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Sample records for multidisciplinary graduate curriculum

  1. Multidisciplinary Graduate Curriculum in Support of the Biobased Products Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John R. Dorgan

    2005-07-31

    The project had a dominant education component. The project involved revising curriculum to educate traditional engineering students in the emerging field of industrial biotechnology. New classes were developed and offered. As a result, the curriculum of the Colorado School of Mines was expanded to include new content. Roughly 100 undergraduates and about 10 graduate students each year benefit from this curricular expansion. The research associated with this project consisted of developing new materials and energy sources from renewable resources. Several significant advances were made, most importantly the heat distortion temperature of polylactide (PLA) was increased through the addition of cellulosic nanowhiskers. The resulting ecobionanocomposites have superior properties which enable the use of renewable resource based plastics in a variety of new applications. Significant amounts of petroleum are thereby saved and considerable environmental benefits also result. Effectiveness and economic feasibility of the project proved excellent. The educational activities are continuing in a sustainable fashion, now being supported by tuition revenues and the normal budgeting of the University. The PI will be teaching one of the newly developed classes will next Fall (Fall 2006), after the close of the DOE grant, and again repeatedly into the future. Now established, the curriculum in biobased products and energy will grow and evolve through regular teaching and revision. On the research side, the new plastic materials appear economically feasible and a new collaboration between the PI’s group and Sealed Air, a major food-packaging manufacturer, has been established to bring the new green plastics to market. Public benefits of the project are noteworthy in many respects. These include the development of a better educated workforce and citizenry capable of providing technological innovation as a means of growing the economy and providing jobs. In particular, the

  2. Multidisciplinary Graduate Education in Bioprocess Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Eiteman

    2006-04-18

    This report describes the accomplishments of the University of Georgia in establishing an academic program geared toward the emerging biobased products industry. By virtue of its strengths and structure, the University of Georgia is particularly well-suited for developing a program focused on plant- and microbial-based bioproducts, and it was in this general area that this program was developed. The program had several unique characteristics. First, we implemented a distinguished lecture series that brought outstanding scientists and engineers to our University to interact with students and share their vision of the biobased economy. Second, we offered industrially-oriented and multidisciplinary courses that provided students with a broad background on various facets of biobased business and technology. Third, we provided the students with opportunities to expand beyond the classroom by engaging in research lab rotations and industrial internships. Fourth, each student was engaged in a creative research project as led by a multidisciplinary faculty team. Throughout the implementation of these activities, we maintained a student-centered, mentoring approach to education. The most tangible outcome of this project was the graduation of two students who participated in a variety of scholarly activities, culminating in research toward the completion of a thesis and dissertation. Both research projects involved the use of microorganisms to produce industrial products from agricultural substrates via fermentation processes. The research advanced our understanding of microorganisms as used for industrial processes and products, as described in several articles published in scholarly journals and presentations made at scientific conferences (see information on pp. 14-15). Another outcome is one graduate course, Fermentation Engineering Laboratory, which is a unique experiential and multidisciplinary course. This course will be offered in the future as an elective to

  3. A Multidisciplinary Process Curriculum in Environmental Education, Grade 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds School District 15, Lynnwood, WA.

    This second grade curriculum guide is based on a multidisciplinary approach to environmental education. The guide includes activities, guidelines for field trip planning, and a resource section. The guide deals with the subjects of plants, soil, and litter. Each subject section includes activities based on the physical characteristics, man's use,…

  4. Graduate curriculum: A need for a change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungatullina Dilyana D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last couple of years there was an increase in graduates’ willingness to interleave their vocational careers with academic instruction at the university. Hence, the authors conducted evaluation and needs analysis of the skills crucial for graduate students to possess. The current study analyzed the attitude of 150 KFU IMEF graduates towards their core requirements within the framework of modern educational environment. The results showed that the majority of the respondents consider knowledge of teaching methodology (a new topic introduction, the material delivery, its further practice and revision, effective groupwork and public speaking to be of great importance. The paper concludes with suggestions on the need for the development and the introduction of a cutting-edge course at a Master’s level tailored to graduates to enhance the skills applicable not only in the professional field but the educational environment as well.

  5. Cybersecurity Curriculum Development: Introducing Specialties in a Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicak, Ali; Liu, Michelle; Murphy, Diane

    2015-01-01

    The cybersecurity curriculum has grown dramatically over the past decade: once it was just a couple of courses in a computer science graduate program. Today cybersecurity is introduced at the high school level, incorporated into undergraduate computer science and information systems programs, and has resulted in a variety of cybersecurity-specific…

  6. Ethics curriculum for emergency medicine graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Catherine A; Lu, Dave W; Stettner, Edward; Sokolove, Peter E; Ufberg, Jacob W; Noeller, Thomas P

    2011-05-01

    Ethics education is an essential component of graduate medical education in emergency medicine. A sound understanding of principles of bioethics and a rational approach to ethical decision-making are imperative. This article addresses ethics curriculum content, educational approaches, educational resources, and resident feedback and evaluation. Ethics curriculum content should include elements suggested by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, and the Model of the Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine. Essential ethics content includes ethical principles, the physician-patient relationship, patient autonomy, clinical issues, end-of-life decisions, justice, education in emergency medicine, research ethics, and professionalism. The appropriate curriculum in ethics education in emergency medicine should include some of the content and educational approaches outlined in this article, although the optimal methods for meeting these educational goals may vary by institution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementation of the medical research curriculum in graduate medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwi Hwa; Kim, Tae-Hee; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of the medical research curriculum on the students' satisfaction and the research self-efficacy. The curriculum was implemented to 79 graduate medical school students who entered in 2007 and 2008. This curriculum is implemented through 3 years consisting of 5 different sub-courses: Research design, Research ethics, Medical statistics, Writing medical paper, and Presentation. The effect of this program was measured with 2 self-administered surveys to students: the course satisfaction survey and the self-efficacy inventories. The Research Self-Efficacy Scale consisted of 18 items from 4 categories: Research design, Research ethics, Data analysis, and Result presentation. The descriptive statistics, paired t-test, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were implemented. The average point of satisfaction of the course was 2.74 out of 4, which told us that students generally satisfied with the course. The frequencies of tutoring for research course were 2 or 3 times on average and each session of tutorial lasted 1.5 to 2 hours. The research self-efficacy in three categories (Research design, Research ethics, and Result presentation) increased significantly (presearch paper writing at undergraduate level. The curriculum showed positive results in cultivating research self-efficacy of students. There is a need for improvement of the class of Statistical analysis as students reported that it was difficult.

  8. Graduates from a traditional medical curriculum evaluate the effectiveness of their medical curriculum through interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmough, Simon; O'Sullivan, Helen; Taylor, David

    2009-10-26

    In 1996 The University of Liverpool reformed its medical course from a traditional lecture-based course to an integrated PBL curriculum. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. Part of this project has involved gathering retrospective views on the relevance of both types of undergraduate education according to graduates. This paper focuses on the views of traditional Liverpool graduates approximately 6 years after graduation. From February 2006 to June 2006 interviews took place with 46 graduates from the last 2 cohorts to graduate from the traditional Liverpool curriculum. The graduates were generally happy with their undergraduate education although they did feel there were some flaws in their curriculum. They felt they had picked up good history and examination skills and were content with their exposure to different specialties on clinical attachments. They were also pleased with their basic science teaching as preparation for postgraduate exams, however many complained about the overload and irrelevance of many lectures in the early years of their course, particular in biochemistry. There were many different views about how they integrated this science teaching into understanding disease processes and many didn't feel it was made relevant to them at the time they learned it. Retrospectively, they felt that they hadn't been clinically well prepared for the role of working as junior doctor, particularly the practical aspects of the job nor had enough exposure to research skills. Although there was little communication skills training in their course they didn't feel they would have benefited from this training as they managed to pick up had the required skills on clinical attachments. These interviews offer a historical snapshot of the views of graduates from a traditional course before many courses were reformed. There was some conflict in the interviews about the doctors enjoying their undergraduate education but then saying that they

  9. Graduates from a traditional medical curriculum evaluate the effectiveness of their medical curriculum through interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor David

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1996 The University of Liverpool reformed its medical course from a traditional lecture-based course to an integrated PBL curriculum. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. Part of this project has involved gathering retrospective views on the relevance of both types of undergraduate education according to graduates. This paper focuses on the views of traditional Liverpool graduates approximately 6 years after graduation. Methods From February 2006 to June 2006 interviews took place with 46 graduates from the last 2 cohorts to graduate from the traditional Liverpool curriculum. Results The graduates were generally happy with their undergraduate education although they did feel there were some flaws in their curriculum. They felt they had picked up good history and examination skills and were content with their exposure to different specialties on clinical attachments. They were also pleased with their basic science teaching as preparation for postgraduate exams, however many complained about the overload and irrelevance of many lectures in the early years of their course, particular in biochemistry. There were many different views about how they integrated this science teaching into understanding disease processes and many didn't feel it was made relevant to them at the time they learned it. Retrospectively, they felt that they hadn't been clinically well prepared for the role of working as junior doctor, particularly the practical aspects of the job nor had enough exposure to research skills. Although there was little communication skills training in their course they didn't feel they would have benefited from this training as they managed to pick up had the required skills on clinical attachments. Conclusion These interviews offer a historical snapshot of the views of graduates from a traditional course before many courses were reformed. There was some conflict in the interviews about the doctors

  10. Graduates from a reformed undergraduate medical curriculum based on Tomorrow's Doctors evaluate the effectiveness of their curriculum 6 years after graduation through interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor David CM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1996 Liverpool reformed its medical curriculum from a traditional lecture based course to a curriculum based on the recommendations in Tomorrow's Doctors. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. This paper focuses on the views of graduates from that reformed curriculum 6 years after they had graduated. Methods Between 2007 and 2009 45 interviews took place with doctors from the first two cohorts to graduate from the reformed curriculum. Results The interviewees felt like they had been clinically well prepared to work as doctors and in particular had graduated with good clinical and communication skills and had a good knowledge of what the role of doctor entailed. They also felt they had good self directed learning and research skills. They did feel their basic science knowledge level was weaker than traditional graduates and perceived they had to work harder to pass postgraduate exams. Whilst many had enjoyed the curriculum and in particular the clinical skills resource centre and the clinical exposure of the final year including the "shadowing" and A & E attachment they would have liked more "structure" alongside the PBL when learning the basic sciences. Conclusion According to the graduates themselves many of the aims of curriculum reform have been met by the reformed curriculum and they were well prepared clinically to work as doctors. However, further reforms may be needed to give confidence to science knowledge acquisition.

  11. Graduates from a reformed undergraduate medical curriculum based on Tomorrow's Doctors evaluate the effectiveness of their curriculum 6 years after graduation through interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmough, Simon D; O'Sullivan, Helen; Taylor, David C M

    2010-09-29

    In 1996 Liverpool reformed its medical curriculum from a traditional lecture based course to a curriculum based on the recommendations in Tomorrow's Doctors. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. This paper focuses on the views of graduates from that reformed curriculum 6 years after they had graduated. Between 2007 and 2009 45 interviews took place with doctors from the first two cohorts to graduate from the reformed curriculum. The interviewees felt like they had been clinically well prepared to work as doctors and in particular had graduated with good clinical and communication skills and had a good knowledge of what the role of doctor entailed. They also felt they had good self directed learning and research skills. They did feel their basic science knowledge level was weaker than traditional graduates and perceived they had to work harder to pass postgraduate exams. Whilst many had enjoyed the curriculum and in particular the clinical skills resource centre and the clinical exposure of the final year including the "shadowing" and A & E attachment they would have liked more "structure" alongside the PBL when learning the basic sciences. According to the graduates themselves many of the aims of curriculum reform have been met by the reformed curriculum and they were well prepared clinically to work as doctors. However, further reforms may be needed to give confidence to science knowledge acquisition.

  12. Factors influencing students’ perceptions of graduate attribute acquisition in a multidisciplinary honours track in a Dutch university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, E.P.W.A.; Suhre, C.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This article studies the relationship between students’ perceptions of teaching and learning in a multidisciplinary honours programme and their impact on graduate attributes acquisition. The study, conducted among 73 honours students in a Dutch research university, evaluates perceived improvement in

  13. Self-reported competency ratings of graduates of a problem-leased medical curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, H. T.

    Purpose. To study the self-reports of professional competencies by graduates of a problem-based medical curriculum. Method. All graduates from a medical school and a faculty of health sciences with a problem-based curriculum were sent a questionnaire asking them to compare their own performances in

  14. Self-reported competency ratings of graduates of a problem-based medical curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk); H.M. van der Molen

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. To study the self-reports of professional competencies by graduates of a problem-based medical curriculum. Method. All graduates from a medical school and a faculty of health sciences with a problem-based curriculum were sent a questionnaire asking them to compare their own

  15. Taking Business Intelligence to Business Education Curriculum: Graduate Students’ Concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Kissi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Business intelligence systems are widely employed in industries. However, students concerns about Business Intelligence course are largely missed in the business education curriculum. To take a proper decision on Business intelligence integration in business education, it is important to understand students’ concerns. This study employed a survey questionnaire to investigate 142 graduate students concerns about integrating business intelligence into business education curriculum. The survey questionnaire was adopted from previous studies to measure students’ concerns on a Business Intelligence job opportunity, interest and relevance in the Business intelligence education. The survey items have a reliability scales of Cronbach’s alpha (α = 0.818, factor loading > 0.5, and Average Variance Extracted (AVE ≥ 0.5, and Composite Reliability (CR ≥ 0.6. Descriptive statistics and Independent sample t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA test were performed on the survey data. Students revealed that Business intelligence knowledge is relevant (mean = 4.29, SD = 0.710, has several job opportunities (mean = 4.16, SD = 0.675, and should be integrated into business education curriculum (mean = 3.95.08, SD = 0.79. In addition, there was no statistically significant difference (t (140 = –0.027, p > 0.05 between the concerns of students with Business Intelligence lecture experience and those without. Further, perceived importance and job opportunity significantly, F = 24.601 and p = .000(< .05 relates to the Business intelligence integration in Business Education. The findings draw implications for university management and business institutions in updating curriculum so as to equip business students with the essential Business Intelligence knowledge and skills for the betterment of the business organizations.

  16. Computer Forensics for Graduate Accountants: A Motivational Curriculum Design Approach

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    Grover Kearns

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Computer forensics involves the investigation of digital sources to acquire evidence that can be used in a court of law. It can also be used to identify and respond to threats to hosts and systems. Accountants use computer forensics to investigate computer crime or misuse, theft of trade secrets, theft of or destruction of intellectual property, and fraud. Education of accountants to use forensic tools is a goal of the AICPA (American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Accounting students, however, may not view information technology as vital to their career paths and need motivation to acquire forensic knowledge and skills. This paper presents a curriculum design methodology for teaching graduate accounting students computer forensics. The methodology is tested using perceptions of the students about the success of the methodology and their acquisition of forensics knowledge and skills. An important component of the pedagogical approach is the use of an annotated list of over 50 forensic web-based tools.

  17. Promoting Active Learning of Graduate Student by Deep Reading in Biochemistry and Microbiology Pharmacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ren

    2017-01-01

    To promote graduate students' active learning, deep reading of high quality papers was done by graduate students enrolled in biochemistry and microbiology pharmacy curriculum offered by college of life science, Jiangxi Normal University from 2013 to 2015. The number of graduate students, who participated in the course in 2013, 2014, and 2015 were…

  18. AIAA Educator Academy - Mars Rover Curriculum: A 6 week multidisciplinary space science based curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, E.; Bering, E. A.; Slagle, E.; Nieser, K.; Carlson, C.; Kapral, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Curiosity mission has captured the imagination of children, as NASA missions have done for decades. The AIAA and the University of Houston have developed a flexible curriculum program that offers children in-depth science and language arts learning culminating in the design and construction of their own model rover. The program is called the Mars Rover Model Celebration. It focuses on students, teachers and parents in grades 3-8. Students learn to research Mars in order to pick a science question about Mars that is of interest to them. They learn principles of spacecraft design in order to build a model of a Mars rover to carry out their mission on the surface of Mars. The model is a mock-up, constructed at a minimal cost from art supplies. This project may be used either informally as an after school club or youth group activity or formally as part of a class studying general science, earth science, solar system astronomy or robotics, or as a multi-disciplinary unit for a gifted and talented program. The project's unique strength lies in engaging students in the process of spacecraft design and interesting them in aerospace engineering careers. The project is aimed at elementary and secondary education. Not only will these students learn about scientific fields relevant to the mission (space science, physics, geology, robotics, and more), they will gain an appreciation for how this knowledge is used to tackle complex problems. The low cost of the event makes it an ideal enrichment vehicle for low income schools. It provides activities that provide professional development to educators, curricular support resources using NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) content, and provides family opportunities for involvement in K-12 student learning. This paper will describe the structure and organization of the 6 week curriculum. A set of 30 new 5E lesson plans have been written to support this project as a classroom activity. The challenge of developing interactive

  19. Factors Influencing Students' Perceptions of Graduate Attribute Acquisition in a Multidisciplinary Honours Track in a Dutch University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, E. P. W. A.; Suhre, C. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    This article studies the relationship between students' perceptions of teaching and learning in a multidisciplinary honours programme and their impact on graduate attributes acquisition. The study, conducted among 73 honours students in a Dutch research university, evaluates perceived improvement in graduate attributes through annually collected…

  20. New ideas in asthma and allergy research: creating a multidisciplinary graduate school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkstén, Bengt; Graninger, Göran; Ekman, Gunilla Jacobsson

    2003-01-01

    The spring term of 2001 saw the start of a new, unique graduate research training program at the Centre for Allergy Research at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. The program was created to bridge the gaps between basic, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences and to establish a global approach to the study of asthma and allergy. A reflection, two years on, discusses the strategies that are key to this model’s success and the challenges in introducing a multidisciplinary research program. PMID:12975463

  1. Developing a Participatory Pedagogical and Multidisciplinary Approach for Integrating HIV/AIDS into University Curriculum

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    Mulwo, Abraham Kiprop; Chemai, Lemmy

    2015-01-01

    The current framework for integrating HIV/AIDS into university curriculum is mainly informed by the need to make HIV/AIDS education relevant to specific disciplines, and to equip graduates with necessary skills to respond to HIV/AIDS in their professional capacities. This strategy mainly emphasizes content and knowledge and largely ignores the…

  2. Effectiveness of the Sexual Attitude Restructuring Curriculum amongst Taiwanese Graduate Students

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    Lin, Yi-Li; Lin, Yen-Chin

    2018-01-01

    This article discusses the effectiveness of the Sexual Attitude Restructuring (SAR) curriculum in developing positive sexual attitudes amongst Taiwanese graduate students in human sexuality. Through purposive sampling, 32 graduate students in human sexuality were selected to participate in the study. Before and after providing participants with a…

  3. Wilderness Education Association certification and safety, ecological impact, and curriculum standardization of graduates

    OpenAIRE

    Detzel, David

    1985-01-01

    Graduates of the Wilderness Education Association (W.E.A.) were surveyed by mail to investigate the effects of their certification on safety, ecological impact, and curriculum standardization of their subsequent leadership activities. Self-reports showed a slight, but not statistically significant, decrease in the number of post- W.E.A. course evacuations and rescues. Graduates reported a moderate W.E.A. influence on their accident records, and knowledge of W.E.A. stan...

  4. Promoting active learning of graduate student by deep reading in biochemistry and microbiology pharmacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ren

    2017-07-08

    To promote graduate students' active learning, deep reading of high quality papers was done by graduate students enrolled in biochemistry and microbiology pharmacy curriculum offered by college of life science, Jiangxi Normal University from 2013 to 2015. The number of graduate students, who participated in the course in 2013, 2014, and 2015 were eleven, thirteen and fifteen, respectively. Through deep reading of papers, presentation, and group discussion in the lecture, these graduate students have improved their academic performances effectively, such as literature search, PPT document production, presentation management, specialty document reading, academic inquiry, and analytical and comprehensive ability. The graduate students also have increased their understanding level of frontier research, scientific research methods, and experimental methods. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(4):305-312, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. Leading change: curriculum reform in graduate education in the biomedical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Shoumita; Symes, Karen; Hyman, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The Division of Graduate Medical Sciences at the Boston University School of Medicine houses numerous dynamic graduate programs. Doctoral students began their studies with laboratory rotations and classroom training in a variety of fundamental disciplines. Importantly, with 15 unique pathways of admission to these doctoral programs, there were also 15 unique curricula. Departments and programs offered courses independently, and students participated in curricula that were overlapping combinations of these courses. This system created curricula that were not coordinated and that had redundant course content as well as content gaps. A partnership of key stakeholders began a curriculum reform process to completely restructure doctoral education at the Boston University School of Medicine. The key pedagogical goals, objectives, and elements designed into the new curriculum through this reform process created a curriculum designed to foster the interdisciplinary thinking that students are ultimately asked to utilize in their research endeavors. We implemented comprehensive student and peer evaluation of the new Foundations in Biomedical Sciences integrated curriculum to assess the new curriculum. Furthermore, we detail how this process served as a gateway toward creating a more fully integrated graduate experience, under the umbrella of the Program in Biomedical Sciences. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Developing a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum for professionalism and scientific integrity training for biomedical graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nancy L; Peiffer, Ann M; Lambros, Ann; Guthold, Martin; Johnson, A Daniel; Tytell, Michael; Ronca, April E; Eldridge, J Charles

    2010-10-01

    A multidisciplinary faculty committee designed a curriculum to shape biomedical graduate students into researchers with a high commitment to professionalism and social responsibility and to provide students with tools to navigate complex, rapidly evolving academic and societal environments with a strong ethical commitment. The curriculum used problem-based learning (PBL), because it is active and learner-centred and focuses on skill and process development. Two courses were developed: Scientific Professionalism: Scientific Integrity addressed discipline-specific and broad professional norms and obligations for the ethical practice of science and responsible conduct of research (RCR). Scientific Professionalism: Bioethics and Social Responsibility focused on current ethical and bioethical issues within the scientific profession, and implications of research for society. Each small-group session examined case scenarios that included: (1) learning objectives for professional norms and obligations; (2) key ethical issues and philosophies within each topic area; (3) one or more of the RCR instructional areas; and (4) at least one type of moral reflection. Cases emphasised professional standards, obligations and underlying philosophies for the ethical practice of science, competing interests of stakeholders and oversight of science (internal and external). To our knowledge, this is the first use of a longitudinal, multi-semester PBL course to teach scientific integrity and professionalism. Both faculty and students endorsed the active learning approach for these topics, in contrast to a compliance-based approach that emphasises learning rules and regulations.

  7. Radiological Engineering: A graduate engineering - based curriculum for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearfott, K.J.; Wepfer, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    Several U.S. universities maintain formal graduate health physics curricula within their Colleges of Engineering. The term radiological engineering was coined to describe the discipline of applying engineering principles to the radiation protection aspects of nuclear technology. Radiological engineering programmes may require a specific core group of courses such as radiation biology, radiation protection practice, nuclear physics, radiation detectors, and radiation dosimetry. Students then might specialist in environmental, nuclear facilities or medical applications areas by selecting advanced courses and graduate design or research projects. In some instances the master's degree may be completed through remotely-delivered lectures. Such programmes promise to assist in educating a new group of engineering professionals dedicated to the safe utilisation of nuclear technology. The Georgis Institute of Technology's programme will serve as the specific example for this report. 8 refs., 1 fig

  8. Multidisciplinary Graduate Training in Social Research Methodology and Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis: A Hands-On/Hands-Off Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Claude Julie; Bourdon, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on the experience of training graduate students and researchers in qualitative and mixed-methods analysis since the mid-1990s, the authors reflect on the evolution of a multidisciplinary graduate course developed in a Canadian university since 2007. The hands-on/hands-off course design based on the use of NVivo was developed in parallel…

  9. Study of graduate curriculum in the radiological science: problems and suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seong Jin; Kim, Hwa Gon; Kang, Se Sik; Park, Byeong Rae; Kim, Chang Soo

    2006-01-01

    Currently, Educational program of radiological science is developed in enormous growth, our educational environments leading allied health science education program in the number of super high speed medical industry. Radiological science may be the fastest growing technologies in our medical department today. In this way, Medical industry fields converged in the daily quick, the fact that department of radiological science didn't discharged ones duties on current educational environments. The curriculum of radiological technologists that play an important part between skill and occupation's education as major and personality didn't performed one's part most effectively on current medical environments and digital radiological equipment interface. We expect improvement and suggestion to grow natural disposition as studies in the graduate of radiological science. Therefore, in this paper, current curriculum of radiological science are catched hold of trend and problems on digital radiology environments, on fact the present state of problems, for Graduate program of radiological science, graduate courses of MS and ph.D. are suggested a reform measure of major education curriculum introduction

  10. Post graduate ESP curriculum: reading and writing needs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Dehnad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessing learners' needs is an integral part of any curriculum and course design , namely English for specific purposes (ESP, syllabus design, materials development, teaching methods and testing issues. Critical approach to needs analysis, which is a relatively recent approach, acknowledges the rights of different stakeholders including teachers, students and administrators in the process of needs analysis. However, there has been no formal need analysis for syllabus design at postgraduate level in Medical Universities affiliated to the Ministry of Health in Iran. This study, conducted in 2011, was an attempt to assess the reading and writing needs of postgraduate students in ESP courses on the basis of critical approach to needs analysis. The study population consisted of 67 people: 56 postgraduate students, 5 heads of departments, 5 ESP instructors and 1 executive manager at the Ministry of Health in Iran. Ethical and demographic forms, needs analysis questionnaires, and a form of semi-structured interview were the instruments of the study. According to the findings, there was a discrepancy between students' and instructors' perception of learners' needs and the assumed needs appearing in the syllabi prescribed by the Ministry of Health in Iran. This study showed that a call for critical needs analysis in which the rights of different stakeholders are acknowledged is necessary for meeting the requirements of any ESP classes especially at postgraduate level where the instructors and learners are fully aware of learners' needs.

  11. Moving Beyond Accidental Leadership: A Graduate Medical Education Leadership Curriculum Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Joshua D; Yu, Clifton E; Cohee, Brian M; Nelson, Michael R; Wilson, Ramey L

    2017-07-01

    Despite calls for greater physician leadership, few medical schools, and graduate medical education programs provide explicit training on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to be an effective physician leader. Rather, most leaders develop through what has been labeled "accidental leadership." A survey was conducted at Walter Reed to define the current status of leadership development and determine what learners and faculty perceived as key components of a leadership curriculum. A branching survey was developed for residents and faculty to assess the perceived need for a graduate medical education leadership curriculum. The questionnaire was designed using survey best practices and established validity through subject matter expert reviews and cognitive interviewing. The survey instrument assessed the presence of a current leadership curriculum being conducted by each department, the perceived need for a leadership curriculum for physician leaders, the topics that needed to be included, and the format and timing of the curriculum. Administered using an online/web-based survey format, all 2,041 house staff and educators at Walter Reed were invited to participate in the survey. Descriptive statistics were conducted using SPSS (version 22). The survey response rate was 20.6% (421/2,041). Only 17% (63/266) of respondents stated that their program had a formal leadership curriculum. Trainees ranked their current leadership abilities as slightly better than moderately effective (3.22 on a 5-point effectiveness scale). Trainee and faculty availability were ranked as the most likely barrier to implementation. Topics considered significantly important (on a 5-point effectiveness scale) were conflict resolution (4.1), how to motivate a subordinate (4.0), and how to implement change (4.0). Respondents ranked the following strategies highest in perceived effectiveness on a 5-point scale (with 3 representing moderate effectiveness): leadership case studies (3.3) and

  12. Development of Integrative STEM Curriculum: A Multiple Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Teams in Two Pennsylvania High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider-Bertrand, Joey H.

    At the start of the 21st century, STEM education was a new priority in many schools as the focus shifted from separate disciplines to integrative STEM education. Unfortunately, there was limited research to offer guidance to practitioners (Brown, 2012; Honey, Pearson & Schweingruber, 2014). This qualitative, multiple case study explored the experiences of two multi-disciplinary teams of secondary teachers from Pennsylvania who developed and implemented integrative STEM curriculum. Four teachers from a rural high school and four teachers from a suburban high school participated in the study. A document review of integrative STEM curriculum and semi-structured interviews were conducted to learn about the curriculum development process and teachers' perceptions regarding conditions that support or hinder success. Individual and cross-case analyses were performed to establish findings and themes. Although the individual case themes varied slightly, the cross-case themes and assertions that emerged provided highly sought after guidance to practitioners and added to the limited body of research on integrative STEM education. This study found that current curriculum models do not fit integrative STEM curriculum, the development process is fluid, and substantial administrative support and resources are necessary to develop, implement, and sustain integrative STEM education programs. The results offered implications for all educators, as well as two examples of how teachers navigated the terrain of integrative STEM curriculum.

  13. A hybrid classroom-online curriculum format for RN-BSN students: cohort support and curriculum structure improve graduation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Susan C; Metzger, Richard; Lindgren, Katherine S

    2011-05-01

    As more registered nurses (RNs) return to school to obtain a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN), innovative ways must be found to support them in this endeavor. Barriers for RNs who return to school include scheduling of coursework and fear of failure. One school of nursing with a traditional BSN program reviewed its RN-BSN track, with its low retention and graduation rates. With input from nursing leaders and nurses in the community, the school applied for and was awarded a 3-year Health Resources and Services Administration grant to redesign the RN-BSN program. A hybrid classroom-online curriculum is offered in a structured, sequential format so that the RNs are admitted once a year and must complete the courses as a group, in a cohort. Data collected from evaluations showed that program support, technology support, and social support from peers encouraged the RNs to "stay the course," and 100% completed the requirements to graduate. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. RFID-Based Multidisciplinary Educational Platform to Improve the Engineering and Technology Curriculums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelamarthi, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Multidisciplinary projects involving electrical engineering (EE), mechanical engineering (ME), and computer engineering (CE) students are both exciting and difficult to conceptualize. Answering this challenge, this paper presents a multidisciplinary educational platform on radio frequency identification-based assistive devices. The combination of…

  15. Role-modelling and the hidden curriculum: New graduate nurses' professional socialisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Kiri; Cook, Catherine

    2018-05-12

    To explore new graduate nurses' experiences of professional socialisation by registered nurses in hospital-based practice settings, and identify strategies that support professional identity development. Professionalism is reinforced and stabilised in the clinical environment through the 'hidden curriculum', with major learning coming from practice role-models. New graduates observe attitudes, behaviours, decision-making and skills, and gain feedback from registered nurses, which they translate into their own practice. Professional socialisation occurs through encounters with desirable and undesirable role-modelling; both are significant in professional identity formation. Qualitative descriptive design. Data collection was undertaken through semi-structured interviews with five new graduate nurse participants. A general inductive approach guided analysis. The meaningful descriptions gained provided insight into their experiences. Three main themes identified from the data include: 'Lessons from the wilderness'; 'Life in the wild'; and 'Belonging to a wolf pack'. The data set highlighted the major transitional process from student identity to registered nurse. New graduates' rethinking of beliefs and professional nursing identities were influenced by organisational pressures and experienced nurses role-modelling practices contrary to professional values. Despite encountering a range of professional behaviours, attitudes and dilemmas, new graduates were capable of moral agency and critical thinking. However, they rapidly acculturated and described compromises to cope. To promote high morale and a sense of belonging, a concerted effort is required by all nurses to facilitate the socialisation process to encourage self-authorship. A well-developed professional identity enhances nursing as a profession, contributing towards better healthcare delivery and outcomes. It is critically important how professional values are learnt within the culture of nursing. Tensions in

  16. Bionanoscience landscape in South Africa and its implications in the development of a post-graduate curriculum - Presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sparrow, R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Africa and its Implications in the Development of a Post-Graduate Curriculum Presented at UWC – Nano-biotechnology Seminar. Dr. Raymond Sparrow Manager of the SynBioTIC Programme. CSIR – Synthetic Biology ERA. 20th November 2009 Nanoscience...

  17. Evaluating Executive Strategies (Management Strategies and Teaching-Learning Strategies) of Graduate Curriculum: Case Study in Isfahan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanpour, Muhammad; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Hatami, Mostafa; Mirzaee, Hamzeh

    2017-01-01

    The present study seeks to evaluate executive strategies in graduate Curriculum of Isfahan University from the point of view of management and teaching-learning strategies. This study is an applied survey. The population comprised BA students and faculty members of the University of Isfahan. In order to do so, 141 professors and 278 students were…

  18. Professional development as a strategy for curriculum implementation in multidisciplinary science education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Talitha Christine

    2012-01-01

    Schoolteachers must deal with curriculum innovations during their teaching careers. In 2005, the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science introduced committees to develop and redesign the curricula for chemistry, biology, physics, and mathematics in secondary education. The purpose of

  19. Integrating a Career Planning and Development Program into the Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum. Part II. Outcomes for New Graduate Nurses 12 Months Post-Graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Janice; Spalding, Karen; Navarro, Justine; Jancar, Sonya; Canizares, Genevieve

    2015-11-28

    New graduate nurses' (NGNs) transition into the nursing workforce is characterized as stressful and challenging. Consequently, a high percentage of them leave their first place of employment or the profession entirely within one year of graduation. Nursing literature describes this complicated shift from student to registered nurse, however, limited attention has focused on strategies that could be implemented during students' academic programs to prepare them for this difficult transition period. Therefore, a longitudinal intervention study was conducted to examine the influence of a career planning and development (CPD) program on the development of career resilience in baccalaureate nursing students and at 12 months post-graduation (NGN). The findings support including structured and progressive curriculum-based CPD opportunities in academic programs, not only for the positive outcomes that accrue to students, but also because of the benefits they extend to NGNs as they make the transition to their first professional nursing role.

  20. Towards a gender inclusive information and communications technology curriculum: a perspective from graduates in the workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppi, Tony; Sheard, Judy; Naghdy, Fazel; Edwards, Sylvia L.; Brookes, Wayne

    2010-12-01

    An online survey was conducted of recent information and communications technology (ICT) graduates from 21 Australian universities. A range of abilities including personal/interpersonal, cognitive, business and technical were examined in relation to importance in the workplace and university preparation of those abilities. In addition, a set of six open-ended text-response questions concerned with the curriculum and other workplace preparation were asked. Quantitative and qualitative analyses revealed a range of responses that were significantly different according to gender. Amongst the significant findings are that females are more concerned than males with interpersonal communication, the development of people-skills and the people side of ICT. Implications for the ICT curriculum are that it should have more than a narrow male-centred technological focus and include the involvement of people and the effects of ICT on society in general. This broad inclusive pedagogical approach would satisfy the needs expressed by all respondents and contribute to increasing the enrolments of both female and male students in ICT.

  1. [Co-ordinate groups: reflexion in the light of the National Curriculum Guidings of the Nursing Graduation Course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Denise Bouttelet; Fernandes, Carla Natalina da Silva

    2004-04-01

    The goal of this reflexion is to discuss about the necessary nurse characteristics as group co-ordinater and analyse, in the New National Curriculum Guidings of the Nursing Graduation Course, aspects that are necessary in this specific knowledge. For this, we base on the specific literature about the subject and in the official document of MEC about the Curriculum Guidings. It was possible to identify many points where this knowledge seams necessary to the development of the nurse abilities and competences in the management of people, groups and teams, even so signalize some indicators to make stronger the professional formation in this direction.

  2. The Swiss Master in Chiropractic Medicine Curriculum: Preparing Graduates to Work Together With Medicine to Improve Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, B Kim; Peterson, Cynthia K

    2016-12-01

    In 2007, chiropractic became 1 of the 5 medical professions in Switzerland. This required a new chiropractic program that was fully integrated within a Swiss medical school. The purpose of this article was to discuss the Master in Chiropractic Medicine (MChiroMed) program at the University of Zürich, including advantages, opportunities, and challenges. In 2008, the MChiroMed program began with its first student cohort. The MChiroMed program is a 6-year Bologna model 2-cycle (bachelor and master) "spiral curriculum," with the first 4 years being fully integrated within the medical curriculum. A review of the main features of the curriculum revealed the advantages, opportunities, and challenges of this program in comparison with other contemporary chiropractic educational programs. Advantages and opportunities include an integrated curriculum within a university, medical school, and musculoskeletal hospital, with their associated human and physical resources. Many opportunities exist for high-level research collaborations. The rigorous entrance qualifications and small student cohorts result in bright, motivated, and enthusiastic students; appropriate assessments; and timely feedback on academic and clinical subjects. Early patient contact in hospitals and clinical facilities encourages the integration of academic theory and clinical practice. The main challenges faced by this program include difficulty recruiting a sufficient number of students because of the rigorous entrance requirements and curriculum overload resulting from undertaking a full medical curriculum and chiropractic modules. The MChiroMed program is a unique chiropractic curriculum that integrates medical and chiropractic education within a spiral curriculum at a world-class Swiss university medical school. The expectation is that graduates, with their expanded diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge, skills, and experience, will become future experts in primary spine care in Switzerland. It is hoped

  3. Developing a pilot curriculum to foster humanism among graduate medical trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Dotters-Katz

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: A pilot humanism curriculum for residents was well-received. Participants showed decreased burnout and trended to improved compassion scores. Development and evaluation of an expanded curriculum would further explore feasibility and effectiveness of the intervention.

  4. Communication skills curriculum for foreign medical graduates in an internal medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Williams, Alicia; Clark, Elizabeth M; Kelley, Amy S

    2014-11-01

    Effective communication is an important aspect of caring for the elderly, who are more likely to have multimorbidity, limited health literacy, and psychosocial barriers to care. About half of Internal Medicine (IM) trainees in the United States are foreign medical graduates, and may not have been exposed to prior communication skills education. This novel communication skills curriculum for IM interns aimed to increase trainees' confidence and use of specific communication tools with older adults, particularly in delivering bad news and conducting family meetings. The workshop consisted of two interactive sessions in a small group with two learners and one or two facilitators, during the 4-week geriatrics block in IM internship training year. Twenty-three IM interns at an urban Veterans Affairs Medical Center were surveyed at the beginning and at the end of the 4-week block and 3 months after completion of the workshop about their knowledge, confidence, and skill in communication and asked about challenges to effective communication with older adults. The primary outcome measure was change in self-reported confidence and behavior in communication at 4 weeks. On a 4-point Likert scale, there was average improvement of 0.70 in self-reported confidence in communication, which was sustained 3 months after completion of the workshop. Participants reported several patient, physician, and system barriers to effective communication. Communication skills education in a small-group setting and the opportunity for repeated practice and self-reflection resulted in a sustained increase in overall confidence in IM interns in communication with older adults and may help overcome certain patient- and physician-specific communication barriers. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Communication Skills Curriculum for Foreign Medical Graduates in an Internal Medicine Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Williams, Alicia; Clark, Elizabeth M.; Kelley, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective communication is an important aspect of caring for the elderly, who are more likely to have multimorbidity, limited health literacy and psychosocial barriers to care. About half of Internal Medicine (IM) trainees in the United States are foreign medical graduates, and may not have been exposed to prior communication skills education. This novel communication skills curriculum for IM interns aimed to increase trainees' confidence and use of specific communication tools with older adults, particularly in delivering bad news and conducting family meetings. Methods The workshop consisted of 2 interactive sessions, in a small group with 2 learners and 1-2 facilitators, during the Geriatrics block of the internship year. Twenty-three IM interns were surveyed at the beginning and at the end of the 4-week block and at 3 months after completion of the workshop about their knowledge, confidence and skill in communication, and asked about any challenges to effective communication with older patients. The primary outcome measure was change in self-reported confidence and behavior in communication at 4 weeks. Results On a 4-point Likert scale, there was an average improvement of 0.70 in self-reported confidence in communication, which sustained at 3 months after completion of the workshop. Participants reported several patient, physician and system barriers to effective communication. Conclusion Communication skills education in a small-group setting and the opportunity for repeated practice and self-reflection resulted in sustained increase in overall confidence among IM interns in communication with older adults, and may help overcome certain patient and physician-specific communication barriers. PMID:25354834

  6. Educating graduates for marketing in SMEs: an update for the traditional marketing curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, R; Lourenço, F; Resnick, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – Despite rising graduate unemployment in the UK, there are insufficient numbers of graduates employed in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The literature suggests that a teaching emphasis on large organisational business models in Higher Education Institutions (HEI), particularly in the teaching of marketing theory, renders the SME sector unattractive to graduate employment and conversely, it is perceived that graduates lack additional ‘soft skills’ vital for SME development...

  7. Post Graduate Multidisciplinary Development Programme – Impact on the Interpretation of Pelvic MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bodil Ginnerup; Blomqvist, Lennart; Brown, Gina

    2011-01-01

    . Conclusions: Performance and reporting of pelvic MRI in rectal cancer patients can be improved significantly through multidisciplinary development courses and on-site-visits while improvements in image interpretation with regard to treatment stratification may demand more intensive efforts....

  8. Creativity as a Desirable Graduate Attribute: Implications for Curriculum Design and Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampersad, Giselle; Patel, Fay

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of graduate attributes are listed, categorized and prioritized by different higher education institutions. However, one attribute that is less visible in the literature is creativity. In the current study, creativity has emerged as a desirable graduate attribute among students and employers. This paper presents an exploratory…

  9. Leading Change: Curriculum Reform in Graduate Education in the Biomedical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Shoumita; Symes, Karen; Hyman, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The Division of Graduate Medical Sciences at the Boston University School of Medicine houses numerous dynamic graduate programs. Doctoral students began their studies with laboratory rotations and classroom training in a variety of fundamental disciplines. Importantly, with 15 unique pathways of admission to these doctoral programs, there were…

  10. A Multicultural, Multidisciplinary Short Course to Introduce Recently Graduated Engineers to the Global Nature of Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelton, Pam; Malone, Molly; Gardner, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Since 2001, the International Institute of Women in Engineering (IIWE) at EPF, Ecole d'ingenieurs generaliste, Sceaux, France, has conducted a 3 week short course for culturally and discipline diverse, recently graduated and final year engineering students. The aim of this course is to introduce young engineers to broad global concepts and issues…

  11. Approaches to the embedding of sustainability into the engineering curriculum - where are we now, and how do our graduates become global engineers?

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Simon; Penlington, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a resume of how the topic of sustainability can become fully-integrated into the engineering curriculum in the UK, and how this needs to evolve toward consideration of how graduates could be better developed as global engineers. The paper begins by providing a justification as to why sustainability is an important feature of the already overcrowded engineering curriculum, and briefly reports, through illustrative examples, on alternative approaches which currently embed su...

  12. Reforming the 4th-Year Curriculum as a Springboard to Graduate Medical Training: One School's Experiences and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackett, Andrew; Daroowalla, Feroza; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Chandran, Latha

    2016-01-01

    Concerns regarding the quality of training in the 4th year of medical school and preparation of graduates to enter residency education persist and are borne out in the literature. We reviewed the published literature regarding Year 4 concerns as well as institutional efforts to improve the 4th-year curriculum from several schools. Based on input from key stakeholders, we established 4 goals for our Year 4 curriculum reform: (a) standardize the curricular structure, (b) allow flexibility and individualization, (c) improve the preparation for residency, and (d) improve student satisfaction. After the reform, we evaluated the outcomes using results from the Association of American Medical Colleges Questionnaire, student focus groups, and program director surveys. This article describes the context, process, and outcomes of the reform of the Year 4 curriculum at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. We were able to achieve all four stated goals for the reform. The significant components of the change included a flexible adaptable curriculum based on individual needs and preferences, standardized learning objectives across the year, standardized competency-based evaluations regardless of discipline, reinforcement of clinical skills, and training for the transition to the workplace as an intern. The reform resulted in increased student satisfaction, increased elective time, and increased preparedness for residency training as perceived by the graduates. The Program Director survey showed significant changes in ability to perform a medical history and exam, management of common medical conditions and emergencies, clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills, working and communication with the healthcare team, and overall professionalism in meeting obligations inherent in the practice of medicine. Lessons learned from our 4th-year reform process are discussed. Listening to the needs of the stakeholders was an important step in ensuring buy-in, having an institutional

  13. Developing a pilot curriculum to foster humanism among graduate medical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Chuang, Alice; Weil, Amy; Howell, Jennifer O

    2018-01-01

    Humanism is a central tenant of professionalism, a required competency for all residency programs. Yet, few residencies have formal curriculum for teaching this critical aspect of medicine. Instead, professionalism and humanism are often taught informally through role-modeling. With increased burnout, faculty professionalism may suffer and may compromise resident role-modeling. The objective of this study was to design a pilot curriculum to foster humanism in among residents and assess its ability to do so. Two-phase exploratory sequential mixed methods study. Phase 1: a qualitative analysis of residents' narratives regarding challenges to humanistic behavior, and identified themes of compassion, fatigue, communication challenges, and work-life balance. Themes used as needs assessment to build curriculum. Phase 2: three sessions with themes taken from faculty development course. Participants and controls completed baseline and 60-day follow-up questionnaires assessing burnout, compassion, satisfaction, and ability to practice psychological medicine. Phase one included Obstetrics/Gynecology and internal medicine residents. Phase two included residents from the above programs, who attended at least 2/3 interactive sessions designed to address the themes identified above. Twelve participants began and ten completed curriculum (83%). The curriculum met course objectives and was well-received (4.8/5). Burnout decreased (-3.1 vs. 2.5, P = 0.048). A trend toward improved compassion (4.4 vs.-0.6, P = 0.096) for participants compared to controls was noted. A pilot humanism curriculum for residents was well-received. Participants showed decreased burnout and trended to improved compassion scores. Development and evaluation of an expanded curriculum would further explore feasibility and effectiveness of the intervention.

  14. Changes in Transferable Knowledge Resulting from Study in a Graduate Software Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareiss, Ray; Sedano, Todd; Katz, Edward

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the initial results of a study of the evolution of students' knowledge of software engineering from the beginning to the end of a master's degree curriculum in software engineering. Students were presented with a problem involving the initiation of a complex new project at the beginning of the program and again at the end of…

  15. Integrating a Peer-Taught Module on Practical Research Ethics into the Graduate Student Orientation Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danowitz, Amy M.; Taylor, Christopher E.

    2011-01-01

    As active members of the scientific community, graduate students make ethical judgments about the conduct and presentation of their research. Pressures in the research environment often influence these decisions. Because inappropriate decisions can lead to unethical behavior and scientific misconduct, it is important that students understand the…

  16. Advances in Graduate Marketing Curriculum: Paying Attention to Ethical, Social, and Sustainability Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, James

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the impact of coercive, mimetic, and normative isomorphic pressures on the coverage and offering of courses addressing ethical, social, and sustainability issues (ESSI) in business schools' graduate marketing curricula. Data from the Aspen Institute's Beyond Grey Pinstripes program are analyzed to detect if significant…

  17. Towards a Gender Inclusive Information and Communications Technology Curriculum: A Perspective from Graduates in the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppi, Tony; Sheard, Judy; Naghdy, Fazel; Edwards, Sylvia L.; Brookes, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    An online survey was conducted of recent information and communications technology (ICT) graduates from 21 Australian universities. A range of abilities including personal/interpersonal, cognitive, business and technical were examined in relation to importance in the workplace and university preparation of those abilities. In addition, a set of…

  18. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents: A flexible informatics curriculum linked to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, Walter H; Karcher, Donald S; Harrison, James H; Sinard, John H; Riben, Michael W; Boyer, Philip J; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics have been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: The objective of the study is to develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:27563486

  19. Developing Curriculum of Nuclear Civil Engineering Degree Programme at Graduate Level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper suggests the introduction of a new degree, namely nuclear civil engineering at graduate level for better utilization of civil engineers in nuclear power plant (NPP) design and construction. At present, both nuclear engineering and civil engineering degrees are offered at undergraduate and graduate levels in numerous renowned universities of the world. However, when a civil engineer, even after completion of nuclear engineering at postgraduate level, undertakes an assignment related to NPP design, he comes across various problems which are not covered in the present curricula. For instance, NPPs’ siting issues, design of pre-stressed concrete containment against loads of loss of coolant accident (LOCA), various impulsive and impactive loads (e.g., detonations, aircraft crash analysis, etc.) and shielding calculations are some of the core issues during nuclear power plant design. The paper highlights the importance of introduction of nuclear civil engineering degree at the graduate level. Besides, the contents of the proposed course work have also been discussed. Keeping in view the fact that, currently, no such degree is offered in any university of the world, the paper explores useful avenues to human resource development for introducing and expanding nuclear power programmes. (author

  20. Bringing Data Science, Xinformatics and Semantic eScience into the Graduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, P.

