WorldWideScience

Sample records for mucosal peroxide transport

  1. Membrane transport of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd P; Schjoerring, Jan K; Jahn, Thomas P

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) belongs to the reactive oxygen species (ROS), known as oxidants that can react with various cellular targets thereby causing cell damage or even cell death. On the other hand, recent work has demonstrated that H2O2 also functions as a signalling molecule controlling different essential processes in plants and mammals. Because of these opposing functions the cellular level of H2O2 is likely to be subjected to tight regulation via processes involved in production, distribution and removal. Substantial progress has been made exploring the formation and scavenging of H2O2, whereas little is known about how this signal molecule is transported from its site of origin to the place of action or detoxification. From work in yeast and bacteria it is clear that the diffusion of H2O2 across membranes is limited. We have now obtained direct evidence that selected aquaporin homologues from plants and mammals have the capacity to channel H2O2 across membranes. The main focus of this review is (i) to summarize the most recent evidence for a signalling role of H2O2 in various pathways in plants and mammals and (ii) to discuss the relevance of specific transport of H2O2.

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Transport in the Lung and Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shlyonsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal and lung epithelial cells are exposed to some significant concentrations of H2O2. In urine it may reach 100 μM, while in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung it is estimated to be in micromolar to tens-micromolar range. Hydrogen peroxide has a stimulatory action on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC single-channel activity. It also increases stability of the channel at the membrane and slows down the transcription of the ENaC subunits. The expression and the activity of the channel may be inhibited in some other, likely higher, oxidative states of the cell. This review discusses the role and the origin of H2O2 in the lung and kidney. Concentration-dependent effects of hydrogen peroxide on ENaC and the mechanisms of its action have been summarized. This review also describes outlooks for future investigations linking oxidative stress, epithelial sodium transport, and lung and kidney function.

  3. Influence of muscle activation and mucosal material property on esophageal transport: study based on a fully-resolved computational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Wenjun; Pandolfino, John; Kahrilas, Peter; Patankar, Neelesh

    2014-11-01

    Esophageal transport involves interactions between food (bolus), the esophageal walls (composed of mucosal, circular muscle (CM) and longitudinal muscle (LM) layers), and neurally coordinated muscle activation including CM contraction and LM shortening. Due to the complexity of these interactions, few studies have been conducted on the mechanical role of the mucosal layer in esophageal transport. Also poorly understood are the collaborative roles of CM contraction and LM shortening and the influence of their synchronization. Here, based on a fully-resolved computational model that we developed, we investigated the individual roles of CM contraction and LM shortening, compared bolus transport with various levels of discoordination between CM and LM activation, and studied the role of the mucosa and how its stiffening influenced transport. These preliminary findings should help understand the synergy between LM, CM, and the mucosal layer in facilitating bolus transport, thereby providing insight into related physiology and pathophysiology. The support of Grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902 from NIH is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Intestinal mucosal changes and upregulated calcium transporter and FGF-23 expression during lactation: Contribution of lactogenic hormone prolactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Sripong, Chanakarn; Longkunan, Asma; Chankamngoen, Wasutorn; Keadsai, Chutiya; Kraidith, Kamonshanok; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2016-01-15

    As the principal lactogenic hormone, prolactin (PRL) not only induces lactogenesis but also enhances intestinal calcium absorption to supply calcium for milk production. How the intestinal epithelium res-ponses to PRL is poorly understood, but it is hypothesized to increase mucosal absorptive surface area and calcium transporter expression. Herein, lactating rats were found to have greater duodenal, jejunal and ileal villous heights as well as cecal crypt depths than age-matched nulliparous rats. Morphometric analyses in the duodenum and cecum showed that their mucosal adaptations were diminished by bromocriptine, an inhibitor of pituitary PRL release. PRL also upregulated calcium transporter expression (e.g., TRPV6 and PMCA1b) in the duodenum of lactating rats. Since excessive calcium absorption could be detrimental to lactating rats, local negative regulator of calcium absorption, e.g., fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23, should be increased. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the upregulation of FGF-23 protein expression in the duodenal and cecal mucosae of lactating rats, consistent with the enhanced FGF-23 mRNA expression in Caco-2 cells. Bromocriptine abolished this lactation-induced FGF-23 expression. Additionally, FGF-23 could negate PRL-stimulated calcium transport across Caco-2 monolayer. In conclusion, PRL was responsible for the lactation-induced mucosal adaptations, which were associated with compensatory increase in FGF-23 expression probably to prevent calcium hyperabsorption.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates the active transport of serotonin into human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosin, T.R. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the active transport of serotonin (5-HT) by human platelets was investigated. Platelets were exposed to either a single dose of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by the glucose/glucose oxidase or xanthine/xanthine oxidase enzyme systems. H{sub 2}{sub 2} produced a rapid, dose-dependent and time-dependent increase in 5-HT transport which was maximal after a 2 min incubation and decreased with continued incubation. Catalase completely prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stimulation and fluoxetine totally blocked 5-HT uptake into stimulated platelets. The glucose/glucose oxidase and the xanthine/xanthine oxidase generating systems produced a similar response to that of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. In the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, superoxide dismutase failed to alter the stimulation, while catalase effectively prevented the response. The kinetics of 5-HT transport indicated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment did not alter the K{sub m} of 5-HT transport but significantly increased the maximal rate of 5-HT transport. These data demonstrated that exposure of human platelets to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resulted in a stimulation of the active transport of 5-HT and suggested that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may function to regulate this process.

  6. 6-mo aerobic exercise intervention enhances the lipid peroxide transport function of HDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiainen, Sanna; Luoto, Riitta; Ahotupa, Markku; Raitanen, Jani; Vasankari, Tommi

    2016-01-01

    During acute exercise, the concentration of oxidized high-density lipoprotein (HDL) lipids (ox-HDL) is reported to increase suggesting that HDL may function in decreasing the concentration of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) lipids. However, the effect of exercise intervention on the lipid peroxide transport function of HDL is unknown. A randomized controlled trial with sedentary women (N = 161), aged 43-63, with no current use of hormone therapy, were randomized into a 6-month (mo) exercise group and a control group. During the 6-mo intervention, the concentration of ox-HDL increased in the exercise group by 5% and decreased in the control group by 2% (p = .003). Also, the ratio of ox-HDL to HDL-cholesterol increased by 5% in the exercise group and decreased by 1.5% in the control group (p = .036). The concentrations of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and adiponectin did not change during the intervention. The concentration of serum triglycerides trended to decrease by 6% in the intervention group (p = .051). We found that the concentration of ox-HDL increased during the 6-mo aerobic exercise intervention, but the increase was not related to changes in the levels of CETP or adiponectin. These results, together with earlier studies, suggest that HDL has an active role in the reverse transport of lipid peroxides.

  7. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  8. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  9. Facilitated Peptide Transport via the Mucosal Epithelium: Impact on Tolerance Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenngott, Elisabeth E.; Pfeil, Jennifer; Hoffmann, Ute; Lauer, Uta; Kühl, Anja A.; Rigby, Anne; Pernthaner, Anton; Hamann, Alf

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of autoimmunity is the breakdown of tolerance and generation of effector responses against self-antigens. Re-establishment of tolerance in autoimmune disorders was always the most desired treatment option; however, despite many efforts, clinical trials have been largely unsuccessful. This also applies to the generation of oral tolerance, which seems to be a default response type of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues to harmless antigens. In this study, we report improved efficacy of oral tolerance induction by coupling antigen with the newly identified mucosal carrier peptide 13C. Antigen coupled to 13C is efficiently taken up in the gastrointestinal tract and could be visualized in cells of the lamina propria. Oral, rectal, or nasal treatment effectively induced the proliferation of antigen-specific T cells with some increase in the frequency of regulatory T cells. In a model of delayed-type hypersensitivity, especially intrarectal tolerization treatment resulted in reduced footpad swelling, demonstrating a moderate tolerogenic effect of mucosal treatment with 13C coupled antigen. Coupling of antigens to a transmucosal carrier, therefore, is a promising tool to improve the efficacy of vaccination via mucosal surfaces.

  10. Inhibition of sodium intestinal transport and mucosal (Na+-K+)-ATPase in experimental Fanconi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapnir, R A; Exeni, R A; McVicar, M; De Rosas, R J; Lifshitz, F

    1975-11-01

    The administration of 1.5 or 9.0 mmoles/kg ip of maleate to rats induced, in addition to renal alterations similar to those occurring in the Fanconi syndrome, a decline in the intestinal mucosa (Na+-K+)-ATPase with a simultaneous decrease in sodium intestinal transport and an increase in potassium absorption. Further differences in the behavior of the two electrolytes were observed when the concentration of sodium in the perfusates was altered. No changes occurred in amino acid or glucose transport in experimental animals.

  11. Protective effect of melatonin against multistress condition induced lipid peroxidation via measurement of gastric mucosal lesion and plasma malondialdehyde levels in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V Kiarostami; L Samini; M Ghazi-Khansari

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the protective effect of a natural antioxidant, melatonin, against multistress condition induced lipid peroxidation via determination of gastric damage and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) level by high performance liquid chromatography in rats.METHODS: We compared indomethacin-induced gastric damage and MDA plasma level in three groups of rats: unoperated, bile duct ligated and sham-operated and evaluated the role of the melatonin on gastric damage and plasma MDA level. Indomethacin and melatonin were injected intraperitoneally in doses of 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg, respectively. Animals were killed 4 h after indomethacin injection.RESULTS: Indomethacin induced more severe gastric damage and plasma MDA level in bile duct ligated animals was significantly higher (3.1 ± 0.04 μmol/L) than sham (2.8 ± 0.04 μmol/L) and unoperated animals (1.4± 0.08 μmol/L). Pretreatment with melatonin reduced indomethacin-induced gastric damage and plasma MDA level.CONCLUSION: Considering the results of this study,we suggest that in multistress conditions the intensity of gastric damage and the plasma MDA level are great and melatonin reduces the negative effect of lipid peroxidation and cell damage by oxidative stress in multistress conditions due to its antioxidizing activity.

  12. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  13. Diet effects on glucose absorption in the small intestine of neonatal calves: importance of intestinal mucosal growth, lactase activity, and glucose transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Zitnan, Rudolf; Schönhusen, Ulrike; Pfannkuche, Helga; Hudakova, Monika; Metges, Cornelia C; Hammon, Harald M

    2014-10-01

    Colostrum (C) feeding in neonatal calves improves glucose status and stimulates intestinal absorptive capacity, leading to greater glucose absorption when compared with milk-based formula feeding. In this study, diet effects on gut growth, lactase activity, and glucose transporters were investigated in several gut segments of the small intestine. Fourteen male German Holstein calves received either C of milkings 1, 3, and 5 (d 1, 2, and 3 in milk) or respective formulas (F) twice daily from d 1 to d 3 after birth. Nutrient content, and especially lactose content, of C and respective F were the same. On d 4, calves were fed C of milking 5 or respective F and calves were slaughtered 2h after feeding. Tissue samples from duodenum and proximal, mid-, and distal jejunum were taken to measure villus size and crypt depth, mucosa and brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were taken to determine protein content, and mRNA expression and activity of lactase and mRNA expression of sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) and facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT2) were determined from mucosal tissue. Additionally, protein expression of SGLT1 in BBMV and GLUT2 in crude mucosal membranes and BBMV were determined, as well as immunochemically localized GLUT2 in the intestinal mucosa. Villus circumference, area, and height were greater, whereas crypt depth was smaller in C than in F. Lactase activity tended to be greater in C than in F. Protein expression of SGLT1 was greater in F than in C. Parameters of villus size, lactase activity, SGLT1 protein expression, as well as apical and basolateral GLUT2 localization in the enterocytes differed among gut segments. In conclusion, C feeding, when compared with F feeding, enhances glucose absorption in neonatal calves primarily by stimulating mucosal growth and increasing absorptive capacity in the small intestine, but not by stimulating abundance of intestinal glucose transporters.

  14. Secretory component as the mucosal transport receptor: separation of physicochemically analogous human IgA fractions with different receptor-binding capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, J M; Fisher, M M; Underdown, B J

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the separation and characterization of several IgA fractions from the same human monoclonal source, based on their ability to bind secretory component (SC). The study was undertaken to elucidate features of the immunoglobulin-binding site for SC, and to examine the dependence of mucosal transport on IgA-SC interaction. Enrichment or depletion of SC-binding activity was accomplished on an affinity adsorbant made with SC from human colostral whey. The affinity-purified human IgA fractions contained IgA polymers and were 77% active in rebinding to the adsorbant; this activity was diminished significantly by direct radioiodination. The non-adherent IgA fractions contained both polymer and monomer, and were only 8% active in rebinding to the adsorbant. When the polymer and monomer components were separated from each other, the non-adherent polymer was found to resemble the affinity-purified fraction by all criteria examined including J-chain content, except that the SC-binding capacity was greater than five-fold lower. These findings have two implications for the SC-binding site on human IgA: first, the presence of J-chain is insufficient to bestow IgA with SC-binding activity; second, a critical tyrosine participates in maintaining the SC-binding region, possibly on the IgA heavy chain. The relationship between SC binding and mucosal transport was tested in the rat hepatobiliary model. All radiolabeled human IgA fractions were captured rapidly from blood by the rat liver, but only the SC-binding fractions underwent substantial intact transport to bile (greater than 70% of the injected dose). Even though a nominal proportion of the SC-non-adherent IgA appeared in bile (4-15% of the dose), most IgA in these fractions was rapidly degraded within the liver. Thus, only a small amount of monomeric and polymeric IgA can use alternative receptors to get to bile by diversion from the degradative pathway. Polymeric IgA can undergo efficient transport across

  15. Involvement of aquaporin-3 in epidermal growth factor receptor signaling via hydrogen peroxide transport in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Watanabe, Sachiko; Satooka, Hiroki

    2016-03-18

    Aquaporin 3 (AQP3), a water/glycerol channel protein, is capable of transporting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here, we show that AQP3-mediated intracellular H2O2 is involved in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced cell signaling and its dependent cell function in the EGF receptor (EGFR)-positive cancer cell lines A431 and H1666. AQP3 knockdown suppressed the transport into the cells of extracellular H2O2 produced in response to EGF in A431 and H1666 cells. EGF-induced Erk and Akt activation, which occurred through SHP2 and/or PTEN modulation, was impaired by AQP3 knockdown. Cell growth and migration induced by EGF stimulation were attenuated in AQP3 knockdown cells compared with those in control cells. Coincidentally, tumor growth of A431 cell xenografts in immunodeficient mice was decreased by AQP3 knockdown. Accordingly, a xenograft with AQP3 knockdown A431 cells significantly enhanced the survival of recipient mice compared with the transplantation with control cells. In addition, AQP3 associated with EGFR and NADPH oxidase 2, which we propose is linked to AQP3 producing a localized increase in intracellular H2O2 to function as a second messenger during EGFR cell signaling. Therefore, our findings suggest that AQP3 is required for EGF-EGFR cell signaling in cancer cells and is a therapeutic target for cancer progression.

  16. Effects of Food Components That Activate TRPA1 Receptors on Mucosal Ion Transport in the Mouse Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Linda J; Callaghan, Brid; Rivera, Leni R; Lieu, TinaMarie; Poole, Daniel P; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Bravo, David M; Furness, John B

    2016-10-10

    TRPA1 is a ligand-activated cation channel found in the intestine and other tissues. Components of food that stimulate TRPA1 receptors (phytonutrients) include allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde and linalool, but these may also act at other receptors. Cells lining the intestinal mucosa are immunoreactive for TRPA1 and Trpa1 mRNA occurs in mucosal extracts, suggesting that the TRPA1 receptor is the target for these agonists. However, in situ hybridisation reveals Trpa1 expression in 5-HT containing enteroendocrine cells, not enterocytes. TRPA1 agonists evoke mucosal secretion, which may be indirect (through release of 5-HT) or direct by activation of enterocytes. We investigated effects of the phytonutrients on transmucosal ion currents in mouse duodenum and colon, and the specificity of the phytonutrients in cells transfected with Trpa1, and in Trpa1-deficient mice. The phytonutrients increased currents in the duodenum with the relative potencies: allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) > cinnamaldehyde > linalool (0.1 to 300 μM). The rank order was similar in the colon, but linalool was ineffective. Responses to AITC were reduced by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (100 μM), and were greatly diminished in Trpa1-/- duodenum and colon. Responses were not reduced by tetrodotoxin, 5-HT receptor antagonists, or atropine, but inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis reduced responses. Thus, functional TRPA1 channels are expressed by enterocytes of the duodenum and colon. Activation of enterocyte TRPA1 by food components has the potential to facilitate nutrient absorption.

  17. Transport and cycling of iron and hydrogen peroxide in a freshwater stream: Influence of organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D.T.; Runkel, R.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Voelker, B.M.; Kimball, B.A.; Carraway, E.R.

    2003-01-01

    An in-stream injection of two dissolved organic acids (phthalic and aspartic acids) was performed in an acidic mountain stream to assess the effects of organic acids on Fe photoreduction and H2O2 cycling. Results indicate that the fate of Fe is dependent on a net balance of oxidative and reductive processes, which can vary over a distance of several meters due to changes in incident light and other factors. Solution phase photoreduction rates were high in sunlit reaches and were enhanced by the organic acid addition but were also limited by the amount of ferric iron present in the water column. Fe oxide photoreduction from the streambed and colloids within the water column resulted in an increase in the diurnal load of total filterable Fe within the experimental reach, which also responded to increases in light and organic acids. Our results also suggest that Fe(II) oxidation increased in response to the organic acids, with the result of offsetting the increase in Fe(II) from photoreductive processes. Fe(II) was rapidly oxidized to Fe(III) after sunset and during the day within a well-shaded reach, presumably through microbial oxidation. H2O 2, a product of dissolved organic matter photolysis, increased downstream to maximum concentrations of 0.25 ??M midday. Kinetic calculations show that the buildup of H2O2 is controlled by reaction with Fe(III), but this has only a small effect on Fe(II) because of the small formation rates of H2O2 compared to those of Fe(II). The results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the effects of light and dissolved organic carbon into Fe reactive transport models to further our understanding of the fate of Fe in streams and lakes.

  18. Effects of Food Components That Activate TRPA1 Receptors on Mucosal Ion Transport in the Mouse Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J. Fothergill

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available TRPA1 is a ligand-activated cation channel found in the intestine and other tissues. Components of food that stimulate TRPA1 receptors (phytonutrients include allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde and linalool, but these may also act at other receptors. Cells lining the intestinal mucosa are immunoreactive for TRPA1 and Trpa1 mRNA occurs in mucosal extracts, suggesting that the TRPA1 receptor is the target for these agonists. However, in situ hybridisation reveals Trpa1 expression in 5-HT containing enteroendocrine cells, not enterocytes. TRPA1 agonists evoke mucosal secretion, which may be indirect (through release of 5-HT or direct by activation of enterocytes. We investigated effects of the phytonutrients on transmucosal ion currents in mouse duodenum and colon, and the specificity of the phytonutrients in cells transfected with Trpa1, and in Trpa1-deficient mice. The phytonutrients increased currents in the duodenum with the relative potencies: allyl isothiocyanate (AITC > cinnamaldehyde > linalool (0.1 to 300 μM. The rank order was similar in the colon, but linalool was ineffective. Responses to AITC were reduced by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (100 μM, and were greatly diminished in Trpa1−/− duodenum and colon. Responses were not reduced by tetrodotoxin, 5-HT receptor antagonists, or atropine, but inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis reduced responses. Thus, functional TRPA1 channels are expressed by enterocytes of the duodenum and colon. Activation of enterocyte TRPA1 by food components has the potential to facilitate nutrient absorption.

  19. Atmospheric-Biospheric Interactions of Ambient Hydrogen Peroxide: Climatology at MT. Mitchell, N.C., and Transport Into Needles of Red Spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claiborn, Candis Sue

    , but rather was to be limited to surface deposition. This hypothesis of deposition on the spruce needle surface without reaching the inner tissues was tested using a transport model based on the fundamental equations for gas diffusion. The detailed physiology of the spruce needle and its stomatal zone were taken into account in the resulting model. The governing transport equations including the species continuity equations and the Stefan-Maxwell equations modified to take into account molecule-wall collisions were area-averaged in the substomatal zone and in the stomatal pore, and volume-averaged in the wax-filled antechamber. The results of this analysis were consistent with the hypothesis of surface deposition of gas-phase hydrogen peroxide, and suggest that the substomatal concentration of hydrogen peroxide was zero for the range of conditions tested.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide enteritis: the "snow white" sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, J J; Waye, J D

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a useful disinfectant that has achieved widespread utility in varied clinical settings. We report an epidemic of hydrogen peroxide enteritis that developed in seven patients in our gastrointestinal endoscopy unit during a 2-week period in early 1988. During endoscopy, using recently sterilized endoscopes that were flushed with 3% hydrogen peroxide after the glutaraldehyde cycle, instantaneous blanching (the "snow white" sign) and effervescence were noted on the mucosal surfaces when the water button was depressed. No patient subsequently suffered morbidity or mortality associated with this peroxide enteritis, and the biopsy specimens revealed nonspecific inflammation. The toxicity of hydrogen peroxide when used in enema form is reviewed, as well as the pathogenesis of peroxide enteritis.

  1. Oral mucositis - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer treatment - mucositis; Cancer treatment - mouth pain; Cancer treatment - mouth sores; Chemotherapy - mucositis; Chemotherapy - mouth pain; Chemotherapy - mouth sores; Radiation therapy - mucositis; Radiation therapy - mouth pain; Radiation ...

  2. Method for the preparation of mucosal flaps from the jejunum of laying hens for transporter studies in Ussing chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnke, Isabelle; Röhe, Ilen; Meyer, Wilfried; Kröger, Susan; Neumann, Konrad; Zentek, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Ussing chambers are frequently used for in vitro evaluation of intestinal transport physiology. The current study describes investigating the jejunal tissue from laying hens using a specific preparation method and evaluates the effect of glutamine in the maintenance buffer. Tunica mucosa was stripped from 104 jejunal samples from 10 hens and stabilised by a net device. Fifty samples were maintained with modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer (Control), 54 samples with additional 5 mM glutamine (Group Gln). The percentage of responding samples varied between 87 and 100%. Mean short circuit current (ΔI sc,) [µA/cm(2)] of samples exposed to 10 mM glucose in the Control group and Group Gln was 17.0 and 14.6 (p = 0.836), respectively, of samples exposed to 100 µM phloridzin -13.3 and -11.8 (p = 0.712), respectively, and of samples exposed to 100 µM carbachol 4.7 and 3.7 (p = 0.450), respectively. In conclusion, the net-supported method enabled a reliable investigation of jejunum from laying hens. Glutamine in the maintenance buffer was of no significant benefit.

  3. Effect of 16.16 dimethyl prostaglandin E2, N-acetyl-cysteine and the proton pump inhibitor BY 831-78 on hydrogen peroxide-induced mucosal damage in the rat stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürer-Maly, C C; Haussner, V; Halter, F

    1990-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are noxious to gastrointestinal mucosa and contribute to a variety of gastrointestinal diseases. We examined whether 16.16 dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (PG) is protective against the oxidizing action of 6% H2O2 causing gross hemorrhagic lesions in rat gastric mucosa. Male Wistar rats were treated with PG, 0.005-5 micrograms/kg, either intragastrically (i.g.) or subcutaneously, 30 min prior to i.g. administration of 6% H2O2, 0.5 ml/100 g. Further animals received 25 mg of the mucus dissolvent N-acetyl-cystein (NAC) following oral PG treatment or 30 mumol/kg of the H+K(+)-ATPase inhibitor BY 831-78 (BY), 4 h before onset of the experiments. Volume, pH and beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase and lactate dehydrogenase as parameters of cell damage were determined in the gastric juice. i.g. PG treatment achieved 60 and 55% reduction of the mucosal lesions in doses between 5 and 0.05 micrograms/kg, respectively. i.p. PG administration was effective in all doses tested. Gastric juice volume was only slightly and enzymes were not significantly affected by PG treatment. NAC did not diminish PG efficacy or aggravate mucosal lesions. Gastric acid suppression did not increase PG-induced protection but was strongly protective by itself, reducing damage by 75%. Low-dose PG treatment achieves an effective protection against oxidative damage in gastric mucosa, which is not the result of dilution or enhanced mucus production.

  4. The Grapevine Uncharacterized Intrinsic Protein 1 (VvXIP1) Is Regulated by Drought Stress and Transports Glycerol, Hydrogen Peroxide, Heavy Metals but Not Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Henrique; Araújo, Diogo; Conde, Carlos; Martins, Ana P; Soveral, Graça; Chaumont, François; Delrot, Serge; Gerós, Hernâni

    2016-01-01

    A MIP (Major Intrinsic Protein) subfamily called Uncharacterized Intrinsic Proteins (XIP) was recently described in several fungi and eudicot plants. In this work, we cloned a XIP from grapevine, VvXIP1, and agrobacterium-mediated transformation studies in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed that the encoded aquaporin shows a preferential localization at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Stopped-flow spectrometry in vesicles from the aqy-null yeast strain YSH1172 overexpressing VvXIP1 showed that VvXIP1 is unable to transport water but is permeable to glycerol. Functional studies with the ROS sensitive probe CM-H2DCFDA in intact transformed yeasts showed that VvXIP1 is also able to permeate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Drop test growth assays showed that besides glycerol and H2O2, VvXIP1 also transports boric acid, copper, arsenic and nickel. Furthermore, we found that VvXIP1 transcripts were abundant in grapevine leaves from field grown plants and strongly repressed after the imposition of severe water-deficit conditions in potted vines. The observed downregulation of VvXIP1 expression in cultured grape cells in response to ABA and salt, together with the increased sensitivity to osmotic stress displayed by the aqy-null yeast overexpressing VvXIP1, corroborates the role of VvXIP1 in osmotic regulation besides its involvement in H2O2 transport and metal homeostasis.

  5. The Grapevine Uncharacterized Intrinsic Protein 1 (VvXIP1) Is Regulated by Drought Stress and Transports Glycerol, Hydrogen Peroxide, Heavy Metals but Not Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Carlos; Martins, Ana P.; Soveral, Graça; Chaumont, François; Delrot, Serge

    2016-01-01

    A MIP (Major Intrinsic Protein) subfamily called Uncharacterized Intrinsic Proteins (XIP) was recently described in several fungi and eudicot plants. In this work, we cloned a XIP from grapevine, VvXIP1, and agrobacterium-mediated transformation studies in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed that the encoded aquaporin shows a preferential localization at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Stopped-flow spectrometry in vesicles from the aqy-null yeast strain YSH1172 overexpressing VvXIP1 showed that VvXIP1 is unable to transport water but is permeable to glycerol. Functional studies with the ROS sensitive probe CM-H2DCFDA in intact transformed yeasts showed that VvXIP1 is also able to permeate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Drop test growth assays showed that besides glycerol and H2O2, VvXIP1 also transports boric acid, copper, arsenic and nickel. Furthermore, we found that VvXIP1 transcripts were abundant in grapevine leaves from field grown plants and strongly repressed after the imposition of severe water-deficit conditions in potted vines. The observed downregulation of VvXIP1 expression in cultured grape cells in response to ABA and salt, together with the increased sensitivity to osmotic stress displayed by the aqy-null yeast overexpressing VvXIP1, corroborates the role of VvXIP1 in osmotic regulation besides its involvement in H2O2 transport and metal homeostasis. PMID:27504956

  6. DIVALENT METAL TRANSPORTER-1 REGULATION BY IRON AND VANADIUM MODULATES HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE IN LUNG CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) participates in the detoxification of metals that can damage lung epithelium. Elevated iron levels increase the expression of DMT1 in bronchial epithelial cells stimulating its uptake and storage in ferritin, thus making iron unavailable t...

  7. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  8. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  9. Management of mucositis in oral irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feber, T. [Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    1996-10-01

    Mucositis significantly affects quality of life and tolerance of treatment in oral irradiation. Effective management of this complication is therefore very important. However, there is a scarcity of up-to-date oral care protocols, with most centres using ritualized regimens. The literature on oral rinses in radiation mucositis is at best inconclusive and at worst confusing. In this study, patients undergoing radical radiotherapy treatment (55-60 Gy in 4 weeks) to more than 50% of the oral cavity and oropharynx were randomized to a research based oral care protocol with either saline 0.9% or hydrogen peroxide 3.5 volumes (HP) as rinses. The results of this study show that, on average, the group receiving saline rinses appeared to do better on some outcomes than the group receiving HP. This suggests that frequent mechanical cleansing of the mouth may be more important than the antiseptic properties of a mouthwash. Antiseptic mouthwashes may be contra-indicated in radiation mucositis. In order to determine best practice in mucositis management, multicentre, multidisciplinary trials should be conducted. (Author).

  10. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  11. 49 CFR 172.552 - ORGANIC PEROXIDE placard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false ORGANIC PEROXIDE placard. 172.552 Section 172.552... SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.552 ORGANIC PEROXIDE placard. (a) Except for size and color, the ORGANIC... background on the ORGANIC PEROXIDE placard must be red in the top half and yellow in the lower half. The...

  12. 49 CFR 172.427 - ORGANIC PEROXIDE label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false ORGANIC PEROXIDE label. 172.427 Section 172.427... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.427 ORGANIC PEROXIDE label. (a) Except for size and color, the ORGANIC... on the ORGANIC PEROXIDE label must be red in the top half and yellow in the lower half....

  13. Mucosal vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Kiron, V.

    2014-01-01

    Among the novel vaccination methods, mucosal vaccination seems to possess all the desired criteria. The chapter reviews the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding this type of vaccination with a focus on their uptake, immune stimulation, and where possible, discusses their potential as future vaccines

  14. Serosal-to-mucosal urea flux across the isolated ruminal epithelium is mediated via urea transporter-B and aquaporins when Holstein calves are abruptly changed to a moderately fermentable diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, M E; Schurmann, B L; Górka, P; Penner, G B; Loewen, M E; Mutsvangwa, T

    2015-02-01

    Urea transport (UT-B) proteins are known to facilitate urea movement across the ruminal epithelium; however, other mechanisms may be involved as well because inhibiting UT-B does not completely abolish urea transport. Of the aquaporins (AQP), which are a family of membrane-spanning proteins that are predominantly involved in the movement of water, AQP-3, AQP-7, and AQP-10 are also permeable to urea, but it is not clear if they contribute to urea transport across the ruminal epithelium. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the functional roles of AQP and UT-B in the serosal-to-mucosal urea flux (Jsm-urea) across rumen epithelium; and (2) whether functional adaptation occurs in response to increased diet fermentability. Twenty-five Holstein steer calves (n=5) were assigned to a control diet (CON; 91.5% hay and 8.5% vitamin and mineral supplement) or a medium grain diet (MGD; 41.5% barley grain, 50% hay, and 8.5% vitamin and mineral) that was fed for 3, 7, 14, or 21 d. Calves were killed and ruminal epithelium was collected for mounting in Ussing chambers under short-circuit conditions and for analysis of mRNA abundance of UT-B and AQP-3, AQP-7, and AQP-10. To mimic physiologic conditions, the mucosal buffer (pH 6.2) contained no urea, whereas the serosal buffer (pH 7.4) contained 1 mM urea. The fluxes of (14)C-urea (Jsm-urea; 26 kBq/10 mL) and (3)H-mannitol (Jsm-mannitol; 37 kBq/10 mL) were measured, with Jsm-mannitol being used as an indicator of paracellular or hydrophilic movement. Serosal addition of phloretin (1 mM) was used to inhibit UT-B-mediated urea transport, whereas NiCl2 (1 mM) was used to inhibit AQP-mediated urea transport. Across treatments, the addition of phloretin or NiCl2 reduced the Jsm-urea from 116.5 to 54.0 and 89.5 nmol/(cm(2) × h), respectively. When both inhibitors were added simultaneously, Jsm-urea was further reduced to 36.8 nmol/(cm(2) × h). Phloretin-sensitive and NiCl2-sensitive Jsm-urea were not affected by diet. The

  15. Human FcRn can mediate the transport across intestinal mucosal barrier and prolong the half-life of rabbit IgG in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangchang Pang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available FcRn (neonatal Fc receptor plays an important role in IgG transportation, antigen presentation and signal transmission. In this study, the complement fixation test and flow cytometry test were performed to verify whether the heterologous antibody could be transmitted to the serum or leukocyte with FcγR (Fc gamma receptor across the intestinal mucosa. The results showed that rabbit anti-bovine IgG could be detected in both the serum and the leukocytes, which indicated that the heterologous antibody could transport across the intestinal mucosa to enter the blood and be effectively delivered to the leukocytes with FcγR. In addition, the results also showed that the rabbit anti-bovine IgG still could be detected in the leukocyte group (P=0.044<0.05 after 21 days. It indicated that the rabbit IgG could exist in the body for a long term (up to 21 days after being transported to the cells containing FcγR.

  16. MUCOSAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Madan Jyotsana; Banode Sagar; Dangi Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    The process of mucoadhesion involving a polymeric drug delivery system is a complex one that includes processes such as wetting, adsorption and interpenetration of polymer chains. The success and degree of mucoadhesion bonding is influenced by various polymer-based properties such as the degree of cross-linking, chain length and the presence of various functional groupings. The attractiveness of mucosal-targeted controlled drug delivery of active pharmaceutical ingredients, has led formulatio...

  17. PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

    1961-08-15

    A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

  18. Buccal Mucosal Graft Urethroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Arlen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available At our institution, the majority of buccal mucosal graft urethroplasties are performed using a two-team approach with an otolaryngologic surgeon. We report our two-surgeon experience with buccal mucosal grafting for reconstruction of all anterior urethral strictures. Twenty-four men underwent autologous buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty between October 2001 and September 2008 for recurrent urethral stricture disease. Twenty-two underwent a single-stage repair and two underwent a two-stage repair. Medical charts were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, comorbidities, etiology, location and length of stricture, and prior interventions in order to identify predictors of buccal urethroplasty success, defined as no evidence of stricture recurrence. All patients underwent retrograde urethrogram and cystoscopy. Operative and anesthesia times were evaluated. We determined an overall success rate of 83.3% (20 of 24 cases. Mean anesthesia time for single-stage urethroplasty was 155 min and mean operative time was 123 min. One of the two two-stage urethroplasties experienced stricture recurrence (50%. The single-stage buccal graft success rate was 86.4% (19 of 22 cases. Two of the four who developed recurrent stricture disease that required intervention had undergone a previous mesh urethroplasty. Complications developed in four of 24 patients (16.6%, including superficial wound infection (one, superficial wound dehiscence (two, and abscess/fistula formation requiring reoperation (one. The buccal mucosa is an ideal tissue for both single- and two-stage substitution urethroplasty for patients with recurrent stricture disease. Our two-surgeon technique minimizes anesthesia and operative times, and contributes to the overall high success rate and relatively low complication rate.

