterizing the immune recovery of HIV-1-infected people have highlighted the importance of the thymus for peripheral T-cell diversity and function. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in immune reconstitution profiles after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART between HIV-children and adults. Methods HIV patients were grouped according to their previous clinical and immunological status: 9 HIV-Reconstituting-adults (HIV-Rec-adults and 10 HIV-Reconstituting-children (HIV-Rec-children on HAART with viral load (VL ≤400 copies/ml and CD4+ ≥500 cells/μL at least during 6 months before the study and CD4+ ≤300 cells/μL anytime before. Fifteen healthy-adults and 20 healthy-children (control subjects were used to calculate Z-score values to unify value scales between children and adults to make them comparable. Results HIV-Rec-children had higher T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC and lower interleukin (IL-7 levels than HIV-Rec-adults (p + (CD4+CD45RA hi+CD27+, naïve CD8+ (CD8+CD45RA hi+CD27+, and memory CD8+ (CD8+CD45RO+ cells/μl than HIV-Rec-adults, but similar memory CD4+ (CD4+CD45RO+ counts. HIV-Rec-children had lower naïve CD8+ Z-score values than HIV-Rec-adults (p = 0.05. Conclusion Our data suggest that HIV-Rec-children had better thymic function than HIV-Rec-adults and this fact affects the peripheral T-cell subsets. Thus, T-cell recovery after HAART in HIV-Rec-adults could be the consequence of antigen-independent peripheral T-cell expansion while in HIV-Rec-children thymic output could play a predominant role in immune reconstitution.

  13. Multiple physical signs detection and decision support system for hospitalized older adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, Mirza Mansoor; GholamHosseini, Hamid; Connolly, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Health monitoring systems have rapidly evolved during the past two decades and have the potential to change the way healthcare is currently delivered. Smart monitoring systems automate patient monitoring tasks and thereby improve patient workflow management. Moreover, expert systems have the potential to assist clinicians and improve their performance by accurately executing repetitive tasks, to which humans are ill-suited. Clinicians working in hospital wards are responsible for conducting a multitude of tasks which require constant vigilance, and thus the need for a smart decision support system has arisen. In particular, wireless patient monitoring systems are emerging as a low cost, reliable and accurate means of healthcare delivery.Vital signs monitoring systems are rapidly becoming part of today’s healthcare delivery. The paradigm has shifted from traditional and manual recording to computer-based electronic records and, further, to handheld devices as versatile and innovative healthcare monitoring systems. The current study focuses on interpreting multiple physical signs and early warning for hospitalized older adults so that severe consequences can be minimized. Data from a total of 30 patients have been collated in New Zealand hospitals under local and national ethics approvals. The system records blood pressure, heart rate (pulse), oxygen saturation (SpO2), ear temperature and blood glucose levels from hospitalized patients and transfers this information to a web-based software application for remote monitoring and further interpretation. Ultimately, this system is aimed to achieve a high level of agreement with clinicians’ interpretation when assessing specific physical signs such as bradycardia, tachycardia, hypertension, hypotension, hypoxaemia, fever and hypothermia to generate early warnings. The performance of the vital signs interpretation system was validated through off-line as well as real-time tests with a high level of agreement between

  14. Decision-making and cancer screening: a qualitative study of older adults with multiple chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Cary P; Fried, Terri R; Tinetti, Mary E; Ross, Joseph S; Genao, Inginia; Hossain, Sabina; Wolf, Elizabeth; Lewis, Carmen L

    2015-03-01

    To understand how older persons with multiple chronic conditions (MCC) approach decisions about cancer screening. We conducted interviews with adults >65 years old with at least two chronic conditions who were taking ≥five medications daily. Patients were first asked how age and multimorbidity influence their cancer screening decisions. After showing them an educational prompt that explained the relationship between life expectancy and the benefits of cancer screening, respondents were then asked about screening in the context of specific health scenarios. Using grounded theory, three independent readers coded responses for salient themes. Sample size was determined by thematic saturation. Most respondents (26 of 28) initially indicated that their overall health or medical conditions do not influence their cancer screening decisions. After viewing the educational prompt, respondents described two broad approaches to cancer screening in the setting of increasing age or multi-morbidity. The first was a "benefits versus harms" approach in which participants weighed direct health benefits (e.g. reducing cancer incidence or mortality) and harms (e.g. complications or inconvenience). The second was a heuristic approach. Some heuristics favored screening, such as a persistent belief in unspecified benefits from screening, value of knowledge about cancer status, and not wanting to "give up", whereas other heuristics discouraged screening, such as fatalism or a reluctance to learn about their cancer status. When considering cancer screening, some older persons with MCC employ heuristics which circumvent the traditional quantitative comparison of risks and benefits, providing an important challenge to informed decision making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Early-Life Parent-Child Relationships and Adult Children's Support of Unpartnered Parents in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Fen; Wu, Hsueh-Sheng

    2018-02-08

    The proportion of older adults who are unpartnered has increased significantly over the past 25 years. Unpartnered older adults often rely on their adult children for support. Most previous studies have focused on proximal factors associated with adult children's support of their parents, while few have examined distal factors, such as parent-child relationships formed during childhood. This study fills the gap by investigating the direct and indirect associations between early-life parent-child relationships and adult children's upward transfers to unpartnered parents. Data came from two supplements to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, in which respondents were asked about their relationships with mothers and fathers before age 17 and their transfers of time and money to parents in 2013. Path models were estimated for unpartnered mother-adult child dyads and father-adult child dyads separately. For adult children of unpartnered mothers, psychological closeness has a direct, positive association with time transfer, while physical violence has an indirect association with time transfer through adult children's marital status. For adult children of unpartnered fathers, psychological closeness has neither a direct nor an indirect association with time or money transfer, but physical violence has a direct, negative association with time transfer. Early-life parent-child relationships play a pivotal role in influencing adult children's caregiving behavior, both directly and indirectly. Our findings suggest that by improving their relationships with children early in life, parents may be able to increase the amount of time transfer that they receive in late life. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Everyday movement and use of the arms: Relationship in children with hemiparesis differs from adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Brad; Uswatte, Gitendra; Vogtle, Laura; Byrom, Ezekiel; Barman, Joydip

    2015-01-01

    In adults with hemiparesis amount of movement of the more-affected arm is related to its amount of use in daily life. In children, little is known about everyday arm use. This report examines the relationships between everyday movement of the more-affected arm and its (a) everyday use and (b) motor capacity in children with hemiparesis. Participants were 28 children with a wide range of upper-extremity hemiparesis subsequent to cerebral palsy due to pre- or peri-natal stroke. Everyday movement of the more-affected arm was assessed by putting accelerometers on the children's forearms for three days. Everyday use of that arm and its motor capacity were assessed with the Pediatric Motor Activity Log-Revised and Pediatric Arm Function Test, respectively. Intensity of everyday movement of the more-affected arm was correlated with its motor capacity (rs ≥ 0.52, ps ≤ 0.003). However, everyday movement of that arm was not correlated with its everyday use (rs ≤ 0.30, ps ≥ $ 0.126). In children with upper-extremity hemiparesis who meet the study intake criteria amount of movement of the more-affected arm in daily life is not related to its amount to use, suggesting that children differ from adults in this respect.