    2012-04-01

    Committee on Information and Data (SCCID), features this excerpt from section 4.2.4 Data scientists and professionals: "An unfortunate state in the recognition of data science, is that there is a lack of appreciation of the need for a set of professional knowledge in skill in key areas, many of which have not been emphasized to date, e.g. professional approaches to the management of data over its lifecycle. As such, the effort required to be a data scientists is not valued sufficiently by the remainder of the scientific community." SCCID Recommendation 6 reads: "We recommend the development of education at university level in the new and vital field of data science. The curriculum included in appendix D can be used as a starting point for curriculum development. Appendix D. is entitled "Example curriculum for data science" and explicitly uses the "Curriculum for Data Science taught at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA" . This contribution will present relevant curriculum offerings at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. http://tw.rpi.edu/web/Courses

  1. Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robi Kroflič

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern curriculum theories emphasize that if we understand the curriculum as a real core substance of education. We have to bear in mind, when planning the curriculum, the whole multitude of factors (curricula which have an influence on the educational impact. In the field of andragogy, we especially have to consider educational needs, and linking the strategies of instruction with those of learning. The best way of realizing this principle is the open strategy of planning the national curriculum and process-developmental strategy of planning with the microandragogic situation. This planning strategy is S1m1lar to the system-integration strategy and Jarvis's model of negotiated curriculum, which derive from the basic andragogic principle: that the interests and capacities of adults for education increase if we enable them to cooperate in the planning and production of the curriculum.

  2. Perceived competency towards preventive dentistry among dental graduates: the need for curriculum change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arheiam, Arheiam; Bankia, Ibtesam; Ingafou, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    A previous study has shown that dental practitioners in Benghazi believed that the less prevention-oriented education system is one of the barriers to applying preventive dentistry. To assess attitudes and perceived competence of the dental graduates in Benghazi towards prevention and early management of dental caries. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was conducted among internship students attending the Department of Community and Preventive Dentistry in Faculty of Dentistry, Benghazi, Libya. The participants were asked to provide demographic information, to respond to statements about their attitudes towards preventive dentistry, and to answer questions regarding their perceived competence in applying preventive dentistry procedures. Data from 108 Libyan dental graduates were analysed for this study, of which 64% of them were females and 42.1% of them passed their final year with grade: acceptable. The most acknowledged aspects of preventive dentistry were being useful and essential to the community (95.4 and 90.8%, respectively). The percentage of participants expressing a proficiency in providing oral hygiene instructions was the highest (95.4%). There were differences between study subgroups in their perceived competence of preventive dental practices by gender and academic performance (p≤0.05). This study highlighted that the currently implemented undergraduate education programme in Benghazi dental school does not provide dentists with the required attitude and skills to fulfil their role in providing preventive-oriented health services.

  3. Base Input - Enrollment and Graduation Data for Naval Postgraduate School for the School of Business and Public Policy, Meyer Institute of Systems Engineering, and PhD Grads by curriculum by year.

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Graphs of Base Input - Enrollment and Graduation Data for Naval Postgraduate School for the School of Business and Public Policy, Meyer Institute of Systems Engineering, and PhD Grads by curriculum by year.

  4. It is over three decades of graduate education in Epizootiology at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria (1975-2011): is there a need to revise the curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olugasa, Babasola Oluseyi; Ijagbone, Ighodalo Folorunso; Esuruoso, Gabriel Oluwole

    2012-01-01

    Epizootiology is the study of variable factors, events, forces and circumstances that contribute to the occurrence, distribution, control and prevention of ill-health, diseases and other problems in animal groups. It is a key component of veterinary medicine education at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria since 1975. It started as a Graduate Certificate in Epizootiology (GCE) in 1976. Later it was revised into M.Sc. Epizootiology in 1986. At graduate level, epizootiology curriculum has supported the M.Sc. Epizootiology programme. It compliments training in Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine. This epizootiology curriculum has been operational at graduate level for more than three decades. Now in 2011, a consortium of English speaking West African Universities is committed to review the current curriculum at the University of Ibadan to strengthen health systems in an interdependent world with scope for internationalized practicum in disease investigation. Emphases are made towards skills development in molecular studies on disease causal agents and the mapping of associated geographic risk factors, including indigenous knowledge and practices. It is notable that most English-speaking West African countries including Ghana, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Gambia either lack a Veterinary School or just started some, but do not have graduate programme in Epizootiology. Thus, the curriculum at Ibadan is positioned to make impact in three key areas, namely, sub-regional ecosystem health studies, improving human-animal disease surveillance programmes, and in indigenization of bio-technology for monitoring and evaluation of trans-boundary animal disease control interventions for global health in West Africa.

  5. Percepções de formandos do curso de odontologia sobre as diretrizes curriculares nacionais Perceptions of dentistry course graduates about the national curriculum guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Berger Fadel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve por objetivo avaliar a percepção de acadêmicos formandos do curso de Odontologia da Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, no Paraná, quanto ao atual projeto pedagógico. Participaram 91 formandos, os quais responderam a um questionário autoaplicado. A maioria dos alunos mostrou conhecer o projeto pedagógico do curso, com uma percepção positiva, e identificou que contempla as características das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais. As competências e habilidades, expressas nas Diretrizes e proporcionadas pelo curso, aquelas nas quais os formandos se consideram mais aptos a desempenhar são: ações de prevenção, promoção, proteção e reabilitação da saúde; disposição ao aprendizado contínuo; e tomada de decisões e atuação em equipes multiprofissionais. Quanto à estrutura curricular, grande parte dos alunos percebeu duplicação de conteúdos entre as disciplinas e dificuldades em oferecer atenção integral aos pacientes. No entanto, a maioria identifica a integração entre teoria e prática como ideal ou satisfatória. Os resultados deste estudo, somados à avaliação institucional, mostram que, apesar da percepção positiva da comunidade acadêmica, existem algumas fragilidades no atual projeto pedagógico do curso que indicam a necessidade de se avançar na construção de um currículo integrado.This study aimed to evaluate the perception graduates have of the current pedagogical project in place at the College of Dentistry at the Ponta Grossa State University State of Paraná, southern Brazil. A total of 91 students took part in the study by completing a selfadministered questionnaire. Most students were knowledgeable about the course's pedagogical project, had a positive view of it, and considered that it includes the features of the National Curriculum Guidelines. The skills and abilities, expressed in the Guidelines and provided by the course, those in which the students consider themselves as

  6. Developing a Curriculum for Information and Communications Technology Use in Global Health Research and Training: A Qualitative Study Among Chinese Health Sciences Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhenyu; Yang, Li; Yang, Lan; Huang, Kaiyong; Yu, Hongping; He, Huimin; Wang, Jiaji; Cai, Le; Wang, Jie; Fu, Hua; Quintiliani, Lisa; Friedman, Robert H; Xiao, Jian; Abdullah, Abu S

    2017-06-12

    Rapid development of information and communications technology (ICT) during the last decade has transformed biomedical and population-based research and has become an essential part of many types of research and educational programs. However, access to these ICT resources and the capacity to use them in global health research are often lacking in low- and middle-income country (LMIC) institutions. The aim of our study was to assess the practical issues (ie, perceptions and learning needs) of ICT use among health sciences graduate students at 6 major medical universities of southern China. Ten focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted from December 2015 to March 2016, involving 74 health sciences graduate students studying at 6 major medical universities in southern China. The sampling method was opportunistic, accounting for the graduate program enrolled and the academic year. All FGDs were audio recorded and thematic content analysis was performed. Researchers had different views and arguments about the use of ICT which are summarized under six themes: (1) ICT use in routine research, (2) ICT-related training experiences, (3) understanding about the pros and cons of Web-based training, (4) attitudes toward the design of ICT training curriculum, (5) potential challenges to promoting ICT courses, and (6) related marketing strategies for ICT training curriculum. Many graduate students used ICT on a daily basis in their research to stay up-to-date on current development in their area of research or study or practice. The participants were very willing to participate in ICT courses that were relevant to their academic majors and would count credits. Suggestion for an ICT curriculum included (1) both organized training course or short lecture series, depending on the background and specialty of the students, (2) a mixture of lecture and Web-based activities, and (3) inclusion of topics that are career focused. The findings of this study suggest that a need exists

  7. Wanted: interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and knowledge translation and exchange training for students of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Lipi; Banerjee, Ananya T; MacLennan, Mary E; Gorczynski, Paul F; Zinszer, Kate A

    2011-01-01

    Students vocalized their concern with public health training programs in Canada at the 2010 CPHA Centennial Conference. Given these concerns, we reviewed the objectives and curricula of public health graduate (master's) programs in Canada. Our objective was to understand to what extent public and population health graduate programs in Canada support interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary and knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) training. This was achieved through a review of all public and population health master's programs in Canada identified from the public health graduate programs listed on the Public Health Agency of Canada website (n = 33) plus an additional four programs that were not originally captured on the list. Of the 37 programs reviewed, 28 (76%) stated that interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary or cross-disciplinary training opportunities are of value to their program, with 12 programs (32%) providing multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary training opportunities in their curriculum. Only 14 (38%) of the 37 programs provided value statements of KTE activities in their program goals or course objectives, with 10 (27%) programs offering KTE training in their curriculum. This review provides a glimpse into how public health programs in Canada value and support interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary collaboration as well as KTE activities.

  8. Promoting human subjects training for place-based communities and cultural groups in environmental research: curriculum approaches for graduate student/faculty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Dianne

    2015-02-01

    A collaborative team of environmental sociologists, community psychologists, religious studies scholars, environmental studies/science researchers and engineers has been working together to design and implement new training in research ethics, culture and community-based approaches for place-based communities and cultural groups. The training is designed for short and semester-long graduate courses at several universities in the northeastern US. The team received a 3 year grant from the US National Science Foundation's Ethics Education in Science and Engineering in 2010. This manuscript details the curriculum topics developed that incorporate ethical principles, particularly for group protections/benefits within the field practices of environmental/engineering researchers.

  9. How Do We Train Our Future Faculty to Teach? A Multidisciplinary Comparison of Graduate-Level Pedagogy Courses Offered at A Large Midwestern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Valerie Dean; Kearns, Katherine; Sherwood-Laughlin, Catherine; Robinson, Jennifer Meta

    2017-01-01

    This study examines and documents graduate pedagogy courses offered at a large Midwestern research university. Thirty-three graduate pedagogy course instructors from 32 departments (a majority of those offering courses) completed an online survey. We report on enrollment demographics, preparation of faculty to teach such a course, and how a…

  10. The usefulness of the surgical knowledge and skills acquired via the university curriculum for doctors' medical practice several years after graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyluk, Andrzej; Puchalski, Piotr; Szlosser, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Teaching surgery during university curriculum comprises transferring theoretical knowledge traditionally and simultaneously acquiring manual skills, i.e., suturing, stitch removal, limb immobilization, catheterization, and assisting operations. Observations of doctors several years after graduation led to the reflection that teachers' ideas about surgical knowledge and skills that are useful in daily practice frequently fail to meet the facts of the case. The objective of this study was to determine which part of the surgical knowledge and skills taught via the university surgical curriculum proved to be useful in the daily practice of young doctors. A custom-made questionnaire was designed and mailed to 200 randomly chosen doctors who had graduated from the medical faculty at the authors' university 5 to 6 years previously. The questionnaire comprised 9 items concerning the knowledge and skills that proved to be the most useful in participants' daily practice, regardless of their specialty. A total of 64 completed questionnaires were returned (32% of 200 sent) and were the subject of analysis. The most useful knowledge in daily practice was that acquired from general surgery, followed by oncological and vascular surgery. The most useful was knowledge about the rational interpretation of clinical symptoms and signs acquired from examination of the patient, followed by arriving at an accurate diagnosis through logical analysis, and next developing "oncological sensitivity" to diagnosing neoplasms. The most effective teaching model was specialized outpatient clinic rounds, followed by training manual skills on a model and classical ward-round teaching. The most frequently learned (acquired) manual skills were removal of stitches, rectal examination, and examination of the abdomen. Of these skills, the most useful in daily practice appeared to be removal of stitches, catheterization of the urinary bladder, and wound suturing. Learning and practicing manual skills

  11. Competency Standards for Bachelor of Industrial Technology Graduates for the Construction Industry in Region IV-A: Inputs For Curriculum Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. Compasivo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to develop competency standards for Industrial Technology graduates for employment in the construction industry in Region IV-A, Philippines. It specifically identified the basic and core competency standards for industrial technology and determined the degree of importance of competencies needed in the construction industry sector. The study identified 28 common competencies for three areas of specializations in industrial technology namely: electrical, civil and drafting technology. There were 39 core competencies for electrical, 31 for drafting and 38 items for civil technology. A total of 50 panel of experts were carefully selected using the purposive sampling as respondents in the study. Experts are selected based on their technical know-how or proficiency and currently practicing their line of profession in the construction industry. The study used the descriptive-developmental method of research. The Delphi technique was applied to determine if the competency under investigation reached the general agreement of opinions by the panel of experts involved. The findings implied that the newly developed competency standards were good input for curriculum enhancement in the area of civil, drafting and electrical technology. The study recommended the newly developed competencies may be followed by the faculty in the course they teach and the new competency items suggested by the panel of experts for inclusion in the curriculum for the three areas of specializations may be considered during the curriculum revision.

  12. Graduate public health training in healthcare of refugee asylum seekers and clinical human rights: evaluation of an innovative curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Ramin

    2016-04-01

    An innovative curriculum was developed to equip public health students with appropriate attitude and skills to address healthcare of asylum seekers. Implemented in 2005 the curriculum included: (1) didactic sessions covering epidemiology and health sequelae of torture, asylum laws, and approaches to identify survivors' healthcare needs; (2) panel discussions with survivors and advocates; and (3) participating in medico-legal process of asylum seeking. Complementary mixed methods evaluations included pre- and post-curriculum questionnaires, formal curriculum evaluations, final papers and oral presentations. 125 students participated. Students showed improved knowledge regrading sequelae of abuse and survivors' healthcare needs (P health and human rights careers. As an advocacy and cultural competency training in public health practice addressing healthcare of refugees domestically, this curriculum was well received and effective, and will also help students better serve other similar populations. Population case-based domestic opportunities to teach global health and health and human rights should be effectively utilized to develop a well-equipped global health corps.

  13. Graduate Medical Education Funding and Curriculum in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: A Survey of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department Chairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Danielle; Knowlton, Tiffany; Worsowicz, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    This national survey highlights graduate medical education funding sources for physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residency programs as well as perceived funding stability, alignment of the current funding and educational model, the need of further education in postacute care settings, and the practice of contemporary PM&R graduates as perceived by PM&R department/division chairs. Approximately half of the reported PM&R residency positions seem to be funded by Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services; more than 40% of PM&R chairs believe that their residency program is undersized and nearly a quarter feel at risk for losing positions. A total of 30% of respondents report PM&R resident experiences in home health, 15% in long-term acute care, and 52.5% in a skilled nursing facility/subacute rehabilitation facility. In programs that do not offer these experiences, most chairs feel that this training should be included. In addition, study results suggest that most PM&R graduates work in an outpatient setting. Based on the results that chairs strongly feel the need for resident education in postacute care settings and that most graduates go on to practice in outpatient settings, there is a potential discordance for our current Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services graduate medical education funding model being linked to the acute care setting.

  14. Designing Higher Education Curriculum to Increase Graduate Outcomes and Work Readiness: The Assessment and Mentoring Program (AMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Kate A.; Benson, Amanda C.

    2016-01-01

    Pre-service teacher programs have a responsibility to equip graduating students with more than the minimum skill sets required by governing bodies. The Assessment and Mentoring Program (AMP) is a four-way collaborative mentoring learning community underpinned by social constructivism. Conducted in Victoria, Australia during the 2014-2016 academic…

  15. Divine Interventions: Needs Analysis for Post-Graduate Academic Literacy and Curriculum Development, in a South African School of Theology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Fiona

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a critical exploration of work in progress to develop a genre based academic support that promotes post-graduate academic literacies among new EIL and EAL Hons and Masters students in the School of Theology, University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg. It traces the path of an action research project, using an eclectic needs analysis…

  16. STEM Graduates and Secondary School Curriculum: Does Early Exposure to Science Matter? CEP Discussion Paper No. 1443

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Philippis, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the number of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) university graduates is considered a key element for long-term productivity and competitiveness in the global economy. Still, little is known about what actually drives and shapes students' choices. This paper focusses on secondary school students at the very top of the…

  17. THE IMPORTANCE OF INFORMATION IN SUPERIOR GRADUATING INSTITUTES WEBSITES, IN THE MATRIX CURRICULUM AND PROFESSIONAL PROFILE OF SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Mariano do Carmo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the existing information in the technological graduation course official web pages need to be clear and objective, in order to ease up the access to programmatic contents, workload, integration and other necessary knowledge so that the students have discernment in their formation choice. Objective: to analyze the curriculum matrix and professional profile in the superior courses in Systems Analysis and Development in the Metropolitan Region of Florianópolis - Santa Catarina, considering the microregion of Grande Florianópolis, composed by nine counties: Florianópolis, São José, Palhoça, Biguaçu, Santo Amaro da Imperatriz, Governador Celso Ramos, Antônio Carlos, Águas Mornas and São Pedro de Alcântara. Methodology: we have performed a qualitative research on the pointed issue, relating it to the current legislation and some of the proposed theories. The research documentally based as it focused on the topics mentioned by the Superior Graduation Institutions in their virtual course environment. It was also used semistructured interviews by phone contact and even visiting when necessary, including searches in the Education Ministry web site to base the study, the curriculum matrix comparison and the course professional profile. Results: results show that the analyzed courses are focused in the job market demands in the studied region, regarding the desktop, web and mobile development solutions using programming languages. The formation professional profile also involves knowledge about logical reasoning, abstract math and learning of a second language. Conclusions: to show to interested students in joining the Systems Analysis and Development course, about the importance of the disciplines approached, utilized technologies, professional profiles and the main educational characteristics offered by the institutions. It is thus intended to contribute that these information are used for the purpose of qualification for the job

  18. LSS, a problem solving skill for graduates and SMEs: Case Study of investigation in a UK Business School curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Shokri, Alireza; Nabhani, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - This research aims to investigate the feasibility of a systematic Lean Six Sigma (LSS) education through the curriculum of business schools to respond to the existing gap between the graduate’s expectation of employability and skill requirements by the Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs).\\ud \\ud Design/approach/methodology - One UK business school has been used as a case study to conduct an extensive module and programme review followed by a semi-structured interview with the ...

  19. Evaluation of an innovative hands-on anatomy-centered ultrasound curriculum to supplement graduate gross anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Danielle F; Kessler, Ross; Stowell, Jeffrey R

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasound (US) can enhance anatomy education, yet is incorporated into few non-medical anatomy programs. This study is the first to evaluate the impact of US training in gross anatomy for non-medical students in the United States. All 32 master's students enrolled in gross anatomy with the anatomy-centered ultrasound (ACUS) curriculum were recruited. Mean Likert ratings on pre- and post-course surveys (100% response rates) were compared to evaluate the effectiveness of the ACUS curriculum in developing US confidence, and gauge its impact on views of US. Post-course, students reported significantly higher (P education and to students' future careers remained positive after the course. End-of-semester quiz performance (91% response rate) provided data on educational outcomes. The average score was 79%, with a 90% average on questions about distinguishing tissues/artifacts, demonstrating positive learning outcomes and retention. The anatomy-centered ultrasound curriculum significantly increased confidence with and knowledge of US among non-medical anatomy students with limited prior training. Non-medical students greatly value the contributions that US makes to anatomy education and to their future careers. It is feasible to enhance anatomy education outside of medical training by incorporating US. Anat Sci Educ 10: 348-362. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  20. Informing radiography curriculum development: The views of UK radiology service managers concerning the ‘fitness for purpose’ of recent diagnostic radiography graduates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloane, C.; Miller, P.K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Recent years have seen significant changes in the way medical imaging services are delivered, rapid changes in technology and big increases in the number and ranges of examinations undertaken. Given these changes the study aimed to critically evaluate the fitness for purpose of newly qualified diagnostic radiography. Method: The study employed a grounded theory approach to analyse the interviews of 20 radiology managers from a range of medical imaging providers across the UK. Results: Four key themes emerged from the analysis. These were: curriculum content and structure review; diversification in the role of the radiographer; professionalism and coping and the reformation of career structures. Conclusion: The results indicate the role of the radiographer is now in a state of flux and challenge radiology managers and educators to design curricula and career structures which are better matched the role of the radiographer in the very rapidly changing technological, organisational and social contexts of modern society. - Highlights: • Imaging services have undergone many changes in recent years. • The role of the radiographer is now in a state of flux. • The role of the radiographer varies greatly between employers. • There is a need to develop curricula and career structure's which match roles. • Graduates must be excellent communicators, resilient and have realistic expectations.

  1. Information literacy as the foundation for evidence-based practice in graduate nursing education: a curriculum-integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Susan Kaplan; Rosenfeld, Peri; Haber, Judith

    2003-01-01

    As part of a system-wide initiative to advance evidence-based practice among clinicians, graduate students, and educators, the New York University Division of Nursing embarked on a curricular initiative to integrate components of information literacy in all core courses of the master's program. Increasing competency in information literacy is the foundation for evidence-based practice and provides nursing professionals with the skills to be literate consumers of information in an electronic environment. Competency in information literacy includes an understanding of the architecture of information and the scholarly process; the ability to navigate among a variety of print and electronic tools to effectively access, search, and critically evaluate appropriate resources; synthesize accumulated information into an existing body of knowledge; communicate research results clearly and effectively; and appreciate the social issues and ethical concerns related to the provision, dissemination, and sharing of information. In collaboration with the New York University Division of Libraries' Health Sciences Librarian, instructional modules in information literacy relevant to each of the 5 core nursing master's courses were developed, complemented by a Web-based tutorial: http://library.nyu.edu/research/health/tutorial. The Web site is multifaceted, with fundamentals for the beginner, as well as more complex content for the advanced user. Course assignments were designed to promote specific competencies in information literacy and strategies for evaluating the strength of the evidence found. A survey of information literacy competencies, which assessed students' knowledge, misconceptions, and use of electronic information resources, was administered when students entered the program and at 1-year intervals thereafter.

  2. Multidisciplinary treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Jingu, Kenichi; Matsuura, Keiichi

    1985-01-01

    Multidisciplinary treatment for malignant lymphoma is reported in terms of indication, current status, and outcome of this approach to Hodgkin's disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NLH). HD is considered to be most successfully managed with multidisciplinary treatment. Success of treatment of HD in European countries and the US, which has resulted from accurate staging of HD and developments in radiotherapy and chemotherapy, is reviewed in the literature. Problems in the treatment of HD in Japan are presented. A treatment policy for NHL is discussed according to the original site, i.e. lymph nodes, Waldeyer's ring or other sites of tumor involvement. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Quality of faculty, students, curriculum and resources for nursing doctoral education in Korea: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ja; Lee, Hyeonkyeong; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Ahn, Yang-Heui; Kim, Euisook; Yun, Soon-Nyoung; Lee, Kwang-Ja

    2010-03-01

    The rapidly increasing number of nursing doctoral programs has caused concern about the quality of nursing doctoral education, including in Korea. To describe the perceived quality of Korean nursing doctoral education in faculty, student, curriculum and resources. Focus group. Fourteen Korean nursing doctoral programs that are research focused and include coursework. Four groups of deans, faculty, students and graduates; students completed three semesters of doctoral program; and graduates completed doctoral programs within the most recent 3 years. Focus groups examined the strengths and weaknesses of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources. Faculty strengths were universities' recognition of faculty research/scholarship and the ability of faculty to attract extramural funding. Faculty weaknesses were aging faculty; high faculty workload; insufficient number of faculty; and teaching without expertise in nursing theories. Student strengths were diverse student backgrounds; multidisciplinary dissertation committee members, and opportunities to socialize with peers and graduates/faculty. Students' weaknesses were overproduction of PhDs with low academic quality; a lower number and quality of doctoral applicants; and lack of full-time students. Curriculum strengths were focusing on specific research areas; emphasis on research ethics; and multidisciplinary courses. Curriculum weaknesses were insufficient time for curriculum development; inadequate courses for core research competencies; and a lack of linkage between theory and practice. Resources strengths were inter-institutional courses with credit transfer. Weaknesses were diminished university financial support for graduate students and limited access to school facilities. Variations in participant groups (providers [deans and faculty] vs. receivers [students and graduates]) and geographical location (capital city vs. regional) were noted on all the four components. The quality characteristics of faculty

  4. Challenges of Trainees in a Multidisciplinary Research Program: Nano-Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Christina; Koehne, Jessica; Tinkle, Sally; Maynard, Andrew D.; Hill, Rodney A.

    2011-01-01

    The breadth of knowledge required for the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology challenges and extends traditional concepts of multidisciplinary graduate education. There is a paucity of information, both general reporting and peer-reviewed studies, on the challenges for graduate students working in this multidisciplinary paradigm, from the…

  5. Development of a Comprehensive Communication Skills Curriculum for Pediatrics Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Eleanor B; Boland, Kimberly A; Bryant, Kristina A; McKinley, Tara F; Porter, Melissa B; Potter, Katherine E; Calhoun, Aaron W

    2016-12-01

    Effective communication is an essential element of medical care and a priority of medical education. Specific interventions to teach communication skills are at the discretion of individual residency programs. We developed the Resident Communication Skills Curriculum (RCSC), a formal curriculum designed to teach trainees the communication skills essential for high-quality practice. A multidisciplinary working group contributed to the development of the RCSC, guided by an institutional needs assessment, literature review, and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. The result was a cohesive curriculum that incorporates didactic, role play, and real-life experiences over the course of the entire training period. Methods to assess curricular outcomes included self-reporting, surveys, and periodic faculty evaluations of the residents. Curricular components have been highly rated by residents (3.95-3.97 based on a 4-point Likert scale), and residents' self-reported communication skills demonstrated an improvement over the course of residency in the domains of requesting a consultation, providing effective handoffs, handling conflict, and having difficult conversations (intern median 3.0, graduate median 4.0 based on a 5-point Likert scale, P  ≤ .002). Faculty evaluations of residents have also demonstrated improvement over time (intern median 3.0, graduate median 4.5 based on a 5-point Likert scale, P  communication skills curriculum for pediatrics residents was implemented, with a multistep evaluative process showing improvement in skills over the course of the residency program. Positive resident evaluations and informal comments from faculty support its general acceptance. The use of existing resources makes this curriculum feasible.

  6. Creating Tomorrow's Technologists: Contrasting Information Technology Curriculum in North American Library and Information Science Graduate Programs against Code4lib Job Listings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    This research study explores technology-related course offerings in ALA-accredited library and information science (LIS) graduate programs in North America. These data are juxtaposed against a text analysis of several thousand LIS-specific technology job listings from the Code4lib jobs website. Starting in 2003, as a popular library technology…

  7. Entrustable professional activities in post-licensure training in primary care pediatrics: Necessity, development and implementation of a competency-based post-graduate curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehr, Folkert

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available There is an absence of broad-based and binding curricular requirements for structured competency-based post-graduate medical training in Germany, and thus no basis for comparing the competencies of physicians undergoing training in a medical specialty (. In response, the German Society of Primary Care Pediatrics’ working group on post-graduate education (DGAAP has identified realistic entrustable professional activities (EPAs in primary care, defined their number, scope and content, selected competency domains, specified required knowledge and skills, and described appropriate assessment methods. These guidelines are referred to as and can be accessed electronically by educators in pediatric medicine; the use and effectiveness of these guidelines are monitored by the German Association for Medical Education’s committee on post-graduate education (GMA. Teaching and training in pediatric medicine should take EPAs into consideration. To accomplish this, phases dedicated to primary care should be integrated into formal medical specialty training. Primary care pediatrics must enhance the sites where such training takes place into learning environments that prepare physicians trainees and turn the practicing specialists into mentoring educators.

  8. Using an Undergraduate Materials Research Project to Foster Multidisciplinary Teaming Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, James A.; Cleary, Doug D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the use of undergraduate materials multidisciplinary research projects as a means of addressing the growing industrial demand for graduates experienced in working in multidisciplinary teams. It includes a detailed description of a project in which a multidisciplinary team of chemical engineering and civil engineering students…

  9. Multidisciplinary Approaches to Allergies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao Zhongshan,; Shen, Hua-Hao; Zheng, M.; Frewer, L.J.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Allergy is an immunological disease caused by multiple factors and characterized by variability, specificity and complexity. "Multidisciplinary Approaches to Allergies" covers diverse aspects ranging from basic molecular mechanisms to societal issues within the framework of multidisciplinary

  10. How we developed a bioethics theme in an undergraduate medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghias, Kulsoom; Ali, Syeda Kauser; Khan, Kausar S; Khan, Robyna; Khan, Murad M; Farooqui, Arshi; Nayani, Parvez

    2011-01-01

    The 5-year undergraduate medical curriculum at Aga Khan University integrates basic sciences with clinical and community health sciences. Multimodal strategies of teaching and learning, with an emphasis on problem-based learning, are utilized to equip students with knowledge, skills, behaviours, attitudes and values necessary for a high-calibre medical graduate. Bioethics teaching was introduced in the medical curriculum in 1988 and has since undergone several changes. In 2009, a multidisciplinary voluntary group began review of undergraduate bioethics teaching and invested over 350 man-hours in curricular revision. This involved formulating terminal objectives, delineating specific objectives and identifying instructional methodologies and assessment strategies appropriate for the contents of each objective. Innovative strategies were specially devised to work within the time constraints of the existing medical curriculum and importantly, to increase student interest and engagement. The new bioethics curriculum is designed to be comprehensive and robust, and strives to develop graduates who, in addition to being technically skilled and competent, are well-versed in the history and philosophy of ethics and bioethics and are ethical in their thinking and practice, especially in the context of a developing country like Pakistan where health indicators are among the worst in the region, and clinical practices are not effectively regulated to ensure quality of care.

  11. Employability and career experiences of international graduates of MSc Public Health: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buunaaisie, C; Manyara, A M; Annett, H; Bird, E L; Bray, I; Ige, J; Jones, M; Orme, J; Pilkington, P; Evans, D

    2018-05-08

    This article aims to describe the public health career experiences of international graduates of a Master of Science in Public Health (MSc PH) programme and to contribute to developing the evidence base on international public health workforce capacity development. A sequential mixed methods study was conducted between January 2017 and April 2017. Ninety-seven international graduates of one UK university's MSc PH programme were invited to take part in an online survey followed by semistructured interviews, for respondents who consented to be interviewed. We computed the descriptive statistics of the quantitative data obtained, and qualitative data were thematically analysed. The response rate was 48.5%. Most respondents (63%) were employed by various agencies within 1 year after graduation. Others (15%) were at different stages of doctor of philosophy studies. Respondents reported enhanced roles after graduation in areas such as public health policy analysis (74%); planning, implementation and evaluation of public health interventions (74%); leadership roles (72%); and research (70%). The common perceived skills that were relevant to the respondents' present jobs were critical analysis (87%), multidisciplinary thinking (86%), demonstrating public health leadership skills (84%) and research (77%). Almost all respondents (90%) were confident in conducting research. Respondents recommended the provision of longer public health placement opportunities, elective courses on project management and advanced statistics, and 'internationalisation' of the programme's curriculum. The study has revealed the relevance of higher education in public health in developing the career prospects and skills of graduates. International graduates of this MSc PH programme were satisfied with the relevance and impact of the skills they acquired during their studies. The outcomes of this study can be used for curriculum reformation. Employers' perspectives of the capabilities of these

  12. Rethinking the MSW Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Ira C.

    2013-01-01

    The foundation year and specialization year of study are the accepted framework for graduate social work education. A common belief among educators is that accreditation standards are prescriptive by design, resulting in a rigidity that neither encourages nor supports curricular innovation. This article outlines a newly developed curriculum model…

  13. Developing a "clinical presentation" curriculum at the University of Calgary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandin, H; Harasym, P; Eagle, C; Watanabe, M

    1995-03-01

    Currently, medical curricula are structured according to disciplines, body systems, or clinical problems. Beginning in 1988, the faculty of the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine (U of C) carefully evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of each of these models in seeking to revise their school's curriculum. However, all three models fell short of a curricular structure based on current knowledge and principles of adult learning, clinical problem solving, community demands, and curriculum management. By 1991, the U of C had formulated a strategic plan for a revised curriculum structure based on the way patients present to physicians, and implementation of this plan has begun. In creating the new curriculum, 120 clinical presentations (e.g., "loss of consciousness/syncope") were defined and each was assigned to an individual or small group of faculty for development based on faculty expertise and interest. Terminal objectives (i.e., "what to do") were defined for each presentation to describe the appropriate clinical behaviors of a graduating physician. Experts developed schemes that outlined how they differentiated one cause (i.e., disease category) from another. The underlying enabling objectives (i.e., knowledge, skills, and attitudes) for reaching the terminal objectives for each clinical presentation were assigned as departmental responsibilities. A new administrative structure evolved in which there is a partnership between a centralized multidisciplinary curriculum committee and the departments. This new competency-based, clinical presentation curriculum is expected to significantly enhance students' development of clinical problem-solving skills and affirms the premise that prudent, continuous updating is essential for improving the quality of medical education.

  14. Lessons learned from curriculum changes and setting curriculum objectives at the University of Pennsylvania's Earth and Environmental Science Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Recent restructuring of the University of Pennsylvania’s curriculum, including a revised multi-disciplinary Environmental Studies major and a proposed Environmental Science major has led to several changes, including a mandatory junior research seminar. Feedback from students indicates that a more structured curriculum has helped guide them through the multi-disciplinary Environmental Studies major. The addition of mandatory courses in Statistics, Geographical and Environmental Modeling, as well as Economics and Policy has ensured that students have important skills needed to succeed after graduation. We have compiled a curriculum objective matrix to clarify both the broad and focused objectives of our curriculum and how each course helps to fulfill these objectives. An important aspect of both majors is the Senior Thesis. The junior research seminar was recently revised to help students prepare for their thesis research. Topic selection, library research, data presentation, basic research methods, advisor identification, and funding options are discussed. Throughout the course, faculty from within the department lecture about their research and highlight opportunities for undergraduates. In one assignment, students are given a few types of datasets and asked to present the data and error analysis in various formats using different software (SPSS and Excel). The final paper was a research proposal outlining the student’s Senior Thesis. Based on both the university and instructor written course evaluations, students felt they benefited most from writing their senior thesis proposal; doing assignments on data analysis, library research and critical analysis; and the faculty research lectures. The lessons learned in restructuring this flexible major and providing a research seminar in the junior year may benefit other departments considering such changes.

  15. Assessing Success in Honors: Getting beyond Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean K.

    2013-01-01

    An honors curriculum with realistic graduation requirements should have a respectable graduation rate. This number, when low, can indicate significant problems in the program. But a high graduation rate does not necessarily indicate success. A quality honors program, especially one that remains attentive to students' ability to thrive, might have…

  16. Informing radiography curriculum development: The views of UK radiology service managers concerning the 'fitness for purpose' of recent diagnostic radiography graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, C; Miller, P K

    2017-09-01

    Recent years have seen significant changes in the way medical imaging services are delivered, rapid changes in technology and big increases in the number and ranges of examinations undertaken. Given these changes the study aimed to critically evaluate the fitness for purpose of newly qualified diagnostic radiography. The study employed a grounded theory approach to analyse the interviews of 20 radiology managers from a range of medical imaging providers across the UK. Four key themes emerged from the analysis. These were: curriculum content and structure review; diversification in the role of the radiographer; professionalism and coping and the reformation of career structures. The results indicate the role of the radiographer is now in a state of flux and challenge radiology managers and educators to design curricula and career structures which are better matched the role of the radiographer in the very rapidly changing technological, organisational and social contexts of modern society. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multidisciplinary Computational Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Visbal, Miguel R

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop advanced multidisciplinary numerical simulation capabilities for aerospace vehicles with emphasis on highly accurate, massively parallel computational methods...

  18. Graduate and Undergraduate Geriatric Dentistry Education in a Selected Dental School in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Noboru; Sato, Yuji; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Geriatric dentistry and its instruction are critical in a rapidly aging population. Japan is the world’s fastest-aging society, and thus geriatric dentistry education in Japan can serve as a global model for other countries that will soon encounter the issues that Japan has already confronted. This study aimed to evaluate geriatric dental education with respect to the overall dental education system, undergraduate geriatric dentistry curricula, mandatory internships, and graduate geriatric education of a selected dental school in Japan. Bibliographic data and local information were collected. Descriptive and statistical analyses (Fisher and Chi-square test) were conducted. Japanese dental schools teach geriatric dentistry in 10 geriatric dentistry departments as well as in prosthodontic departments. There was no significant differences found between the number of public and private dental schools with geriatric dentistry departments (p = 0.615). At Showa University School of Dentistry, there are more didactic hours than practical training hours; however, there is no significant didactic/practical hour distribution difference between the overall dental curriculum and fourth-year dental students’ geriatric dental education curriculum (p=0.077). Graduate geriatric education is unique because it is a four-year Ph.D. course of study; there is neither a Master’s degree program nor a certificate program in Geriatric Dentistry. Overall, both undergraduate and graduate geriatric dentistry curricula are multidisciplinary. This study contributes to a better understanding of geriatric dental education in Japan; the implications of this study include developing a clinical/didactic curriculum, designing new national/international dental public health policies, and calibrating the competency of dentists in geriatric dentistry. PMID:21985207

  19. Multidisciplinary Rural Studies in the Land Grant University Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David L; Ranney, Christine

    1991-01-01

    Proposes a multidisciplinary graduate program in rural studies within the land grant university context. Requires a universitywide Rural Studies Center to coordinate efforts across the various colleges. Students could earn dual-title master's and Ph.D. degrees in rural studies and applied economics, sociology, geography, public administration,…

  20. Innovative Conference Curriculum: Maximizing Learning and Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Nancy; Kranzow, Jeannine

    2012-01-01

    This action research study evaluated the potential of an innovative curriculum to move 73 graduate students toward professional development. The curriculum was grounded in the professional conference and utilized the motivation and expertise of conference presenters. This innovation required students to be more independent, act as a critical…

  1. Curriculum Redesign in Veterinary Medicine: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Kristin P; Macik, Maria L; Turner, Jacqueline S; Korich, Jodi A; Rogers, Kenita S; Fowler, Debra; Scallan, Elizabeth M; Keefe, Lisa M

    Curricular review is considered a necessary component for growth and enhancement of academic programs and requires time, energy, creativity, and persistence from both faculty and administration. At Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (TAMU), the faculty and administration partnered with the university's Center for Teaching Excellence to create a faculty-driven, data-enhanced curricular redesign process. The 8-step process begins with the formation of a dedicated faculty curriculum design team to drive the redesign process and to support the college curriculum committee. The next steps include defining graduate outcomes and mapping the current curriculum to identify gaps and redundancies across the curriculum. Data are collected from internal and external stakeholders including veterinary students, faculty, alumni, and employers of graduates. Data collected through curriculum mapping and stakeholder engagement substantiate the curriculum redesign. The guidelines, supporting documents, and 8-step process developed at TAMU are provided to assist other veterinary schools in successful curricular redesign. This is the first of a two-part report that provides the background, context, and description of the process for charting the course for curricular change. The process involves defining expected learning outcomes for new graduates, conducting a curriculum mapping exercise, and collecting stakeholder data for curricular evaluation (steps 1-4). The second part of the report describes the development of rubrics that were applied to the graduate learning outcomes (steps 5-8) and engagement of faculty during the implementation phases of data-driven curriculum change.

  2. Multidisciplinary approaches to climate change questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Beth A.; LePage, Ben A.

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary approaches are required to address the complex environmental problems of our time. Solutions to climate change problems are good examples of situations requiring complex syntheses of ideas from a vast set of disciplines including science, engineering, social science, and the humanities. Unfortunately, most ecologists have narrow training, and are not equipped to bring their environmental skills to the table with interdisciplinary teams to help solve multidisciplinary problems. To address this problem, new graduate training programs and workshops sponsored by various organizations are providing opportunities for scientists and others to learn to work together in multidisciplinary teams. Two examples of training in multidisciplinary thinking include those organized by the Santa Fe Institute and Dahlem Workshops. In addition, many interdisciplinary programs have had successes in providing insight into climate change problems including the International Panel on Climate Change, the Joint North American Carbon Program, the National Academy of Science Research Grand Challenges Initiatives, and the National Academy of Science. These programs and initiatives have had some notable success in outlining some of the problems and solutions to climate change. Scientists who can offer their specialized expertise to interdisciplinary teams will be more successful in helping to solve the complex problems related to climate change.

  3. Graduate Curriculum | College of Engineering & Applied Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrical Engineering, and grad students with solar panels on the second floor roof of Bolton Hall. Dr. Adel Nasiri, Professor of Electrical Engineering, and grad students with solar panels on the second floor roof

  4. Challenge: A Multidisciplinary Degree Program in Bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudasser Fraz Wyne

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics is a new field that is poorly served by any of the traditional science programs in Biology, Computer science or Biochemistry. Known to be a rapidly evolving discipline, Bioinformatics has emerged from experimental molecular biology and biochemistry as well as from the artificial intelligence, database, pattern recognition, and algorithms disciplines of computer science. While institutions are responding to this increased demand by establishing graduate programs in bioinformatics, entrance barriers for these programs are high, largely due to the significant prerequisite knowledge which is required, both in the fields of biochemistry and computer science. Although many schools currently have or are proposing graduate programs in bioinformatics, few are actually developing new undergraduate programs. In this paper I explore the blend of a multidisciplinary approach, discuss the response of academia and highlight challenges faced by this emerging field.

  5. Curriculum Innovation for Marketing Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Elizabeth J.; McCabe, Catherine; Smith, Robert S.

    2018-01-01

    College graduates need better preparation for and experience in data analytics for higher-quality problem solving. Using the curriculum innovation framework of Borin, Metcalf, and Tietje (2007) and case study research methods, we offer rich insights about one higher education institution's work to address the marketing analytics skills gap.…

  6. Broadening the spectrum through curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel-Hills P

    2006-01-01

    Radiography has experienced changes and challenges from a number of sources. The rapid technological changes in imaging an radiation treatment, changes in the professional context and social transformation have had an impact on the shape and structure of the radiography curriculum. It too must change to prepare graduates for the broadening radiography spectrum

  7. Gestalt and Figure-Ground: Reframing Graduate Attribute Conversations between Educational Developers and Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knewstubb, Bernadette; Ruth, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Academics implementing graduate attributes, and the educational developers who support those academics, may experience graduate attributes and disciplinary knowledge and skills as unrelated dimensions of curriculum. Gestalt conceptions of curriculum, together with a figure-ground understanding of the relationship between disciplinary understanding…

  8. Equipping medical graduates to address health systems challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: We defined HSR and strengthening competencies for medical graduates through a literature review and expert consultations. Learning outcomes in terms of knowledge, skill or attitude in the 64 module guides of the curriculum were compared with the competencies required. A survey of recent medical graduates ...

  9. Development of a Comprehensive Digital Avionics Curriculum for the Aeronautical Engineer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hofer, Thomas W

    2006-01-01

    ... avionics curriculum does not yet exist that satisfies the needs of graduates who will serve as aeronautical engineers involved with the development, integration, testing, fielding, and supporting...

  10. Integrating Multidisciplinary Engineering Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Karin; Luckett, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    In order to design two distinct engineering qualification levels for an existing University of Technology programme, empirical evidence based on the current diploma is necessary to illuminate the nature of and the relationship between the "contextual" and "conceptual" elements underpinning a multidisciplinary engineering…

  11. Multidisciplinary care of craniosynostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchanan EP

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Edward P Buchanan,1 Yunfeng Xue,1 Amy S Xue,1 Asaf Olshinka,1 Sandi Lam2 1Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, 2Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: The management of craniosynostosis, especially in the setting of craniofacial syndromes, is ideally done in a multidisciplinary clinic with a team focused toward comprehensive care. Craniosynostosis is a congenital disorder of the cranium, caused by the premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures. This fusion results in abnormal cranial growth due to the inability of the involved sutures to accommodate the growing brain. Skull growth occurs only at the patent sutures, resulting in an abnormal head shape. If cranial growth is severely restricted, as seen in multisuture craniosynostosis, elevation in intracranial pressure can occur. Whereas most patients treated in a multidisciplinary craniofacial clinic have non-syndromic or isolated craniosynostosis, the most challenging patients are those with syndromic craniosynostosis. The purpose of this article was to discuss the multidisciplinary team care required to treat both syndromic and non-syndromic craniosynostosis. Keywords: multidisciplinary team care, syndromic craniosynostosis, nonsyndromic craniosynostosis

  12. Multidisciplinary team functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovitz, K E; Dougan, P; Riese, R; Brummitt, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper advocates the need to move beyond interdisciplinary team composition as a minimum criterion for multidisciplinary functioning in child abuse treatment. Recent developments within the field reflect the practice of shared professional responsibility for detection, case management and treatment. Adherence to this particular model for intervention requires cooperative service planning and implementation as task related functions. Implicitly, this model also carries the potential to incorporate the supportive functioning essential to effective group process. However, explicit attention to the dynamics and process of small groups has been neglected in prescriptive accounts of multidisciplinary child abuse team organization. The present paper therefore focuses upon the maintenance and enhancement aspects of multidisciplinary group functioning. First, the development and philosophy of service for the Alberta Children's Hospital Child Abuse Program are reviewed. Second, composition of the team, it's mandate for service, and the population it serves are briefly described. Third, the conceptual framework within which the program functions is outlined. Strategies for effective group functioning are presented and the difficulties encountered with this model are highlighted. Finally, recommendations are offered for planning and implementing a multidisciplinary child abuse team and for maintaining its effective group functioning.