  19. Protective effect of 3,4-methylenedioxyphenol (sesamol) on stress-related mucosal disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chen, Yi-Wei; Chu, Pei-Yi; Periasamy, Srinivasan; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2013-01-01

    Stress-related mucosal disease (SRMD) causes considerable morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. 3,4-Methylenedioxyphenol (sesamol) has been reported to have potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sesamol on water immersion restraint- (WIR-) induced SRMD in rats. Rat gastric ulcer and hemorrhage were induced by WIR. Rats were pretreated orally with various doses of sesamol (0.1, 0.3, and 1 mg/kg, resp.) 30 min before WIR. Gastric mucosal ulceration, hemoglobin, lipid peroxidation, mucus secretion, proinflammatory cytokines, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB levels were determined 4 h after WIR. In addition, the infiltration of neutrophil and macrophage into gastric mucosa was also determined after WIR. Water immersion restraint increased gastric mucosal ulcer and hemorrhage, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels but failed to affect mucosal lipid peroxidation and mucus secretion compared with non-WIR. Sesamol significantly decreased gastric ulceration and hemorrhage and inhibited mucosal TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 production and NF-κB activity in WIR-treated rats. In addition, increased myeloperoxidase and CD68 levels in gastric mucosa were found in WIR-treated rats compared to non-WIR rats. Sesamol did not affect myeloperoxidase but decreased CD68 levels in mucosa in WIR-treated rats. Sesamol may protect against SRMD by inhibiting gastric mucosal proinflammatory cytokines in rats.

  20. Chemistry of peroxide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volnov, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The history of Soviet research from 1866 to 1967 on peroxide compounds is reviewed. This research dealt mainly with peroxide kinetics, reactivity and characteristics, peroxide production processes, and more recently with superoxides and ozonides and emphasis on the higher oxides of group 1 and 2 elements. Solid state fluidized bed synthesis and production of high purity products based on the relative solubilities of the initial, intermediate, and final compounds and elements in liquid ammonia are discussed.

  1. Alteration of the redox state with reactive oxygen species for 5-fluorouracil-induced oral mucositis in hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko Yoshino

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis.

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F.

    2007-01-01

    A relatively simple and economical process and apparatus for concentrating hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution at the point of use have been invented. The heart of the apparatus is a vessel comprising an outer shell containing tubular membranes made of a polymer that is significantly more permeable by water than by hydrogen peroxide. The aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to be concentrated is fed through the interstitial spaces between the tubular membranes. An initially dry sweep gas is pumped through the interiors of the tubular membranes. Water diffuses through the membranes and is carried away as water vapor mixed into the sweep gas. Because of the removal of water, the hydrogen peroxide solution flowing from the vessel at the outlet end is more concentrated than that fed into the vessel at the inlet end. The sweep gas can be air, nitrogen, or any other gas that can be conveniently supplied in dry form and does not react chemically with hydrogen peroxide.

  3. Cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes are characterized by pain, burning sensation, numbness or paraesthesia of a particular part of the skin or mucosal surface without any visible signs. They are usually sensory disorders, sometimes with a great deal of psychologic overlay. In this article various conditions have been listed and are described. The possible causative mechanisms are discussed when they are applicable and the outline of their management is described.

  4. Protective effect of ginsenoside Re on acute gastric mucosal lesion induced by compound 48/80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of ginsenoside Re, isolated from ginseng berry, against acute gastric mucosal lesions was examined in rats with a single intraperitoneal injection of compound 48/80 (C48/80. Ginsenoside Re (20 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg was orally administered 0.5 h prior to C48/80 treatment. Ginsenoside Re dose-dependently prevented gastric mucosal lesion development 3 h after C48/80 treatment. Increases in the activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO; an index of neutrophil infiltration and xanthine oxidase (XO and the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS; an index of lipid peroxidation and decreases in the contents of hexosamine (a marker of gastric mucus and adherent mucus, which occurred in gastric mucosal tissues after C48/80 treatment, were significantly attenuated by ginsenoside Re. The elevation of Bax expression and the decrease in Bcl2 expression after C48/80 treatment were also attenuated by ginsenoside Re. Ginsenoside Re significantly attenuated all these changes 3 h after C48/80 treatment. These results indicate that orally administered ginsenoside Re protects against C48/80-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions in rats, possibly through its stimulatory action on gastric mucus synthesis and secretion, its inhibitory action on neutrophil infiltration, and enhanced lipid peroxidation in the gastric mucosal tissue.

  5. Alanylglutamine dipeptide and growth hormone maintain PepT1-mediated transport in oxidatively stressed Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alteheld, B; Evans, M E; Gu, L H; Ganapathy, V; Leibach, F H; Jones, D P; Ziegler, T R

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by gut mucosal cells during conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may impair mucosal repair and nutrient transport/absorptive function. Absorption of di- and tripeptides in the small intestine and colon is mediated by the H(+)-dependent transporter PepT1, but effects of oxidative stress on di- and tripeptide transport are unknown. We assessed whether exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) influences dipeptide transport in human colonic epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Uptake of [(14)C]glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar) was used to evaluate PepT1-mediated dipeptide transport. Exposure to 1-5 mmol/L H(2)O(2) for 24 h caused a dose-dependent decrease in Gly-Sar transport, which was associated with decreased PepT1 transport velocity (V(max)). Treatment with alanylglutamine (Ala-Gln) or growth hormone (GH) did not alter Caco-2 Gly-Sar transport in the absence of H(2)O(2). However, both Ala-Gln and GH prevented the decrease in dipeptide transport observed with 1 mmol/L H(2)O(2) treatment. Ala-Gln, but not GH, maintained cellular glutathione and prevented the decrease in PepT1 protein expression. Thus, these agents should be further investigated as potential therapies to improve absorption of small peptides in disorders associated with oxidative injury to the gut mucosa.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  7. Protective effect of Matricaria chamomilla on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemek, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Ezgi; Büyükokuroğlu, Mehmet Emin

    2010-07-01

    The antiulcerogenic and antioxidant properties of Matricaria chamomilla L. (Compositae) hydroalcoholic extract (MCE) on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury were investigated in rats. After the induction of gastric mucosal injury, all groups were sacrificed; the gastric ulcer index was calculated, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in whole blood and gastric tissue, and serum ascorbic acid, retinol, and beta-carotene levels were measured in all groups. Pretreatment with MCE at some doses significantly reduced gastric lesions. Again, some doses of MCE significantly reduced the MDA, and significantly increased GSH levels in gastric tissue or whole blood. Serum beta-carotene and retinol levels were significantly higher in the 200 mg/kg MCE-administered group with respect to control. As a result, MCE clearly has a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions, and this effect, at least in part, depends upon the reduction in lipid peroxidation and augmentation in antioxidant activity.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) stimulates the active transport of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) into platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosin, T.R.

    1986-03-01

    Platelets function in a variety of physiological and pathological processes which may be altered by oxidant injury. One such process is the active transport 5-HT, which is an important mechanism in the control of circulating 5-HT levels. Exposure of mouse platelets (10/sup 8//ml) to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ caused a time-dependent and dose-dependent increase in 5-HT (10/sup -7/M) uptake. The uptake 4 and 10 min following H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ (50 ..mu..M) was 228% and 145% of control values, respectively. Fluoxetine (10/sup -6/M) blocked all 5-HT uptake and catalase (1500 U/ml) blocked the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-stimulated uptake. Enzymatically produced H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ (glucose/glucose oxidase) and xanthine (X)/xanthine oxidase (XO) generated oxygen radicals produced quantitatively and qualitatively similar results. The stimulatory response of platelets to X/XO generated oxidants was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (250 U/ml) but, was inhibited using heat-denatured XO, allopurinol (0.5 mM) and catalase; fluoxetine inhibited all 5-HT uptake. Platelets exposed to X/XO in the presence of chelated (EDTA, 100 ..mu..M) or unchelated FeSO/sub 4/, FeNH/sub 4/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/ or CuCl (50 ..mu..M) did not have altered 5-HT uptake. These data indicate that brief exposure of platelets to physiological levels of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ results in marked, reversible stimulation of active 5-HT uptake which may represent a homeostatic defense mechanism when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is elevated in the platelet microenvironment.

  9. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  10. Mucosal immunity and the microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    By definition, the mucosal immune system is responsible for interfacing with the outside world, specifically responding to external threats, of which pathogenic microbes represent a primary challenge. However, it has become apparent that the human host possesses a numerically vast and taxonomically diverse resident microbiota, predominantly in the gut, and also in the airway, genitourinary tract, and skin. The microbiota is generally considered symbiotic, and has been implicated in the regulation of cellular growth, restitution after injury, maintenance of barrier function, and importantly, in the induction, development, and modulation of immune responses. The mucosal immune system uses diverse mechanisms that protect the host from overt pathogens, but necessarily has coevolved to monitor, nurture, and exploit the normal microbiota. As a whole, mucosal immunity encompasses adaptive immune regulation that can involve systemic processes, local tissue-based innate and inflammatory events, intrinsic defenses, and highly conserved cell autonomous cytoprotective responses. Interestingly, specific taxa within the normal microbiota have been implicated in roles shaping specific adaptive, innate, and cell autonomous responses. Taken together, the normal microbiota exerts profound effects on the mucosal immune system, and likely plays key roles in human physiology and disease.

  11. Erythromycin and Benzoyl Peroxide Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide is used to treat acne. Erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide are in a class of medications called topical antibiotics. The combination of erythromycin ...

  12. Clindamycin and Benzoyl Peroxide Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of clindamycin and benzoyl peroxide is used to treat acne. Clindamycin and benzoyl peroxide are in a class of medications called topical antibiotics. The combination of clindamycin ...

  13. Effect of Hymenolepis nana on the mouse ileal mucosal cells: histochemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanad, M M; Salem, S A; el-Gamal, R L; Darwish, R A; el-Ridi, A M

    1990-12-01

    Histochemical studies of the ileal mucosal cells of mice experimentally infected with H. nana revealed definite increase in mucous secretions indicating increased activity of the goblet cells in response to mucosal irritation. The activity of acid phosphatase was also increased representing a sort of defence mechanism against the attached worms. The activities of ATP-ase and NADH diaphorase enzymes were decreased indicating disturbance in the metabolic and transport processes and in the absorptive function of the intestinal epithelial cells.

  14. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Salinas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT, skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT, the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT. Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture.

  15. Vestibuloplasty: allograft versus mucosal graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, H M; Parhiz, A; Ghafari, S

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the application of alloderm and mucosal graft for vestibuloplasty. This randomized controlled trial with split mouth design was carried out on 20 edentulous patients. Patients underwent vestibuloplasty surgery with the Clark technique. Half of the prepared bed in each patient was covered with alloderm and the other half with mucosal graft. Vestibule depth (width of fixed tissue) and relapse in the two sides immediately after surgery, and 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery were measured and compared. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Student's paired t and Friedman tests. The width of the fixed tissue in the alloderm graft at 1, 3 and 6 month intervals was significantly lower than that in the autograft (Pvestibuloplasty. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  16. Lansoprazole ameliorates intestinal mucosal damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi Ichikawa; Toshikazu Yoshikawa; Norimasa Yoshida; Tomohisa Takagi; Naoya Tomatsuri; Kazuhiro Katada; Yutaka Isozaki; Kazuhiko Uchiyama; Yuji Naito; Takeshi Okanoue

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effect of lansoprazole on ischemia and reperfusion (I/R)-induced rat intestinal mucosal injury in vivo.METHODS: Intestinal damage was induced by clamping both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk for 30 min followed by reperfusion in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Lansoprazole was given to rats intraperitoneally 1 h before vascular clamping.RESULTS: Both the intraluminal hemoglobin and protein levels, as indices of mucosal damage, significantly increased in I/R-groups comparion with those of shamoperation groups. These increases in intraluminal hemoglobin and protein levels were significantly inhibited by the treatment with lansoprazole at a dose of 1 mg/kg. Small intestine exposed to I/R resulted in mucosal inflammation that was characterized by significant increases in thiobarbituric acidreactive substances (TBARS), tissue-associated myeloperoxidase activity (MPO), and mucosal content of rat cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1).These increases in TBARS, MPO activities and CINC-1 content in the intestinal mucosa after I/R were all inhibited by pretreatment with lansoprazole at a dose of 1 mg/kg.Furthermore, the CINC-1 mRNA expression was increased during intestinal I/R, and this increase in mRNA expression was inhibited by treatment with lansoprazole.CONCLUSION: Lansoprazole inhibits lipid peroxidation and reduces development of intestinal mucosal inflammation induced by I/R in rats, suggesting that lansoprazole may have a therapeutic potential for I/R injury.

  17. LIPID PEROXIDATION IN PREECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Sharmila Krishna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension in pregnancy is a leading cause of both maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Preeclampsia is characterised by hypertension and proteinuria. Lipid peroxidation is an important factor in the pathophysiology of Preeclampsia. The present study was undertaken to determine Serum Malondialdehyde (MDA levels , a product of lipid peroxidation , in clinically diagnosed Preeclamptic women(n=30 and the values were compared with that of Normotensive pregnant women (n=30 aged between 18-30yrs. All of them were in their third trimester and were primigravida. Serum MDA was estimated by TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. We observed that Serum MDA levels were significantly increased in Preeclamptic women (p <0.000 as compared to that of Normotensive pregnant women . Increased levels of lipid peroxiation product - MDA may contribute to the pathophysiology of Preeclampsia.

  18. The pleiotropic role of vitamin A in regulating mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisinha, Stitaya

    2015-06-01

    The effect of vitamin A on mucosal immunity has never been subjected to extensive studies until recently. We started to work in this area in the early 1970s when we observed that children with protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM) often had defective mucosal immunity, judging from the incidence of respiratory tract infections and diarrhea. We reported that these children had depressed secretory IgA (sIgA) levels in their nasal wash fluids. The IgA level in specimens collected from those superimposed with some degrees of vitamin A deficiency state appeared to be more severely affected. In order to better understand the underlying mechanism associated with this condition, we started to study more detail the deficiency state using experimental vitamin A-deficient rats. From a series of experiments using this animal model, we proposed that vitamin A was needed for transport and/or secretion of sIgA across the mucosa. This conclusion was based on the observation that the secretory component of sIgA synthesized by the epithelial cells of these vitamin A deficient animals was adversely affected as compared to the control animals. From that time onward, much progress has been made by several other groups showing that other mechanisms could also influence the integrity and immune function of the mucosa. For instance, recent studies demonstrated that retinoic acid which is a biologically active form of vitamin A has an essential role in mucosal homeostasis, controlling tolerance and immunity in these non-lymphoid tissues. Such a conclusion was made possible by the availability of sophisticated new molecular biology and genetic engineering techniques together with advances in the field of immunoregulation, e.g., the discovery of dendritic cells (DCs) and T helper cell subsets in 1980s, and the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) together with other innate immune regulators in controlling adaptive immune response in the early 1990s. These advances provided considerable new

  19. Role of polyamines in gastrointestinal mucosal growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xiang Bian; Jian Hua Wang

    2000-01-01

    The polyamines [putrescine (PU), spermidine (SPD) and spermine (SPM)] are ubiquitous polycationiccompounds found in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, are essentially involved in a variety of regulatorysteps during normal, adaptive, and malignant cell proliferation. Nearly four decades investigation about thepolyamines contributed to the synthesis and decomposition of polyamines and the active and passive enzymeswhich regulate them at different levels. This review focuses on the sources and homeostasis of intracellularpolyamines, the transport and role of the polyamines in the growth of the gastrointestinal mucosa and theirpossible mechanism. We tried to point out the gaps remaining in the story and give a working hypothesis forthe role of polyamines in gastrointestinal mucosal growth. We propose in the hypothesis that polyamine is a“key”to unlock the “door”of cell proliferation. How many “doors” between the “polyamine key” and the“real start” of proliferation? The polyamine might be the only key for cell proliferation. Another possibilityis that polyamine is the first key and its “unlocking-effect” resulting in getting another key for the next doorin the proliferation chain, for example, proto-oncogenes. To decide whether polyamine is an intermediatestep or just only one step of cell proliferation, the possible way is to keep polyamine to be a stimulus and finda way to deprive the function of proto-oncogene protein (or other possible gene expression product) to checkthe effect on the cell proliferation. Another important question is how polyamine can trigger the synthesis ofDNA in virtual. Arabinose operon model may give us some ideas to investigate about that. And furthermore,it is necessary to pay attention to the relationship between polyamine and other cell proliferation regulator,like growth factor, chalone, cAMP, cGMP, etc. Further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism ofpolyamine acted on the gastrointestinal mucosal

  20. The Development of an AIDS Mucosal Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Tang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that mucosal tissues contain the largest surface area of the human body and are the front line of natural host defense against various pathogens. In fact, more than 80% of infectious disease pathogens probably gain entry into the susceptible human hosts through open mucosal surfaces. Human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1, a mainly sexually transmitted virus, also primarily targets the vaginal and gastrointestinal mucosa as entry sites for viral transmission, seeding, replication and amplification. Since HIV-1 establishes its early replication in vaginal or rectal mucosal tissues, the induction of sufficient mucosal immunity at the initial site of HIV-1 transmission becomes essential for a protective vaccine. However, despite the fact that current conventional vaccine strategies have remained unsuccessful in preventing HIV-1 infection, sufficient financial support and resources have yet to be given to develop a vaccine able to elicit protective mucosal immunity against sexual transmissions. Interestingly, Chinese ancestors invented variolation through intranasal administration about one thousand years ago, which led to the discovery of a successful smallpox vaccine and the final eradication of the disease. It is the hope for all mankind that the development of a mucosal AIDS vaccine will ultimately help control the AIDS pandemic. In order to discover an effective mucosal AIDS vaccine, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of mucosal immunology and to test various mucosal vaccination strategies.

  1. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function....... Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides...

  2. Voice disorders in mucosal leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Nunes Ruas

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases-Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. RESULTS: 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81% were male and five (19% female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years. The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%, followed by dysphonia (38.5%, odynophagia (30.8% and dysphagia (26.9%. 23 patients (84.6% presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. CONCLUSION: We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some

  3. Mucosal immunity and probiotics in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazado, Carlo C; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A

    2014-07-01

    Teleost mucosal immunity has become the subject of unprecedented research studies in recent years because of its diversity and defining characteristics. Its immune repertoire is governed by the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) which are divided into gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissues (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissues (GIALT). The direct contact with its immediate environment makes the mucosal surfaces of fish susceptible to a wide variety of pathogens. The inherent immunocompetent cells and factors in the mucosal surfaces together with the commensal microbiota have pivotal role against pathogens. Immunomodulation is a popular prophylactic strategy in teleost and probiotics possess this beneficial feature. Most of the studies on the immunomodulatory properties of probiotics in fish mainly discussed their impacts on systemic immunity. In contrast, few of these studies discussed the immunomodulatory features of probiotics in mucosal surfaces and are concentrated on the influences in the gut. Significant attention should be devoted in understanding the relationship of mucosal immunity and probiotics as the present knowledge is limited and are mostly based on extrapolations of studies in humans and terrestrial vertebrates. In the course of the advancement of mucosal immunity and probiotics, new perspectives in probiotics research, e.g., probiogenomics have emerged. This review affirms the relevance of probiotics in the mucosal immunity of fish by revisiting and bridging the current knowledge on teleost mucosal immunity, mucosal microbiota and immunomodulation of mucosal surfaces by probiotics. Expanding the knowledge of immunomodulatory properties of probiotics especially on mucosal immunity is essential in advancing the use of probiotics as a sustainable and viable strategy for successful fish husbandry.

  4. Modulation of gut mucosal biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleessen, Brigitta; Blaut, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Non-digestible inulin-type fructans, such as oligofructose and high-molecular-weight inulin, have been shown to have the ability to alter the intestinal microbiota composition in such a way that members of the microbial community, generally considered as health-promoting, are stimulated. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are the most frequently targeted organisms. Less information exists on effects of inulin-type fructans on the composition, metabolism and health-related significance of bacteria at or near the mucosa surface or in the mucus layer forming mucosa-associated biofilms. Using rats inoculated with a human faecal flora as an experimental model we have found that inulin-type fructans in the diet modulated the gut microbiota by stimulation of mucosa-associated bifidobacteria as well as by partial reduction of pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium and thereby benefit health. In addition to changes in mucosal biofilms, inulin-type fructans also induced changes in the colonic mucosa stimulating proliferation in the crypts, increasing the release of mucins, and altering the profile of mucin components in the goblet cells and epithelial mucus layer. These results indicate that inulin-type fructans may stabilise the gut mucosal barrier. Dietary supplementation with these prebiotics could offer a new approach to supporting the barrier function of the mucosa.

  5. Emerging evidence on the pathobiology of mucositis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Dasooqi, N.; Sonis, S.T.; Bowen, J.M.; Bateman, E.; Blijlevens, N.M.; Gibson, R.J.; Logan, R.M.; Nair, R.G.; Stringer, A.M.; Yazbeck, R.; Elad, S.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the biological basis for cancer therapy-induced mucosal barrier injury (mucositis). The last formal review of the subject by MASCC/ISOO was published in 2007; consequently, an update is timely. METHODS: Panel members reviewed th

  6. Biology and mucosal immunity to myxozoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Daniela; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J Oriol

    2014-04-01

    Myxozoans are among the most abundant parasites in nature. Their life cycles involve two hosts: an invertebrate, usually an annelid, and a vertebrate, usually a fish. They affect fish species in their natural habitats but also constitute a menace for fish aquaculture. Using different strategies they are able to parasitize and cause damage in multiple organs, including mucosal tissues, which they use also as portals of entry. In fish, the main mucosal sites include the intestine, skin and gills. Recently the finding of a specific mucosal immunoglobulin in teleost (IgT), analogous to mammalian IgA, and the capacity of fish to develop a specific mucosal immune response against different pathogens, has highlighted the importance of studying immune responses at mucosal sites. In this review, we describe the major biological characteristics of myxozoan parasites and present the data available regarding immune responses for species that infect mucosal sites. As models for mucosal immunity we review the responses to Enteromyxum spp. and Ceratomyxa shasta, both of which parasitize the intestine. The immune response at the skin and gills is also described, as these mucosal tissues are used by myxozoans as attaching surfaces and portal of entry, and some species also parasitize these sites. Finally, the development of immunoprophylactic strategies is discussed.

  7. Nutrition and Gut Mucositis in Pediatric Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko

    . Unfortunately, effective treatment strategies against mucositis are not in general available. The overall aim of the present PhD was to study interactions between mucositis, inflammation and nutrition. We hypothesized that toxic reactions in the alimentary tract, induced by chemotherapy, followed by release...

  8. Mucosal vaccines: a paradigm shift in the development of mucosal adjuvants and delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, Devegowda Vishakante; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Shinde, Chetan G; Iyer, Meenakshi

    2015-04-01

    Mucosal immune responses are the first-line defensive mechanisms against a variety of infections. Therefore, immunizations of mucosal surfaces from which majority of infectious agents make their entry, helps to protect the body against infections. Hence, vaccinization of mucosal surfaces by using mucosal vaccines provides the basis for generating protective immunity both in the mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Mucosal vaccines offer several advantages over parenteral immunization. For example, (i) ease of administration; (ii) non-invasiveness; (iii) high-patient compliance; and (iv) suitability for mass vaccination. Despite these benefits, to date, only very few mucosal vaccines have been developed using whole microorganisms and approved for use in humans. This is due to various challenges associated with the development of an effective mucosal vaccine that can work against a variety of infections, and various problems concerned with the safe delivery of developed vaccine. For instance, protein antigen alone is not just sufficient enough for the optimal delivery of antigen(s) mucosally. Hence, efforts have been made to develop better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for improved mucosal Th1 and Th2 immune responses using an efficient and safe immunostimulatory molecule and novel delivery carriers. Therefore, in this review, we have made an attempt to cover the recent advancements in the development of adjuvants and delivery carriers for safe and effective mucosal vaccine production. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Mucosal vaccines: novel strategies and applications for the control of pathogens and tumors at mucosal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis Cs; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites.

  10. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Darcy Shaw; Kartik Gohil; Marc D Basson

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis.The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation,short-gut syndrome,obesity,and bariatric surgery.Broadly,these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation.These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal,immune,dietary,nervous,and mechanical stimuli.It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation.This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation,delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention,and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan.Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes.

  11. Mucosal acid causes gastric mucosal microcirculatory disturbance in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funatsu, Toshiyuki; Chono, Koji; Hirata, Takuya; Keto, Yoshihiro; Kimoto, Aishi; Sasamata, Masao

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism by which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suppress gastric mucosal blood flow is not fully understood, although the depletion of mucosal prostaglandin E2 has been proposed as one possible explanation. We investigated the role of gastric acid on gastric mucosal blood flow in NSAID-treated rats. A rat stomach was mounted in an ex vivo chamber, and gastric mucosal blood flow was measured sequentially in a 5-mm2 area of the gastric corpus using a scanning laser Doppler perfusion image system. Results showed that diclofenac (5 mg/kg s.c.) and indomethacin (10 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect gastric mucosal blood flow, although both strongly decreased mucosal prostaglandin E2 when saline was instilled into the gastric chamber. On replacement of the saline in the chamber with 100 mM hydrochloric acid, these drugs caused a decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow levels within 30 min. The specific cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors celecoxib (50 mg/kg s.c.) and rofecoxib (25 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect mucosal prostaglandin E2 level, nor did they decrease gastric mucosal blood flow, even when hydrochloric acid was added to the chamber. Furthermore, measurement of vasoconstrictive factors present in the mucosa showed that endothelin-1 levels increased after administration of diclofenac s.c. in the presence of intragastric hydrochloric acid. This indicates that the presence of mucosal hydrochloric acid plays an important role in the NSAID-induced decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow, while the COX-1-derived basal prostaglandin E2, which is unlikely to control gastric mucosal blood flow itself, protects microcirculatory systems from mucosal hydrochloric acid.

  12. Brain neuropeptides in gastric mucosal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyires, Klára; Zádori, Zoltán S

    2014-12-01

    The centrally induced gastroprotective effect of neuropeptides has been intensively studied. Besides many similarities, however, differences can also be observed in their gastroprotective actions. The gastroprotective dose-response curve proved to be either sigmoid, or bell-shaped. Additional gastrointestinal effects of neuropeptides can contribute to their mucosal protective effect. Part of the neuropeptides induces gastroprotection by peripheral administration as well. Besides vagal nerve the sympathetic nervous system may also be involved in conveying the central effect to the periphery. Better understanding of the complex mechanism of the maintenance of gastric mucosal integrity may result in the development of new strategy to enhance gastric mucosal resistance against injury.

  13. Evidence of anti-oxidant role of sucralfate in gastric mucosal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudanno, O M; Bedini, O A; Cesolari, J A; San Miguel, P

    1990-02-01

    Six percent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was used as a generator of the *OH free radical, and as an aggressor of gastric mucosa, in 100 Wistar rats. The mucosal cytoprotector effect of sucralfate, misoprostol, enprostil, cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine and 10% aluminum sulphate yielded almost complete macroscopic and histological protection to the gastric mucosa. Misoprostol or enprostil gave partial protection whereas the H2 blockers aggravated the gastric necrotic lesions produced by the H2O2. We conclude that sucralfate is a true anti-oxidant that protects the gastric mucosa through its aluminum and sulphydril components, the increment of gastric mucins and endogenous PGs.

  14. Role of Melatonin, Neuropeptide S and Short Chain Fatty Acids in Regulation of Duodenal Mucosal Barrier Function and Motility

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Saudi, Wan Salman

    2015-01-01

    The duodenal epithelium is regularly exposed to HCl, digestive enzymes, bacteria and toxins, and sometimes also to ethanol and drugs. The imbalance of aggressive factors in the intestinal lumen and mucosal barrier function increases the risk of tissue injury and inflammation. The key components of the duodenal barrier function include mucosal permeability, bicarbonate transport and the secretion or absorption of fluids. This thesis aims to elucidate the role of melatonin, neuropeptide S (NPS)...

  15. Exploiting Mucosal Immunity for Antiviral Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-20

    Mucosal surfaces provide a remarkably effective barrier against potentially dangerous pathogens. Therefore, enhancing mucosal immunity through vaccines-strengthening that first line of defense-holds significant promise for reducing the burden of viral diseases. The large and varied class of viral pathogens, however, continues to present thorny challenges to vaccine development. Two primary difficulties exist: Viruses exhibit a stunning diversity of strategies for evading the host immune response, and even when we understand the nature of effective immune protection against a given virus, eliciting that protection is technically challenging. Only a few mucosal vaccines have surmounted these obstacles thus far. Recent developments, however, could greatly improve vaccine design. In this review, we first sketch out our understanding of mucosal immunity and then compare the herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and influenza virus to illustrate the distinct challenges of developing successful vaccines and to outline potential solutions.

  16. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Bruno M; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  17. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M Colombo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last twenty years we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacterias, archeas and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: i the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and ii the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  18. Effect of ageing on colonic mucosal regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferenc Sipos; Katalin Leiszter; Zsolt Tulassay

    2011-01-01

    The physiologic and pathologic cellular and molecular changes occurring with age in the human colon affect both the inflammatory process leading to mucosal injury and the regenerative capacity of the epithelium. On the one hand, age-related telomere shortening and inflamm-ageing may lead to the development of colonic inflammation, which results in epithelial damage. On the other hand, the altered migration and function of regenerative stem cells, the age-related methylation of mucosal healing-associated genes, together with the alterations of growth factor signaling with age, may be involved in delayed mucosal regeneration. The connections of these alterations to the process of ageing are not fully known. The understanding and customtailored modification of these mechanisms are of great clinical importance with regard to disease prevention and modern therapeutic strategies. Here, we aim to summarize the age-related microscopic and molecular changes of the human colon, as well as their role in altered mucosal healing.

  19. Transgenic Killer Commensal Bacteria as Mucosal Protectants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Polonelli

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available As first line of defense against the majority of infections and primary site for their transmission, mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity and genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts represent the most suitable sites to deliver protective agents for the prevention of infectious diseases. Mucosal protection is important not only for life threatening diseases but also for opportunistic infections which currently represent a serious burden in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost of cures. Candida albicans is among the most prevalent causes of mucosal infections not only in immuno- compromised patients, such as HIV-infected subjects who are frequently affected by oral and esophageal candidiasis, but also in otherwise healthy individuals, as in the case of acute vaginitis. Unfortunately, current strategies for mucosal protection against candidiasis are severely limited by the lack of effective vaccines and the relative paucity and toxicity of commercially available antifungal drugs. An additional option has been reported in a recent

  20. A regenerative approach towards mucosal fenestration closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandi, Padma; Anumala, Naveen; Reddy, Amarender; Chandra, Rampalli Viswa

    2013-06-06

    Mucosal fenestration is an opening or an interstice through the oral mucosa. A lesion which occurs with greater frequency than generally realised, its occurrence is attributed to a myriad of causes. Mucogingival procedures including connective tissue grafts, free gingival grafts and lateral pedicle grafts are generally considered to be the treatment of choice in the closure of a mucosal fenestration. More often, these procedures are performed in conjunction with other procedures such as periradicular surgery and with bone grafts. However, the concomitant use of gingival grafts and bone grafts in mucosal fenestrations secondary to infections in sites exhibiting severe bone loss is highly debatable. In this article, we report two cases of mucosal fenestrations secondary to trauma and their management by regenerative periodontal surgery with the placement of guided tissue regeneration membrane and bone graft. The final outcome was a complete closure of the fenestration in both the cases.

  1. 49 CFR 176.400 - Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides) materials. 176.400 Section 176.400 Transportation Other... Solids), Class 5 (Oxidizers and Organic Peroxides), and Division 1.5 Materials § 176.400 Stowage of Division 1.5, Class 4 (flammable solids) and Class 5 (oxidizers and organic peroxides) materials. (a)...

  2. Probiotics the Good Neighbor: Guarding the Gut Mucosal Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Rao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The disruption of gut barrier function plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of not only gastrointestinal diseases, but also the diseases of liver and other organs. Mucosal protective factors that preserve the gut barrier integrity are beneficial in the prevention and treatment of such diseases. Probiotics is a group of helpful bacteria that protect the gastrointestinal mucosa from a variety of insults. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of probiotic-mediated protection of gut barrier function is an important area of investigation. Approach: Several studies had addressed the role of probiotics in the protection of gut barrier integrity. In a recent study, we investigated the role of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and two soluble proteins, p40 and p75, in the protection of gut barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayer, a model of the intestinal epithelium. Results: Studies demonstrated that live or dead Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG prevents oxidative stress-induced disruption of tight junctions and barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The isolated soluble proteins of this probiotic, p40 and p75, also prevent hydrogen peroxide-induced tight junction disruption. This protective effect of probiotic proteins was mediated by the activation of ERK1/2 and protein kinase C isoforms, PKCβI and PKCε. Conclusion: Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG prevent oxidative stress-induced disruption of intestinal epithelial tight junctions and barrier function, suggesting that preservation of epithelial barrier function is one of the mechanisms involved in the mucosal protective role of probiotics in the gut.

  3. The development of an AIDS mucosal vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Xian Tang; Zhiwei Chen

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that mucosal tissues contain the largest surface area of the human body and are the front line of natural host defense against various pathogens. In fact, more than 80% of infectious disease pathogens probably gain entry into the susceptible human hosts through open mucosal surfaces. Human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1), a mainly sexually transmitted virus, also primarily targets the vaginal and gastrointestinal mucosa as entry sites for viral transmission, seeding, ...

  4. Inner-shell excitation spectroscopy of peroxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harding, K. L.; Kalirai, S.; Hayes, R.; Ju, V.; Cooper, G.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Thompson, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    O 1s inner-shell excitation spectra of a number of vapor phase molecules containing peroxide bonds - hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), di-t-butylperoxide ((BuOBu)-Bu-t-Bu-t), benzoyl peroxide, ((C6H5(CO)O)(2)), luperox-F [1,3(4)-bis(tertbutylperoxyisopropyl)benzene], and analogous, non-peroxide compounds -

  5. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Spencer W

    2005-08-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies, particularly radiation therapy for head and neck cancer and various forms of chemotherapy. It commonly results in severe oral pain that can compromise the duration and success of cancer management. Hospitalizations are common because patients lose the ability to take anything by mouth due to severe pain and must have alimentation supported during this period. Pain management usually requires potent narcotic analgesia. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis is commonly described as the most significant and debilitating acute complication associated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Until recently, cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis was thought to be a process involving the epithelium only. Evidence is building that the process of oral mucositis involves far more than just the epithelium, but includes multiple cellular processes of the submucosa as well. Many strategies have been evaluated to prevent oral mucositis, but the data is confusing since it is often conflicting. Therapy with the growth factor, KGF1, appears promising, as it is the only medication currently approved by the FDA. A multifaceted approach that targets the entire mucositis process will probably be needed to optimize overall prevention.