  17. The impact of distracter-target similarity on contextual cueing effects of children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingying; Merrill, Edward C

    2014-05-01

    Contextual cueing reflects a memory-based attentional guidance process that develops through repeated exposure to displays in which a target location has been consistently paired with a specific context. In two experiments, we compared 20 younger children's (6-7 years old), 20 older children's (9-10 years old), and 20 young adults' (18-21 years old) abilities to acquire contextual cueing effects from displays in which half of the distracters predicted the location of the target and half did not. Across experiments, we varied the similarity between the predictive and nonpredictive distracters and the target. In Experiment 1, the predictive distracters were visually similar to the target and dissimilar from the nonpredictive distracters. In Experiment 2, the nonpredictive distracters were also similar to the target and predictive distracters. All three age groups exhibited contextual cueing in Experiment 1, although the effect was not as strong for the younger children relative to older children and adults. All participants exhibited weaker contextual cueing effects in Experiment 2, with the younger children not exhibiting significant contextual cueing at all. Apparently, when search processes could not be guided to the predictive distracters on the basis of salient stimulus features, younger children in particular experienced difficulty in implicitly identifying and using aspects of the context to facilitate with the acquisition of contextual cueing effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Children's and adults' understanding of death: Cognitive, parental, and experiential influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotaki, Georgia; Hopkins, Michelle; Nobes, Gavin; Ward, Emma; Griffiths, Debra

    2018-02-01

    This study explored the development of understanding of death in a sample of 4- to 11-year-old British children and adults (N=136). It also investigated four sets of possible influences on this development: parents' religion and spiritual beliefs, cognitive ability, socioeconomic status, and experience of illness and death. Participants were interviewed using the "death concept" interview that explores understanding of the subcomponents of inevitability, universality, irreversibility, cessation, and causality of death. Children understood key aspects of death from as early as 4 or 5years, and with age their explanations of inevitability, universality, and causality became increasingly biological. Understanding of irreversibility and the cessation of mental and physical processes also emerged during early childhood, but by 10years many children's explanations reflected not an improved biological understanding but rather the coexistence of apparently contradictory biological and supernatural ideas-religious, spiritual, or metaphysical. Evidence for these coexistent beliefs was more prevalent in older children than in younger children and was associated with their parents' religious and spiritual beliefs. Socioeconomic status was partly related to children's biological ideas, whereas cognitive ability and experience of illness and death played less important roles. There was no evidence for coexistent thinking among adults, only a clear distinction between biological explanations about death and supernatural explanations about the afterlife. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Systemic bioavailability and safety of twice-daily topical ozenoxacin 1% cream in adults and children with impetigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gropper, Savion; Cepero, Ana Luisa; Santos, Benjamin; Kruger, Dawie

    2014-01-01

    In this Phase I open-label study, the systemic absorption, clinical response, safety and tolerability of multiple-dose ozenoxacin 1% cream were evaluated in children (≥ 2 months of age) and adults with impetigo. A single (evening) dose of ozenoxacin 1% cream on day 1 was followed by twice-daily application for 4 days (every 12 h), and then a final single (morning) dose on day 6. A total of 46 patients were enrolled in the study. The majority of ozenoxacin plasma samples were below the limit of quantification (no systemic absorption). Approximately half (22/45) of the evaluable patients achieved clinical success (skin lesions were cured). No patients were withdrawn from the study because of a lack of healing or worsening of a lesion. Ozenoxacin was well tolerated in all patients.

  20. Health of adults caring for orphaned children in an HIV-endemic community in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Caroline; Operario, Don

    2011-09-01

    In South Africa, an estimated 2.5 million children have been orphaned by AIDS and other causes of adult mortality. Although there is a growing body of research on the well-being of South African orphaned children, few research studies have examined the health of adult individuals caring for children in HIV-endemic communities. The cross-sectional survey assessed prevalence of general health and functioning (based on Short-Form 36 version 2 scale), depression (based on Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale), anxiety (using Kessler-10 scale), and post-traumatic stress (using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire) among a representative community sample of adults caring for children in Umlazi Township, an HIV-endemic community in South Africa. Of 1599 respondents, 33% (n=530) were carers of orphaned children. Results showed that, overall, carers reported poor general health and functioning and elevated levels of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress. Carers of orphaned children reported significantly poorer general health and functioning and higher rates of depression and post-traumatic stress compared with carers of non-orphaned children. In multivariate analyses, orphan carer and non-orphan carer differences in general health were accounted for by age, gender, education, economic assets, and source of income, but differences in depression were independent of these cofactors. Interventions are needed to address physical and mental health of carers in general. Greater health problems among orphan carers appeared to be fully explained by socioeconomic characteristics, which offer opportunities for targeting of programs. More research is needed to understand determinants of mental health disparities among orphan carers, which were not explained by socioeconomic characteristics.

  1. Throughput times for adults and children during two drive-through influenza vaccination clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Laura L; Crandall, Cameron; Esquibel, Luke

    2013-04-01

    Successful planning for public health emergencies requires knowledge of effective methods for mass distribution of medication and supplies to the public. We measured the time required for the key components of 2 drive-through vaccination clinics and summarized the results as they applied to providing medical countermeasures to large populations of children and adults. We hypothesized that vaccinating children in addition to adults would affect throughput time. Using 2 separate drive-through vaccination clinics, we measured elapsed time for vehicle flow and vaccination procedures. We calculated the median length of stay and the time to administer vaccinations based on the number of individual vaccinations given per vehicle, and compared the vehicles in which children (aged 9-18 years) were vaccinated to those in which only adults were vaccinated. A total of 2174 vaccinations and 1275 vehicles were timed during the 2 clinics. The number of vaccinations and vehicles per hour varied during the course of the day; the maximums were 200 and 361 per hour, respectively. The median throughput time was 5 minutes, and the median vaccination time was 48 seconds. Flow over time varied by the hour, and the optimum number of vaccinations per vehicle to maximize efficiency was between 3 and 4. Our findings showed that the presence of children raised the total number of vaccinations given per vehicle and, therefore, the total vaccination processing time per vehicle. However, the median individual procedure time in the vehicles with children was not significantly increased, indicating no need to calculate increased times for processing children 9 years of age or older during emergency planning. Drive-through clinics can provide a large number of seasonal influenza vaccinations in a relatively efficient manner; provide needed experience for students and practitioners in techniques for mass administration of medical countermeasures; and assist public health and emergency management

  2. Zinc or multiple micronutrient supplementation to reduce diarrhea and respiratory disease in South African children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kany-Kany Angelique Luabeya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic zinc supplementation has been shown to reduce diarrhea and respiratory illness in children in many developing countries, but its efficacy in children in Africa is uncertain.To determine if zinc, or zinc plus multiple micronutrients, reduces diarrhea and respiratory disease prevalence.Randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.Rural community in South Africa.THREE COHORTS: 32 HIV-infected children; 154 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers; and 187 HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers.Children received either 1250 IU of vitamin A; vitamin A and 10 mg of zinc; or vitamin A, zinc, vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12, C, D, E, and K and copper, iodine, iron, and niacin starting at 6 months and continuing to 24 months of age. Homes were visited weekly.Primary outcome was percentage of days of diarrhea per child by study arm within each of the three cohorts. Secondary outcomes were prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms and percentage of children who ever had pneumonia by maternal report, or confirmed by the field worker.Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-infected mothers, median percentage of days with diarrhea was 2.3% for 49 children allocated to vitamin A; 2.5% in 47 children allocated to receive vitamin A and zinc; and 2.2% for 46 children allocated to multiple micronutrients (P = 0.852. Among HIV-uninfected children born to HIV-uninfected mothers, median percentage of days of diarrhea was 2.4% in 56 children in the vitamin A group; 1.8% in 57 children in the vitamin A and zinc group; and 2.7% in 52 children in the multiple micronutrient group (P = 0.857. Only 32 HIV-infected children were enrolled, and there were no differences between treatment arms in the prevalence of diarrhea. The prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms or incidence of pneumonia did not differ by treatment arms in any of the cohorts.When compared with vitamin A alone, supplementation with zinc, or with zinc and multiple

  3. Risk group assignment differs for children and adults 1-45 yr with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated by the NOPHO ALL-2008 protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Nina; Birgens, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is poorer in adults than in children. Studies have indicated that young adults benefit from pediatric treatment, although no upper age limit has been defined.......The prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is poorer in adults than in children. Studies have indicated that young adults benefit from pediatric treatment, although no upper age limit has been defined....