  13. EL PLAN DE ESTUDIOS DE LA CARRERA DE EDUCACIÓN ESPECIAL CON ÉNFASIS EN INTEGRACIÓN: UNA MIRADA DESDE LOS EGRESADOS (THE CURRICULUM OF THE SCHOOL OF SPECIAL EDUCATION WITH EMPHASIS ON INTEGRATION: A VIEW FROM THE GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández Segura, Ana María

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El objetivo principal del artículo es presentar la valoración que hacen los egresados de la carrera de Educación Especial acerca del Plan de Estudios, para establecer relaciones con planteamientos de este documento y otras fuentes que se enmarcan en la fundamentación misma del Plan. Uno de los actores e informantes claves de estos procesos es un grupo de egresados de la carrera, quienes en este caso particular hacen una valoración de su proceso de formación docente, tomando en consideración aspectos tales como: desempeño laboral y habilidades desarrolladas, valores y actitudes, formación teórica-práctica recibida, así como contenidos adquiridos y desempeño profesional, todos aspectos contemplados en el Plan de Estudios de la Carrera. Participó un total de 31 egresados, graduados del periodo 2006-2009 y se utilizó un cuestionario que consta de 55 ítems. Las principales conclusiones del estudio evidencian que los egresados deben participar en espacios de consulta, los cuales les permitan fortalecer sus procesos reflexivos. En este sentido, los egresados valoran que la atención de poblaciones diversas, la actitud de disposición y la sensibilidad ante las diferencias que poseen las personas con necesidades educativas especiales son las tres habilidades desarrolladas durante su proceso de formación y que adquieren mayor trascendencia en el quehacer de su profesión. Desde la perspectiva de los egresados, la formación en valores es una de las fortalezas que tiene el Plan de Estudios de la carrera, lo cual permite asegurar que la dimensión del ser persona es de vital importancia para el desarrollo de la profesión docente.Abstract: The aim of the paper is to present the valuation made by graduates of the race on the Special Education Curriculum, to establish relationships with approaches of this document and other sources that fall under the same rationale of the Plan. One of the stakeholders and key informants from these

  14. A Graduate Degree in Library or Information Science Is Required, but not Sufficient, to Enter the Profession. A Review of: Reeves, R., & Hahn, T. (2010. Job advertisements for recent graduates: Advising, curriculum, and job-seeking implications. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, 51(2, 103-119.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazi Torabi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To analyze the current state of the job market for recent MLS or MLIS graduates.Design – Content analysis of job postings.Setting – Online library or archival job advertisements published between 15 April, 2006 and 10 May, 2009 and collected from two national library publications (American Libraries and Library Journal, two electronic lists (Maryland's iSchool Discussion list and the Archives and Archivists list sponsored by the Society of American Archivists, two Internet job banks (USAJobs.gov and LISJobs.com, and several local chapters of library and archival organizations in the South Atlantic region of the United States.Subjects – 1,042 online library or archival job advertisements. Salary data were obtained from 401 available online job advertisements.Methods – The methodology for collection and content analysis of job ads was adapted from earlier studies, with slight modification wherever appropriate. The following criteria for selecting the ads were applied:• Ad says "entry-level"• No mention of professional experience• No experience or duties impossible for entry-level librarians to gain• Only ads that required an MLS or MLIS degree from an ALA-accredited institution• Part-time or temporary positions of less than nine months were excluded The authors removed duplicated job postings and identified three major areas of content analysis. Table 1 lists a brief summary of these areas and further sub-categories for each area. The content analysis was performed using a custom Microsoft Access database for data organization and storage and Microsoft Excel spreadsheet for data manipulation. SPSS was used for statistical analysis.Main Results – The two largest represented institution types for library positions were academic (63.6% and public (17.5%. For archival positions, the academic (62.7% and "other" (25.4% institutions rank first and second. When the job ads were broken down into the position types, which

  15. Building multidisciplinary business teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyson, C.J.; Winte, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is a description of an approach to managing Exploration and Production assets through the operation of multidisciplinary business teams. The business team approach can assist in improved asset performance in terms of efficiency, motivation and business results, compared with more traditional matrix style hierarchies. Within this paper certain critical success factors for the long term success of multidiscipline teams are outlined, together with some of the risk of business team operation

  16. Multidisciplinary Management of Mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Dybedal, Ingunn; Gülen, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases defined by an increased number and accumulation of mast cells, and often also by signs and symptoms of mast cell activation. Disease subtypes range from indolent to rare aggressive forms. Mastocytosis affects people of all ages and has been...... an individualized, multidisciplinary approach. We present here consensus recommendations from a Nordic expert group for the diagnosis and general management of patients with mastocytosis....

  17. Multidisciplinary Management of Mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Dybedal, Ingunn; Gülen, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases defined by an increased number and accumulation of mast cells, and often also by signs and symptoms of mast cell activation. Disease subtypes range from indolent to rare aggressive forms. Mastocytosis affects people of all ages and has been consid...... an individualized, multidisciplinary approach. We present here consensus recommendations from a Nordic expert group for the diagnosis and general management of patients with mastocytosis....

  18. Building multidisciplinary business teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyson, C.J.; Winter, N.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to managing oil and gas industry E and P assets through the operation of multidisciplinary business teams (MBT's). This approach can result in improved asset performance in terms of efficiency, motivation, and business results compared with more traditional matrix-style hierarchies. This paper also outlines certain critical success factors for the long-term success of MBT's and discusses some of the risks of MBT operation

  19. Student and recent graduate employment opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2016-08-30

    As an unbiased, multidisciplinary science organization, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is dedicated to the timely, relevant, and impartial study of the health of our ecosystems and environment, our natural resources, the impacts of climate and land-use change, and the natural hazards that affect our lives. Opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as recent graduates, to participate in USGS science are available in the selected programs described in this publication. Please note: U.S. citizenship is required for all government positions.

  20. Science as a general education: Conceptual science should constitute the compulsory core of multi-disciplinary undergraduate degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2006-01-01

    It is plausible to assume that in the future science will form the compulsory core element both of school curricula and multi-disciplinary undergraduate degrees. But for this to happen entails a shift in the emphasis and methods of science teaching, away from the traditional concern with educating specialists and professionals. Traditional science teaching was essentially vocational, designed to provide precise and comprehensive scientific knowledge for practical application. By contrast, future science teaching will be a general education, hence primarily conceptual. Its aim should be to provide an education in flexible rationality. Vocational science teaching was focused on a single-discipline undergraduate degree, but a general education in abstract systematic thinking is best inculcated by studying several scientific disciplines. In this sense, 'science' is understood as mathematics and the natural sciences, but also the abstract and systematic aspects of disciplines such as economics, linguistics, music theory, history, sociology, political science and management science. Such a wide variety of science options in a multi-disciplinary degree will increase the possibility of student motivation and aptitude. Specialist vocational science education will progressively be shifted to post-graduate level, in Masters and Doctoral programs. A multi-disciplinary and conceptually-based science core curriculum should provide an appropriate preparation for dealing with the demands of modern societies; their complex and rapidly changing social systems; and the need for individual social and professional mobility. Training in rational conceptual thinking also has potential benefits to human health and happiness, since it allows people to over-ride inappropriate instincts, integrate conflicting desires and pursue long-term goals.

  1. Development of multidisciplinary practical lessons through research-action methodology in the faculties of computer science and educational psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Pertegal-Felices, María Luisa; Navarro Soria, Ignasi; Jimeno-Morenilla, Antonio; Gil, David

    2010-01-01

    Computer science studies possess a strong multidisciplinary vocation; most graduates do their professional work elsewhere of a computing environment, in collaboration with professionals from many different areas. However, the training offered in computer science studies lacks that multidisciplinary, focusing more on purely technical aspects. The campus, a place where studies of very different nature exist side by side, may constitute an excellent basis for conducting multidisciplinary trainin...

  2. Processes of Curriculum Development in the Department of Graphic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    national skills shortage by developing responsive curricula which will ensure that graduating students are well ... innovative pedagogy which integrates recent technologies into curriculum development and classroom practice. .... developing confidence amongst staff and in facilitating creative and innovative thinking.

  3. Social Science Disciplines. Fundamental for Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLendon, Johathan C., Ed.

    This guide is written for the social studies curriculum developer interested in developing a structured multidisciplinary program based on the concepts, methodology, and structure of social science disciplines and history. Seven 15-29 page chapters are included on each discipline: Anthropology and Psychology, by Charles R. Berryman; Economics, by…

  4. International Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  5. Developing a Collaborative Multidisciplinary Online Design Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Bender, Ph.D.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Technology is transforming the practice of architecture and design from the conceptual stages right down to the actual construction. One would assume technology is being readily integrated into current design education. Unfortunately, this is not the case. The purpose of this study is to explore the integration of online education into the curriculum of architecture and design. The three primary obstacles to integrating technology with education in these disciplines are identified as: 1 the limited evidence of online education in the fields of architecture and design (Sagun, Demirkan, & Goktepe, 2001; 2 the reluctance of design educators to teach in an online environment (Bender & Good, 2003; and 3 the lack of multidisciplinary coursework currently available between architecture, design, and other related fields (IIDA Report, 1998. This paper will discuss online education in the context of traditional architecture and design studio instruction. A case study of the development of a collaborative, multidisciplinary online course offered between five major universities will be presented as a catalyst for change. The paper concludes with reflections on the pedagogical advantages and disadvantages of this new educational model and its implications for instructors involved in online education.

  6. International Multidisciplinary Microscopy Congress

    CERN Document Server

    Oral, Ahmet; Ozer, Mehmet; InterM; INTERM2013

    2014-01-01

    The International Multidisciplinary Microscopy Congress (INTERM2013) was organized on October 10-13, 2013. The aim of the congress was to bring together scientists from various branches to discuss the latest advances in the field of microscopy. The contents of the congress have been broadened to a more "interdisciplinary" scope, so as to allow all scientists working on related subjects to participate and present their work. These proceedings include 39 peer-reviewed technical papers, submitted by leading academic and research institutions from over 12 countries and representing some of the most cutting-edge research available. The 39 papers are grouped into the following sections: - Applications of Microscopy in the Physical Sciences - Applications of Microscopy in the Biological Sciences

  7. Internationalisation of the Sport Management Curriculum: Academic and Student Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Donna; Sherry, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Internationalisation of the sport industry has resulted in a demand for integration of international perspectives into the sport management higher education curriculum, to produce graduates capable of working within this rapidly developing global industry. Internationalisation of the curriculum can occur both abroad (i.e., study tour) or at home…

  8. The Curriculum Ideology of the South African Secondary School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnguni, Lindelani

    2013-01-01

    South Africa has had a number of curriculum reforms since 1994 which have been based on both political and education grounds. However, there is a dearth of knowledge about the nature of the envisioned graduates, especially with respect to social challenges. This can be addressed by exploring the curriculum ideology which outlines the vision of…

  9. Curriculum structure: principles and strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, R; Kersten, H; Vinkka-Puhakka, H; Alpasan, G; Bearn, D; Cema, I; Delap, E; Dummer, P; Goulet, J P; Gugushe, T; Jeniati, E; Jerolimov, V; Kotsanos, N; Krifka, S; Levy, G; Neway, M; Ogawa, T; Saag, M; Sidlauskas, A; Skaleric, U; Vervoorn, M; White, D

    2008-02-01

    This report provides general guidelines for the structure of a curriculum, followed by specific advice on the principles of learning and teaching, the process of restructuring and change leadership and management. It provides examples of several educational philosophies, including vertical and horizontal integration. It discusses the use of competence, learning outcomes, level of degree and assessment and provides a number of recommendations. It does not seek to be prescriptive of time allocation to disciplines within a curriculum. Although this report has been written primarily for those who will develop an undergraduate curriculum, the information may be sufficiently generic to apply to the recent development in graduate entry ('shortened dental' or 'accelerated') courses and to postgraduate degree planning and higher education certificate or diploma courses for other dental care professionals (auxiliaries). The report may have a European bias as progress is made to converge and enhance educational standards in 29 countries with different educational approaches - a microcosm of global collaboration.

  10. Medical humanities in the undergraduate medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supe, Avinash

    2012-01-01

    The medical humanities have been introduced in medical curricula over the past 30 years in the western world. Having medical humanities in a medical school curriculum can nurture positive attitudes in the regular work of a clinician and contribute equally to personality development. Though substantial evidence in favour of a medical humanities curriculum may be lacking, the feedback is positive. It is recommended that medical humanities be introduced into the curriculum of every medical school with the purpose of improving the quality of healthcare, and the attitudes of medical graduates.

  11. Graduate School and You: A Guide for Prospective Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Clara Sue; LaPidus, Jules B.

    This pamphlet guides the college graduate in determining whether graduate school is an appropriate choice in career planning. Chapter titles include: "Why Graduate School?,""What is Graduate Education?,""Preparation for Graduate School,""Career Options with a Graduate Degree,""Making the Decision,""Financing a Graduate Education,""Choosing a…

  12. Measuring the Value of Graduate Manpower Systems Analysis Education for Naval Officers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Sullivan, Lindsay M

    2006-01-01

    ...? Or does the MSA curriculum teach graduates the necessary skills for follow-on billets? Individuals in the private and public sections have tried to quantify the value of both training and education...

  13. Teaching concept analysis to graduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Catharine J

    2018-04-01

    To provide guidance to educators who use the Wilson (1963) concept analysis method, as modified by Walker and Avant (2011), in their graduate nursing curriculum BACKGROUND: While graduate nursing curricula often include a concept analysis assignment, there is a paucity of literature to assist educators in guiding students through this challenging process. This article details one way for educators to assist graduate nursing students in learning how to undertake each step of the Wilson (1963) concept analysis method, as modified by Walker and Avant (2011). Wilson (1963) concept analysis method, as modified by Walker and Avant (2011). Using examples, this article walks the reader through the Walker and Avant (2011) concept analysis process and addresses those issues commonly encountered by educators during this process. This article presented one way of walking students through a Walker and Avant (2011) concept analysis. Having clear information about the steps involved in developing a concept analysis will make it easier for educators to incorporate it into their graduate nursing curriculum and to effectively guide students on their journey through this process. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Multidisciplinary System Reliability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code, developed under the leadership of NASA Glenn Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multidisciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

  15. Breakfast: a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affinita, Antonio; Catalani, Loredana; Cecchetto, Giovanna; De Lorenzo, Gianfranco; Dilillo, Dario; Donegani, Giorgio; Fransos, Lucia; Lucidi, Fabio; Mameli, Chiara; Manna, Elisa; Marconi, Paolo; Mele, Giuseppe; Minestroni, Laura; Montanari, Massimo; Morcellini, Mario; Rovera, Giuseppe; Rotilio, Giuseppe; Sachet, Marco; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo

    2013-07-10

    The role of breakfast as an essential part of an healthy diet has been only recently promoted even if breakfast practices were known since the Middle Age. The growing scientific evidences on this topic are extremely sector-based nevertheless breakfast could be regarded from different point of views and from different expertises. This approach, that take into account history, sociology, anthropology, medicine, psychology and pedagogy, is useful to better understand the value of this meal in our culture. The aim of this paper was to analyse breakfast-related issues based on a multidisciplinary approach with input by specialists from different fields of learning. Breakfast is now recommended as part of a diet because it is associated with healthier macro- and micronutrient intakes, body mass index and lifestyle. Moreover recent studies showed that breakfast improves cognitive function, intuitive perception and academic performance. Research demonstrates the importance of providing breakfast not only to children but in adults and elderly too. Although the important role breakfast plays in maintaining the health, epidemiological data from industrialised countries reveal that many individuals either eat a nutritionally unhealthy breakfast or skip it completely. The historical, bio-psychological and educational value of breakfast in our culture is extremely important and should be recognized and stressed by the scientific community. Efforts should be done to promote this practice for the individual health and well-being.

  16. Training graduate students to be teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de-Macedo D.V.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedagogic education of graduate students, when and where it exists, is restricted to theoretical courses or to the participation of the students as teachers' assistants. This model is essentially reproductive and offers few opportunities for any significant curriculum innovation. To open an opportunity for novelty we have introduced a new approach in "Biochemistry Teaching", a course included in the Biochemistry Graduate Program of the Biochemistry Department (Universidade Estadual de Campinas and Universidade de São Paulo. The content of the course consists of a choosing the theme, b selecting and organizing the topics, c preparing written material, d establishing the methodological strategies, e planning the evaluation tools and, finally, f as teachers, conducting the course as an optional summer course for undergraduate students. During the first semester the graduate students establish general and specific educational objectives, select and organize contents, decide on the instructional strategies and plan evaluation tools. The contents are explored using a wide range of strategies, which include computer-aided instruction, laboratory classes, small group teaching, a few lectures and round table discussions. The graduate students also organize printed class notes to be used by the undergraduate students. Finally, as a group, they teach the summer course. In the three versions already developed, the themes chosen were Biochemistry of Exercise (UNICAMP, Biochemistry of Nutrition (UNICAMP and Molecular Biology of Plants (USP. In all cases the number of registrations greatly exceeded the number of places and a selection had to be made. The evaluation of the experience by both graduate and undergraduate students was very positive. Graduate students considered this experience to be unique and recommended it to their schoolmates; the undergraduate students benefited from a more flexible curriculum (more options and gave very high scores to both

  17. A True Delphi Approach: Developing a Tailored Curriculum in Response to Local Agriscience Need

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenstein, Eric; Thoron, Andrew; Burleson, Sarah

    2012-02-07

    The Delphi approach is a structured communication technique, developed as a systematic, interactive forecasting method which relies on a panel of experts. In this specific case experts from Industry, Education and Extension fields addressed needs for educational programs in a traditional agriculturally-based community, environmentally conscious practices in order to restore environmental integrity and multi-disciplinary approach to solve sustainability problems facing the agricultural industry. The experts were divided into two main groups, (A) Secondary and (B) Post-secondary, and answered questionnaires in three rounds: • 1st Round – Participants generated a list of knowledge, skills, and competencies followed • 2nd Round – Panelists rated each item • 3rd Round – Panelists were given the opportunity to combine and add additional items As a result, top six items from both groups were not found similar, secondary panelists centralized around employment skills and post-secondary panelists focused on content areas. Implications include a need for content-based curriculum for post-secondary graduates, utilization of true-Delphi technique for future curriculum development research and further examination of students that complete secondary and post-secondary programs in biofuels/sustainable agriculture.

  18. Teaching Computing in a Multidisciplinary Way in Social Studies Classes in School--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wangenheim, Christiane Gresse; Alves, Nathalia Cruz; Rodrigues, Pedro Eurico; Hauck, Jean Carlo

    2017-01-01

    In order to be well-educated citizens in the 21st century, children need to learn computing in school. However, implementing computing education in schools faces several practical problems, such as lack of computing teachers and time in an already overloaded curriculum. A solution can be a multidisciplinary approach, integrating computing…

  19. Multidisciplinary accident investigation : volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    The Task II final report for 1974 of the Multidisciplinary Accident Investigation : Team of the Maryland Medical-Legal Foundation, Inc. is presented. This report describes some preliminary findings emanating from a series of comprehensive, multivaria...

  20. Multidisciplinary accident investigation : volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-09-01

    The final report of the Multidisciplinary Accident Investigation Team of the Maryland Medical-Legal Foundation, Inc. is presented. The report describes the methodology, results, discussions, conclusions and recommendations pertaining to the investiga...

  1. Graduate studies in instrumentation at the University of Provence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carette, M.; Reynard, C.; Claire, N.; Deschaintres, J. L.; Felts, B.; Lyoussi, A.; Andre, J.; Bertin, D.

    2009-01-01

    The University of Provence instrumentation department offers a high level of graduate and post graduate engineering programs. Its mission is to form technician experts and engineers with a deep knowledge in their discipline: metrology, instrumentation, tests, Research and Development, automatism and industrial process control. The specialty of master on test facilities instrumentation has been developed in collaboration with the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) since 2004. This curriculum offers now a specialization in nuclear detection and nuclear instrumentation. More than 80% of the graduates formed by block-release training of master find a job within 6 months

  2. Improving innovation and multidisciplinary competences among bachelor of engineering students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løje, Hanne; Andersson, Pernille Hammar; Grex, Sara

    2017-01-01

    within Engineering Education. Furthermore, there is also a demand for the graduates to be able to work multidisciplinary and to be able to use generic skills in their work. In this paper, the research question is how to enhance innovation and multidisciplinary competences of engineering students......From society and industry, there are increasing requirements for skilled and well-educated engineers who can develop new solutions through innovation and this have pushed universities to meet these requirements by having an increasing focus on developing innovation and entrepreneurship programmes......? This is a central question in order to educate engineers that can create sustainable solutions for the environment, for products and to secure future workplaces. In this paper, a new mandatory course for Bachelor of Engineering students at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) "Innovation Pilot...

  3. An Educational Program of Mechatronics for Multidisciplinary Knowledge Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Keiichi; Kojima, Kazuyuki

    Recently, as the technologies surrounding mechanical engineering have improved remarkably, the expectations for students who graduate from departments of mechanical engineering have increased. For example, in order to develop a mechatronics system, a student needs to integrate a wide variety of technologies, such as mechanical engineering, electrical and electronics engineering, and information technology. Therefore, from the perspective of educators, the current education system, which stresses expertizing each technology, should be replaced by an education system that stresses integrating multidisciplinary knowledge. In this paper, a trial education program for students of the department of mechanical engineering in our university, in which students are required to integrate multidisciplinary knowledge in order to develop a biologically-based robot, is described. Finally, the efficacy of the program is analyzed.

  4. The professional profile of UFBA nursing management graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Mirian Santos; Coelho, Edméia de Almeida Cardoso; Nascimento, Enilda Rosendo do; Melo, Cristina Maria Meira de; Fernandes, Josicelia Dumêt; Santos, Ninalva de Andrade

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the professional profile of the nursing graduate students of Federal University of Bahia, more specifically of the nursing management area. This descriptive, exploratory study was performed using documental research. The data was collected from the graduates' curriculum on the Lattes Platform and from the graduate program documents, using a form. The study population consisted of graduates enrolled under the line of research The Organization and Evaluation of Health Care Systems, who developed dissertations/theses addressing Nursing/Health Management. The data were stored using Microsoft Excel, and then transferred to the STATA 9.0 statistical software. Results showed that most graduates are women, originally from the State of Bahia, and had completed the course between 2000 and 2011; faculty of public institutions who continued involved in academic work after completing the course. These results point at the program as an academic environment committed to preparing researchers.

  5. Flipped Classroom Model Improves Graduate Student Performance in Cardiovascular, Respiratory, and Renal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tune, Johnathan D.; Sturek, Michael; Basile, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a traditional lecture-based curriculum versus a modified "flipped classroom" curriculum of cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology delivered to first-year graduate students. Students in both courses were provided the same notes and recorded lectures. Students in the…

  6. Research and Assessment of Learning Environments through Photoelicitation: Graduate Student Perceptions of Electronics Manufacturing in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Catherine G. P.; Cox, Monica F.

    2015-01-01

    This research studies the positive and negative perceptions of graduate students from the United States studying issues of sustainable electronics and electronics manufacturing in India as part of a National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) curriculum. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the…

  7. Graduate forensic nursing education: how to better educate nurses to care for this patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Nurses are often the first healthcare contact for those affected by violence. Despite the impact of violence on healthcare across specialties and ages, forensic nursing content is limited in undergraduate and graduate curricula. The purpose of this article is to provide background on forensic nursing and present a model of a graduate forensic nursing program that can be used as a curriculum guide.

  8. Contemporary Management and Operations Research Graduate Programs: A Review, Recommendations, and Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Joseph A.; Polak, George G.; Scherer, Robert F.; Munoz, Carmen Gloria

    2001-01-01

    Criticisms of graduate management education have led to changes in the balance between business and academic standards, strategic leadership, curriculum, faculty performance incentives, graduate proficiencies, and relations with the business community. Operations management/management sciences have similarly changed in terms of curricular…

  9. Anesthesia Nursing: A Collaborative Model for Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamings, Patricia A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe development of a collaborative graduate concentration in anesthesia nursing involving North Carolina Baptist Hospital and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Project components included (1) developing a cohesive faculty work group, (2) developing the curriculum, and (3) combining resources through an administrative…

  10. 253 Education and the Paradox of Graduate Unemployment: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... The paper is an assessment of education, graduate unemployment and the ... acknowledged as a legitimized vehicle for self and societal advancement. The ... curriculum and pedagogical reforms, upgrading existing facilities to match ... It is against this background that the paper examines the issue of.

  11. The Communicative Ability of Universiti Teknologi MARA Sarawak's Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sharifah Zakiah Wan; Hakim, Simon Faizal; Rahim, Mahdalela; Noyem, John Francis; Ibrahim, Sueb; Ahmad, Johnny; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    This study explores Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Sarawak graduating students' oral proficiency, focusing on grammatical accuracy. Oral proficiency in English has always been the benchmark of language proficiency, and in the context of UiTM's language teaching curriculum, efforts to enhance students' oral proficiency are implemented through…

  12. Avaliação de necessidades para um currículo de otorrinolaringologia na graduação Evaluation of the necessities for an otolaryngology curriculum in the graduation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Gomes Patrocínio

    have been performed about teaching and curricular change. Aim: For such, we aimed to assess the needs for an undergraduate ENT curriculum, in the vision of otolaryngologists and general physicians. Study design: clinical. Material and method: Questionnaires were applied to two groups: Group 1 - otolaryngologists; Group 2 - general physicians. The questionnaire contained a list of 88 areas of knowledge and 65 of skills in ENT. Result: The interviewees evaluated each area in accordance with a scale of relevance for the undergraduate curriculum, being 4 indispensable, 3 important, 2 useful for few general physicians, 1 interesting, but unnecessary its inclusion, and 0 dispensable. Based on this score system, the average was calculated for each area. Areas of knowledge as tonsillitis, otitis, allergic rhinitis, epistaxis, sinusitis and pharyngitis received the highest scores. The otolaryngologists prioritized complications of otitis and sinusitis. In the areas of skills, the topics with highest scores were: history taking; otoscopy; physical examination of ENT; cranial nerves examination; anterior nasal packing. The general physicians prioritized removal of foreign body from ear and nose and cleaning cerumen from ear canal. Conclusion: This study showed data that may subsidize medical educators when reformulating undergraduate ENT curriculum.

  13. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  14. Preparing Graduate Students as Science Communicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, K.; Gutstein, J.

    2012-12-01

    Our presentation introduces our interdisciplinary curriculum that teaches graduate students at our R-1 university to translate their research to general audiences. We also discuss the challenges we have faced and strategies we have employed to broaden graduate education at our campus to include preparation in science communication. Our "Translating Research beyond Academia" curriculum consists of three separate thematically based courses taught over the academic year: Education and Community Outreach, Science Communication and Writing, Communicating with Policy- and Decision-makers. Course goals are to provide professional development training so that graduate students become more capable professionals prepared for careers inside and outside academia while increasing the public understanding of science and technology. Open to graduate students of any discipline, each course meets weekly for two hours; students receive academic credit through a co-sponsoring graduate program. Students learn effective strategies for communicating research and academic knowledge with the media, the general public, youth, stakeholders, and decision- and policy-makers. Courses combine presentations from university and regional experts with hands-on work sessions aimed towards creating effective communications, outreach and policy plans, broader impacts statements, press releases, blogs, and policy briefs. A final presentation and reflections are required. Students may opt for further training through seminars tailored to student need. Initial results of our analyses of student evaluations and work indicate that students appreciate the interdisciplinary, problem-based approach and the low-risk opportunities for learning professional development skills and for exploring non-academic employment. Several students have initiated engaged work in their disciplines, and several have secured employment in campus science communication positions. Two have changed career plans as a direct result of

  15. Bridging Innovation and Curriculum in Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Fenzhi; Kolmos, Anette; Du, Xiangyun

    2010-01-01

    As innovation is seen as a key factor in economic competitiveness, graduates who can contribute to and participate in innovation are in great need.. Higher education is confronted with the demands that the curriculum practice and learning environments should facilitate innovation and competences...... for innovation. Problem and project based learning has been seen as a strategy for renewing the teaching practice and the learning environment by integrating the competence demands of the curriculum and of work life during the process of education. However, the integrations of innovation into curriculum...... are minor in the problem and project based learning (PBL) literature. Based on theoretical reflections and practical cases in Aalborg University (Denmark), this article presents the basis of PBL knowledge and curriculum conceptualization, and explores a case experience which bridges innovation and PBL...

  16. Undergraduate and graduate petroleum engineering education in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Gonten, W.D.; Whiting, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Petroleum Engineering educational programs produce graduates primarily for the upstream sector of the petroleum industry. This paper presents a summary of both the undergraduate and graduate petroleum engineering programs in the United States. The undergraduate portion of the paper will address the curriculum, accreditation, enrollments, student recruitment, faculty, jobs, starting salaries, and a historical perspective. The graduate section will address both master and doctoral level programs including the number and size of programs, curriculum, admission requirements, program administration, jobs, salaries, and a historical perspective

  17. European veterinary public health specialization: post-graduate training and expectations of potential employers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Silvia; Dürr, Salome; Fahrion, Anna; Harisberger, Myriam; Papadopoulou, Christina; Zimmerli, Urs

    2013-01-01

    Residents of the European College of Veterinary Public Health (ECVPH) carried out a survey to explore the expectations and needs of potential employers of ECVPH diplomates and to assess the extent to which the ECVPH post-graduate training program meets those requirements. An online questionnaire was sent to 707 individuals working for universities, government organizations, and private companies active in the field of public health in 16 countries. Details on the structure and activities of the participants' organizations, their current knowledge of the ECVPH, and potential interest in employing veterinary public health (VPH) experts or hosting internships were collected. Participants were requested to rate 22 relevant competencies according to their importance for VPH professionals exiting the ECVPH training. A total of 138 completed questionnaires were included in the analysis. While generic skills such as "problem solving" and "broad horizon and inter-/multidisciplinary thinking" were consistently given high grades by all participants, the importance ascribed to more specialized skills was less homogeneous. The current ECVPH training more closely complies with the profile sought in academia, which may partly explain the lower employment rate of residents and diplomates within government and industry sectors. The study revealed a lack of awareness of the ECVPH among public health institutions and demonstrated the need for greater promotion of this veterinary specialization within Europe, both in terms of its training capacity and the professional skill-set of its diplomates. This study provides input for a critical revision of the ECVPH curriculum and the design of post-graduate training programs in VPH.

  18. Integration of Cognitive Skills as a Cross-Cutting Theme Into the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum at Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Soltani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, improvement of thinking skills of students is one of the universally supported aims in the majority of medical schools. This study aims to design longitudinal theme of reasoning, problem-solving and decision-making into the undergraduate medical curriculum at Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS. A participatory approach was applied to design the curriculum during 2009-2011. The project was conducted by the contribution of representatives of both basic and clinical faculty members, students and graduates at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The first step toward integrating cognitive skills into the curriculum was to assemble a taskforce of different faculty and students, including a wide variety of fields with multidisciplinary expertise using nonprobability sampling and the snowball method. Several meetings with the contribution of experts and some medical students were held to generate the draft of expected outcomes. Subsequently, the taskforce also determined what content would fit best into each phase of the program and what teaching and assessment methods would be more appropriate for each outcome. After a pilot curriculum with a small group of second-year medical students, we implemented this program for all first-year students since 2011 at TUMS. Based on findings, the teaching of four areas, including scientific and critical thinking skills (Basic sciences, problem-solving and reasoning (Pathophysiology, evidence-based medicine (Clerkship, and clinical decision-making (Internship were considered in the form of a longitudinal theme. The results of this study could be utilized as a useful pattern for integration of psycho-social subjects into the medical curriculum.

  19. Neuroscience and humanistic psychiatry: a residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James L

    2014-04-01

    Psychiatry residencies with a commitment to humanism commonly prioritize training in psychotherapy, cultural psychiatry, mental health policy, promotion of human rights, and similar areas reliant upon dialogue and collaborative therapeutic relationships. The advent of neuroscience as a defining paradigm for psychiatry has challenged residencies with a humanistic focus due to common perceptions that it would entail constriction of psychiatric practice to diagnostic and psychopharmacology roles. The author describes a neuroscience curriculum that has taught psychopharmacology effectively, while also advancing effectiveness of language-based and relationship-based therapeutics. In 2000, the George Washington University psychiatry residency initiated a neuroscience curriculum consisting of (1) a foundational postgraduate year 2 seminar teaching cognitive and social neuroscience and its integration into clinical psychopharmacology, (2) advanced seminars that utilized a neuroscience perspective in teaching specific psychotherapeutic skill sets, and (3) case-based teaching in outpatient clinical supervisions that incorporated a neuroscience perspective into traditional psychotherapy supervisions. Curricular assessment was conducted by (1) RRC reaccreditation site visit feedback, (2) examining career trajectories of residency graduates, (3) comparing PRITE exam Somatic Treatments subscale scores for 2010-2012 residents with pre-implementation residents, and (4) postresidency survey assessment by 2010-2012 graduates. The 2011 RRC site visit report recommended a "notable practice" citation for "innovative neurosciences curriculum." Three of twenty 2010-2012 graduates entered neuroscience research fellowships, as compared to none before the new curriculum. PRITE Somatic Treatments subscale scores improved from the 23rd percentile to the 62nd percentile in pre- to post-implementation of curriculum (p neuroscience curriculum for a residency committed to humanistic psychiatry

  20. DO STUDENTS PREFER RESEARCH AS A CURRICULUM IN MBBS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantaraman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Biomedical research has very little representation in the graduate curriculum in India. Research and academic education operate in tandem and enhance critical appraisal skills of the students and orients them to evidence based medical practice in the years of their profession. It has been reported that students in medical schools report mixed interest in undertaking research during the study period. MATERIALS & METHODS This institute implements a short term student Research Program as a systemic annual curricular engagement. A questionnaire based assessment of the awareness, knowledge and attitude of MBBS students about research as a curricular activity was performed. RESULTS & CONCLUSION The responses of the medical students were tabulated and statistically analysed. Of the 347 respondents, 70.32% were aware that medical research was possible during the graduate course period in the medical school, in the current medical curriculum and 87.6% opined that research as a compulsory part of graduate medical curriculum was welcome.

  1. Communication in multidisciplinary systems architecting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Systems architecting is multidisciplinary by nature. It is interesting to note that the methods and tools that are developed and presented in literature are mostly based on one or a very limited number of formalisms. This means that an often large part of the stakeholders involved in the

  2. Multidisciplinary Efforts Driving Translational Theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tony Y.

    2014-01-01

    This themed issue summarizes significant efforts aimed at using “biological language” to discern between “friends” and “foes” in the context of theranostics for true clinical application. It is expected that the success of theranostics depends on multidisciplinary efforts, combined to expedite our understanding of host responses to “customized” theranostic agents and formulating individualized therapies. PMID:25285169

  3. Prescribing tests must have curriculum support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemon TI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rupali D Shah, Thomas I LemonSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, WalesGordon, Catchpole and Baker1 have discussed and investigated a very interesting, currently relevant, subject in medical education; particularly with the introduction of the prescribing test for undergraduates trialled in the UK this year and set to become a fully-fledged part of the curriculum and assessment criteria for 2014 graduates.2 It would of course be of great interest to compare the themes discussed in this paper and see they how would compare to recent graduates in late 2014.View original paper by Gordon and colleagues.

  4. Continued multidisciplinary project-based learning - implementation in health informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, C; Spreckelsen, C

    2009-01-01

    Problem- and project-based learning are approved methods to train students, graduates and post-graduates in scientific and other professional skills. The students are trained on realistic scenarios in a broader context. For students specializing in health informatics we introduced continued multidisciplinary project-based learning (CM-PBL) at a department of medical informatics. The training approach addresses both students of medicine and students of computer science. The students are full members of an ongoing research project and develop a project-related application or module, or explore or evaluate a sub-project. Two teachers guide and review the students' work. The training on scientific work follows a workflow with defined milestones. The team acts as peer group. By participating in the research team's work the students are trained on professional skills. A research project on a web-based information system on hospitals built the scenario for the realistic context. The research team consisted of up to 14 active members at a time, who were scientists and students of computer science and medicine. The well communicated educational approach and team policy fostered the participation of the students. Formative assessment and evaluation showed a considerable improvement of the students' skills and a high participant satisfaction. Alternative education approaches such as project-based learning empower students to acquire scientific knowledge and professional skills, especially the ability of life-long learning, multidisciplinary team work and social responsibility.

  5. Case Study: Incorporating International Themes into the Business Curriculum at Missouri Southern State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzard, Janet; Block, Beverly

    2007-01-01

    Higher education is charged with preparing graduates to be successful in an international society. This paper will examine Missouri Southern State University's approach to internationalizing their campus and curriculum.

  6. Digestive oncologist in the gastroenterology training curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Chris Jacob Johan; Peeters, Marc; Cats, Annemieke; Dahele, Anna; Droste, Jochim Terhaar sive

    2011-01-01

    Until the late 1980s, gastroenterology (GE) was considered a subspecialty of Internal Medicine. Today, GE also incorporates Hepatology. However, Digestive Oncology training is poorly defined in the Hepatogastroenterology (HGE)-curriculum. Therefore, a Digestive Oncology curriculum should be developed and this document might be a starting point for such a curriculum. HGE-specialists are increasingly resisting the paradigm in which they play only a diagnostic and technical role in the management of digestive tumors. We suggest minimum end-points in the standard HGE-curriculum for oncology, and recommend a focus year in the Netherlands for Digestive Oncology in the HGE-curriculum. To produce well-trained digestive oncologists, an advanced Digestive Oncology training program with specific qualifications in Digestive Oncology (2 years) has been developed. The schedule in Belgium includes a period of at least 6 mo to be spent in a medical oncology department. The goal of these programs remains the production of well-trained digestive oncologists. HGE specialists are part of the multidisciplinary oncological teams, and some have been administering chemotherapy in their countries for years. In this article, we provide a road map for the organization of a proper training in Digestive Oncology. We hope that the World Gastroenterology Organisation and other (inter)national societies will support the necessary certifications for this specific training in the HGE-curriculum. PMID:21556128

  7. Marine Education in a Land-Based Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrazo, Gerry M., Jr.; Hounshell, Paul B.

    1980-01-01

    Develops a rationale for integrating oceanography and marine education in land-oriented curriculum at the secondary level. Examples of topics with a multidisciplinary approach are described in the areas of acoustics and music, aquaria, archeology, art, astronomy, literature, careers, ecology, gastronomy, geology, and topics on various aquatic…

  8. Curriculum Integration Using Enterprise Resource Planning: An Integrative Case Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, David M.; Klein, Helen A; Koste, Lori L.; Magal, Simha R.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts to achieve greater curriculum integration in schools of business have included team teaching, student group projects, multidisciplinary cases, and, more recently, the use of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Although these approaches are beneficial, they tend to be implemented on an ad hoc basis rather than through curriculum…

  9. Training Multidisciplinary Scholars in Science Policy for Careers in Academia, Private Sector, and Public Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Regardless of a graduate student's ultimate career ambitions, it is becoming increasingly important to either develop skills to successfully transition into non-academic careers or to be able to understand the societal benefits of basic and applied research programs. In this talk I will provide my prospective -- from working in academia, the Federal government, and as an independent consultant -- about the training that we need for graduate students to navigate the jungle gym of career opportunities available (or not available) after they graduate. In particular, I will speak to the need for science policy training, in which scientific and coordination skills are put to use to help support societal decisions. I will assert that, to effectively train graduate students, it is necessary to provide experiences in multidisciplinary, policy-relevant scholarship to build marketable skills critical for a student's professional development.

  10. Medical Education and Curriculum Reform: Putting Reform Proposals in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kam Yin Chan, MD, MB.BS, MHA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to elaborate criteria by which the principles of curriculum reform can be judged. To this end, the paper presents an overview of standard critiques of medical education and examines the ways medical curriculum reforms have responded to these critiques. The paper then sets out our assessment of these curriculum reforms along three parameters: pedagogy, educational context, and knowledge status. Following on from this evaluation of recent curriculum reforms, the paper puts forward four criteria with which to gauge the adequacy medical curriculum reform. These criteria enable us to question the extent to which new curricula incorporate methods and approaches for ensuring that its substance: overcomes the traditional opposition between clinical and resource dimensions of care; emphasizes that the clinical work needs to be systematized in so far as that it feasible; promotes multi-disciplinary team work, and balances clinical autonomy with accountability to non-clinical stakeholders.

  11. [Creating an integrated nursing curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, R A; Papa, L M; Lopes, G T

    1997-01-01

    During the last two decades, Brazilian society has gone through great changes into political, ideological and economical fields. These changes left their strings into society, specially in population health. The nurse formation based on the Law n(o) 5540/68 and on the Statement n(o) 163/72, no more meets population demands. Since 1992, the Nursing Faculty of UERJ-FEUerj intensifies the reflection movement upon teaching-learning process searching for transforming its own reality. The making of this project presents two complementary and important reasons: FEUerj docents and discents' desire in elaborating a curriculum which searches for nurses' formation that articulates teaching-work-community, theory and practice, based on a Critical Theory of Education, on the line of PROBLEMATIZATION, and the accomplishment of Statement n(o) 314/94 from the CFE and from the Letter of Order MEC n(o) 1171/15/dez/94. From debating, the professional profile has been defined from the social environment where the profession is performed and the alumnate's characteristics; area determination or group of attributions, according to professional praxis adequation, concept hierachization, processes, etc., which in the process of 'classification and syntheses' of knowledge results into a netlike chained and related tree. In the first phase of the curriculum study, it has diagnosed as principal condition, the actual curriculum 'DECONTEXTUALIZATION' and the 'US' to be faced to lead it to an end the Curriculum Reformulation Proposal. The Process of Pedagogical Abilitation for professors, workshops, researches on the desirable and present profile, seminars, performance, abilities and principles systematization, identification of areas which compose the integrated curriculum, subjects localization into areas and articulation between professional subjects and other activities, has been implemented. Based on this work on the problematized pedagogy first step, an instrument 'Research on the

  12. Envisioning Curriculum as Six Simultaneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Hanin; Conner, Lindsey; Mayo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the discourse of complexity thinking to envision curriculum as six partial and coupled facets that exist simultaneously: curriculum as structure, curriculum as process, curriculum as content, curriculum as teaching, curriculum as learning and curriculum as activity. Such a curriculum is emergent and self-organising. It is emergent…

  13. 34 CFR 303.17 - Multidisciplinary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Multidisciplinary. 303.17 Section 303.17 Education... DISABILITIES General Purpose, Eligibility, and Other General Provisions § 303.17 Multidisciplinary. As used in this part, multidisciplinary means the involvement of two or more disciplines or professions in the...

  14. Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient…

  15. Undergraduate Competences as Labour Market Mechanism for Curriculum Alignment in Ghana: Case of University of Cape Coast School of Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Owusu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing graduate unemployment rate in Ghana is a matter of concern not only to government but also to stakeholders in education. In an era of globalisation, the issue has culminated in discourses about curriculum planning and alignment. Using a concurrent mixed method, the study purposely focused on exploring graduate competences as a labour market mechanism for curriculum alignment. In this regard, 63 participants comprising alumni, Human Resource Managers and lecturers were sampled using multiple procedures. In the end, the study showed that employers’ highly ranked integrated curriculum and their responses favoured an amalgamation of education and practical training tailored to promote organisational growth. A significant difference was found between responses of lecturers and alumni regarding their preference for graduate competences as the basis for curriculum alignment. The study finally advocated, among other things, for competency-based curriculum philosophy as the underpinning variable to underlie Business Education curriculum in Ghana.

  16. Multidisciplinary teamwork and communication training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, Shad; Johnston, Lindsay C; Colacchio, Kathryn

    2011-04-01

    Every delivery is a multidisciplinary event, involving nursing, obstetricians, anesthesiologists, and pediatricians. Patients are often in labor across multiple provider shifts, necessitating numerous handoffs between teams. Each handoff provides an opportunity for errors. Although a traditional approach to improving patient outcomes has been to address individual knowledge and skills, it is now recognized that a significant number of complications result from team, rather than individual, failures. In 2004, a Sentinel Alert issued by the Joint Commission revealed that most cases of perinatal death and injury are caused by problems with an organization's culture and communication failures. It was recommended that hospitals implement teamwork training programs in an effort to improve outcomes. Instituting a multidisciplinary teamwork training program that uses simulation offers a risk-free environment to practice skills, including communication, role clarification, and mutual support. This experience should improve patient safety and outcomes, as well as enhance employee morale. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Multidisciplinary team care in rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, A.-M.; Nielsen, C.V.; Rasmussen, J.O.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically investigate current scientific evidence about the effectiveness of multidisciplinary team rehabilitation for different health problems. Data sources: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in Cochrane, Medline, DARE, Embase, and Cinahl databases, and research...... for adults, without restrictions in terms of study population or outcomes. The most recent reviews examining a study population were selected. Data extraction: Two reviewers independently extracted information about study populations, sample sizes, study designs, rehabilitation settings, the team...

  18. Mathematical modeling with multidisciplinary applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She

    2013-01-01

    Features mathematical modeling techniques and real-world processes with applications in diverse fields Mathematical Modeling with Multidisciplinary Applications details the interdisciplinary nature of mathematical modeling and numerical algorithms. The book combines a variety of applications from diverse fields to illustrate how the methods can be used to model physical processes, design new products, find solutions to challenging problems, and increase competitiveness in international markets. Written by leading scholars and international experts in the field, the

  19. The 2016 ACCP Pharmacotherapy Didactic Curriculum Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinghammer, Terry L; Crannage, Andrew J; Boyce, Eric G; Bradley, Bridget; Christensen, Alyssa; Dunnenberger, Henry M; Fravel, Michelle; Gurgle, Holly; Hammond, Drayton A; Kwon, Jennifer; Slain, Douglas; Wargo, Kurt A

    2016-11-01

    The 2016 American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Educational Affairs Committee was charged with updating and contemporizing ACCP's 2009 Pharmacotherapy Didactic Curriculum Toolkit. The toolkit has been designed to guide schools and colleges of pharmacy in developing, maintaining, and modifying their curricula. The 2016 committee reviewed the recent medical literature and other documents to identify disease states that are responsive to drug therapy. Diseases and content topics were organized by organ system, when feasible, and grouped into tiers as defined by practice competency. Tier 1 topics should be taught in a manner that prepares all students to provide collaborative, patient-centered care upon graduation and licensure. Tier 2 topics are generally taught in the professional curriculum, but students may require additional knowledge or skills after graduation (e.g., residency training) to achieve competency in providing direct patient care. Tier 3 topics may not be taught in the professional curriculum; thus, graduates will be required to obtain the necessary knowledge and skills on their own to provide direct patient care, if required in their practice. The 2016 toolkit contains 276 diseases and content topics, of which 87 (32%) are categorized as tier 1, 133 (48%) as tier 2, and 56 (20%) as tier 3. The large number of tier 1 topics will require schools and colleges to use creative pedagogical strategies to achieve the necessary practice competencies. Almost half of the topics (48%) are tier 2, highlighting the importance of postgraduate residency training or equivalent practice experience to competently care for patients with these disorders. The Pharmacotherapy Didactic Curriculum Toolkit will continue to be updated to provide guidance to faculty at schools and colleges of pharmacy as these academic pharmacy institutions regularly evaluate and modify their curricula to keep abreast of scientific advances and associated practice changes. Access the

  20. Expectations of Graduate Communication Skills in Professional Veterinary Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, Sarah; Hinchcliff, Kenneth; Mansell, Peter; Baik, Chi

    Good communication skills are an important entry-level attribute of graduates of professional degrees. The inclusion of communication training within the curriculum can be problematic, particularly in programs with a high content load, such as veterinary science. This study examined the differences between the perceptions of students and qualified veterinarians with regards to the entry-level communication skills required of new graduates in clinical practice. Surveys were distributed to students in each of the four year levels of the veterinary science degree at the University of Melbourne and to recent graduates and experienced veterinarians registered in Victoria, Australia. Respondents were asked to rank the relative importance of six different skill sets: knowledge base; medical and technical skills; surgical skills; verbal communication and interpersonal skills; written communication skills; and critical thinking and problem solving. They were then asked to rate the importance of specific communication skills for new graduate veterinarians. Veterinarians and students ranked verbal communication and interpersonal skills as the most important skill set for an entry-level veterinarian. Veterinarians considered many new graduates to be deficient in these skills. Students often felt they lacked confidence in this area. This has important implications for veterinary educators in terms of managing the expectations of students and improving the delivery of communication skills courses within the veterinary curriculum.

  1. Competencies of Career-Entry Medical Technology Graduates of Lyceum of Batangas: Basis for Enhancement of the Internship Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Anacleta P.

    2010-01-01

    The role of medical technologists in the years due to changes in the laboratory environment. curriculum is needed to prepare graduates for changes in laboratory medicine. It is the ultimate goal of the College to prepare students for career entry positions as medical technology professionals. The curriculum should be designed to prepare the…

  2. Developing a new industrial engineering curriculum using a systems engineering approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyurgan, Nebil; Kiassat, Corey

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports on the development of an engineering curriculum for a new industrial engineering programme at a medium-sized private university in the northeast United States. A systems engineering process has been followed to design and develop the new curriculum. Considering the programme curriculum as a system, first the stakeholders have been identified, and some preliminary analysis on their needs and requirements has been conducted. Following that, the phases of conceptual design, preliminary design, and detailed design have been pursued during which different levels of validation, assessment, and evaluation processes have been utilised. In addition, a curriculum assessment and continuous improvement process have been developed to assess the curriculum and the courses frequently. The resulting curriculum is flexible, allowing the pursuit of accelerated graduate programmes, a second major, various minor options, and study-abroad; relevant, tailored to the needs of industry partners in the vicinity; and practical, providing hands-on education, resulting in employment-ready graduates.