  6. Inside the mucosal immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R McGhee

    Full Text Available An intricate network of innate and immune cells and their derived mediators function in unison to protect us from toxic elements and infectious microbial diseases that are encountered in our environment. This vast network operates efficiently by use of a single cell epithelium in, for example, the gastrointestinal (GI and upper respiratory (UR tracts, fortified by adjoining cells and lymphoid tissues that protect its integrity. Perturbations certainly occur, sometimes resulting in inflammatory diseases or infections that can be debilitating and life threatening. For example, allergies in the eyes, skin, nose, and the UR or digestive tracts are common. Likewise, genetic background and environmental microbial encounters can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs. This mucosal immune system (MIS in both health and disease is currently under intense investigation worldwide by scientists with diverse expertise and interests. Despite this activity, there are numerous questions remaining that will require detailed answers in order to use the MIS to our advantage. In this issue of PLOS Biology, a research article describes a multi-scale in vivo systems approach to determine precisely how the gut epithelium responds to an inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, given by the intravenous route. This article reveals a previously unknown pathway in which several cell types and their secreted mediators work in unison to prevent epithelial cell death in the mouse small intestine. The results of this interesting study illustrate how in vivo systems biology approaches can be used to unravel the complex mechanisms used to protect the host from its environment.

  7. Local glutathione redox status does not regulate ileal mucosal growth after massive small bowel resection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Junqiang; Washizawa, Naohiro; Gu, Li H; Levin, Marc S; Wang, Lihua; Rubin, Deborah C; Mwangi, Simon; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Jones, Dean P; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2007-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) concentration affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in intestinal and other cell lines in vitro. However, in vivo data on gut mucosal GSH redox status and cell turnover are limited. We investigated the effect of altered GSH redox status on the ileal mucosa in a rat model of short bowel syndrome following massive small bowel resection (SBR). Rats underwent 80% mid-jejunoileal resection (RX) or small bowel transection (TX; as operative controls), with administration of either saline or D, L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO), a specific inhibitor of cellular GSH synthesis. Ileal mucosal redox, morphology, and indices of cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined at different days after surgery. Ileal GSH redox status was assessed by GSH and GSH disulfide (GSSG) concentrations and the redox potential of GSH/GSSG (Eh). Ileal lipid peroxidation [free malondialdehyde (MDA)] was measured as an index of lipid peroxidation. BSO markedly decreased ileal mucosal GSH, oxidized GSH/GSSG Eh, and increased MDA content without inducing morphological damage as assessed by light or electron microscopy. As expected, SBR stimulated adaptive growth of ileal villus height and total mucosal height at 7 d after surgery, but this response was unaffected by BSO treatment despite a modest increase in crypt cell apoptosis. Ileal cell proliferation (crypt cell bromodeoxyuridine incorporation) increased at 2 d after SBR but was unaffected by BSO. Collectively, our in vivo data show that marked depletion of ileal GSH and oxidation of the GSH redox pool does not alter indices of ileal epithelial proliferation or SBR-induced ileal mucosal adaptive growth.

  8. Iron regulatory proteins control a mucosal block to intestinal iron absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, Bruno; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Becker, Christiane; Gretz, Norbert; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schümann, Klaus; Hentze, Matthias W

    2013-03-28

    Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated "mucosal block." We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin "mucosal block" and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  9. Iron Regulatory Proteins Control a Mucosal Block to Intestinal Iron Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Galy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated “mucosal block.” We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin “mucosal block” and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  10. Mucosal Immunity and the Onset of Allergic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusei Ohshima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal barriers encounter an environment that is rich in pathogens that possess mechanisms for invading mucosal tissues. These barriers also encounter innocuous antigens, such as foods, airborne antigens, and microbiota. The mucosa has developed a sophisticated immune system that can mount robust immune responses against pathogenic antigens, while maintaining mucosal tolerance against non-pathogenic antigens. Accumulating evidence indicates that the mucosal epithelium, dendritic cells, and a subtype of T cells with regulatory properties play important roles in the development and maintenance of mucosal tolerance. Moreover, the micribiota also contribute to regulating the mucosal immune system. A failure to develop or the breakdown of mucosal tolerance can result in allergic diseases, such as food allergy and asthma. By taking advantage of the unique characteristics of the mucosal immune system, strategies that induce regulatory cells in vivo and, thereby, reconstitute mucosal tolerance may be used to develop novel therapies that are suitable for treating or preventing of allergic diseases.

  11. Progress toward hydrogen peroxide micropulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C; Dittman, M D; Ledebuhr, A G

    1999-07-08

    A new self-pressurizing propulsion system has liquid thrusters and gas jet attitude control without heavy gas storage vessels. A pump boosts the pressure of a small fraction of the hydrogen peroxide, so that reacted propellant can controllably pressurize its own source tank. The warm decomposition gas also powers the pump and is supplied to the attitude control jets. The system has been incorporated into a prototype microsatellite for terrestrial maneuvering tests. Additional progress includes preliminary testing of a bipropellant thruster, and storage of unstabilized hydrogen peroxide in small sealed tanks.

  12. Connexins in respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Saab, Joanna; Losa, Davide; Chanson, Marc; Ruez, Richard

    2014-04-17

    The mucosal lining forms the physical and chemical barrier that protects against pathogens and hostile particles and harbors its own population of bacteria, fungi and archea, known as the microbiota. The immune system controls tolerance of this population of microorganisms that have proven to be beneficial for its host. Keeping its physical integrity and a correct balance with the microbiota, the mucosa preserves its homeostasis and its protective function and maintains host's health. However, in some conditions, pathogens may succeed in breaching mucosal homeostasis and successfully infecting the host. In this review we will discuss the role the mucosa plays in the defense against bacterial pathogens by considering the gap junction protein connexins. We will detail their implication in mucosal homeostasis and upon infection with bacteria in the respiratory and the gastrointestinal tracts. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel vaccine development strategies for inducing mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujkuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kosuke; Gilbert, Rebekah S; McGhee, Jerry R; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-03-01

    To develop protective immune responses against mucosal pathogens, the delivery route and adjuvants for vaccination are important. The host, however, strives to maintain mucosal homeostasis by responding to mucosal antigens with tolerance, instead of immune activation. Thus, induction of mucosal immunity through vaccination is a rather difficult task, and potent mucosal adjuvants, vectors or other special delivery systems are often used, especially in the elderly. By taking advantage of the common mucosal immune system, the targeting of mucosal dendritic cells and microfold epithelial cells may facilitate the induction of effective mucosal immunity. Thus, novel routes of immunization and antigen delivery systems also show great potential for the development of effective and safe mucosal vaccines against various pathogens. The purpose of this review is to introduce several recent approaches to induce mucosal immunity to vaccines, with an emphasis on mucosal tissue targeting, new immunization routes and delivery systems. Defining the mechanisms of mucosal vaccines is as important as their efficacy and safety, and in this article, examples of recent approaches, which will likely accelerate progress in mucosal vaccine development, are discussed.

  14. Oral mucosal diseases: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoopler, Eric T; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2014-11-01

    Oral mucosal diseases encompass several common conditions that affect the general population. Some of these disorders present with signs and symptoms that are pathognomonic for the condition, whereas others present with similar features that can make clinical diagnosis difficult to achieve. It is important for physicians to have a clear understanding of these disorders to provide appropriate care to patients. This article reviews clinical aspects of common oral mucosal disorders, including candidiasis, herpes simplex viral infections, aphthous stomatitis, lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris, and mucous membrane pemphigoid.

  15. Endoscopic, assisted, modified turbinoplasty with mucosal flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puterman, M M; Segal, N; Joshua, B-Z

    2012-05-01

    A variety of surgical methods have been developed to reduce the volume of the inferior turbinates, in order to create a more patent nasal airway. We describe a technique used in our department since February 2002 for all patients undergoing inferior turbinectomy. We resect with endoscopic assistance the lateral mucosa and bony inferior turbinate. This technique can reduce a large volume of the turbinate while preserving the mucosal continuity and the submucosa by covering the raw surface with a mucosal flap. We believe our method minimises post-operative side effects and complications such as dryness, infection, bleeding and pain.

  16. Concise review: transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells for treating limbal stem cell deficiency-current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2015-06-01

    A number of diseases and external factors can deplete limbal stem cells, causing pain and visual loss. Ten years have passed since the first transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells in humans, representing the first autologous cell-based therapy for severe bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency. Its steady increase in popularity since then can be attributed to the accumulating evidence of its efficacy in reverting limbal stem cell deficiency. In this review, the focus is on clinical, and to a lesser degree laboratory, features of cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplants over the past 10 years. Comparisons with other available technologies are made. Avenues for research to stimulate further improvements in clinical results and allow worldwide distribution of limbal stem cell therapy based on oral mucosal cells are discussed. These include storage and transportation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial sheets and in vivo culture of oral mucosal epithelial cells.

  17. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. Organic Peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Edward S.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the thermodynamic instability of organic peroxides. The process of autoxidation which results in peroxide formation is described. Precautions necessary to prevent autoxidation hazards associated with these reagents are suggested. (CW)

  18. The Role of Intestinal Microbiota in the Development and Severity of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Michel J.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Mucositis, also referred to as mucosal barrier injury, is one of the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. Clinically, mucositis is associated with pain, bacteremia, and malnutrition. Furthermore, mucositis is a frequent reason to postpone chemotherapy treatment,

  19. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Common Aviation Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    peroxide has been used for years as a disinfectant in the medical community and is under consideration in the dilute vapor form as a decontaminant... disinfectant /sterilant for transportation vehicles like aircraft, buses, subway trains, ambulances, etc. Although the biological efficacy of STERIS...10-min dip in 35% liquid H2O2 . 13 (a) (b) Figure 15. (a) Vertical and (b) horizontal flammability test results for nylon. 14 (a) (b) Figure 16. (a

  20. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  1. Topical morphine for oral mucositis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina Nygaard; Aagaard, Gitte; Henneberg, Steen W;

    2012-01-01

    Systemic opioids for painful chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in children often result in unsatisfactory pain relief and a high frequency of side effects. Opioids applied topically can produce analgesia by binding to opioid receptors on peripheral terminals of sensory neurons. These receptors...

  2. Nutrition and Gut Mucositis in Pediatric Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Peter Erik Lotko

    and differential regulation of miRNA-155 and -146a. This was sustained during the first three weeks after transplantation, along with increased spontaneous production of inflammatory cytokines by early trafficking of leukocytes. In conclusion, we successfully induced oral and intestinal mucositis in piglets...

  3. Measuring mucosal damage induced by cytotoxic therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Land, B. van 't; Donnelly, J.P.; Rabet, L. M'; Pauw, B.E. de

    2004-01-01

    We scored oral mucositis and gut toxicity and measured sugar permeability testing among 56 recipients of a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) given myeloablative conditioning with idarubicin, cyclophosphamide and TBI, and a group of 18 patients given cytotoxic chemotherapy for newly diagnose

  4. Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Accorona, Remo; Botti, Gerardo; Farina, Davide; Fossati, Piero; Gatta, Gemma; Gogas, Helen; Lombardi, Davide; Maroldi, Roberto; Nicolai, Piero; Ravanelli, Marco; Vanella, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck is a very rare and aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. The nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and oral cavity are the most common locations. One-, 3- and 5-year survival rates between 2000 and 2007 were 63%, 30% and 20%, respectively. Cigarette smoking seems to be a risk factor even though the evidence for this is very low. Clinical signs and symptoms are usually nonspecific. While surgery is considered the mainstay of treatment for most mucosal melanomas of the head and neck region, radiotherapy has a role in local control of the disease after surgery. Many new treatment options in the last years, in particular targeted therapies (i.e. inhibitors of c-KIT, NRAS/MEK or BRAF) and immunotherapies (anti CTLA-4 and anti PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies), have changed the history of cutaneous melanoma. Despite the different biology, mucosal melanoma is currently treated in the same way as cutaneous melanoma; however, patients with mucosal melanoma were excluded from the majority of recent clinical trials. Recent molecular findings offer new hope for the development of more effective systemic therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mucosal biofilm detection in chronic otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Marcus; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Eickhardt-Sørensen, Steffen Robert

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine middle ear biopsies from Greenlandic patients with chronic otitis media (COM) for the presence of mucosal biofilms and the bacteria within the biofilms. Thirty-five middle ear biopsies were obtained from 32 Greenlandic COM patients admitted to ear...

  6. Biomarkers and non-invasive tests for gastrointestinal mucositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.S.S. Kuiken (Nicoline S. S.); E.H.H.M. Rings (Edmond); N.M. Blijlevens (Nicole ); W.J.E. Tissing (Wim)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractGastrointestinal mucositis is a complex inflammatory reaction of the mucous membranes, a side effect of both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently, assessment scales are used to diagnose mucositis. However, a biomarker which would determine whether there is mucositis and thereby

  7. Can the oral microflora affect oral ulcerative mucositis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; de Soet, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review: Oral mucositis is one of the most prevalent toxicities after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Mucositis is initiated by the chemotherapy or radiotherapy preceding the transplantation. It is commonly accepted that microorganisms play a role in the process of oral mucositis.

  8. Mucosal Vaccination and Therapy with Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that

  9. Biomarkers and non-invasive tests for gastrointestinal mucositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, N. S. S.; Rings, E. H. H. M.; Blijlevens, N. M. A.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    Gastrointestinal mucositis is a complex inflammatory reaction of the mucous membranes, a side effect of both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Currently, assessment scales are used to diagnose mucositis. However, a biomarker which would determine whether there is mucositis and thereby establish the

  10. Concomitant early mucosal and cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Viviane S; Cafe, Virginia; Costa, Jackson; Oliveira, Fabiano; Bafica, Andre; Rosato, Andrea; de Freitas, Luiz A R; Brodskyn, Claudia; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2006-08-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is often clinically silent until reaching a highly advanced state. In this prospective study, 6 of 220 patients with early cutaneous leishmaniasis were diagnosed with mucosal involvement by otorhinolaryngological examination (a rate similar to the reported rate of late ML). Detection of early ML may represent an important strategy in preventing severe mucosal destruction in human leishmaniasis.

  11. Mucosal Vaccination and Therapy with Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that

  12. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor ePuerto-Galán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs, thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen- and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Suppressive effect of astaxanthin isolated from the Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous mutant on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Choi, Seok-Keun; Choi, Sang-Yun; Kim, Han-Kyeom; Chang, Hyo-Ihl

    2005-07-01

    Ethanol has been found to induce ulcerative gastric lesion in humans. The present study investigated the in vivo protective effect of astaxanthin isolated from the Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous mutant against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. The rats were treated with 80% ethanol for 3 d after pretreatment with two doses of astaxanthin (5 and 25 mg/kg of body weight respectively) for 3 d, while the control rats received only 80% ethanol for 3 d. The oral administration of astaxanthin (5 and 25 mg/kg of body weight) showed significant protection against ethanol-induced gastric lesion and inhibited elevation of the lipid peroxide level in gastric mucosa. In addition, pretreatment with astaxanthin resulted in a significant increase in the activities of radical scavenging enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. A histologic examination clearly indicated that the acute gastric mucosal lesion induced by ethanol nearly disappeared after pretreatment with astaxanthin.

  14. Strategies of mucosal immunotherapy for allergic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ling Ye; Ya-Hui Chuang; Bor-Luen Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Incidences of allergic disease have recently increased worldwide.Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) has long been a controversial treatment for allergic diseases.Although beneficial effects on clinically relevant outcomes have been demonstrated in clinical trials by subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT),there remains a risk of severe and sometimes fatal anaphylaxis.Mucosal immunotherapy is one advantageous choice because of its non-injection routes of administration and lower side-effect profile.This study reviews recent progress in mucosal immunotherapy for allergic diseases.Administration routes,antigen quality and quantity,and adjuvants used are major considerations in this field.Also,direct uses of unique probiotics,or specific cytokines,have been discussed.Furthermore,some researchers have reported new therapeutic ideas that combine two or more strategies.The most important strategy for development of mucosal therapies for allergic diseases is the improvement of antigen formulation,which includes continuous searching for efficient adjuvants,collecting more information about dominant T-cell epitopes of allergens,and having the proper combination of each.In clinics,when compared to other mucosal routes,sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a preferred choice for therapeutic administration,although local and systemic side effects have been reported.Additionally,not every allergen has the same beneficial effect.Further studies are needed to determine the benefits of mucosal immunotherapy for different allergic diseases after comparison of the different administration routes in children and adults.Data collected from large,well-designed,double-blind,placebo-controlled,and randomized trials,with post-treatment follow-up,can provide robust substantiation of current evidence.

  15. Accidental Ingestion of 35% Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Pritchett

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide is a commonly used oxidizing agent with a variety of uses depending on its concentration. Ingestion of hydrogen peroxide is not an uncommon source of poisoning, and results in morbidity through three main mechanisms: direct caustic injury, oxygen gas formation and lipid peroxidation. A case of a 39-year-old man who inadvertently ingested 250 mL of unlabelled 35% hydrogen peroxide intended for natural health use is presented. Hydrogen peroxide has purported benefits ranging from HIV treatment to cancer treatment. Its use in the natural health industry represents an emerging source for accidental poisonings.

  16. Peroxide Propulsion at the Turn of the Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William E.; Butler, Kathy; Crocket, Dave; Lewis, Tim; McNeal, Curtis

    2000-01-01

    A resurgence of interest in peroxide propulsion has occurred in the last years of the 21st Century. This interest is driven by the need for lower cost propulsion systems and the need for storable reusable propulsion systems to meet future space transportation system architectures. NASA and the Air Force are jointly developing two propulsion systems for flight demonstration early in the 21st Century. One system will be a development of Boeing's AR2-3 engine, which was successfully fielded in the 1960s. The other is a new pressure-fed design by Orbital Sciences Corporation for expendable mission requirements. Concurrently NASA and industry are pursuing the key peroxide technologies needed to design, fabricate, and test advanced peroxide engines to meet the mission needs beyond 2005. This paper will present a description of the AR2-3, report the status of its current test program, and describe its intended flight demonstration. This paper will then describe the Orbital 10K engine, the status of its test program, and describe its planned flight demonstration. Finally the paper will present a plan, or technology roadmap, for the development of an advanced peroxide engine for the 21st Century.

  17. Peroxide-induced cell death and lipid peroxidation in C6 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Arne; Gülden, Michael; Martin, Hans-Jörg; Maser, Edmund; Seibert, Hasso

    2008-08-01

    Peroxides are often used as models to induce oxidative damage in cells in vitro. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation in peroxide-induced cell death. To this end (i) the ability to induce lipid peroxidation in C6 rat astroglioma cells of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) (ii) the relation between peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death in terms of time and concentration dependency and (iii) the capability of the lipid peroxidation chain breaking alpha-tocopherol to prevent peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and/or cell death were investigated. Lipid peroxidation was characterised by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and, by HPLC, malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and hexanal. Within 2 h CHP, t-BuOOH and H2O2 induced cell death with EC50 values of 59+/-9 microM, 290+/-30 microM and 12+/-1.1 mM, respectively. CHP and t-BuOOH, but not H2O2 induced lipid peroxidation in C6 cells with EC50 values of 15+/-14 microM and 130+/-33 microM, respectively. The TBARS measured almost exclusively consisted of MDA. 4-HNE was mostly not detectable. The concentration of hexanal slightly increased with increasing concentrations of organic peroxides. Regarding time and concentration dependency lipid peroxidation preceded cell death. Pretreatment with alpha-tocopherol (10 microM, 24 h) prevented both, peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death. The results strongly indicate a major role of lipid peroxidation in the killing of C6 cells by organic peroxides but also that lipid peroxidation is not involved in H2O2 induced cell death.

  18. Mucosal Schwann cell "Hamartoma": A new entity?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paola Pasquini; Andrea Baiocchini; Laura Falasca; Dante Annibali; Guido Gimbo; Francesco Pace; Franca Del Nonno

    2009-01-01

    Schwannoma is a well-described, benign nerve sheath tumor of the soft tissue, but is rare in the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal schwannomas are often incidentally discovered as small polypoid intraluminal lesions. In this report, we describe the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of a distinctive neural mucosal polyp composed of a diffuse cellular proliferation of uniform bland spindled cells in the lamina propria that entraps the colonic crypts. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed strong and diffuse positivity for the S-100 protein. To avoid confusion of these solitary colorectal polyps containing pure spindled Schwann cell proliferation in the lamina propria with neural lesions that have significant association with inherited syndromes, it is better to use the designation "mucosal Schwann hamartoma".

  19. Age, gender, dentures and oral mucosal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEntee, M I; Glick, N; Stolar, E

    1998-03-01

    The numbers of participants over 75 years of age in previous studies of oral health have not been sufficient to permit a full investigation of the influence of age on the mouth. In this study a disproportionate stratified random sample of 255 independent elders was selected from a list of urban voters to provide similar numbers of men and women in three age groups. The subjects were interviewed and examined, and nearly half of them had mucosal disorders. There was a significant (P angular cheilitis in particular were associated significantly with men and with the use of defective dentures. Logistic regression revealed that neither age alone nor the quality of dentures predispose to mucosal lesions, but that the odds of finding stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular increased about three-fold in denture-users, and almost doubled in men.

  20. The microbiome and regulation of mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Andrew J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a mucosal surface constantly exposed to foreign antigens and microbes, and is protected by a vast array of immunologically active structures and cells. Epithelial cells directly participate in immunological surveillance and direction of host responses in the gut and can express numerous pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR9, and nucleotide oligomerization domain 2, as well as produce chemotactic factors for both myeloid and lymphoid cells following inflammatory stimulation. Within the epithelium and in the underlying lamina propria resides a population of innate lymphoid cells that, following stimulation, can become activated and produce effector cytokines and exert both protective and pathogenic roles during inflammation. Lamina propria dendritic cells play a large role in determining whether the response to a particular antigen will be inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. It is becoming clear that the composition and metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiome, as a whole community, exerts a profound influence on mucosal immune regulation. The microbiome produces short-chain fatty acids, polysaccharide A, α-galactosylceramide and tryptophan metabolites, which can induce interleukin-22, Reg3γ, IgA and interleukin-17 responses. However, much of what is known about microbiome-host immune interactions has come from the study of single bacterial members of the gastrointestinal microbiome and their impact on intestinal mucosal immunity. Additionally, evidence continues to accumulate that alterations of the intestinal microbiome can impact not only gastrointestinal immunity but also immune regulation at distal mucosal sites.

  1. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    OpenAIRE

    Raufman, J P

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for t...

  2. Hitting the mucosal road in tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedermann, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decades a dramatic increase in allergic diseases has been recognized in the Westernized societies, leading to the fact that meanwhile 25-30% of the population is afflicted by allergic disorders. Besides a hereditary disposition, other factors, including a reduced microbial contact early in life or changes in nutrition, might also have influenced this epidemiological development. So far the only causative treatment against type-I allergies is specific immunotherapy. In young and monosensitized patients this treatment is highly efficacious, while there are clear limitations in older or multisensitized patients. Allergy research therefore aims at establishing new and more efficacious treatment strategies in prophylactic as well as therapeutic settings. Our research programs focus on the development of novel allergy vaccines based on the induction of mucosal tolerance. In different mouse models of respiratory allergy mucosal treatment with genetically engineered allergen constructs proved to prevent the development of allergic mono- and multisensitivities. The additional use of mucosal adjuvants seems particularly important to improve therapeutic treatment approaches. Recent studies on the inverse relation of certain parasite infections and the development of allergy prompted us to search for selected parasitic molecules with immunosuppressive properties as potential adjuvant systems for novel allergy vaccines. An overview of our recent studies will be given.

  3. Brain-gut axis and mucosal immunity: a perspective on mucosal psychoneuroimmunology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    The role of the brain-gut axis has traditionally been investigated in relation to intestinal motility, secretion, and vascularity. More recently, the concept of brain-gut dialogue has extended to the relationship between the nervous system and mucosal immune function. There is compelling evidence for a reciprocal or bi-directional communication between the immune system and the neuroendocrine system. This is mediated, in part, by shared ligands (chemical messengers) and receptors that are common to the immune and nervous systems. Although the concept of psychoneuroimmunology and neuroimmune cross-talk has been studied primarily in the context of the systemic immune system, it is likely to have special significance in the gut. The mucosal immune system is anatomically, functionally, and operationally distinct from the systemic immune system and is subject to independent regulatory signals. Furthermore, the intestinal mucosal immune system operates in a local milieu that depends on a dense innervation for its integrity, with juxtaposition of neuroendocrine cells and mucosal immune cells. An overview of evidence for the biologic plausibility of a brain-gut-immune axis is presented and its potential relevance to mucosal inflammatory disorders is discussed.

  4. Mucoadhesive formulation of Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae reduces intestinal injury from 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Marcelino de Ávila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal mucositis induced during cancer treatment is considered a serious dose-limiting side effect of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Frequently, interruption of the cancer treatment due to this pathology leads to a reduction in cure rates, increase of treatment costs and decrease life quality of the patient. Natural products such as Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae, represent a potential alternative for the treatment of mucositis given its anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, B. pilosa glycolic extract was formulated (BPF with poloxamer, a mucoadhesive copolymer, was used for treatment of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-induced mucositis in mice. As expected, animals only treated with 5-FU (200 mg/kg presented marked weight loss, reduction of intestinal villi, crypts and muscular layer, which was associated with severe disruption of crypts, edema, inflammatory infiltrate and vacuolization in the intestinal tissue, as compared to the control group and healthy animals only treated with BPF. On the other hand, the treatment of intestinal mucositis-bearing mice with BPF (75, 100 or 125 mg/kg managed to mitigate clinical and pathologic changes, noticeably at 100 mg/kg. This dose led to the restoration of intestinal proliferative activity through increasing Ki-67 levels; modulated the expression of Bax, Bcl2 and p53 apoptotic markers protecting intestinal cells from cell death. Moreover, this treatment regulated lipid peroxidation and inflammatory infiltration. No acute toxic effects were observed with this formulation. This work demonstrated that BPF was safe and effective against 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in mice. Additional studies are already in progress to further characterize the mechanisms involved in the protective effects of this technological formulation toward the development of a new medicine for the prevention and treatment of intestinal injury in patients undergoing chemotherapy/radiotherapy.

  5. Protective effects of hot spring water drinking and radon inhalation on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etani, Reo; Kataoka, Takahiro; Kanzaki, Norie; Sakoda, Akihiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ishimori, Yuu; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2017-05-12

    Radon therapy using radon (222Rn) gas is classified into two types of treatment: inhalation of radon gas and drinking water containing radon. Although short- or long-term intake of spa water is effective in increasing gastric mucosal blood flow, and spa water therapy is useful for treating chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer, the underlying mechanisms for and precise effects of radon protection against mucosal injury are unclear. In the present study, we examined the protective effects of hot spring water drinking and radon inhalation on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in mice. Mice inhaled radon at a concentration of 2000 Bq/m3 for 24 h or were provided with hot spring water for 2 weeks. The activity density of 222Rn ranged from 663 Bq/l (start point of supplying) to 100 Bq/l (end point of supplying). Mice were then orally administered ethanol at three concentrations. The ulcer index (UI), an indicator of mucosal injury, increased in response to the administration of ethanol; however, treatment with either radon inhalation or hot spring water inhibited the elevation in the UI due to ethanol. Although no significant differences in antioxidative enzymes were observed between the radon-treated groups and the non-treated control groups, lipid peroxide levels were significantly lower in the stomachs of mice pre-treated with radon or hot spring water. These results suggest that hot spring water drinking and radon inhalation inhibit ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  6. Peroxides and peroxide-degrading enzymes in the thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Ulrich; Chiu, Jazmin; Köhrle, Josef

    2008-09-01

    Iodination of thyroglobulin is the key step of thyroid hormone biosynthesis. It is catalyzed by thyroid peroxidase and occurs within the follicular space at the apical plasma membrane. Hydrogen peroxide produced by thyrocytes as an oxidant for iodide may compromise cellular and genomic integrity of the surrounding cells, unless these are sufficiently protected by peroxidases. Thus, peroxidases play two opposing roles in thyroid biology. Both aspects of peroxide biology in the thyroid are separated in space and time and respond to the different physiological states of the thyrocytes. Redox-protective peroxidases in the thyroid are peroxiredoxins, glutathione peroxidases, and catalase. Glutathione peroxidases are selenoenzymes, whereas selenium-independent peroxiredoxins are functionally linked to the selenoenzymes of the thioredoxin reductase family through their thioredoxin cofactors. Thus, selenium impacts directly and indirectly on protective enzymes in the thyroid, a link that has been supported by animal experiments and clinical observations. In view of this relationship, it is remarkable that rather little is known about selenoprotein expression and their potential functional roles in the thyroid. Moreover, selenium-dependent and -independent peroxidases have rarely been examined in the same studies. Therefore, we review the relevant literature and present expression data of both selenium-dependent and -independent peroxidases in the murine thyroid.

  7. Coating for components requiring hydrogen peroxide compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefiani, Ali (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a heretofore-unknown use for zirconium nitride as a hydrogen peroxide compatible protective coating that was discovered to be useful to protect components that catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide or corrode when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. A zirconium nitride coating of the invention may be applied to a variety of substrates (e.g., metals) using art-recognized techniques, such as plasma vapor deposition. The present invention further provides components and articles of manufacture having hydrogen peroxide compatibility, particularly components for use in aerospace and industrial manufacturing applications. The zirconium nitride barrier coating of the invention provides protection from corrosion by reaction with hydrogen peroxide, as well as prevention of hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R.W.; Anderson, M.S.; Johnson, R.E.; Smythe, W.D.; Hendrix, A.R.; Barth, C.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Hansen, G.B.; McCord, T.B.; Dalton, J.B.; Clark, R.N.; Shirley, J.H.; Ocampo, A.C.; Matson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Spatially resolved infrared and ultraviolet wavelength spectra of Europa's leading, anti-jovian quadrant observed from the Galileo spacecraft show absorption features resulting from hydrogen peroxide. Comparisons with laboratory measurements indicate surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations of about 0.13 percent, by number, relative to water ice. The inferred abundance is consistent with radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide by intense energetic particle bombardment and demonstrates that Europa's surface chemistry is dominated by radiolysis.

  9. PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF LOW-FREENESS TMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongLiu; Y.Ni; Z.Li,G.Court

    2004-01-01

    Peroxide bleaching is an essential unit operation toproduce value-added mechanical pulp-based papergrade. In this paper, we presented the results fromperoxide bleaching of low-freeness TMP for theproduction of SC paper. Two aspects wereaddressed; the effect of pulp strength and theformation of anionic trashes. The strength properties,such as tensile, burst and zero-span tensile, areimproved after the peroxide bleaching process. Theamount of anionic trashes formed is almostproportional to the hydrogen peroxide charge.

  10. PEROXIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborg, G.T.; Perlman, I.

    1958-09-16

    reduced state, from hexavalent uranium. It consists in treating an aqueous solution containing such uranium and plutonium ions with sulfate ions in order to form a soluble uranium sulfate complex and then treating the solution with a soluble thorium compound and a soluble peroxide compound in order to ferm a thorium peroxide carrier precipitate which carries down with it the plutonium peroxide present. During this treatment the pH of the solution must be maintained between 2 and 3.

  11. PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF LOW-FREENESS TMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Liu; Y. Ni; Z. Li; G. Court

    2004-01-01

    Peroxide bleaching is an essential unit operation to produce value-added mechanical pulp-based paper grade. In this paper, we presented the results from peroxide bleaching of low-freeness TMP for the production of SC paper. Two aspects were addressed; the effect of pulp strength and the formation of anionic trashes. The strength properties,such as tensile, burst and zero-span tensile, are improved after the peroxide bleaching process. The amount of anionic trashes formed is almost proportional to the hydrogen peroxide charge.

  12. Sacral nerve stimulation enhances early intestinal mucosal repair following mucosal injury in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brégeon, Jérémy; Coron, Emmanuel; Da Silva, Anna Christina Cordeiro; Jaulin, Julie; Aubert, Philippe; Chevalier, Julien; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Meurette, Guillaume; Neunlist, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Reducing intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions is recognized as being of major therapeutic interest for various intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability. Here, we report in a pig model that SNS enhances morphological and functional recovery of IEB following mucosal injury induced via 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. These effects are associated with an increased expression of tight junction proteins such as ZO-1 and FAK. These results establish that SNS enhances intestinal barrier repair in acute mucosal injury. They further set the scientific basis for future use of SNS as a complementary or alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of gut disorders with IEB dysfunctions such as inflammatory bowel diseases or irritable bowel syndrome. Intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions, such as increased permeability or altered healing, are central to intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability, but its ability to modulate IEB repair remains unknown. This study aimed to characterize the impact of SNS on mucosal repair following 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced lesions. Six pigs were stimulated by SNS 3 h prior to and 3 h after TNBS enema, while sham animals (n = 8) were not stimulated. The impact of SNS on mucosal changes was evaluated by combining in vivo imaging, histological and functional methods. Biochemical and transcriptomic approaches were used to analyse the IEB and mucosal inflammatory response. We observed that SNS enhanced the recovery from TNBS-induced increase in transcellular permeability. At 24 h, TNBS-induced alterations of mucosal morphology were significantly less in SNS compared with sham animals. SNS reduced TNBS-induced changes in ZO-1 expression and its epithelial pericellular distribution, and also increased pFAK/FAK expression compared with sham. Interestingly, SNS increased the mucosal density of neutrophils

  13. Effects of zinc acexamate (NAS-501) on superoxide radicals and lipid peroxidation of rat gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Y; Nakamura, Y; Yamaguchi, S; Kawanaka, N; Sato, M

    1999-04-01

    Zinc acexamate (NAS-501), an anti-ulcer agent, has been reported to prevent various acute experimental gastric mucosal lesions and duodenal ulcers in rats. In order to clarify the mechanisms by which NAS-501 exhibits the anti-ulcer effects, we investigated the anti-oxidative effects of NAS-501 in vitro and in vivo. NAS-501 significantly reduced the superoxide radical-dependent chemiluminescence, generated by hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase, rat neutrophils and guinea-pig macrophages in vitro. These in vitro effects were also confirmed by electron spin resonance using a 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide spin-trapping method. In addition, NAS-501 significantly inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by increasing concentrations of Fe2+/ascorbate in rat gastric mucosal homogenate in vitro. Oral administration of NAS-501 (30 mg/kg) significantly inhibited production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance in rat gastric mucosa following per os instillation of 60% ethanol in 150 mmol/l HCl in vivo. These results suggest that NAS-501 exhibits the preventive effect from acute gastric mucosal lesions by the anti-oxidative activity.