  4. Boomerang families and failure-to-launch: Commentary on adult children living at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Katherine; Szoeke, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    With a shifting economic climate and changes in social norms, young adults are increasingly reported to be living with their parents, either through delayed launch or by launch and return. For young adults grappling with financial and domestic independence, the family home can represent a safe haven; however, living with parents can also pose a threat to autonomy and self-image as they strive for adult status. Parents, on the other hand, are often beleaguered by the economic and emotional demands of their dependent adult children and struggle to maintain their own independence. The roles and expectations of both parties need to be redefined in order to achieve optimal household functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Solidarity and conflict between adult children and parents: a latent class analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, R.I.A.; Dykstra, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    Using multiple dimensions of solidarity and conflict in a latent class analysis, we develop a typology of adult child–parent relationships. The data (N= 4,990) are from the first wave of the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study. In descending order of relationship quality, the 5 types are harmonious

  6. Coping and Psychological Health of Aging Parents of Adult Children with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Vivian E.; Floyd, Frank J.; Mailick, Marsha R.; Greenberg, Jan S.

    2014-01-01

    Among aging parents (mean age = 65, "N" = 139) of adults with developmental disabilities, we examined the effectiveness of multiple forms of coping with caregiver burden. As expected, accommodative strategies of adapting to stress (secondary engagement), used frequently in later life, buffered the impact of caregiver burden, whereas…

  7. Recognition and source memory for pictures in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cycowicz, Y M; Friedman, D; Snodgrass, J G; Duff, M

    2001-01-01

    The present experiment investigated the developmental aspects of source compared to item memory. College students and 7-8-year-old children viewed pictures drawn in red or green during a study phase, and were asked either to remember the pictures for a subsequent recognition test, or to remember both the pictures and their associated colors for a subsequent source memory test. In the test phase, new and old pictures were presented in black. In the recognition task, participants were asked to make binary old/new recognition judgments, while in the source task, they were asked to make trinary old-green/old-red/new source judgements. Performance on all tasks improved with increasing age, but the age difference for source was much larger than that for item memory. It has been suggested that the frontal lobes play a critical role in the retrieval of source information, and that this brain region relative to the medial temporal lobes continues to develop into late adolescence. Thus, it is possible that immaturity of the frontal lobes may be causally related to the children's lower performance on the source memory task.

  8. A Comparative Study Of The Predisposing Factors And Natural History Of Lichen sclerosus ET Atrophicus (LSA In Children And Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraji Fariba

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen sclerosus et atrophicus (LSA is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis that results in white plaques with epidermal atrophy usually affecting the genital area in both adults and children. The causes of LSA are not clear but possible predisponsing factors include trauma, infection (borrelia, human papilloma virus, autoimmune diseases and local irritation. This study is a retrospective case review of children and adults with LSA attending the department of Dermatology at the Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh, clinical notes for 22 patients were reviewed for age, sex, personal and familial history, symptoms associated diseases and clinical course and treatment. The mean ages at diagnosis of LSA in 9 children (8F: 1M and 13 adults (13 F were 7 and 57.5 years respectively. The mean duration of illness was 1.5 year in children and 5.5 year in adults. Itching was the most common symptom in both children and adults. Children also suffered with difficulties in defaecation and in micturation , dribbling, incontinence, constipation and bleeding. Atopy and hypothyroidism were common associated conditions in both the groups. Squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva was confirmed in two adult patients. This study showed the variable symptoms in children, which seemed more severe than in the adult population.

  9. Long-Term Outcomes of Cultivated Limbal Epithelial Transplantation: Evaluation and Comparison of Results in Children and Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Ganger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the long-term clinical outcomes of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET in children and adults with limbal stem cell deficiency. Design. Retrospective case series. Methods. Case records of patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD who underwent CLET from April 2004 to December 2014 were studied. Outcome measures were compared in terms of anatomical success and visual improvement. Parameters for total anatomical success were avascular, epithelized, and clinically stable corneal surface without conjunctivalization, whereas partial anatomical success was considered when mild vascularization (sparing centre of cornea and mild conjunctivalization were noted along with complete epithelization. Results. A total of 62 cases underwent the CLET procedure: 38 (61.3% were children and 24 (38.7% were adults. Patients with unilateral LSCD (33 children and 21 adults had autografts and those with bilateral LSCD (5 children and 3 adults had allografts. Amongst the 54 autografts partial and total anatomical success were noted in 21.2% and 66.6% children, respectively, and 19.0% and 80.9% in adults, respectively (p value 0.23. Visual improvement of 1 line and ≥2 lines was seen in 57.5% and 21.2% children, respectively, and 38% and 38% in adults, respectively (p value 0.31. Conclusion. Cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation gives good long-term results in patients with LSCD and the outcomes are comparable in children and adults.

  10. Primary antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains among adults and children in a tertiary referral centre in Lithuania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dargiene, Gintare; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Jonaitis, Laimas

    2018-01-01

    The study evaluated primary antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori within the period 2013-2015 and trends of antibiotic consumption over the last decade in Lithuania; 242 adults and 55 children were included in the study. E-tests were performed for amoxicillin, metronidazole, clarithromycin......, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin and tetracycline. The presence of H. pylori and clarithromycin resistance was additionally tested by PCR. Helicobacter pylori culture was positive in 67 of 242 (28%) adult and in 12 of 55 (21.8%) children samples. Resistance rates among adults by E-tests were as follows: metronidazole......, while it has doubled from 1.10 to 2.22 DDD/1000/children/day in children within 2003-2015. There are no significant changes in the susceptibility of H. pylori to the most widely used antibiotics in adults over the last years in Lithuania; however, clarithromycin resistance among children exceeds 15...