  3. Educational strategies for architectural design management : the design of a new curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.; Halman, J.I.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is about the design of a new curriculum on Architectural Design Management Systems. This curriculum is embedded in the Stan Ackermans lnstitute(SAI). The SAI is a school for continuing post graduate education on technological design. First some recent developments in the building industry

  4. Are Expectations Alone Enough? Estimating the Effect of a Mandatory College-Prep Curriculum in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Brian; Dynarski, Susan; Frank, Kenneth; Schneider, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the impacts of the Michigan Merit Curriculum (MMC), a statewide college-preparatory curriculum that applies to the high school graduating class of 2011 and later. Our analyses suggest that the higher expectations embodied in the MMC had slight impact on student outcomes. Looking at student performance in the ACT, the only…

  5. Ethics Instruction in Library and Information Science: The Role of "Ethics across the Curriculum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bernie Todd

    2010-01-01

    Ethics is an important element of most graduate professional training programs. In the field of Library and Information Science (LIS) the inclusion of ethics in the curriculum is supported by a position paper by library educators and is monitored in the accreditation of graduate programs. Despite the many LIS programs which claim to integrate…

  6. Calculating graduation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, Patricia L; Love, Karen; McPherson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the focus has been on increasing the number of registered nurse (RN) graduates. Numerous states have initiated programs to increase the number and quality of students entering nursing programs, and to expand the capacity of their programs to enroll additional qualified students. However, little attention has been focused on an equally, if not more, effective method for increasing the number of RNs produced-increasing the graduation rate of students enrolling. This article describes a project that undertook the task of compiling graduation data for 15 entry-level programs, standardizing terms and calculations for compiling the data, and producing a regional report on graduation rates of RN students overall and by type of program. Methodology is outlined in this article. This effort produced results that were surprising to program deans and directors and is expected to produce greater collaborative efforts to improve these rates both locally and statewide.

  7. The Siemens graduate program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffler, I.

    2000-01-01

    Siemens is an international company acting in different domains: power generation, communication and information, traffic, health, etc. To be more flexible and active in a world in constant evolution, the company proposes a graduate program where young people with a special background have the possibility to start an international career in all the domains of activity. This graduate program is especially important in the domain of nuclear energy, where the know-how transfer between the previous generation and the new one is a constant point of interest. This article presents the conditions to be accepted in this graduate program, and the supplementary training supporting this program. The Siemens graduate program (Sg) proposes a global concept with a main emphasis being international. (authors)

  8. Credentialism among Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodt, Martha McGinty; Thielens, Wagner, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An exploratory study of students entering four elite fields found that most sought both credentials and competence. Stiff competition within chosen occupations led the majority of students to seek every advantage that graduate education could provide. (Author/MLW)

  9. Meet Your Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Karen L.

    1989-01-01

    Presents five vocational graduates who have become successful entrepreneurs. Their businesses include an ice cream parlor, an investment service, a dog grooming business, microcomputer program manufacturing, and high-fashion clothing and cosmetics for problem skin. (JOW)

  10. TA Professional Development: A Graduate Student's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Munoz, Emily

    Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are essential for teaching large introductory physics classes. In such courses, undergraduates spend approximately half of their in-class contact time in instructional environments (e.g., labs and recitations) supervised by GTAs, which means GTAs can have a large impact on student learning. Therefore it is crucial to adequately prepare GTAs before they first enter the classroom, and to offer them continued support throughout. Since many of the skills required to become effective teachers will also be relevant to their future research careers, it is useful for a GTA preparation program to also include professional development strategies. But what exactly do GTAs get out of these programs? The School of Physics at Georgia Tech runs a preparation and mentoring program for GTAs that focuses on pedagogical knowledge, physics content, and professional development, as well as their intersections. Nearly seventy graduate students have gone through this program in the three years since it was established. Here we discuss the impact this program has had on our GTAs, from their own point of view: the program's effect on their teaching abilities, how it has influenced their attitudes towards teaching, what elements they have found useful, and what changes they have suggested to its curriculum. We find that, in general, GTAs are more receptive when the curriculum is more hands-on and they are presented with frequent opportunities for practice and feedback.

  11. Mutual Workshops enhancing Curriculum Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard Jensen, Lotte; Markvorsen, Steen; Almegaard, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    . A course in material science was moved from the fourth to the first semester so that the project could be informed by material science. A new course in geometry was prepared and software that could facilitate an integrated design project was introduced (STAAD Pro). The ‘full package’ of the new third....... Every semester has a teaching team consisting of all the teachers for courses in that semester. Each semester also has its own theme and a multidisciplinary, joint project. So the most active members of the teaching team, of course, are those responsible for courses that address the theme and contribute...... to the joint project. The theme of the third semester is ‘structural design’. Structural design is defined as an integration of material science, statics and geometry in relation to an architectural project. Anticipating the implementation of CDIO and this theme, major changes were made to the curriculum...

  12. How Multidisciplinary Are the Multidisciplinary Journals Science and Nature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gregg E A; Carley, Stephen; Porter, Alan L

    2016-01-01

    Interest in cross-disciplinary research knowledge interchange runs high. Review processes at funding agencies, such as the U.S. National Science Foundation, consider plans to disseminate research across disciplinary bounds. Publication in the leading multidisciplinary journals, Nature and Science, may signify the epitome of successful interdisciplinary integration of research knowledge and cross-disciplinary dissemination of findings. But how interdisciplinary are they? The journals are multidisciplinary, but do the individual articles themselves draw upon multiple fields of knowledge and does their influence span disciplines? This research compares articles in three fields (Cell Biology, Physical Chemistry, and Cognitive Science) published in a leading disciplinary journal in each field to those published in Nature and Science. We find comparable degrees of interdisciplinary integration and only modest differences in cross-disciplinary diffusion. That said, though the rate of out-of-field diffusion might be comparable, the sheer reach of Nature and Science, indicated by their potent Journal Impact Factors, means that the diffusion of knowledge therein can far exceed that of leading disciplinary journals in some fields (such as Physical Chemistry and Cognitive Science in our samples).

  13. How Multidisciplinary Are the Multidisciplinary Journals Science and Nature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gregg E. A.; Carley, Stephen; Porter, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in cross-disciplinary research knowledge interchange runs high. Review processes at funding agencies, such as the U.S. National Science Foundation, consider plans to disseminate research across disciplinary bounds. Publication in the leading multidisciplinary journals, Nature and Science, may signify the epitome of successful interdisciplinary integration of research knowledge and cross-disciplinary dissemination of findings. But how interdisciplinary are they? The journals are multidisciplinary, but do the individual articles themselves draw upon multiple fields of knowledge and does their influence span disciplines? This research compares articles in three fields (Cell Biology, Physical Chemistry, and Cognitive Science) published in a leading disciplinary journal in each field to those published in Nature and Science. We find comparable degrees of interdisciplinary integration and only modest differences in cross-disciplinary diffusion. That said, though the rate of out-of-field diffusion might be comparable, the sheer reach of Nature and Science, indicated by their potent Journal Impact Factors, means that the diffusion of knowledge therein can far exceed that of leading disciplinary journals in some fields (such as Physical Chemistry and Cognitive Science in our samples). PMID:27043924

  14. Are doctor of pharmacy curricula in developing countries adequate to train graduates to provide pharmaceutical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Peraman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD program is a new dimension of pharmacy education in developing countries. The PharmD graduates are expected to participate in patient health care by providing pharmaceutical care. The graduates should have enough necessary clinical knowledge, competitiveness and skills in community, hospital and clinical pharmacy related services. There is a need of curriculum that fit into the program outcome that helps to attain graduate competency. Programs in India, Pakistan, Iran and Nepal were reviewed based on the available literature. Even though it is evident that the PharmD curriculum in developing countries has made an attempt to provide patient-oriented approach for pharmacists, the existing curriculum, training and orientation have several pitfalls. It needs assessment, evaluation and improvement.

  15. Evaluating the philosophical foundation of 2013 Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mardiana

    2017-12-01

    Curriculum had been in accordance to experiences, (d the philosophical foundation of 2013 Curriculum had been in accordance to other religions, (e the Graduates Competence Standards for the Senior High School students in the 2013 Curriculum had been too high and the learning method of 2013 Curriculum for the Elementary School students had been too high and (f 2013 Curriculum had simple paradigm and it might be attended by the learning participants easily but such paradigm still demanded teachers’ creativity within the learning process implementation.

  16. Learning Multidisciplinary Collaboration with Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the design of a game-based learning process for developing communication in public organisations. The game-design presented here emphasises those parts of public organisations that tend to employ multidisciplinary teams for solving wicked problems. As such teams employ...... members from different, professional backgrounds, the game Public Professional sought to develop new understandings among team members and across professions. The purpose of this game was to facilitate an understanding among team members and across professions, a game-based learning process named Public...... from the game’s core mechanics....

  17. Engineering the curriculum: Towards an adaptive curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns-Boast, Lynette Frances

    The curriculum is one of the most important artefacts produced by higher education institutions, yet it is one of the least studied. Additionally, little is known about the decision-making of academics when designing and developing their curricula, nor how they make use of them. This research investigates how 22 Australian higher education engineering, software engineering, computer science, and information systems academics conceive of curriculum, what approaches they take when designing, and developing course and program curricula, and what use they make of the curriculum. It also considers the implications of these conceptions and behaviour upon their curricula. Data were collected through a series of one-to-one, in-depth, qualitative interviews as well as small focus group sessions and were analysed following Charmaz’ (2006) approach to grounded theory. In this thesis, I argue that the development of curricula for new higher degree programs and courses and / or the updating and innovating of an existing curriculum is a design problem. I also argue that curriculum is a complex adaptive system. Surrounding the design and development of a curriculum is a process of design that leads to the creation of a designed object - the official-curriculum. The official-curriculum provides the guiding principles for its implementation, which involves the design and development of the curriculum-in-use, its delivery, and evaluation. Data show that while the participants conceive of curriculum as a problem of design involving a design process leading to the development of the official-curriculum, surprisingly, their behaviour does not match their conceptions. Over a very short period, their behaviour leads to a process I have called curriculum drift where the official-curriculum and the curriculum-in-use drift away from each other causing the curriculum to lose its integrity. Curricular integrity is characterised through the attributes of alignment, coherence, and

  18. Educational Challenges to Train Accountable Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadreza Abdolmaleki

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: social accountability, a concept which is in the focal attention more than ever, is to provide service in the field of medical sciences. We aimed to identify the educational challenges to train accountable graduates in the medical education system to meet social needs.Methods: This study was conducted by qualitative content analysis using in-depth semi-structured interviews with eleven academic members of Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences who were selected by purposeful sampling. The interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis.Results: The findings of the study consisted of 3 main themes and each one was extracted from categories, sub-categories, and codes. One of the themes was educational program which consisted of 2 categories called defects in the curriculum and inappropriate educational strategies. The second theme was management policies, including macro policies and the policies of the university. The third theme was personal factors which mostly referred to formal and informal education prior to university.Conclusions: The results of the study indicated the educational challenges to train accountable graduates in the medical education system. It seemed that although the results were obtained from Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, it had many common points with other universities. Therefore, planning and taking appropriate measures to address these challenges can find a way to train accountable graduates in the medical education system to meet social needs.Keywords: SOCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY, EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM, MEDICAL EDUCATION

  19. Evaluation of an Integrated Curriculum in Physics, Mathematics, Engineering, and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichner, Robert

    1997-04-01

    An experimental, student centered, introductory curriculum called IMPEC (for Integrated Mathematics, Physics, Engineering, and Chemistry curriculum) is in its third year of pilot-testing at NCSU. The curriculum is taught by a multidisciplinary team of professors using a combination of traditional lecturing and alternative instructional methods including cooperative learning, activity-based class sessions, and extensive use of computer modeling, simulations, and the world wide web. This talk will discuss the research basis for our design and implementation of the curriculum, the qualitative and quantitative methods we have been using to assess its effectiveness, and the educational outcomes we have noted so far.

  20. The Vanishing Native Reappears in the College Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    1991-01-01

    A review of the history of American Indian studies in the college curriculum traces the political, demographic, academic, and social changes affecting American Indian roles. The recent revival of native American studies and the emergence of graduation requirements in ethnic studies are seen as both beneficial and risky. (MSE)

  1. Curriculum Change: What Do Teachers and Students Really Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Rosemary; Frid, Sandra

    This study examined secondary teachers' and recent secondary school graduates' awareness of curriculum change in mathematics and its impact upon teaching and learning. Fifty-three secondary teachers and 54 students enrolled in first year university programs at Northern Territory University (Australia) were surveyed about their awareness and…

  2. Grant Writing Skill Building: A Business Administration Curriculum Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Dianna; Jones, Irma; Lovett, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the need for grant writing skills within various types of organizations and the resulting proposal for including grant writing within business administration curriculum at the undergraduate and/or graduate levels. An introduction precedes the results of a survey regarding current grant writing courses within AACSB schools of…

  3. Perceived Requirements of MIS Curriculum Implementation in Bilingual Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeil, Magdy M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses additional requirements associated with implementing a standard curriculum of Management Information Systems (MIS) in bilingual developing countries where both students and workplace users speak English as a second language. In such countries, MIS graduates are required to develop bilingual computer applications and to…

  4. A Two-Year Water Quality Monitoring Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Richard B.; And Others

    The Environmental Protection Agency developed this curriculum to train technicians to monitor water quality. Graduates of the program should be able to monitor municipal, industrial, and commercial discharges; test drinking water for purity; and determine quality of aquatic environments. The program includes algebra, communication skills, biology,…

  5. Team-Based Multidisciplinary Research Scholarship in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernette, P. A.; Houser, C.; Quick, C.

    2016-12-01

    The traditional approach to undergraduate research can be time-intensive for both the mentee and mentor, and can deter potential undergraduates and faculty from participating in research. The Aggie Research Leadership (ARL) and Aggie Research Scholars (ARS) programs represent a team-based, vertically-tiered, and multidisciplinary approach to research that can successfully address complex and relevant research questions. The program is structured such that faculty mentor one or more graduate students or postdocs, who, in turn, mentor teams of 2 to 8 undergraduate students. While it is the responsibility of the graduate student or postdoc to put together a team that works for their research question, undergraduate teams are encouraged to be multidisciplinary in order to leverage the experience and perspective that comes from students in different areas of study. Team leaders are encouraged to discuss their research teams with the faculty mentor regularly to address any potential issues that they might be having, but team leaders are required to meet regularly with other team leaders to discuss any issues that they might be having. Meeting with new and experienced team leaders is a valuable approach to a graduate student or postdoc developing their own set of best practices for mentoring. This experience is invaluable in their future careers, regardless of the field of study. By collaborating with students from other fields of study, no one student is required to become an expert in all topics relating to the research. Another significant advantage of the ARL/ARS programs is that complex research questions are able to be examined because teams typically continue longer than a single semester or academic year. Research teams are vertically-tiered and typically include freshman through seniors. In this way, younger students on the projects are mentored by senior students when they first arrive. Eventually, the younger students will advance through to senior students and

  6. Curriculum Analytics: Application of Social Network Analysis for Improving Strategic Curriculum Decision-Making in a Research-Intensive University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Shane; Hubball, Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides insight into the use of curriculum analytics to enhance learning-centred curricula in diverse higher education contexts. Engagement in evidence-based practice to evaluate and monitor curricula is vital to the success and sustainability of efforts to reform undergraduate and graduate programs. Emerging technology-enabled inquiry…

  7. How Do You Learn Multidisciplinary Idea?

    OpenAIRE

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2015-01-01

    The way how to learn multidisciplinary ideas has been discussed. Biomedical engineering is exemplified for a multidisciplinary field. "Biomedical Engineering" makes a multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering and others. The cross-cultural student seminars on biomedical engineering have been exemplified as the case studies. In the group fieldwork, students were divided into small groups. Each group visited the university hospital to find research topics re...

  8. Introducing DAE Systems in Undergraduate and Graduate Chemical Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandela, Ravi Kumar; Sridhar, L. N.; Rengaswamy, Raghunathan

    2010-01-01

    Models play an important role in understanding chemical engineering systems. While differential equation models are taught in standard modeling and control courses, Differential Algebraic Equation (DAE) system models are not usually introduced. These models appear naturally in several chemical engineering problems. In this paper, the introduction…

  9. Computer Forensics for Graduate Accountants: A Motivational Curriculum Design Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Grover Kearns

    2010-01-01

    Computer forensics involves the investigation of digital sources to acquire evidence that can be used in a court of law. It can also be used to identify and respond to threats to hosts and systems. Accountants use computer forensics to investigate computer crime or misuse, theft of trade secrets, theft of or destruction of intellectual property, and fraud. Education of accountants to use forensic tools is a goal of the AICPA (American Institute of Certified Public Accountants). Accounting stu...

  10. Quantitative Data Analysis--In the Graduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative research study collects numerical data that must be analyzed to help draw the study's conclusions. Teaching quantitative data analysis is not teaching number crunching, but teaching a way of critical thinking for how to analyze the data. The goal of data analysis is to reveal the underlying patterns, trends, and relationships of a…

  11. The Siemens graduate program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffler, I.

    2001-01-01

    SIEMENS is an international company acting in various domains: power generation, communication and information, traffic, health...etc. To increase flexibility and activity in a world in constant evolution, the company proposes a graduate program where young people with a special background have the possibility to start an international career in one of the different business areas. This graduate program is also very important in the domain of nuclear energy, where the know-how transfer between the previous generation and the new one is a constant point of interest. (author)

  12. Graduation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warburg, Margit

    2009-01-01

    all the characteristics of a rite of passage. The graduates wear a traditional cap with a cross as cockade emblem; this special cross is a symbol of Denmark. For graduates of non-Christian background, alternative cockade emblems are available, e.g. a Star of David or a crescent; this shows...... that the cross emblem is also perceived as a Christian symbol. Social anthropologists Sally Moore and Barbara Myerhoff have suggested a scheme of the categories of religious versus scared for analysing secular rituals where religious symbols are sometimes exhibited. The applicability of their approach...

  13. Blueprint for an Undergraduate Primary Care Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Sara B; Demasi, Monica; Farren, Erin; Frankl, Susan; Gottlieb, Barbara; Hoy, Jessica; Johnson, Amanda; Kasper, Jill; Lee, Patrick; McCarthy, Claire; Miller, Kathe; Morris, Juliana; O'Hare, Kitty; Rosales, Rachael; Simmons, Leigh; Smith, Benjamin; Treadway, Katherine; Goodell, Kristen; Ogur, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    In light of the increasing demand for primary care services and the changing scope of health care, it is important to consider how the principles of primary care are taught in medical school. While the majority of schools have increased students' exposure to primary care, they have not developed a standardized primary care curriculum for undergraduate medical education. In 2013, the authors convened a group of educators from primary care internal medicine, pediatrics, family medicine, and medicine-pediatrics, as well as five medical students to create a blueprint for a primary care curriculum that could be integrated into a longitudinal primary care experience spanning undergraduate medical education and delivered to all students regardless of their eventual career choice.The authors organized this blueprint into three domains: care management, specific areas of content expertise, and understanding the role of primary care in the health care system. Within each domain, they described specific curriculum content, including longitudinality, generalism, central responsibility for managing care, therapeutic alliance/communication, approach to acute and chronic care, wellness and prevention, mental and behavioral health, systems improvement, interprofessional training, and population health, as well as competencies that all medical students should attain by graduation.The proposed curriculum incorporates important core features of doctoring, which are often affirmed by all disciplines but owned by none. The authors argue that primary care educators are natural stewards of this curriculum content and can ensure that it complements and strengthens all aspects of undergraduate medical education.

  14. [Anorexia nervosa: a multidisciplinary approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastidas, A; Cantó, T; Font, E

    2000-06-01

    The childhood-adolescent psychiatrics field has, for various years, been confronted by a very significant increase in cases of nervous anorexia, a serious eating disorder characterized by a noticeable loss of weight. At the bottom of this situation lie complex biological, psychological and social-cultural problems, which demand an interdisciplinary approach to solve them. This article presents the predisposing factors, the initial factors, the factors which maintain this disorder...; what behaviors are considered to be normal; what the physical and psychological manifestations are; as well as what the medical evaluation carried out is ... to finalize with an explanation of the different functions to be performed by each member of a multidisciplinary team.

  15. Vocational rehabilitation: a multidisciplinary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobelet, C; Luthi, F; Al-Khodairy, A T; Chamberlain, M A

    2007-09-15

    Vocational rehabilitation is by definition a multidisciplinary intervention in a process linked to the facilitation of return to work or to the prevention of loss of the work. Clinical staff in contact with a person who has lost his job (general practitioner, specialized physician) must promote vocational rehabilitation. Medical rehabilitation for those with disabilities, whether new or old, has to be followed without delay by vocational rehabilitation. It is even better if these two intertwined processes are overlapping. They involve many professionals including physiotherapists, occupational therapists, psychologists, vocational trainers, job counsellors, teachers, case-managers, job placement agencies. Vocational rehabilitation has a financial cost, borne by many state organizations (security, social system, social affairs) as well as by employers and private insurances, which are in case of accident, concerned by this process. However, the evidence suggests that this is recouped 2- to 10-fold as suggested by the British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine.

  16. [Multidisciplinary practice guideline 'Marfan syndrome'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multi-system disorder of dominant inheritance in which the cardiovasculature, in particular the aorta, the eyes and the skeleton are affected. Diagnostic assessment and treatment of patients who are suspected of or have Marfan syndrome should preferably be done by multidisciplinary teams such as those found in specialised Marfan syndrome centres. The practice guideline is intended for all care givers involved with the recognition, diagnosis, consultations and the medicinal and surgical treatment of Marfan patients; it includes referral criteria and information on the referral process. A diagnosis of Marfan syndrome is based on international criteria in which aortic root dilatation and dissection, ectopia lentis, an affected first-degree family member and a pathogenic FBN1 mutation are the cardinal features. Alternative diagnoses are also included in the practice guideline. Recommendations are given for the monitoring and treatment of Marfan patients during pregnancy and delivery. Advice on lifestyle is mainly focussed on sports activities.

  17. [Multidisciplinary treatment of orofacial pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, J W; Haumann, J; van Kleef, M

    2016-11-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of orofacial pain can be complex. The differential diagnosis is very extensive. Therefore, multidisciplinary diagnosis and treatment are often indicated. The diagnosis of chronic pain also entails the investigation of psychological factors. This is because psychological problems can play a role in the chronification of pain, but they can also be a consequence of chronic pain. Patients with persistent orofacial complaints should be seen by a medical team consisting of an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, a neurologist, an anaesthesiologist/pain specialist, a dentist-gnathologist, an orofacial physical therapist, and a psychologist or psychiatrist specialising in orofacial pain. Treatment options should be discussed, taking into account literature concerning their effectiveness. The general conclusion is that much research remains to be done into the causes of, and treatments for, orofacial pain.

  18. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jacob HG Grand¹, Sienna Caspar², Stuart WS MacDonald11Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada; 2Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1 Alzheimer’s disease; 2 vascular dementias; 3 frontotemporal dementias; and 4 dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of

  19. Multidisciplinary approach to carotid stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, C S; Chambers, B R; Clark, D J; Molan, M; Brooks, M; Roberts, N; Fell, G; Roberts, A K; New, G; Donnan, G A

    2011-11-01

    Stroke neurologists, vascular surgeons, interventional neuroradiologists and interventional cardiologists have embraced carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) because of potential advantages over carotid endarterectomy (CEA). At Austin Health, a multidisciplinary neuro-interventional group was formed to standardise indications and facilitate training. The aims of this study were to describe our organisational model and to determine whether 30-day complications and early outcomes were similar to those of major trials. A clinical protocol was developed to ensure optimal management. CAS was performed on patients with high medical risk for CEA, with technically difficult anatomy for CEA, or who were randomised to CAS in a trial. From October 2003 to May 2008, 47 patients (34 male, mean age 71.5) underwent CAS of 50 carotid arteries. Forty-three cases had ipsilateral carotid territory symptoms within the previous 12 months. The main indications for CAS were high risk for CEA (n= 17) and randomised to CAS (n= 21). Interventionists were proctored in 27 cases. The procedural success rate was 94% with two cases abandoned because of anatomical problems and one because of on-table angina. Hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy occurred in 12 cases (24%). The duration of follow up was one to 44 months (mean 6.8 months). The 30-day rate of peri-procedural stroke or death was 6% and the one-year rate of peri-procedural stroke or death or subsequent ipsilateral stroke was 10.6%. Restenosis occurred in 13% (all asymptomatic). A multidisciplinary approach is a useful strategy for initiating and sustaining a CAS programme. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  20. Counseling Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, Richard B.

    1995-01-01

    Explores how the understanding of graduate students' special needs and circumstances enhances counseling of this population. Looks at stress factors, educational preparation, delayed gratification, achieving autonomy, intellectual development, and the counseling process. Emphasizes the importance of establishing trust in the therapeutic dialog so…

  1. Hospital-based, Multidisciplinary, youth mentoring and medical exposure program positively influences and reinforces health care career choice: "The Reach One Each One Program early Experience".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Omar K; Lokko, Carl; Mobley, Felicia; Dansby, Montreka; Maze, Michael; Bradley, Brene'; Williams, Elizabeth; Matthews, Leslie Ray; Harrington, Emma; Mack, Lisa; Clark, Clarence; Wilson, Ken; Beech, Derrick; Heron, Sheryl; Childs, Ed

    2017-04-01

    According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, underrepresented minorities (URMs) are more likely to leave science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields at higher rates than their peers during undergraduate studies. Many institutions of higher learning have implemented pipeline programs aimed at preparing and inspiring high school and college aged students in select careers in health sciences with varying levels of success. Research has shown that a health care workforce that mirrors the community they serve is more effective in reducing health disparities and increasing positive health outcomes. We hypothesize that a hospital-based, multidisciplinary youth mentoring and medical exposure program will enhance the decision of URM high school students to choose healthcare careers. A retrospective analysis of the Reach One Each One Program (ROEO) was performed. ROEO is a hospital based, 11-week multidisciplinary youth mentoring and medical exposure program for inner-city high school students. The analysis was based on a phone survey of the twenty-six (26) seniors who completed the program and subsequently graduated from high school between May 2013 and May 2015 to assess the following: 1) College enrollment/attendance, 2) Health profession majors, and 3) Pre-med status. The study was approved by the Morehouse School of Medicine Institutional Review Board. Of the twenty-six students, 23 were female and 3 were male; 25 (96%) of the students were African American and one student was a Caucasian female. Twenty-four (92.3%) of the students were enrolled in college and 2 (7.7%) were scheduled to begin in the spring semester of 2016. Twenty-one of the 24 attending college at the time of the survey (87.5%) were enrolled in a health science degree program and 16 (66.7%) confirmed that they were enrolled in pre-medical (Pre-med) curriculum. Hospital-based, multidisciplinary medical mentoring programs can have a positive impact on the lives and

  2. Clinical capabilities of graduates of an outcomes-based integrated medical program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicluna Helen A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The University of New South Wales (UNSW Faculty of Medicine replaced its old content-based curriculum with an innovative new 6-year undergraduate entry outcomes-based integrated program in 2004. This paper is an initial evaluation of the perceived and assessed clinical capabilities of recent graduates of the new outcomes-based integrated medical program compared to benchmarks from traditional content-based or process-based programs. Method Self-perceived capability in a range of clinical tasks and assessment of medical education as preparation for hospital practice were evaluated in recent graduates after 3 months working as junior doctors. Responses of the 2009 graduates of the UNSW’s new outcomes-based integrated medical education program were compared to those of the 2007 graduates of UNSW’s previous content-based program, to published data from other Australian medical schools, and to hospital-based supervisor evaluations of their clinical competence. Results Three months into internship, graduates from UNSW’s new outcomes-based integrated program rated themselves to have good clinical and procedural skills, with ratings that indicated significantly greater capability than graduates of the previous UNSW content-based program. New program graduates rated themselves significantly more prepared for hospital practice in the confidence (reflective practice, prevention (social aspects of health, interpersonal skills (communication, and collaboration (teamwork subscales than old program students, and significantly better or equivalent to published benchmarks of graduates from other Australian medical schools. Clinical supervisors rated new program graduates highly capable for teamwork, reflective practice and communication. Conclusions Medical students from an outcomes-based integrated program graduate with excellent self-rated and supervisor-evaluated capabilities in a range of clinically-relevant outcomes. The program

  3. [Chicano Counselor Training: Curriculum and Beyond Curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Ramon

    The particulars of the evolved curriculum and how the training has evolved around the change-agent concept are stressed in this presentation. The measure of success achieved in attempting to influence the staff and course of studies of the regular guidance department is also emphasized. The curriculum of this counselor training institute has, from…

  4. Analyzing the Curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Gezira using Harden's 10 questions framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Yasar Albushra; Alneel, Salma

    2017-04-01

    Despite the importance of curriculum analysis for internal refinement of a programme, the approach for such a step in under-described in the literature. This article describes the analysis of the medical curriculum at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Gezira (FMUG). This analysis is crucial in the era of innovative medical education since introducing new curricula and curricular changes has become a common occurrence in medical education worldwide. The curriculum analysis was qualitatively approached using descriptive analysis and adopting Harden's 10 Questions of curriculum development framework approach. Answering Harden's questions reflects the fundamental curricular components and how the different aspects of a curriculum framework fit together. The key features highlighted in the curriculum-related material and literature have been presented. The analysis of the curriculum of FMUG reveals a curriculum with interactive components. Clear structured objectives and goals reflect the faculty's vision. The approach for needs assessment is based on a scientific ground, and the curriculum integrated contents have been set to meet national and international requirements. Adopting SPICES strategies helps FMUG and students achieve the objectives of the curriculum. Multiple motivated instructional methods are adopted, fostering coping with the programme objectives and outcomes. A wide range of assessment methods has been adopted to assess the learning outcomes of the curriculum correctly, reliably, and in alignment with the intended outcomes. The prevailing conducive educational environment of FMUG is favourable for its operation and profoundly influences the outcome of the programme. And there is a well-defined policy for curriculum management, monitoring and evaluation. Harden's 10 questions are satisfactorily addressed by the multi-disciplinary and well-developed FMUG curriculum. The current curriculum supports the well-written faculty missions and educational

  5. Sociology of Hidden Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Moradi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the concept of hidden curriculum in the sociological theories and wants to explain sociological aspects of formation of hidden curriculum. The main question concentrates on the theoretical approaches in which hidden curriculum is explained sociologically.For this purpose it was applied qualitative research methodology. The relevant data include various sociological concepts and theories of hidden curriculum collected by the documentary method. The study showed a set of rules, procedures, relationships and social structure of education have decisive role in the formation of hidden curriculum. A hidden curriculum reinforces by existed inequalities among learners (based on their social classes or statues. There is, in fact, a balance between the learner's "knowledge receptions" with their "inequality proportion".The hidden curriculum studies from different major sociological theories such as Functionalism, Marxism and critical theory, Symbolic internationalism and Feminism. According to the functionalist perspective a hidden curriculum has a social function because it transmits social values. Marxists and critical thinkers correlate between hidden curriculum and the totality of social structure. They depicts that curriculum prepares learners for the exploitation in the work markets. Symbolic internationalism rejects absolute hegemony of hidden curriculum on education and looks to the socialization as a result of interaction between learner and instructor. Feminism theory also considers hidden curriculum as a vehicle which legitimates gender stereotypes.

  6. Curriculum Development in Geomorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the context of present curriculum development in geomorphology and the way in which it has developed in recent years. Discusses the content of the geomorphology curriculum in higher education and the consequences of curriculum development together with a consideration of future trends and their implications. (GEA)

  7. A Model for Technovocational School-Based Curriculum Planning and Evaluation under the Framework of Total Quality Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yen-Zen

    In the current climate of rapid technological advance and social value change, many have suggested that schools should use a school-based approach to curriculum planning. How to design such a curriculum in order to train graduates suited for employment has become an important issue. Many domestic and international enterprises have successfully…

  8. Final Year Undergraduates' Perceptions of the Integration of Soft Skills in the Formal Curriculum: A Survey of Malaysian Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadason, Evelyn Shyamala; Subramaniam, Thirunaukarasu; Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini

    2010-01-01

    A recent initiative or skill bridging measure taken by the Malaysian public universities is to build into the formal curriculum soft skills to produce graduates with a right balance of diverse abilities. However, to date, there is no comprehensive attempt to review the integration of soft skills in the formal curriculum (both coursework and…

  9. The design of a medical school social justice curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria, Alexandra; McKelvey, T Greg; Charlton, Paul; Woodworth, Michael; Lahey, Timothy

    2013-10-01

    The acquisition of skills to recognize and redress adverse social determinants of disease is an important component of undergraduate medical education. In this article, the authors justify and define "social justice curriculum" and then describe the medical school social justice curriculum designed by the multidisciplinary Social Justice Vertical Integration Group (SJVIG) at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. The SJVIG addressed five goals: (1) to define core competencies in social justice education, (2) to identify key topics that a social justice curriculum should cover, (3) to assess social justice curricula at other institutions, (4) to catalog institutionally affiliated community outreach sites at which teaching could be paired with hands-on service work, and (5) to provide examples of the integration of social justice teaching into the core (i.e., basic science) curriculum. The SJVIG felt a social justice curriculum should cover the scope of health disparities, reasons to address health disparities, and means of addressing these disparities. The group recommended competency-based student evaluations and advocated assessing the impact of medical students' social justice work on communities. The group identified the use of class discussion of physicians' obligation to participate in social justice work as an educational tool, and they emphasized the importance of a mandatory, longitudinal, immersive, mentored community outreach practicum. Faculty and administrators are implementing these changes as part of an overall curriculum redesign (2012-2015). A well-designed medical school social justice curriculum should improve student recognition and rectification of adverse social determinants of disease.

  10. Adjusting to future demands in healthcare: Curriculum changes and nursing students' self-reported professional competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theander, Kersti; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Carlsson, Marianne; Florin, Jan; Gardulf, Ann; Johansson, Eva; Lindholm, Christina; Nordström, Gun; Nilsson, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Nursing competence is of significant importance for patient care. Newly graduated nursing students rate their competence as high. However, the impact of different designs of nursing curricula on nursing students' self-reported nursing competence areas is seldom reported. To compare newly graduated nursing students' self-reported professional competence before and after the implementation of a new nursing curriculum. The study had a descriptive comparative design. Nursing students, who graduated in 2011, having studied according to an older curriculum, were compared with those who graduated in 2014, after a new nursing curriculum with more focus on person-centered nursing had been implemented. A higher education nursing program at a Swedish university. In total, 119 (2011 n=69, 2014 n=50) nursing students responded. Nursing students' self-reported professional competencies were assessed with the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups of nursing students, who graduated in 2011 and 2014, respectively, with regard to age, sex, education, or work experience. Both groups rated their competencies as very high. Competence in value-based nursing was perceived to be significantly higher after the change in curriculum. The lowest competence, both in 2011 and 2014, was reported in education and supervision of staff and students. Our findings indicate that newly graduated nursing students - both those following the old curriculum and the first batch of students following the new one - perceive that their professional competence is high. Competence in value-based nursing, measured with the NPC scale, was reported higher after the implementation of a new curriculum, reflecting curriculum changes with more focus on person-centered nursing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Developing a comprehensive curriculum for public health advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Ayelet; Jernigan, David H

    2012-11-01

    There is a substantial gap in public health school curricula regarding advocacy. Development of such a curriculum faces three challenges: faculty lack advocacy skills and experience; the public health literature on effective advocacy is limited; and yet a successful curriculum must be scalable to meet the needs of approximately 9,000 public health students graduating each year. To meet these challenges, we propose a 100-hour interactive online curriculum in five sections: campaigning and organizing, policy making and lobbying, campaign communications, new media, and fund-raising. We outline the content for individual modules in each of these sections, describe how the curriculum would build on existing interactive learning and social media technologies, and provide readers the opportunity to "test-drive" excerpts of a module on "grasstops" organizing. Developing advocacy skills and expertise is critical to meeting the challenges of public health today, and we provide a blueprint for how such training might be brought to scale in the field.

  12. An analysis of curriculum implementation on high schools in Yogyakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febriana, Beta Wulan; Arlianty, Widinda Normalia; Diniaty, Artina; Fauzi'ah, Lina

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to find out how the implementation of the curriculum at three schools in Yogyakarta. The selection of these three schools is based on the use of different curriculum in each school. The analysis was done by distributing questionnaire analysis of eight national education standards (NES). The purpose of this questionnaire is to find out how the curriculum implemented in the schools. In addition, to find out whether or not the implementation was done in accordance with the expectations of the curriculum. The questionnaire distributed in the form of indicators on each NES. These indicators include, Content Standards, Process Standards, Graduates Competency Standards, Teacher and Education Staff Standards, Facility and Infrastructure Standards, Management Standards, Financing Standards and Assessment Standards. Results of the observation indicate that there is a discrepancy between the expectations and the reality of the three schools observed.

  13. Multidisciplinary Management of Laryngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendenhall, William M.; Mancuso, Anthony A.; Hinerman, Russell W.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Werning, John W.; Amdur, Robert J.; Villaret, Douglas B.

    2007-01-01

    The management of head and neck cancer has evolved into a multidisciplinary approach in which patients are evaluated before treatment and decisions depend on prospective multi-institutional trials, as well as retrospective outcome studies. The choice of one or more modalities to use in a given case varies with the tumor site and extent, as exemplified in the treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The goals of treatment include cure, laryngeal voice preservation, voice quality, optimal swallowing, and minimal xerostomia. Treatment options include transoral laser excision, radiotherapy (both definitive and postoperative), open partial laryngectomy, total laryngectomy, and neck dissection. The likelihood of local control and preservation of laryngeal function is related to tumor volume. Patients who have a relatively high risk of local recurrence undergo follow-up computed tomography scans every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after radiotherapy. Patients with suspicious findings on computed tomography might benefit from fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to differentiate post-radiotherapy changes from tumor

  14. EMSO: European multidisciplinary seafloor observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favali, Paolo; Beranzoli, Laura

    2009-04-01

    EMSO has been identified by the ESFRI Report 2006 as one of the Research Infrastructures that European members and associated states are asked to develop in the next decades. It will be based on a European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the aim of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes, providing long time series data for the different phenomenon scales which constitute the new frontier for study of Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry, and ocean processes. The development of an underwater network is based on past EU projects and is supported by several EU initiatives, such as the on-going ESONET-NoE, aimed at strengthening the ocean observatories' scientific and technological community. The EMSO development relies on the synergy between the scientific community and industry to improve European competitiveness with respect to countries such as USA, Canada and Japan. Within the FP7 Programme launched in 2006, a call for Preparatory Phase (PP) was issued in order to support the foundation of the legal and organisational entity in charge of building up and managing the infrastructure, and coordinating the financial effort among the countries. The EMSO-PP project, coordinated by the Italian INGV with participation by 11 institutions from as many European countries, started in April 2008 and will last four years.

  15. Learning More by Being Taught Less: A "Time-for-Self-Study" Theory Explaining Curricular Effects on Graduation Rate and Study Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Henk G.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; van der Molen, Henk T.; Splinter, Ted A. W.; Bulte, Jan; Holdrinet, Rob; van Rossum, Herman J. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, an alternative for Tinto's integration theory of student persistence is proposed and tested. In the proposed theory, time available for individual study is considered a major determinant of both study duration and graduation rate of students in a particular curriculum. In this view, other activities in the curriculum, in…

  16. Developing graduate student competency in providing culturally sensitive end of life care in critical care environments - a pilot study of a teaching innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, Holly L; Hercelinskyj, Gylo; Grealish, Laurie; Mak, Anita S

    2015-11-01

    Australia's immigration policy has generated a rich diverse cultural community of staff and patients in critical care environments. Many different cultural perspectives inform individual actions in the context of critical care, including the highly sensitive area of end of life care, with nurses feeling poorly prepared to provide culturally sensitive end of life care. This article describes and evaluates the effectiveness of an educational innovation designed to develop graduate-level critical care nurses' capacity for effective interpersonal communication, as members of a multi-disciplinary team in providing culturally sensitive end-of-life care. A mixed method pilot study was conducted using a curriculum innovation intervention informed by The Excellence in Cultural Experiential Learning and Leadership Program (EXCELL),(1) which is a higher education intervention which was applied to develop the nurses' intercultural communication skills. 12 graduate nursing students studying critical care nursing participated in the study. 42% (n=5) of the participants were from an international background. Information about students' cultural learning was recorded before and after the intervention, using a cultural learning development scale. Student discussions of end of life care were recorded at Week 2 and 14 of the curriculum. The quantitative data was analysed using descriptive statistical analysis and qualitative data was thematically analysed. Students demonstrated an increase in cultural learning in a range of areas in the pre-post surveys including understandings of cultural diversity, interpersonal skills, cross cultural interactions and participating in multicultural groups. Thematic analysis of the end of life discussions revealed an increase in the levels of nurse confidence in approaching end of life care in critical care environments. The EXCELL program provides an effective and supportive educational framework to increase graduate nurses' cultural learning

  17. The prevalence and effect of burnout on graduate healthcare students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Garrett; Kraft, Lynnea; Amsden, Katherine; Gore, Whitney; Prengle, Bobby; Wimsatt, Jeffrey; Ledbetter, Leila; Covington, Kyle; Goode, Adam

    2017-06-01

    Burnout is a growing epidemic among professional healthcare students. Unaddressed burnout has been shown to have psychological and performance related detriments. The purpose of this scoping literature review was to investigate the prevalence of burnout and its effects on the psychological, professional, empathetic ability, and academic acuity of graduate healthcare students. Inclusion criteria included English language papers published within the last 10 years and subjects in graduate healthcare professional programs. This search encompassed 8,214 articles. After title and abstract screening, 127 articles remained and were sorted into five domains of interest: etiology, professionalism, mental health, empathy, and academic performance. After duplicates were removed, 27 articles remained for the scoping review. Graduate level healthcare students had higher levels of burnout than age matched peers and the general population. The high prevalence of burnout within graduate healthcare students can have an effect on their mental health, empathy, and professional conduct. Understanding the occurrence and effects of burnout within graduate healthcare programs allows faculty and administration to plan curriculum, and provide information to students to understand, recognize, and create opportunities to decrease burnout in order to create long lasting quality clinicians.

  18. Employers' Perceptions of Recent Agricultural Communications Graduates' Workplace Habits and Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlbeck, Erica Goss; Akers, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural communications programs should frequently review their curriculum to ensure students receive the highest quality of education possible (Akers, 2000). This research is a nationwide look at recent agricultural communications graduates' employers and/or co-workers. The purpose of this study was to determine which workplace habits and…

  19. A Five Year Study of Selected Demographics of Middlesex Community College Graduates: 1985-1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggins, John H.; Muzeroll, Terry

    This analysis of selected demographic statistics of Middlesex Community College (MxCC) graduates is intended for future academic advising, curriculum planning, and decision making. This demographic profile is comprised of data from studies published between 1985 and 1989. The study focuses on fundamental demographic indicators, such as sex, age,…

  20. Intersectionality and Social Work: Omissions of Race, Class, and Sexuality in Graduate School Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubar, Roe; Cespedes, Karina; Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    In 2008 EPAS Standards on "Engaging Diversity and Difference in Practice" (2.1.4) added intersectionality (a theory developed by feminist of color) as one aspect to understand diversity, difference, and power in social work curriculum. We consider how intersectionality is omitted in graduate student learning even when class assignments…

  1. Professional International Service Learning as an International Service Learning Opportunity Appropriate for Graduate or Professional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Elizabeth; Lee, Hee Yun

    2015-01-01

    Graduate and professional schools are increasingly using short-term international study abroad courses as one way for internationalizing their curriculum. While international service learning can be a means for improving students' engagement in international learning experiences and providing a structure for learning, it is difficult to design…

  2. Development and Trialling of a Graduated Descriptors Tool for Australian Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupans, Ieva; Owen, Susanne; McKauge, Leigh; Pont, Lisa; Ryan, Greg; Woulfe, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Profession-derived competency standards are key determinants for curriculum and assessment in many professional university programmes. An Australian Learning and Teaching Council funded project used a participatory action research approach to enable the collaborative development of a graduated (or incremental) descriptors tool related to…

  3. Assessing International Product Design and Development Graduate Courses: The MIT-Portugal Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dori, Yehudit Judy; Silva, Arlindo

    2010-01-01

    The Product Design and Development (PDD) course is part of the graduate curriculum in the Engineering Design and Advanced Manufacturing (EDAM) study in the MIT-Portugal Program. The research participants included about 110 students from MIT, EDAM, and two universities in Portugal, Instituto Superior Técnico-Universidade Técnica de Lisboa (IST) and…

  4. A survey of the opinions of recent veterinary graduates and employers regarding early career business skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachynsky, E A; Dale, V H M; Kinnison, T; Gazzard, J; Baillie, S

    2013-06-08

    A questionnaire was designed to assess recent veterinary graduates' proficiency in early career business skills, from the perspectives of graduates of 2006-2008 and employers of recent graduates in the UK. Recent graduates perceived themselves to be generally more competent in financial matters than employers considered them to be. However, when specific skills were assessed, graduates felt less prepared than employers considered them to be competent. Overall, graduates and employers rated recent graduates' preparedness/competence as poor to average for all skills, which were regarded as having average to high importance. Both groups commented on the difficulties faced by new graduates in terms of client communication (generally and financially), and having the confidence to charge clients appropriately for veterinary services. The results of this study indicate that veterinary schools need to take a more active role in the teaching of basic finance skills in order to equip graduates with essential early career competencies. It is anticipated that the information reported will help inform undergraduate curriculum development and highlight the need for increased training at the continuing education level.

  5. On the Development of Digital Forensics Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manghui Tu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer Crime and computer related incidents continue their prevalence and frequency and result in loss of billions of dollars. To fight against those crimes and frauds, it is urgent to develop digital forensics education programs to train a suitable workforce to efficiently and effectively investigate crimes and frauds. However, there is no standard to guide the design of digital forensics curriculum for an academic program. In this research, we investigate the research works on digital forensics curriculum design and existing education programs.  Both digital forensics educators and practitioners were surveyed and the results are analyzed to determine what industry and law enforcement need. Based on the survey results and what the industry certificate programs cover, we identified topics that are desired to be covered in digital forensics courses. Finally, we propose six digital forensics courses and their topics that can be offered in both undergraduate and graduate digital forensics programs.

  6. Preparedness for clinical practice - Perceptions of graduates and their work supervisors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, S.J.; Anderson, A.C.; Hogg, P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The standards of performance of healthcare professionals are now well defined and used to determine health professional curricula. Empirical research evidence exists in medicine and nursing which explores how well these curricula prepare their students for clinical practice but not in the radiography profession. This research aims to determine how well prepared newly qualified radiographers were for clinical practice and to identify strengths and weaknesses in their preparedness to inform curriculum development. Methods: A postal questionnaire and semi-structured interview were used to obtain data from newly qualified diagnostic radiographers and their work-based supervisors. The questionnaire assessed graduate preparedness against a number of items drawn from published documents which define UK radiographic practice. Statistical analysis, using ANOVA and Wilcoxon, examined differences between the groups' perception of preparedness. A sample of graduates and their work supervisors were interviewed to explore preparedness. Results: There were significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between; the preparedness scores of the graduates and supervisors, with supervisors rating the graduates higher than the graduates themselves; subscales of teamwork (p ≤ 0.05), personal attributes (p ≤ 0.05) and digital skills (p ≤ 0.01). No significant differences were found between graduates employed in their training hospital and those employed elsewhere. Interview data revealed perceived areas of graduate strength, weaknesses and areas for curriculum development. Suggestions for improvement to the methodology were identified for exploring preparedness in other health professional programmes. Conclusion: The graduates were well prepared for their role as a diagnostic radiographer. Some curriculum development is needed in specific areas and advice on methodological improvement is offered

  7. Job requirements compared to medical school education: differences between graduates from problem-based learning and conventional curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federkeil Gero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problem-based Learning (PBL has been suggested as a key educational method of knowledge acquisition to improve medical education. We sought to evaluate the differences in medical school education between graduates from PBL-based and conventional curricula and to what extent these curricula fit job requirements. Methods Graduates from all German medical schools who graduated between 1996 and 2002 were eligible for this study. Graduates self-assessed nine competencies as required at their day-to-day work and as taught in medical school on a 6-point Likert scale. Results were compared between graduates from a PBL-based curriculum (University Witten/Herdecke and conventional curricula. Results Three schools were excluded because of low response rates. Baseline demographics between graduates of the PBL-based curriculum (n = 101, 49% female and the conventional curricula (n = 4720, 49% female were similar. No major differences were observed regarding job requirements with priorities for "Independent learning/working" and "Practical medical skills". All competencies were rated to be better taught in PBL-based curriculum compared to the conventional curricula (all p Conclusion Among medical graduates in Germany, PBL demonstrated benefits with regard to competencies which were highly required in the job of physicians. Research and business competence deserve closer attention in future curricular development.