  14. [Evaluation of Gastric Mucosal Injury Model Animals of Rebamipide Formulation--Study of Therapeutic Equivalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Noriaki; Funato, Hiroki; Hirata, Ayumu; Nakai, Megumi; Iizuka, Michiro; Shiraishi, Hisashi; Jobu, Kohei; Yagi, Yusuke; Kadota, Aki; Ogi, Kyoko; Yokota, Junko; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of generic drugs is promoted from the perspective of medical economics. In this context, we need to understand not only the bioequivalence of generic drugs specified in "the Guidelines for Bioequivalence Studies of Generic Products", but also formulation properties to consider their effect on pharmacological therapy. We evaluated the pharmaceutical characteristics of rebamipide formulations, a brand-name drug and two generic drugs, and their clinical functionality by using rat models of gastric mucosal injury induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Pharmaceutical evaluation showed significant differences in hardness. The inter-lot variation was small in all rebamipide formulations. In the clinical functionality study, biochemistry test values 7 d after the administration of rebamipide showed no differences among formulations. Higher levels of mucosal fluid secretion and antioxidative enzymes were observed in the groups administered rebamipide than in the control group. The levels of lipid peroxide were lower in the groups administered rebamipide than the control group. Multivariate analysis showed slight divergence between the brand-name and generic drugs. In future, it will be necessary to select generic drugs after careful consideration of bioequivalence, clinical functionality, and therapeutic equivalence by reviewing scientific evidence such as indication and formulation design, not to mention stable provision.

  15. DNA damage, apoptosis and cell cycle changes induced by fluoride in rat oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Fei He; Jian-Gang Chen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of fluoride on oxidativestress,DNA damage and apoptosis as well as cell cycle of rat oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes.METHODS: Ten male SD rats weighing 80~120 g were randomly divided into control group and fluoride group,5 animals each group. The animals in fluoride group had free access to deionized water containing 150 mg/L sodium fluoride (NaF). The animals in control group were given distilled water. Four weeks later, the animals were killed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) in oral mucosa and liver were measured by Fenton reaction, lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde (MDA), was detected by thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reaction, reduced glutathione (GSH) was assayed by dithionitrobenzoic acid (DTNB)reaction. DNA damage in oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes was determined by single cell gel (SCG) electrophoresis or comet assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle in oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes were detected by flow cytometry.RESULTS: The contents of ROS and MDA in oral mucosa and liver tissue of fluoride group were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.01), but the level of GSH was markedly decreased (P<0.01). The contents of ROS, MDA and GSH were (134.73±12.63) U/mg protein,(1.48±0.13) mmol/mg protein and (76.38±6.71) mmol/mg protein in oral mucosa respectively, and (143.45±11.76) U/mg protein, (1.44±0.12) mmol/mg protein and (78.83±7.72) mmol/mg protein in liver tissue respectively. The DNA damage rate in fluoride group was 50.20%in oral mucosal cells and 44.80% in hepatocytes, higher than those in the control group (P<0.01). The apoptosis rate in oral mucosal cells was (13.63±1.81) % in fluoride group, and (12.76±1.67) % in hepatocytes,higher than those in control group. Excess fluoride could differently lower the number of oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes at G0/G1 and S G2/M phases (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Excess fluoride can induce oxidative stress and DNA damage and lead to apoptosis and cell cycle

  16. Chitosan-Based Nanoparticles for Mucosal Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martirosyan, Alina; Olesen, Morten Jarlstad; Howard, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    of the polysaccharide chitosan have been used to facilitate delivery of siRNA across mucosal surfaces following local administration. This chapter describes the mucosal barriers that need to be addressed in order to design an effective mucosal delivery strategy and the utilization of the mucoadhesive properties...... of chitosan. Focus is given to preparation methods and the preclinical application of chitosan nanoparticles for respiratory and oral delivery of siRNA....

  17. Chitosan-Based Nanoparticles for Mucosal Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martirosyan, Alina; Olesen, Morten Jarlstad; Howard, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    of the polysaccharide chitosan have been used to facilitate delivery of siRNA across mucosal surfaces following local administration. This chapter describes the mucosal barriers that need to be addressed in order to design an effective mucosal delivery strategy and the utilization of the mucoadhesive properties...... of chitosan. Focus is given to preparation methods and the preclinical application of chitosan nanoparticles for respiratory and oral delivery of siRNA....

  18. Enhanced gastric mucosal haemostasis after upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Allison, M C; Fullarton, G M; Brown, I.L.; Crean, G P; McColl, K E

    1991-01-01

    An endoscopic technique for the measurement of gastric mucosal bleeding time has been developed to study gastric haemostasis in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The relation of gastric mucosal bleeding time to skin bleeding time and nonsterodial anti-inflammatory drug usage was examined in 61 control patients and in 47 patients presenting with bleeding peptic ulcers or erosions. Gastric mucosal bleeding time was shorter in patients with haemorrhage (median 2 minutes, ra...

  19. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on rabbit urinary bladder citrate synthase activity in the presence and absence of a grape suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Venugopal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The etiology of obstructive bladder dysfunction includes free radical damage to mitochondria. Feeding rabbits a standardized grape suspension protects the ability of the bladder to contract and empty in part by preventing mitochondrial damage, thus maintaining smooth muscle and mucosal metabolism. The objective of the current study is to determine the direct effect of this grape suspension on the response of mitochondria to the oxidative effects of hydrogen peroxide. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six male rabbits were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital and the bladders excised. Four full thickness strips were obtained for contractile studies and the balance separated into smooth muscle and mucosa compartments by blunt dissection. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the contractile response to field stimulation was quantitated. Each tissue was homogenized and the effects of increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide in the presence and absence of grape suspension on citrate synthase activity was determined. RESULTS: Citrate synthase activity was significantly higher in the mucosa than in the muscle. The grape suspension had no effect on control citrate synthase activity. However, the grape suspension provided significant protection of both smooth muscle and mucosal citrate synthase activity. CONCLUSIONS: These studies support the conclusion that the grape suspension provides direct protection of mitochondrial function.

  20. Scoring irradiation mucositis in head and neck cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Panders, A.K. (Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)); Saene, H.K.F. van (Medical Microbiology, University of Liverpool (UK)); Vermey, A. (Department of Surgery Oncology Division, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)); Mehta, D.M. (Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands))

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation mucositis is defined as an inflammatory-like process of the oropharyngeal mucosa following therapeutic irradiation of patients who have head and neck cancer. Clinically, it is a serious side effect because severe mucositis can cause generalized problems (weight loss, nasogastic tube feedings) and interferes with the well-being of the patient seriously. Grading mucositis is important for the evaluation of preventive and therapeutic measures. The object of this study was to develop a scoring method based on local mucositis signs only. Four clinical local signs of mucositis were used in this score: white discoloration, erythema, pseudomembranes and ulceration. Mucositis of the oral cavity was calcualted during conventional irradiation protocol for 8 distinguishable areas using the 4 signs and their extent. A prospective evaluation of this method in 15 irradiated head and neck cancer patients displayed an S-curve reflecting a symptomless first irradiation week, followed by a rapid and steady increase of white discoloration, erythema and pseudomembranes during the second and third week. Oral candidiasis, generalized symptoms such as weight loss and the highest mucositis scores were seen after 3 weeks irradiation. The novel mucositis scoring method may be of value in studying the effect of hygiene programs, topical application of disinfectans or antibiotics on oral mucositis. (author).

  1. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  2. Oral mucosal immunization using glucomannosylated bilosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sanyog; Indulkar, Anura; Harde, Harshad; Agrawal, Ashish K

    2014-06-01

    The present study embarks on the feasibility of GM-bilosomes as a rationally designed vehicle for oral mucosal immunization. Bilosomes containing BSA as a model antigen were found to have vesicle size of 157 +/- 3 nm, PDI of 0.287 +/- 0.045, zeta potential of -21.8 +/- 2.01 mV and entrapment efficiency of 71.3 +/- 4.3%. Bilosomal formulations were freeze dried and entrapped BSA in freeze dried formulations was found to retain its structural and conformational stability as evident by SDS-PAGE and CD analysis. The GM-bilosomes were also found stable in different simulated biological fluids and bile salt solutions of different concentrations. In-vitro drug release revealed that GM-bilosomes were able to sustain drug release up to 24 h. In-vitro cell uptake in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells demonstrated significantly higher uptake of GM-bilosomes in comparison with bilosomes and free antigen. Intestinal uptake studies on excised rat intestinal sections further demonstrated higher uptake of vesicular systems throughout the intestinal region in comparison with free antigen. Significantly higher (p alum adsorbed BSA (BSA-AL) following oral administration. The immune response observed in case of GM-bilosomes was comparable to BSA-AL administered through im route without any significant difference (p > 0.05). More importantly, GM-bilosomes were found capable of inducing mucosal immune response as well as cell mediated immune response which was not induced by im BSA-AL. In conclusion, GM-bilosomes could be considered as promising carrier and adjuvant system for oral mucosal immunization and productively exploited for oral delivery of other candidate antigens.

  3. [Nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristol, J P; Maggi, M F; Guérin, M C; Torreilles, J; Descomps, B

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical produced enzymatically in biological systems from the guanidino group of L-arginine. Its large spectrum of biological effects is achieved through chemical interactions with different targets including oxygen (O2), superoxide (O2o-) and other oxygen reactive species (ROS), transition metals and thiols. Superoxide anions and other ROS have been reported to react with NO to produce peroxynitrite anions that can decompose to form nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and hydroxyl radial (OHo). Thus, NO has been reported to have a dual effect on lipid peroxidation (prooxidant via the peroxynitrite or antioxydant via the chelation of ROS). In the present study we have investigated in different models the in vitro and in vivo action of NO on lipid peroxidation. Copper-induced LDL oxidation were used as an in vitro model. Human LDL (100 micrograms ApoB/ml) were incubated in oxygene-saturated PBS buffer in presence or absence of Cu2+ (2.5 microM) with increasing concentrations of NO donnors (sodium nitroprussiate or nitroso-glutathione). LDL oxidation was monitored continuously for conjugated diene formation (234 nm) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation. Exogenous NO prevents in a dose dependent manner the progress of copper-induced oxidation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (I/R), characterized by an overproduction of ROS, is used as an in vivo model. Anaesthetized rats were submitted to 1 hour renal ischaemia following by 2 hours of reperfusion. Sham-operated rats (SOP) were used as control. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measuring the HNE accumulated in rats kidneys in presence or absence of L-arginine or D-arginine infusion. L-arginine, but not D-arginine, enhances HNE accumulation in I/R but not in SOP (< 0.050 pmol/g tissue in SOP versus 0.6 nmol/g tissue in I/R), showing that, in this experimental conditions, NO produced from L-arginine, enhances the toxicity of ROS. This study shows that the pro- or antioxydant effects of NO are different

  4. Oral lichen planus and lichenoid mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine

    2014-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is commonly found in middle-aged women. Although the cause is unknown, research points to several complex immunologic events and cells that are responsible for the inflammatory destruction and chronicity of these lesions. Biopsy for histologic diagnosis is recommended. The mainstay of treatment remains topical corticosteroids; however, newer therapies such as immunomodulating agents are available for recalcitrant lesions. In cases of lichenoid mucositis or reactions, treatment should be directed at identifying and removing the presumed cause. Given the apparent risk of squamous cell carcinoma in these patients, frequent follow-up and repeat biopsy are vital.

  5. Rhubarb extract partially improves mucosal integrity in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajic, Juliana E; Eden, Georgina L; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Pei, Jinxin V; Yool, Andrea J; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of orally gavaged aqueous rhubarb extract (RE) on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis in rats. METHODS Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged daily (1 mL) with water, high-dose RE (HDR; 200 mg/kg) or low-dose RE (LDR; 20mg/kg) for eight days. Intestinal mucositis was induced (day 5) with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection. Intestinal tissue samples were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histological examination. Xenopus oocytes expressing aquaporin 4 water channels were prepared to examine the effect of aqueous RE on cell volume, indicating a potential mechanism responsible for modulating net fluid absorption and secretion in the gastrointestinal tract. Statistical significance was assumed at P < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. RESULTS Bodyweight was significantly reduced in rats administered 5-FU compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01). Rats administered 5-FU significantly increased intestinal MPO levels (≥ 307%; P < 0.001), compared to healthy controls. However, LDR attenuated this effect in 5-FU treated rats, significantly decreasing ileal MPO activity (by 45%; P < 0.05), as compared to 5-FU controls. 5-FU significantly reduced intestinal mucosal thickness (by ≥ 29% P < 0.001) as compared to healthy controls. LDR significantly increased ileal mucosal thickness in 5-FU treated rats (19%; P < 0.05) relative to 5-FU controls. In xenopus oocytes expressing AQP4 water channels, RE selectively blocked water influx into the cell, induced by a decrease in external osmotic pressure. As water efflux was unaltered by the presence of extracellular RE, the directional flow of water across the epithelial barrier, in the presence of extracellular RE, indicated that RE may alleviate water loss across the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal health in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. CONCLUSION In summary, low dose RE improves selected parameters of mucosal integrity and reduces ileal

  6. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  7. [Advances in peroxide-based decontaminating technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Hai-ling; Zhao, San-ping; Zhou, Wen

    2013-05-01

    With the boosting demand for eco-friendly decontaminants, great achievements in peroxide-based decontaminating technologies have been made in recent years. These technologies have been applied in countering chemical/biological terrorist attacks, dealing with chemical/biological disasters and destructing environmental pollutants. Recent research advances in alpha-nucleophilic/oxidative reaction mechanisms of peroxide-based decontamination against chemical warfare agents were reviewed, and some classical peroxide-based decontaminants such as aqueous decontaminating solution, decontaminating foam, decontaminating emulsions, decontaminating gels, decontaminating vapors, and some newly developed decontaminating media (e.g., peroxide-based self-decontaminating materials and heterogeneous nano-catalytic decontamination systems) were introduced. However, currently available peroxide-based decontaminants still have some deficiencies. For example, their decontamination efficiencies are not as high as those of chlorine-containing decontaminants, and some peroxide-based decontaminants show relatively poor effect against certain agents. More study on the mechanisms of peroxide-based decontaminants and the interfacial interactions in heterogeneous decontamination media is suggested. New catalysts, multifunctional surfactants, self-decontaminating materials and corrosion preventing technologies should be developed before peroxide-based decontaminants really become true "green" decontaminants.

  8. Simple, field portable colorimetric detection device for organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoria, Philip F.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; Whipple, Richard E.; Carman, M. Leslie; Reynolds, John G.; Nunes, Peter; Shields, Sharon J.

    2010-11-09

    A simple and effective system for the colorimetric determination of organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide. A peroxide pen utilizing a swipe material attached to a polyethylene tube contains two crushable vials. The two crushable vials contain a colorimetric reagent separated into dry ingredients and liquid ingredients. After swiping a suspected substance or surface the vials are broken, the reagent is mixed thoroughly and the reagent is allowed to wick into the swipe material. The presence of organic peroxides or hydrogen peroxide is confirmed by a deep blue color.

  9. Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide Sterilization Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack

    For interplanetary missions landing on a planet of potential biological interest, United States NASA planetary protection currently requires that the flight system must be assembled, tested and ultimately launched with the intent of minimizing the bioload taken to and deposited on the planet. Currently the only NASA approved microbial reduction method is dry heat sterilization process. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements. The VHP sterilization technology is widely used by the medical industry, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal of our study is determine the minimum VHP process conditions for PP acceptable microbial reduction levels. A series of experiments were conducted using Geobacillus stearothermophilus to determine VHP process parameters that provided significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters -hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of pulses, and exposure duration -the investigation also considered the possible effect of environmental pa-rameters. Temperature, relative humidity, and material substrate effects on lethality were also studied. Based on the results, a most conservative D value was recommended. This recom-mended D value was also validated using VHP "hardy" strains that were isolated from clean-rooms and environmental populations collected from spacecraft relevant areas. The efficiency of VHP at ambient condition as well as VHP material compatibility will also be

  10. Rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaremenko, Ivan A; Vil’, Vera A; Demchuk, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review is the first to collate and summarize main data on named and unnamed rearrangement reactions of peroxides. It should be noted, that in the chemistry of peroxides two types of processes are considered under the term rearrangements. These are conventional rearrangements occurring with the retention of the molecular weight and transformations of one of the peroxide moieties after O–O-bond cleavage. Detailed information about the Baeyer−Villiger, Criegee, Hock, Kornblum−DeLaMare, Dakin, Elbs, Schenck, Smith, Wieland, and Story reactions is given. Unnamed rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes are also analyzed. The rearrangements and related processes of important natural and synthetic peroxides are discussed separately. PMID:27559418

  11. Inorganic precursor peroxides for antifouling coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, S.M.; Pedersen, L.T.; Hermann, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Modern antifouling coatings are generally based on cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and organic biocides as active ingredients. Cu2O is prone to bioaccumulation, and should therefore be replaced by more environmentally benign compounds when technically possible. However, cuprous oxide does not only provide...... antifouling properties, it is also a vital ingredient for the antifouling coating to obtain its polishing and leaching mechanism. In this paper, peroxides of strontium, calcium, magnesium, and zinc are tested as pigments in antifouling coatings. The peroxides react with seawater to create hydrogen peroxide...... and highly seawater-soluble ions of the metal. The goals have been to establish the antifouling potency of an antifouling coating that releases hydrogen peroxide as biocide, and to investigate the potential use of peroxides as water-soluble polishing and leaching pigments. The investigations have shown...

  12. Rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaremenko, Ivan A; Vil', Vera A; Demchuk, Dmitry V; Terent'ev, Alexander O

    2016-01-01

    This review is the first to collate and summarize main data on named and unnamed rearrangement reactions of peroxides. It should be noted, that in the chemistry of peroxides two types of processes are considered under the term rearrangements. These are conventional rearrangements occurring with the retention of the molecular weight and transformations of one of the peroxide moieties after O-O-bond cleavage. Detailed information about the Baeyer-Villiger, Criegee, Hock, Kornblum-DeLaMare, Dakin, Elbs, Schenck, Smith, Wieland, and Story reactions is given. Unnamed rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes are also analyzed. The rearrangements and related processes of important natural and synthetic peroxides are discussed separately.

  13. HEME OXYGENASE-1 UPREGULATED BY MELATONIN: POTENTIAL PROTECTION AGAINST BURN-INDUCED OXIDATIVE GASTRIC MUCOSAL INJURY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minka Hristova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is indoleamine hormone derived from L-tryptophan. Due to its lipophilic nature, it is accessible to every cell. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities thus protecting tissue injury. Heat shock proteins such as HSP32 known as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilatory properties and plays an important role in the protecting of tissues from several stresses. The aim of study is to investigate the expression of HO-1 in gastric mucosa and its connection with oxidative stress and melatonin mediated protection after thermal injury. On rats back, under anesthesia, third degree burn was applied involving 30% of total body surface area (TBSA. Melatonin (10 mg per kg body mass was injected i.p. immediately and 12 hours after thermal skin injury. We used tissue malondialdehyde (MDA, lipid peroxidation product, as a marker of oxidative stress. Gastric mucosa histopathology were observed on light microscopy and light immunohistochemistry investigating the HO-1 too. Results: The levels of MDA in gastric mucosa were elevated (p< 0.05. The HO-1 expression was significantly increased in rats with trauma. Melatonin inhibited elevation in lipid peroxidation product and augmented the increase in expression of HO-1 in the gastric mucosa. In conclusion, our data suggest that HO-1 induction following burn injury is an adaptive response protecting gastric mucosal against further oxidative damage. Melatonin increased the antioxidant capacity and restricted burn-induced oxidative damage in gastric mucosa and thus could be used therapeutically in organ protection.

  14. MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF THE DRY DEPOSITION OF PEROXIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of the dry deposition velocity (Vd) of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and total organic peroxides (ROOH) were made during four experiments at three forested sites. Details and uncertainties associated with the measurement of peroxide...

  15. Dexmedetomidine decreases the oral mucosal blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Togami, Kohei; Tada, Hitoshi; Ganzberg, Steven; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    There is an abundance of blood vessels in the oral cavity, and intraoperative bleeding can disrupt operations. There have been some interesting reports about constriction of vessels in the oral cavity, one of which reported that gingival blood flow in cats is controlled by sympathetic α-adrenergic fibres that are involved with vasoconstriction. Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts through the α-2 adrenoceptor, and is expected to have a vasoconstrictive action in the oral cavity. We have focused on the relation between the effects of α-adrenoceptors by dexmedetomidine and vasoconstriction in oral tissues, and assessed the oral mucosal blood flow during sedation with dexmedetomidine. The subjects comprised 13 healthy male volunteers, sedated with dexmedetomidine in a loading dose of 6 μg/kg/h for 10 min and a continuous infusion of 0.7 μg/kg/h for 32 min. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) were measured at 0, 5, 10, 12, 22, and 32 min after the start of the infusion. The HR, CO, and PBMF decreased significantly during the infusion even though there were no differences in the SV. The SVR increased significantly but the PMBF decreased significantly. In conclusion, PMBF was reduced by the mediating effect of dexmedetomidine on α-2 adrenoceptors.

  16. Probiotics as Antifungals in Mucosal Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Victor H; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia P A; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Candidais an opportunistic pathogen that causes mucosal and deep systemic candidiasis. The emergence of drug resistance and the side effects of currently available antifungals have restricted their use as long-term prophylactic agents for candidal infections. Given this scenario, probiotics have been suggested as a useful alternative for the management of candidiasis. We analyzed the available data on the efficacy of probiotics in candidal colonization of host surfaces. A number of well-controlled studies indicate that probiotics, particularly lactobacilli, suppressCandidagrowth and biofilm development in vitro.A few clinical trials have also shown the beneficial effects of probiotics in reducing oral, vaginal, and enteric colonization byCandida; alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms; and, in some cases, reducing the incidence of invasive fungal infection in critically ill patients. Probiotics may serve in the future as a worthy ally in the battle against chronic mucosal candidal infections. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-04-02

    Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity.

  18. Chemotherapy induced intestinal mucositis; from bench to bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.E. Koning, de (Barbara)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPart 1 focuses primarily on the pathophysiology of mucositis, in order to gain more insight different experimental mouse models were used. Chapter 2 describes mucositis induced by high dose doxorubicin (DOX)- treatment. DOX is a frequently used cytostatic drug in childhood cancer,

  19. Minimally invasive treatment of oral ranula with a mucosal tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, T; Xing, L; Zhu, F; Jin, X; Liu, L; Tao, J; Chen, Y; Gao, Z; Zhang, H

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a new method for minimally-invasive treatment of uncomplicated oral ranulas using a mucosal tunnel, and we report the clinical outcome. We constructed a mucosal tunnel for each of 35 patients who presented with an oral ranula, by making 2 parallel incisions across the top of the protruding ranula 2-3mm apart, and dissected the soft tissue along the incisions to its wall. The fluid was removed and the cavity irrigated with normal saline. The wall of the ranula was not treated. The first mucosal tunnel was made by suturing the base of the mucosal strip to the deepest part of the wall of the ranula. The mucosal base of the tunnel and the deepest part of the base of the ranula were fixed with absorbable sutures. The two external edges of the incisions were sutured together to form the second mucosal tunnel, and apposing sutures were inserted between the two parallel incisions to form two natural mucosal tunnels. The duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 5 years. One patient was lost to follow-up and 34 patients were cured. Outcomes were satisfactory without relapse during the follow-up period and the patients were satisfied with the outcome. The mucosal tunnel is a safe, effective, simple, and minimally-invasive treatment for oral ranula.

  20. Chemotherapy induced intestinal mucositis; from bench to bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.E. Koning, de (Barbara)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPart 1 focuses primarily on the pathophysiology of mucositis, in order to gain more insight different experimental mouse models were used. Chapter 2 describes mucositis induced by high dose doxorubicin (DOX)- treatment. DOX is a frequently used cytostatic drug in childhood cancer,

  1. Enhanced stability of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of subsurface solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard J.; Finn, Dennis D.; Cutler, Lynn M.; Schmidt, Jeremy T.; Teel, Amy L.

    2007-05-01

    The stabilization of hydrogen peroxide was investigated as a basis for enhancing its downgradient transport and contact with contaminants during catalyzed H 2O 2 propagations (CHP) in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Stabilization of hydrogen peroxide was investigated in slurries containing four characterized subsurface solids using phytate, citrate, and malonate as stabilizing agents after screening ten potential stabilizers. The extent of hydrogen peroxide stabilization and the most effective stabilizer were solid-specific; however, phytate was usually the most effective stabilizer, increasing the hydrogen peroxide half-life to as much as 50 times. The degree of stabilization was nearly as effective at 10 mM concentrations as at 250 mM or 1 M concentrations. The effect of stabilization on relative rates of hydroxyl radical activity varied between the subsurface solids, but citrate and malonate generally had a greater positive effect than phytate. The effect of phytate, citrate, and malonate on the relative rates of superoxide generation was minimal to somewhat negative, depending on the solid. The results of this research demonstrate that the stabilizers phytate, citrate, and malonate can significantly increase the half-life of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of subsurface solids during CHP reactions while maintaining a significant portion of the reactive oxygen species activity. Use of these stabilizers in the field will likely improve the delivery of hydrogen peroxide and downgradient treatment during CHP ISCO.

  2. Lipid peroxides level in the Indonesian elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwantyastuti Purwantyastuti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was done to see the possible association of plasma lipid peroxides in the elderly with age and other factors. Plasma lipid peroxides is a product of free radical reactions which according to the latest theory of aging is the cause of aging process. Lipid peroxides were also found high in coronary heart disease. Four hundred forty relatively healthy elderly, age 55-85 years, were randomly chosen from free living elderly under guidance of health care centers (PUSKESMAS in Jakarta. Anamnesis and physical examination were done in the morning in the health centers. Blood samples were taken in fasting conditions, plasma lipids and lipid peroxides were measured according to standard methods. There was an age difference of lipid peroxides level in the elderly, which increased with age up to 70 years old. Elderly 70 years old and over had low plasma lipid peroxides. The level was not related to high plasma lipids. Higher level was found when more chronic degenerative diseases were found. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 71-7Keywords: lipid peroxides, aging

  3. HIV and mucosal barrier interactions: consequences for transmission and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, Adam; McGowan, Ian; Klatt, Nichole R

    2015-10-01

    The mucosal barrier plays an integral function in human health as it is the primary defense against pathogens, and provides a critical transition between the external environment and the human internal body. In the context of HIV infection, the most relevant mucosal surfaces include those of the gastrointestinal (GI) and genital tract compartments. Several components help maintain the effectiveness of this mucosal surface, including the physical anatomy of the barrier, cellular immunity, soluble factors, and interactions between the epithelial barrier and the local microenvironment, including mucus and host microbiota. Any defects in barrier integrity or function can rapidly lead to an increase in acquisition risk, or with established infection may result in increased pathogenesis, morbidities, or mortality. Indeed, a key feature to all aspects of HIV infection from transmission to pathogenesis is disruption and/or dysfunction of mucosal barriers. Herein, we will detail the host-pathogen relationship of HIV and mucosal barriers in both of these scenarios.

  4. Erythropoietin-induced proliferation of gastric mucosal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuro Itoh; Masato Higuchi; Fumio Ishihata; Yushi Sudoh; Soichiro Miura; Yoshio Sawasaki; Kyoko Takeuchi; Shingo Kato; Nobuhiro Imai; Yoichiro Kato; Noriyuki Shibata; Makio Kobayashi; Yoshiyuki Moriguchi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the localization of erythropoietin receptor on gastric specimens and characterize the effects of erythropoietin on the normal gastric epithelial proliferation using a porcine gastric epithelial cell culture model.METHODS: Erythropoietin receptor was detected by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochermistry.Growth stimulation effects of erythropoietin on cultured gastric mucosal cells were determined by ELISA using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU).RESULTS: Erythropoietin receptor was detected on cultured porcine gastric mucosal epithelial cells.Erythropoietin receptor was also detected histochemically at the base of gastric mucosal epithelium. BrdU assay demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in growth potential of cultured porcine gastric mucosal epithelial cells by administration of erythropoietin, as well as these effects were inhibited by administration of antierythropoietin antibody (P< 0.01).CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that erythropoietin has a potential to proliferate gastric mucosal epithelium via erythropoietin receptor.

  5. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  6. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  7. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, D.P.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Allemano, J.; Bossi, P.; Wetering, M.D. van de; Rao, N.G.; Potting, C.M.J.; Cheng, K.K.; Freidank, A.; Brennan, M.T.; Bowen, J.; Dennis, K.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. METHODS: A systematic review of the available literature was

  8. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, D.P.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Allemano, J.; Bossi, P.; Wetering, M.D. van de; Rao, N.G.; Potting, C.M.J.; Cheng, K.K.; Freidank, A.; Brennan, M.T.; Bowen, J.; Dennis, K.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. METHODS: A systematic review of the available literature was con

  9. Detection of interstellar hydrogen peroxide

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, P; Liseau, R; Larsson, B; Olofsson, H; Menten, K M; Güsten, R

    2011-01-01

    The molecular species hydrogen peroxide, HOOH, is likely to be a key ingredient in the oxygen and water chemistry in the interstellar medium. Our aim with this investigation is to determine how abundant HOOH is in the cloud core {\\rho} Oph A. By observing several transitions of HOOH in the (sub)millimeter regime we seek to identify the molecule and also to determine the excitation conditions through a multilevel excitation analysis. We have detected three spectral lines toward the SM1 position of {\\rho} Oph A at velocity-corrected frequencies that coincide very closely with those measured from laboratory spectroscopy of HOOH. A fourth line was detected at the 4{\\sigma} level. We also found through mapping observations that the HOOH emission extends (about 0.05 pc) over the densest part of the {\\rho} Oph A cloud core. We derive an abundance of HOOH relative to that of H_2 in the SM1 core of about 1\\times10^(-10). To our knowledge, this is the first reported detection of HOOH in the interstellar medium.

  10. Mucosal immunity to pathogenic intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Behnsen, Judith; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly dynamic environment in which the host constantly interacts with trillions of commensal microorganisms, known as the microbiota, and periodically interacts with pathogens of diverse nature. In this Review, we discuss how mucosal immunity is controlled in response to enteric bacterial pathogens, with a focus on the species that cause morbidity and mortality in humans. We explain how the microbiota can shape the immune response to pathogenic bacteria, and we detail innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that drive protective immunity against these pathogens. The vast diversity of the microbiota, pathogens and immune responses encountered in the intestines precludes discussion of all of the relevant players in this Review. Instead, we aim to provide a representative overview of how the intestinal immune system responds to pathogenic bacteria.

  11. Mucosal Immunity and acute viral gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a major killer of the very young worldwide. Rotavirus is the most common intestinal virus, causing acute gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal complications especially in young and chronically ill subjects. As early as 1991, the WHO recommended as high priority the development of a vaccine against rotavirus, the major pathogen causing enteric infections. Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccines for infant immunization programmes in different parts of the world in 2006, vaccination against rotavirus has resulted in substantial declines in severe gastroenteritis. The oral rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq(®) and Rotarix(®) are excellent examples for their unique features and principles of mucosal immunization. We elaborate on rotavirus immunity and the success of rotavirus vaccination and aspects also beyond infants' acute gastroenteritis.

  12. Oral mucosal involvement in visceral leishmaniasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunny Garg; Richik Tripathi; Kamlakar Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis affects both the visceral and cutaneous tissues in body.OralMucosal involvement in leishmaniasis is rare and is often overlooked.We present a case17 year old boy from the north east region ofBihar who has a history of visceral leishmaniasis one year back, came to the department of oral surgery for treatment of persistent oral ulcers.Oral examination did not give any diagnostic information while systemic examination revealed enlarged spleen and low grade fever.Patient was screened for leishmaniasis by rK39 based immunochromatographic strip test which came to be positive.Biopsy of the ulcer as well as splenic and bone marrow aspirate confirmed the presence of leishmaniasis.Patient was administeredAmphotericinB for20 days following which significant clinical and haematological improvement followed.

  13. Mucosal barrier injury, fever and infection in neutropenic patients with cancer: introducing the paradigm febrile mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Walter J F M; Herbers, Alexandra H E; Netea, Mihai G; Blijlevens, Nicole M A

    2014-11-01

    Infection remains one of the most prominent complications after cytotoxic treatment for cancer. The connection between neutropenia and both infections and fever has long been designated as 'febrile neutropenia', but treatment with antimicrobial agents and haematopoietic growth factors has failed to significantly reduce its incidence. Moreover, emerging antimicrobial resistance is becoming a concern that necessitates the judicious use of available antimicrobial agents. In addition to neutropenia, patients who receive cytotoxic therapy experience mucosal barrier injury (MBI) or 'mucositis'. MBI creates a port-de-entrée for resident micro-organisms to cause blood stream infections and contributes directly to the occurrence of fever by disrupting the highly regulated host-microbe interactions, which, even in the absence of an infection, can result in strong inflammatory reactions. Indeed, MBI has been shown to be a pivotal factor in the occurrence of inflammatory complications after cytotoxic therapy. Hence, the concept 'febrile neutropenia' alone may no longer suffice and a new concept 'febrile mucositis' should be recognized as the two are at least complementary. This review we summarizes the existing evidence for both paradigms and proposes new therapeutic approaches to tackle the perturbed host-microbe interactions arising from cytotoxic therapy-induced tissue damage in order to reduce fever in neutropenic patients with cancer.

  14. Mucosal adaptation to aspirin induced gastric damage in humans. Studies on blood flow, gastric mucosal growth, and neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, J W; Dembinski, A; Stoll, R; Domschke, W; Konturek, S J

    1994-01-01

    The gastropathy associated with the ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin is a common side effect of this class of drugs, but the precise mechanisms by which they cause mucosal damage have not been fully explained. During continued use of an injurious substance, such as aspirin, the extent of gastric mucosal damage decreases and this phenomenon is named gastric adaptation. To assess the extent of mucosal damage by aspirin and subsequent adaptation the effects of 14 days of continuous, oral administration of aspirin (2 g per day) to eight healthy male volunteers was studied. To estimate the rate of mucosal damage, gastroscopy was performed before (day 0) and at days 3, 7, 14 of aspirin treatment. Gastric microbleeding and gastric mucosal blood flow were measured using laser Doppler flowmeter and mucosal biopsy specimens were taken for the estimation of tissue DNA synthesis and RNA and DNA concentration. In addition, the activation of neutrophils in peripheral blood was assessed by measuring their ability to associate with platelets. Aspirin induced acute damage mainly in gastric corpus, reaching at day 3 about 3.5 on the endoscopic Lanza score but lessened to about 1.5 at day 14 pointing to the occurrence of gastric adaptation. Mucosal blood flow increased at day 3 by about 50% in the gastric corpus and by 88% in the antrum. The in vitro DNA synthesis and RNA concentration, an index of mucosal growth, were reduced at day 3 but then increased to reach about 150% of initial value at the end of aspirin treatment. It is concluded that the treatment with aspirin in humans induces gastric adaptation to this agent, which entails the increase in mucosal blood flow, the rise in neutrophil activation, and the enhancement in mucosal growth. PMID:7959223

  15. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen... group. Eggs: Some strains of rainbow trout eggs are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide treatment at a time...