  11. Multiple Levels of Family Factors and Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms Among Chinese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiuyun; Li, Longfeng; Heath, Melissa A; Chi, Peilian; Xu, Shousen; Fang, Xiaoyi

    2018-03-01

    Family factors are closely associated with child developmental outcomes. This study examined the relationship of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms and factors at whole family, dyadic, and individual levels in Chinese children. Participants, who were recruited from 14 primary schools in north, east, and south-west China, included 80 father-child dyads and 169 mother-child dyads. Children in the participating dyads were previously diagnosed with ODD. Results revealed that family cohesion/adaptability was indirectly associated with ODD symptoms via parent-child relationship and child emotion regulation. Parent-child relationship affected ODD symptoms directly and indirectly through child emotion regulation. In addition, the effects of family cohesion/adaptability on parent emotion regulation and child emotion regulation were mediated by the parent-child relationship. The tested model provides a comprehensive framework of how family factors at multiple levels are related to child ODD symptoms and highlights the importance of understanding child emotional and behavioral problems within the family context, more specifically within the multiple levels of family relationships. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  12. Incidence and injury characteristics of traumatic brain injury: Comparison between children, adults and seniors in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siman-Tov, Maya; Radomislensky, Irina; Knoller, Nachshon; Bahouth, Hany; Kessel, Boris; Klein, Yoram; Michaelson, Moshe; Avraham Rivkind, Bala Miklosh; Shaked, Gad; Simon, Daniel; Soffer, Dror; Stein, Michael; Jeroukhimov, Igor; Peleg, Kobi

    2016-01-01

    To assess the incidence and injury characteristics of hospitalized trauma patients diagnosed with TBI. A retrospective study of all injured hospitalized patients recorded in the National Trauma Registry at 19 trauma centres in Israel between 2002-2011. Incidence and injury characteristics were examined among children, adults and seniors. The annual incidence rate of hospitalized TBI for the Israeli population in 2011 was 31.8/100,000. Age-specific incidence was highest among seniors with a dramatic decrease in TBI-related mortality rate among them. Adults, in comparison to children and seniors, had higher rates of severe TBI, severe and critical injuries, more admission to the intensive care unit, underwent surgery, were hospitalization for more than 2 weeks and were discharged to rehabilitation. After adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, mechanism of injury and injury severity score, TBI-related in-hospital mortality was higher among seniors and adults compared to children. Seniors are at high risk for TBI-related in-hospital mortality, although adults had more severe and critical injuries and utilized more hospital resources. However, seniors showed the most significant reduction in mortality rate during the study period. Appropriate intervention programmes should be designed and implemented, targeted to reduce TBI among high risk groups.

  13. Gaze-contingent reinforcement learning reveals incentive value of social signals in young children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernetti, Angélina; Smith, Tim J; Senju, Atsushi

    2017-03-15

    While numerous studies have demonstrated that infants and adults preferentially orient to social stimuli, it remains unclear as to what drives such preferential orienting. It has been suggested that the learned association between social cues and subsequent reward delivery might shape such social orienting. Using a novel, spontaneous indication of reinforcement learning (with the use of a gaze contingent reward-learning task), we investigated whether children and adults' orienting towards social and non-social visual cues can be elicited by the association between participants' visual attention and a rewarding outcome. Critically, we assessed whether the engaging nature of the social cues influences the process of reinforcement learning. Both children and adults learned to orient more often to the visual cues associated with reward delivery, demonstrating that cue-reward association reinforced visual orienting. More importantly, when the reward-predictive cue was social and engaging, both children and adults learned the cue-reward association faster and more efficiently than when the reward-predictive cue was social but non-engaging. These new findings indicate that social engaging cues have a positive incentive value. This could possibly be because they usually coincide with positive outcomes in real life, which could partly drive the development of social orienting. © 2017 The Authors.

  14. Clustering and correlates of multiple health behaviours in 9-10 year old children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie K Elsenburg

    Full Text Available Sleep, physical activity, screen time and dietary behaviours influence health during childhood, but few studies have looked at all of these behaviours simultaneously and previous research has relied predominantly on self- or proxy-reports of physical activity and food frequency questionnaires for the assessment of diet.To assess the prevalence and clustering of health behaviours and examine the socio-demographic characteristics of children that fail to meet multiple health behaviour guidelines.Data are from the Sport, Physical activity and Eating behaviour: Environmental Determinants in Young people (SPEEDY study. Participants (n = 1472, 42.9% male were dichotomized based on whether or not they met public health guidelines for accelerometer-assessed physical activity, diet-diary assessed fruit/vegetable intake and fat/non-milk extrinsic sugar (NMES intake, and self-reported screen time and sleep duration. Behavioural clustering was assessed using an observed over expected ratio (O/E. Socio-demographic characteristics of participants that failed to meet multiple health behaviour guidelines were examined using ordinal logistic regression. Data were analysed in 2013.83.3% of children failed to meet guidelines for two or more health behaviours. The O/E ratio for two behavioural combinations significantly exceeded 1, both of which featured high screen time, insufficient fruit/vegetable consumption and excessive fat/NMES intake. Children who were older (Proportional odds ratio (95% confidence interval: 1.69 (1.21,2.37 and those that attended a school with a physical activity or diet-related policy (1.28 (1.01,1.62 were more likely to have a poor health behaviour profile. Girls (0.80 (0.64,0.99, participants with siblings (0.76 (0.61,0.94 and those with more highly educated parents (0.73 (0.56,0.94 were less likely to have a poor health behaviour profile.A substantial proportion of children failed to meet guidelines for multiple health behaviours

  15. Averaged head phantoms from magnetic resonance images of Korean children and young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Miran; Lee, Ae-Kyoung; Choi, Hyung-Do; Jung, Yong Wook; Park, Jin Seo

    2018-02-01

    Increased use of mobile phones raises concerns about the health risks of electromagnetic radiation. Phantom heads are routinely used for radiofrequency dosimetry simulations, and the purpose of this study was to construct averaged phantom heads for children and young adults. Using magnetic resonance images (MRI), sectioned cadaver images, and a hybrid approach, we initially built template phantoms representing 6-, 9-, 12-, 15-year-old children and young adults. Our subsequent approach revised the template phantoms using 29 averaged items that were identified by averaging the MRI data from 500 children and young adults. In females, the brain size and cranium thickness peaked in the early teens and then decreased. This is contrary to what was observed in males, where brain size and cranium thicknesses either plateaued or grew continuously. The overall shape of brains was spherical in children and became ellipsoidal by adulthood. In this study, we devised a method to build averaged phantom heads by constructing surface and voxel models. The surface model could be used for phantom manipulation, whereas the voxel model could be used for compliance test of specific absorption rate (SAR) for users of mobile phones or other electronic devices.

  16. Iron Supplementation Effects on Redox Status following Aseptic Skeletal Muscle Trauma in Adults and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Chariklia K; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Paschalis, Vassilis; Tsiokanos, Athanasios; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Zalavras, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced skeletal muscle microtrauma is characterized by loss of muscle cell integrity, marked aseptic inflammatory response, and oxidative stress. We examined if iron supplementation would alter redox status after eccentric exercise. In a randomized, double blind crossover study, that was conducted in two cycles, healthy adults ( n = 14) and children ( n = 11) received daily either 37 mg of elemental iron or placebo for 3 weeks prior to and up to 72 h after an acute eccentric exercise bout. Blood was drawn at baseline, before exercise, and 72 h after exercise for the assessment of iron status, creatine kinase activity (CK), and redox status. Iron supplementation at rest increased iron concentration and transferrin saturation ( p exercise, while no changes occurred in children. Iron supplementation increased TBARS at 72 h after exercise in both adults and children; no changes occurred under placebo condition. Eccentric exercise decreased bilirubin concentration at 72 h in all groups. Iron supplementation can alter redox responses after muscle-damaging exercise in both adults and children. This could be of great importance not only for healthy exercising individuals, but also in clinical conditions which are characterized by skeletal muscle injury and inflammation, yet iron supplementation is crucial for maintaining iron homeostasis. This study was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02374619.