  8. The medical school curriculum committee revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricson, W D; Payer, A F; Rogers, L P; Markus, J F

    1993-03-01

    Numerous study commissions have contended that departmental territoriality and lack of coordinated planning are stagnating contemporary medical education. As a cure, these commissions have recommended the creation of centralized academic management units empowered to oversee revitalization of the curriculum through a series of reforms, including better definition of graduation competencies, community-based training, interdisciplinary courses, problem-based learning, and modernization of evaluation strategies. To determine the extent to which these recommendations were being adopted, in 1990 the authors sent a questionnaire on curriculum committee functions, current innovation efforts, and future priorities to academic administrators and members of medical school curriculum committees at 143 North American medical schools. Responses were received from administrators (primarily associate deans for academic affairs) at 118 schools and committee members (primarily faculty) at 111 schools. Recommendations for enhancing curriculum committee effectiveness were also elicited. The authors conclude that centralization of curricular management has occurred at very few institutions, and that the commonly mentioned reforms are being adopted at a modest pace. The results are analyzed in light of theories of the institutional change process and strategies for introducing educational innovations into established institutions.

  9. Adaptive leadership curriculum for Indian paramedic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, Aditya; Coggins, Nathaniel L; Mahadevan, Aditya; Strehlow, Rebecca N; Strehlow, Matthew C; Mahadevan, S V

    2016-12-01

    Paramedic trainees in developing countries face complex and chaotic clinical environments that demand effective leadership, communication, and teamwork. Providers must rely on non-technical skills (NTS) to manage bystanders and attendees, collaborate with other emergency professionals, and safely and appropriately treat patients. The authors designed a NTS curriculum for paramedic trainees focused on adaptive leadership, teamwork, and communication skills critical to the Indian prehospital environment. Forty paramedic trainees in the first academic year of the 2-year Advanced Post-Graduate Degree in Emergency Care (EMT-paramedic equivalent) program at the GVK-Emergency Management and Research Institute campus in Hyderabad, India, participated in the 6-day leadership course. Trainees completed self-assessments and delivered two brief video-recorded presentations before and after completion of the curriculum. Independent blinded observers scored the pre- and post-intervention presentations delivered by 10 randomly selected paramedic trainees. The third-party judges reported significant improvement in both confidence (25 %, p leadership (2.6 vs. 4.6, p confidence (3.0 vs. 4.8, p leadership curriculum for prehospital providers demonstrated significant improvement in self-reported NTS commonly required of paramedics in the field. The authors recommend integrating focused NTS development curriculum into Indian paramedic education and further evaluation of the long term impacts of this adaptive leadership training.

  10. Evolution of the Pathology Residency Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Y. Naritoku MD, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The required medical knowledge and skill set for the pathologist of 2020 are different than in 2005. Pathology residency training curriculum must accordingly change to fulfill the needs of these ever-changing requirements. In order to make rational curricular adjustments, it is important for us to know the current trajectory of resident training in pathology—where we have been, what our actual current training curriculum is now—to understand how that might change in anticipation of meeting the needs of a changing patient and provider population and to fit within the evolving future biomedical and socioeconomic health-care setting. In 2013, there were 143 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited pathology residency training programs in the United States, with approximately 2400 residents. There is diversity among residency training programs not only with respect to the number of residents but also in training venue(s. To characterize this diversity among pathology residency training programs, a curriculum survey was conducted of pathology residency program directors in 2013 and compared with a similar survey taken almost 9 years previously in 2005 to identify trends in pathology residency curriculum. Clinical pathology has not changed significantly in the number of rotations over 9 years; however, anatomic pathology has changed dramatically, with an increase in the number of surgical pathology rotations coupled with a decline in stand-alone autopsy rotations. With ever-expanding medical knowledge that the graduating pathology resident must know, it is necessary to (1 reflect upon what are the critical need subjects, (2 identify areas that have become of lesser importance, and then (3 prioritize training accordingly.

  11. Evolution of the Pathology Residency Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Suzanne Z.; Black-Schaffer, W. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The required medical knowledge and skill set for the pathologist of 2020 are different than in 2005. Pathology residency training curriculum must accordingly change to fulfill the needs of these ever-changing requirements. In order to make rational curricular adjustments, it is important for us to know the current trajectory of resident training in pathology—where we have been, what our actual current training curriculum is now—to understand how that might change in anticipation of meeting the needs of a changing patient and provider population and to fit within the evolving future biomedical and socioeconomic health-care setting. In 2013, there were 143 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited pathology residency training programs in the United States, with approximately 2400 residents. There is diversity among residency training programs not only with respect to the number of residents but also in training venue(s). To characterize this diversity among pathology residency training programs, a curriculum survey was conducted of pathology residency program directors in 2013 and compared with a similar survey taken almost 9 years previously in 2005 to identify trends in pathology residency curriculum. Clinical pathology has not changed significantly in the number of rotations over 9 years; however, anatomic pathology has changed dramatically, with an increase in the number of surgical pathology rotations coupled with a decline in stand-alone autopsy rotations. With ever-expanding medical knowledge that the graduating pathology resident must know, it is necessary to (1) reflect upon what are the critical need subjects, (2) identify areas that have become of lesser importance, and then (3) prioritize training accordingly. PMID:28725779

  12. Integrated Multidisciplinary Optimization Objects, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M4 Engineering proposes to implement physics-based, multidisciplinary analysis and optimization objects that will be integrated into a Python, open-source framework...

  13. On track for success: an innovative behavioral science curriculum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedy, John R; Carek, Peter J; Dickerson, Lori M; Mallin, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the behavioral science curriculum currently in place at the Trident/MUSC Family Medicine Residency Program. The Trident/MUSC Program is a 10-10-10 community-based, university-affiliated program in Charleston, South Carolina. Over the years, the Trident/MUSC residency program has graduated over 400 Family Medicine physicians. The current behavioral science curriculum consists of both required core elements (didactic lectures, clinical observation, Balint groups, and Resident Grand Rounds) as well as optional elements (longitudinal patient care experiences, elective rotations, behavioral science editorial experience, and scholars project with a behavioral science focus). All Trident/MUSC residents complete core behavioral science curriculum elements and are free to participate in none, some, or all of the optional behavioral science curriculum elements. This flexibility allows resident physicians to tailor the educational program in a manner to meet individual educational needs. The behavioral science curriculum is based upon faculty interpretation of existing "best practice" guidelines (Residency Review Committee-Family Medicine and AAFP). This article provides sufficient curriculum detail to allow the interested reader the opportunity to adapt elements of the behavioral science curriculum to other residency training programs. While this behavioral science track system is currently in an early stage of implementation, the article discusses track advantages as well as future plans to evaluate various aspects of this innovative educational approach.

  14. An architecture for integration of multidisciplinary models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belete, Getachew F.; Voinov, Alexey; Holst, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Integrating multidisciplinary models requires linking models: that may operate at different temporal and spatial scales; developed using different methodologies, tools and techniques; different levels of complexity; calibrated for different ranges of inputs and outputs, etc. On the other hand......, Enterprise Application Integration, and Integration Design Patterns. We developed an architecture of a multidisciplinary model integration framework that brings these three aspects of integration together. Service-oriented-based platform independent architecture that enables to establish loosely coupled...

  15. Otoplasty: A graduated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, H M

    1999-01-01

    Numerous otoplastic techniques have been described for the correction of protruding ears. Technique selection in otoplasty should be done only after careful analysis of the abnormal anatomy responsible for the protruding ear deformity. A graduated surgical approach is presented which is designed to address all contributing factors to the presenting auricular deformity. The approach starts with the more conservative cartilage-sparing suturing techniques, then proceeds to incorporate other more aggressive cartilage weakening maneuvers. Applying this approach resulted in better long-term results with less postoperative lateralization than that encountered on using the cartilage-sparing techniques alone.

  16. Codesign Graduates 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    of addressing complex problems by applying a codesign approach involves a broad range of methods and outcomes. With a focus on design dialogue and collaboration, the codesigner’s toolbox encompass tools and media that are: • Documentary-oriented (audio, image, and video recording to enrich the capture...... and comunication of, for example, field research) • Artefact-oriented (prototyping in 2D and 3D, visualization techniques, design games, and props & probes) • Performance-oriented (staging events, scenarios, role play) Codesign graduates are qualified to do research and work within design consultancies. They can...

  17. INTRODUCTION: GRADUATE STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laverne Jacobs

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice is proud to publish issue 32 (1. This issue features a special section highlighting the scholarship of graduate students. While it is always a pleasure to read promising work by newer scholars in the fields of law and social justice, we are certain that this collection of articles represents some of the finest and thought-provoking scholarship stemming from current graduate students in law. The articles stem from a graduate student essay contest that WYAJ held in 2013 and for which we received many submissions. The collection of selected papers offers a view of legal and interdisciplinary research examining issues that are topically diverse but which are all of deep, long-term importance to the world of access to justice. A reader of the special section on Graduate Student Scholarship will find explorations of access to justice from the perspectives of equality rights, discretion, adjudication and methods of legal service delivery, to name a few. A prize was offered to two papers judged to be of exceptional quality. I am very pleased to announce that the winners of those two prizes are Andrew Pilliar, for his article “Exploring a Law Firm Business Model to Improve Access to Justice” and Blair A. Major, for his contribution, “Religion and Law in R v NS: Finding Space to Re-think the Balancing Analysis”. The Editorial Board thanks all those who submitted papers to the contest and to this final special issue of the Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice. Another notable feature of this issue is the introduction of a section called Research Notes. The Yearbook will periodically publish peer-reviewed research notes that present the findings of empirical (quantitative, qualitative or mixed method research studies. This section aims to contribute to the growing and important body of empirical scholarship within the realm of access to justice socio-legal research. We hope that you enjoy

  18. A model curriculum of health care informatics for Dutch higher professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a two year project to design a model curriculum of health care informatics for Dutch higher professional education. The core of the curriculum are sixteen modules which cover the broad range of medical informatics and which are closely related to the profiles of the professions involved (nursing, physiotherapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy and dietetics). The curriculum emphasizes the need of using structured data and information to perform tasks in health care delivery and management, for which modern information technology is indispensable. The model curriculum will enable faculty to redesign existing undergraduate programs and to select the contents they see appropriate. In this way we hope that the model curriculum will contribute to an innovative attitude of future graduating health care professionals. A new three year project just has started to develop learning materials using professional health care software based on the sixteen modules of the curriculum. PMID:8563329

  19. Teaching graduate students The Art of Being a Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel

    2011-03-01

    Graduate education in the classroom traditionally focuses on disciplinary topics, with non-disciplinary skills only marginally discussed, if at all, between graduate student and adviser. Given the wide range of advisers with different types and quality of communication skill (or lack thereof), the professional coaching delivered to students often is restricted to just the technical aspects of research. Yet graduate students have a great need to receive professional training aimed at, among other things, helping their graduate career be more efficient, less frustrating and less needlessly time-consuming. We have addressed this gap in graduate education by developing the one-credit course ``The Art of Being a Scientist.'' This course covers a diverse range of topics of importance to being an effective and creative researcher. Topics covered include the following: What is science? Choosing a research topic, department, and adviser. The adviser and thesis committee. Making a work plan. Setting goals. Ethics of research. Using the scientific literature. Perfecting oral and written communication. Publishing papers and writing proposals. Managing time effectively. Planning a scientific career. Applying for jobs in academia or industry. In evaluations of the course, students invariably comment that they could have avoided significant problems in their graduate study and saved valuable time if they would have taken the course earlier on. This is an indication that the course not only useful for students, but also that it is best taken early in a their graduate career. The material covered in the course is captured in the book ``The Art of Being a Scientist: A Guide for Graduate Students and Their Mentors,'' published by Cambridge University Press; more information can be found at: www.mines.edu/~rsnieder/Art_of_Science.html From this website one can download a description of the curriculum used in the class, including homework exercises. Currently we are expanding of

  20. Multidisciplinary teaching in swimming: methodological reflection and proposal of check list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Canossa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study proposes a new multidisciplinary approach related to teaching in swimming. Swimming is an interdisciplinary physical activity, which can be truly important at the level of the motor learning and experimentation in aquatic activities. In the present manuscript, it was compared the present reality of teaching in Swimming with a new perspective, this one with a multidisciplinary scope. Following the referred analysis, it was presented a discussion about the orientation and adequacy of the contents of the Swimming curriculum for children and youngsters, which are populations with specific characteristics and development necessities. In this sense, after stating the relevance of a multidisciplinary perspective, it was proposed a new approach for basic aquatic motor skills acquisition based on four disciplines: swimming, water polo, synchronised swimming and platform diving. This was made taking into account the initial stage of swimming teaching, i.e., aquatic readiness. This proposal aims mainly at implementing the teaching of Swimming at a multidisciplinary point of view that, in our opinion, is urgent, namely due to the small expression that the aquatic modalities traditionally considered as swimming satellites (water polo, synchronised swimming and platform diving have in the Portuguese sports context.

  1. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favali, P.; Partnership, Emso

    2009-04-01

    EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. EMSO will reply also to the need expressed in the frame of GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) to develop a marine segment integrated in the in situ and satellite global monitoring system. The EMSO development relays upon the synergy between the scientific community and the industry to improve the European competitiveness with respect to countries like USA/Canada, NEPTUNE, VENUS and MARS projects, Taiwan, MACHO project, and Japan, DONET project. In Europe the development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90, and presently supported by EU initiatives. The EMSO infrastructure will constitute the extension to the sea of the land-based networks. Examples of data recorded by seafloor observatories will be presented. EMSO is presently at the stage of Preparatory Phase (PP), funded in the EC FP7 Capacities Programme. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years with the participation of 12 Institutions representing 12 countries. EMSO potential will be significantly increased also with the interaction with other Research Infrastructures addressed to Earth Science. 2. IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph Waldmann); IMI-Irish Marine Institute (Ireland, ref. Michael Gillooly); UTM-CSIC-Unidad de

  2. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favali, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap (Report 2006, http://cordis.europa.eu/esfri/roadmap.htm), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. The development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90 and is being supported by several EU initiatives, as the on-going ESONET-NoE, coordinated by IFREMER (2007-2011, http://www.esonet-emso.org/esonet-noe/), and aims at gathering together the Research Community of the Ocean Observatories. In 2006 the FP7 Capacities Programme launched a call for Preparatory Phase (PP) projects, that will provide the support to create the legal and organisational entities in charge of managing the infrastructures, and coordinating the financial effort among the countries. Under this call the EMSO-PP project was approved in 2007 with the coordination of INGV and the participation of other 11 Institutions of 11 countries. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years. The EMSO is a key-infrastructure both for Ocean Sciences and for Solid Earth Sciences. In this respect it will enhance and complement profitably the capabilities of other European research infrastructures such as EPOS, ERICON-Aurora Borealis, and SIOS. The perspective of the synergy among EMSO and other ESFRI Research Infrastructures will be outlined. EMSO Partners: IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph

  3. IDES-EDU: Comprehensive multidisciplinary education programme to accelerate the implementation of EPBD in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyckmans, Annemie; Almeida, Manuela; Brunsgaard, Camilla

    are expected learning outcomes, level of integration in existing curricula and alignment with theory and assessment methods. Measures for improvement as well as further dissemination to other European educational facilities are proposed. In this manner, the project will contribute to make the multiple......This paper presents a new education and training programme on integrated energy design developed by fifteen European universities collaborating within the IDES-EDU project (2010-2013), funded by Intelligent Energy Europe. IDES-EDU aims to accelerate the implementation of the Energy Performance...... of Buildings Directive (EPBD) by proposing Master and Post Graduate education and training in multidisciplinary teams. To speed up transition from traditional, sub-optimised building projects with discipline-oriented, segregated budgets and operations, IDES-EDU developed comprehensive, multidisciplinary...

  4. European Master's Program in Gerontology (EuMaG): Goals, Curriculum, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, Marja

    2011-01-01

    The European Master's Program in Gerontology (EuMaG) started in September 2003 with support from the European Commission. The EuMaG is a modular, 2-year, part-time international training program about the aging process and its societal implications. The multidisciplinary curriculum comprises four domains of gerontology (i.e., social gerontology,…

  5. European Master's program in Gerontology (EuMaG): Goals, curriculum, and students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartsen, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    The European Master's Program in Gerontology (EuMaG) started in September 2003 with support from the European Commission. The EuMaG is a modular, 2-year, part-time international training program about the aging process and its societal implications. The multidisciplinary curriculum comprises four

  6. Multidisciplinary Mentoring Programs to Enhance Junior Faculty Research Grant Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freel, Stephanie A; Smith, Paige C; Burns, Ebony N; Downer, Joanna B; Brown, Ann J; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2017-10-01

    Junior faculty face challenges in establishing independent research careers. Declining funding combined with a shift to multidisciplinary, collaborative science necessitates new mentorship models and enhanced institutional support. Two multidisciplinary mentorship programs to promote grant success for junior faculty were established at the Duke University School of Medicine beginning in 2011. These four-month programs-the Path to Independence Program (PtIP) for National Institutes of Health (NIH) R applicants and the K Club for NIH K applicants-use multiple senior faculty mentors and professional grant-writing staff to provide a 20-hour joint curriculum comprising a series of lectures, hands-on workshops, career development counseling, peer groups, and an internal study section. In March 2016, the authors analyzed the success rate for all NIH grants submitted by participants since program enrollment. In a 2015 postprogram survey, participants rated their feelings of support and competency across six skill factors. From October 2011 to March 2016, the programs engaged 265 senior faculty mentors, 145 PtIP participants, and 138 K Club participants. Success rates for NIH grant applications were 28% (61 awards/220 decisions) for PtIP participants-an increase over the 2010 Duke University junior faculty baseline of 11%-and 64% (38/59) for K Club participants. Respondents reported significantly increased feelings of support and self-ratings for each competency post program. The authors plan to expand the breadth of both the mentorship pool and faculty served. Broad implementation of similar programs elsewhere could bolster success, satisfaction, and retention of junior faculty investigators.

  7. Forms of Graduate Capital and Their Relationship to Graduate Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In the context of far-reaching changes in higher education and the labour market, there has been extensive discussion on what constitutes graduate employability and what shapes graduates' labour market outcomes. Many of these discussions are based on skills-centred approaches and related supply-side logic. The purpose of this paper is to…

  8. Graduates' Employability: What Do Graduates and Employers Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsouka, Kyriaki; Mihail, Dimitrios M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the views of university graduates and human resource managers (HRMs) on graduates' employability in terms of the soft skills required by the labour market. Soft skills (personal attributes that enhance an individual's interactions, job performance and career prospects) are necessary in the labour…

  9. Interdisciplinary innovations in biomedical and health informatics graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, G

    2007-01-01

    Biomedical and health informatics (BHI) is a rapidly growing domain that relies on the active collaboration with diverse disciplines and professions. Educational initiatives in BHI need to prepare students with skills and competencies that will allow them to function within and even facilitate interdisciplinary teams (IDT). This paper describes an interdisciplinary educational approach introduced into a BHI graduate curriculum that aims to prepare informatics researchers to lead IDT research. A case study of the "gerontechnology" research track is presented which highlights how the curriculum fosters collaboration with and understanding of the disciplines of Nursing, Engineering, Computer Science, and Health Administration. Gerontechnology is a new interdisciplinary field that focuses on the use of technology to support aging. Its aim is to explore innovative ways to use information technology and develop systems that support independency and increase quality of life for senior citizens. As a result of a large research group that explores "smart home" technologies and the use of information technology, we integrated this new domain into the curriculum providing a platform for computer scientists, engineers, nurses and physicians to explore challenges and opportunities with our informatics students and faculty. The interdisciplinary educational model provides an opportunity for health informatics students to acquire the skills for communication and collaboration with other disciplines. Numerous graduate and postgraduate students have already participated in this initiative. The evaluation model of this approach is presented. Interdisciplinary educational models are required for health informatics graduate education. Such models need to be innovative and reflect the needs and trends in the domains of health care and information technology.

  10. Bio-Nanotechnology: Challenges for Trainees in a Multidisciplinary Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica Erin

    2009-01-01

    The recent developments in the field of nanotechnology have provided scientists with a new set of nanoscale materials, tools and devices in which to investigate the biological science thus creating the mulitdisciplinary field of bio-nanotechnology. Bio-nanotechnology merges the biological sciences with other scientific disciplines ranging from chemistry to engineering. Todays students must have a working knowledge of a variety of scientific disciplines in order to be successful in this new field of study. This talk will provide insight into the issue of multidisciplinary education from the perspective of a graduate student working in the field of bio-nanotechnology. From the classes we take to the research we perform, how does the modern graduate student attain the training required to succeed in this field?

  11. Reno Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship business curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althausen, Peter L; Bray, Timothy J; Hill, Austin D

    2014-07-01

    The Reno Orthopaedic Center (ROC) Trauma Fellowship business curriculum is designed to provide the fellow with a graduate level business practicum and research experience. The time commitments in a typical 12-month trauma fellowship are significant, rendering a traditional didactic master's in business administration difficult to complete during this short time. An organized, structured, practical business education can provide the trauma leaders of tomorrow with the knowledge and experience required to effectively navigate the convoluted and constantly changing healthcare system. The underlying principle throughout the curriculum is to provide the fellow with the practical knowledge to participate in cost-efficient improvements in healthcare delivery. Through the ROC Trauma Fellowship business curriculum, the fellow will learn that delivering healthcare in a manner that provides better outcomes for equal or lower costs is not only possible but a professional and ethical responsibility. However, instilling these values without providing actionable knowledge and programs would be insufficient and ineffective. For this reason, the core of the curriculum is based on individual teaching sessions with a wide array of hospital and private practice administrators. In addition, each section is equipped with a suggested reading list to maximize the learning experience. Upon completion of the curriculum, the fellow should be able to: (1) Participate in strategic planning at both the hospital and practice level based on analysis of financial and clinical data, (2) Understand the function of healthcare systems at both a macro and micro level, (3) Possess the knowledge and skills to be strong leaders and effective communicators in the business lexicon of healthcare, (4) Be a partner and innovator in the improvement of the delivery of orthopaedic services, (5) Combine scientific and strategic viewpoints to provide an evidence-based strategy for improving quality of care in a

  12. Medical graduates feel well-prepared for clinical work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørcke, Anne Mette; Nielsen, Dorte Guldbrand; Kjeldsen, Inge Trads

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to assess the coherence between the undergraduate medical program at Aarhus University and the foundation year. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This cross-sectional questionnaire survey included 503 doctors graduated from Aarhus University from the winter of 2007....../2008 to the summer of 2009. RESULTS: The response rate was 73%. Approximately 73% of the respondents were in their foundation year or their first year of specialist training and 83% generally felt well-prepared. Respondents found that most of the learning outcomes of the undergraduate medical curriculum at Aarhus...... of diagnoses, initiation of treatment, pharmacotherapy, handling of own emotions and structuring of own learning. Also, 40% stated that their clerkships had only had little value in preparing them for their foundation year. CONCLUSION: Overall, graduates felt well-prepared and characterized the education...

  13. LIFE SKILLS ORIENTATION IN MADRASAH CURRICULUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Ahmadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to elaborate a charge include life skills opportunities in both madrasah curriculum of ibtidaiyah, tsanawiyah and aliyah. The approach used is the science of Islamic education. Some important concepts in Islam that allows it to be analyzed and used as the basis of life skills-based curriculum contained in QS. Al-Ghâsyiyah [88]: 17-20, QS. Fâthir [35]: 39, QS. Al-Jâtsiyah [45]: 12-13, QS. Al-A‟râf [7]: 56-85 and QS. Al-Hujurât [49]: 1, 13, 18. Ethical values (Rasul Muhammad Islam that allows elaborating life skills is shiddiq, amanah, fathanah and tabligh. The fourth value is assumed to equip graduates of madrassas that he later had a number of personal, social, academic, vocational and soft. The fourth value is assumed to equip graduates of madrassas that he later had the skills. A number of core Islamic values should be in synergy with the age issues such as democracy, globalization, the mastery of science, technology and information (the environment.

  14. Global education implications of the foreign pharmacy graduate equivalency examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Fadi M; Clauson, Kevin A; Latif, David A; Al-Rousan, Rabaa M

    2010-06-15

    Although the Foreign Pharmacy Graduate Equivalency Examination (FPGEE) is not intended to measure educational outcomes or institutional effectiveness, it may be a reliable and valid criterion to assess the quality or success of international pharmacy programs. This comprehensive review describes the evolution and historical milestones of the FPGEE, along with trends in structure, administration, and passing rates, and the impact of country of origin on participant performance. Similarities between the FPGEE and the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA) are also explored. This paper aims to provide a global prospective and insight for foreign academic institutions into parameters for evaluating their students' educational capabilities.

  15. Influence of a nontraditional master's degree on graduates' career paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J P; Wen, L K

    2000-12-01

    Graduates' assessments of the University of Texas at Austin's nontraditional M.S. degree program in pharmacy administration were studied. A survey was constructed to assess the impact of the master's program on career advancement, to examine why pharmacists enrolled in the program, and to determine if the curriculum provided knowledge or developed skills that were practical or beneficial. The survey was mailed in April 1999 to all persons who had completed the program between 1990 and 1998. A total of 56 graduates responded, for a response rate of 90.3%. The three reasons for entering the program most frequently cited as most important were career advancement, personal development, and the desire to change job responsibilities. Thirty-four respondents (60.7%) reported receiving a promotion or changing jobs for a higher position while they were enrolled in the program or after completing it. Of these 34 respondents, 29 (85.3%) attributed their promotion or new job to the master's degree. On average, graduates reported that the knowledge and skills obtained through the program had been useful in their practice. The benefits of the program that were cited most frequently were management skills, competencies in areas of pharmacy business, opportunity to advance career, job satisfaction, and competitive advantage when applying for a job. A nontraditional master's degree program in pharmacy administration had a positive impact on the career paths of graduates.

  16. Infusing Technical Communication and Teamwork within the ECE Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    KEDROWICZ, By April; WATANABE, Sundy

    2006-01-01

    This paper highlights a unique approach to infusing formal training and practice in oral and written communication and teamwork development in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of Utah. Faculty and graduate (Ph.D.) students from the College of Humanities have teamed up with faculty from engineering to develop communication and teamwork instruction that is integrated into the existing engineering curriculum. These skills are used as a vehicle ...

  17. Preparing Future Leaders: An Integrated Quality Improvement Residency Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Stacy; Shields, Sara; Upshur, Carole

    2016-06-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has recognized the importance of quality improvement (QI) training and requires that accredited residencies in all specialties demonstrate that residents are "integrated and actively participate in interdisciplinary clinical quality improvement and patient safety activities." However, competing demands in residency training may make this difficult to accomplish. The study's objective is to develop and evaluate a longitudinal curriculum that meets the ACGME requirement for QI and patient safety training and links to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) practices. Residents in the Worcester Family Medicine Residency (WFMR) participated in a faculty-developed quality improvement curriculum that included web-based tutorials, quality improvement projects, and small-group sessions across all 3 years of residency. They completed self-evaluations of knowledge and use of curricular activities annually and at graduation, and comparisons were made between two graduating classes, as well as comparison of end of PGY2 to end of PGY3 for one class. Graduating residents who completed the full 3 years of the curriculum rated themselves as significantly more skilled in nine of 15 areas assessed at end of residency compared to after PGY2 and reported confidence in providing future leadership in a focus group. Five areas were also rated significantly higher than prior-year residents. Involving family medicine residents in a longitudinal curriculum with hands-on practice in implementing QI, patient safety, and chronic illness management activities that are inclusive of PCMH goals increased their self-perceived skills and leadership ability to implement these new and emerging evidence-based practices in primary care.

  18. The Graduation Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛竹晨

    2004-01-01

    It is one of the hottest summer days that Cambridge has ever had.We wereclad(clothe的过去式和过去分词)in the black gown once more.However thiswill probably be my last time to wear it.I had not been wearing it that much af-ter all.After this day,it will be shipped back to my home and lie in my closet,just to be dug out many years later and the sight of it will bring me back to thisvery day.It is our graduation day,the day wher we can add a hood(头巾;兜帽)

  19. STEm Minority Graduate Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Kaen E

    2012-09-20

    ABSTRACT The state of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education in the United States has seen some unfavorable assessments over the past decade. In early February, 2010 the House of Representatives heard testimony on undergraduate and graduate education. The message from the panel, which included experts from academia, STEM-based industries, and the National Science Foundation (NSF) was dire and required an urgent response. The experts along with the committee's chairperson, U. S. Representative Daniel Lipinski (D-IL) cited that the complexity of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics applications and coursework and the methodology utilized to teach these subjects are forcing students out of these disciplines. As the National Academies described in its 2007 report Rising Above the Gathering Storm, successful STEM education is not just an academic pursuit it's a necessity for competing in the knowledge-based economy that the United States had a key role in creating. The potential for action is being made available again as the America COMPETES Act of 2007 is up for reauthorization. Its initial focus was on STEM education at the K-12 levels, but efforts at the undergraduate and graduate levels are needed to retain students to fill the jobs left vacant as baby boomers retire. The Educational Advancement Alliance, Inc. (EAA) has for two decades created programs that have not only addressed the issues of ensuring that students are aptly prepared for college but have focused its efforts over the past decade on increasing the number of students who pursue degrees in STEM disciplines. For the EAA, the introduction of the wonders of science begins at the elementary and middle school level via the Learning Lab, a state-of-the-art mobile science laboratory that visits students in grades 4-6 at the various schools throughout Philadelphia and The Math/Tech Academy which meets on Saturdays for students in grades 5-7. For the past two years

  20. Social Origin and Graduation Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Trond Beldo

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates whether social origin has an impact on graduation age among university students. A large number of social background factors are applied on a large data set of 4 successive cohorts of Danish university graduates born 1960–1975. These are cohorts for whom university...

  1. Graduates' Perceptions towards UKM's Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ramli; Khoon, Koh Aik; Hamzah, Mohd Fauzi; Ahmadan, Siti Rohayu

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the surveys which were conducted between 2006 and 2008 on graduates' perceptions towards the infrastructure at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM). It covered three major aspects pertaining to learning, living and leisure on campus. Eight out of 14 components received overwhelming approval from our graduates. (Contains 1…

  2. Electromechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Vocational and Career Development.

    This guide offers information and procedures necessary to train electromechanical engineering technicians. Discussed first are the rationale and objectives of the curriculum. The occupational field of electromechanical engineering technology is described. Next, a curriculum model is set forth that contains information on the standard…

  3. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  4. Solar Technology Curriculum, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains lecture outlines and handouts for training solar technicians in the installation, maintenance, and repair of solar energy hot water and space heating systems. The curriculum consists of four modular units developed to provide a model through which community colleges and area vocational/technical schools can respond…

  5. The Galapagos Jason Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    The JASON Curriculum Project materials are designed to prepare teachers and students for an exploration around the Galapagos Islands via satellite transmission of live images and sound. This curriculum package contains five units, 25 lesson plans, and over 50 activities, along with teacher background material, student worksheets and readings, a…

  6. Equasions for Curriculum Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrod, James S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Technology in Curriculum (TIC) program resource guides which will be distributed to California schools in the fall of 1986. These guides match available instructional television programs and computer software to existing California curriculum guides in order to facilitate teachers' classroom use. (JDH)

  7. Analyzing the curriculum of the faculty of medicine, University of Gezira using Harden’s 10 questions framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YASAR ALBUSHRA AHMED

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the importance of curriculum analysis for internal refinement of a programme, the approach for such a step in under-described in the literature. This article describes the analysis of the medical curriculum at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Gezira (FMUG. This analysis is crucial in the era of innovative medical education since introducing new curricula and curricular changes has become a common occurrence in medical education worldwide. Methods: The curriculum analysis was qualitatively approached using descriptive analysis and adopting Harden’s 10 Questions of curriculum development framework approach. Answering Harden’s questions reflects the fundamental curricular components and how the different aspects of a curriculum framework fit together. The key features highlighted in the curriculum-related material and literature have been presented. Results: The analysis of the curriculum of FMUG reveals a curriculum with interactive components. Clear structured objectives and goals reflect the faculty’s vision. The approach for needs assessment is based on a scientific ground, and the curriculum integrated contents have been set to meet national and international requirements. Adopting SPICES strategies helps FMUG and students achieve the objectives of the curriculum. Multiple motivated instructional methods are adopted, fostering coping with the programme objectives and outcomes. A wide range of assessment methods has been adopted to assess the learning outcomes of the curriculum correctly, reliably, and in alignment with the intended outcomes. The prevailing conducive educational environment of FMUG is favourable for its operation and profoundly influences the outcome of the programme. And there is a well-defined policy for curriculum management, monitoring and evaluation. Conclusion: Harden’s 10 questions are satisfactorily addressed by the multi-disciplinary and well-developed FMUG curriculum. The current

  8. Design of accounting curriculum: The case of Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alver Lehte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of globalization sets new requirements for the professional qualification of accountants and auditors. In the business world globalized investment market demands consistent high quality financial information across borders; investors are looking for a global accounting profession to provide it. There is more pressure on accounting professionals to expand and enhance their knowledge, skills, and abilities beyond what they are currently likely to possess. Providers of accounting education must take into account the changed world and create contemporary curricula. In Estonia the change from a command to a market economy has inevitably influenced not only the accounting framework but also the entire system of accounting education. It is clear that without a design of accounting curricula it is practically impossible to fulfill requirements of nowadays high quality financial information. Tallinn University of Technology (TUT holds on the advanced level of accounting education the leading position in Estonia. The accounting curriculum (on the graduate level as well as undergraduate level is the most popular among all curricula at the Tallinn School of Economics and Business Administration of TUT. It is a joint system, which consists of undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Small sub specializations: for example in financial accounting, managerial cost accounting, taxation and auditing become evident while interpreting the graduate and undergraduate programs as one united system. The paper explains a new model of accounting curriculum developed at TUT as well as its educational philosophy and principles of designing. It also describes conditions required for development and continuous improvement of competitive curriculum.

  9. Evidences in multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bari, B.; Bosset, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Valentini, V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 10 years, a number of important European randomized published studies investigated the optimal management of rectal cancer. In order to define an evidence-based approach of the clinical practice based, an international consensus conference was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO) and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). The aim of this article is to present highlights of multidisciplinary rectal cancer management and to compare the conclusions of the international conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) with the new National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. (authors)

  10. Columbia Public Health Core Curriculum: Short-Term Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Melissa D; Fried, Linda P; Glover, Jim W; Delva, Marlyn; Wiggin, Maggie; Hooper, Leah; Saxena, Roheeni; de Pinho, Helen; Slomin, Emily; Walker, Julia R; Galea, Sandro

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated a transformed core curriculum for the Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health (New York, New York) master of public health (MPH) degree. The curriculum, launched in 2012, aims to teach public health as it is practiced: in interdisciplinary teams, drawing on expertise from multiple domains to address complex health challenges. We collected evaluation data starting when the first class of students entered the program and ending with their graduation in May 2014. Students reported being very satisfied with and challenged by the rigorous curriculum and felt prepared to integrate concepts across varied domains and disciplines to solve public health problems. This novel interdisciplinary program could serve as a prototype for other schools that wish to reinvigorate MPH training.

  11. Impact of the implantation of a new curriculum in the process of learning in a Faculty of Dentistry in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junges, Roger; Stello, Ruggiero Silveira; Portella, Fernando Freitas; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate two dental curricula at a school of dentistry in southern Brazil. The study population included dentists trained in the last two classes of the institution's old curriculum (n = 98) and graduates of the first two classes of the new curriculum (n = 56). A questionnaire with open and closed questions was used for an overall evaluation of different aspects of the curricula, such as study methods, importance given to basic sciences, quality of theoretical and clinical guidance, perception about skills needed to perform different dental procedures, professional goals and an overall assessment. Students in the new curriculum reported more frequent use of the internet (69.6%) and scientific articles (50.0%). More importance was given to the basic sciences in the new curriculum. Graduates of the old curriculum alleged themselves to be more capable of both performing conventional (99%) and complex amalgam restorations (68.4%), as well as three-unit fixed prostheses (62.2%). Graduates of the new curriculum alleged higher capability with periodontal surgeries (48.2%), treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders (58.1%) and public health planning (78.6%). Regarding professional goals, the new curriculum was associated with an increase in the graduates' willingness to work in the public health system and to pursue an academic career. New curriculum graduates reported higher overall assessments regarding their educational, as well as theoretical and clinical, outcomes. A new curricular approach was associated with several changes from the perspective of the students.

  12. Impact of the implantation of a new curriculum in the process of learning in a Faculty of Dentistry in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Junges

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate two dental curricula at a school of dentistry in southern Brazil. The study population included dentists trained in the last two classes of the institution's old curriculum (n = 98 and graduates of the first two classes of the new curriculum (n = 56. A questionnaire with open and closed questions was used for an overall evaluation of different aspects of the curricula, such as study methods, importance given to basic sciences, quality of theoretical and clinical guidance, perception about skills needed to perform different dental procedures, professional goals and an overall assessment. Students in the new curriculum reported more frequent use of the internet (69.6% and scientific articles (50.0%. More importance was given to the basic sciences in the new curriculum. Graduates of the old curriculum alleged themselves to be more capable of both performing conventional (99% and complex amalgam restorations (68.4%, as well as three-unit fixed prostheses (62.2%. Graduates of the new curriculum alleged higher capability with periodontal surgeries (48.2%, treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorders (58.1% and public health planning (78.6%. Regarding professional goals, the new curriculum was associated with an increase in the graduates' willingness to work in the public health system and to pursue an academic career. New curriculum graduates reported higher overall assessments regarding their educational, as well as theoretical and clinical, outcomes. A new curricular approach was associated with several changes from the perspective of the students.

  13. Thematic curriculum approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šefer Jasmina P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Thematic curriculum combines disciplines and media. The process is problem-oriented and the scenario most often follows the logic of exploring or storytelling. Those two approaches to teaching are appropriate because they fit into interdisciplinary and creative open-ended problem solving through play, as insisted upon by thematic curriculum. The matrix, where seven types of abilities intersect with five types of problems according to their degree of openness, defines well the outcomes of teaching. However, it did not prove to be suitable for planning the majority of activities in thematic curriculum, for it follows with difficulty the process of exploring or storytelling i.e. it disrupts the subject matter coherence of thematic curriculum. Therefore, it is suggested that matrix should be used for disciplinary curriculum planning but for that of thematic curriculum only in exclusive cases. The matrix should be used primarily as a framework for evaluating the distribution of various types of abilities and problem situations in teaching. The logic of diverse approaches to teaching reflects itself in the manner of planning and organizing the teaching process. Conceptual, visual-graphic, structural and other aids employed during educational process planning should suit the nature of the approach chosen. On the basis of qualitative investigations of educational process, in the present paper considerations are given to various approaches to teaching development of various drafts for the planning of teaching, and recognition of the logic of storytelling and exploring in thematic curriculum.

  14. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  15. Job requirements compared to medical school education: differences between graduates from problem-based learning and conventional curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlett, Christopher L; Doll, Hinnerk; Dahmen, Janosch; Polacsek, Ole; Federkeil, Gero; Fischer, Martin R; Bamberg, Fabian; Butzlaff, Martin

    2010-01-14

    Problem-based Learning (PBL) has been suggested as a key educational method of knowledge acquisition to improve medical education. We sought to evaluate the differences in medical school education between graduates from PBL-based and conventional curricula and to what extent these curricula fit job requirements. Graduates from all German medical schools who graduated between 1996 and 2002 were eligible for this study. Graduates self-assessed nine competencies as required at their day-to-day work and as taught in medical school on a 6-point Likert scale. Results were compared between graduates from a PBL-based curriculum (University Witten/Herdecke) and conventional curricula. Three schools were excluded because of low response rates. Baseline demographics between graduates of the PBL-based curriculum (n = 101, 49% female) and the conventional curricula (n = 4720, 49% female) were similar. No major differences were observed regarding job requirements with priorities for "Independent learning/working" and "Practical medical skills". All competencies were rated to be better taught in PBL-based curriculum compared to the conventional curricula (all p learning/working" (Delta + 0.57), "Psycho-social competence" (Delta + 0.56), "Teamwork" (Delta + 0.39) and "Problem-solving skills" (Delta + 0.36), whereas "Research competence" (Delta--1.23) and "Business competence" (Delta--1.44) in the PBL-based curriculum needed improvement. Among medical graduates in Germany, PBL demonstrated benefits with regard to competencies which were highly required in the job of physicians. Research and business competence deserve closer attention in future curricular development.

  16. An experiment in multidisciplinary digital design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuncer, B.; De Ruiter, P.; Mulders, S.

    2008-01-01

    The design and realization of complex buildings requires multidisciplinary design collaboration from early on in the design process. The intensive use of digital design environments in this process demands new knowledge and skills from the involved players including integrating and managing digital

  17. Improving Student Achievement in a Multidisciplinary Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Amanda; Bloxham, Sue

    2004-01-01

    This article analyses interim findings of an ongoing action research project into the use of assessment criteria and grade descriptors in the assessment process. The project is multidisciplinary and covers areas as diverse as Sports Sociology, Economics, Youth and Community Studies, and Education. The idea is to equip first-year students with the…

  18. Sustaining impactful multidisciplinary contributions over five decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulbhushan Balooni

    2017-06-01

    By tracing the trajectory of Singh's vast and varied experience, attitude and approach to research, and scholarly output in international publications that have advanced knowledge and found applications from management to biological and social sciences, this interview offer pathways to research scholars for sustained multidisciplinary and impactful research in their careers.

  19. Stronger Disciplinary Identities in Multidisciplinary Research Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geschwind, Lars; Melin, Göran

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two multidisciplinary Social Sciences and Humanities research schools in Sweden have been investigated regarding disciplinary identity-making. This study investigates the meetings between different disciplines around a common thematic area of study for Ph.D. students. The Ph.D. students navigate through a complex social and…

  20. Multidisciplinary Teams: The Next Step in Science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Leal-Egaña.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the current characteristics in science, is the high complexity and technical character that becomes over the last years. This has induced the development of a specific type of professionals, highly specialized in the disciplines that they are involved in, which has produced a communicational breach between the scientists involved on different branches of the science. One of the strategies intended to cross this breach, is the generation of multidisciplinary research strategies, in which professionals of every field of the science can take part, being a kind of scientific and human bridge between the different research teams where they are involved in. This new style to do investigation has made possible the generation of new branches in science, such as for example Biotechnology. In this field -Tissue Engineering- becomes to be a very interesting example of the potential to work in multidisciplinary teams. The reason for this is mainly to avoid technical mistakes, which could cause the death of some patients and which can only be solved by developing research under a multidisciplinary strategy. Nevertheless, and in spite of the success working with multidisciplinary teams, this kind of strategy is rarely used in Latin-American, where the reasons seems to be centered in some aspects personal and cultural. This work shows an example of the new style to develop complex research, which could suggest a new way of working in Latin-American, granted that there is the will to enhance current scientific level.

  1. Augmented Reality for Multi-disciplinary Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiangyu; Rui,

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents a framework for multi-disciplinary collaboration. Tangible Augmented Reality has been raised as one of suitable systems for design collaboration. Furthermore, it emphasizes the advantages of Tangible Augmented Reality to illustrate the needs for integrating the Tangible User Interfaces and Augmented Reality Systems.

  2. Multidisciplinary training of cancer specialists in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benstead, Kim; Turhal, Nazim Serdar; O'Higgins, Niall

    2017-01-01

    The best care for patients with cancer is most likely to be achieved when decisions about diagnosis, staging and treatment are made at multidisciplinary and multiprofessional meetings, preferably when all the professional expertise relevant to the patient's condition is gathered together. Questio......The best care for patients with cancer is most likely to be achieved when decisions about diagnosis, staging and treatment are made at multidisciplinary and multiprofessional meetings, preferably when all the professional expertise relevant to the patient's condition is gathered together....... Questionnaires were sent to National Societies of Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology concerning similarities and differences in training programs and multidisciplinary care in member states in Europe. Results indicated wide variation in training systems and practice. Data were lacking for Surgery because...... surgeons training in cancer surgery) is recommended. This is likely to improve the value of multidisciplinary meetings and may result in improved patient care. The Expert Group on Cancer Control of the European Commission has endorsed this recommendation....

  3. Multidisciplinary Analysis of a Hypersonic Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Ambady; Stewart, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The objective is to develop high fidelity tools that can influence ISTAR design In particular, tools for coupling Fluid-Thermal-Structural simulations RBCC/TBCC designers carefully balance aerodynamic, thermal, weight, & structural considerations; consistent multidisciplinary solutions reveal details (at modest cost) At Scram mode design point, simulations give details of inlet & combustor performance, thermal loads, structural deflections.

  4. Multidisciplinary workshops: learning to work together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatchett, Anita; Taylor, Dawn

    2013-03-01

    Health and social care professional practice needs to move with the times and to respond to the ever-changing combination of health needs, economic realities and health-policy imperatives. A clear understanding of the variety of forces at play and the ability to marshal these to good effect by working in partnership with multidisciplinary colleagues and children/families is a must, not least in this time of economic austerity and ever-rising health inequalities, when vulnerable children's lives and complex family relationships and behaviours so easily become increasingly strained and challenged. This sad reality calls out for relevant joined-up solutions by all participants--an agenda so often called into question by court judgement after court judgement. The multidisciplinary workshops to be discussed have developed and changed over the past decade and provide a safe but realistic learning environment for students from health and social care backgrounds to experience the difficulties and barriers to good multidisciplinary working, to better understand others' perspectives and activities and consider and develop new and better practical strategies for working with multidisciplinary professional colleagues, children and families. All of the workshops are underpinned by specific discipline-focused theoretical work.

  5. The Multidisciplinary Economics of Money Laundering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferwerda, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314405526

    2012-01-01

    Money laundering has been studied for many years, but mainly by lawyers and criminologists. This dissertation presents a number of ways on how an economist – mainly in a multidisciplinary fashion – can contribute to this field of research. This dissertation answers four important questions about

  6. Selective Mutism in Elementary School: Multidisciplinary Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddan, Jane J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents the symptoms of selective mutism and historical background for treatment. It provides a case study which illustrates successful multidisciplinary treatment outcomes for a child who was selectively mute. Issues relevant to speech-language pathologists working with elementary school children are discussed and treatment guidelines provided.…

  7. Placenta accreta and anesthesia: A multidisciplinary approach

    OpenAIRE

    R S Khokhar; J Baaj; M U Khan; F A Dammas; N Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Placenta accreta (an abnormally adherent placenta) is one of the two leading causes of peripartum hemorrhage and the most common indication for peripartum hysterectomy. Placenta accreta may be associated with significant maternal hemorrhage at delivery owing to the incomplete placental separation. When placenta accreta is diagnosed before delivery, a multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome.

  8. Placenta accreta and anesthesia: A multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Khokhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Placenta accreta (an abnormally adherent placenta is one of the two leading causes of peripartum hemorrhage and the most common indication for peripartum hysterectomy. Placenta accreta may be associated with significant maternal hemorrhage at delivery owing to the incomplete placental separation. When placenta accreta is diagnosed before delivery, a multidisciplinary approach may improve patient outcome.