  16. Isothermal Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide Dihydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method of growing pure solid hydrogen peroxide in an ultra high vacuum environment and apply it to determine thermal stability of the dihydrate compound that forms when water and hydrogen peroxide are mixed at low temperatures. Using infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, we quantified the isothermal decomposition of the metastable dihydrate at 151.6 K. This decomposition occurs by fractional distillation through the preferential sublimation of water, which leads to the formation of pure hydrogen peroxide. The results imply that in an astronomical environment where condensed mixtures of H2O2 and H2O are shielded from radiolytic decomposition and warmed to temperatures where sublimation is significant, highly concentrated or even pure hydrogen peroxide may form.

  17. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer from Peroxide Dianion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bryce L; Maher, Andrew G; Nava, Matthew; Lopez, Nazario; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-06-18

    The encapsulation of peroxide dianion by hexacarboxamide cryptand provides a platform for the study of electron transfer of isolated peroxide anion. Photoinitiated electron transfer (ET) between freely diffusing Ru(bpy)3(2+) and the peroxide dianion occurs with a rate constant of 2.0 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). A competing electron transfer quenching pathway is observed within an ion pair. Picosecond transient spectroscopy furnishes a rate constant of 1.1 × 10(10) s(-1) for this first-order process. A driving force dependence for the ET rate within the ion pair using a series of Ru(bpy)3(2+) derivatives allows for the electronic coupling and reorganization energies to be assessed. The ET reaction is nonadiabatic and dominated by a large inner-sphere reorganization energy, in accordance with that expected for the change in bond distance accompanying the conversion of peroxide dianion to superoxide anion.

  18. Lipid peroxidation in experimental uveitis: sequential studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, H; Wu, G S; Chen, F; Kristeva, M; Sevanian, A; Rao, N A

    1992-06-01

    Previously we have detected the occurrence of retinal lipid peroxidation initiated by phagocyte-derived oxygen radicals in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). In the current studies, the confirmation of inflammation-mediated lipid peroxidation was proceeded further to include measurement of multiple parameters, including conjugated dienes, ketodienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and fluorescent chromolipids. The assay for myeloperoxidase, a measure for the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the inflammatory sites was also carried out. The levels of all these parameters were followed through the course of EAU development. The sequential evaluation of histologic changes using both light and electron microscopy was also carried out and the results were correlated with lipid peroxidation indices. These data suggest that the retinal lipid peroxidation plays a causative role in the subsequent retinal degeneration.

  19. Modeling mucosal candidiasis in larval zebrafish by swimbladder injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratacap, Remi L; Bergeron, Audrey C; Wheeler, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Early defense against mucosal pathogens consists of both an epithelial barrier and innate immune cells. The immunocompetency of both, and their intercommunication, are paramount for the protection against infections. The interactions of epithelial and innate immune cells with a pathogen are best investigated in vivo, where complex behavior unfolds over time and space. However, existing models do not allow for easy spatio-temporal imaging of the battle with pathogens at the mucosal level. The model developed here creates a mucosal infection by direct injection of the fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, into the swimbladder of juvenile zebrafish. The resulting infection enables high-resolution imaging of epithelial and innate immune cell behavior throughout the development of mucosal disease. The versatility of this method allows for interrogation of the host to probe the detailed sequence of immune events leading to phagocyte recruitment and to examine the roles of particular cell types and molecular pathways in protection. In addition, the behavior of the pathogen as a function of immune attack can be imaged simultaneously by using fluorescent protein-expressing C. albicans. Increased spatial resolution of the host-pathogen interaction is also possible using the described rapid swimbladder dissection technique. The mucosal infection model described here is straightforward and highly reproducible, making it a valuable tool for the study of mucosal candidiasis. This system may also be broadly translatable to other mucosal pathogens such as mycobacterial, bacterial or viral microbes that normally infect through epithelial surfaces.

  20. Roles of Mucosal Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Deng, Guangcun; Li, Min; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is one of the world's leading infectious causes of morbidity and mortality. As a mucosal-transmitted pathogen, Mtb infects humans and animals mainly through the mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Apart from providing a physical barrier against the invasion of pathogen, the major function of the respiratory mucosa may be to serve as the inductive sites to initiate mucosal immune responses and sequentially provide the first line of defense for the host to defend against this pathogen. A large body of studies in the animals and humans have demonstrated that the mucosal immune system, rather than the systemic immune system, plays fundamental roles in the host's defense against Mtb infection. Therefore, the development of new vaccines and novel delivery routes capable of directly inducing respiratory mucosal immunity is emphasized for achieving enhanced protection from Mtb infection. In this paper, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mucosal immunity against Mtb infection, including the development of TB vaccines, and respiratory delivery routes to enhance mucosal immunity are discussed.

  1. Mucositis and non-invasive markers of small intestinal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Katie L; Howarth, Gordon S; Butler, Ross N

    2009-05-01

    Mucositis is a common and debilitating side effect of chemotherapy that manifests due to the inability of chemotherapy agents to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells. This results in ulcerating lesions lining the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, the development of efficacious treatments for small intestinal mucositis has been hindered as the pathobiology of mucositis is still not fully understood. The small intestine is an extensive organ which is largely inaccessible by conventional means. Non-invasive biomarkers such as small intestinal permeability, H(2) breath tests, serum citrulline tests and the (13)C-sucrose breath test (SBT) have emerged as potential markers of small intestinal function. The SBT is emerging as the more appropriate biomarker to assess chemotherapy-induced mucositis in cancer patients and animal models, where it measures the decrease in sucrase activity associated with villus blunting and crypt disruption. The SBT has been successfully applied to detect mucositis induced by different classes of chemotherapy agents and has been used successfully to monitor small intestinal function with a range of candidate anti-mucositis treatments. We propose the SBT a superior biomarker of small intestinal function that could be successfully applied in clinical practice for monitoring the development of mucositis in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  2. Roles of Mucosal Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, is one of the world's leading infectious causes of morbidity and mortality. As a mucosal-transmitted pathogen, Mtb infects humans and animals mainly through the mucosal tissue of the respiratory tract. Apart from providing a physical barrier against the invasion of pathogen, the major function of the respiratory mucosa may be to serve as the inductive sites to initiate mucosal immune responses and sequentially provide the first line of defense for the host to defend against this pathogen. A large body of studies in the animals and humans have demonstrated that the mucosal immune system, rather than the systemic immune system, plays fundamental roles in the host’s defense against Mtb infection. Therefore, the development of new vaccines and novel delivery routes capable of directly inducing respiratory mucosal immunity is emphasized for achieving enhanced protection from Mtb infection. In this paper, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mucosal immunity against Mtb infection, including the development of TB vaccines, and respiratory delivery routes to enhance mucosal immunity are discussed.

  3. Dental students' ability to detect and diagnose oral mucosal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad A; Joseph, Bobby K; Sundaram, Devipriya B

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of dental students in the screening clinic of the Kuwait University Dental Center to detect and diagnose oral mucosal lesions. Clinical examinations performed by dental students between January 2009 and February 2011 were included. All their findings regarding the oral mucosal lesions and dental carious lesions detected were recorded, after which the patients were re-examined by faculty examiners. The students rated their own ability to detect mucosal and carious lesions before each examination. Among the 341 patients screened, 375 oral mucosal lesions were found by the faculty examiners. Of those, the students detected 178 (47.5%). Out of the 375 lesions, including the ones they failed to detect, the students diagnosed 272 (72.5%) correctly. The students were more likely (p≤0.01) to correctly diagnose a mucosal lesion when they themselves had detected it (n=169/178) than when they failed to detect it and had it subsequently pointed out by the faculty examiners (n=103/197). The students were more competent in detecting carious lesions (p≤0.001) than in detecting mucosal lesions. A significantly higher proportion of students who felt confident in detecting mucosal lesions were actually more competent in detecting the lesions than those who were not confident (p≤0.001). Further educational strategies are needed to motivate Kuwait University dental students to develop the knowledge, skills, and judgment necessary to integrate a complete intraoral examination into their routine practice.

  4. Oral mucosal status and major salivary gland function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, A.; Fox, P.C.; Ship, J.A.; Atkinson, J.C.; Macynski, A.A.; Baum, B.J. (National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Normal salivary function is considered to be critical for the maintenance of healthy oral mucosa. However, few studies have examined mucosal changes in patients with objectively documented salivary gland performance. In the present report, the mucosal status of 298 subjects being evaluated in a dry mouth clinic was assessed. A complete oral examination was performed and unstimulated and stimulated salivary samples were collected separately from the parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands. Data were analyzed according to diagnosis and salivary output after the assignment of an oral mucosal rating to each subject. In general, the mucosal surfaces were well preserved and infections were not seen. Patients evaluated for Sjoegren's syndrome and radiation-induced xerostomia had the lowest salivary gland performance but displayed a mucosal status similar to denture-wearing healthy subjects or patients with normal salivary flow who had idiopathic xerostomia. However, those patients with a total lack of salivary flow rarely had normal-appearing oral mucosa. These results confirm a role for saliva in oral mucosal preservation and also suggest that other factors may act to maintain oral mucosal integrity.

  5. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2012-11-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  6. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells. PMID:23457415

  7. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits photosynthetic electron transport in cells of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuilov, V D; Bezryadnov, D B; Gusev, M V; Kitashov, A V; Fedorenko, T A

    2001-06-01

    The effect of H2O2 on photosynthetic O2 evolution and photosynthetic electron transfer in cells of cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis and Anacystis nidulans was studied. The following experiments were performed: 1) directly testing the effect of exogenous H2O2; 2) testing the effect of intracellular H2O2 generated with the use of methyl viologen (MV); 3) testing the effect of inhibiting intracellular H2O2 decomposition by salicylic acid (SA) and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT). H2O2 inhibited photosynthetic O2 evolution and light-induced reduction of p-benzoquinone (BQ) + ferricyanide (FeCy) in the Hill reaction. The I50 value for H2O2 was ~0.75 mM. Photosynthetic electron transfer in the cells treated with H2O2 was not maintained by H2O2, NH2OH, 1,5-diphenylcarbazide, tetraphenylboron, or butylated hydroxytoluene added as artificial electron donors for Photosystem (PS) II. The H2O --> CO2, H2O --> MV (involving PSII and PSI) and H2O --> BQ + FeCy (chiefly dependent on PSII) electron transfer reactions were inhibited upon incubation of the cells with MV, SA, or AT. The N,N,N,N-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine --> MV (chiefly dependent on PSI) electron transfer was inhibited by SA and AT but was resistant to MV. The results show that H2O2 inhibits photosynthetic electron transfer. It is unlikely that H2O2 could be a physiological electron donor in oxygenic photosynthesis.

  8. EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION CATALYST TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HALGREN DL

    2008-07-30

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) main treatment train includes the peroxide destruction module (PDM) where the hydrogen peroxide residual from the upstream ultraviolet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation unit is destroyed. Removal of the residual peroxide is necessary to protect downstream membranes from the strong oxidizer. The main component of the PDM is two reaction vessels utilizing granular activated carbon (GAC) as the reaction media. The PDM experienced a number of operability problems, including frequent plugging, and has not been utilized since the ETF changed to groundwater as the predominant feed. The unit seemed to be underperforming in regards to peroxide removal during the early periods of operation as well. It is anticipated that a functional PDM will be required for wastewater from the vitrification plant and other future streams. An alternate media or methodology needs to be identified to replace the GAC in the PDMs. This series of bench scale tests is to develop information to support an engineering study on the options for replacement of the existing GAC method for peroxide destruction at the ETF. A number of different catalysts will be compared as well as other potential methods such as strong reducing agents. The testing should lead to general conclusions on the viability of different catalysts and identify candidates for further study and evaluation.

  9. HIV infection and specific mucosal immunity: workshop 4B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challacombe, S J; Fidel, P L; Tugizov, S; Tao, L; Wahl, S M

    2011-04-01

    Most HIV infections are transmitted across mucosal epithelium. An area of fundamental importance is understanding the role of innate and specific mucosal immunity in susceptibility or protection against HIV infection, as well as the effect of HIV infection on mucosal immunity, which leads to increased susceptibility to bacterial, fungal, and viral infections of oral and other mucosae. This workshop attempted to address 5 basic issues-namely, HIV acquisition across mucosal surfaces, innate and adaptive immunity in HIV resistance, antiviral activity of breast milk as a model mucosal fluid, neutralizing immunoglobulin A antibodies against HIV, and progress toward a mucosal vaccine against HIV. The workshop attendants agreed that progress had been made in each area covered, with much recent information. However, these advances revealed how little work had been performed on stratified squamous epithelium compared with columnar epithelium, and the attendants identified several important biological questions that had not been addressed. It is increasingly clear that innate immunity has an important biological role, although basic understanding of the mechanisms of normal homeostasis is still being investigated. Application of the emerging knowledge was lacking with regard to homeostatic mucosal immunity to HIV and its role in changing this homeostasis. With regard to breast milk, a series of studies have demonstrated the differences between transmitters and nontransmitters, although whether these findings could be generalized to other secretions such as saliva was less clear. Important progress toward an oral mucosal HIV vaccine has been made, demonstrating proof of principle for administering vaccine candidates into oral lymphoid tissues to trigger anti-HIV local and systemic immune responses. Similarly, experimental data emphasized the central role of neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV infection via mucosal routes.

  10. Cyclic Organic Peroxides Characterization by Mass Spectrometry and Raman Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    organic peroxides,DART, hexa -methylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), triacetonetriperoxide (TATP), TATP-d18, triacetone triperoxide (TATP), time-of...peroxides, DART, hexa -methylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), triacetone triperoxide (TATP), , triacetone triperoxide (TATP), time-of-flight–mass...acetone tri-peroxide (TATP) and hexa -methylene triper- oxide diamine (HMTD) are the more commonly used cyclic organic peroxides in terrorist acts

  11. Polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette transporter genes and interaction with diet and life style factors in relation to colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective case-cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Tine Iskov; Andersen, Vibeke; Tjonneland, Anne;

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family transports various molecules across the enterocytes in the gut protecting the intestine against potentially harmful substances. Moreover, ABC transporters are involved in mucosal immune defence through interaction with cytokines. The study aimed...

  12. Risk analysis, diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal mucositis in pediatric cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, Nicoline S. S.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Mucositis is a complex inflammatory reaction of the mucous membranes of the alimentary tract upon chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment in oncology patients. Mucositis can be subdivided in oral and gastrointestinal mucositis (GI mucositis). The damage to the gastrointestinal tract compromises the

  13. How can probiotics and prebiotics impact mucosal immunity?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Saulnier, Delphine; Pot, Bruno; Versalovic, James

    2010-01-01

    ...? These questions were part of a discussion entitled "How Can Probiotics and Prebiotics Impact Mucosal Immunity" at the 2009 annual meeting of the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP...

  14. Prevention of acute gastric mucosal lesions by Solcoseryl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, T; Radecki, T; Sendur, R; Gustaw, P; Konturek, S J

    1987-04-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract from calf blood containing various biologically active substances, has been reported to promote the healing of skin wounds and gastric ulceration In this study, the gastroprotective effects of Solcoseryl vis-a-vis acute gastric mucosal damage were examined in rats. Solcoseryl significantly reduced the formation of acute lesions induced by intragastric application of absolute ethanol or acidified taurocholate and by water immersion and restraint stress, but failed to affect those caused by acidified aspirin. Since Solcoseryl did not offer protection in the absence of mucosal prostaglandins (PG) e.g. in aspirin-induced gastric damage, it is likely that PG may be involved in the observed gastroprotective activity of the drug. Solcoseryl failed to affect gastric acid or pepsin secretion, but increased mucosal blood flow. Thus PG generated by Solcoseryl might contribute to the maintenance of the observed mucosal microcirculation and the prevention of lesion formation by corrosive substances and stress conditions.

  15. Mucosal malignant melanoma - a clinical, oncological, pathological and genetic survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lauge H; Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    melanoma must be excluded. Mutations in KIT are frequently found, while BRAF and NRAS mutations are rarely found - except in conjunctival melanomas that carry BRAF mutations. Mutations in the TERT promotor region are also found in mucosal melanomas. Complete surgical resection with free margins......Mucosal melanomas constitute 1.3% of all melanomas and they may develop in any mucosal membrane. Conjunctival melanomas (0.5/million/year) and melanomas in the sinonasal cavity (0.5/million/year) are the most common, followed by anorectal melanomas (0.4/million/year) and melanomas in the oral...... cavity (0.2/million/year). Anorectal melanoma occurs slightly more often in females, whereas oral melanoma has a male predilection. Mucosal melanoma most commonly develops in a patient's sixth or seventh decade of life, and no differences between races have been found except for sinonasal melanoma...

  16. Mucosal environmental sensors in the pathogenesis of dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Stern, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    The 4th Cullen Symposium, held April 17 and 18, 2014, included expert researchers in mucosal immunity of the eye and other mucosal surfaces, particularly the gut. The theme of the meeting was environmental sensing mechanisms in mucosal tissues and their relevance for initiating ocular surface inflammation in dry eye. There are a number of shared features between the ocular surface and other mucosal surfaces, but distinct differences may exist in the type and distribution of mucins and microbiota. Mechanisms to regulate DC maturation and prevent tissue-damaging inflammation are shared among these sites. Epithelial and dendritic cells are key environmental sensors participating in initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses in response to a variety of environmental stresses.

  17. Chamomile Mouth Rinse Effects on Mucositis Reduction After Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talaipour AR

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years many patients have been received radiotherapy for head and neck tumors and"na large number of them have been survived for some years."nThe side effects of radiotherapy in oral region are mucositis, ulcers, fungal and viral infections and"nsalivary glands dysfunction. Among these, mucositis is the most important one."nA randomized double blind clinical trial was performed in radiotherapy department of Tehran Imam"nKhomeini Hospital to determine chamomile mouth rinse effects on mucositis after radiotherapy."nThe patients are selected randomly from those with oral oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal cancers."nData showed that chamomile administration could decrease mucositis rate significantly,

  18. [Mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiochemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Renata Cristina Schmidt; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2011-12-01

    The objective of present study was to classify oral mucositis according to the Common Toxicity Criterion (CTC) international parameters in head and neck tumor patients simultaneously treated with radio and chemotherapy, and characterize a patient profile in our area, observing the individuals' habits, tumor characteristics, treatment protocol and acute reaction intensity. Fifty patients undergoing simultaneous 66 to 70 Gy megavoltage radiotherapy and cisplatin/carboplatin chemotherapy were evaluated in this study. Weekly evaluations of the degree of mucositis were perfoemed according to CTC, a four-degree ordinal scale; 36% of all patients and 100% of those with diabetes discontinued treatment due to mucositis, showing that this pathology contributes to the severity of mucositis.

  19. A DETAILED REVIEW ON ORAL MUCOSAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Bhati

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal drug delivery system is widely applicable as novel site for administration of drug for immediate and controlled release action by preventing first pass metabolism and enzymatic degradation due to GI microbial flora. Oral mucosal drug delivery system provides local and systemic action. In this review, attention is focused to give regarding physiology of oral mucosal including tissue permeability, barriers to permeation and route of permeation, biopharmaceutics of buccal and sublingual absorption, factors affecting drug absorption, detailed information of penetration enhancers, design of oral mucosal drug delivery system and role of mucoadhesion and various theories of bioadhesion. Evaluation techniques and selection of animal model for in-vivo studies are also discussed.

  20. (CGRP) on gastric mucosal barrier in stress induced rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... phospholipids (Kao et al., 1987), mucosal blood flow. (Stein, 1989 .... in blood vessels of tunica mucosa. A diffuse ... improve and there were signs of regeneration in lamina epitelialis ... The dilatation and edema of the vessels.

  1. Protective effect of Holothurian intestine against indomethacin induced gastric mucosal damage in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyu; Qiao, Xuejing; Zhang, Cuiping; Gao, Hua; Niu, Qinghui; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Zibin

    2017-06-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the protective effects of Holothurian intestines (HI) on NSAIDs-induced gastric mucosal damage and the possible mechanism. At first, 60 male Wistar rats were induced of gastric lesions with indomethacin (IDM, 30 mg kg-1). The rats were pretreated for 15 consecutive days with saline, sucralfate, or HI (0.4 g kg-1d-1, 0.8 g kg-1d-1 and 1.6 g kg-1d-1) prior to IDM treatment, followed by evaluations of macroscopic damage and microscopic features; and investigation of the levels of inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress parameters, gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and total hexosamine in tissues. The expression of COX-1 and COX-2 mRNA in the gastric tissue were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Pathological gastric ulcer indexes, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-17, TNF-α) and lipid peroxidation were significantly decreased in HI-treated groups, whereas the levels of protective factors (TGF-β, GSH, SOD activity and PGE2) were significantly elevated especially in the group with HI 1.6 g kg-1d-1 ( P < 0.05). Furthermore, the expression of COX-2 mRNA decreased significantly in HI groups ( P < 0.05). The study investigates that holothurian intestines may act as a kind of marine medicine which have protective effect on IDM-induced gastric ulcer, which could be a dietary preventive agent for the prevention of gastric damage.

  2. MUCOSAL MALIGNANT MELANOMA OF NASOPHARYNX: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary mucosal malignant melanomas of sinonasal tract are uncommon tumors comprising 0.3-2% of all malignant melanomas and 4% of all head and Neck melanomas. We are reporting a rare case of mucosal malignant melanoma in a 45 year old female arising from nasopharynx which was excised completely by trans palatal approach followed by irradiation. This case is being reported because of its isolated involvement of nasopharynx, and early age of presentation.

  3. Limitations in assessment of mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2010-01-01

    An emerging parameter to define the effectiveness of new therapeutic agents in clinical trials,and by extension,for use in day-to-day clinical practice has been labeled mucosal healing.It has been hypothesized that complete healing of the intestinal mucosa in inflammatory bowel diseases should result in reduced disease complications,reduced hospitalization and reduced surgical treatment.By implication,the natural history of inflammatory bowel disease might then be altered. Measurement of mucosal healing,how...

  4. Mucosal Inflammatory Response to Salmonella Typhimurium Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir ePatel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The human intestinal epithelium consists of a single layer of epithelial cells that forms a barrier against food antigens and the resident microbiota within the lumen. This delicately balanced organ functions in a highly sophisticated manner to uphold the fidelity of the intestinal epithelium and to eliminate disease-causing microorganisms. On the luminal side, this barrier is fortified by a thick mucus layer, and on the serosal side exists the lamina propria containing a resident population of immune cells. Pathogens that are able to breach this barrier disrupt the healthy epithelial lining by interfering with the regulatory mechanisms that govern the normal balance of intestinal architecture and function. This disruption results in a coordinated innate immune response deployed to eliminate the intruder that includes the release of antimicrobial peptides, activation of pattern recognition receptors, and recruitment of a variety of immune cells. In the case of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium infection, induction of an inflammatory response has been linked to its virulence mechanism, the type III secretion system (T3SS. The T3SS secretes protein effectors that exploit the host’s cell biology to facilitate bacterial entry and intracellular survival, and to modulate the host immune response. As the role of the intestinal epithelium in initiating an immune response has been increasingly realized, this review will highlight recent research that details progress made in understanding mechanisms underlying the mucosal inflammatory response to Salmonella infection, and how such inflammatory responses impact pathogenic fitness of this organism.

  5. Safe handling of potential peroxide forming compounds and their corresponding peroxide yielded derivatives.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Boyle, Timothy J.; Dean, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01

    This report addresses recent developments concerning the identification and handling of potential peroxide forming (PPF) and peroxide yielded derivative (PYD) chemicals. PPF chemicals are described in terms of labeling, shelf lives, and safe handling requirements as required at SNL. The general peroxide chemistry concerning formation, prevention, and identification is cursorily presented to give some perspective to the generation of peroxides. The procedure for determining peroxide concentrations and the proper disposal methods established by the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility are also provided. Techniques such as neutralization and dilution are provided for the safe handling of any PYD chemicals to allow for safe handling. The appendices are a collection of all available SNL documentation pertaining to PPF/PYD chemicals to serve as a single reference.

  6. Berberine Reduces Uremia-Associated Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Shanjun; Zhou, Chunyu; Zhu, Cuilin; Kang, Xin; Liu, Shuai; Zhao, Shuang; Fan, Shulin; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai; Wang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Berberine is one of the main active constituents of Rhizoma coptidis, a traditional Chinese medicine, and has long been used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of berberine on the intestinal mucosal barrier damage in a rat uremia model induced by the 5/6 kidney resection. Beginning at postoperative week 4, the uremia rats were treated with daily 150 mg/kg berberine by oral gavage for 6 weeks. To assess the intestinal mucosal barrier changes, blood samples were collected for measuring the serum D-lactate level, and terminal ileum tissue samples were used for analyses of intestinal permeability, myeloperoxidase activity, histopathology, malondialdehyde (MDA) level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Berberine treatment resulted in significant decreases in the serum D-lactate level, intestinal permeability, intestinal myeloperoxidase activity, and intestinal mucosal and submucosal edema and inflammation, and the Chiu's scores assessed for intestinal mucosal injury. The intestinal MDA level was reduced and the intestinal SOD activity was increased following berberine treatment. In conclusion, berberine reduces intestinal mucosal barrier damage induced by uremia, which is most likely due to its anti-oxidative activity. It may be developed as a potential treatment for preserving intestinal mucosal barrier function in patients with uremia.

  7. [New routes of administration: epidermal, transcutaneous mucosal ways of vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, François; Alain, Sophie; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2007-04-01

    A successful vaccine triggers the interaction of various cells of the immune system as does a regular immune response. It is thus necessary to introduce the vaccine antigens into an anatomic site where they will contact immune cells. The route of administration is thus critical for the outcome of vaccination. Intramuscular or subcutaneous injections are the most popular. Antigens injected intramuscularly can form persistent precipitates that are dissolved and re-absorbed relatively slowly. If injecting antigens is a quick, easy and reproducible way to vaccination, it requires trained personnel. Alternatives exist, through non-invasive formulations which allow administration by the patient or a third party with no particular expertise. The skin, especially its epidermal layer, is an accessible and competent immune environment and an attractive target for vaccine delivery, through transcutaneous delivery or immunostimulant patches. Mucosal immunization is another strategy: its major rationale is that organisms invade the body via mucosal surfaces. Therefore, local protection at mucosal surface as well as systemic defense is beneficial. Various formulations of mucosal vaccines have been developed, such as the Sabin oral polio vaccine (OPV), rotavirus vaccines, cold-adapted influenza vaccines or vaccine against typhoid fever. Thus we are entering in an era where mucosal and transcutaneous immunisation will play an important role in disease management. However, it has not been so easy to obtain regulatory approval for mucosal or transcutaneous formulations and needle-based vaccines continue to dominate the market.

  8. Sodium alginate inhibits methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Atsuki; Itoh, Tomokazu; Nasu, Reishi; Kajiwara, Eiji; Nishida, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mucositis is one of the most prevalent side effects of chemotherapy. Methotrexate is a pro-oxidant compound that depletes dihydrofolate pools and is widely used in the treatment of leukemia and other malignancies. Through its effects on normal tissues with high rates of proliferation, methotrexate treatment leads to gastrointestinal mucositis. In rats, methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis is histologically characterized by crypt loss, callus fusion and atrophy, capillary dilatation, and infiltration of mixed inflammatory cells. The water-soluble dietary fiber sodium alginate (AL-Na) is derived from seaweed and has demonstrated muco-protective and hemostatic effects on upper gastrointestinal ulcers. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of AL-Na on methotrexate-induced small intestinal mucositis in rats. Animals were subcutaneously administered methotrexate at a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg once daily for 3 d. Rats were treated with single oral doses of AL-Na 30 min before and 6 h after methotrexate administration. On the 4th day, small intestines were removed and weighed. Subsequently, tissues were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and bromodeoxyuridine. AL-Na significantly prevented methotrexate-induced small intestinal mucositis. Moreover, AL-Na prevented decreases in red blood cell numbers, hemoglobin levels, and hematocrit levels. These results suggest the potential of AL-Na as a therapy for methotrexate-induced small intestinal mucositis.

  9. Differential Apoptosis in Mucosal and Dermal Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ariel; Francis, Marybeth; DiPietro, Luisa Ann

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Dermal and mucosal healing are mechanistically similar. However, scarring and closure rates are dramatically improved in mucosal healing, possibly due to differences in apoptosis. Apoptosis, nature's preprogrammed form of cell death, occurs via two major pathways, extrinsic and intrinsic, which intersect at caspase3 (Casp3) cleavage and activation. The purpose of this experiment was to identify the predominant pathways of apoptosis in mucosal and dermal wound healing. Approach: Wounds (1 mm biopsy punch) were made in the dorsal skin (n=3) or tongue (n=3) of female Balb/C mice aged 6 weeks. Wounds were harvested at 6 h, 24 h, day 3 (D3), D5, D7, and D10. RNA was isolated and analyzed using real time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Expression levels for genes in the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were compared in dermal and mucosal wounds. Results: Compared to mucosal healing, dermal wounds exhibited significantly higher expression of Casp3 (at D5; pwound healing compared to skin. Conclusion: Expression patterns of key regulators of apoptosis in wound healing indicate that apoptosis occurs predominantly through the intrinsic pathway in the healing mucosa, but predominantly through the extrinsic pathway in the healing skin. The identification of differences in the apoptotic pathways in skin and mucosal wounds may allow the development of therapeutics to improve skin healing. PMID:25493209

  10. Using Light to Treat Mucositis and Help Wounds Heal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatius, Robert W.; Martin, Todd S.; Kirk, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development is focusing on the use of controlled illumination by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat mucositis and to accelerate healing of wounds. The basic idea is to illuminate the affected area of a patient with light of an intensity, duration, and wavelength (or combination of wavelengths) chosen to produce a therapeutic effect while generating only a minimal amount of heat. This method of treatment was originally intended for treating the mucositis that is a common complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. It is now also under consideration as a means to accelerate the healing of wounds and possibly also to treat exposure to chemical and radioactive warfare agents. Radiation therapy and many chemotherapeutic drugs often damage the mucosal linings of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, leading to mouth ulcers (oral mucositis), nausea, and diarrhea. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy is currently the standard of care for ischemic, hypoxic, infected, and otherwise slowlyhealing problem wounds, including those of oral mucositis. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy increases such cellular activities as collagen production and angiogenesis, leading to an increased rate of healing. Biostimulation by use of laser light has also been found to be effective in treating mucositis. For hyperbaricoxygen treatment, a patient must remain inside a hyperbaric chamber for an extended time. Laser treatment is limited by laser-wavelength capabilities and by narrowness of laser beams, and usually entails the generation of significant amounts of heat.

  11. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Zajdel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytic acid (PA has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20% compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  12. Phytic acid inhibits lipid peroxidation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10-20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  13. Electronic structure and bonding in crystalline peroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königstein, Markus; Sokol, Alexei A.; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    1999-08-01

    Hartree-Fock and density-functional PW91 theories as realized in the CRYSTAL95 code have been applied to investigate the structural and electronic properties of Ba, Sr, and Ca peroxide materials with the calcium carbide crystal structure, results for which are compared with those for the corresponding oxides. Special attention is paid to the stabilization of the peroxide molecular ion O2-2 in the ionic environment provided by the lattice, and to chemical bonding effects. In order to describe the covalent bonding within the O2-2 ion and the polarization of the O- ion in the crystal electrostatic field, it is essential to include an account of the effects of electron correlation. The PW91 density functional has allowed us to reproduce the crystallographic parameters within a 3% error. The chemical bonding within the peroxide molecular ion has a complex nature with a balance between the weak covalent bond of σz type and the strong electrostatic repulsion of the closed-shell electron groups occupying O 2s and O 2px and 2py states. Compression of the peroxide ion in the ionic crystals gives rise to an excessive overlap of the O 2s closed shells of the two O- ions of a peroxide molecular ion O2-2, which in turn determines the antibonding character of the interaction and chemical bonding in the O2-2 molecular ion.

  14. Protein energy malnutrition alters mucosal IgA responses and reduces mucosal vaccine efficacy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Semi; Kim, Heejoo; Shim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Seung Young; Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho; Han, Byung Woo; Song, Man Ki; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Kim, Jae-Ouk

    2017-08-30

    Oral vaccine responsiveness is often lower in children from less developed countries. Childhood malnutrition may be associated with poor immune response to oral vaccines. The present study was designed to investigate whether protein energy malnutrition (PEM) impairs B cell immunity and ultimately reduces oral vaccine efficacy in a mouse model. Purified isocaloric diets containing low protein (1/10 the protein of the control diet) were used to determine the effect of PEM. PEM increased both nonspecific total IgA and oral antigen-specific IgA in serum without alteration of gut permeability. However, PEM decreased oral antigen-specific IgA in feces, which is consistent with decreased expression of polymeric Immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) in the small intestine. Of note, polymeric IgA was predominant in serum under PEM. In addition, PEM altered B cell development status in the bone marrow and increased the frequency of IgA-secreting B cells, as well as IgA secretion by long-lived plasma cells in the small intestinal lamina propria. Moreover, PEM reduced the protective efficacy of the mucosally administered cholera vaccine and recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine in a mouse model. Our results suggest that PEM can impair mucosal immunity where IgA plays an important role in host protection and may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in malnourished subjects. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of systemic and mucosal immunization with helper-dependent adenoviruses for vaccination against mucosal challenge with SHIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Weaver

    Full Text Available Most HIV-1 infections are thought to occur at mucosal surfaces during sexual contact. It has been hypothesized that vaccines delivered at mucosal surfaces may mediate better protection against HIV-1 than vaccines that are delivered systemically. To test this, rhesus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular (i.m. or intravaginal (ivag. routes with helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad vectors expressing HIV-1 envelope. Macaques were first immunized intranasally with species C Ad serotype 5 (Ad5 prior to serotype-switching with species C HD-Ad6, Ad1, Ad5, and Ad2 vectors expressing env followed by rectal challenge with CCR5-tropic SHIV-SF162P3. Vaccination by the systemic route generated stronger systemic CD8 T cell responses in PBMC, but weaker mucosal responses. Conversely, mucosal immunization generated stronger CD4 T cell central memory (Tcm responses in the colon. Intramuscular immunization generated higher levels of env-binding antibodies, but neither produced neutralizing or cytotoxic antibodies. After mucosal SHIV challenge, both groups controlled SHIV better than control animals. However, more animals in the ivag. group had lower viral set points than in in the i.m. group. These data suggest mucosal vaccination may have improve protection against sexually-transmitted HIV. These data also demonstrate that helper-dependent Ad vaccines can mediate robust vaccine responses in the face of prior immunity to Ad5 and during four rounds of adenovirus vaccination.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... facilitated by microbial enzyme activity. The model describes how the hydrogen peroxide removal declines and eventually stops at relatively low chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations. It is hypothesized that this is due to an enzyme deficit because it is destructed due to the reactive radicals created...