  17. Generational jeopardy? Parents' marital transitions and the provision of financial transfers to adult children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam; Remle, R Corey

    2011-01-01

    Transitions into and out of marriage are becoming more commonplace among persons in middle and later life. We assess the extent to which parental marital transitions influence inter vivos financial transfers to adult children at the family level. Panel data from 6,017 households with adult children in the 1992-1998 waves of the Health and Retirement Study are analyzed in this study. Net of familial characteristics, those families experiencing a parental marriage were less likely than stably married households to make a financial transfer to an adult child. The effects of divorce or widowhood were modest. Divorce was associated with a slight increase in the probability of providing a transfer. Widowhood was associated with a slight increase in the total amount transferred to children. The study adds weight to the growing argument that marital transitions may alter intergenerational exchanges. The results prompt us to further question how broader demographic and marriage patterns will influence relationships between parents and children in aging societies.

  18. Auditory Emotion Word Primes Influence Emotional Face Categorization in Children and Adults, but Not Vice Versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesker, Michael; Bahn, Daniela; Kauschke, Christina; Tschense, Monika; Degé, Franziska; Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2018-01-01

    In order to assess how the perception of audible speech and facial expressions influence one another for the perception of emotions, and how this influence might change over the course of development, we conducted two cross-modal priming experiments with three age groups of children (6-, 9-, and 12-years old), as well as college-aged adults. In Experiment 1, 74 children and 24 adult participants were tasked with categorizing photographs of emotional faces as positive or negative as quickly as possible after being primed with emotion words presented via audio in valence-congruent and valence-incongruent trials. In Experiment 2, 67 children and 24 adult participants carried out a similar categorization task, but with faces acting as visual primes, and emotion words acting as auditory targets. The results of Experiment 1 showed that participants made more errors when categorizing positive faces primed by negative words versus positive words, and that 6-year-old children are particularly sensitive to positive word primes, giving faster correct responses regardless of target valence. Meanwhile, the results of Experiment 2 did not show any congruency effects for priming by facial expressions. Thus, audible emotion words seem to exert an influence on the emotional categorization of faces, while faces do not seem to influence the categorization of emotion words in a significant way.

  19. The impact of signal-to-noise ratio on contextual cueing in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingying; Merrill, Edward C

    2015-04-01

    Contextual cueing refers to a form of implicit spatial learning where participants incidentally learn to associate a target location with its repeated spatial context. Successful contextual learning produces an efficient visual search through familiar environments. Despite the fact that children exhibit the basic ability of implicit spatial learning, their general effectiveness in this form of learning can be compromised by other development-dependent factors. Learning to extract useful information (signal) in the presence of various amounts of irrelevant or distracting information (noise) characterizes one of the most important changes that occur with cognitive development. This research investigated whether signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) affects contextual cueing differently in children and adults. S/N was operationally defined as the ratio of repeated versus new displays encountered over time. Three ratio conditions were created: high (100%), medium (67%), and low (33%) conditions. Results suggested no difference in the acquisition of contextual learning effects in the high and medium conditions across three age groups (6- to 8-year-olds, 10- to 12-year-olds, and young adults). However, a significant developmental difference emerged in the low S/N condition. As predicted, adults exhibited significant contextual cueing effects, whereas older children showed marginally significant contextual cueing and younger children did not show cueing effects. Group differences in the ability to exhibit implicit contextual learning under low S/N conditions and the implications of this difference are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Association between Congenital Lung Malformations and Lung Tumors in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, Arianna; Pederiva, Federica

    2016-11-01

    The appropriate management of asymptomatic congenital pulmonary malformations (CPMs) remains controversial. Prophylactic surgery is recommended to avoid the risk for development of pulmonary infections and to prevent the highly debated development of malignancy. However, the true risk for development of malignancy remains unknown. A systematic review analyzed all cases in which lung tumors associated with CPMs in both the pediatric and adult populations were described. A comprehensive literature search was carried out; it included all the cases in which an association between CPMs and malignant pulmonary lesions was reported. In all, 134 publications were eligible for inclusion. In 168 patients CPM was found associated with lung tumor. The diagnosis was made in 76 children at a mean age of 3.68 ± 3.4, whereas in the adult population (n = 92) it was made at a mean age of 44.62 ± 16.09. Cough was the most frequent presenting symptom both in children and in adults. Most of the patients underwent lobectomy. The tumor most often associated with CPM was pleuropulmonary bastoma in children (n = 31) and adenocarcinoma (n = 20) or bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (n = 20) in adults. The CPM most frequenty associated with tumors in children was congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (n = 37), especially type 1 (n = 21), whereas in adults it was bronchogenic cyst (n = 25), followed by congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (n = 21). CPMs should be followed up and never underestimated because they may conceal a tumor. Apparently, there is no age limit for malignant progression of CPMs and no limit of the interval between first detection of the CPM and appearance of the associated tumor. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Seroprevalence of diphtheria toxoid IgG antibodies in children, adolescents and adults in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasada, Aleksandra A; Rastawicki, Waldemar; Rokosz, Natalia; Jagielski, Marek

    2013-11-19

    Recommendations for diphtheria immunization are to apply an effective primary immunization in infancy and to maintain immunity throughout life. Immunity against diphtheria depends primarily on antibody to the diphtheria toxin. This study evaluated the seroprevalence of IgG diphtheria antitoxin in sera of healthy children, adolescents and adults in Poland. A total of 1387 serum samples collected between 2010 and 2012 from individuals with ages ranging from 1 month to 85 years were investigated. Antibody concentrations were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Anti-Diphtheria Toxoid ELISA IgG, Euroimmun, Germany). The results showed that among 1387 individuals examined, 547 (39.4%) had anti-diphtheria toxoid IgG antibody levels below 0.1 IU/ml (36.9% ≤ 18 years and 40.5% >18 years old, respectively). The 212 (50.8%) children and 542 (55.9%) adults showed only basic protection (0.1-1.0 IU/ml) and need immediate booster. High levels of anti-diphtheria toxoid IgG antibodies (>1.0 IU/ml) were found more often in children and adolescent (12.2%) than in adults (3.6%) and this was statistically significant (P 60 years old. Characteristically, in individuals > 40 years old high levels of anti-diphtheria toxoid IgG antibodies (>1.0 IU/ml) were not seen. There were no statistically significant differences in results in relation to gender. The present study showed inadequate immunity levels to diphtheria amongst the Polish population, especially in adults > 40 years old and children ≤ 2 years old. To prevent reemergence of diphtheria an information campaign reminding people about recommendations concerning diphtheria booster vaccination in adults should be conducted. Moreover, the immunogenicity of the DTP vaccine used in Poland should be verified.

  2. Long-term control medication use and asthma control status among children and adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, Hatice S; Bailey, Cathy M; Qin, Xiaoting; Johnson, Carol

    2017-12-01

    Uncontrolled asthma decreases quality of life and increases health care use. Most people with asthma need daily use of long-term control (LTC) medications for asthma symptoms and to prevent asthma attacks. Ongoing assessment of a person's level of asthma control and medication use is important in determining the effectiveness of current treatment to decrease the frequency and intensity of symptoms and functional limitations. To assess the use of LTC medication among children and adults with current asthma and identify contributing factors for LTC medication use. We used the 2006-2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) child and adult Asthma Call-back Survey (ACBS) data to assess the level of asthma control and LTC medication use. Asthma control was classified as well controlled and uncontrolled using guideline-based measures. We used multivariable logistic regression models to identify contributing factors for LTC medication use and having uncontrolled asthma. Among persons with current asthma, 46.0% of children and 41.5% of adults were taking LTC medications and 38.4% of children and 50.0% of adults had uncontrolled asthma. Among children who had uncontrolled asthma (38.4%), 24.1% were taking LTC medications and 14.3% were not taking LTC medications. Among adults who had uncontrolled asthma (50.0%), 26.7% were taking LTC medications and 23.3% were not taking LTC medications. Using BRFSS ACBS data to assess the level of asthma control and LTC medication use can identify subpopulations of persons with asthma who receive suboptimal treatment, for which better asthma-related medical treatment and management are needed.