  9. Towards multidisciplinary support tools for innovation tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Bakker, H.M.; Chechurin, L.S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper highlights the imperative need for innovation and characterizes a promising support tool to stimulate this process. The importance of innovation for both a global economy and specifically for engineering education is discussed. Additionally, the urgency for multidisciplinary skills for

  10. Impact of a Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Curriculum on an Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Dawn M; Miladinovic, Branko; Caselnova, Petra M; Holmström, Shelly W

    2016-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a new pediatric and adolescent gynecology (PAG) curriculum for improving obstetrics/gynecology resident physician knowledge and comfort level in patient management and to describe the current deficiencies in resident physician knowledge and comfort level in PAG. A PAG curriculum was implemented for the obstetrics/gynecology resident physicians (n = 20) at the University of South Florida in July 2013. Before and after the curriculum was introduced, resident physicians and recent graduates of the residency program completed a survey to assess their comfort level and a knowledge assessment consisting of 20 case-based questions. University-based residency program. Resident physicians and recent resident physician graduates in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Introduction of a PAG curriculum during the 2013-2014 academic year. Improvement in resident physicians' comfort level and knowledge in PAG. After the curriculum was introduced, comfort increased in examining the genitals of a pediatric gynecology patient (median difference = 1.5; P = .003) and history-taking, physical examination skills, and management (median difference = 1; P = .002) compared with before the curriculum. There was no significant difference in overall quiz score (15.5 ± 1.87 vs 15.8 ± 1.3; P = .78). A curriculum in PAG did improve resident comfort level in managing PAG patients, but did not significantly improve knowledge of this topic. Copyright © 2016.

  11. How does the medical graduates' self-assessment of their clinical competency differ from experts' assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The assessment of the performance of medical school graduates during their first postgraduate years provides an early indicator of the quality of the undergraduate curriculum and educational process. The objective of this study was to assess the clinical competency of medical graduates, as perceived by the graduates themselves and by the experts. Methods This is a hospital based cross-sectional study. It covered 105 medical graduates and 63 experts selected by convenient sampling method. A self-administered questionnaire covering the different areas of clinical competency constructed on a five-point Likert scale was used for data collection. Data processing and analysis were performed using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) 16.0. The mean, frequency distribution, and percentage of the variables were calculated. A non-parametric Kruskal Wallis test was applied to verify whether the graduates' and experts' assessments were influenced by the graduates' variables such as age, gender, experience, type of hospital, specialty and location of work at a (p ≤ 0.05) level of significance. Results The overall mean scores for experts' and graduates' assessments were 3.40 and 3.63, respectively (p= 0.035). Almost 87% of the graduates perceived their competency as good and very good in comparison with only 67.7% by experts. Female and male graduates who rated themselves as very good were 33.8% and 25% respectively. More than 19% of the graduates in the age group > 30 years perceived their clinical competency as inadequate in contrast with only 6.2% of the graduates in the youngest age group. Experts rated 40% of the female graduates as inadequate versus 20% of males, (p= 0.04). More than 40% of the graduates in younger age group were rated by experts as inadequate, versus 9.7% of the higher age group >30 years (p = 0.03). Conclusion There was a wide discrepancy between the graduates' self-assessment and experts' assessment, particularly in the level

  12. The Component Packaging Problem: A Vehicle for the Development of Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Georges; Bridgewood, Michael; Figliola, Richard; Greenstein, Joel; Kostreva, Michael; Nowaczyk, Ronald; Stevenson, Steve

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes academic research which has resulted in an increased appreciation for multidisciplinary efforts among our students, colleagues and administrators. It has also generated a number of research ideas that emerged from the interaction between disciplines. Overall, 17 undergraduate students and 16 graduate students benefited directly from the NASA grant: an additional 11 graduate students were impacted and participated without financial support from NASA. The work resulted in 16 theses (with 7 to be completed in the near future), 67 papers or reports mostly published in 8 journals and/or presented at various conferences (a total of 83 papers, presentations and reports published based on NASA inspired or supported work). In addition, the faculty and students presented related work at many meetings, and continuing work has been proposed to NSF, the Army, Industry and other state and federal institutions to continue efforts in the direction of multidisciplinary and recently multi-objective design and analysis. The specific problem addressed is component packing which was solved as a multi-objective problem using iterative genetic algorithms and decomposition. Further testing and refinement of the methodology developed is presently under investigation. Teaming issues research and classes resulted in the publication of a web site, (http://design.eng.clemson.edu/psych4991) which provides pointers and techniques to interested parties. Specific advantages of using iterative genetic algorithms, hurdles faced and resolved, and institutional difficulties associated with multi-discipline teaming are described in some detail.

  13. ASTRO's 2007 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E.; Gerbi, Bruce J.; Price, Robert A.; Balter, James M.; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Hughes, Lesley; Huang, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a curriculum for physics education. The document described a 54-hour course. In 2006, the committee reconvened to update the curriculum. The committee is composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions. Simultaneously, members have associations with American Association of Physicists in Medicine, ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, American Board of Radiology, and American College of Radiology. Representatives from the latter two organizations are key to provide feedback between the examining organizations and ASTRO. Subjects are based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements (particles and hyperthermia), whereas the majority of subjects and appropriated hours/subject were developed by consensus. The new curriculum is 55 hours, containing new subjects, redistribution of subjects with updates, and reorganization of core topics. For each subject, learning objectives are provided, and for each lecture hour, a detailed outline of material to be covered is provided. Some changes include a decrease in basic radiologic physics, addition of informatics as a subject, increase in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and migration of some brachytherapy hours to radiopharmaceuticals. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in late 2006. It is hoped that physicists will adopt the curriculum for structuring their didactic teaching program, and simultaneously, American Board of Radiology, for its written examination. American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee added suggested references, a glossary, and a condensed version of lectures for a Postgraduate Year 2 resident physics orientation. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, subject matter will be updated again in 2 years

  14. Using Reflections of Recent Resident Graduates and their Pediatric Colleagues to Evaluate a Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Kamei, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purposes: In response to the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandate for residency programs to use feedback to improve its educational program, we piloted a novel evaluation strategy of a residency program using structured interviews of resident graduates working in a primary care practice and their physician associates. Methods: A research assistant performed a structured telephone interview. Quantitative data assessing the graduate’s self-assessment and the graduate’s clinical practice by the associate were analyzed. In addition, we performed a qualitative analysis of the interviews. Results: Thirteen resident graduates in primary care practice and seven physician practice associates participated in the study. Graduate self-assessment revealed high satisfaction with their residency training and competency. The associates judged our graduates as highly competent and mentioned independent decision-making and strong interpersonal skills (such as teamwork and communication as important. They specifically cited the graduate’s skills in intensive care medicine and adolescent medicine as well as communication and teamwork skills as important contributions to their practice. Conclusions: The ACGME Outcomes Project, which increases the emphasis on educational outcomes in the accreditation of residency education programs, requires programs to provide evidence of its effectiveness in preparing residents for practice. Direct assessment of the competency of our physician graduates in practice using structured interviews of graduates and their practice associates provide useful feedback information to a residency program as part of a comprehensive evaluation plan of our program’s curriculum and can be used to direct future educational initiatives of our training program

  15. Mental health workers. Graduation daze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Carol

    2003-09-11

    PCTs are likely to miss the national target on employment of graduate mental health workers. Pilots are showing success in reducing referrals. Managers must address career progression problems and define roles more clearly.

  16. Graduate Courses in Argumentation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, William L.; Follert, Vincent F.

    1986-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of graduate courses in argumentation theory. Includes data on types of courses, theorists, historical and basic concepts in argument, everyday argument, resources (books and articles), etc. (PD)

  17. Curriculum Guidelines for Periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines describe the interrelationships of this and other dental fields, give an overview of the curriculum and its primary educational objectives, and outline the suggested prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, and faculty requirements. (MSE)

  18. Curriculum and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Joseph

    1971-01-01

    Paper presented at the Summer Meeting of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf held in Philadelphia, June 24-27, 1970. Discussed are concepts of curriculum development, cognitive development, and educational methods with implications for the handicapped. (CB)

  19. Graduate School and Fellowship Discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles Reed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-25

    This was a presentation presented for the Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School. This is a set of slides about how to prepare for college, specifically graduate school. It gives instructions for succeeding and getting into a good school with financial aid through assistantships and scholarships, specifically applying to engineering backgrounds. Also, there are tips given for applying for fellowships and concludes with some general recommendations for graduate school.

  20. Class Room Seminar and Journal Club (CRSJC) as an Effective Teaching Learning Tool: Perception to Post Graduation Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Sunita; Dahiya, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Theory and practicals are two essential components of pharmacy course curriculum; but in addition to appearing and passing examination with good score grades, pharmacy post graduation (PG) pursuing students are essentially required to develop some professional skills which might not be attained solely by conventional class room programs. This…

  1. A mixed-methods evaluation of a multidisciplinary point of care ultrasound program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Parsons, Michael; Renouf, Tia; Boyd, Sarah; Rogers, Peter

    2018-04-24

    Point of Care Ultrasound (PoCUS) is well established within emergency medicine, however, the availability of formal training for other clinical disciplines is limited. Memorial University has established a cost-efficient, multidisciplinary PoCUS training program focusing on training residents' discipline-specific ultrasound skills. This study evaluates the skills, knowledge, and attitudes of residents who participated in the program. Analysis was conducted using a mixed-methods, sequential exploratory approach. Initially, a focus group of seven first year residents was conducted to generate themes that were used to guide development of a survey administered to residents over a two-year period. Thirty residents responded to the survey (response rate 63.8%) with 53.3% meeting the training requirements for focused assessment using sonography in trauma, 43.3% for pleural effusion, 40.0% for aortic aneurysms, and 40.0% for cardiac scans. Early pregnancy assessment was the skill of least interest with 46.6% not interested. Over half the residents (53.6%) agreed or strongly agreed that a multidisciplinary program met their needs while 21.4% disagreed. The focus group found the multidisciplinary approach adequate. A single PoCUS curriculum has been shown to meet the needs and expectations of a majority of residents from multiple disciplines. It can enhance collaboration and bridge gaps between increasingly compartmentalized practices of medicine.

  2. Graduate Information Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall McSweeney

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available It is one of six modules within the SIF (Strategic Innovative Fund funded Generic Skills Project for PHDS. The Generic Skills Project itself was just one strand within others Supporting the development of 4th level education in Ireland. The Graduate Information Skills module is a collaborative project led by NUI Galway with partners Trinity College Dublin and University College Cork. It is aimed at PHDS but Masters Research and post-docs will find the module of benefit too. The module is developed to offer both an online and face-to-face environment and be customizable with eLearning environments. Project launched in 2007 and has a three year cycle. We agreed to outsource online development and after a tendering process a company called eMedia were awarded the contract. We have piloted full content to PHDS in the three institutions involved and have reviewed feed-back received from attendees. We have also met with module presenters and authors to review their feed-back. The initial content while generic to all PHDS has Science Technology Medicine specific examples. We have complete Online content and module is being offered locally for face-to-face credited teaching. The module has in all units Learning Outcomes and is intended to be fully credited and evaluated for module completion. Funds allowing we would hope to develop Humanities specific content, add units such as on Writing Skills etc. We feel the module has created very good blended learning opportunities and is offered to students in a very contemporary design format. In an Irish context we feel the module offers a national resource that could be used by other institutions.

  3. Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Program Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    develop new curricula, materials and methods that will enhance the appreciation and learning of science, especially chemistry, for every undergraduate student such that all college graduates will command the knowledge and skills necessary to permit continued learning, lead productive lives, and make informed decisions. To accomplish this mission, a modular approach to teaching chemistry in the first two years of the undergraduate curriculum is being developed and evaluated. Modules of 1-4 weeks present fundamental chemistry to students in the context of a real-world problem or application and emphasize the links between chemistry and other disciplines. In collaboration with the ChemLinks Coalition, modules are being developed, tested and refined at the two- and four-year colleges and research universities comprising the two consortia. Curriculum materials, including text, lab, and multimedia components suitable for students from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds and usable at a wide variety of undergraduate institutions are being produced and distributed by an established publisher. Teaching methods that utilize current understanding of learning processes and emphasize active learning and the full spectrum of modern technologies are being supported, tested, and promulgated. A model support infrastructure for development and assessment of new materials and methods is being provided. A framework for continuous improvement of curricula should result from the work and be institutionalized within the consortium. Faculty workshops and sessions at national and regional meetings will be conducted to guarantee dissemination. Our consortium institutions now participate significantly in pre-service teacher training and education of advanced science or engineering technicians and are developing new programs in these areas. Thus, our program will strongly impact the Advanced Technological Education and Teacher Preparation Programs by developing modular materials appropriate to

  4. Diversity in Primary Teacher Education Gender Differences in Student Factors and Curriculum Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerdink, Gerda; Bergen, Theo; Dekkers, Hetty

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands only a small number of male students opt for primary school teaching and a relatively large percentage of them leave without graduating. A small-scale research project was set up to explore the question: Can gender-specific student factors be identified in relation to the initial teacher education curriculum that leads to the…

  5. Self-Efficacy, Curriculum Content, Practicum Experience, and the Interest of Social Work Students in Gerontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the linkages among perceptions of self-efficacy, curriculum, and field experience on students' attitudes and interest in working with older adults. Graduate level social work students were surveyed regarding perceived self-efficacy to intervene with older adult clients, the amount of aging content in the master of social…

  6. Measuring Course Competencies in a School of Business: The Use of Standardized Curriculum and Rubrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jane Whitney

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the growing emphasis on measurement of course competencies by individual college students through two course examples, an undergraduate course in managing change and conflict and a graduate course in human resource management. The author explains how standardized curriculum and assignment rubrics are being used to measure…

  7. Searching for the Core of Journalism Education: Program Directors Disagree on Curriculum Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Robin; Davenport, Lucinda D.

    2012-01-01

    To carry out their mission of preparing students to be successful journalism professionals, educators make important decisions on the core curriculum: the common courses that all journalism students must take to graduate, no matter their area of emphasis or academic constraints. This national study of U.S. journalism program directors shows they…

  8. Integrating Ethics across the Curriculum: A Pilot Study to Assess Students' Ethical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Susan L.; Mansfield, Nancy Reeves; Sherman, Margaret B.

    2012-01-01

    At Georgia State University (GSU), undergraduate and graduate business students are introduced to ethical theory and decision making in the required legal environment of business course, but ethics instruction in the functional areas is sporadic and uncoordinated. After a broad overview of the history of ethics in the business curriculum in Part…

  9. The Relationship between Curriculum Change and Student Outcomes in a Registered Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Nursing schools face the challenge of improving student academic performance and completion rates. The current supply of newly graduated nurses fails to meet the increasing demands of society. In 2009, Cochise College responded by implementing a major change in their curriculum to improve student retention and academic performance. The problem…

  10. Enhancing the Undergraduate Industrial Engineering Curriculum: Defining Desired Characteristics and Emerging Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Hamidreza; Sala-Diakanda, Serge; Furterer, Sandra; Rabelo, Luis; Crumpton-Young, Lesia; Williams, Kent

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the results of an initial research study conducted to identify the desired professional characteristics of an industrial engineer with an undergraduate degree and the emerging topic areas that should be incorporated into the curriculum to prepare industrial engineering (IE) graduates for the future workforce.…

  11. Identification of Industry Needs with Hospitality Management Curriculum Development: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayburry, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify a well-defined, comprehensive portrait of knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) expected of students graduating from baccalaureate institutions conferring four-year degrees in hospitality management and further, to utilize those KSAs as foundations for curriculum development. This study provided a…

  12. "Bush Law 101": Realising Place Conscious Pedagogy in the Law Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Amanda; Mundy, Trish; Nielsen, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, a team of academics from six universities worked on an OLT-funded project, "Rethinking Law Curriculum: developing strategies to prepare law graduates for practice in rural and regional Australia." The project was motivated by the declining proportion of lawyers being attracted to and remaining in practice in rural and regional…

  13. Community Inquiry and Curriculum Development: A Relevant Education for Teachers about the Vietnam War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentith, Audrey M.; McCarry, David S.

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an innovative university-based project that connected graduate-level, preservice, and beginning teachers enrolled in a curriculum class for secondary and elementary teaching certification with a community-based war museum memorial and educational center. The course required these teachers to construct units on…

  14. [Multidisciplinary management of gastroplasty candidates: example of Avicenne Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihan, Hélène; Choleau, Carine; Catheline, Jean-Marc; Reach, Gérard; Fournier, Jean-Luc; Garnier, Nathalie; Robert, Françoise; Poulhès, Christiane; Sidotmane, Fatma; Bénichou, Joseph; Cohen, Régis

    2008-03-01

    The decision to perform gastroplasty must be made by a multidisciplinary team. This organization ensures compliance with good practice guidelines. Multidisciplinary management after surgery is also essential but patients' adhesion to follow-up is relatively poor.

  15. The critical thinking curriculum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, William Haviland

    The Critical Thinking Curriculum Model (CTCM) utilizes a multidisciplinary approach that integrates effective learning and teaching practices with computer technology. The model is designed to be flexible within a curriculum, an example for teachers to follow, where they can plug in their own critical issue. This process engages students in collaborative research that can be shared in the classroom, across the country or around the globe. The CTCM features open-ended and collaborative activities that deal with current, real world issues which leaders are attempting to solve. As implemented in the Critical Issues Forum (CIF), an educational program administered by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the CTCM encompasses the political, social/cultural, economic, and scientific realms in the context of a current global issue. In this way, students realize the importance of their schooling by applying their efforts to an endeavor that ultimately will affect their future. This study measures student attitudes toward science and technology and the changes that result from immersion in the CTCM. It also assesses the differences in student learning in science content and problem solving for students involved in the CTCM. A sample of 24 students participated in classrooms at two separate high schools in New Mexico. The evaluation results were analyzed using SPSS in a MANOVA format in order to determine the significance of the between and within-subjects effects. A comparison ANOVA was done for each two-way MANOVA to see if the comparison groups were equal. Significant findings were validated using the Scheffe test in a Post Hoc analysis. Demographic information for the sample population was recorded and tracked, including self-assessments of computer use and availability. Overall, the results indicated that the CTCM did help to increase science content understanding and problem-solving skills for students, thereby positively effecting critical thinking. No matter if the

  16. Practice transition in graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Robyn; Piro, Nancy; Katznelson, Laurence; Gephart, Melanie Hayden

    2017-10-01

    Debt repayment, professional negotiation and practice management skills are vital to a successful medical practice, yet are undervalued and seldom taught in graduate medical education. Medical residents need additional training to confidently transition to independent practice, requiring the development of novel curricula. Medical residents need additional training to confidently transition to independent practice METHODS: We developed a trial practice management curriculum to educate senior residents and fellows through voluntary workshops. Topics discussed in the workshops included debt repayment, billing compliance, medical malpractice, contract negotiations, and lifestyle and financial management. Resident self-confidence was assessed, and feedback was obtained through voluntary survey responses before and after attendance at a workshop, scored using a Likert scale. Twenty-five residents from 20 specialties attended a 1-day session incorporating all lectures; 53 residents from 17 specialties attended a re-designed quarterly session with one or two topics per session. Survey evaluations completed before and after the workshop demonstrated an improvement in residents' self-assessment of confidence in contract negotiations (p practice (p practice. One hundred per cent of respondents agreed that the presentation objectives were relevant to their needs as residents. Participant responses indicated a need for structured education in practice management for senior trainees. Senior residents and fellows will benefit most from curricula, but have high familial and professional demands on their schedules. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  17. Promoting convergence: The integrated graduate program in physical and engineering biology at Yale University, a new model for graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Dorottya B; Mochrie, Simon G J; O'Hern, Corey S; Pollard, Thomas D; Regan, Lynne

    2016-11-12

    In 2008, we established the Integrated Graduate Program in Physical and Engineering Biology (IGPPEB) at Yale University. Our goal was to create a comprehensive graduate program to train a new generation of scientists who possess a sophisticated understanding of biology and who are capable of applying physical and quantitative methodologies to solve biological problems. Here we describe the framework of the training program, report on its effectiveness, and also share the insights we gained during its development and implementation. The program features co-teaching by faculty with complementary specializations, student peer learning, and novel hands-on courses that facilitate the seamless blending of interdisciplinary research and teaching. It also incorporates enrichment activities to improve communication skills, engage students in science outreach, and foster a cohesive program cohort, all of which promote the development of transferable skills applicable in a variety of careers. The curriculum of the graduate program is integrated with the curricular requirements of several Ph.D.-granting home programs in the physical, engineering, and biological sciences. Moreover, the wide-ranging recruiting activities of the IGPPEB serve to enhance the quality and diversity of students entering graduate school at Yale. We also discuss some of the challenges we encountered in establishing and optimizing the program, and describe the institution-level changes that were catalyzed by the introduction of the new graduate program. The goal of this article is to serve as both an inspiration and as a practical "how to" manual for those who seek to establish similar programs at their own institutions. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(6):537-549, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Graduate Study in Psychology, 2013 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    APA Books, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Graduate Study in Psychology" is the best source of information related to graduate programs in psychology and provides information related to approximately 600 graduate programs in psychology in the U.S. and Canada. "Graduate Study in Psychology" contains information about: (1) number of applications received by a program;…

  19. Graduate students teaching elementary earth science through interactive classroom lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, T. E.; Goudge, T. A.; Jawin, E. R.; Robinson, F.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2005, graduate students in the Brown University Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Studies have volunteered to teach science to second-grade students at Vartan Gregorian Elementary School in Providence, RI. Initially developed to bring science into classrooms where it was not explicitly included in the curriculum, the graduate student-run program today incorporates the Providence Public Schools Grade 2 science curriculum into weekly, interactive sessions that engage the students in hypothesis-driven science. We will describe the program structure, its integration into the Providence Public Schools curriculum, and 3 example lessons relevant to geology. Lessons are structured to develop the students' ability to share and incorporate others' ideas through written and oral communication. The volunteers explain the basics of the topic and engage the students with introductory questions. The students use this knowledge to develop a hypothesis about the upcoming experiment, recording it in their "Science Notebooks." The students record their observations during the demonstration and discuss the results as a group. The process culminates in the students using their own words to summarize what they learned. Activities of particular interest to educators in geoscience are called "Volcanoes!", "The "Liquid Race," and "Phases of the Moon." The "Volcanoes!" lesson explores explosive vs. effusive volcanism using two simulated volcanoes: one explosive, using Mentos and Diet Coke, and one effusive, using vinegar and baking soda (in model volcanoes that the students construct in teams). In "Liquid Race," which explores viscosity and can be integrated into the "Volcanoes!" lesson, the students connect viscosity to flow speed by racing liquids down a ramp. "Phases of the Moon" teaches the students why the Moon has phases, using ball and stick models, and the terminology of the lunar phases using cream-filled cookies (e.g., Oreos). These lessons, among many others

  20. Psychomotor skills for the undergraduate medical curriculum in a developing country--Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rashida; Naqvi, Zoon; Wolfhagen, Ineke

    2005-03-01

    To identify essential psychomotor skills for all the medical graduates of an undergraduate programme in Pakistan. Twenty-five physicians practising in a tertiary care centre and ninety primary care physicians used a Likert's scale, ranging from "very essential" to"not required at all", to mark 99 psychomotor skills in the undergraduate medical curriculum in Pakistan. Overall the opinions of both the groups about the essential skills matched except for a few areas. This study provides baseline data about psychomotor skills that a medical graduate in developing countries should be able to perform. Further studies will be undertaken by involving other stakeholders to identify and incorporate these skills in the undergraduate medical curriculum, thereby enabling graduates to practice in all the settings in Pakistan.

  1. Aderência de cursos de graduação em enfermagem às diretrizes curriculares nacionais na perspectiva do sistema único de saúde Adherencia de cursos de graduación en enfermería a las directrices curriculares nacionales en la perspectiva del sistema único de salud Tack in the nursing graduate courses according to the curriculum national guidelines in the perspective of the sistema único de saúde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josicelia Dumêt Fernandes

    2013-03-01

    su proceso formativo. Los resultados del estudio evidencian la necesidad de fortalecer el proceso de formación de enfermería en los escenarios dentro de la red de servicios de salud.The study aimed to grasp the record of the didactic-pedagogic coherence in nursing graduate courses with the National Curriculum Guidelines for Nursing in the Unified Public Health System (SUS - Sistema Unico de Saude perspective, according to students perceptions. The exploratory/descriptive qualitative study took place in four nursing graduate programs in a northeastern city in Brazil. The subjects were students who, through interviews, have indicated that the relationship among the institutions that form the SUS takes place at the time of practices implementations, as well as in the teaching of the principles and guidelines from SUS, moreover, in the curricular activities and in the research and extension projects. Others have also mentioned not realizing such relationship in their academic process. The study results revealed the need of strengthen the nursing education process towards the proper health services system.

  2. Recent advances in multidisciplinary critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, Stijn; Afonso, Elsa; Labeau, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit is a work environment where superior dedication is crucial for optimizing patients' outcomes. As this demanding commitment is multidisciplinary in nature, it requires special qualities of health care workers and organizations. Thus research in the field covers a broad spectrum of activities necessary to deliver cutting-edge care. However, given the numerous research articles and education activities available, it is difficult for modern critical care clinicians to keep up with the latest progress and innovation in the field. This article broadly summarizes new developments in multidisciplinary intensive care. It provides elementary information about advanced insights in the field via brief descriptions of selected articles grouped by specific topics. Issues considered include care for heart patients, mechanical ventilation, delirium, nutrition, pressure ulcers, early mobility, infection prevention, transplantation and organ donation, care for caregivers, and family matters. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  3. Initial Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozoroski, L. P.; Geiselhart, K. A.; Padula, S. L.; Li, W.; Olson, E. D.; Campbell, R. L.; Shields, E. W.; Berton, J. J.; Gray, J. S.; Jones, S. M.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Within the Supersonics (SUP) Project of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), an initial multidisciplinary design & analysis framework has been developed. A set of low- and intermediate-fidelity discipline design and analysis codes were integrated within a multidisciplinary design and analysis framework and demonstrated on two challenging test cases. The first test case demonstrates an initial capability to design for low boom and performance. The second test case demonstrates rapid assessment of a well-characterized design. The current system has been shown to greatly increase the design and analysis speed and capability, and many future areas for development were identified. This work has established a state-of-the-art capability for immediate use by supersonic concept designers and systems analysts at NASA, while also providing a strong base to build upon for future releases as more multifidelity capabilities are developed and integrated.

  4. Assessment of graduate orthodontic programs in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas; Orellana, Maria

    2013-04-01

    This study collected information on four main aspects of U.S. and Canadian orthodontic programs: demographic profiles of residents, requirements for graduation, graduate curriculum, and number of faculty and staff members. Program directors at seventy U.S. and Canadian orthodontic programs were invited to participate in a twenty-question survey and to distribute a ten-question survey to their residents. Twenty program directors and eighty-four residents completed the anonymous, online surveys on Qualtrics.com in July-August 2010. The average age of surveyed residents was 29.6 years of age; 73 percent were non-Hispanic white, with 14 percent Asian/Asian-American, 5 percent Hispanic, and 1 percent African American. A small percentage of residents (13 percent) were foreign-trained. The majority of residents (64 percent) were male. There was a wide variety of clinical and didactic requirements in the programs. Almost all programs emphasized treatment with functional appliances and clear aligners. An average of three full-time and ten part-time faculty members were dedicated to each residency program. This survey reveals a potential shortage of minority orthodontic residents currently being trained in orthodontic programs, in addition to several commonalities and differences among the programs' curricula, graduation requirements, and numbers of faculty and staff members. This preliminary survey will hopefully inspire measures to address the discrepancies revealed, particularly the lack of minority students and full-time faculty members.

  5. The Multidisciplinary Economics of Money Laundering

    OpenAIRE

    Ferwerda, J.

    2012-01-01

    Money laundering has been studied for many years, but mainly by lawyers and criminologists. This dissertation presents a number of ways on how an economist – mainly in a multidisciplinary fashion – can contribute to this field of research. This dissertation answers four important questions about money laundering: Why should we fight money laundering? How is money laundered? In which sectors is money laundered? And how can we fight money laundering? The literature mentions 25 effects of money ...

  6. Nível de percepção dos alunos egressos de um curso de administração sobre a adequação do currículo às atividades profissionais Marketing perceptions of business administration graduates about changes that were made in their curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Renato Kitahara

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A adequação do conteúdo programático dos cursos de Administração, com vistas à formação de profissionais intelectualmente preparados e competitivos para o mercado profissional, é uma questão tratada continuamente pelas universidades. Este artigo analisa estatisticamente se as modificações dos currículos disciplinares ocorridas no curso de Administração de uma universidade estadual entre 1980 e 2004 foram percebidas pelos alunos de graduação e, portanto, se houve uma efetiva comunicação mercadológica. Nesta survey eletrônica, graduados já inseridos no mercado de trabalho, em diversos setores da economia, auto-avaliaram sua percepção sobre a adequação ou não do conhecimento adquirido no curso às necessidades de seu exercício profissional. São considerados, como fatores importantes do modelo, o setor da economia em que o graduado atua, o ano de conclusão do curso e sua idade na época. A interpretação dos dados utilizará as técnicas estatísticas multivariadas de Análise de Correspondência e de Regressão Logística Multinomial. A análise cobriu 26 diferentes tipos de conhecimentos acadêmicos relacionados às diversas disciplinas oferecidas no curso, e a amostra consta de 212 casos.The adequacy of administration courses for the education of intellectually prepared and competitive professionals is an issue continuously addressed by universities. Business administration graduates of a state university, already employed, were surveyed by an e-mail self-evaluation and statistically analyzed to measure perception of modifications made in their curricular disciplines between 1980 and 2004, for the purpose of evaluating effective marketing communication. They were asked if the knowledge acquired during the course was adequate for their professional needs. The sector of the economy of the graduate, year of graduation and student age at the time were considered to have an important bearing on the subject

  7. Dual US-Europe Graduate Degrees in Volcanology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W. I.; van Wyk Devries, B.; Calder, E. S.; Tibaldi, A.

    2010-12-01

    Michigan Tech, Buffalo, Universite Blaise Pascal and University of Milan Bicocca have formed an educational consortium to offer dual MS degrees in volcanology and geotechniques. Students in the program spend half of their MS in Europe and half in the US and have graduate advisory committees that bridge the Atlantic. The new program combines the expertise of four campuses and give students a broader choice of study options than any one campus can offer, while building an international professional experience. The initiative is funded jointly by the US Department of Education and the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA) of the European Community. Volcanology and geotechniques are global concerns: the volcanological community is fully globalized, while international consortia now deal with major geotechnical problems. Importantly, both fields require clear appreciation of specific local cultural, social and economical conditions. The new generation of researchers and professionals require international vision, but also the ability to understand local conditions. This masters specifically answers this need. This program will give students a language and cultural training in American English, French and Italian, as well as a wide course choice to meet each individual’s professional requirements. Students benefit from both research and professional approaches, acquiring a sound multidisciplinary profile for an excellent start to their careers. The trained INVOGE masters students will: meet a clear need for professionals/researchers with broad volcanology/geotechniques skills, and provide a workforce with international vision, but capable of addressing local projects. The project is innovative, combining international experience, strong multidisciplinary grounding and a broad subject range: students can choose among many possible advanced coursework and research combinations, and can have a broad choice of graduate advisors, field sites and

  8. Spatial Graduation of Fuel Taxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rietveld, P.; Van Vuuren, D. [Tinbergen Institute, Labor, Region and Environment, Amsterdam/Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bruinsma, F. [Department of Spatial Economics, Faculty of Economics and Econometrics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1999-06-01

    Substantial differences exist among fuel taxes in various countries. These differences represent a form of fiscal competition that has undesirable side effects because it leads to cross-border fuelling and hence to extra kilometres driven. One possible way of solving the problem of low fuel taxes in neighbouring countries is to introduce a spatial differentiation of taxes: low near the border and higher further away. This paper contains an empirical analysis of the consequences of such a spatial graduation of fuel taxes for the Netherlands. We will analyse impacts on fuelling behaviour, vehicle kilometres driven, tax receipts, and sales by owners of gas stations. The appropriate slope of the graduation curve is also discussed. Our conclusion is that in a small country such as the Netherlands, a spatial graduation of fuel taxes will lead to substantial changes in fuelling behaviour, even when the graduation curve is not steep. Depending on the graduation profile implemented, the spatial differentiation of fuel tax will give rise to substantial problems for owners of gas stations in areas with decreasing fuel sales. 9 refs.

  9. Spatial Graduation of Fuel Taxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rietveld, P.; Van Vuuren, D.; Bruinsma, F.

    1999-06-01

    Substantial differences exist among fuel taxes in various countries. These differences represent a form of fiscal competition that has undesirable side effects because it leads to cross-border fuelling and hence to extra kilometres driven. One possible way of solving the problem of low fuel taxes in neighbouring countries is to introduce a spatial differentiation of taxes: low near the border and higher further away. This paper contains an empirical analysis of the consequences of such a spatial graduation of fuel taxes for the Netherlands. We will analyse impacts on fuelling behaviour, vehicle kilometres driven, tax receipts, and sales by owners of gas stations. The appropriate slope of the graduation curve is also discussed. Our conclusion is that in a small country such as the Netherlands, a spatial graduation of fuel taxes will lead to substantial changes in fuelling behaviour, even when the graduation curve is not steep. Depending on the graduation profile implemented, the spatial differentiation of fuel tax will give rise to substantial problems for owners of gas stations in areas with decreasing fuel sales. 9 refs

  10. Renewable Energy Systems in the Power Electronics Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe; Teodorescu, Remus

    2005-01-01

    of the most important area is renewable energy systems. This paper will discuss the basic courses for the power electronics curriculum. It will also discuss how to teach power electronic systems efficiently through a projectoriented and problem-based learning approach with Aalborg University in Denmark...... as a full-scale example. Different project examples will be given as well as important laboratories for adjustable speed drives and renewable energy systems which are used at the university are described.......Power Electronics is still an emerging technology and its applications are increasing. The primary function is to convert electrical energy from one stage to another and it is used in many different applications. The power electronics curriculum is multidisciplinary covering fields like devices...

  11. [Needs assessment of a core curriculum for residency training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Young-Mee; Chang, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Ae-Ri

    2015-09-01

    The core curriculum in graduate medical education (GME) is an educational program that covers the minimum body of knowledge and skills that is required of all residents, regardless of their specialty. This study examined the opinions of stakeholders in GME regarding the core curriculum. A questionnaire was administered at three tertiary hospitals that were affiliated with one university; 192 residents and 61 faculty members and attending physicians participated in the survey. The questionnaire comprised six items on physician competency and the needs for a core curriculum. Questions on subjects or topics and adequate training years for each topics were asked only to residents. Most residents (78.6%) and faculty members (86.9%) chose "medical expertise" as the "doctor's role in the 21st century." In contrast, communicator, manager, and collaborator were recognized by less than 30% of all participants. Most residents (74.1%) responded that a core curriculum is "necessary but not feasible," whereas 68.3% of faculty members answered that it is "absolutely needed." Regarding subjects that should be included in the core curriculum, residents and faculty members had disparate preferences- residents preferred more "management of a private clinic" and "financial management," whereas faculty members desired "medical ethics" and "communication skills." Residents and faculty members agree that residents should develop a wide range of competencies in their training. However, the perception of the feasibility and opinions on the contents of the core curriculum differed between groups. Further studies with larger samples should be conducted to define the roles and professional competencies of physicians and the needs for a core curriculum in GME.

  12. Money matters: a resident curriculum for financial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizell, Jason S; Berry, Katherine S; Kimbrough, Mary Katherine; Bentley, Frederick R; Clardy, James A; Turnage, Richard H

    2014-12-01

    A 2005 survey reported 87% of surgery program directors believed practice management training should occur during residency. However, only 8% of program directors believed residents received adequate training in practice management [1]. In addition to the gap in practice financial management knowledge, we recognized the need for training in personal finance among residents. A literature review and needs assessment led to the development of a novel curriculum for surgery residents combining principles of practice management and personal finance. An 18-h curriculum was administered over the 2012 academic year to 28 post graduate year 1-5 surgery residents and faculty. A self-assessment survey was given at the onset and conclusion of the curriculum [2]. Pre-tests and post-tests were given to objectively evaluate each twice monthly session's content. Self-perception of learning, interest, and acquired knowledge were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Initial self-assessment data revealed high interest in practice management and personal finance principles but a deficiency in knowledge of and exposure to these topics. Throughout the curriculum, interest increased. Residents believed their knowledge of these topics increased after completing the curriculum, and objective data revealed various impacts on knowledge. Although surgery residents receive less exposure to these topics than residents in other specialties, their need to know is no less. We developed, implemented, and evaluated a curriculum that bridged this gap in surgery education. After the curriculum, residents reported an increase in interest, knowledge, and responsible behavior relating to personal and practice financial management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The essential research curriculum for doctor of pharmacy degree programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mary W; Clay, Patrick G; Kennedy, W Klugh; Kennedy, Mary Jayne; Sifontis, Nicole M; Simonson, Dana; Sowinski, Kevin M; Taylor, William J; Teply, Robyn M; Vardeny, Orly; Welty, Timothy E

    2010-09-01

    In 2008, the American College of Clinical Pharmacy appointed the Task Force on Research in the Professional Curriculum to review and make recommendations on the essential research curriculum that should be part of doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree programs. The essential research curriculum provides all students with critical and analytical thinking and lifelong learning skills, which will apply to current and future practice and stimulate some students to pursue a career in this field. Eight key curricular competencies are as follows: identifying relevant problems and gaps in pharmacotherapeutic knowledge; generating a research hypothesis; designing a study to test the hypothesis; analyzing data results using appropriate statistical tests; interpreting and applying the results of a research study to practice; effectively communicating research and clinical findings to pharmacy, medical, and basic science audiences; interpreting and effectively communicating research and clinical findings to patients and caregivers; and applying regulatory and ethical principles when conducting research or using research results. Faculty are encouraged to use research-related examples across the curriculum in nonresearch courses and to employ interactive teaching methods to promote student engagement. Examples of successful strategies used by Pharm.D. degree programs to integrate research content into the curriculum are provided. Current pharmacy school curricula allow variable amounts of time for instructional content in research, which may or may not include hands-on experiences for students to develop research-related skills. Therefore, an important opportunity exists for schools to incorporate the essential research curriculum. Despite the challenges of implementing these recommendations, the essential research curriculum will position pharmacy school graduates to understand the importance of research and its applications to practice. This perspective is provided as an aid

  14. Occupational training in the health physics curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, R.J.; Ziemer, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    In response to projected demands for health physics personnel with field training at the bachelor's degree level, the Bionucleonics Department has revised its curriculum in Radiological Health to provide applied training in health physics. The basic program provides a strong background in math, physics, chemistry and biology and an in-depth background in the fundamentals of health physics and field training in applied health physics. The field training is also open to graduate students. The field exercises are coordinated with Purdue's Radiological Control Program and include such tasks as contamination and direct radiation surveys; facility and personnel decontamination; reactor, accelerator, and analytical and diagnostic X-ray monitoring; instrument calibration; personnel monitoring; and emergency planning and accident evaluation. In a weekly discussion period associated with the field exercises, the students evaluate their field experience, discuss assigned problems, and receive additional information on regulations, regulatory guides, and management of radiation protection programs

  15. Tracer Study of Dentistry Graduates of one Higher Education Institution in the Philippines from 2008 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Maderazo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This tracer study determines the employment status of the graduates of Doctor of Dental Medicine of Lyceum of the Philippines University (LPU from 2008-2012. It assessed the relevance of the Dentistry curriculum, knowledge, skills and attitude acquired by the graduates deemed to be relevant for their employment; identify the personal and professional characteristics and job placement of Dentistry graduates and the school related factors associated with their employment. This tracer study used a descriptive research design. The study described the experiences of the graduates before and after employment. The graduates conveyed their personal observations regarding the situations they faced after graduation. The findings showed that majority of the Dentistry graduate-respondents are presently employed except for one whose primary reason is family concern and decided not to find a job. Most of the graduates had their first job as associate dentist with recommendation from the department or alumni of the college and opted to put up their own private practice after 6 months. Rewarding salaries and benefits are the main reason for staying on the job and are all enjoying a professional career in dentistry with initial gross income of 25,000 pesos and above. The following school related factors for job placement such as curriculum and instruction for the general education and professional subjects, student services and faculty instruction were found to be relevant in meeting the demands of the graduates’ dental profession. And the following are the work related values gained by the graduates such a love for God, honesty and truth, professional integrity and leadership. These values were found to be very relevant in the practice of the profession.

  16. Flipped classroom model improves graduate student performance in cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tune, Johnathan D; Sturek, Michael; Basile, David P

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a traditional lecture-based curriculum versus a modified "flipped classroom" curriculum of cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology delivered to first-year graduate students. Students in both courses were provided the same notes and recorded lectures. Students in the modified flipped classroom were required to watch the prerecorded lectures before class and then attend class, where they received a quiz or homework covering material in each lecture (valued at 25% of the final grade) followed by a question and answer/problem-solving period. In the traditional curriculum, attending lectures was optional and there were no quizzes. Evaluation of effectiveness and student performance was achieved by having students in both courses take the same multiple-choice exams. Within a comparable group of graduate students, participants in the flipped course scored significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and weighted cumulative sections by an average of >12 percentage points. Exam averages for students in the flipped course also tended to be higher on the renal section by ∼11 percentage points (P = 0.06). Based on our experience and responses obtained in blinded student surveys, we propose that the use of homework and in-class quizzes were critical motivating factors that likely contributed to the increase in student exam performance. Taken together, our findings support that the flipped classroom model is a highly effective means in which to disseminate key physiological concepts to graduate students.

  17. The GenDev Curriculum Development Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'cunha, J

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the second Curriculum Development Workshop held in May 1997 at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) in Bangkok, Thailand. The workshop aimed to review critically and restructure the Gender and Development Studies (GenDev) curriculum and to assess AIT's role in training gender experts for the region. Participants included 22 people from 16 countries in Asia, Europe, and the US who were teaching graduate students about gender issues and who were activists with nongovernmental organizations working on gender issues. It was determined that the following were required courses: Culture, Knowledge and Gender Relations; Gender, Technology, and Development; Principles of Gender Research and Methodology in Science and Technology; and Gender Analysis and Field Methods. Other suggested core courses included: Gender and Natural Resource Management; Enterprise Management, Technology, and Gender; Gender and Agrarian Reform; Urbanization: A Gender Perspective; Gender-Responsive Development Planning; and Gender and Economic Change: Past and Present Concerns. Participants distinguished between GenDev courses offered to anyone attending AIT and training courses designed to produce gender experts in the region. The aim of training courses for AIT graduate students was to sensitize potential managers, technologists, and others on gender issues and to create awareness of the importance of including gender perspectives within decision-making, policy formation, and implementation. Training courses to produce gender experts should be directed to those with a prior background in gender studies and include gender analysis in field methods. Participants agreed that there should be an independent and autonomous field of gender and development studies. Participants made six recommendations for such a field of study.

  18. Medical Resident Workload at a Multidisciplinary Hospital in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Sadeghi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical resident workload has been shown to be associated with learning efficiency and patient satisfaction. However, there is limited evidence about it in developing countries. This study aimed to evaluate the medical resident workload in a multidisciplinary teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran.Methods: All medical residents at Shariati Hospital, a teaching hospital affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Science, who were working between November and December 2011 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. A self–reported questionnaire was used to gather information about their duty hours (including daily activities and shifts and financial issues.Results:135 (52.5% out of 257 residents responded to the questionnaire. 72 (53.3% residents were in surgical departments and 63 (46.7% were in non-surgical departments. Mean duty hours per month were significantly higher in surgical (350.8 ±76.7 than non-surgical (300.6±74.2 departments (p=0.001. Three cardiology (a non-surgical group residents (5.7% and 30 residents (41% in surgical groups (p<0.001 declared a number of “on-calls in the hospital” more than the approved number in the curriculum. The majority of residents (97.8% declared that their salary was not sufficient to manage their lives and they needed other financial resources. Conclusion: Medical residents at teaching hospitals in Iran suffer from high workloads and low income. There is a need to reduce medical resident workload and increase salary to improve worklife balance and finances.

  19. Impact of competence-based training on employability of Technical and Vocational graduates in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birhane Sime Geressu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to critically examine the impact of competence based training on employability of technical and vocational college graduates in Ethiopia. Mixed methods of research design, predominantly concurrent nested strategy were employed to conduct the study. The study involved 162 instructors, 123 Level III automotive technology trainees, 87 department heads and 89 graduates, a total of 461 respondents as a sample. Moreover, 24 respondents (6 industry owners, 6 TVET college deans, 6 competence-based process owners and 6 industry trainers’ leaders were purposely selected for interview and focus group discussion. Under the study, the researcher used employability of graduates as dependent variable and competency based training as independent variable. Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed for data analysis. The study result showed that technical and vocational education and training (TVET colleges in Ethiopia have been performing below expectations in developing demand-based curriculum and implementing competence-based training in TVET colleges and industries. As a result, among the graduates nearly 50 percent are not employed in the past two years. Hence, it is recommended that constantly consulting and involving relevant stakeholders in setting study profile, identifying intended learning outcomes and strengthening competence based learning style are vital for graduates to demonstrate employability skill, knowledge and attitude into the job that consequentially lead to graduate employment.First published online: 30 November 2017

  20. Rethinking the mathematics curriculum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyles, Celia; Woodhouse, Geoffrey

    1998-01-01

    At a time when political interest in mathematics education is at its highest, this book demonstrates that the issues are far from straightforward. A wide range of international contributors address such questions as: What is mathematics, and what is it for? What skills does mathematics education need to provide as technology advances? What are the implications for teacher education? What can we learn from past attempts to change the mathematics curriculum? Rethinking the Mathematics Curriculum offers stimulating discussions, showing much is to be learnt from the differences in culture, national expectations, and political restraints revealed in the book. This accessible book will be of particular interest to policy makers, curriculum developers, educators, researchers and employers as well as the general reader.

  1. Learners, teachers and curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2008-01-01

    of virtual e-learning, interviews with teachers and 10 learner participants in a virtual classroom setting, and discourse analysis of curriculum developed for the particular e-learning course The research has taken place in the context of a study of e-learning and virtual teaching of Danish as a Second...... language for adults. The research results indicate that teachers seem to compensate by trying to create virtual communities of learning. Learners, however, experience disembedded relations. Conversely, curriculum development, on tends to ‘exploit’ the conditions of disembedding social relations in e-learning......, locationally distant”. The aim of the paper is to analyse and discuss how different positions in e-learning settings result in different answers to modernity. These settings can be applied to either teacher, learner or curriculum positions. The research was based on a qualitative longitudinal case study...

  2. Graduate diplomas in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereznai, G. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) offers a graduate diploma program in nuclear technology that consists of a suite of six sub-specialties: Fuel, Materials and Chemistry; Reactor Systems; Operation and Maintenance; Safety, Licensing and Regulatory Affairs; Health Physics; and Radiological Applications. Four courses selected from a list that covers the knowledge and skill set of each sub-specialty have to be completed in order to gain a graduate diploma in the specific area. The program is designed to accommodate the needs of people working in the nuclear industry to upgrade their knowledge and skills, to promote career advancement and to provide a framework for lifelong learning. (author)

  3. Graduates beliefs about career management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Lepa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Career management is increasingly becoming an individuals' matter, despite the various activities organized by the different institutions to support career development and planning. An exploratory survey was conducted to determine what kind of beliefs graduates have about career management. Results indicate that graduates are aware of the importance of university knowledge for getting a job, the importance of knowledge and investment in education for positioning in the labor market, so they give priority to development opportunities that business brings opposed to the material rewards.

  4. Scientific Training in the Era of Big Data: A New Pedagogy for Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikat, Jay; Carsey, Thomas M; Fecho, Karamarie; Jeffay, Kevin; Krishnamurthy, Ashok; Mucha, Peter J; Rajasekar, Arcot; Ahalt, Stanley C

    2017-03-01

    The era of "big data" has radically altered the way scientific research is conducted and new knowledge is discovered. Indeed, the scientific method is rapidly being complemented and even replaced in some fields by data-driven approaches to knowledge discovery. This paradigm shift is sometimes referred to as the "fourth paradigm" of data-intensive and data-enabled scientific discovery. Interdisciplinary research with a hard emphasis on translational outcomes is becoming the norm in all large-scale scientific endeavors. Yet, graduate education remains largely focused on individual achievement within a single scientific domain, with little training in team-based, interdisciplinary data-oriented approaches designed to translate scientific data into new solutions to today's critical challenges. In this article, we propose a new pedagogy for graduate education: data-centered learning for the domain-data scientist. Our approach is based on four tenets: (1) Graduate training must incorporate interdisciplinary training that couples the domain sciences with data science. (2) Graduate training must prepare students for work in data-enabled research teams. (3) Graduate training must include education in teaming and leadership skills for the data scientist. (4) Graduate training must provide experiential training through academic/industry practicums and internships. We emphasize that this approach is distinct from today's graduate training, which offers training in either data science or a domain science (e.g., biology, sociology, political science, economics, and medicine), but does not integrate the two within a single curriculum designed to prepare the next generation of domain-data scientists. We are in the process of implementing the proposed pedagogy through the development of a new graduate curriculum based on the above four tenets, and we describe herein our strategy, progress, and lessons learned. While our pedagogy was developed in the context of graduate education

  5. Curriculum at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This Symposium presents curriculum design and content issues in a Scandinavian business school at its Centenary. The aim is an exploration of an educational institution at the interface of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) within the historical trends of the European Union. We hope...... of interdisciplinarity, use of text production as a tool in support of project and thesis writing, and the use of plurilingual content based teaching in a cooperative learning model for European studies. The history of one curriculum model initiated to educate better citizens, combining interdisciplinary methods...