  17. Lipid peroxidation in adrenal and testicular microsomes.

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    Studies were carried out to determine the actions of and interactions between ascorbate, NADPH, Fe2+, and Fe3+ on lipid peroxidation in adrenal and testicular microsomes. Ascorbate-induced malonaldehyde production was maximal in adrenal and testicular microsomes at an ascorbate concentration of 1 X 10(-4)M. Fe2+, at levels between 10(-6) and 10(-3)M, produced concentration-dependent increases in lipid peroxidation in adrenal and testicular microsomes; Fe2+ had a far greater effect than Fe3+ i...

  18. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Alicja Zajdel; Adam Wilczok; Ludmiła Węglarz; Zofia Dzierżewicz

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the deca...

  19. Reactive Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidative Defense Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam S. EL-BELTAGI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lipid peroxidation can be defined as the oxidative deterioration of lipids containing any number of carbon-carbon double bonds. Lipid peroxidation is a well-established mechanism of cellular injury in both plants and animals, and is used as an indicator of oxidative stress in cells and tissues. Lipid peroxides are unstable and decompose to form a complex series of compounds including reactive carbonyl compounds. The oxidation of linoleates and cholesterol is discussed in some detail. Analytical methods for studying lipid peroxidation were mentioned. Various kinds of antioxidants with different functions inhibit lipid peroxidation and the deleterious effects caused by the lipid peroxidation products.

  20. Clotrimazole nanoparticle gel for mucosal administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Elisabetta, E-mail: ese@unife.it [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Ravani, Laura [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Contado, Catia [Department of Chemistry, University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Costenaro, Andrea [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Drechsler, Markus [Macromolecular Chemistry II, University of Bayreuth (Germany); Rossi, Damiano [Department of Biology and Evolution, LT Terra and Acqua Tech UR7, University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Menegatti, Enea [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Grandini, Alessandro [Department of Biology and Evolution, LT Terra and Acqua Tech UR7, University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Cortesi, Rita [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-01-01

    In this study a formulation suitable to be applied on oral and/or vaginal mucosa has been developed for the treatment of fungal infections. The aim of the research is a comparison between clotrimazole (CLO) containing semisolid formulations based on monoolein aqueous dispersion (MAD) or nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC). MAD and NLC have been characterized in terms of morphology and dimensional distribution by cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). CLO was encapsulated with high entrapment efficiency both in MAD and in NLC, according to Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF) combined with HPLC. CLO recovery in MAD and NLC has been investigated by time. In order to obtain formulations with suitable viscosity for mucosal application, MAD was diluted with a carbomer gel, while NLC was directly viscosized by the addition of poloxamer 407 in the dispersion. The rheological properties of MAD and NLC after viscosizing have been investigated. Franz cell has been employed to study CLO diffusion from the different vehicles, evidencing diffusion rates from MAD and NLC superimposable to that obtained using Canesten{sup Registered-Sign }. An anticandidal activity study demonstrated that both CLO-MAD and CLO-NLC were more active against Candida albicans with respect to the pure drug. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison between monoolein aqueous dispersion (MAD) and nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clotrimazole (CLO) encapsulated with high entrapment efficiency both in MAD and in NLC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solid matrix of NLC controls CLO degradation better than MAD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CLO containing MAD and NLC exhibits a higher anticandidal activity than the free drug. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple production of CLO-NLC based poloxamer gel, suitable for industry scaling up.

  1. Involvement of lipid peroxidation and organic peroxides in UVA-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polte, Tobias; Tyrrell, Rex M

    2004-06-15

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation causes human skin aging and skin cancer at least partially through the activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMP-1, the interstitial collagenase, is responsible for the degradation of collagen and is involved in tumor progression in human skin. The present study uses human skin fibroblast cells (FEK4) to investigate the involvement of lipid peroxidation and the role of peroxides as possible mediators in MMP-1 activation by UVA. Preincubation with the antioxidants butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox reduced UVA-dependent MMP-1 upregulation, suggesting that peroxidation of membrane lipids is involved. Blocking the iron-driven generation of lipid peroxides and hydroxyl radicals by different iron chelators led to a decrease in UVA-induced MMP-1 mRNA accumulation. Moreover, modulation of glutathione peroxidase activity by use of the specific inhibitor mercaptosuccinate (MS) or by the depletion of glutathione (using buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine, BSO), enhanced the UVA-dependent MMP-1 response. Finally, UVA irradiation generated a significant increase in intracellular peroxide levels which is augmented by pretreatment of the cells with BSO or MS. Our results demonstrate that lipid peroxidation and the production of peroxides are important events in the signalling pathway of MMP-1 activation by UVA.

  2. Colonic mucosal gene expression and genotype in irritable bowel syndrome patients with normal or elevated fecal bile acid excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Acosta, Andres; Busciglio, Irene

    2015-07-01

    The mucosal gene expression in rectosigmoid mucosa (RSM) in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is unknown. Our objectives were, first, to study mRNA expression [by RT(2) PCR of 19 genes pertaining to tight junctions, immune activation, intestinal ion transport and bile acid (BA) homeostasis] in RSM in IBS-D patients (n = 47) and healthy controls (n = 17) and study expression of a selected protein (PDZD3) in 10 IBS-D patients and 4 healthy controls; second, to assess RSM mRNA expression according to genotype and fecal BA excretion (high ≥ 2,337 μmol/48 h); and third, to determine whether genotype or mucosal mRNA expression is associated with colonic transit or BA parameters. Fold changes were corrected for false detection rate for 19 genes studied (P colonic transit. We concluded that mucosal ion transport mRNA (for several genes and PDZD3 protein) is upregulated and barrier protein mRNA downregulated in IBS-D compared with healthy controls, independent of genotype. There are no differences in gene expression in IBS-D with high compared with normal fecal BA excretion.

  3. Gastroprotective Activity of Polygonum chinense Aqueous Leaf Extract on Ethanol-Induced Hemorrhagic Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Iza Farhana; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Kadir, Farkaad A.; Al-Bayaty, Fouad; Awang, Khalijah

    2012-01-01

    Polygonum chinense is a Malaysian ethnic plant with various healing effects. This study was to determine preventive effect of aqueous leaf extract of P. chinense against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into seven groups. The normal and ulcer control groups were orally administered with distilled water. The reference group was orally administered with 20 mg/kg omeprazole. The experimental groups received the extracts 62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg, accordingly. After sixty minutes, distilled water and absolute ethanol were given (5 mL/kg) to the normal control and the others, respectively. In addition to histology, immunohistochemical and periodic acid schiff (PAS) stains, levels of lipid peroxidation, malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidant enzymes, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. The ulcer group exhibited severe mucosal damages. The experimental groups significantly reduced gastric lesions and MDA levels and increased SOD level. Immunohistochemistry of the experimental groups showed upregulation and downregulation of Hsp70 and Bax proteins, respectively. PAS staining in these groups exhibited intense staining as compared to the ulcer group. Acute toxicity study revealed the nontoxic nature of the extract. Our data provide first evidence that P. chinense extract could significantly prevent gastric ulcer. PMID:23365597

  4. Gastroprotective Activity of Polygonum chinense Aqueous Leaf Extract on Ethanol-Induced Hemorrhagic Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iza Farhana Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polygonum chinense is a Malaysian ethnic plant with various healing effects. This study was to determine preventive effect of aqueous leaf extract of P. chinense against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into seven groups. The normal and ulcer control groups were orally administered with distilled water. The reference group was orally administered with 20 mg/kg omeprazole. The experimental groups received the extracts 62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg, accordingly. After sixty minutes, distilled water and absolute ethanol were given (5 mL/kg to the normal control and the others, respectively. In addition to histology, immunohistochemical and periodic acid schiff (PAS stains, levels of lipid peroxidation, malondialdehyde (MDA, antioxidant enzymes, and superoxide dismutase (SOD were measured. The ulcer group exhibited severe mucosal damages. The experimental groups significantly reduced gastric lesions and MDA levels and increased SOD level. Immunohistochemistry of the experimental groups showed upregulation and downregulation of Hsp70 and Bax proteins, respectively. PAS staining in these groups exhibited intense staining as compared to the ulcer group. Acute toxicity study revealed the nontoxic nature of the extract. Our data provide first evidence that P. chinense extract could significantly prevent gastric ulcer.

  5. Self-assembly of uranyl-peroxide nanocapsules in basic peroxidic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miro, Pere; Vlaisavljevich, Bess [Department of Chemistry, Supercomputing Institute, and Chemical Theory Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Gil, Adria [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Tarragona (Spain); Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN (United States); Nyman, May [Materials Science of Actinides, Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Bo, Carles [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Tarragona (Spain); Departament de Quimica Fisica i Inorganica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Campus Sescelades, Tarragona (Spain)

    2016-06-13

    A wide range of uranyl-peroxide nanocapsules have been synthesized using very simple reactants in basic media; however, little is known about the process to form these species. We have performed a density functional theory study of the speciation of the uranyl ions under different experimental conditions and explored the formation of dimeric species via a ligand exchange mechanism. We shed some light onto the importance of the excess of peroxide and alkali counterions as a thermodynamic driving force towards the formation of larger uranyl-peroxide species. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.; Terpstra, P.; Koopmans, M.; Duizer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Viral contamination of surfaces is thought to be important in transmission. Chemical disinfection can be an effective means of intervention, but little is known about the virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) against enteric and respiratory viruses. Aim: To measure the

  7. Virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.; Terpstra, P.; Koopmans, M.; Duizer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Viral contamination of surfaces is thought to be important in transmission. Chemical disinfection can be an effective means of intervention, but little is known about the virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) against enteric and respiratory viruses. Aim: To measure the vir

  8. Intestinal colonization with Candida albicans and mucosal immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Bai; Xian-Hua Liu; Qing-Ying Tong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe the relationship between intestinal lumen colonization with Candida albicans and mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA).METHODS: A total of 82 specific-pathogen-free mice were divided randomly into control and colonization groups. After Candida albicans were inoculated into specific-pathogenfree mice, the number of Candida albicans adhering to cecum and mucosal membrane was counted. The lymphocyte proliferation in Peyer's patch and in lamina propria was shown by BrdU incorporation, while mucosal sIgA (surface membrane) isotype switch in Peyer's patch was investigated. IgA plasma cells in lamina propria were observed by immunohistochemical staining. Specific IgA antibodies to Candida albicans were measured with ELISA.RESULTS: From d 3 to d 14 after Candida albicans gavaging to mice, the number of Candida albicans colonizing in lumen and adhering to mucosal membrane was sharply reduced.Candida albicans translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes occurred at early time points following gavage administration and disappeared at later time points. Meanwhile, the content of specific IgA was increased obviously. Proliferation and differentiation of lymphocytes in lamina propria were also increased.CONCLUSION: Lymphocytes in lamina propria play an important role in intestinal mucosal immunity of specificpathogen-free mice when they are first inoculated with Candida albicans. The decreasing number of Candida albicans in intestine is related to the increased level of specific IgA antibodies in the intestinal mucus.

  9. Fluorimetric analysis of hydrogen peroxide with automated measurement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, W.J.C van; Bosch, M.J. van den; Janssen, W.C.; Smeenk, F.W.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Harff, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    In the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) oxidative stress plays an important role, which can be determined by measuring hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide can be measured fluorimetrically in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), however, not standardized. The objective of

  10. Drinking Peroxide as 'Natural' Cure Leads to Dangerous Blood Clots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163513.html Drinking Peroxide as 'Natural' Cure Leads to Dangerous Blood Clots ... 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Ingesting high-concentration hydrogen peroxide as a "natural cure" or cleansing agent may ...

  11. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  12. Microsomal lipid peroxidation as a mechanism of cellular damage. [Dissertation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornbrust, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    The NADPH/iron-dependent peroxidation of lipids in rat liver microsomes was found to be dependent on the presence of free ferrous ion and maintains iron in the reduced Fe/sup 2 +/ state. Chelation of iron by EDTA inhibited peroxidation. Addition of iron, after preincubation of microsomes in the absence of iron, did not enhance the rate of peroxidation suggesting that iron acts by initiating peroxidative decomposition of membrane lipids rather than by catalyzing the breakdown of pre-formed hydroperoxides. Liposomes also underwent peroxidation in the presence of ferrous iron at a rate comparable to intact microsomes and was stimulated by ascorbate. Carbon tetrachloride initiated lipid peroxidation in the absence of free metal ions. Rates of in vitro lipid peroxidation of microsomes and homogenates were found to vary widely between different tissues and species. The effects of paraquat on lipid peroxidation was also studied. (DC)

  13. Beneficial effects of Foeniculum vulgare on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fatih Mehmet Birdane; Mustafa Cemek; Yavuz Osman Birdane; (I)lhami Gül(c)in; Mehmet Emin Büyükokuro(g)lu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine the anti-ulcerogenic and antioxidant effects of aqueous extracts of Foeniculum vulgare (FVE) on ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats.METHODS: FVE was administered by gavage at doses of 75, 150 and 300 mg/kg, and famotidine was used at the dose of 20 mg/kg. Following a 60 min period, all the rats were given 1 mL of ethanol (80%) by gavage. One hour after the administration of ethanol, all groups were sacrificed, and the gastric ulcer index was calculated;whole blood malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH), serum nitrate, nitrite, ascorbic acid,retinol and β-carotene levels were measured in all the groups.RESULTS: It was found that pretreatment with FVE significantly reduced ethanol-induced gastric damage.This effect of FVE was highest and statistically significant in 300 mg/kg group compared with the control (4.18 ± 2.81 vs 13.15 ± 4.08, P < 0.001). Also, pretreatment with FVE significantly reduced the MDA levels, while significantly increased GSH, nitrite, nitrate, ascorbic acid,retinol and β-carotene levels.CONCLUSION: FVE has clearly a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesion, and this effect, at least in part, depends upon the reduction in lipid peroxidation and augmentation in the antioxidant activity.

  14. A hyaluronic acid-based compound inhibits fibroblast senescence induced by oxidative stress in vitro and prevents oral mucositis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Nicola; Vicidomini, Antonio; McCullough, Michael; Gambardella, Antonio; Hassona, Yazan; Prime, Stephen S; Colella, Giuseppe

    2015-07-01

    Virtually all patients receiving radio- and chemotherapy for cancer develop oral mucositis, a severe and highly debilitating condition. The onset of mucositis is thought to involve the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the submucosa. Here we investigated a possible protective effect of a commercial formulation of hyaluronic acid (HA) enriched with amino acids (Mucosamin(®)) against the damage induced by oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Transient exposure of normal human oral fibroblasts to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) led to irreversible senescence, as demonstrated by sustained increase in the levels of p16(INK4A) and SA-βGal. Conditioned media from senescent fibroblasts induced detrimental effects on keratinocytes, as shown by reduced metabolic activity and migration capability. Pre-treatment with Mucosamin(®) prevented H(2)O(2) -induced, but not TGF-β-induced, fibroblast senescence with a concomitant reduction of fibroblast-induced loss of keratinocyte vitality and functional activity. Finally, data from a case-series of patients undergoing radio/chemotherapy strongly suggested that prophylactic use of the hyaluronic acid-based compound in the form of a spray may be effective in preventing the onset of oral mucositis.

  15. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the ...

  16. Expanding the crystal chemistry of uranyl peroxides: four hybrid uranyl-peroxide structures containing EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jie; Ling, Jie; Sieradzki, Claire; Nguyen, Kevin; Wylie, Ernest M; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Burns, Peter C

    2014-11-17

    The first four uranyl peroxide compounds containing ethylenediaminetetra-acetate (EDTA) were synthesized and characterized from aqueous uranyl peroxide nitrate solutions with a pH range of 5-7. Raman spectra demonstrated that reaction solutions that crystallized [NaK15[(UO2)8(O2)8(C10H12O10N2)2(C2O4)4]·(H2O)14] (1) and [Li4K6[(UO2)8(O2)6(C10H12O10N2)2(NO3)6]·(H2O)26] (2) contained excess peroxide, and their structures contained oxidized ethylenediaminetetraacetate, EDTAO2(4-). The solutions from which [K4[(UO2)4(O2)2(C10H13O8N2)2(IO3)2]·(H2O)16] (3) and LiK3[(UO2)4(O2)2(C10H12O8N2)2(H2O)2]·(H2O)18 (4) crystallized contained no free peroxide, and the structures incorporated intact EDTA(4-). In contrast to the large family of uranyl peroxide cage clusters, coordination of uranyl peroxide units in 1-4 by EDTA(4-) or EDTAO2(4-) results in isolated tetramers or dimers of uranyl ions that are bridged by bidentate peroxide groups. Two tetramers are bridged by EDTAO2(4-) to form octamers in 1 and 2, and dimers of uranyl polyhedra are linked through iodate groups in 3 and EDTA(4-) in 4, forming chains in both cases. In each structure the U-O2-U dihedral angle is strongly bent, at ∼140°, consistent with the configuration of this linkage in cage clusters and other recently reported uranyl peroxides.

  17. Inactivating Influenza Viruses on Surfaces Using Hydrogen Peroxide or Triethylene Glycol at Low Vapor Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Inactvaton of avan nfluenza vruses by chemcal agents and physcal condtons: a revew. Zoonoses - Public - Health , 54(2), 51-68. EPA (2005a...Research Harvard School of Public Health Boston, MA 02115 April 2009 Final Report Inactivating Influenza Viruses on Surfaces Using Hydrogen Peroxide or...Transportation Center of Excellence for Airliner Cabin Environment Research Harvard School of Public Health 665 Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02115 12

  18. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  19. Oral mucosal alterations among the institutionalized elderly in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Conceição Ferreira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the prevalence of oral mucosal alterations and associated factors among the institutionalized elderly in Brazil. Data were collected through a structured questionnaire, a review of their medical records and an intra-oral examination. A sample of 335 individuals over 60 years of age was randomly selected. In total, 646 alterations were diagnosed; 59.1% were variations of the normal oral mucosa. The most frequent variation consisted of sublingual varicosities (51.6%. Denture stomatitis (15.2% and denture hyperplasia (12.8% were the most frequent lesions. Elderly patients who wore dentures had a significantly higher prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (p = 0.00 than those that didn't wear dentures. There was a high prevalence of variations of the normal oral mucosa and of mucosal lesions, especially denture-induced lesions, among the institutionalized elderly.

  20. Mucosal immunity in the gut: the non-vertebrate perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Erick; Galindo-Villegas, Jorge; Mulero, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Much is now known about the vertebrate mechanisms involved in mucosal immunity, and the requirement of commensal microbiota at mucosal surfaces for the proper functioning of the immune system. In comparison, very little is known about the mechanisms of immunity at the barrier epithelia of non-vertebrate organisms. The purpose of this review is to summarize key experimental evidence illustrating how non-vertebrate immune mechanisms at barrier epithelia compare to those of higher vertebrates, using the gut as a model organ. Not only effector mechanisms of gut immunity are similar between vertebrates and non-vertebrates, but it also seems that the proper functioning of non-vertebrate gut defense mechanisms requires the presence of a resident microbiota. As more information becomes available, it will be possible to obtain a more accurate picture of how mucosal immunity has evolved, and how it adapts to the organisms' life styles.

  1. Potential Benefits of Oral Cryotherapy for Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodzinski, Amelia

    2016-10-01

    Mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies that causes painful, erythematous lesions to develop in the gastrointestinal tract. These lesions can lead to malnutrition, increased risk for serious infection, prolonged hospital stays, and reduced quality of life. Oral cryotherapy, or the use of ice chips to cool the mucous membranes during bolus chemotherapy infusions (e.g., 5-fluorouracil [Adrucil®] and melphalan [Alkeran®]), is the most readily accessible and cost-effective intervention available. Although many factors may contribute to the development of mucositis during cancer treatment, studies have found a reduction in the incidence and the severity of mucositis with the use of oral cryotherapy.


  2. Peptic ulcer pathophysiology: acid, bicarbonate, and mucosal function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Mertz Nielsen, A; Rune, S J

    1996-01-01

    The previously accepted role of gastric acid hypersecretion in peptic ulcer disease has been modified by studies showing no correlation between acid output and clinical outcome of ulcer disease, or between ulcer recurrence rate after vagotomy and preoperative acid secretion. At the same time......, studies have been unable to demonstrate increased acidity in the duodenal bulb in patients with duodenal ulcer, and consequently more emphasis has been given to the mucosal protecting mechanisms. The existence of an active gastric and duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion creates a pH gradient from...... cell removal and repair regulated by epidermal growth factor. Sufficient mucosal blood flow, including a normal acid/base balance, is important for subepithelial protection. In today's model of ulcer pathogenesis, gastric acid and H. pylori work in concert as aggressive factors, with the open question...

  3. Oral cryotherapy reduced oral mucositis in patients having cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivakovsky, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CANCERLIT, CINAHL, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment compared to usual care, no treatment or other interventions to prevent mucositis. The primary outcome was incidence of mucositis and its severity.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers carried out study assessment and data extraction independently. Treatment effect for continuous data was calculated using mean values and standard deviations and expressed as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Meta-analysis was performed.ResultsFourteen studies with 1280 participants were included. Subgroup analysis was undertaken according to the main cancer treatment type. Cryotherapy reduced the risk of developing mucositis by 39% (RR = 0.61; 95%CI, 0.52 to 0.72) on patients treated with fluorouracil (5FU). For melphalan-based treatment the risk of developing mucositis was reduced by 41% (RR =0.59; 95%CI, 0.35 to 1.01). Oral cryotherapy was shown to be safe, with very low rates of minor adverse effects, such as headaches, chills, numbness/taste disturbance and tooth pain. This appears to contribute to the high rates of compliance seen in the included studies.ConclusionsThere is confidence that oral cryotherapy leads to a large reduction in oral mucositis in adults treated with 5FU. Although there is less certainty on the size of the reduction on patients treated with melphalan, it is certain there is reduction of severe mucositis.

  4. Mucosal biofilm communities in the human intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Bahrami, Bahram; Macfarlane, George T

    2011-01-01

    Complex and highly variable site-dependent bacterial ecosystems exist throughout the length of the human gastrointestinal tract. Until relatively recently, the majority of our information on intestinal microbiotas has come from studies on feces, or from aspirates taken from the upper gut. However, there is evidence showing that mucosal bacteria growing in biofilms on surfaces lining the gut differ from luminal populations, and that due to their proximity to the epithelial surface, these organisms may be important in modulating the host's immune system and contributing to some chronic inflammatory diseases. Over the past decade, increasing interest in mucosal bacteria, coupled with advances in molecular approaches for assessing microbial diversity, has begun to provide some insight into the complexity of these mucosa-associated communities. In gastrointestinal conditions such as inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease), it has been shown that a dysbiosis exists in microbial community structure, and that there is a reduction in putatively protective mucosal organisms such as bifidobacteria. Therefore, manipulation of mucosal communities may be beneficial in restoring normal functionality in the gut, thereby improving the immune status and general health of the host. Biofilm structure and function has been studied intensively in the oral cavity, and as a consequence, mucosal communities in the mouth will not be covered in this chapter. This review addresses our current knowledge of mucosal populations in the gastrointestinal tract, changes that can occur in community structure in disease, and therapeutic modulation of biofilm composition by antibiotics, prebiotics, and probiotics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  6. Time and concentration dependency in the potentially affected fraction of species: the case of hydrogen peroxide treatment of ballast water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.G.D.; Ebbens, E.; Jak, R.G.; Huijbregts, M.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Transport of large volumes of ballast water contributes greatly to invasions of species. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can be used as a disinfectant to prevent the spread of exotic species via ballast water. Instead of using environmental risk assessment techniques for protecting a certain fraction of th

  7. Using a Hands-On Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition Activity to Teach Catalysis Concepts to K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-01-01

    A versatile and transportable laboratory apparatus was developed for middle and high school (6th-12th grade) students as part of a hands-on outreach activity to estimate catalytic rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition from oxygen evolution rates measured by using a volumetric displacement method. The apparatus was constructed with inherent…

  8. Evaluation of Mucosal and Systemic Immune Responses Elicited by GPI-0100-Adjuvanted Influenza Vaccine Delivered by Different Immunization Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Heng; Patil, Harshad P.; de Vries-Idema, Jacqueline; Wilschut, Jan; Huckriede, Anke

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery

  9. Clinical validation and calibration of in vitro peroxide tooth whitening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putt, Mark S; Moore, Michael H; Milleman, Jeffery L; Milleman, Kimberly R; Thong, Stephen H; Vorwerk, Linda M; Charig, Andrew J; Nelson, Bruce J; Winston, Anthony E

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate and calibrate an in vitro test method for screening the performance of peroxide-containing toothpastes against actual clinical whitening performance. An additional objective was to estimate the whitening performance of a new peroxide-additive gel using the in vitro methodology. A one-month longitudinal clinical study was performed to provide a benchmark for the in vivo intrinsic whitening performance of a peroxide-containing fluoride toothpaste. An in vitro study was then conducted, using freshly prepared slurries of the same peroxide-containing toothpaste in artificial saliva, to repeatedly treat extracted human teeth with natural intrinsic stain. The effect of cumulative treatment time on whiteness was determined using objective chromometer whiteness measurements (L*, a*, and b*), and more subjective Vita Shade guide (Vitapan) comparisons, and the results were correlated. A non-peroxide fluoride toothpaste was used as a negative control. The peroxide gel additive, combined in a 1:1 ratio with each of two non-peroxide toothpastes and diluted in artificial saliva, was evaluated using the same instrumental and subjective measures for in vitro whitening efficacy. The previously evaluated peroxide toothpaste and one of the non-peroxide toothpastes were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. In the clinical study, the peroxide-containing toothpaste produced a linear increase in tooth whiteness with time, achieving an approximately two Vita Shade guide improvement in whiteness at the end of four weeks. The same peroxide toothpaste in vitro produced a curvilinear increase in tooth whiteness versus cumulative treatment time, with a two-shade increase being achieved in 116 minutes. The non-peroxide control toothpaste produced less than half a shade guide increase in whiteness within the first 30 minutes, and none thereafter. Both the clinical and in vitro studies indicated that further whitening can be obtained with

  10. Polymer nanomicelles for efficient mucus delivery and antigen-specific high mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Young-Woock; Hong, Ji Hyun; Shim, Sang-Mu; Park, Hye Sun; Bae, Hee Ho; Ryu, Eun Kyoung; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chul-Ho; Cho, Seong Hun; Sung, Moon-Hee; Poo, Haryoung; Lim, Yong Taik

    2013-07-22

    Micelles for mucosal immunity: A mucosal vaccine system based on γ-PGA nanomicelles and viral antigens was synthesized. The intranasal administration of the vaccine system induces a high immune response both in the humoral and cellular immunity (see picture).

  11. Mucosal delivery routes for optimal immunization: targeting immunity to the right tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerkinsky, C; Holmgren, J

    2012-01-01

    The mucosal immune system exhibits a high degree of anatomic compartmentalization related to the migratory patterns of lymphocytes activated at different mucosal sites. The selective localization of mucosal lymphocytes to specific tissues is governed by cellular "homing" and chemokine receptors in conjunction with tissue-specific addressins and epithelial cell-derived chemokines that are differentially expressed in "effector" tissues. The compartmentalization of mucosal immune responses imposes constraints on the selection of vaccine administration route. Traditional routes of mucosal immunization include oral and nasal routes. Other routes for inducing mucosal immunity include the rectal, vaginal, sublingual, and transcutaneous routes. Sublingual administration is a new approach that results in induction of mucosal and systemic T cell and antibody responses with an exceptionally broad dissemination to different mucosae, including the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, and the genital mucosa. Here, we discuss how sublingual and different routes of immunization can be used to generate immune responses in the desired mucosal tissue(s).

  12. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  13. Functionalized Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between two biosensors for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The first biosensor was developed by the immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP enzyme on thiol-modified gold electrode. The second biosensor was developed by the immobilization of cysteamine functionalizing palladium nanoparticles on modified gold surface. The amino groups can be activated with glutaraldehyde for horseradish peroxidase immobilization. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS for both biosensors using the cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. The results show that the limit detection depends on the large surface-to-volume ratio attained with palladium nanoparticles. The second biosensor presents a better detection limit of 7.5 μM in comparison with the first one which is equal to 75 μM.

  14. The lipid peroxidation in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzierska, Magdalena; Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Piekarski, Janusz

    2010-06-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate oxidative stress (by using different biomarkers of lipid peroxidation--isoprostanes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)) in patients with invasive breast cancer, patients with benign breast diseases and in a control group. We observed a statistically increased level of TBARS in plasma and isoprostanes in urine of patients with invasive breast cancer in comparison with a control group. The concentration of tested biomarkers in plasma or urine from patients with invasive breast cancer was also higher than in patients with benign breast diseases. Moreover, the levels of tested markers in patients with benign breast diseases and in a control group did not differ. Considering the data presented in this study, we suggest that free radicals induce peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acid in patients with breast cancer.

  15. Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion for Smaller Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehead, John

    1998-01-01

    As satellite designs shrink, providing maneuvering and control capability falls outside the realm of available propulsion technology. While cold gas has been used on the smallest satellites, hydrogen peroxide propellant is suggested as the next step in performance and cost before hydrazine. Minimal toxicity and a small scale enable bench top propellant preparation and development testing. Progress toward low-cost thrusters and self-pressurizing tank systems is described.

  16. Inactivation of human myeloperoxidase by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumann-Page, Martina; Furtmüller, Paul G; Hofbauer, Stefan; Paton, Louise N; Obinger, Christian; Kettle, Anthony J

    2013-11-01

    Human myeloperoxidase (MPO) uses hydrogen peroxide generated by the oxidative burst of neutrophils to produce an array of antimicrobial oxidants. During this process MPO is irreversibly inactivated. This study focused on the unknown role of hydrogen peroxide in this process. When treated with low concentrations of H2O2 in the absence of reducing substrates, there was a rapid loss of up to 35% of its peroxidase activity. Inactivation is proposed to occur via oxidation reactions of Compound I with the prosthetic group or amino acid residues. At higher concentrations hydrogen peroxide acts as a suicide substrate with a rate constant of inactivation of 3.9 × 10(-3) s(-1). Treatment of MPO with high H2O2 concentrations resulted in complete inactivation, Compound III formation, destruction of the heme groups, release of their iron, and detachment of the small polypeptide chain of MPO. Ten of the protein's methionine residues were oxidized and the thermal stability of the protein decreased. Inactivation by high concentrations of H2O2 is proposed to occur via the generation of reactive oxidants when H2O2 reacts with Compound III. These mechanisms of inactivation may occur inside neutrophil phagosomes when reducing substrates for MPO become limiting and could be exploited when designing pharmacological inhibitors.

  17. The Mucosal Immune System and Its Regulation by Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract presents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system, which has to constantly monitor the vast surface for the presence of pathogens, while at the same time maintaining tolerance to beneficial or innocuous antigens. In the intestinal mucosa, specialized innate and adaptive immune components participate in directing appropriate immune responses toward these diverse challenges. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that the process of autophagy influences several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Initially described as a "self-eating" survival pathway that enables nutrient recycling during starvation, autophagy has now been connected to multiple cellular responses, including several aspects of immunity. Initial links between autophagy and host immunity came from the observations that autophagy can target intracellular bacteria for degradation. However, subsequent studies indicated that autophagy plays a much broader role in immune responses, as it can impact antigen processing, thymic selection, lymphocyte homeostasis, and the regulation of immunoglobulin and cytokine secretion. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of mucosal immune cells and discuss how autophagy influences many aspects of their physiology and function. We focus on cell type-specific roles of autophagy in the gut, with a particular emphasis on the effects of autophagy on the intestinal T cell compartment. We also provide a perspective on how manipulation of autophagy may potentially be used to treat mucosal inflammatory disorders.

  18. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Eric A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Camacho, Zenaido T. [Department of Cell Biology, Department of Natural Sciences, Western New Mexico University, Silver City, NM 88062 (United States); Hillestad, Matthew L. [Nephrology Training Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J. [Virology and Gene Therapy Graduate Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Mercier, George T. [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Barry, Michael A., E-mail: mab@mayo.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States); Department of Immunology and Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55902 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  19. Live bacterial delivery systems for development of mucosal vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thole, J.E.R.; Dalen, P.J. van; Havenith, C.E.G.; Pouwels, P.H.; Seegers, J.F.M.L.; Tielen, F.D.; Zee, M.D. van der; Zegers, N.D.; Shaw, M.

    2000-01-01

    By expression of foreign antigens in attenuated strains derived from bacterial pathogens and in non-pathogenic commensal bacteria, recombinant vaccines are being developed that aim to stimulate mucosal immunity. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and molecular biology of these bacteria have allowed

  20. Mucosal damage and neutropenia are required for Candida albicans dissemination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Y Koh

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans fungemia in cancer patients is thought to develop from initial gastrointestinal (GI colonization with subsequent translocation into the bloodstream after administration of chemotherapy. It is unclear what components of the innate immune system are necessary for preventing C. albicans dissemination from the GI tract, but we have hypothesized that both neutropenia and GI mucosal damage are critical for allowing widespread invasive C. albicans disease. We investigated these parameters in a mouse model of C. albicans GI colonization that led to systemic spread after administration of immunosuppression and mucosal damage. After depleting resident GI intestinal flora with antibiotic treatment and achieving stable GI colonization levels of C. albicans, it was determined that systemic chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide led to 100% mortality, whereas selective neutrophil depletion, macrophage depletion, lymphopenia or GI mucosal disruption alone resulted in no mortality. Selective neutrophil depletion combined with GI mucosal disruption led to disseminated fungal infection and 100% mortality ensued. GI translocation and dissemination by C. albicans was also dependent on the organism's ability to transform from the yeast to the hyphal form. This mouse model of GI colonization and fungemia is useful for studying factors of innate host immunity needed to prevent invasive C. albicans disease as well as identifying virulence factors that are necessary for fungal GI colonization and dissemination. The model may also prove valuable for evaluating therapies to control C. albicans infections.

  1. Live bacterial delivery systems for development of mucosal vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thole, J.E.R.; Dalen, P.J. van; Havenith, C.E.G.; Pouwels, P.H.; Seegers, J.F.M.L.; Tielen, F.D.; Zee, M.D. van der; Zegers, N.D.; Shaw, M.