  3. Dental Caries and General Health in Children and Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante

    2016-01-01

    in society with caries risk due to age- and medication-induced salivary reduction. However, a general disease may not always have a negative influence on dental health. Therefore, a regular individual caries risk assessment is of utmost importance for clinical decision-making and tailoring of recall......Caries is a biofilm-mediated noncommunicable disease fueled by dietary sugar, neglected oral hygiene, and reduced saliva flow. General diseases may influence the oral environment through its pathogenesis, medication, and/or the caring of the condition. Associations between caries and chronic...... diseases are mainly derived from case–control studies with various sample sizes and quality of matching. Few observational studies are available and the majority of all research is conducted in childhood and among older adults. There is an increased caries risk for subjects with obesity, severe asthma...

  4. Change in circulating microRNA profile of obese children indicates future risk of adult diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xianwei; You, Lianghui; Zhu, Lijun; Wang, Xing; Zhou, Yahui; Li, Yun; Wen, Juan; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Ji, Chenbo; Guo, Xirong

    2018-01-01

    Childhood obesity increases susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D) in adults. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in serum have been proposed as potential diagnostic biomarkers, and they may contribute to the progression toward T2D. Here, we investigated the possibility of predicting the future risk of adult T2D in obese children by using circulating miRNAs. We performed miRNA high-throughput sequencing to screen relevant circulating miRNAs in obese children. The expression patterns of targeted miRNAs were further explored in obese children and adults with T2D. To investigate the underlying contributions of these miRNAs to the development of T2D, we detected the impacts of the candidate miRNAs on preadipocyte proliferation, insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cell, and glucose uptake by skeletal muscle cells. Three miRNAs (miR-486, miR-146b and miR-15b), whose expression in the circulation was most dramatically augmented in obese children and adult T2D patients, were selected for further investigation. Of these 3 miRNAs, miR-486 was implicated in accelerating preadipocyte proliferation and myotube glucose intolerance, miR-146b and miR-15b were engaged in the suppression of high concentration glucose-induced pancreatic insulin secretion, and they all contributed to the pathological processes of obesity and T2D. Our results provide a better understanding of the role of circulating miRNAs, particularly miR-486, miR-146b and miR-15b, in predicting the future risk of T2D in obese children. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of single and multiple infections on atopy and wheezing in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara-Neves, Neuza Maria; Veiga, Rafael Valente; Dattoli, Vitor Camilo Cavalcante; Fiaccone, Rosimeire Leovigildo; Esquivel, Renata; Cruz, Álvaro Augusto; Cooper, Philip John; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2012-02-01

    The current epidemic of asthma and atopy has been explained by alterations in immune responses related to reduction in childhood infections. However, the findings of epidemiologic studies investigating the association between infection with atopy and asthma have been inconsistent. We sought to investigate the effect of single or multiple infections (pathogen burden) on atopy and wheeze in urban children from Latin America. Specific IgE against aeroallergens (sIgE) and skin prick test (SPT) reactivity for the most common local allergens were measured in 1128 children aged 4 to 11 years. Data on wheezing and potential confounders were collected by questionnaire. Infections by 8 pathogens were assessed by using serology and stool examination. Associations of wheeze and atopic outcomes with single and multiple infections were analyzed by means of logistic regression. Negative results for Toxoplasma gondii were associated with a higher prevalence of sIgE (≥0.70 kU/L), whereas negative results for Ascaris lumbricoides, T gondii, herpes simplex virus, and EBV were associated with a higher prevalence of SPT reactivity. Children with 3 or fewer infection markers had a higher prevalence of sIgE and SPT reactivity compared with those with 4 or more infection markers. However, isolated infections or pathogen burden were not associated with the prevalence of atopic or nonatopic wheeze. The findings provide support for the idea that the hygiene hypothesis is operating in an urban Latin American context, but its expression is thus far restricted to the atopic status of patients and not the perceived asthma symptoms. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of low vision care on reading performance in children with multiple disabilities and visual impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kumar Ramani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lack of evidence in literature to show low vision care enhances the reading performance in children with Multiple Disabilities and Visual Impairment (MDVI. Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of Low Vision Care intervention on the reading performance of children with MDVI. Materials and Methods: Three subjects who were diagnosed to have cerebral palsy and visual impairment, studying in a special school were recruited for the study. All of them underwent detailed eye examination and low vision care evaluation at a tertiary eye care hospital. A single subject multiple baseline (study design was adopted and the study period was 16 weeks. The reading performance (reading speed, reading accuracy, reading fluency was evaluated during the baseline phase and the intervention phase. The median of all the reading parameters for each week was noted. The trend of the reading performance was graphically represented in both the phases. Results: Reading speed increased by 37 Word per minute, 37 Letters per minute and 5 letters per minute for the subject 1, 2 and 3 respectively after the intervention. Reading accuracy was 84%, 91% and 86.4% at the end of the baseline period and 98.7%, 98.4% and 99% at the end of 16 weeks for subject 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Average reading fluency score was 8.3, 7.1 and 5.5 in the baseline period and 10.2, 10.2 and 8.7 in the intervention period. Conclusion: This study shows evidence of noticeable improvement in reading performance of children with MDVI using a novel study design.

  7. The night of the hunter: children & adults in the secret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry caesar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Night of the Hunter is  the 1956 Charles Laughton’s film considered  one of the best discussions about childhood. In this film, the story revolves around the fate of John and Pearl, two orphaned siblings whose father was hanged for stealing. The father had given the children the money, and they hid the money inside the girl’s doll. When the Preacher Powell enters their lives , both John and Pearl are in danger. The siblings have to keep a secret which is both where they put the money, and the fact that, for children, money is simply paper.

  8. Utilization of Preventive Health Care in Adults and Children With Eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Mark A; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2016-02-01

    Chronic disease is a barrier to delivery of preventive health care and health maintenance. However, health behaviors of adults and children with eczema, a chronic skin disorder, have not been examined. This study examined associations of eczema with vaccination, disease screening, health maintenance, and healthcare utilization. This study investigated 34,613 adults and 13,298 children from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, a prospective questionnaire-based study. Data were analyzed between August 2014 and January 2015. Adult eczema was associated with higher odds of vaccination for tetanus (OR [95% CI]=1.37 [1.22, 1.54]); influenza (1.23 [1.10, 1.37]); hepatitis A (1.21 [1.04, 1.41]) and B (1.21 [1.07, 1.35]); human papilloma virus (1.66 [1.32, 2.08]); and pneumonia (1.35 [1.19, 1.54]), but not herpes zoster virus (1.07 [0.87, 1.31]). Adult eczema was associated with increased measurement of blood glucose (1.29 [1.16, 1.44]); cholesterol (1.19 [1.06, 1.34]); blood pressure (1.84 [1.56, 2.08]); and HIV infection (1.50 [1.34, 1.70]), but not Pap smears (1.11 [0.95, 1.30]); colon cancer screening (p=0.17); or mammograms (p=0.63). Adults with eczema were more likely to interact with general doctors, mid-level providers, mental health professionals, eye doctors, podiatrists, chiropractors, therapists, obstetrician/gynecologists, and other specialists (p≤0.01). Childhood eczema was associated with higher rates of vaccination for influenza (pEczema in adults and children is associated with greater utilization of preventive health care and health maintenance, but not cancer screening. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Genotypes of rhinoviruses in children and adults patients with acute respiratory tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkan, Eda; Kırdar, Sevin; Ceylan, Emel; Yenigün, Ayşe; Kurt Ömürlü, İmran