  6. Perception of Summer Cooperative Graduates on Employers Generic Skills Preference, Haramaya University, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Aman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meeting the needs of employers and equipping graduates with employability skills are considered as among the shared responsibilities of Universities and different organizations. This study intends to assess the perception of summer cooperative graduates on their employers’ preference for generic skills to secure employment, based on their work-performance. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed for 150 summer cooperative students and 110 were received and used for analysis during the 2013 summer academic program. Both descriptive and empirical analyses were used to achieve the objectives. The One-way-ANOVA result showed statistically significant difference among respondents on the higher order thinking skills as first choice among employers. This implies that, employers of cooperative graduates prioritize higher order thinking skills than the basic academic and personal quality skills. Hence, there is a need to focus and imbed higher order thinking skills enhancing contents in the curriculum.

  7. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S McClintock

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Methods: The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Results: Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1 Information Fundamentals, (2 Information Systems, (3 Workflow and Process, and (4 Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012. Discussion: The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world

  8. Teaching optics in a multi-disciplinary curriculum: experience from optometry programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2007-06-01

    The Optometry program in Schools and Colleges of Optometry leads to a Doctor of Optometry (OD) degree in north America and is usually a post-baccalaureate course of study of four years duration. Historically Optometry developed out of Physics and/or applied optics programs. Optics, and more specifically, geometric optics and it's applications to the human eye plays a significant role in the education of an optometrist. In addition, optometrists are trained in physical optics as well as in radiometry/photometry. Considering the fact that most optometry students come to the program with a biological sciences background implies that educating these students require elucidation of "real-world" applications and clinical relevance to hold their interest. Even though the trend in optometric education in the past few years is to put more emphasis on biological sciences due to the increased scope of practice of the optometrist, optics still continues to play a major role in the training and career of an optometrist, especially with the advent of new technologies in treating low vision, measurement and correction of aberrations of the eye, etc.

  9. Food-Based Science Curriculum Increases 4th Graders Multidisciplinary Science Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, Jana A.; Carraway-Stage, Virginia G.; Cela, Artenida; Collins, Caitlin; Díaz, Sebastián R.; Collins, Angelo; Duffrin, Melani W.

    2013-01-01

    Health professionals and policymakers are asking educators to place more emphasis on food and nutrition education. Integrating these topics into science curricula using hand-on, food-based activities may strengthen students' understanding of science concepts. The Food, Math, and Science Teaching Enhancement Resource (FoodMASTER) Initiative is a…

  10. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface MM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Megan M Boniface,1 Sachin B Wani,2 Tracey E Schefter,3 Phillip J Koo,4 Cheryl Meguid,1 Stephen Leong,5 Jeffrey B Kaplan,6 Lisa J Wingrove,7 Martin D McCarter1 1Section of Surgical Oncology, Division of GI, Tumor and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Therapeutic and Interventional Endoscopy, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, 4Division of Radiology-Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, 5Division of Medical Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Denver, 7Department of Food and Nutrition Services, University of Colorado Hospital Cancer Center, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical, and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Keywords: tumor board, upper gastrointestinal malignancies, patient centered

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Multidisciplinary Rotorcraft Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Diskin, Boris; Biedron, Robert T.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Bauchau, Olivier A.

    2017-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis of rotorcraft simulations involving tightly coupled high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics and comprehensive analysis solvers is presented and evaluated. An unstructured sensitivity-enabled Navier-Stokes solver, FUN3D, and a nonlinear flexible multibody dynamics solver, DYMORE, are coupled to predict the aerodynamic loads and structural responses of helicopter rotor blades. A discretely-consistent adjoint-based sensitivity analysis available in FUN3D provides sensitivities arising from unsteady turbulent flows and unstructured dynamic overset meshes, while a complex-variable approach is used to compute DYMORE structural sensitivities with respect to aerodynamic loads. The multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis is conducted through integrating the sensitivity components from each discipline of the coupled system. Numerical results verify accuracy of the FUN3D/DYMORE system by conducting simulations for a benchmark rotorcraft test model and comparing solutions with established analyses and experimental data. Complex-variable implementation of sensitivity analysis of DYMORE and the coupled FUN3D/DYMORE system is verified by comparing with real-valued analysis and sensitivities. Correctness of adjoint formulations for FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces is verified by comparing adjoint-based and complex-variable sensitivities. Finally, sensitivities of the lift and drag functions obtained by complex-variable FUN3D/DYMORE simulations are compared with sensitivities computed by the multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis, which couples adjoint-based flow and grid sensitivities of FUN3D and FUN3D/DYMORE interfaces with complex-variable sensitivities of DYMORE structural responses.

  12. Multidisciplinary Techniques and Novel Aircraft Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Rogers, James L.; Raney, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The Aircraft Morphing Program at NASA Langley Research Center explores opportunities to improve airframe designs with smart technologies. Two elements of this basic research program are multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) and advanced flow control. This paper describes examples where MDO techniques such as sensitivity analysis, automatic differentiation, and genetic algorithms contribute to the design of novel control systems. In the test case, the design and use of distributed shape-change devices to provide low-rate maneuvering capability for a tailless aircraft is considered. The ability of MDO to add value to control system development is illustrated using results from several years of research funded by the Aircraft Morphing Program.

  13. American Vacuum Society: A multidisciplinary organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavis, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    This presentation is based upon that which was to be given by the Society President at the 25th National Symposium of the American Vacuum Society, 29 November 1978, in San Francisco, California. The talk to the Society by its President was an innovation of the 1979 Program Committee. The intention is that such a presentation be given each year at the awards acceptance plenary session along with those of the Welch and, when appropriate, Gaede--Langmuir awards. To be discussed are the recent highlights of Society activity, the direction the Society is taking, and an example of the multidisciplinary activities of Society members

  14. Graduate Level Training in Nutrition: An Integrated Model for Capacity Building- A National Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHEIKHOLESLAM, Robabeh; GHASSEMI, Hossein; GALAL, Osman; DJAZAYERY, Abolghassem; OMIDVAR, Nasrin; NOURMOHAMMADI, Issa; TUAZON, Ma. Antonia G.

    2015-01-01

    Iran has been active in human nutrition training for the past five decades, but the existing curricular programs do not equip the graduates with the knowledge and skills required for solving food security and nutritional problems of the country. Given this, the Nutrition Department (ND) of Iran’s Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHME) initiated a curricular reform to develop responsive graduate programs in key areas of nutrition that fill the existing gaps in nutrition training with the goal of improving nutrition policy-making and program development, implementation and evaluation. ND called for a request for proposals for a project entitled “Graduate Level Training in Nutrition”. Specifically, with technical assistance from leading academic institutions in Asia, North America and UK, seven new graduate programs were housed in three separate institutions, but coordinated so that together they form a broad multidisciplinary resource for graduate education and research. These seven-degree programs are MSc and PhD in Molecular/Cellular Nutrition, MSc and PhD in Nutritional Epidemiology, MSc and PhD in Food Policy and Nutrition Intervention, and MSc in Community Nutrition. The programs were prepared in collaboration and active participation of selected faculty members of the three Iranian universities, International Union of Nutritional Sciences and the University of Philippines at Los Baños. The development of these programs was made possible through a loan from the World Bank, under the Second Primary Health and Nutrition Project in the MOHME. PMID:25905083

  15. Graduate level training in nutrition: an integrated model for capacity building- a national report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslam, Robabeh; Ghassemi, Hossein; Galal, Osman; Djazayery, Abolghassem; Omidvar, Nasrin; Nourmohammadi, Issa; Tuazon, Ma Antonia G

    2015-03-01

    Iran has been active in human nutrition training for the past five decades, but the existing curricular programs do not equip the graduates with the knowledge and skills required for solving food security and nutritional problems of the country. Given this, the Nutrition Department (ND) of Iran's Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHME) initiated a curricular reform to develop responsive graduate programs in key areas of nutrition that fill the existing gaps in nutrition training with the goal of improving nutrition policy-making and program development, implementation and evaluation. ND called for a request for proposals for a project entitled "Graduate Level Training in Nutrition". Specifically, with technical assistance from leading academic institutions in Asia, North America and UK, seven new graduate programs were housed in three separate institutions, but coordinated so that together they form a broad multidisciplinary resource for graduate education and research. These seven-degree programs are MSc and PhD in Molecular/Cellular Nutrition, MSc and PhD in Nutritional Epidemiology, MSc and PhD in Food Policy and Nutrition Intervention, and MSc in Community Nutrition. The programs were prepared in collaboration and active participation of selected faculty members of the three Iranian universities, International Union of Nutritional Sciences and the University of Philippines at Los Baños. The development of these programs was made possible through a loan from the World Bank, under the Second Primary Health and Nutrition Project in the MOHME.

  16. EERE Resources for Graduate Students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-04-01

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a number of resources available for graduate students, including research positions, internships, and career-planning information to help you navigate the education-to-employment pathway in energy.

  17. Emotional Problems of Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenberg, Peter

    1969-01-01

    Describes the domination-submission relationship between professors and students at the graduate level. Stresses the prevalence of transferences, which are "exacerbated by reality factors which infantilize the student and magnify the omnipotence of the teachers. This dependence is not conductive to creativity, maturity, and intellectual…

  18. Nontraditional Student Graduation Rate Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan B.

    2014-01-01

    The prominence of discourse on postsecondary degree completion, student persistence, and retention has increased in the national dialogue. Heightened attention to college completion rates by the federal government and pressure to tie state funding to performance metrics associated with graduation rates are catalysts for the discussion.…

  19. The migration of university graduates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, Ina; Holm, Jacob Rubæk; Nielsen, Kristian

    Several studies have documented that highly educated citizens contribute to regional economic performance (Moretti, 2013; Faggian and McCann,2009b; Sterlacchini 2008). Moreover, Åstebro et al. (2012) emphasize the importance of promoting start-up by recent university graduates. Thus, the retentio...

  20. USO-Built Graduate School

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, van J.E.M.H.; Doevendans, C.H.; Verbeke, J.

    2003-01-01

    USO-Built is a distributed Graduate Research School under the CLUSTER (www.cluster.org) umbrella with its own aim, high-quality research and educational programs. It focuses on teaching research at the PhD and MPhil-level, concerns the technological domains of science aiming at balanced and implicit

  1. Back on Track to Graduate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfanz, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Talent Development program at Johns Hopkins, City Year, and Communities in Schools have created a new middle school and high school model that reduces dropout risk. Diplomas Now integrates strategies that are designed to raise student achievement, promotion, and graduation rates in the nation's most challenged high-poverty secondary schools. A…

  2. Graduates: Perceptions of MBA Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, Maynard T.; Oatsvall, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    MBA worth--who decides? Much of the current assessment comes from market driven and/or institutional perspectives. This research examines responses from Meredith College MBA graduates to determine their perceptions of the worth and value of their MBA experience.

  3. Community as Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Jim; Chow, Patricia; Schechter, Sandra R.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a project involving teachers, parents, and university researchers in collaborations to support multilingual children's development and use of language. Strategies for fostering an inclusive climate included building on the interests and resources of the local community, involving community members in curriculum development,…

  4. BIBLIOGRAPHY ON CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Graduate School of Education.

    THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY LISTS MATERIALS ON VARIOUS ASPECTS OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT. FORTY UNANNOTATED REFERENCES ARE PROVIDED FOR DOCUMENTS DATING FROM 1960 TO 1966. BOOKS, JOURNALS, REPORT MATERIALS, AND SOME UNPUBLISHED MANUSCRIPTS ARE LISTED IN SUCH AREAS AS COGNITIVE STUDIES, VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION, INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS, SCIENCE STUDIES, AND…

  5. Classical Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Judith W.

    2009-01-01

    The article identifies some key findings in pedagogical research over recent decades, placing them within a framework of logical curriculum development and current practice in quality assurance and enhancement. Throughout, the ideas and comments are related to the practice of teaching classics in university. (Contains 1 figure and 3 notes.)

  6. The Corporate Law Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofsky, James S.

    1976-01-01

    On the premise that corporate counsel must be an able diagnostician before he can focus on highly specialized and interrelated issues of business law, the author suggests an approach to corporate law curriculum in which the basic course balances the quality and quantity of material designed to create the needed sensitivity. (JT)

  7. School Curriculum in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Chie

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Japanese education system especially relevant to the school curriculum, which might support Japanese high performance in the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), mainly through Japanese policy documents. The Japanese education systems have been constructed by the local context of society and politics,…

  8. Latin Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Instructional Services.

    North Carolina's Latin curriculum guide describes the overarching concepts for Latin study, particularly at the secondary level, and outlines what students should know and be able to do at the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels. It is designed to provide directions to school districts as they plan and/or continue to improve their Latin…

  9. Box City Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Understanding the Built Environment, Prairie Village, KS.

    This curriculum packet contains two lesson plans about cities and architecture intended for use with students in upper elementary grades and middle schools. The first lesson plan, "City People, City Stories" (Jan Ham), states that understanding architecture and cities must begin with an understanding of the people of the city. The children create…

  10. Fashion Merchandising Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winthrop Coll., Rock Hill, SC. School of Home Economics.

    The curriculum guide (developed by the South Carolina Office of Vocational Education, the School of Home Economics of Winthrop College, business leaders, and distributive educators) is designed for the teaching of a one-year distributive education specialty program for 12th grade students interested in pursuing a career in fashion merchandising.…

  11. Graphic Communications. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck.

    This guide provides the basic foundation to develop a one-semester course based on the cluster concept, graphic communications. One of a set of six guides for an industrial arts curriculum at the junior high school level, it suggests exploratory experiences designed to (1) develop an awareness and understanding of the drafting and graphic arts…

  12. Curriculum Development Through Delphi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Gary; Jauch, Lawrence R.

    1978-01-01

    The basic Delphi methodology is outlined along with possible goals and objectives in a Delphi study. The results of an actual case study in the use of the Delphi method for higher education curriculum development are reported, and attention is given to the problem of selecting participants for a Delphi exercise. (Author/LBH)

  13. A Cooking Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Wynn D., Ed.

    This cooking curriculum, issued by the Washington District Early Childhood Council, details specific ways in which language arts, math, science, and social studies may be taught through cooking specific recipes. Cooking activities and recipes are presented for the fall, winter, and spring months, and guidelines are provided for preparing…

  14. K-6 Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueford, J. R.; And Others

    A unified science approach is incorporated in this K-6 curriculum mode. The program is organized into six major cycles. These include: (1) science, math, and technology cycle; (2) universe cycle; (3) life cycle; (4) water cycle; (5) plate tectonics cycle; and (6) rock cycle. An overview is provided of each cycle's major concepts. The topic…

  15. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  16. Across the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Marilyn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Across-the-curriculum articles focus on four areas. A math activity describes optical illusions and the properties of shapes. A hands-on science activity presents the chemistry of secret messages. A writing lesson helps students capture the essence of character. An art lesson presents a project on medieval castles. (SM)

  17. Curriculum, Curriculum Development, Curriculum Studies? Problematising Theoretical Ambiguities in Doctoral Theses in the Education Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Preez, Petro; Simmonds, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical ambiguities in curriculum studies result in conceptual mayhem. Accordingly, they hinder the development of the complicated conversation on curriculum as a verb. This article aims to contribute to reconceptualizing curriculum studies as a dynamic social practice that aspires to thinking and acting with intelligences and sensitivity so…

  18. Perceptions of business skill development by graduates of the University of Michigan Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Michael; Wiesen, Robert; Arnold, Sara; Taichman, Russell S; Taichman, Linda Susan

    2011-04-01

    Many graduating dentists leave dental school feeling that they are not prepared to start and run a dental practice. The aim of this pilot study was to explore the knowledge and perceptions dental graduates have in the area of practice management. A twenty-item survey was mailed in the fall of 2008 to nearly half of the University of Michigan dental school alumni who had graduated between the years of 1997 and 2007. Respondents were asked about their demographics, practice characteristics, and perceptions of knowledge/experience regarding practice management skills at the present time as well as at graduation. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The majority of respondents were general practitioners (84 percent) aged thirty to thirty-nine practicing between six and ten years with practice incomes reported to be greater than $300,000 per year (79 percent). Most dentists reported being either an owner or co-owner of the practice (57 percent), and 33 percent reported being an associate in the practice. Upon graduation, 7 percent of the respondents felt that they had a strong knowledge of accounting or human resource issues; this perception increased to 47 percent at the present time. Similarly, less than 6 percent of respondents felt they understood issues pertaining to dental insurance upon graduation; this perception increased to 68 percent after having spent time in the workforce. In contrast to the large increase in knowledge/experience in business aspects of dentistry that had accrued since graduation, most alumni reported only a 7 percent increase in their knowledge of the legal aspects of dental practice. Results from this study indicate that interventions are needed to increase graduating dentists' knowledge of practice management and close the gap between their knowledge and its application in real life. The majority of alumni believed there is a need to improve the curriculum focused on these aspects of dental practice.

  19. Opus: A Coordination Language for Multidisciplinary Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Chapman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Data parallel languages, such as High Performance Fortran, can be successfully applied to a wide range of numerical applications.However, many advanced scientific and engineering applications are multidisciplinary and heterogeneous in nature, and thus do not fit well into the data parallel paradigm. In this paper we present Opus, a language designed to fill this gap. The central concept of Opus is a mechanism called ShareD Abstractions (SDA. An SDA can be used as a computation server, i.e., a locus of computational activity, or as a data repository for sharing data between asynchronous tasks. SDAs can be internally data parallel, providing support for the integration of data and task parallelism as well as nested task parallelism. They can thus be used to express multidisciplinary applications in a natural and efficient way. In this paper we describe the features of the language through a series of examples and give an overview of the runtime support required to implement these concepts in parallel and distributed environments.

  20. ASTROS: A multidisciplinary automated structural design tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    ASTROS (Automated Structural Optimization System) is a finite-element-based multidisciplinary structural optimization procedure developed under Air Force sponsorship to perform automated preliminary structural design. The design task is the determination of the structural sizes that provide an optimal structure while satisfying numerous constraints from many disciplines. In addition to its automated design features, ASTROS provides a general transient and frequency response capability, as well as a special feature to perform a transient analysis of a vehicle subjected to a nuclear blast. The motivation for the development of a single multidisciplinary design tool is that such a tool can provide improved structural designs in less time than is currently needed. The role of such a tool is even more apparent as modern materials come into widespread use. Balancing conflicting requirements for the structure's strength and stiffness while exploiting the benefits of material anisotropy is perhaps an impossible task without assistance from an automated design tool. Finally, the use of a single tool can bring the design task into better focus among design team members, thereby improving their insight into the overall task.

  1. Information Management for a Large Multidisciplinary Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Randall, Donald P.; Cronin, Catherine K.

    1992-01-01

    In 1989, NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) initiated the High-Speed Airframe Integration Research (HiSAIR) Program to develop and demonstrate an integrated environment for high-speed aircraft design using advanced multidisciplinary analysis and optimization procedures. The major goals of this program were to evolve the interactions among disciplines and promote sharing of information, to provide a timely exchange of information among aeronautical disciplines, and to increase the awareness of the effects each discipline has upon other disciplines. LaRC historically has emphasized the advancement of analysis techniques. HiSAIR was founded to synthesize these advanced methods into a multidisciplinary design process emphasizing information feedback among disciplines and optimization. Crucial to the development of such an environment are the definition of the required data exchanges and the methodology for both recording the information and providing the exchanges in a timely manner. These requirements demand extensive use of data management techniques, graphic visualization, and interactive computing. HiSAIR represents the first attempt at LaRC to promote interdisciplinary information exchange on a large scale using advanced data management methodologies combined with state-of-the-art, scientific visualization techniques on graphics workstations in a distributed computing environment. The subject of this paper is the development of the data management system for HiSAIR.

  2. Developing the Intercultural Competence of Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nanda; Dawson, Debra L.; Olsen, Karyn C.; Meadows, Ken N.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how teaching development programs may facilitate the development of intercultural competence in graduate students and prepare them for communicating effectively in the global workplace after graduation. First, we describe the concept of intercultural teaching competence and examine the skills that graduate students may need to…

  3. Where do Foreign Student STEM graduates work after they graduate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Foreign students and entrepreneurs add path-breaking innovative ideas and billions of dollars to the United States economy. This presentation takes a look at where foreign students originate, what degrees and subjects they are pursuing in the U.S., and where they work after they graduate from U.S. universities. With a special focus on STEM degrees and physics, Dr. Ruiz will show how foreign students open up markets in their hometown cities which facilitates trade, foreign direct investment and knowledge transfer. In addition, they infuse revenue into local communities, and they help fill demand for jobs requiring specific skills in local U.S. labor markets. He argues that America's business, educational, and community leaders need to develop better strategies that retain their talents after they graduate. Invited speaker number 44869.

  4. National High School Graduation Rate: Are Recent Birth Cohorts Taking More Time to Graduate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Myungkook; Kim, Jeounghee

    2016-01-01

    Debates about the national high school graduation rate have heated up as various national high school graduation estimates based on the Common Core of Data (CCD) and the Current Population Survey (CPS) do not coincide with one another partially due to different assumptions about graduation age. This study found that (a) while graduation rate by…

  5. NDA National Graduate Programme 'nucleargraduates'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Carl

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to outline the NDA National Graduate Programme (nuclear graduates). The NDA has a remit under the Energy Act (2004) 'to maintain and develop the skills for decommissioning and nuclear clean-up'. Although current research is now being reviewed, there is significant evidence to suggest that the age profile in the Site Licence Companies is skewed towards older workers and there is likely to be a skill shortage in 3-5 years. As nuclear clean-up is a national issue; skill shortages also become a national issue in a very real sense. In addition, evidence suggests that the industry needs to be constantly challenged in order to achieve its targets for decommissioning. The NDA has a unique position under the Act. It is both a strategic overseer and direct employer. To this end the 'National Graduate Programme' is aligned to both the NDA's previous succession plans and the needs of the industry. Industry needs leadership that challenges the status quo and moves the UK nuclear industry to become best in class; Industry needs a dedicated to programme to address skills shortages and difficult to recruit areas such as, but not exclusively, estimators, schedulers, contract managers, site engineers, decommissioning technicians, safety monitors; The NDA has indicated a 'commercial and politically savvy' cohort is required to meet its own internal challenges and to ensure sustainability in its own workforce, and to be sensitive to the needs of customers and suppliers alike; Need to create a more diversified workforce in the nuclear industry and also plan for new skills evolving from research and development breakthroughs; Need to ensure that Tier 1, 2, 3 and 4 contractors invest in the leadership and skills for the future. World Class - delivery will be benchmarked against UK based multinational companies who operate in a global graduate attraction and development marketplace. The graduates targeted will be from leading institutions and will have a blend of

  6. Biomedical Engineering curriculum at UAM-I: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Licona, Fabiola; Azpiroz-Leehan, Joaquin; Urbina Medal, E Gerardo; Cadena Mendez, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The Biomedical Engineering (BME) curriculum at Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (UAM) has undergone at least four major transformations since the founding of the BME undergraduate program in 1974. This work is a critical assessment of the curriculum from the point of view of its results as derived from an analysis of, among other resources, institutional databases on students, graduates and their academic performance. The results of the evaluation can help us define admission policies as well as reasonable limits on the maximum duration of undergraduate studies. Other results linked to the faculty composition and the social environment can be used to define a methodology for the evaluation of teaching and the implementation of mentoring and tutoring programs. Changes resulting from this evaluation may be the only way to assure and maintain leadership and recognition from the BME community.

  7. Not left to chance: introducing an undergraduate interprofessional education curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardue, Karen T

    2013-01-01

    Teaching diverse health profession students to work in teams, communicate, understand each other's roles and responsibilities, and effectively collaborate is imperative for creating a practice-ready workforce. This short report introduces an innovative undergraduate interprofessional curriculum for students enrolled in the baccalaureate majors of applied exercise science, athletic training, dental hygiene, nursing and pre-occupational therapy. The process of designing this program of study, guided by the method of appreciative inquiry, is highlighted. The format and learning activities created for this novel curriculum are described. Congruence for this endeavor is explored through alignment with the recent national Interprofessional Education Collaborative expert panel report. Preparing graduates to fulfill the dual identity of discipline-specific clinician and interprofessional team member is an essential curricular consideration for contemporary health profession education.

  8. CURRICULUM VITAE: A DISCOURSE OF CELEBRATION WITH NARCISSISTIC ALLUSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazid Basthomi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study, a part of a larger project, deals with the under-researched (sub genre of curriculum vitae (CV of theses written in English by Indonesian students of English as a foreign language (EFL. The corpus was composed of CV of 40 theses obtainable from the Graduate Library, Graduate Program, Universitas Negeri Malang (State University of Malang, Indonesia. In a categorical structure, the CVs exhibit four main issues: personal information about age and familial origin, academic information pertaining to educational backgrounds, work information, and another piece of personal information, i.e., family. Central to the findings is that the CVs allude to the notion of celebration with narcissistic expressions.

  9. Unity in Diversity: Electronic Patient Record Use in Multidisciplinary Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Davidson, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we examine the use of electronic patient records (EPR) by clinical specialists in their development of multidisciplinary care for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. We develop a practice theory lens to investigate EPR use across multidisciplinary team practice. Our findings suggest that there are oppositional tendencies towards diversity in EPR use and unity which emerges across multidisciplinary work, and this influences the outcomes of EPR use. The value of this persp...

  10. The European Graduate Course in Cryogenics hosted at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Tavian

    2010-01-01

    The “liquid helium” week of the European Graduate Course in Cryogenics was held at CERN from 30 August to 3 September 2010. This course scheduled annually since 2008 is a common teaching project of the Universities of Technology of Dresden, Wroclaw and Trondheim. It is focused on liquid natural gas, hydrogen and helium cryogenics. Attending students were carefully selected, and will take an examination giving ECTS credits for their academic curriculum.   This year, as Wroclaw University of Technology was already heavily involved in organising the International Cryogenic Engineering Conference (ICEC), it requested that the “liquid helium” week to be exceptionally held at CERN. While this is certainly a good choice from the point of view of large cryogenic helium systems, with the large cryoplants cooling the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments, CERN has only acted as host laboratory organizing the course classes and visits, and the teaching and i...

  11. Medical Students' Perspectives on Implementing Curriculum Change at One Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Baker, Courtney E; Lomis, And Kimberly D

    2017-04-01

    Training physicians to be effective practitioners throughout their careers begins in undergraduate medical education with particular focus on self-directed inquiry, professional and interprofessional development, and competency-based assessment. A select number of medical schools are restructuring their curricula by placing the student at the center of content delivery to enhance the learning experience. While this restructuring may benefit the adult learner, administrators often make assumptions about how students will perceive and respond to such innovative and unfamiliar educational concepts. This can create a disconnect between students and their curriculum. Administrative mindfulness of student experiences is needed to ensure successful implementation of curricular change, facilitate the transition from old to new modalities, and train competent physician graduates.Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (VUSM) recently completed a curriculum update, and student representatives have been essential participants in the transition, from the earliest stages in preplanning to rapid-cycle feedback as the curriculum runs. Two of the authors are members of VUSM's Student Curriculum Committee, which facilitates gathering and relaying student feedback to the administration. Drawing from their experiences, five specific considerations to address and manage when implementing student-centered curricular change are presented: (1) Communicate the rationale, (2) acknowledge anxiety, (3) adjust extracurricular leadership roles, (4) manage "The Bulge" of learners in the clinical environment, and (5) foster ongoing collaboration of students and administrators. For each consideration, examples and proposed solutions are provided.

  12. How to Align the Hidden Curriculum of RM Education?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasco, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Graduates are reputedly still leaving business school with poor morals, despite considerable focus on responsible management education? The ‘hidden curriculum’ (HC) directs the attention to the idea that what is taught in educational institutions is not necessarily what is actually learned. The HC...... operates through many areas of business schools, most notably in i) formal curriculum; ii) interaction; and iii) school governance. This means recognizing that changing curricula alone is not enough to bring about transformation in students’ moral attitudes because signals about appropriate conduct...

  13. Curriculum in biomedical optics and laser-tissue interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Steven L.

    2003-10-01

    A graduate student level curriculum has been developed for teaching the basic principles of how lasers and light interact with biological tissues and materials. The field of Photomedicine can be divided into two topic areas: (1) where tissue affects photons, used for diagnostic sensing, imaging, and spectroscopy of tissues and biomaterials, and (2) where photons affect tissue, used for surgical and therapeutic cutting, dissecting, machining, processing, coagulating, welding, and oxidizing tissues and biomaterials. The courses teach basic principles of tissue optical properties and light transport in tissues, and interaction of lasers and conventional light sources with tissues via photochemical, photothermal and photomechanical mechanisms.

  14. A Curriculum For Dispensing Optician A Case Study In Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duong Dieu MD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Until 2011 there had been no full-time training course for dispensing optician diploma in Vietnam. Most of the practicing opticians with no qualification and formal training have learnt their skills through apprentice. In response to the demand of the industry Nguyen Tat Thanh University Vietnam has teamed up with Bradford College United Kingdom to develop a curriculum for a of formal 2-year full-time training for dispensing optician. The curriculum is applied for 4 semesters and graduate gets called Intermediate Professional Diploma level included 4 semesters. In VN after high school students can obtain different many levels of study such as Intermediate Professional Diploma College Bachelor Master and PhD. The 1st semester is basis of Intermediate Professional Diploma level. The 2nd semester is the study of refractive error and primary care each for 4 weeks 100 hours in theory and primary eye care 4 weeks for theory 100 hours. Also in this semester the learners have practiced clinical rotation at the Ophthalmic Hospital Ophthalmic Service in General Hospital for 10 weeks. The 3rd semester is specialized of dispensing Optician included Lenses frame contact lenses and laboratory for optician. In the 4th semester the training concentrates in the management of the eyeglasses shop and practicing in making spectacles for customers are in the 4th semester. The 1st intake of the course was opened started in 2011 and had 30 students graduated in 2013. This paper describes the experience of developing the curriculum in the context of a developing country where the industry is still under regulated and less developed. The first program optician that privileged on primary eye care will be satisfied for community WHO 2020 1 optometrist for 50.000 people and 10 ophthalmologists for 1.000.000 people. Some characteristics of first course students have been noted. The result of this curriculum will be evaluated in the coming time.

  15. The impact of a resident-run review curriculum and USMLE scores on the Otolaryngology in-service exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmann, Andrew J; Tawfik, Kareem O; Myer, Charles M

    2018-01-01

    Describe the association of USMLE Step 1 scores and the institution of a dedicated board review curriculum with resident performance on the Otolaryngology training examination. Retrospective cross sectional study. We reviewed American Board of Otolaryngology Training Examination (OTE) scores for an otolaryngology residency program between 2005 and 2016. USMLE Step 1 scores were collected. In 2011 a resident-run OTE review curriculum was instituted with the goal of improving test preparation. Scores were compared before and after curriculum institution. Linear regression was performed to identify predictors of OTE scores. 47 residents were evaluated, 24 before and 23 after instituting the curriculum. There was a moderate correlation between USMLE step 1 scores and OTE scores for all years. For PGY-2 residents, mean OTE scores improved from 25th percentile to 41st percentile after institution of the review curriculum (p = 0.05). PGY 3-5 residents demonstrated no significant improvement. On multivariate linear regression, after controlling for USMLE step 1 scores, a dedicated board review curriculum predicted a 23-point percentile improvement in OTE scores for PGY-2 residents (p = 0.003). For other post-graduate years, the review curriculum did not predict score improvement. USMLE step 1 scores are moderately correlated with OTE performance. A dedicated OTE review curriculum may improve OTE scores for PGY-2 residents, but such a curriculum may have less benefit for intermediate- and senior-level residents. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An Empirical Investigation of the Conception Focused Curriculum: The Importance of Introducing Undergraduate Business Statistics Students to the "Real World"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Gerald F.; Burch, Jana J.; Heller, Nathan A.; Batchelor, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Continuing pressures are being placed on undergraduate business education to alter curriculum content and delivery. The anticipated product of these changes is a graduate that is capable of performing the higher order thinking skills needed to navigate a constantly changing, global business environment. This article describes the implementation of…

  17. Curriculum Development for Quantitative Skills in Degree Programs: A Cross-Institutional Study Situated in the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kelly E.; Belward, Shaun; Coady, Carmel; Rylands, Leanne; Simbag, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Higher education policies are increasingly focused on graduate learning outcomes, which infer an emphasis on, and deep understanding of, curriculum development across degree programs. As disciplinary influences are known to shape teaching and learning activities, research situated in disciplinary contexts is useful to further an understanding of…

  18. Curriculum Preparation for Adulthood: A Course for High School Seniors. Pennsylvania Cooperative Extension Studies 66, November 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiker, Nancy R.

    Resulting from a survey of two past graduating classes (1967 and 1972) and teacher involvement, this curriculum guide for seniors in the Pequea Valley School District (a rurally conservative area comprised mainly of an Amish and Mennonite population in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania) constitutes the home economics component of a joint effort on…

  19. The Curriculum-Faculty-Reinforcement Alignment and Its Effect on Learning Retention of Core Marketing Concepts of Marketing Capstone Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raska, David; Keller, Eileen Weisenbach; Shaw, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Curriculum-Faculty-Reinforcement (CFR) alignment is an alignment between fundamental marketing concepts that are integral to the mastery of knowledge expected of our marketing graduates, their perceived importance by the faculty, and their level of reinforcement throughout core marketing courses required to obtain a marketing degree. This research…

  20. Establishing Enabling Conditions to Develop Critical Thinking Skills: A Case of Innovative Curriculum Design in Environmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belluigi, Dina Zoe; Cundill, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers a curriculum design motivated by a desire to explore more valid pedagogical approaches that foster critical thinking skills among students engaged in an Environmental Science course in South Africa, focussing specifically on the topic of Citizen Science. Fifty-three under graduate students were involved in the course, which…

  1. EVALUATION OF UNIVERSITY GRADUATE COMPETENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail B. Gitman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality evaluation problem in training of students at competence-based approach is considered in the article. The technique of creation of a negentropic assessment of level of the competences formation of graduates students is offered. The article deals with the special learning curves, which provide the opportunity to be more precise in defi ning the dependence of the level of the students' competence formation of the on their scoring. 

  2. Designing a Mathematics Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Peng Yee

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A decade of PMRI saw the changes in the classroom in some of the primary schools in Indonesia. Based on observation, we can say that though the mathematics syllabus in Indonesia did not change, its curriculum has changed under the movement of PMRI. In this article, we put in writing some of the experience gained through the involvement in designing curricula since 1971. Hopefully, some of the observations made may be of use to the colleagues in Indonesia. The discussion below will cover some deciding factors in designing a curriculum, some practices, and the latest trends. For convenience, we keep the discussion general, and do not refer to a specific syllabus. Also, in many cases, we refer mainly to secondary schools, that is, Grade 7 to Grade 10.

  3. A Team Formation Framework for Managing Diversity in Multidisciplinary Engineering Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawqi Mohammed Hossain

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Team formation is one of the essential elements in constructing effective teamwork of any team size that requires different skill sets. Diversity in team encourages students to challenge and compete with one another while searching for new ideas, which in turn can lead to a better team performance. In a well-functioning diverse teams, the students who performed poorly may gain benefit by observing how excellent students approach the assignments. They may also benefit by getting advice and assistance from the excellent students. Studies have shown that Malaysian university graduates lack of team skills. The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for forming a diverse multidisciplinary team among engineering undergraduates based on selected criteria such as individual personality type, gender, and other relevant demographic information. The proposed framework can also be used to design an automated team-formation system based on the identified metrics. The purpose of the framework is to consolidate the existing team formation literature, and to develop and test interventions for maximizing individual member and team performance as a whole that makes an effective team. For this study, a multidisciplinary approach was used where first year engineering students from three different faculties, namely Faculty of Electrical Engineering (FKE, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering (FKM, and Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering (FBME at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM worked on an innovation project using the Conceive, Design, Implement, and Operate (CDIO framework. Keirsey Temperament Sorter was used as an instrument to identify an individual's personality type.

  4. Career development: graduate nurse views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Muthulakshmi, Paulpandi; Happell, Brenda; Hunt, Glenn E

    2013-09-01

    To explore recent Singapore nursing graduates' experience of and views about their career development and progress. The recruitment and retention of an adequate number of registered nurses is a continuing workforce issue in Singapore and other major cities. Survey of recent nursing graduates. Recent nursing graduates from the Bachelor programme (n = 147) were sent an individual survey; a response rate of 54% was achieved. Findings show that nurses rated their self-concept in a positive manner and were most satisfied (moderately to very) with helping patients and providing effective care, and the level of patient involvement. They were least satisfied (moderately to only a little) with prestige among the general medical community and the general public, hours of work, lifestyle factors and research opportunities. The following four factors were identified as significant impediments to career development; lack of support in the work place; perceived insufficient clinical career development opportunities; excessive work hours; and limited access to merit-based places in further education. Suggestions made to overcome perceived career development barriers are as follows: broad multifactorial healthcare system changes; decreased and more flexible working hours; and fairer access to further clinical and higher education. Results highlight the value clinical nurses place on having access to career development opportunities, merit-based further education and work place supports. These factors also have the potential to influence patient care and impact on the retention of nurses in their present job and satisfaction with their nursing career. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Entrepreneurship of dietetic program graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Linda L; Blum, Ilya

    2004-01-01

    Successful dietetic program graduates must have an entrepreneurial mindset and skills to respond to environmental changes and consumer trends. The purpose of this study was to determine current or intended entrepreneurship by graduates of a Dietitians of Canada accredited university program, as influenced by self-efficacy stemming from entrepreneurial experiences in education or early career, as well as by internal and external factors. This study employed an exploratory descriptive methodology with a questionnaire mailed to a discrete sample. Ninety graduates completed and returned the questionnaire for a response rate of 55%. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, two-way table analysis, the chi-square test for independence, and Fisher's exact test. Significant relationships were found between self-efficacy scores and entrepreneurial action, specific entrepreneurial experiences and entrepreneurial intent and action, dietetic internship and intent, and belief in the importance of business skills and intent. Those with entrepreneurial intent and/or action identified creativity, dietetic education/internship, persistence, business skills, and family/friend support as helping factors. These results suggest that undergraduate, internship, and continuing education programs for dietitians should incorporate activities that develop entrepreneurial skills and contribute toward an entrepreneurial mindset.

  6. Preparedness and Practice Management Skills of Graduating Dental Students Entering the Work Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Manakil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental education aims to produce competent graduates with the ability to provide quality care to the patients and facilitate the smooth integration into professional practice. The objective of this study was to explore the overall preparedness of graduands for integrating into professional practice. The survey was tested for reliability and analysed the career paths, learning preferences, overall knowledge, and confidence amongst graduating dentists in integrating and managing a dental practice on graduation. Sixty-nine students (89.6% in age group of 20–50 years participated in the study. Students indicated a high level of confidence in their skills and ability to work in a team in a practice or collaboratively with other colleagues and specialists but expressed some reservation on their practice management skills (73.1%. Challenges in gaining employment and pressures to repay educational debts are amongst the reasons for graduands preferring a paid job immediately on graduation regardless of demographics. Students indicated that an increase in speciality training and clinical/outreach placements could enhance employability. This study explores the students’ perception of their confidences, knowledge, learning preferences, and practice management skills as a method of evaluating their preparedness to practice on graduation and provides a base line for curriculum structuring to prepare graduands to enter the competitive dental work force.

  7. Research Ethics Education in Post-Graduate Medical Curricula in I.R. Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravanfard, Nazila; Khorasanizadeh, Faezeh; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2017-08-01

    Research ethics training during post-graduate education is necessary to improve ethical standards in the design and conduct of biomedical research. We studied quality and quantity of research ethics training in the curricula of post-graduate programs in the medical science in I.R. Iran. We evaluated curricula of 125 post-graduate programs in medical sciences in I.R. Iran. We qualitatively studied the curricula by education level, including the Master and PhD degrees and analyzed the contents and the amount of teaching allocated for ethics training in each curriculum. We found no research ethics training in 72 (58%) of the programs. Among the 53 (42%) programs that considered research ethics training, only 17 programs had specific courses for research ethics and eight of them had detailed topics on their courses. The research ethics training was optional in 25% and mandatory in 76% of the programs. Post-graduate studies that were approved in the more recent years had more attention to the research ethics training. Research ethics training was neglected in most of the medical post-graduate programs. We suggest including sufficient amount of mandatory research ethics training in Master and PhD programs in I.R. Iran. Further research about quality of research ethics training and implementation of curricula in the biomedical institutions is warranted. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Robust Parameter Coordination for Multidisciplinary Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduced a robust parameter coordination method to analyze parameter uncertainties so as to predict conflicts and coordinate parameters in multidisciplinary design. The proposed method is based on constraints network, which gives a formulated model to analyze the coupling effects between design variables and product specifications. In this model, interval boxes are adopted to describe the uncertainty of design parameters quantitatively to enhance the design robustness. To solve this constraint network model, a general consistent algorithm framework is designed and implemented with interval arithmetic and the genetic algorithm, which can deal with both algebraic and ordinary differential equations. With the help of this method, designers could infer the consistent solution space from the given specifications. A case study involving the design of a bogie dumping system demonstrates the usefulness of this approach.

  9. Multi-disciplinary collaboration in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Tadashi

    1989-01-01

    Various possibilities often exist in each step of radiopharmaceutical preparation, and multi-disciplinary knowledge and collaboration are necessary for improved choice of the preparation conditions. In the radionuclide production step, proton bombardment of a separated nuclide target usually exceeds other bombardments of natural targets. Isotope separation by laser-chemical method is expected to soon offer several enriched nuclides useful as the target in enough amount and moderate price. The design and preparation of radiopharmaceuticals will be directly influenced by further progress of enzymology and immunology. Nondestructive, continuous observation of chemical changes in vivo is a longing of radiochemists, and may be realized gradually through elaborate examination of chemical effects in Mossbauer absorption, γ-γ angular correlation, EC X-ray properties, and positron annihilation. Present knowledge and techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, on the other hand, can be utilized effectively in other fields of life sciences

  10. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesher, Melissa S

    2015-06-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with months of severe widespread musculoskeletal pain. He was profoundly fatigued and unable to attend school. Laboratory evaluation, including complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, and thyroid function, was unrevealing. Physical examination was also normal except for multiple tender points. The patient was diagnosed with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome and referred for multidisciplinary treatment including physical therapy, exercise, and counseling, and his daily functioning gradually improves. Juvenile fibromyalgia is a complex syndrome that often severely limits patients' activities and can impede normal adolescent development. Effective treatment requires an understanding of the biologic, psychologic, and social factors contributing to the perpetuation of chronic pain. The author reviews the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, and treatment of juvenile fibromyalgia. Medications, particularly antidepressants and anticonvulsants, can be useful adjuncts to therapy. However, multimodal pain management including intensive physical therapy, exercise, counseling, and sleep hygiene is most effective in treating fibromyalgia. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Multidisciplinary treatment approach in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Joseph B; Leon-Salazar, Vladimir; Anderson, Gary C; De Felippe, Nanci L O

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a common genetic disorder with high penetrance and phenotypic variability. First and second branchial arches are affected in TCS, resulting in craniofacial and intraoral anomalies such as: severe convex facial profile; mid-face hypoplasia; microtia; eyelid colobomas; mandibular retrognathism; cleft palate; dental hypoplasia; heterotopic teeth; maxillary transverse hypoplasia; anterior open bite; and Angle Class II molar relationship. A high incidence of caries is also a typical finding in TCS patients. Nonetheless, even simple dental restorative procedures can be challenging in this patient population due to other associated medical conditions, such as: congenital heart defects; decreased oropharyngeal airways; hearing loss; and anxiety toward treatment. These patients often require a multidisciplinary treatment approach, including: audiology; speech and language pathology; otorhinolaryngology; general dentistry; orthodontics; oral and maxillofacial surgery; and plastic and reconstructive surgeries to improve facial appearance. This paper's purpose was to present a current understanding of Treacher Collins syndrome etiology, phenotype, and current treatment approaches.

  12. [Low back pain during pregnancy. Multidisciplinary approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Padilla, D; Gallo-Padilla, C; Gallo-Vallejo, F J; Gallo-Vallejo, J L

    2016-09-01

    After explaining that low back pain is considered the most common pregnancy complication, its pathogenesis, risk factors and the clinical characteristics of the very painful symptoms of this condition are described. As for its approach, it is stressed that it must be multidisciplinary, introducing very important preventive measures, including proper postural hygiene. For its treatment, the methods may be based on non-surgical or pharmacological interventions of a conservative non-invasive nature. Thus, physiotherapy, osteopathic manipulation, multimodal intervention (exercise and education), exercises performed in water environment, acupuncture, etc., have proven to be effective. Finally, it is emphasised that given the significant impact on their quality of life, different health professionals must be proactive and treat the lumbar disease in pregnant women. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Gummy smile: A contemporary and multidisciplinary overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Tomás Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate the diagnosis, etiology, and therapeutic options for the treatment of gummy smile. The smile level is an imaginary line after the lower superior lip and used seems to be convex. The presence of 3 mm or grater continuous gingival band exposures to natural smile or speech performs the gummy smile. Original articles studying the diagnosis, etiology, and therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of gummy smile were searched in the Medline, Scopus, Science direct, and EBSCO host databases. Together with some example and diagnosis method was purposed. The authors conclude that the etiology is multifactorial and can be showed excessive vertical maxillary grow up, excessive labial contraction, shorter upper lip, gingival excess, and extrusion of the anterior teeth. The therapeutics alternative are often multidisciplinary, besides can be used orthognathic, plastic and periodontal surgery, and orthodontic.

  14. Multidisciplinary systems engineering architecting the design process

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, James A; Demijohn, Russell

    2016-01-01

    This book presents Systems Engineering from a modern, multidisciplinary engineering approach, providing the understanding that all aspects of systems design, systems, software, test, security, maintenance and the full life-cycle must be factored in to any large-scale system design; up front, not factored in later. It lays out a step-by-step approach to systems-of-systems architectural design, describing in detail the documentation flow throughout the systems engineering design process. It provides a straightforward look and the entire systems engineering process, providing realistic case studies, examples, and design problems that will enable students to gain a firm grasp on the fundamentals of modern systems engineering.  Included is a comprehensive design problem that weaves throughout the entire text book, concluding with a complete top-level systems architecture for a real-world design problem.