    2000-01-01

    By expression of foreign antigens in attenuated strains derived from bacterial pathogens and in non-pathogenic commensal bacteria, recombinant vaccines are being developed that aim to stimulate mucosal immunity. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and molecular biology of these bacteria have allowed

  2. Mucosal malignant melanoma - a clinical, oncological, pathological and genetic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Lauge H; Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; von Buchwald, Christian; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Prause, Jan U; Heegaard, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal melanomas constitute 1.3% of all melanomas and they may develop in any mucosal membrane. Conjunctival melanomas (0.5/million/year) and melanomas in the sinonasal cavity (0.5/million/year) are the most common, followed by anorectal melanomas (0.4/million/year) and melanomas in the oral cavity (0.2/million/year). Anorectal melanoma occurs slightly more often in females, whereas oral melanoma has a male predilection. Mucosal melanoma most commonly develops in a patient's sixth or seventh decade of life, and no differences between races have been found except for sinonasal melanoma and conjunctival melanoma, which are very rare in Black people. The symptoms are not tumour-specific and are related to the organ system affected, and the disease is most often diagnosed at an advanced clinical stage. The diagnosis of a primary tumour is difficult, and metastatic cutaneous melanoma and choroidal melanoma must be excluded. Mutations in KIT are frequently found, while BRAF and NRAS mutations are rarely found - except in conjunctival melanomas that carry BRAF mutations. Mutations in the TERT promotor region are also found in mucosal melanomas. Complete surgical resection with free margins is the treatment of choice. The prognosis is poor, with the 5-year survival rate ranging from 0% (gastric melanoma) to 80% (conjunctival melanoma).

  3. Management of oral mucositis in patients with cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, R.; Fliedner, M.C.; Smiet, A.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a distressing toxic effect of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It can increase the need for total parenteral nutrition and opioid analgesics, prolong hospital stays, increase the risk of infection, and greatly diminish a patient's quality of life. Nurses play a critical role in

  4. Conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue in avian mucosal immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van F.W.; Gulley, S.L.; Lammers, A.; Hoerr, F.J.; Gurjar, R.; Toro, H.

    2012-01-01

    Conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue’s (CALT) role in generating avian mucosal adaptive immunity was measured by analyzing cellular composition, expression of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), and production of cytokines and antibodies in chickens ocular exposed to a replication-defici

  5. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotrim, Ana P. [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yoshikawa, Masanobu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baum, Bruce J., E-mail: bbaum@dir.nidcr.nih.gov [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  6. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6 J/cm2 during 6 s/point, 0.24 J/point, for a total dose of 1.44 J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway.

  7. Management of chronic mucosal otitis media in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, E.L.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mucosal otitis media (COM) is one of the most common infectious diseases in children worldwide. As it causes considerable morbidity and is a major global cause of hearing impairment, establishing its most effective treatment is important. It is generally accepted that antibiotic eardrops

  8. Neural fibrolipoma in pharyngeal mucosal space: A rare occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishith Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural fibrolipoma is a rare lesion presenting in early childhood, as a slow-growing fusiform swelling of a nerve, usually in the forearm or wrist (median nerve, associated with symptoms of compression neuropathy. There are only few case reports of neural fibrolipoma in neck and no such case has been reported in pharyngeal mucosal space.

  9. The Origin of Mucosal Immunity: Lessons from the Holobiont Hydra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Schroder

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Historically, mucosal immunity—i.e., the portion of the immune system that protects an organism’s various mucous membranes from invasion by potentially pathogenic microbes—has been studied in single-cell epithelia in the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts of vertebrates. Phylogenetically, mucosal surfaces appeared for the first time about 560 million years ago in members of the phylum Cnidaria. There are remarkable similarities and shared functions of mucosal immunity in vertebrates and innate immunity in cnidarians, such as Hydra species. Here, we propose a common origin for both systems and review observations that indicate that the ultimately simple holobiont Hydra provides both a new perspective on the relationship between bacteria and animal cells and a new prism for viewing the emergence and evolution of epithelial tissue-based innate immunity. In addition, recent breakthroughs in our understanding of immune responses in Hydra polyps reared under defined short-term gnotobiotic conditions open up the potential of Hydra as an animal research model for the study of common mucosal disorders.

  10. Altered systemic bioavailability and organ distribution of azathioprine in methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf A Karbelkar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Study outcome has thrown light on altered fate of AZA when administered to individuals with mucositis which suggests modified drug therapy. These findings can further be investigated in different drug classes which might be administered concomitantly in mucositis and study outcome can be further confirmed in mucositis patients in clinical practice also.

  11. Oral mucosal injury caused by cancer therapies: current management and new frontiers in research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Peterson, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    This invited update is designed to provide a summary of the state-of-the-science regarding oral mucosal injury (oral mucositis) caused by conventional and emerging cancer therapies. Current modeling of oral mucositis pathobiology as well as evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for prevention...

  12. Diagnostic Accuracy of Mucosal Biopsy versus Endoscopic Mucosal Resection in Barrett's Esophagus and Related Superficial Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsadek, Hany M; Radwan, Mamdouh M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Endoscopic surveillance for early detection of dysplastic or neoplastic changes in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) depends usually on biopsy. The diagnostic and therapeutic role of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) in BE is rapidly growing. Objective. The aim of this study was to check the accuracy of biopsy for precise histopathologic diagnosis of dysplasia and neoplasia, compared to EMR in patients having BE and related superficial esophageal lesions. Methods. A total of 48 patients with previously diagnosed BE (36 men, 12 women, mean age 49.75 ± 13.3 years) underwent routine surveillance endoscopic examination. Biopsies were taken from superficial lesions, if present, and otherwise from BE segments. Then, EMR was performed within three weeks. Results. Biopsy based histopathologic diagnoses were nondysplastic BE (NDBE), 22 cases; low-grade dysplasia (LGD), 14 cases; high-grade dysplasia (HGD), 8 cases; intramucosal carcinoma (IMC), two cases; and invasive adenocarcinoma (IAC), two cases. EMR based diagnosis differed from biopsy based diagnosis (either upgrading or downgrading) in 20 cases (41.67%), (Kappa = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.170-0.69). Conclusions. Biopsy is not a satisfactory method for accurate diagnosis of dysplastic or neoplastic changes in BE patients with or without suspicious superficial lesions. EMR should therefore be the preferred diagnostic method in such patients.

  13. Mucosal healing and deep remission: What does it mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, Gerhard; Vavricka, Stephan; Schoepfer, Alain; Lakatos, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    The use of specific terms under different meanings and varying definitions has always been a source of confusion in science. When we point our efforts towards an evidence based medicine for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) the same is true: Terms such as “mucosal healing” or “deep remission” as endpoints in clinical trials or treatment goals in daily patient care may contribute to misconceptions if meanings change over time or definitions are altered. It appears to be useful to first have a look at the development of terms and their definitions, to assess their intrinsic and context-independent problems and then to analyze the different relevance in present-day clinical studies and trials. The purpose of such an attempt would be to gain clearer insights into the true impact of the clinical findings behind the terms. It may also lead to a better defined use of those terms for future studies. The terms “mucosal healing” and “deep remission” have been introduced in recent years as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of IBD patients. Several clinical trials, cohort studies or inception cohorts provided data that the long term disease course is better, when mucosal healing is achieved. However, it is still unclear whether continued or increased therapeutic measures will aid or improve mucosal healing for patients in clinical remission. Clinical trials are under way to answer this question. Attention should be paid to clearly address what levels of IBD activity are looked at. In the present review article authors aim to summarize the current evidence available on mucosal healing and deep remission and try to highlight their value and position in the everyday decision making for gastroenterologists. PMID:24282345

  14. Oral health as a predictive factor for oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Luiz Coracin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Oral mucositis is a complication frequently associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, decreasing a patient's quality of life and increasing the occurrence of opportunistic infections. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and severity of oral mucositis and to assess the correlation of this disease with the oral health of an individual at the time of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODS: Before transplantation, patients' oral health and inflammatory conditions were determined using the gingival index and the plaque index, which are based on gingival bleeding and the presence of dental plaque, respectively. Additionally, the dental health status was determined using the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index. The monitoring of oral mucositis was based on the World Health Organization grading system and was performed for five periods: from Day 0 to D+5, from D+6 to D+10, from D+11 to D+15, from D+16 to D+20, and from D+21 to D+30. RESULTS: A total of 97 patients (56% male and 44% female who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo between January 2008 and July 2009 were prospectively examined. The incidence of ulcerative mucositis was highest from days +6 to +10 and from days +11 to +15 in the patients who underwent autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, respectively. CONCLUSION: The data, including the dental plaque and periodontal status data, showed that these oral health factors were predictive of the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in a cohort of patients with similar conditioning regimens before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  15. Cumene peroxide and Fe(2+)-ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation and effect of phosphoglucose isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agadjanyan, Z S; Dugin, S F; Dmitriev, L F

    2006-09-01

    Malondialdehyde (MDA) is one of cytotoxic aldehydes produced in cells as a result of lipid peroxidation and further MDA metabolism in cytoplasm is not known. In our experiments the liver fraction 10,000 g containing phosphoglucose isomerase and enzymes of the glyoxalase system was used and obtained experimental data shows that in this fraction there is an aggregate of reactions taking place both in membranes (lipid peroxidation) and outside membranes. MDA accumulation is relatively slow because MDA is a substrate of aldehyde isomerase (MDA methylglyoxal). The well known enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase acts as an aldehyde isomerase (Michaelis constant for this enzyme Km = 133 +/- 8 microM). MDA conversion to methylglyoxal and further to neutral product D-lactate (with GSH as a cofactor) occurs in cytoplasm and D-lactate should be regarded as the end product of two different parametabolic reactions: lipid peroxidation or protein glycation.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide stabilization in one-dimensional flow columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jeremy T.; Ahmad, Mushtaque; Teel, Amy L.; Watts, Richard J.

    2011-09-01

    Rapid hydrogen peroxide decomposition is the primary limitation of catalyzed H 2O 2 propagations in situ chemical oxidation (CHP ISCO) remediation of the subsurface. Two stabilizers of hydrogen peroxide, citrate and phytate, were investigated for their effectiveness in one-dimensional columns of iron oxide-coated and manganese oxide-coated sand. Hydrogen peroxide (5%) with and without 25 mM citrate or phytate was applied to the columns and samples were collected at 8 ports spaced 13 cm apart. Citrate was not an effective stabilizer for hydrogen peroxide in iron-coated sand; however, phytate was highly effective, increasing hydrogen peroxide residuals two orders of magnitude over unstabilized hydrogen peroxide. Both citrate and phytate were effective stabilizers for manganese-coated sand, increasing hydrogen peroxide residuals by four-fold over unstabilized hydrogen peroxide. Phytate and citrate did not degrade and were not retarded in the sand columns; furthermore, the addition of the stabilizers increased column flow rates relative to unstabilized columns. These results demonstrate that citrate and phytate are effective stabilizers of hydrogen peroxide under the dynamic conditions of one-dimensional columns, and suggest that citrate and phytate can be added to hydrogen peroxide before injection to the subsurface as an effective means for increasing the radius of influence of CHP ISCO.

  17. Natural Products for Management of Oral Mucositis Induced by Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohamamdi, Azar; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2016-03-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of systemic chemotherapy and radiotherapy of head and neck in patients with cancer. Severe oral mucositis is painful and affects oral functions, including intake of food and medications and speech. Prevention of oral mucositis affects the life quality of patients. Recent studies have been focused on natural products to improve or reduce this complication. Many clinical trials have been performed to assess natural products for treatment of mucositis and their results are promising. The authors reviewed the evidence for natural products in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

  18. Effect of electroacupunture on gastric mucosal intestinal trefoil factor gene expression of stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Li; Jie Yan; Shou-Xiang Yi; Xiao-Rong Chang; Ya-Ping Lin; Zong-Bao Yang; Ai Huang; Rong Hu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate electroacupunture(EA) at the acupoints of Stomach Meridian of Foot-Yangming(SMFY),Gallbladder Meridian of Foot-Yangming(SMFY) on gastric mucosal intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) gene expression detection in stress-induced rats with gastric mucosal lesion, and to explore the regulatory mechanism and significance of EA-related gastric mucosal protective effect.METHODS: Forty rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Blank group, Model group, Model group+EA at acupoints of SMFY group("SMFY group"), and Model group+EA at acupoints of GMFY group(GMFY group).All rats (except blank group) were made model by water immersion and restraint stress (WRS). Then the gastric mucosa tissue in each rat was taken off after assessment of gastric mucosal lesion index(GUI), and the expression of ITF mRNA of the tissues was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) method.RESULTS: Compared with Model group(54.3 ± 1.34),the GUI value in SMFY group (31±2.21) decreased significantly(P 0.05), in SMFY group(0.76± 0.01)with an extremely obvious difference (P<0.01), furthermore the expression in SMFY group was significantly higher than in GMFY group (P< 0.01).CONCLUSION: The gastric mucosal protective effect by EA at the acupoints of SMFY and GMFY was related to the expression variance of ITF, indicating certain meridian specificity exists. It could be one proof for the TCM theory "Relative particularity between SMFY and stomach".

  19. Measuring oral mucositis of pediatric patients with cancer: A psychometric evaluation of chinese version of the oral mucositis daily questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karis Kin Fong Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oral mucositis is a frequent clinical condition that has been shown to affect pediatric cancer patients. Oral Mucositis Daily Questionnaire (OMDQ is one of the few available patient-reported outcome measures to assess the extent and impact of oral mucositis. The objectives of the study were to translate the Mouth and Throat Soreness-Related Questions of the OMDQ into Chinese (OMDQ MTS-Ch for children and adolescents aged 6–18 years receiving chemotherapy and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: This was part of a multicenter, prospective cohort study involving two phases. Phase I involved forward-backward translation to fit the cognitive and linguistic age level of the children and adolescents, followed by face and content validation, together with pretesting. In Phase II, which evaluated the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and discriminant validity, a total of 140 patients completed the OMDQ MTS-Ch for 14 days. Results: The OMDQ MTS-Ch had satisfactory face and content validities. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the OMDQ MTS-Ch was 0.984. All of the corrected item-total correlations were higher than 0.90. The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient between consecutive days for the OMDQ MTS-Ch items ranged from 0.576 to 0.983; the only value that was not over 0.70 was that for the paired study days 7 and 8 for the item of talking. The mean area-under-the-curve OMDQ MTS-Ch item scores were significantly different among patients with different degrees of mucositis severity (P < 0.001, supporting the discriminant validity. Conclusions: It has been shown that the OMDQ MTS-Ch has a good level of reliability and discriminant validity and can be completed by children aged ≥6 years and adolescents on a daily basis to measure mucositis and its related functional limitations.

  20. Lipid peroxidation in women with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lipid peroxidation is an indicator of free radical metabolism and oxidative stress in human beings and other organisms. Malondialdehyde (MDA, an end product of lipid peroxidation, is a metabolite that can be readily estimated in serum samples. Excess oxidative stress may be a final common pathway through which anti epileptic drugs may exert their teratogenic potential in pregnant women with epilepsy. Our objective in this study was to ascertain the variations in malondialdehyde (MDA in women with epilepsy. Material and Methods: This study was carried out in the Kerala Registry of Epilepsy and pregnancy after obtaining clearance from the Institutional Ethics Committee. Informed consent was obtained from all the subjects. The quantitative examination of MDA was performed according to standard procedures. The ideal plasma level of MDA is below 2 nmol/ml. Results: Fifteen women with confirmed epilepsy (mean age 26.9 ± 3.5 were included in the study. Two women were pregnant. MDA levels ranged from 1.7 to 2.8 nmol/ml (mean level = 2.13 ± 0.37 nmol/ml. Eight women (53 % had MDA levels above the upper limit of normal. Three patients had levels above 2.5 nmol/ml, which corresponded to the 75 centile. Conclusions: This study had shown that the estimation of MDA levels in plasma is a convenient method to study lipid peroxidation and thereby oxidative stress in women with epilepsy. Over half of Women With Epilepsy (WWE have excess oxidative stress as indicated by high levels of MDA in the plasma. Correlations between MDA level and characteristics of epilepsy, AED therapy, nutritional status and other medical conditions need to be observed in a larger cohort.

  1. Alkaline Peroxide Delignification of Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Ashutosh [Biosciences; Katahira, Rui [National; Donohoe, Bryon S. [Biosciences; Black, Brenna A. [National; Pattathil, Sivakumar [Complex; Stringer, Jack M. [National; Beckham, Gregg T. [National

    2017-05-30

    Selective biomass fractionation into carbohydrates and lignin is a key challenge in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals. In the present study, alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment was investigated to fractionate lignin from polysaccharides in corn stover (CS), with a particular emphasis on the fate of the lignin for subsequent valorization. The influence of peroxide loading on delignification during AHP pretreatment was examined over the range of 30-500 mg H2O2/g dry CS at 50 degrees C for 3 h. Mass balances were conducted on the solid and liquid fractions generated after pretreatment for each of the three primary components, lignin, hemicellulose, and cellulose. AHP pretreatment at 250 mg H2O2/g dry CS resulted in the pretreated solids with more than 80% delignification consequently enriching the carbohydrate fraction to >90%. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) spectroscopy of the AHP pretreated residue shows that, under high peroxide loadings (>250 mg H2O2/g dry CS), most of the side chain structures were oxidized and the aryl-ether bonds in lignin were partially cleaved, resulting in significant delignification of the pretreated residues. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) analysis shows that AHP pretreatment effectively depolymerizes CS lignin into low molecular weight (LMW) lignin fragments in the aqueous fraction. Imaging of AHP pretreated residues shows a more granular texture and a clear lamellar pattern in secondary walls, indicative of layers of varying lignin removal or relocalization. Enzymatic hydrolysis of this pretreated residue at 20 mg/g of glucan resulted in 90% and 80% yields of glucose and xylose, respectively, after 120 h. Overall, AHP pretreatment is able to selectively remove more than 80% of the lignin from biomass in a form that has potential for downstream valorization processes and enriches the solid pulp into a highly digestible material.

  2. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witzeman K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Witzeman,1 Ruby HN Nguyen,2 Alisa Eanes,3 Sawsan As-Sanie,4 Denniz Zolnoun51Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, 2Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 3Pelvic Pain Research Unit, Division of Advanced Laparoscopy and Pelvic Pain, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: An estimated 8.3%–16% of women experience vulvovaginal discomfort during their lifetime. Frequently these patients report provoked pain on contact or with attempted intercourse, commonly referred to as provoked vestibulodynia (PVD. Despite the burden of this condition, little is known about its potential etiologies including pelvic floor muscular dysfunction and mucosal components. This knowledge would be beneficial in developing targeted therapies including physical therapy.Objective: To explore the relative contribution of mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity on pain report from intercourse among women with PVD.Design: In this proof of concept study, 54 women with PVD underwent a structured examination assessing mucosal and pelvic muscle sensitivity.Methods: We examined three mucosal sites in the upper and lower vestibule. Patients were asked to rate their pain on cotton swab palpation of the mucosa using a 10-point visual analog scale. Muscle pain was assessed using transvaginal application of pressure on right and left puborectalis, and the perineal muscle complex. The Gracely pain scale (0–100 was used to assess the severity of pain with intercourse, with women rating the lowest, average, and highest pain levels; a 100 rating the

  3. Anisodamine augments mucosal blood flow during gut ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Sen; Sheng Zhiyong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine if anisodamine is able to augment mucosal perfusion during gut ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Methods: A jejunal sac was formed in Sprague Dawley rat. A Laser Doppler probe and a tonometer were inserted into the sac which was filled with saline. The superior mesenteric artery was occluded (SMAO) for 60minutes followed by 90 minutes of reperfusion. At the end of 60 minutes of SMAO, either 0.2mg/kg of anisodmine or dobutamine was injected into the jejunal sac. Laser Doppler mucosal blood flow and regional PCO2 (PrCO2) measurements were made. Results: Mucosal blood flow was significantly increased at 30,60 and 90 minutes of reperfusion (R30, R60, R90 ) when intraluminal anisodamine or dobutamine was introduced compared to intraluminal saline only (44±3.3)% or (48±4.1)% vs. (37±2.6) % at R30, (57±5.0)% or (56±4.7)% vs. (45±2.7)% at R60, (64±3.3) % or (56 ± 4.2) % vs. (48 ± 3.4) % at R90 , respectively P<0.05). Blood flow changes were also reflected by lowering of jejunal PrCO2 measurements after intraluminal anisodamine or dobutamine compared with that of the saline controls (41±3. 1)mmHg or (44±3.0)mmHg vs. (49±3.7) mmHg at R30 , (38±3.7)mmHg or (40±2. 1)mmHg vs. (47±3.8) mmHgat R60, (34±2.1) mmHg or (39± 3.0) mmHg vs. (46±3.4) mmHg at R90, respectively,P<0. 05). The most interesting finding was that there were significantly higher mucosal blood flow and lower jejunal PrCO2 in anisodamine group than those in dobutamine group at 90 minutes of reperfusion (64± 3.3) %vs. (56±4.2)% for blood flow or (34 ± 2.1)mmHg vs. (39 ± 3.0)mmHg for PrCO2, respectively, P<0.05),suggesting that anisodamine had more lasting effect on mucosal perfusion than dobutamine. Conclusions:Intraluminal anisodamine can augment mucosal blood flow during gut I/R, and it may provide the protective effect on gut from ischemia and reperfusion injury.

  4. Reactive extraction for preparation of hydrogen peroxide under pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongxi CHENG; Hongtao LI; Shuxiang L(U); Li WANG

    2008-01-01

    The preparation of hydrogen peroxide from anthrahydroquinone by reactive extraction was investi-gated.The integration process of oxidation of anthrahydro-quinone by air and extraction of hydrogen peroxide from the organic phase with water was carried out in a sieve plate column under'pressure.The conversion of anthrahydroqui-none increased with increasing pressure resulting in an increase of hydrogen peroxide concentration in the aqueous phase.However,no change in extraction efficiency of hydrogen peroxide was observed.A mathematical model for gas-liquid-liquid reactive extraction was established.In the model,the effects of pressure and gas superficial velocity on reaction were considered.With increasing gas superficial velocity,the conversion of anthrahydroquinone increased,and the fraction of hydrogen peroxide extracted reached a plateau with a maximum of 72.94%.However,both the conversion of anthrahydroquinone and the traction of hydrogen peroxide extracted decreased with increasing organic phase superficial velocity.

  5. Effect of cadmium chloride on hepatic lipid peroxidation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H R; Andersen, O

    1988-01-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of cadmium chloride to 8-12 weeks old CBA-mice enhanced hepatic lipid peroxidation. A positive correlation between cadmium chloride dose and level of peroxidation was observed in both male and female mice. A sex-related difference in mortality was not observed...... but at a dose of 25 mumol CdCl2/kg the level of hepatic lipid peroxidation was higher in male mice than in female mice. The hepatic lipid peroxidation was not increased above the control level in 3 weeks old mice, while 6 weeks old mice responded with increased peroxidation as did 8-12 weeks old mice....... The mortality after an acute toxic dose of cadmium chloride was the same in the three age groups. Pretreatment of mice with several low intraperitoneal doses of cadmium chloride alleviated cadmium induced mortality and lipid peroxidation. The results demonstrate both age dependency and a protective effect...

  6. Peroxide coordination of tellurium in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhaylov, Alexey A.; Medvedev, Alexander G. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); The Casali Center of Applied Chemistry, The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Churakov, Andrei V.; Grishanov, Dmitry A.; Prikhodchenko, Petr V. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lev, Ovadia [The Casali Center of Applied Chemistry, The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-02-15

    Tellurium-peroxo complexes in aqueous solutions have never been reported. In this work, ammonium peroxotellurates (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} (1) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 5}Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 5}(OH).1.28 H{sub 2}O.0.72 H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (2) were isolated from 5 % hydrogen peroxide aqueous solutions of ammonium tellurate and characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analysis, by Raman spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The crystal structure of 1 comprises ammonium cations and a symmetric binuclear peroxotellurate anion [Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}]{sup 4-}. The structure of 2 consists of an unsymmetrical [Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 5}(OH)]{sup 5-} anion, ammonium cations, hydrogen peroxide, and water. Peroxotellurate anions in both 1 and 2 contain a binuclear Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O) fragment with one μ-oxo- and two μ-peroxo bridging groups. {sup 125}Te NMR spectroscopic analysis shows that the peroxo bridged bitellurate anions are the dominant species in solution, with 3-40 %wt H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and for pH values above 9. DFT calculations of the peroxotellurate anion confirm its higher thermodynamic stability compared with those of the oxotellurate analogues. This is the first direct evidence for tellurium-peroxide coordination in any aqueous system and the first report of inorganic tellurium-peroxo complexes. General features common to all reported p-block element peroxides could be discerned by the characterization of aqueous and crystalline peroxotellurates. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Relationships between body mass index and short-circuit current in human duodenal and colonic mucosal biopsies. Osbak PS, Bindslev N, Hansen MB. Acta Physiol (Oxf). 2011 Jan;201(1):47-53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osbak, Philip Samuel; Bindslev, Niels; Berner-Hansen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Retrospectively, to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and basal electrogenic transport as measured by short-circuit current (SCC) in human duodenal and colonic mucosal biopsies. Methods: The study included biopsies from mucosa of normal appearance in the sigmoid colo...

  8. Velopharyngeal mucosal surface topography in healthy subjects and subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambeth, Christopher; Amatoury, Jason; Wang, Ziyu; Foster, Sheryl; Amis, Terence; Kairaitis, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Macroscopic pharyngeal anatomical abnormalities are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of upper airway (UA) obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Microscopic changes in the UA mucosal lining of OSA subjects are reported; however, the impact of these changes on UA mucosal surface topography is unknown. This study aimed to 1) develop methodology to measure UA mucosal surface topography, and 2) compare findings from healthy and OSA subjects. Ten healthy and eleven OSA subjects were studied. Awake, gated (end expiration), head and neck position controlled magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the velopharynx (VP) were obtained. VP mucosal surfaces were segmented from axial images, and three-dimensional VP mucosal surface models were constructed. Curvature analysis of the models was used to study the VP mucosal surface topography. Principal, mean, and Gaussian curvatures were used to define surface shape composition and surface roughness of the VP mucosal surface models. Significant differences were found in the surface shape composition, with more saddle/spherical and less flat/cylindrical shapes in OSA than healthy VP mucosal surface models (P surface models were also found to have more mucosal surface roughness (P surface models. Our novel methodology was utilized to model the VP mucosal surface of OSA and healthy subjects. OSA subjects were found to have different VP mucosal surface topography, composed of increased irregular shapes and increased roughness. We speculate increased irregularity in VP mucosal surface may increase pharyngeal collapsibility as a consequence of friction-related pressure loss.NEW & NOTEWORTHY A new methodology was used to model the upper airway mucosal surface topography from magnetic resonance images of patients with obstructive sleep apnea and healthy adults. Curvature analysis was used to analyze the topography of the models, and a new metric was derived to describe the mucosal surface roughness. Increased roughness was

  9. A critical role of gastric mucosal ascorbic acid in the progression of acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by compound 48/80 in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshio Kamiya; Yoshiji Ohta; Yoichiro Imai; Tomiyasu Arisawa; Hiroshi Nakano

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of gastric mucosal ascorbic acid(AA) in the progression of acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by compound 48/80 (C48/80), a mast cell degranulator, in rats.METHODS: C48/80 (0.75 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected to fasted Wistar rats. Oral administration of AA (10, 50 or 100 mg/kg) was performed 0.5 h after C48/80treatment. Determinations for gastric mucosal lesion severity and blood flow, and assays for gastric mucosal total AA, reduced AA, oxidized AA, vitamin E, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), adherent mucus, nitrite/nitrate (NOx), non-protein SH (NPSH), and myeloperoxidase(MPO), and serum total AA, reduced AA, oxidized AA,and NOx were conducted 0.5 and 3 h after C48/80treatment.RESULTS: Gastric mucosal lesions occurred 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment and progressed at 3 h. Gastric mucosal blood flow decreased 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment but the decrease was recovered at 3 h. Gastric mucosal total AA, reduced AA, vitamin E, and adherent mucus concentrations decreased 3 h after C48/80 treatment.Gastric mucosal oxidized AA concentration remained unchanged after C48/80 treatment. Gastric mucosal NPSH concentration decreased 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment,but the decrease was recovered at 3 h. Gastric mucosal TBARS concentration and MPO activity increased 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment and further increased at 3 h.Serum total AA and reduced AA concentrations increased 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment and further increased at 3 h, while serum oxidized AA concentration increased at 0.5 h. Serum and gastric mucosal NOx concentrations increased 3 h after C48/80 treatment. AA administration to C48/80-treated rats at 0.5 h after the treatment prevented the gastric mucosal lesion progression and the changes in gastric mucosal total AA, reduced AA, vitamin E, adherent mucus, NOx, and TBARS concentrations and MPO activity and serum NOx concentration found at 3 h after the treatment dose-dependently. The AA administration to C48/80-treated

  10. Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

  11. Detection of volatile organic peroxides in indoor air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, J; Maguhn, J; Freitag, D; Kettrup, A

    2001-12-01

    A supercritical fluid extraction cell filled with adsorbent (Carbotrap and Carbotrap C) was used directly as a sampling tube to enrich volatile organic compounds in air. After sampling, the analytes were extracted by supercritical fluid CO2 with methanol as modifier. Collected organic peroxides were then determined by a RP-HPLC method developed and validated previously using post-column derivatization and fluorescence detection. Some volatile organic peroxides were found in indoor air in a new car and a newly decorated kitchen in the lower microg m(-3) range. tert-Butyl perbenzoate, di-tert-butyl peroxide, and tert-butylcumyl peroxide could be identified.

  12. Application of simulation modeling to lipid peroxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappel, A L; Tappel, A A; Fraga, C G

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative simulation model was developed that utilized present knowledge of lipid peroxidation in biological systems. The simulation model incorporated the following features: peroxidizability of polyunsaturated lipids, activation of inducers and their initiation of lipid peroxidation, concurrent autoxidation, inhibition of lipid peroxidation by vitamin E, reduction of some of the hydroperoxides by glutathione peroxidase, and formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Simulation calculations were done using a computer spreadsheet program. When the simulation program was applied to tissue slice and microsomal peroxidizing systems, the results of the stimulation were in agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Effects of zinc acexamate on gastric mucosal resistance factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplugues, J V; Bulbena, O; Escolar, G; Martí-Bonmatí, E; Esplugues, J

    1985-02-26

    The effects of zinc acexamate on gastric defensive systems were evaluated in the rat. Gastric ulcers induced by oral administration of three necrotic agents (0.6 N HCl, 25% NaCl, 100% ethanol) were markedly reduced by different pretreatments with zinc acexamate. This cytoprotective effect was not modified by previous treatment with indomethacin (30 mg/kg orally). Zinc acexamate pretreatment also prevents the disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier induced by aspirin (40 mM) and increases mucus production in the gastric glands and tracheal walls. These observations suggest that the antiulcer effects described for zinc salts could be the result, at least partly, of an action increasing gastric mucosal defensive systems.

  14. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefèvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  15. Transabdominal sonography to measure the total vaginal and mucosal thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balica, Adrian; Schertz, Katherine; Wald-Spielman, Daniella; Egan, Susan; Bachmann, Gloria

    2017-10-01

    Transabdominal and transvaginal sonography are used to measure bladder wall and detrusor thickness. Only transvaginal sonography has been used to measure the vaginal wall thickness. We describe the use of transabdominal sonography to measure the total vaginal wall thickness and total vaginal mucosal thickness at the bladder trigone. The mean bladder wall thickness and SD from published data were within the 95% confidence interval of our data. Total vaginal and mucosal thicknesses are reliable measurements, which require specific evaluation in a postmenopausal population. They could be used to quantify vaginal atrophy and could correlate to symptoms of atrophy and response to treatment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 45:461-464, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Mucosal immunity in the female genital tract, HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis Machado, Juliana; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; dos Reis, Marlene Antônia; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Miranda Corrêa, Rosana Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immunity consists of innate and adaptive immune responses which can be influenced by systemic immunity. Despite having been the subject of intensive studies, it is not fully elucidated what exactly occurs after HIV contact with the female genital tract mucosa. The sexual route is the main route of HIV transmission, with an increased risk of infection in women compared to men. Several characteristics of the female genital tract make it suitable for inoculation, establishment of infection, and systemic spread of the virus, which causes local changes that may favor the development of infections by other pathogens, often called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The relationship of these STDs with HIV infection has been widely studied. Here we review the characteristics of mucosal immunity of the female genital tract, its alterations due to HIV/AIDS, and the characteristics of coinfections between HIV/AIDS and the most prevalent STDs.

  17. Mucosal Immunity in the Female Genital Tract, HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Reis Machado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal immunity consists of innate and adaptive immune responses which can be influenced by systemic immunity. Despite having been the subject of intensive studies, it is not fully elucidated what exactly occurs after HIV contact with the female genital tract mucosa. The sexual route is the main route of HIV transmission, with an increased risk of infection in women compared to men. Several characteristics of the female genital tract make it suitable for inoculation, establishment of infection, and systemic spread of the virus, which causes local changes that may favor the development of infections by other pathogens, often called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs. The relationship of these STDs with HIV infection has been widely studied. Here we review the characteristics of mucosal immunity of the female genital tract, its alterations due to HIV/AIDS, and the characteristics of coinfections between HIV/AIDS and the most prevalent STDs.

  18. Immunotherapies Targeting Fish Mucosal Immunity - Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshio, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, studies on the mucosal immunity in fish species have shown much progress. Although there are some organs such as skin, gills, and gut are directly associated with the mucosal immunity of fish species, this mini review emphasizes the general knowledge on the role and production figures of skin mucus and factors affecting the secretion of skin mucus of fish species. As the skin mucus of fish species is the first defense line for protection against invading microorganisms such as pathogens (bacteria, virus), parasites, etc., the information for understanding the roles of the skin mucus is very important. Furthermore, the information in the review will shed light on the development of high quality aquafeeds for the sustainable aquaculture field as well.

  19. Induction of allergen-specific tolerance via mucosal routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarell, Laurent; Zimmer, Aline; Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Tourdot, Sophie; Moingeon, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only curative treatment of allergies against insect venom, house dust mites, tree/grass pollens, or cat dander. Subcutaneous immunotherapy is successful to reorient the immune system and re-establish long-term tolerance. However, major drawbacks for using this route include: repeated injections, as well as the risk of anaphylaxis. In this context, alternative mucosal routes of administration are being considered together with the combined use of adjuvants/vector systems and recombinant allergens or peptide fragments. Herein, we review the current status in the use of mucosal routes (i.e., sublingual, oral, intranasal) for allergen-specific immunotherapy, as well as the latest understanding with respect to underlying mechanisms of action.