    2017-10-01

    Rhinovirus (RV) is one of the most frequent causative agent of acute respiratory tract infections in the world. The virus may cause a mild cold, as well as more serious clinical symptoms in patients with immune system deficiency or comorbidities. Rhinoviruses have been identified by molecular methods under three types: RV-A, RV-B and RV-C. In most of the cases, it was reported that RV-A and RV-C were related with lower respiratory tract infections and asthma exacerbations, while RV-B was rarely reported in lower respiratory tract infections. The main objective of this study was to investigate RV species by sequence analysis in nasopharyngeal samples in pediatric and adult patients who were admitted to hospital with acute respiratory tract infections and to establish the relationship between species and age, gender and clinical diagnosis of the patients. Secondly, it was planned to emphasize the efficiency of the sequence analysis method in the determination of RV species. One hundred twenty seven patients (children and adults) who were followed up with acute respiratory tract infections in our university hospital were evaluated between January 2014 and January 2016. Viral loads were determined by quantitative real-time PCR in RV positive patients detected by a commercial kit in nasopharyngeal swab specimens. Thirty-one samples whose viral loads could not be determined were excluded from the study. The remaining 96 samples (50 children and 46 adults) were retested by conventional PCR using the target of VP4/VP2 gene region. A total of 65 samples (32 adults and 33 children) with the bands (549 bp) corresponding to the VP4/VP2 gene regions after the conventional PCR were analyzed by DNA sequencing. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the neighbour-joining method. After sequence analysis it was determined that 28 (43.07%) were RV-A, 7 (10.76%) were RV-B and 28 (43.07%) were RV-C; and moreover one of each enterovirus (EV) species EV-D68 (1.53%) and EV-C (1

  10. Association between multiple geriatric syndromes and life satisfaction in community-dwelling older adults: A nationwide study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deng-Chi; Lee, Jenq-Daw; Huang, Chi-Chang; Shih, Hsin-I; Chang, Chia-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have investigated the association between a single geriatric syndrome and life satisfaction in the older adults, the accumulated effects of multiple geriatric syndromes on life satisfaction remain unclear. We conducted a nationwide study by using data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging database. A total of 2415 older adults were enrolled. Life satisfaction was evaluated according to the Life Satisfaction Index, and the geriatric syndromes included a depressive disorder, cognitive impairment, functional impairment, urine incontinence, pain, a fall, and polypharmacy. Other characteristics were age, sex, marital status, education level, self-rated health, and chronic diseases. Univariate analysis revealed that the older adults, who were illiterate, did not live with a partner, yet other issues such as stroke, malignancy, osteoarthritis, poor self-rated health, a depressive disorder, functional impairment, urine incontinence, or pain were associated with lower life satisfaction. In the multivariate regression model, the older adults who were male, illiterate, lived without a partner, had poor self-rated health, or had a depressive disorder were more likely to have lower life satisfaction. In addition, life satisfaction was unaffected in the older adults with only 1 geriatric syndrome, but among those with ≥2 geriatric syndromes, an increased number of geriatric syndromes were associated with lower life satisfaction. In addition to socio-demographic factors, cumulative effects of multiple geriatric syndromes might affect life satisfaction in the older adults. Further study of interventions for reducing geriatric syndromes to maintain life satisfaction is required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk Factors for Pneumococcal Colonization of the Nasopharynx in Alaska Native Adults and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, Jonathan; Rudolph, Karen; Bruden, Dana; Hurlburt, Debby; Bruce, Michael G; Hennessy, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Alaska Native children have high invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) rates, and lack of in-home running water has been shown to have a significant association with infection. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines reduced IPD; however, this population saw substantial replacement disease and colonization with nonvaccine serotypes. We evaluated risk factors for nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization in Alaska Native adults and children. We conducted annual surveys from 2008 through 2011 of residents of all ages in 8 rural Alaskan villages. Interviews were conducted, medical charts were reviewed, and nasopharyngeal swabs were cultured for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed for 3 age groups (under 10 years, 10-17 years, and 18 years and older) to determine risk factors for colonization. We obtained 12 535 nasopharyngeal swabs from 4980 participants. Our population lived in severely crowded conditions, and 48% of households lacked in-home running water. In children water, household crowding, and more children in the home. Pneumococcal vaccination status was not associated with colonization. In older children and adults, increased number of persons in the household was associated with pneumococcal colonization. Higher colonization prevalence may partially explain increased IPD rates seen in those lacking in-home water services. Improving availability of sanitation services and reducing household crowding may reduce the burden of IPD in this population. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of children and young adults with suspected spinal fusion hardware infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrosky, Brian M. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Hayes, Kari L.; Fenton, Laura Z. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); Koo, Phillip J. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Evaluation of the child with spinal fusion hardware and concern for infection is challenging because of hardware artifact with standard imaging (CT and MRI) and difficult physical examination. Studies using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT combine the benefit of functional imaging with anatomical localization. To discuss a case series of children and young adults with spinal fusion hardware and clinical concern for hardware infection. These people underwent FDG PET/CT imaging to determine the site of infection. We performed a retrospective review of whole-body FDG PET/CT scans at a tertiary children's hospital from December 2009 to January 2012 in children and young adults with spinal hardware and suspected hardware infection. The PET/CT scan findings were correlated with pertinent clinical information including laboratory values of inflammatory markers, postoperative notes and pathology results to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT. An exempt status for this retrospective review was approved by the Institution Review Board. Twenty-five FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 20 patients. Spinal fusion hardware infection was confirmed surgically and pathologically in six patients. The most common FDG PET/CT finding in patients with hardware infection was increased FDG uptake in the soft tissue and bone immediately adjacent to the posterior spinal fusion rods at multiple contiguous vertebral levels. Noninfectious hardware complications were diagnosed in ten patients and proved surgically in four. Alternative sources of infection were diagnosed by FDG PET/CT in seven patients (five with pneumonia, one with pyonephrosis and one with superficial wound infections). FDG PET/CT is helpful in evaluation of children and young adults with concern for spinal hardware infection. Noninfectious hardware complications and alternative sources of infection, including pneumonia and pyonephrosis, can be diagnosed. FDG PET/CT should be the first-line cross-sectional imaging study in

  13. Acute presentation of craniopharyngioma in children and adults in a Danish national cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, E H; Jørgensen, J O; Bjerre, Peter Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to study the occurrence of acute-onset symptoms at initial presentation in a national Danish cohort of patients with childhood- or adult-onset craniopharyngioma, and to investigate potential risk factors for acute presentation. Medical records of 189 consecutive patients (39 children, 150...... adults) presenting with craniopharyngioma during the period 1985-2004 were reviewed, and data regarding initial symptoms, neuroimaging results, vision and pituitary function were systematically collected. Acute symptoms preceding hospital admission were noted. Subgroup analyses were based on age, gender...