  15. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildik, Tezan; Ozbaran, Burcu; Kose, Sezen; Koturoglu, Guldane; Gokce, Bulent; Gunaydin, Asli; Altintas, Inci

    2012-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED; Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome) is a genetic disorder characterized by sparse hair, oligodontia with peg-shaped teeth, reduced sweating, and defects in a number of other ectodermal organs. A partial or complete absence of eccrine glands can lead to recurrent severe overheating that may cause seizures and neurological deficits. This clinical report presents a 14-year-old male patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, including the clinical and radiographic findings, and multidisciplinary treatment. The Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL) was administered to patient along with mother to assess for any psychiatric disorders. The screening and rating scales completed by mother and two teachers to evaluate the severity of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, and other behavioral problems. Patient's academic performance, adaptive functioning, and problem behavior was evaluated using. The Teacher Report Form. Mental capacity was assessed with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-R). Illness Perception Questionnaire Revised was used to systematically assess illness representation attributes and emotional representations of illness. On the psychiatric diagnosis assessment using K-SADS-PL sub-threshold attention deficits and anxiety symptoms were determined. In this case we established a multidisciplinary approach in his treatment with pediatric, dermatological, and dental examinations, beside his psychiatric evaluation. The prosthetic rehabilitation included restoring upper teeth with copings and fabrication of upper and lower complete dentures. Metal framework was not incorporated in the partial denture design allowing modifications as the oral and maxillofacial development continued. Removable complete or partial dentures without metal framework is a treatment of choice until the completion of facial growth at

  16. Implementation of Competency and Conservation Based Curriculum to Improve Graduates’ Quality to be Competence and Conservation-Minded

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asrori Asrori

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to analyze the implementation of Competency and Conservation Based Curriculum in order to improve the quality of graduates of Economics Faculty of Universitas Negeri Semarang (UNNES. The goal of this study was to provide information, policy,  and recommendations to improve the quality of graduates based on lectures behavior. The respondents of this research were lecturers of Faculty of Economics. Research data were collected by using questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistical multiple linear regression were employed to analyze data. This study provided empirical support that lecturers’ ability and commitment positively contributed to the implementation of Competency and Conservation Based Curriculum to improve the quality of graduates to be competence and conservation-minded. This study also proved that while lecturers’ ability and commitment play an important role, their commitments do not affect the implementation of Competency and Conservation Based Curriculum. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that lecturers’ ability to implement the Competency and Conservation Based Curriculum needs to be improved. Workshops and training should be given to lecturers in order to help them to create learning apparatus such as syllabus, lesson plans and teaching materials, as well as the evaluation of Competency and Conservation Based Curriculum.

  17. Technical and Sociological Approaches for Curriculum Innovation on Clothing Education Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristantie, N.

    2018-02-01

    Education in the context of social and technical development is defined as the main factor in the learning process which is implied into curriculum. It needs to be anticipated responsively how the goals of Clothing Education Department should be achieved. The sociological and technological through curriculum innovation at Clothing Education Department aims to gain good profile of the professional graduates in the future. By using the literature study, it is found out that sociological development and technological approach are the main foundation for sustainability of Clothing Education Department.

  18. Learning more by being taught less: A "time-for-self-study" theory explaining curricular effects on graduation rate and study duration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk); J. Cohen-Schotanus (Janke); H.T. van der Molen (Henk); T.A.W. Splinter (Ted); C. van den Bulte (Christophe); R. Holdrinet (Rob); H.J.M. van Rossum (Herman)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn this article, an alternative for Tinto's integration theory of student persistence is proposed and tested. In the proposed theory, time available for individual study is considered a major determinant of both study duration and graduation rate of students in a particular curriculum.

  19. Learning more by being taught less : a "time-for-self-study" theory explaining curricular effects on graduation rate and study duration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, H.G.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.; van der Molen, H.T.; Splinter, T.A.W.; Bulte, J.; Holdrinet, R.; van Rossum, H.J.M.

    In this article, an alternative for Tinto's integration theory of student persistence is proposed and tested. In the proposed theory, time available for individual study is considered a major determinant of both study duration and graduation rate of students in a particular curriculum. In this view,

  20. Part-Time Post Graduate Certificate in Education Teacher-Students: What Do They Bring to and Expect from a Formal South African Teaching Programme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukeredzi, Tabitha Grace; Sibanda, Doras

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the nature and extent of subject content and curriculum knowledge that part-time Post Graduate Certificate in Education students in one South African university, brought to the classroom, and the kind and level of knowledge that they expected and sought from the programme. The study employed a…

  1. Improving Chemistry Education by Offering Salient Technology Training to Preservice Teachers: A Graduate-Level Course on Using Software to Teach Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofan, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level course on computers in chemical education that was developed and offered for the first time in Fall 2007. The course provides future chemistry teachers with exposure to current software tools that can improve productivity in teaching, curriculum development, and education…

  2. An Assessment of the Employability Skills Needed by Graduates in the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources at the University of Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. Shane; Garton, Bryan L.

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this descriptive study were to assess graduates' perception of the importance and competence levels of performing identified transferable skills in the workplace and use the Borich (1980) needs assessment model to identify the skills most in need to enhance the curriculum. The findings revealed that solving problems, working…

  3. A Study of Issues Affecting International Students at the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy in the Naval Postgraduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    TOEFL scores before coming to NPS ........................58 Table 28. Students’ level of English proficiency in four communication skills (Speaking...Environment Social Activity Other Demographics Service Country Rank Curriculum Age Marital Status Quarter TOEFL Grade Native...quarter status, the number of children, TOEFL score, expected date of graduation, native language, undergraduate area, and postgraduate area. After

  4. [Pedagogical training in stricto sensu graduate programs in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Guilherme Torres; Ribeiro, Victoria Maria Brant

    2013-06-01

    The scope of this research is to discuss the relevance and need for pedagogical training of university lecturers in the Public Health field. The contention is that college teaching is a practice that requires specific training, since it is characterized by complex elements that transcend the mastery of given content. Considering stricto sensu graduate studies as an important stage in the training of future university lecturers, an attempt was made to identify and analyze the subjects and practices of pedagogical training in academic masters and doctorate programs in Public Health. To achieve the research aim, this work was based on Pierre Bourdieu's field theory and on Tomaz Tadeu da Silva's curriculum theory. Results indicate that the programs do not consider the aspect of teacher training as a major issue. With regard to the Public Health field approximately 61% of masters and 38% of doctorate programs have pedagogical training subjects/practices. Furthermore, there is a tendency for technical-instrumental training, which is in line with the history of the Public Health field. The conclusion is that there is a need to develop a culture that values college and graduate Public Health teaching, considering the complexity of pedagogical practice in all its dimensions.

  5. Global challenges of graduate level Ayurvedic education: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Kishor; Gehlot, Sangeeta; Singh, Girish; Rathore, H.C.S.

    2010-01-01

    In the present day scenario, Ayurveda is globally being perceived in several contradictory ways. Poor quality of Ayurveda graduates produced as a result of poorly structured and poorly regulated education system is at least one of the important factors responsible for this scenario. The present study was carried out to evaluate the ‘Global challenges of graduate level Ayurvedic education’ and is based on the responses of Ayurvedic students and Ayurvedic teachers from various educational institutions of India to a methodically validated questionnaire. As the study indicates, the poor standard of Ayurvedic education in India is definitely a cause of concern. The curriculum of Bachelor of Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery (BAMS) course of studies is required to be reviewed and restructured. The syllabi are required to be updated with certain relevant topics like laws governing the intellectual property rights, basic procedures of standardization of medicinal products, fundamental methods of evaluating the toxicity of the medicinal products, essentials of healthcare management and the basics of cultivation and marketing of medicinal plants. Furthermore, the study suggests that the Ayurvedic academicians are required to be trained in standard methods of research and documentation skills, and the educational institutions are required to be encouraged to contribute their share in building up the evidence base for Ayurveda in the form of quality education and research. PMID:20532099

  6. Tobacco training in clinical social work graduate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinfelder, JoAnn; Price, James H; Dake, Joseph A; Jordan, Timothy R; Price, Joy A

    2013-08-01

    The leading cause of preventable death, in the most vulnerable segments of society, whom social workers often counsel, is cigarette smoking. The purpose of this study was to assess tobacco smoking cessation training in clinical social work programs. A valid 21-item questionnaire was sent to the entire population of 189 clinical graduate social work programs identified by the Council on Social Work Education. A three-wave mailing process was used to maximize the return rate. Directors from 112 clinical social work programs returned completed questionnaires (61 percent). The majority (91 percent) of directors reported having never thought about offering formal smoking cessation training, and only nine of the programs (8 percent) currently provided formal smoking cessation education. The three leading barriers to offering smoking cessation education were as follows: not a priority (60 percent), not enough time (55 percent), and not required by the accrediting body (41 percent). These findings indicate that clinical social work students are not receiving standardized smoking cessation education to assist in improving the well-being of their clients. The national accrediting body for graduate clinical social work programs should consider implementing guidelines for smoking cessation training in the curriculums.

  7. Rad World -- computer-animated video radiation and hazardous waste-management science curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, B.

    1996-01-01

    The Rad World computer-animated video and curriculum materials were developed through a grant from the Waste-management Education and Research Consortium. The package, which includes a computer-animated video, hands-on activities, and multidisciplinary lessons concerning radiation and hazardous-waste management, was created to approach these subjects in an informative, yet entertaining, manner. The lessons and video, designed to supplement studies of energy and physical science at the middle school and high school level, also implement quality and consistent science education as outlined by the New Mexico Science Standards and Benchmarks (1995). Consistent with the curriculum standards and benchmarks, the curriculum includes library research, collaborative learning, hands-on-science, and discovery learning. Pre- and post-tests are included

  8. Multidisciplinary Teamwork in Autism: Can One Size Fit All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenburger, Karola; Röttgers, Hanns-Rüdiger; Dounavi, Katerina; Sparkman, Coleen; Keenan, Mickey; Thyer, Bruce; Nikopoulos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary practice has become an accepted approach in many education and social and health care fields. In fact, the right to a multidisciplinary assessment is enshrined in the United Nations Convention of the Rights for Persons with Disabilities (United Nations, 2007). In order to avert a "one size fits all" response to…

  9. The result of implementation of multidisciplinary teams in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Sparre, Peter; Glenthøj, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Aim:  In 2003 colorectal multidisciplinary teams (MDT) were established in all major Danish hospitals treating colorectal cancer. The aim was to improve the prognosis by a multidisciplinary evaluation and decision about surgical and oncological treatment, based on medical history, clinical...

  10. Multidisciplinary Special Education Efforts: A Transactional-Ecological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buktenica, Norman A.

    The rationale and philosophy for multidisciplinary activities by school psychologists and educators are presented with an emphasis on the acquisition of information on the social context of children's behavior and needs. Multidisciplinary training teams (MDTT) established over an eight-year period in elementary schools in Nashville, Kentucky, are…

  11. A blueprint for multidisciplinary fast track gastrointestinal oncology care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basta, Y.L.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, we have evaluated the implementation of two key concepts of the Gastro Intestinal oncology Center Amsterdam (GIOCA): multidisciplinary teams (MDT) and the fast delivery of care in fast track clinics (FTC). The first part of this thesis investigates the value of multidisciplinary

  12. The multidisciplinary approach to the management toxic epidermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complete haematological and biochemical tests were carried out and management was symptomatic. This report shows the multidisciplinary approach to the management and highlights the role of the dental surgeon in the management. It concludes that multidisciplinary approach to healthcare provision will be of benefit to ...

  13. Use of Multi-Disciplinary Projects To Develop Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman-Dickenson, Danusia

    1992-01-01

    Undergraduate technology and business students at the Polytechnic of Wales (United Kingdom) participated in multi-disciplinary team projects to experience real life business challenges and develop competences that employers expect in professionals. Lists characteristics of successful multi-disciplinary projects, discusses cost and industry…

  14. Stochastic integer programming for multi-disciplinary outpatient clinic planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeftink, A. G.; Vliegen, I. M.H.; Hans, E. W.

    2017-01-01

    Scheduling appointments in a multi-disciplinary clinic is complex, since coordination between disciplines is required. The design of a blueprint schedule for a multi-disciplinary clinic with open access requirements requires an integrated optimization approach, in which all appointment schedules are

  15. Using Sustainability Themes and Multidisciplinary Approaches to Enhance STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Michael; Pfaff, Thomas; Hamilton, Jason; Erkan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the Multidisciplinary Sustainability Education Project (MSEP) as a framework using sustainability-themed education modules to introduce students to the need for multidisciplinary approaches to solving twenty-first-century problems while retaining traditional course strengths and content.…

  16. Application of quality function deployment for designing and developing a curriculum for Industrial Engineering at Prince of Songkla University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirachara Boonyanuwat

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A Quality Function Deployment (QFD technique is used to design a curriculum for Industrial Engineering (IE at Prince of Songkla University (PSU. This paper shows a systematical step-by-step application of the QFD. This analysis focuses both on external evaluators of the university, companies that hire graduates and students’ parents, and internal evaluators of the university, the student themselves and faculty. Survey data from 232 stakeholders were used in the QFD analysis in order to identify the requirements most valued by them. Results indicate that the stakeholders are looking for the graduates’ abilities in the area of productivity improvement, knowledge application, production planning and control, quality management and control, and manufacturing management. Further, the QFD is used to translate the key requirements into an effective curriculum. It can be concluded that the QFD is a useful tool for designing a curriculum for higher educational institutions.

  17. Neonatal intensive care nursing curriculum challenges based on context, input, process, and product evaluation model: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Ashghali-Farahani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Weakness of curriculum development in nursing education results in lack of professional skills in graduates. This study was done on master's students in nursing to evaluate challenges of neonatal intensive care nursing curriculum based on context, input, process, and product (CIPP evaluation model. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with qualitative approach, which was completed according to the CIPP evaluation model. The study was conducted from May 2014 to April 2015. The research community included neonatal intensive care nursing master's students, the graduates, faculty members, neonatologists, nurses working in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, and mothers of infants who were hospitalized in such wards. Purposeful sampling was applied. Results: The data analysis showed that there were two main categories: “inappropriate infrastructure” and “unknown duties,” which influenced the context formation of NICU master's curriculum. The input was formed by five categories, including “biomedical approach,” “incomprehensive curriculum,” “lack of professional NICU nursing mentors,” “inappropriate admission process of NICU students,” and “lack of NICU skill labs.” Three categories were extracted in the process, including “more emphasize on theoretical education,” “the overlap of credits with each other and the inconsistency among the mentors,” and “ineffective assessment.” Finally, five categories were extracted in the product, including “preferring routine work instead of professional job,” “tendency to leave the job,” “clinical incompetency of graduates,” “the conflict between graduates and nursing staff expectations,” and “dissatisfaction of graduates.” Conclusions: Some changes are needed in NICU master's curriculum by considering the nursing experts' comments and evaluating the consequences of such program by them.

  18. Communication skills training curriculum for pulmonary and critical care fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Jennifer W; Gustin, Jillian L; Wells-Di Gregorio, Sharla; Way, David P; Mastronarde, John G

    2015-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires physicians training in pulmonary and critical care medicine to demonstrate competency in interpersonal communication. Studies have shown that residency training is often insufficient to prepare physicians to provide end-of-life care and facilitate patient and family decision-making. Poor communication in the intensive care unit (ICU) can adversely affect outcomes for critically ill patients and their family members. Despite this, communication training curricula in pulmonary and critical care medicine are largely absent in the published literature. We evaluated the effectiveness of a communication skills curriculum during the first year of a pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship using a family meeting checklist to provide formative feedback to fellows during ICU rotations. We hypothesized that fellows would demonstrate increased competence and confidence in the behavioral skills necessary for facilitating family meetings. We evaluated a 12-month communication skills curriculum using a pre-post, quasiexperimental design. Subjects for this study included 11 first-year fellows who participated in the new curriculum (intervention group) and a historical control group of five fellows who had completed no formal communication curriculum. Performance of communication skills and self-confidence in family meetings were assessed for the intervention group before and after the curriculum. The control group was assessed once at the beginning of their second year of fellowship. Fellows in the intervention group demonstrated significantly improved communication skills as evaluated by two psychologists using the Family Meeting Behavioral Skills Checklist, with an increase in total observed skills from 51 to 65% (P ≤ 0.01; Cohen's D effect size [es], 1.13). Their performance was also rated significantly higher when compared with the historical control group, who demonstrated only 49% of observed skills

  19. Advancing Graduate Limnology Education through Active Learning and Community Partnerships: A Pilot Program at the Large Lakes Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, K. M.; Katsev, S.; Steinman, B. A.; Sterner, R.; Williams, J.; Zak, K.

    2017-12-01

    At the Large Lakes Observatory at the University of Minnesota Duluth, we designed a flipped-classroom, interdisciplinary limnology course sequence that incorporates partnerships with industry, meaningful field and analytical work, and integrated skills learning for our graduate students. This new curriculum is co-taught by four instructors with different research backgrounds and is meant to teach incoming graduate students with a wide range of undergraduate preparation. The courses we developed include lecture and practice classes each semester in the graduate students' first year and are built around a course website, www.studywater.org, which will go public in fall of 2018 and contains new, interdisciplinary limnology curriculum applicable to both upper level undergraduate and graduate students. Because the lecture and practice sections were co-taught by the same instructor group, we had the opportunity to fully integrate meaningful skills training directly into the course, including laboratory and analytical training, sample collection in the field and ship work, and professional skills like working in teams, oral and written communication, and project management. Another important component of this project was the cultivation of community partnerships in order to teach our graduate students applicable skills for a variety of careers. In our first year of implementation we partnered with two environmental consulting companies who have local ongoing projects, and they designed and led capstone projects for the students, including advising them on the production of project deliverables and helping them to relay their results to the consulting companies' clients. While this pilot project was designed specifically for graduate limnology students, the principles we employed would be applicable to any interdisciplinary graduate program that attracts students from a variety of undergraduate majors who still must all be taught in the same classroom.

  20. Educating engineering designers for a multidisciplinary future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    engineering design education. Educating engineering designers today significantly differs from traditional engineering education (McAloone, et.al., 2007). However, a broader view of design activities gains little attention. The project course Product/Service-Systems, which is coupled to the lecture based...... course Product life and Environmental issues at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and the master programme Product Development Processes at the Luleå University of Technology (LTU), Sweden, are both curriculums with a broader view than traditional (mechanical) engineering design. Based...... on these two representatives of a Scandinavian approach, the purpose in this presentation is to describe two ways of educating engineering designers to enable them to develop these broader competencies of socio-technical aspects of engineering design. Product Development Processes at LTU A process, called...

  1. Development and evaluation of a peer-tutoring program for graduate students*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, H Liesel; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2005-03-01

    Many interdisciplinary Ph.D. programs admit students of different educational backgrounds who receive a first year of a general curriculum education. However, student preparation for this curriculum varies, and methods are needed to provide academic support. Graduate student peer tutoring was piloted as an initiative funded by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Initiative for Minority Student Development award to the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (UMDNJ-RWJMS) and is now offered to all students in the interdisciplinary Molecular Biosciences Ph.D. program between Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and UMDNJ-RWJMS. Tutoring occurs individually or in small groups and has grown over the past 5 years in the number of students tutored and hours of tutoring. The program was evaluated by surveying and interviewing both tutors and students concerning process variables (e.g. awareness, frequency) and impact variables (e.g. perceived benefits, motivators), as well as by assessing changes in exam scores for the four core courses of the first-year graduate curriculum. Copyright © 2005 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION: The development of a curriculum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    approach to environmental education and curriculum innovation. ... transition from an external and rational strategy of curriculum ... 'scientific' approaches to curriculum development .... 'get the conservation message across' so as to foster.

  3. Employability of the Bachelor of Science in Electronics Engineering Graduates of Camarines Sur Polytechnic Colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizza T. Loquias

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study determined the employment status of the graduates of BS Electronics Engineering from 1999 to 2011. It also addressed the relevance of the ECE program outcomes and school factors to their employability. Pertinent data were gathered using a questionnaire and the sample size of 180 was determined using Slovin’s formula. Findings revealed that the graduates are highly employable in a wide range of industry such as electronics manufacturing, electronics design, telecommunications, broadcasting, and data communications and ICT-related areas, were able to pass the licensure examinations and other certifications, currently enjoying regular permanent job positions as supervisors, production engineers, process engineers, educators and others, and are working for companies located in Metro Manila and industrial zones in Laguna and Cavite. A significant number work abroad as OFWs. Only a small number are employed in the province of Camarines Sur mainly due to the lack of electronics industries and employment opportunities in the area. The skills the graduates found most useful to their first jobs are critical thinking, problem solving, and communication skills. Suggestions were given such as the inclusion of industry-utilized software and enhancement of the OJT program, more hands-on activities in the curriculum, exposure to industry while studying, and job familiarization among others. The findings of the study can serve as basis for curriculum review and revision to meet the demands of the industry.

  4. Students' perceptions of their education on graduation from a dental school in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Vittaldas B; Shirahatti, Ravi V; Pawar, Prakash

    2012-11-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of assessing students' perceived learning experience at the time of graduation from a dental school in India. The domains appraised were undergraduate curriculum, student motivation and support services, institutional infrastructure, administrative services, components of teaching-learning programs, confidence level in carrying out specific clinical procedures, career choice, and postgraduate specialty preference after graduation. The authors surveyed forty-five dental interns at the end of their undergraduate course, a 100 percent response rate from the class. The results showed that over 95 percent of the graduates were satisfied with the curriculum and 60 to 95 percent reported that the various components of the teaching-learning process were adequate. Only 42 percent of the students were confident about setting up a practice; 65 percent wished to take a course on general dentistry; and 86 percent wanted to pursue postgraduate study. The principal conclusions were that although the program was satisfactory to the majority of participants, some areas of concern were identified that need improvement.

  5. Engendering Curriculum History. Studies in Curriculum Theory Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Petra

    2011-01-01

    How can curriculum history be re-envisioned from a feminist, poststructuralist perspective? "Engendering Curriculum History" disrupts dominant notions of history as linear, as inevitable progress, and as embedded in the individual. This conversation requires a history that seeks "rememberance" not representation, "reflexivity" not linearity, and…

  6. Whatever Happened to Curriculum Theory? Critical Realism and Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In the face of what has been characterised by some as a "crisis" in curriculum--an apparent decline of some aspects of curriculum studies combined with the emergence of new types of national curricula which downgrade knowledge--some writers have been arguing for the use of realist theory to address these issues. This article offers a…

  7. Curriculum Online Review System: Proposing Curriculum with Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhinehart, Marilyn; Barlow, Rhonda; Shafer, Stu; Hassur, Debby

    2009-01-01

    The Curriculum Online Review System (CORS) at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) uses SharePoint as a Web platform for the JCCC Curriculum Proposals Process. The CORS application manages proposals throughout the approval process using collaboration tools and workflows to notify all stakeholders. This innovative new program has changed the way…

  8. Enhancing Transparency in Multidisciplinary Expert Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hukki, Kristiina; Pulkkinen, Urho

    2003-01-01

    Faced with problems of public acceptance most nuclear waste management organisations now acknowledge the importance of transparency in their pursuit of solutions for high-level nuclear waste disposal. To make progress the implementing organizations need the trust of other stakeholders in the decision-making process. For such trust these outside stakeholders need knowledge on the grounds for the judgments and decisions made in different scientific and technical disciplines. Transparency is, however, at least as important for the multidisciplinary expert communication itself. As a matter of fact, the transparency of the internal expert interaction processes is a prerequisite for the true transparency of the communication between the implementer and the external stakeholder groups. The introduced conceptual framework has been developed for the identification of the requirements of safety-informed communication in multidisciplinary expert work in nuclear waste management. The framework offers a common thinking model and common concepts which can be utilized in the development of the communication practices. The basis of the framework is on the possibility to understand the safety-critical significance of one's work. The transparency of communication is, for its part, based on making explicit the relevant knowledge necessary for gaining the understanding. This supplementary knowledge, which is related to the substance issues but is not scientific-technical by nature, enhances the experts' awareness of the context of their own contribution and of the background of the other experts' contributions. The common conceptualization and modelling of the knowledge-related dependencies between the tasks make it possible to realize the significance of the supplementary knowledge for transparent communication in actual situations. They also facilitate the recognition of the need for different types of supplementary knowledge in the interfaces between the tasks. By enhancing mutual

  9. New graduate nurses in transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tingleff, Ellen Boldrup; Gildberg, Frederik Alkier

    2014-01-01

    was to review existing research literature, and in doing so, investigate transition programmes for new graduate nurses (NGN) into mental health care, and their experiences of role transition and evaluations of participation in transition programmes. The literature review spans literature published after...... the year 2000. The literature search was conducted using the following databases: CINAHL, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, PsycINFO, and Pubmed. Search results consisting of 14 articles were analysed using thematic analysis. Results from the analysis showed four overall themes: nursing...

  10. Employability of Nursing Care Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donik Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting points: In Slovenia, the higher education institution for nursing started exploring employability opportunities in nursing care in connection with the achievement of competencies from students’ and employers’ point of view. This article highlights the importance of monitoring nursing graduates’ employability. Its aim is to examine the employability of nursing care graduates based on the self-evaluation of competences obtained during the last study year and to establish a link between the self-evaluation of competences and students’ academic performance.

  11. ASTRO's core physics curriculum for radiation oncology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E.; Balter, James M.; Chaney, Edward L.; Gerbi, Bruce J.; Hughes, Lesley

    2004-01-01

    In 2002, the Radiation Physics Committee of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) appointed an Ad-hoc Committee on Physics Teaching to Medical Residents. The main initiative of the committee was to develop a core curriculum for physics education. Prior publications that have analyzed physics teaching have pointed to wide discrepancies among teaching programs. The committee was composed of physicists or physicians from various residency program based institutions. Simultaneously, members had associations with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO), American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology (ACR). The latter two organizations' representatives were on the physics examination committees, as one of the main agendas was to provide a feedback loop between the examining organizations and ASTRO. The document resulted in a recommended 54-h course. Some of the subjects were based on American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements (particles, hyperthermia), whereas the majority of the subjects along with the appropriated hours per subject were devised and agreed upon by the committee. For each subject there are learning objectives and for each hour there is a detailed outline of material to be covered. Some of the required subjects/h are being taught in most institutions (i.e., Radiation Measurement and Calibration for 4 h), whereas some may be new subjects (4 h of Imaging for Radiation Oncology). The curriculum was completed and approved by the ASTRO Board in late 2003 and is slated for dissemination to the community in 2004. It is our hope that teaching physicists will adopt the recommended curriculum for their classes, and simultaneously that the ABR for its written physics examination and the ACR for its training examination will use the recommended curriculum as the basis for subject matter and depth of

  12. Talk the Talk: Implementing a Communication Curriculum for Surgical Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Anna B; Trickey, Amber W; Porrey, Melissa; Wright, Jeffrey; Piscitani, Franco; Graling, Paula; Dort, Jonathan

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education milestones provide a framework of specific interpersonal and communication skills that surgical trainees should aim to master. However, training and assessment of resident nontechnical skills remains challenging. We aimed to develop and implement a curriculum incorporating interactive learning principles such as group discussion and simulation-based scenarios to formalize instruction in patient-centered communication skills, and to identify best practices when building such a program. The curriculum is presented in quarterly modules over a 2-year cycle. Using our surgical simulation center for the training, we focused on proven strategies for interacting with patients and other providers. We trained and used former patients as standardized participants (SPs) in communication scenarios. Surgical simulation center in a 900-bed tertiary care hospital. Program learners were general surgery residents (postgraduate year 1-5). Trauma Survivors Network volunteers served as SPs in simulation scenarios. We identified several important lessons: (1) designing and implementing a new curriculum is a challenging process with multiple barriers and complexities; (2) several readily available facilitators can ease the implementation process; (3) with the right approach, learners, faculty, and colleagues are enthusiastic and engaged participants; (4) learners increasingly agree that communication skills can be improved with practice and appreciate the curriculum value; (5) patient SPs can be valuable members of the team; and importantly (6) the culture of patient-physician communication appears to shift with the implementation of such a curriculum. Our approach using Trauma Survivors Network volunteers as SPs could be reproduced in other institutions with similar programs. Faculty enthusiasm and support is strong, and learner participation is active. Continued focus on patient and family communication skills would enhance

  13. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    Often students and educators view assessments as an obligation and finality for a unit. In the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, the balance of time, resources and emphasis on students' scores related to assessment have been slanted considerably toward the summative side. This tension between assessment for accountability and assessment to inform teaching strains instruction and educators' ability to use that information to design learning opportunities that help students develop deeper conceptual understanding. A substantive body of research indicates that formative and reflective assessment can significantly improve student learning. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum (BRAC) examines support provided for high school science students through assessment practices. This investigation incorporates the usage of reflective assessments as a guiding practice for differentiated instruction and student choice. Reflective assessment is a metacognitive strategy that promotes self-monitoring and evaluation. The goals of the curriculum are to promote self-efficacy and conceptual understanding in students learning biology through developing their metacognitive awareness. BRAC was implemented in a high school biology classroom. Data from assessments, metacognitive surveys, self-efficacy surveys, reflective journals, student work, a culminating task and field notes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. The results suggest that students who develop their metacognitive skills developed a deeper conceptual understanding and improved feelings of self-efficacy when they were engaged in a reflective assessment unit embedded with student choice. BRAC is a tool for teachers to use assessments to assist students in becoming metacognitive and to guide student choice in learning opportunities.

  14. Sustainability Infused Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Independent Schools Foundation Academy (ISF) in Hong Kong established a sustainability policy in 2015, which explicitly states, "an experimentally integrated, environmentally and ethically sustainable system of science education and conservation practices based on the 2012 Jeju Declaration of the World Conservation Congress will be implemented through the school". ISF Academy is a private Chinese bilingual school in Hong Kong serving over 1500 students K-12, following the framework and curriculum of the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). The strategy behind the implementation of this policy includes: development of a scientific sustainable curriculum that is age appropriate; establish a culture of sustainability within the ISF community and beyond to the wider HK community; install sustainable infrastructure that allows students to learn; and learn first hand sustainable living practices. It is well understood that solutions to the environmental challenges facing Hong Kong and our planet will require multiple disciplines. The current sustainability programs at ISF include: a) a whole school aerobic food waste composting system and organic farming, b) energy consumption monitoring of existing buildings, c) upcoming installation of an air pollution monitoring equipment that will correlate with the AQHI data collected by the Hong Kong government, d) a Renewable Energy Education Center (REEC) that will teach students about RE and also produce solar energy for classroom consumption, and e) student lead environmental group that manages the paper and used cooking oil recycling on campus. The Shuyuan Science and Sustainability faculty work closely with classroom teachers to ensure that the above mentioned projects are incorporated into the curriculum throughout the school. Interdisciplinary units (IDU) of study are being developed that encourage faculty and students to work across subject areas. Projects include Personal Projects, Extended Essays

  15. Position epistemological, paradigmatical and pedagogical of the curriculum for the Degree in Nursing at the University of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viriam Leiva Díaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of educational research which analyzed the epistemological position, paradigmaticand educational curriculum of the Degree of Nursing at the University of Costa Rica. The population consisted ofthe graduates of the School of Nursing. For the participation of teachers in service, worked with saturation (11.For graduates (2008 the population was 74 for a sample of 47 of them and her. We analyzed three dimensions theepistemological and pedagogical paradigm of teaching and reflected in the curriculum. To collect data, aquestionnaire was structured and semi-structured interviews to selected population. The study found that althoughthe position does not require explicit epistemic quote, there are some modules that need internal review to showconsistency between what is manifested mainly in learning activities and methodology, with the characteristicsand assumptions of the hermeneutic interpretive position curriculum. Moreover we can consider that the modulesdespite their particularities and differences in their teaching and learning, with characteristics savedapproximation pedagogical approach that suggests the curriculum. We conclude that it is not explicit or clear theposition that the teachers expressed regarding the pedagogical approach of the curriculum, so it is essential todeepen these concepts again with faculty. However, it is clear that significant progress has been made, howeverthey must think that the investigation is unrelated to the nursing task, a finding consistent with the findings 12years ago, when he became the curriculum change.

  16. Integrated Curriculum and Subject-based Curriculum: Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, Victoria

    The research conducted for this mixed-method study, qualitative and quantitative, analyzed the results of an academic year-long study to determine whether the use of an integrated fourth grade curriculum would benefit student achievement in the areas of English language arts, social studies, and science more than a subject-based traditional curriculum. The research was conducted based on the international, national, and state test scores, which show a slowing or lack of growth. Through pre- and post-assessments, student questionnaires, and administrative interviews, the researcher analyzed the phenomenological experiences of the students to determine if the integrated curriculum was a beneficial restructuring of the curriculum. The research questions for this study focused on the achievement and attitudes of the students in the study and whether the curriculum they were taught impacted their achievement and attitudes over the course of one school year. The curricula for the study were organized to cover the current standards, where the integrated curriculum focused on connections between subject areas to help students make connections to what they are learning and the world beyond the classroom. The findings of this study indicated that utilizing the integrated curriculum could increase achievement as well as students' attitudes toward specific content areas. The ANOVA analysis for English language arts was not determined to be significant; although, greater growth in the students from the integrated curriculum setting was recorded. The ANOVA for social studies (0.05) and the paired t-tests (0.001) for science both determined significant positive differences. The qualitative analysis led to the discovery that the experiences of the students from the integrated curriculum setting were more positive. The evaluation of the data from this study led the researcher to determine that the integrated curriculum was a worthwhile endeavor to increase achievement and attitudes

  17. Profile of graduates of Israeli medical schools in 1981--2000: educational background, demography and evaluation of medical education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterman, Noemi; Shalev, Ilana

    2005-05-01

    In light of changes in the medical profession, the different requirements placed on physicians and the evolving needs of the healthcare system, the need arose to examine the medical education curriculum in Israel. This survey, conducted by the Samuel Neaman Institute for Science and Technology, summarizes 20 years of medical education in Israel's four medical schools, as the first stage in mapping the existing state of medical education in Israel and providing a basis for decision-making on future medical education programs. To characterize the academic background of graduates, evaluate their attitudes towards current and alternative medical education programs, and examine subgroups among graduates according to gender, medical school, high school education, etc. The survey included graduates from all four Israeli medical schools who graduated between the years 1981 and 2000 in a sample of 1:3. A questionnaire and stamped return envelope were sent to every third graduate; the questionnaire included open and quantitative questions graded on a scale of 1 to 5. The data were processed for the entire graduate population and further analyzed according to subgroups such as medical schools, gender, high school education, etc. The response rate was 41.3%. The survey provided a demographic profile of graduates over a 20 year period, their previous educational and academic background, additional academic degrees achieved, satisfaction, and suggestions for future medical education programs. The profile of the medical graduates in Israel is mostly homogenous in terms of demographics, with small differences among the four medical schools. In line with recommendations of the graduates, and as an expression of the changing requirements in the healthcare system and the medical profession, the medical schools should consider alternative medical education programs such as a bachelor's degree in life sciences followed by MD studies, or education programs that combine medicine with

  18. Developing a flexible core Dental Public Health curriculum for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Bhoopathi, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for graduating dental and dental hygiene students must prepare them to contribute to the improvement or maintenance of health for individual patient's and the public's health. The objective is to describe the background for and the process used to develop a core Dental Public Health Curriculum for such students. The process used was to solicit and review existing dental public health curriculum in dental and dental hygiene schools; review curriculum for other health professionals; identify the themes needed to frame the curriculum; select usable materials and identify gaps in existing curricular materials; and develop appropriate curriculum materials that would embody the competencies developed for undergraduate dental and dental hygiene education. Twenty-three topics were identified as embodying the eight competencies. Based on these topics, six courses, Principles of Dental Public Health, Evidence-Based Dentistry, Ethics and Dental Public Health, Dental Public Health Policy and Advocacy, Oral Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Oral Health Literacy and Dental Public Health, were prepared. Each course includes syllabus, PowerPoint presentations, student assignments and activities, instructor guide, and classroom discussion points. Depending on the hours available in the existing curriculum at the dental or hygiene school, lecture presentations and take home assignments/discussions may be used independently or in combination with presentations from other courses. In addition, individual discussions and activities may be used to integrate dental public health materials into other courses. A flexible curriculum is available at the AAPHD website to enable the incorporation of DPH topics into the curriculum. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  19. Correlations between Academic Achievement and Anxiety and Depression in Medical Students Experiencing Integrated Curriculum Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Chun Yeh; Cheng-Fang Yen; Chung-Sheng Lai; Chun-Hsiung Huang; Keh-Min Liu; In-Ting Huang

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the correlations between academic achievement and levels of anxiety and depression in medical students who were experiencing curriculum reform. The differences in academic achievement and the directions of correlations between academic achievement and anxiety and depression among the medical students with different levels of anxiety and depression were also examined. Grade 1 students from graduate-entry program and grade 3 students from undergraduate-entry program ...

  20. Design Environment for Multifidelity and Multidisciplinary Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges when developing propulsion systems is predicting the interacting effects between the fluid loads, thermal loads, and structural deflection. The interactions between technical disciplines often are not fully analyzed, and the analysis in one discipline often uses a simplified representation of other disciplines as an input or boundary condition. For example, the fluid forces in an engine generate static and dynamic rotor deflection, but the forces themselves are dependent on the rotor position and its orbit. It is important to consider the interaction between the physical phenomena where the outcome of each analysis is heavily dependent on the inputs (e.g., changes in flow due to deflection, changes in deflection due to fluid forces). A rigid design process also lacks the flexibility to employ multiple levels of fidelity in the analysis of each of the components. This project developed and validated an innovative design environment that has the flexibility to simultaneously analyze multiple disciplines and multiple components with multiple levels of model fidelity. Using NASA's open-source multidisciplinary design analysis and optimization (OpenMDAO) framework, this multifaceted system will provide substantially superior capabilities to current design tools.

  1. "Redefining smile-a multidisciplinary approach".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Prakash; Zakkula, Srujana; Atla, Jyothi; Muvva, Suresh Babu; Sampath, Anche

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a case report of a 20 year old female who was very much dissatisfied with her facial appearance and smile.On examination, it was found that there was a Angles class II division 1 malocclusion and a generalised spacing in the anterior teeth, with a retained, deciduous, left maxillary canine and a malposed 15. On radiographic examination, an impacted 18, 23 was noticed. As the part of the treatment plan, the retained deciduous canine and the impacted permanent canine were extracted and an orthodontic correction of the malocclusion was accomplished. The missing canine was planned to be replaced with a fixed partial denture.The short clinical crown height of the abutment teeth was increased by crown lengthening procedures and the pontic space was contoured to receive a ovate pontic by using diode lasers. The missing tooth was restored by using an all ceramic three unit zirconia bridge. This multi-disciplinary approach improved the smile of the patient and it ultimately enhanced her aesthetics and self confidence.

  2. Multidisciplinary management of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: Current approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guro, Hanisah; Kim, Jin Won; Choi, YoungRok; Cho, Jai Young; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Han, Ho-Seong

    2017-06-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a common primary hepatic tumor. However, its outcomes are usually worse than those of hepatocellular carcinoma owing to its non-specific presentation and detection at an advanced stage. The most widely used serum marker, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, is non-specific. Furthermore, imaging studies rarely identify any pathognomonic features. Surgery is the only treatment option that offers a chance of long-term survival. However, the resectability rate is low owing to the high frequencies of intrahepatic metastases, peritoneal carcinomatosis, or extrahepatic metastases. Surgical treatment should be tailored according to the macroscopic classification of ICC (e.g. mass-forming, periductal infiltrating, and intraductal growth types) because it reflects the tumor's dissemination pattern. Although lymph node metastasis is a negative prognostic factor, the importance and extent of lymph node dissection is still controversial. To improve patient survival, liver transplantation is considered in some patients with unresectable ICC, especially in those with an insufficient remnant liver volume. Minimally invasive procedures, including laparoscopic and robotic liver resection, have been tested and achieved comparable outcomes to conventional surgery in preliminary studies. No randomized trials have confirmed the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in ICC, and several trials have evaluated molecular-targeted agents as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. Multidisciplinary approaches are necessary to improve the outcomes of ICC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Instruction of Multidisciplinary Content in Introductory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaibani, Saami J.

    2017-01-01

    There has been an ever-increasing emphasis on the integration of material in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics during the past decade or so. However, there are two major requirements for accomplishing the effective delivery of such multidisciplinary content in the classroom: having high levels of expertise in all of the subjects; and, having the ability to combine the separate fields in a consistent manner without compromising academic purity. The research reported here involves a teacher with this skill set and it includes an example from kinematics, which is initially explored with standard treatment of concepts in mechanics and then developed with analysis employing algebra. As often happens, the non-trivial nature of the result in this case does not readily allow students to have a sense that the physics-based outcome is correct. This shortfall is remedied by adopting a complementary approach with geometry and calculus, which adds an independent perspective that reassures students by confirming the validity of the original answer. The enhanced quality of instruction achieved with the above methodology produces many benefits, including greater student understanding and more opportunities for active involvement by students in the learning process.

  4. Multidisciplinary approach for patients with esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria M Villaflor; Marco E Allaix; Bruce Minsky; Fernando A Herbella; Marco G Patti

    2012-01-01

    Patients with esophageal cancer have a poor prognosis because they often have no symptoms until their disease is advanced.There are no screening recommendations for patients unless they have Barrett's esophagitis or a significant family history of this disease.Often,esophageal cancer is not diagnosed until patients present with dysphagia,odynophagia,anemia or weight loss.When symptoms occur,the stage is often stage Ⅲ or greater.Treatment of patients with very early stage disease is fairly straight forward using only local treatment with surgical resection or endoscopic mucosal resection.The treatment of patients who have locally advanced esophageal cancer is more complex and controversial.Despite multiple trials,treatment recommendations are still unclear due to conflicting data.Sadly,much of our data is difficult to interpret due to many of the trials done have included very heterogeneous groups of patients both histologically as well as anatomically.Additionally,studies have been underpowered or stopped early due to poor accrual.In the United States,concurrent chemoradiotherapy prior to surgical resection has been accepted by many as standard of care in the locally advanced patient.Patients who have metastatic disease are treated palliatively.The aim of this article is to describe the multidisciplinary approach used by an established team at a single high volume center for esophageal cancer,and to review the literature which guides our treatment recommendations.

  5. Multi-Disciplinary System Reliability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code developed under the leadership of NASA Lewis Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multi-disciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

  6. Desensitization to rituximab in a multidisciplinary setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorós-Reboredo, Patrícia; Sánchez-López, Jaime; Bastida-Fernández, Carla; do Pazo-Oubiña, Fernando; Borràs-Maixenchs, Núria; Giné, Eva; Valero, Antonio; Creus-Baró, Natàlia

    2015-10-01

    The need to offer first-line therapy to the increasing number of patients who have suffered an hypersensitivity reaction has stimulated the use of rapid desensitization protocols. To present our experience working as a multidisciplinary team using a rituximab rapid desensitization scheme. Patient demographics, allergic reaction, skin tests to rituximab, number of desensitizations, reactions during the desensitization protocol and actions taken, number of administered and completed cycles, were retrospectively collected in patients who received at least one desensitization to rituximab. Number of desensitizations successfully managed. Between 2012 and June 2013 five patients received a total of 19 desensitizations to rituximab using a 12 step rapid desensitization protocol. All patients received the scheduled chemotherapeutic cycles as inpatients, with no delay in administration dates. Three patients presented a hypersensitivity reaction during the first desensitization and in one patient the event occurred again during the second treatment cycle. All reactions occurred in the last step, when the infusion rate reached the maximum speed. The developed protocol for rapid desensitization was successful in five patients receiving rituximab. Patients could receive the full intended dose.

  7. Advanced Texas Studies: Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlandale Independent School District, San Antonio, TX. Career Education Center.

    The guide is arranged in vertical columns relating curriculum concepts in Texas studies to curriculum performance objectives, career concepts and career performance objectives, suggested teaching methods, and audio-visual and resource materials. Career information is included on 24 related occupations. Space is provided for teachers' notes which…

  8. Rethinking the Tertiary Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petocz, Peter; Reid, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Mathematics curriculum at the tertiary level is located within a range of social and cultural theories, and is often constructed by academics seeking to promulgate a particular view of mathematics. We argue that such a curriculum should incorporate a real acknowledgement of the different ways in which students understand the nature of mathematics…

  9. Tides. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrett, Andrea

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  10. Guidelines for Curriculum Development. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, K.; And Others

    The curriculum development process explained in this booklet was first implemented at College of the Redwoods in May 1986 and then revised in June 1989. First, information on the college's Curriculum Committee is provided, indicating that the committee was formed to plan credit/non-credit courses; evaluate and approve additions, modifications, or…

  11. Models for Instruction and Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Elizabeth L.

    1999-01-01

    Proposes three models of course-specific curricula and a content-curriculum model for undergraduate public-relations education, and proposes core and elective areas for a master's of public-relations curriculum. Agrees that public-relations curricula should have a broad liberal arts and science basis, and recommended more attention to ethics,…

  12. Curriculum theory in physical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Ann E.

    1989-03-01

    Primary current concerns of curriculum theorists in sport and physical education relate to clarification of value orientations underlying curricular decision-making, selection and statement of curriculum goals, identification and organization of programme content, and the process of curriculum change. Disciplinary mastery is the most traditional value orientation and that which is most frequently found in practice. Curriculum theorists have identified four other value orientations for study: social reconstruction, self-actualization, learning process, and ecological validity. Health-related fitness and the development of motor skills have long been the primary goals of physical education. In recent years, however, curriculum specialists have begun to assign higher priorities to goals of personal integration and challenge, of social development and multicultural understanding. There is general agreement that human movement activities constitute the subject-matter of the sport and physical education curriculum. Differences exist, however, as to how learning activities should be selected for particular programmes. The current trend in seeking better understanding of content is toward studying the operational curriculum with particular attention to the historical and social contexts. An important contemporary focus is the need to translate short-term results into lifestyle changes. The curriculum in sports and physical education should be viewed as a multitude of possibilities.

  13. Transportation Consumer Education Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Peter; And Others

    Materials in this curriculum guide represent a selection of the major transportation consumer topics and ideas and are designed to set the stage for more intensive transportation consumer education curriculum development and teacher efforts. (Eleven manuals covering the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the…

  14. Customizing Curriculum with Digital Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    To effectively use digital resources in the classroom, teachers must customize the information, merge it with pre-existing curriculum, differentiate it for diverse student populations, and still meet standards-based learning goals. This article describes a solution to these challenges: the Curriculum Customization Service, which provides access to…

  15. Discrete Mathematics and Curriculum Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Margaret J.

    1996-01-01

    Defines discrete mathematics as the mathematics necessary to effect reasoned decision making in finite situations and explains how its use supports the current view of mathematics education. Discrete mathematics can be used by curriculum developers to improve the curriculum for students of all ages and abilities. (SLD)

  16. Curriculum Change Management and Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkahtani, Aishah

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the ways in which Saudi teachers have responded or are responding to the challenges posed by a new curriculum. It also deals with issues relating to workload demands which affect teachers' performance when they apply a new curriculum in a Saudi Arabian secondary school. In addition, problems such as scheduling and sharing space…

  17. The Integrated Early Childhood Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Suzanne

    This textbook provides an outline of an integrated curriculum for early childhood education. Part 1 discusses the human element in school: the child and the teacher and child development. Part 2 contains the curriculum itself and covers the subjects of language, mathematics, science, social studies, art, music, and movement. Guidelines provide…

  18. Adolescents, Graduated Autonomy, and Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Fox

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomy takes many shapes. The concept of “graduated autonomy” is conceived as comprising several unique features: (1 it is incremental, (2 it is proportional, and (3 it is related to the telos of the life stage during which it occurs. This paper focuses on graduated autonomy in the context of genetic testing during adolescence. Questions can be raised about other life stages as well, and some of these questions will be addressed by discussing a possible fourth characteristic of graduated autonomy, that is, its elasticity. Further scholarship and analysis is needed to refine the concept of graduated autonomy and examine its applications.

  19. Graduates perception towards instructional methods of emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Graduates perception towards instructional methods of emergency medicine: affecting their self-confidence in emergency departments. Mohamed Daffalla Awadalla, Ahmed Abd Elrahman Abdalla, Sami Mahjoub Taha ...

  20. Undergraduate grade point average and graduate record examination scores: the experience of one graduate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Sarah E; Moore, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Graduate nursing programs frequently use undergraduate grade point average (UGPA) and Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores for admission decisions. The literature indicates that both UGPA and GRE scores are predictive of graduate school success, but that UGPA may be the better predictor. If that is so, one must ask if both are necessary for graduate nursing admission decisions. This article presents research on one graduate nursing program's experience with UGPA and GRE scores and offers a perspective regarding their continued usefulness for graduate admission decisions. Data from 120 graduate students were examined, and regression analysis indicated that UGPA significantly predicted GRE verbal and quantitative scores (p < .05). Regression analysis also determined a UGPA score above which the GRE provided little additional useful data for graduate nursing admission decisions.