  14. Meniscal pathology in children: differences and similarities with the adult meniscus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francavilla, Michael L.; Restrepo, Ricardo; Zamora, Kathryn W.; Sarode, Vijaya [Department of Radiology, Miami Children' s Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Swirsky, Stephen M. [Department of Orthopedics, Miami Children' s Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Mintz, Douglas [Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The normal meniscus undergoes typical developmental changes during childhood, reaching a mature adult appearance by approximately 10 years of age. In addition to recognizing normal meniscal appearances in children, identifying abnormalities - such as tears and the different types of discoid meniscus and meniscal cysts, as well as the surgical implications of these abnormalities - is vital in pediatric imaging. The reported incidence of meniscal tears in adolescents and young adults has increased because of increased sports participation and more widespread use of MRI. This review discusses the normal appearance of the pediatric meniscus, meniscal abnormalities, associated injuries, and prognostic indicators for repair. (orig.)

  15. Meniscal pathology in children: differences and similarities with the adult meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francavilla, Michael L.; Restrepo, Ricardo; Zamora, Kathryn W.; Sarode, Vijaya; Swirsky, Stephen M.; Mintz, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    The normal meniscus undergoes typical developmental changes during childhood, reaching a mature adult appearance by approximately 10 years of age. In addition to recognizing normal meniscal appearances in children, identifying abnormalities - such as tears and the different types of discoid meniscus and meniscal cysts, as well as the surgical implications of these abnormalities - is vital in pediatric imaging. The reported incidence of meniscal tears in adolescents and young adults has increased because of increased sports participation and more widespread use of MRI. This review discusses the normal appearance of the pediatric meniscus, meniscal abnormalities, associated injuries, and prognostic indicators for repair. (orig.)

  16. Children with Disabilities in Poor Households: Association with Juvenile and Adult Offending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Karen M Matta; Huang, Jin; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Drake, Brett

    2010-06-01

    Disabled youths are arrested, adjudicated, and recidivate at higher rates than their nondisabled peers. Although multiple theories have been offered to explain the relationship between disability and delinquency, the empirical evidence is limited and contradictory. Little is known about how disability may be associated with offending once poverty and family risks like maltreatment are controlled for. Using administrative data from a Midwest state, this article discusses results from a Cox regression of juvenile and young adult offending outcomes for low income disabled compared with nondisabled youths (N = 1,568). Youths with disabilities had higher rates of juvenile court petitions than similarly low-income peers. In models of adult offending, there was no relationship between disability status and adult arrest, but youths who had received educational services for emotional disturbance or other categories of health impairment had higher risk of entering adult corrections.

  17. Nouns and verbs in Chintang: children's usage and surrounding adult speech

    OpenAIRE

    Stoll, Sabine; Bickel, Balthasar; Lieven, Elena; Banjade, Goma; Bhatta, Toya Nath; Gaenszle, Martin; Paudyal, Netra P; Pettigrew, Judith; Rai, Ichchha Purna; Rai, Manoj; Rai, Novel Kishore

    2012-01-01

    peer-reviewed Analyzing the development of the noun-to-verb ratio in a longitudinal corpus of four Chintang (Sino-Tibetan) children, we find that up to about age four, children have a significantly higher ratio than adults. Previous cross-linguistic research rules out an explanation of this in [*] This research was made by possible by Grant Nos. BI 799/1-2 and II/81 961 from the Volkswagen Foundation (DoBeS program). Author contributions: Stoll designed the study; Bickel ...

  18. Clinical application of inert gas Multiple Breath Washout in children and adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwitserloot, Annelies; Fuchs, Susanne I; Müller, Christina; Bisdorf, Kornelia; Gappa, Monika

    2014-09-01

    Children with asthma often have normal spirometry despite significant disease. The pathology of the small airways in asthma may be assessed using Multiple Breath Washout (MBW) and calculating the Lung Clearance Index (LCI). There are only few studies using MBW in children with asthma and existing data regarding bronchodilator effect are contradictory. The aim of the present pilot study was to compare LCI in asthma and controls and assess the effect of salbutamol in children with asthma on the LCI. Unselected patients with a diagnosis of asthma visiting the outpatient department of our hospital between 04-2010 and 03-2011 were recruited and compared to a healthy control group. MBW was performed as inert gas MBW using sulfurhexafluorid (SF6) as the tracer gas. Clinical data were documented and spirometry and MBW (EasyOne Pro, MBW module, NDD Switzerland) were performed before and after the use of salbutamol (200-400 μg). Healthy controls performed baseline MBW only. 32 children diagnosed with asthma (4.7-17.4 years) and 42 controls (5.3-20.8) were included in the analysis. LCI differed between patients and controls, with a mean LCI (SD) of 6.48 (0.48) and 6.21 (0.38) (P = 0.008). Use of salbutamol had no significant effect on LCI for the group. These pilot data show that clinically stable asthma patients and controls both have a LCI in the normal range. However, in patients the LCI is significantly higher indicating that MBW may have a role in assessing small airways disease in asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Serological response to influenza vaccination among children vaccinated for multiple influenza seasons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Rafiq

    Full Text Available To evaluate if, among children aged 3 to 15 years, influenza vaccination for multiple seasons affects the proportion sero-protected.Participants were 131 healthy children aged 3-15 years. Participants were vaccinated with trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV over the 2005-06, 2006-07 and 2007-8 seasons. Number of seasons vaccinated were categorized as one (2007-08; two (2007-08 and 2006-07 or 2007-08 and 2005-06 or three (2005-06, 2006-07, and 2007-08. Pre- and post-vaccination sera were collected four weeks apart. Antibody titres were determined by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI assay using antigens to A/Solomon Islands/03/06 (H1N1, A/Wisconsin/67/05 (H3N2 and B/Malaysia/2506/04. The proportions sero-protected were compared by number of seasons vaccinated using cut-points for seroprotection of 1:40 vs. 1:320. The proportions of children sero-protected against H1N1 and H3N2 was high (>85% regardless of number of seasons vaccinated and regardless of cut-point for seroprotection. For B Malaysia there was no change in proportions sero-protected by number of seasons vaccinated; however the proportions protected were lower than for H1N1 and H3N2, and there was a lower proportion sero-protected when the higher, compared to lower, cut-point was used for sero-protection.The proportion of children sero-protected is not affected by number of seasons vaccinated.

  20. State-by-State Variation in the Number of Children and Young Adults in Nursing Homes, 2005-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Evan; Agrawal, Rishi

    2017-12-01

    Objectives One goal of Healthy People 2020 is to reduce the number of children and young adults living in nursing homes. However, little is known about the prevalence of nursing home use among children and young adults on a state-by-state basis. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of nursing home use among children and young adults in each state from 2005 to 2012. The study also looked for prevalence trends between 2005 and 2012. Methods The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Minimum Data Set and US Census data were used to calculate the prevalence of nursing home residents among children and young adults aged 0-30 in each US state in 2012 and assess trends in each state from 2005 to 2012. Results In 2012, the prevalence of nursing home residents among children and young adults aged 0-30 varied across states, ranging from 14 in 100,000 (New Jersey) to 0.8 in 100,000 (Alaska). Testing for trends from 2005 to 2012 also revealed significant trends (p young adults aged 0-30 across states. There is also variation in the nursing home prevalence trends across states. Observed variations may represent potential opportunities for some states to reduce their population of children and young adults in nursing homes.