  20. Novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hairui; Yu, Yuan; Faraji Dana, Sara; Li, Bo; Lee, Chi-Ying; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-08-01

    Technological advances in drug discovery have resulted in increasing number of molecules including proteins and peptides as drug candidates. However, how to deliver drugs with satisfactory therapeutic effect, minimal side effects and increased patient compliance is a question posted before researchers, especially for those drugs with poor solubility, large molecular weight or instability. Microfabrication technology, polymer science and bioconjugate chemistry combine to address these problems and generate a number of novel engineered drug delivery systems. Injection routes usually have poor patient compliance due to their invasive nature and potential safety concerns over needle reuse. The alternative non-invasive routes, such as oral, mucosal (pulmonary, nasal, ocular, buccal, rectal, vaginal), and transdermal drug delivery have thus attracted many attentions. Here, we review the applications of the novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

  1. Novel ways for immune intervention in immunotherapy: mucosal allergy vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarell, Laurent; Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moingeon, Philippe

    2006-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is currently the only curative treatment for allergy. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been successfully used to treat patients who are allergic to insect venom, house dust mites, or tree or grass pollens. In the context of potentially severe, albeit infrequent, side effects associated with SCIT, mucosal routes of administration are being investigated to conduct allergenic desensitization. This article reviews recent developments in the field of nasal, oral, and sublingual immunotherapy as they relate to safety, clinical efficacy, and immune mechanisms of action. Implications for the design and development of improved allergy vaccines that could be used through such nonparenteral routes are discussed. Specifically, allergen presentation platforms and adjuvants facilitating the targeting of immune cells at mucosal surfaces to promote tolerance induction are reviewed.

  2. [Physiological importance of calpains in gastric mucosal defense].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Shoji; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2011-06-01

    The continuous and/or improper ingestion of irritants, including alcohol, NSAIDs, and Helicobacter pylori, often leads to serious gastropathies, affecting a wide range of people. A complex gastric defense system works to protect against these threats, for example by secreting mucus. Recently, by analysis of gene targeting mice for two gastrointestinal-tract-specific calpains, calpain-8 and calpain-9, we have demonstrated that they are cooperatively involved in the mucosal defense against stress-induced gastropathies. Calpains-8 and -9 are members of Ca2+ -dependent intracellular proteases comprising a superfamily in almost all eukaryotes, and form a functional complex, "G-calpain", expressed specifically in the mucus-producing cells. In this review, we show our recent results on calpains -8 and -9, and discuss gastric mucosal defense mechanisms involving them.

  3. A practical method for clinical diagnosis of oral mucosal melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Azañero, Wilson A; Mosqueda Taylor, Adalberto

    2003-01-01

    To present a practical and technically simple method for clinical diagnosis of oral melanomas that allows to differentiate this neoplasm from other pigmented lesions. Thirteen oral pigmented lesions with suspected diagnosis of mucosal melanomas were submitted to a test named "rubbing with a gauze" the surface of the lesion. The test was considered positive when the gauze stained dark brown or black due to the presence of melanin-laden cells on the epithelial surface. In all cases definite diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy. Positive results were obtained in 11 out of 13 cases (84.6%). Our results establish that the test "rubbing with gauze" the surface of oral pigmented lesions demonstrates a high sensitivity to anticipate clinically the diagnosis of mucosal melanomas. However, a negative result does not exclude this neoplasm, since there are some cases in which malignant cells have not invaded the superficial epithelial layers. In every case the final diagnosis must be established by histopathologic or immunohistochemical analysis.

  4. Intestinal dendritic cells in the regulation of mucosal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekiaris, Vasileios; Persson, Emma K.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    immune cells within the mucosa must suitably respond to maintain intestinal integrity, while also providing the ability to mount effective immune responses to potential pathogens. Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinel immune cells that play a central role in the initiation and differentiation of adaptive...... immune responses. In the intestinal mucosa, DCs are located diffusely throughout the intestinal lamina propria, within gut-associated lymphoid tissues, including Peyer's patches and smaller lymphoid aggregates, as well as in intestinal-draining lymph nodes, including mesenteric lymph nodes....... The recognition that dietary nutrients and microbial communities in the intestine influence both mucosal and systemic immune cell development and function as well as immune-mediated disease has led to an explosion of literature in mucosal immunology in recent years and a growing interest in the functionality...

  5. Effect of carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide on the surface morphology and zinc oxide levels of IRM fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostein, I; Cohenca, N; Mor, C; Moshonov, J; Stabholz, A

    1995-12-01

    The effect of 10% carbamide peroxide or 10% hydrogen peroxide on the surface morphology and zinc oxide levels of IRM fillings was tested. Ninety IRM samples were treated with either 10% carbamide peroxide, 10% hydrogen peroxide or phosphate buffer which served as control. Treatment consisted of placing the samples in a dry incubator at 37 degrees C for 1, 3 or 7 days. At each time point, the samples were removed from the test solutions, dried and prepared for surface scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometric analysis. After 3 days, 10% carbamide peroxide significantly reduced the zinc oxide levels as compared to the 10% hydrogen peroxide group (IRM fillings, but their modes of action differed.

  6. Protective effects of DIDS against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhao; Feng Zhu; Weiwei Shen; Aifen Fu; Lin Zheng; Zhaowen Yan; Lingzi Zhao; Guohui Fu

    2009-01-01

    The compound 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) is an efficient anion exchanger inhibitor that can block the activities of anion exchanger 2(AE2), which plays an indispensable role in gastric acid secretion. DIDS also has potent anti-oxidative and anti-apoptosis activities. This study aimed to investigate the effect of DIDS on ethanol-induced mucosai damage in rats and to evaluate the underlying mechanisms that mediate the action of the compound. The rats received 1 ml of absolute ethanol or saline orally. DIDS [50 mg/kg intravenous (i.v.)] was given 5 min before ethanol administration. Gastric lesions were evaluated macroscopically, microscopically, and electron micro-scopically at 60 min after ethanol challenge. Gastric myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, malonyldialdehyde (MDA) level, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression were assessed.For the evaluation of the effect of DIDS on gastric acid secretion, histamine-stimulatory gastric acid secretion was examined with or without pretreatment of DIDS (50 mg/kg; i.v.). Ethanol-induced gastric lesions were characterized by increasing gastric MDA level, MPO activity, and COX-2 expression, and decreasing PGE2 synthesis. It was found that DIDS significantly reduced the extent of gastric mucosal damage and reversed tissue MDA level and MPO activity. DIDS further enhanced the expression of COX-2 and reversed the decrease of PGE2. Our results suggested that DIDS is beneficial in rat model of gastric injury through mech-anisms that involve inhibiting inflammatory cell infil-tration and lipid peroxidation and up-regulating the COX-2/PGE2 pathway.

  7. Evaluation of Oral Mucosal Lesions in 598 Referred Iranian Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jahanbani, Jahanfar; Sandvik, Leiv; Lyberg, Torstein; Ahlfors, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The mucosal membrane of the oral cavity displays at times classical developmental lesions considered to be variations of normal structures rather than having disease characteristics. Of these lesions leukoedema, Fordyce granules, geographic-, fissured- and hairy tongue, median rhomboid glossitis and lingual varices were studied in 598 patients referred to the School of Dentistry, Tehran, Iran. The prevalence was studied in relation to age, gender, occupation, education, smoking habits, genera...

  8. Mucosal Kaposi sarcoma, a Rare Cancer Network study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Miller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS most often affect the skin but occasionally affect the mucosa of different anatomic sites. The management of mucosal KS is seldom described in the literature. Data from 15 eligible patients with mucosal KS treated between 1994 and 2008 in five institutions within three countries of the Rare Cancer Network group were collected. The inclusion criteria were as follows: age >16 years, confirmed pathological diagnosis, mucosal stages I and II, and a minimum of 6 months’ follow-up after treatment. Head and neck sites were the most common (66%. Eleven cases were HIV-positive. CD4 counts correlated with disease stage. Twelve patients had biopsy only while three patients underwent local resection. Radiotherapy (RT was delivered whatever their CD4 status was. Median total radiation dose was 16.2 Gy (0-45 delivered in median 17 days (0-40 with four patients receiving no RT. Six patients underwent chemotherapy and received from 1 to 11 cycles of various regimens namely vinblastin, caelyx, bleomycine, or interferon, whatever their CD4 counts was. Five-year disease free survival were 81.6% and 75.0% in patients undergoing RT or not, respectively. Median survival was 66.9 months. Radiation-induced toxicity was at worse grade 1-2 and was manageable whatever patients’ HIV status. This small series of mucosal KSs revealed that relatively low-dose RT is overall safe and efficient in HIV-positive and negative patients. Since there are distant relapses either in multicentric cutaneous or visceral forms in head and neck cases, the role of systemic treatments may be worth investigations in addition to RT of localized disease. Surgery may be used for symptomatic lesions, with caution given the risk of bleeding.

  9. What interactions drive the salivary mucosal pellicle formation?

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbins, Hannah L.; Yakubov, Gleb E.; Proctor, Gordon B.; Wilson, Stephen; Carpenter, Guy H.

    2014-01-01

    The bound salivary pellicle is essential for protection of both the enamel and mucosa in the oral cavity. The enamel pellicle formation is well characterised, however the mucosal pellicle proteins have only recently been clarified and what drives their formation is still unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the salivary pellicle on particles with different surface properties (hydrophobic or hydrophilic with a positive or negative charge), to determine a suitable model to mimic the mu...

  10. NRAS and BRAF mutation frequency in primary oral mucosal melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Buery, R. R.; Siar, C. H.; Katase, N; Gunduz, M; Lefeuvre, M.; Fujii, M.; Inoue, M.; Setsu, K.; Nagatsuka, H

    2011-01-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma (OMM) is a fatal sarcoma of unknown etiology. Histological morphology and genetic events are distinct from those of its cutaneous counterpart. Mutation and up-regulation of c-kit has been identified in OMM which may activate downstream molecules such as RAS and RAF. These molecules are involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway leading to tremendous cell proliferation and survival. NRAS and BRAF mutation and protein expression have been studied in ot...

  11. Mucosal immunity in liver autoimmunity: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Palak J; Adams, David H

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) all nestle within the umbrella term of autoimmune liver disease, in which the end result is immune-mediated hepatocellular or hepatobiliary injury. All three conditions are associated with gut inflammation; PSC and AIH being strongly linked to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and PBC to coeliac disease. This clinical observation has stimulated several intriguing pathogenic concepts in which gut commensals, pathogens and intestinal antigens are all implicated in causing liver injury. Th17-cells have also been linked to AIH, PBC and more recently PSC. Given that the intestine is a key regulator of immunopathogenic Th17 responses, this may underpin a common disease mechanism and open up novel treatment avenues based on rational targeting of immune pathways. Moreover, the discovery of long-lived mucosal memory T-cells being recruited to the liver in response to aberrantly expressed endothelial-cell adhesion molecules and chemokines, which are normally 'gut-restricted,' could plausibly explain why these diseases are associated with site-restricted tissue distributions and pave the way for therapeutic strategies based on modulating tissue specific lymphocyte homing. That particular gene-polymorphisms have been found which confer combined PSC/IBD susceptibility underscores the fundamental role of mucosal immunogenicity in disease pathogenesis. Mucosal lymphocytes may also play a pivotal role in graft versus host disease affecting the liver, and there is increasing evidence to support dysregulated mucosal immunity as being responsible for the hepatic manifestations of gluten-sensitive enteropathy, graft versus host disease, as wells as the pancreatobiliary manifestations of IgG4-related disease.

  12. Isoniazid Induced Lupus Presenting as Oral Mucosal Ulcers with Pancytopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Ria; Ankale, Padmaraj; Sinha, Kanishk; Iyer, Aparna; Jayalakshmi, T. K.

    2016-01-01

    Drug Induced Lupus Erythematous (DILE) is a rare adverse reaction to a large variety of drugs including Isoniazid (INH), with features resembling idiopathic Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Diagnosis require identification of a temporal relationship between drug administered and symptom. It is an idiosyncratic reaction, with no pre-existing lupus. Our case highlights a rare presentation of isoniazid induced lupus with profound pancytopenia and mucosal ulcers, thus posing a diagnostic chall...

  13. Intestinal epithelial cells and their role in innate mucosal immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado-Contreras, A. L.; McCormick, Beth A

    2010-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts are covered by a layer of epithelial cells that are responsible for sensing and promoting a host immune response in order to establish the limits not only for commensal microorganisms but also for foreign organisms or particles. This is a remarkable task as the human body represents a composite of about 10 trillion human-self cells plus non-self cells from autochthonous or indigenous microbes that outnumber human ...

  14. Mucosal and salivary microbiota associated with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Ji; Choi, Yun Sik; Baek, Keum Jin; Yoon, Seok-Hwan; Park, Hee Kyung; Choi, Youngnim

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral mucosal disorder of unclear etiopathogenesis. Although recent studies of the oral microbiota by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes have suggested that imbalances in the oral microbiota may contribute to the etiopathogenesis of RAS, no specific bacterial species associated with RAS have been identified. The present study aimed to characterize the microbiota in the oral mucosa and saliva of RAS patients in comparison with control subjects at the species level. The bacterial communities of the oral mucosa and saliva from RAS patients with active lesions (RAS, n = 18 for mucosa and n = 8 for saliva) and control subjects (n = 18 for mucosa and n = 7 for saliva) were analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. There were no significant differences in the alpha diversity between the controls and the RAS, but the mucosal microbiota of the RAS patients showed increased inter-subject variability. A comparison of the relative abundance of each taxon revealed decreases in the members of healthy core microbiota but increases of rare species in the mucosal and salivary microbiota of RAS patients. Particularly, decreased Streptococcus salivarius and increased Acinetobacter johnsonii in the mucosa were associated with RAS risk. A dysbiosis index, which was developed using the relative abundance of A. johnsonii and S. salivarius and the regression coefficients, correctly predicted 83 % of the total cases for the absence or presence of RAS. Interestingly, A. johnsonii substantially inhibited the proliferation of gingival epithelial cells and showed greater cytotoxicity against the gingival epithelial cells than S. salivarius. RAS is associated with dysbiosis of the mucosal and salivary microbiota, and two species associated with RAS have been identified. This knowledge may provide a diagnostic tool and new targets for therapeutics for RAS.

  15. Omeprazole promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, J; Bukhave, K; Rask-Madsen, J

    1996-01-01

    The proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, surprisingly resulted in higher rates of proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion than previously reported using an H2 receptor antagonist for gastric acid inhibition. Gastroduodenal perfusions were performed in healthy volunteers to evaluate whether this incidental finding is explained by more potent gastric acid inhibition by omeprazole or might be caused by the different mode of drug action. Basal and stimulated gastric and duodenal bicarbonate...

  16. [Changes of rat gastric mucosal barrier under stress conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Li, Zhaoshen; Cui, Zhongmin; Duan, Yimin; Nie, Shinan; Liu, Jing; Xu, Guoming

    2002-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the changes of rat gastric mucosal barrier under conditions of water immersion restraint stress. METHODS Eighty rats were randomly divided into Group A (20 rats), B (40 rats) and C (20 rats) after being fasted for 24 hours. And then Group A was divided into two subgroups with ten rats in each. The two subgroups in Group A were given normal saline or omeprazole respectively while under the stress condition. The changes of gastric acid or bicarbonate secretion were determined. Group B (40 rats) were randomly divided into four subgroups,which were subgroup control, 1h, 2h and 4h after beginning of the stress. The quantity of glandular mucosal adherent mucus, the thickness of mucus gel layer and ulcer index were measured after stress in Group B. The glandular mucosal samples were labeled by Lanthanum and observed by transmission electromicroscopy. Group C was randomly divided into two subgroups in the same way with Group A. And each subgroup received normal saline or omeprazole respectively H(+) loss in gastric lumen was calculated by determining the difference of acidity between lavage and drainage fluid H(+) concentration. RESULTS It was found that gastric alkaline secretion decreased progressively (P omeprazole subgroup, the amount of H(+) loss (micromol) was 7.46 +/- 1.22, 4.56 +/- 0.35, 3.11 +/- 0.81, 2.32 +/- 1.42 and 2.13 +/- 1.60, which decreased progressively, however still higher than those in normal saline subgroup (P "bicarbonate secretion is inhibited; gastric barrier is damaged; and hydrogen permeability through gastric mucosal barrier increases under stress conditions.

  17. Gut-Brain Axis in Gastric Mucosal Damage and Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgambato, Dolores; Capuano, Annalisa; Sullo, Maria Giuseppa; Miranda, Agnese; Federico, Alessandro; Romano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background The gut-brain axis plays a potential role in numerous physiological and pathological conditions. Several substances link stomach with central nervous system. In particular, hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, thyrotropin-releasing factor-containing nerve fibers and capsaicin-sensitive nerves are principal mediators of the harmful and protective central nervous system-mediated effects on gastric mucosa. Also, existing evidence indicates that nitric oxide, prostaglandins and calcitonin gene-related peptide play a role as final effectors of gastric protection. Methods We undertook a structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature with the aim of focusing on the role of gut-brain axis in gastric damage and protection. In particular, we examined manuscripts dealing with the role of steroids, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, prostaglandins, melatonin, hydrogen sulfide and peptides influencing food intake (i.e. leptin, cholecystokinin, peptide YY, central glucagon–like peptide-1, and ghrelin). Also, the role of GABAergic and glutamatergic pathways in gastric mucosal protection have been examined. Results We found and reviewed 61 peer-reviewed papers dealing with the major aspects related to the role of gut brain axis in gastric mucosal damage and protection. Conclusions A dense neuronal network links stomach with central nervous system and a number of neurotransmitters and peptides functionally and anatomically related to central nervous system play a major role in contributing to gastric mucosal integrity. Exploiting the mechanisms underlying the connection between brain and gut may lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of gastric mucosal injury and to an improvement in the prevention and, eventually, management of gastric damage. PMID:26903151

  18. Role of mucosal dendritic cells in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Hendrik Niess

    2008-01-01

    The gastrointestinal innate and adaptive immune system continuously faces the challenge of potent stimuli from the commensal microflora and food constituents.These local immune responses require a tight control,the outcome of which is in most cases the induction of tolerance.Local T cell immunity is an important compartment of the specific intestinal immune system.T cell reactivity is programmed during the initial stage of its activation by professional presenting cells.Mucosal dendritic cells(DCs)are assumed to play key roles in regulating immune responses in the antigen-rich gastrointestinal environment.Mucosal DCs are a heterogeneous population that can either initiate(innate and adaptive)immune responses,or control intestinal inflammation and maintain tolerance.Defects in this regulation are supposed to lead to the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD),Crohn's disease(CD)and ulcerative colitis(UC).This review will discuss the emerging role of mucosal DCs in regulating intestinal inflammation and immune responses.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  19. JAM-related proteins in mucosal homeostasis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2014-03-01

    Mucosal surfaces are lined by epithelial cells that form a physical barrier protecting the body against external noxious substances and pathogens. At a molecular level, the mucosal barrier is regulated by tight junctions (TJs) that seal the paracellular space between adjacent epithelial cells. Transmembrane proteins within TJs include junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) that belong to the cortical thymocyte marker for Xenopus family of proteins. JAM family encompasses three classical members (JAM-A, JAM-B, and JAM-C) and related molecules including JAM4, JAM-like protein, Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR), CAR-like membrane protein and endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule. JAMs have multiple functions that include regulation of endothelial and epithelial paracellular permeability, leukocyte recruitment during inflammation, angiogenesis, cell migration, and proliferation. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of the JAM family members in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis and leukocyte trafficking with a particular emphasis on barrier function and its perturbation during pathological inflammation.

  20. Subversion of mucosal barrier polarity by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne eEngel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The lumenal surfaces of human body are lined by a monolayer of epithelia that together with mucus secreting cells and specialized immune cells form the mucosal barrier. This barrier is one of the most fundamental components of the innate immune system, protecting organisms from the vast environmental microbiota. The mucosal epithelium is comprised of polarized epithelial cells with distinct apical and basolateral surfaces that are defined by unique set of protein and lipid composition and are separated by tight junctions. The apical surface serves as a barrier to the outside world and is specialized for the exchange of materials with the lumen. The basolateral surface is adapted for interaction with other cells and for exchange with the bloodstream. A wide network of proteins and lipids regulates the formation and maintenance of the epithelium polarity. Many human pathogens have evolved virulence mechanisms that target this network and interfere with epithelial polarity to enhance binding to the apical surface, enter into cells, and/or cross the mucosal barrier. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of how Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic human pathogen that preferentially infects damaged epithelial tissues, exploits the epithelial cell polarization machinery to enhance infection.

  1. Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Is Associated With Genital Tract Mucosal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhatre, Mohak; McAndrew, Thomas; Carpenter, Colleen; Burk, Robert D.; Einstein, Mark H.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical studies demonstrate increased prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated disease in HIV-infected individuals and an increased risk of HIV acquisition in HPV-infected individuals. The mechanisms underlying this synergy are not defined. We hypothesize that women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) will exhibit changes in soluble mucosal immunity that may promote HPV persistence and facilitate HIV infection. Methods The concentrations of immune mediators and endogenous anti-Escherichia coli activity in genital tract secretions collected by cervicovaginal lavage were compared in HIV-negative women with high-risk HPV-positive (HRHPV+) CIN-3 (n = 37), HRHPV+ CIN-1 (n = 12), or PAP-negative control subjects (n = 57). Results Compared with control subjects, women with CIN-3 or CIN-1 displayed significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8 (P < 0.002) and significantly lower levels of anti-inflammatory mediators and antimicrobial peptides, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (P < 0.01), and human β defensins 2 and 3 (P < 0.02). There was no significant difference in endogenous anti-E. coli activity after controlling for age and sample storage time. Conclusion HRHPV+ CIN is characterized by changes in soluble mucosal immunity that could contribute to HPV persistence. The observed mucosal inflammation suggests a mechanism that may also contribute to the epidemiologic link between persistent HPV and HIV. PMID:22801340

  2. Cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission: the neglected pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Deborah J; Le Grand, Roger

    2014-12-15

    This supplement to The Journal of Infectious Diseases is devoted to the important and understudied topic of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV) mucosal transmission. It stems from a workshop held in Boston, Massachusetts, in October 2013, in which scientists discussed their research and insights regarding cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission. The 10 articles in this supplement present the case for cell-associated HIV transmission as an important element contributing to the HIV epidemic, review evidence for the efficacy of current HIV prevention strategies against cell-associated HIV transmission and opportunities for further development, and describe in vitro, ex vivo, and animal cell-associated transmission models that can be used to further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cell-associated HIV mucosal transmission and test HIV prevention strategies. We hope that these articles will help to inform and invigorate the HIV prevention field and contribute to the development of more-effective vaccine, treatment, and microbicide strategies for HIV prevention.

  3. Cancer patients with oral mucositis: challenges for nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Nilkece Mesquita Araújo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze nursing care provided to cancer patients with oral mucositis based on the Nursing Process (NP. METHOD: this exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted with 213 patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in two cancer facilities: one philanthropic and one private service. RESULTS: the participants were mainly female, aged 45.8 years old on average, with up to 11 years of schooling and income of up to one times the minimum wage. Severe mucositis was related to chemotherapy associated with radiotherapy. Only 25.3% of the patients reported having received guidance from nurses during their treatment concerning self-care. The perceptions of patients regarding quality of care did not significantly differ between the private and public facilities. The basic human needs mainly affected were comfort, eating, and hygiene. Based on this finding, one NP was established listing the diagnoses, interventions and expected results to establish an ideal, though individualized, standard of nursing care to be provided to these patients. CONCLUSION: to understand oral mucositis is crucial to establish nursing care that includes prevention based on the implementation of an oral care plan.

  4. Osteitis and mucosal inflammation in a rabbit model of sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Carlos Augusto Correia de; Dolci, Eduardo Landini Lutaif; Silva, Leonardo da; Dolci, José Eduardo Lutaif; Campos, Carlos Alberto Herrerias de; Dolci, Ricardo Landini Lutaif

    2015-01-01

    Several experimental studies have shown osteitis after the onset of sinusitis, supporting the idea that bone involvement could participate in the dissemination and perpetuation of this inflammatory disease. However, procedures commonly performed for the induction of sinusitis, such as antrostomies, can trigger sinusitis by themselves. To evaluate osteitis in an animal model of sinusitis that does not violate the sinus directly and verify whether this is limited to the induction side, or if it affects the contralateral side. Experimental study in which sinusitis was produced by inserting an obstructing sponge into the nasal cavity of 20 rabbits. After defined intervals, the animals were euthanized and maxillary sinus samples were removed for semi-quantitative histological analysis of mucosa and bone. Signs of bone and mucosal inflammation were observed, affecting both the induction and contralateral sides. Statistical analysis showed correlation between the intensity of osteitis on both sides, but not between mucosal and bone inflammation on the same side, supporting the theory that inflammation can spread through bone structures, regardless of mucosal inflammation. This study demonstrated that in an animal model of sinusitis that does not disturb the sinus directly osteitis occurs in the affected sinus and that it also affects the contralateral side. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Altered faecal and mucosal microbial composition in post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome patients correlates with mucosal lymphocyte phenotypes and psychological distress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundin, J.; Rangel, I.; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, Susana; Heikamp-De Jong, I.; Hultgren-Hörnquist, E.; Vos, De W.M.; Brummer, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A subset of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients, denoted post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS), develop symptoms after an enteric infection. Bacterial dysbiosis and mucosal inflammation have been proposed to be involved in the pathophysiology of this entity. Aim To characterise the mucosal

  6. Hydrogen peroxide deposition and decomposition in rain and dew waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Vicky; Angélica Rubio, M.; Lissi, Eduardo A.

    Peroxides and hydrogen peroxide were determined by a fluorometric method in dew and rain collected in the atmosphere of Santiago of Chile city. The measured peroxides comprise hydrogen peroxide (the main component) and peroxides not decomposed by catalase. The collected natural peroxides readily decompose in the natural matrix, rendering difficult an estimation of the values present in real-time. In order to establish the kinetics of the process and the factors that condition their decomposition, the kinetics of the decay at several pHs and/or the presence of metal chelators were followed. The kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the water matrix was evaluated employing the natural peroxides or hydrogen peroxide externally added. First-order kinetics was followed, with half decay times ranging from 80 to 2300 min. The addition of Fe(II) in the micromolar range increases the decomposition rate, while lowering the pH (<3) notably reduces the rate of the process. The contribution of metals to the decomposition of the peroxides in the natural waters was confirmed by the reduction in decomposition rate elicited by its treatment with Chelex-100. Dew and rain waters were collected in pre-acidified collectors, rendering values considerably higher than those measured in non-treated collectors. This indicates that acidification can be proposed as an easy procedure to stabilize the samples, reducing its decomposition during collection time and the time elapsed between collection and analysis. The weighted average concentration for total peroxides measured in pre-treated collectors was 5.4 μM in rains and 2.2 μM in dews.

  7. An overview of challenges limiting the design of protective mucosal vaccines for finfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetron Mweemba Munang'andu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Research in mucosal vaccination in finfish has gained prominence in the last decade in pursuit of mucosal vaccines that would lengthen the duration of protective immunity in vaccinated fish. However, injectable vaccines have continued to dominate in the vaccination of finfish because they are perceived to be more protective than mucosal vaccines. Therefore, it has become important to identify the factors that limit developing protective mucosal vaccines in finfish as an overture to identifying key areas that require optimization in mucosal vaccine design. Some of the factors that limit the success for designing protective mucosal vaccines for finfish identified in this review include the lack optimized protective antigen doses for mucosal vaccines, absence of immunostimulants able to enhance the performance of non-replicative mucosal vaccines, reduction of systemic antibodies due to prolonged exposure to oral vaccination and the lack of predefined correlates of protective immunity for use in the optimization of newly developed mucosal vaccines. This review also points out the need to develop prime-boost vaccination regimes able to induce long-term protective immunity in vaccinated fish. By overcoming some of the obstacles identified herein it is anticipated that future mucosal vaccines shall be designed to induce long-term protective immunity in finfish.

  8. Advances in research of mucosal immunity and mucosal vaccines%黏膜免疫和黏膜疫苗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周祖木

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal immunity covers a variety of mucosal surfaces susceptible to different pathogens.This review explores the basic principles of mucosal immunity in light of the diversity of mucosal surfaces and their unique tissue environments,and offers some thoughts on approaches for developing vaccines to induce mucosal immunity,predominantly based on experiments studying immune responses to infection and vaccination in large animals.%黏膜免疫包括各种对不同病原体易感的黏膜表面.此文根据黏膜表面的多样性及其独特的组织环境探索黏膜免疫的基本原理,并基于大动物对感染和疫苗接种的免疫应答的实验研究,为研制诱导黏膜免疫的疫苗提供一些思路.

  9. Antibiotics Suppress Activation of Intestinal Mucosal Mast Cells and Reduce Dietary Lipid Absorption in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hirokazu; Zhang, Linda S; Martinez, Kristina; Chang, Eugene B; Yang, Qing; Wang, Fei; Howles, Philip N; Hokari, Ryota; Miura, Soichiro; Tso, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    The gut microbiota affects intestinal permeability and mucosal mast cells (MMCs) responses. Activation of MMCs has been associated with absorption of dietary fat. We investigated whether the gut microbiota contributes to the fat-induced activation of MMCs in rats, and how antibiotics might affect this process. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were given streptomycin and penicillin for 4 days (n = 6-8) to reduce the abundance of their gut flora, or normal drinking water (controls, n = 6-8). They underwent lymph fistula surgery and after an overnight recovery were given an intraduodenal bolus of intralipid. We collected intestinal tissues and lymph fluid and assessed activation of MMCs, intestinal permeability, and fat transport parameters. Compared with controls, intestinal lymph from rats given antibiotics had reduced levels of mucosal mast cell protease II (produced by MMCs) and decreased activity of diamine oxidase (produced by enterocytes) (P antibiotics had reduced intestinal permeability in response to dietary lipid compared with controls (P antibiotics also reduced lymphatic transport of triacylglycerol and phospholipid (P antibiotics and controls. These effects were not seen with an acute dose of antibiotics or 4 weeks after the antibiotic regimen ended. The intestinal microbiota appears to activate MMCs after the ingestion of fat in rats; this contributes to fat-induced intestinal permeability. We found that the gut microbiome promotes absorption of lipid, probably by intestinal production of apolipoproteins and secretion of chylomicrons. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nasal Drug Absorption from Powder Formulations: Effect of Fluid Volume Changes on the Mucosal Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Enomura, Yuki; Hori, Tomoki; Shimomura, Rina; Maeda, Chiaki; Kimura, Shunsuke; Inoue, Daisuke; Kusamori, Kosuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The effect of changes in the mucosal fluid volume on the nasal drug absorption of powder formulations was evaluated using warfarin (WF), piroxicam (PXC), and norfloxacin (NFX) as model drugs. Lactose and sodium chloride (NaCl), which are water soluble and small-sized chemicals that increase osmotic pressure after dissolution, were used as excipients to change the mucosal fluid volume. The in vitro study using a Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell monolayer indicated that lactose and NaCl, sprayed over the surface of air interface monolayers, increased the fluid volume on the monolayer surface and enhanced the transepithelial transport of the model drugs. The in vivo animal study indicated that the nasal absorption of PXC is enhanced by lactose and NaCl after nasal administration of the powder formulations. This is likely due to the enhanced dissolution of PXC on fluid-rich nasal mucosa and an increase in the effective surface area for drug permeation, which lead to better nasal absorption. However, both excipients failed to increase the nasal absorption of WF and NFX. To clarify the mechanism of the drug-dependent effect of lactose and NaCl, the nasal residence of the formulation was examined using FD70 as a non-absorbable marker. The nasal clearance of FD70 was enhanced by lactose and NaCl, leading to a decrease in the nasal drug absorption. Lactose and NaCl caused no damage to the nasal tissue. These results indicate that the addition of water-soluble excipients such as lactose to powder formulations can enhance the nasal absorption of highly permeable but poorly soluble drugs.

  11. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anh, Dam T.V.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.; Berg, van den A.

    2004-01-01

    An increase in produced hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase

  12. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anh, Dam Thi Van; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.

    2005-01-01

    An increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to the lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase toge

  13. A Three-Step Synthesis of Benzoyl Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Brenda; Jones, Alexandra; Wollack, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Benzoyl peroxide is used as a bleaching agent for flour and whey processing, a polymerization initiator in the synthesis of plastics, and the active component of acne medication. Because of its simplicity and wide application, benzoyl peroxide is a target molecule of interest. It can be affordably synthesized in three steps from bromobenzene using…

  14. [Lipid peroxidation in the adrenal cortex during exhausting stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshkevich, N A; Antsulevich, S N; Naumov, A V; Vinogradov, V V

    1990-05-01

    Under prolonged stress which is connected with exhaustion of functional resources of adrenal cortex the activation of lipid peroxidation processes in this gland was found. It is possible that the reason for such lipid peroxidation activation is the decrease in the content of adrenal cortex ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol.

  15. Lipid peroxidation in type 2 diabetes : Relationship with macrovascular disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oranje, W A; Rondas-Colbers, G J; Swennen, G N; Wolffenbuttel, B H

    BACKGROUND: Macrovascular disease is the leading cause of death in diabetes. The increased risk of atherosclerosis in diabetes may be partly explained by increased lipid peroxidation. METHODS: We assessed lipid peroxidation in subjects with type 2 diabetes with (n = 23) and without (n = 23)

  16. Hydrogen Peroxide Storage in Small Sealed Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J.

    1999-10-20

    Unstabilized hydrogen peroxide of 85% concentration has been prepared in laboratory quantities for testing material compatibility and long term storage on a small scale. Vessels made of candidate tank and liner materials ranged in volume from 1 cc to 2540 cc. Numerous metals and plastics were tried at the smallest scales, while promising ones were used to fabricate larger vessels and liners. An aluminum alloy (6061-T6) performed poorly, including increasing homogeneous decay due to alloying elements entering solution. The decay rate in this high strength aluminum was greatly reduced by anodizing. Better results were obtained with polymers, particularly polyvinylidene fluoride. Data reported herein include ullage pressures as a function of time with changing decay rates, and contamination analysis results.

  17. Analysis of lipid peroxidation kinetics. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doktorov, Alexander B.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden

    2008-01-01

      The kinetics of the lipid peroxidation reaction is only partly under-  stood. Although the set of reactions constituting the overall reaction  is believed to be known, it has not been possible to predict how the  reaction will respond to a change of one or more of the parameters, e.g.  initial......· ,  but not for the peroxyl radicals LO·2 as assumed in previous works.  The method allows us to derive manageable analytical expressions.  Based on literature values of the rate constants we are able to intro-  duce specific simplifications that allow us to obtain simple analytical  expressions for the time dependence of all...

  18. Tetrafluoroethylene telomerization initiated by benzoyl peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakov, A. I.; Kuzina, S. I.; Kiryukhin, D. P.

    2017-03-01

    The radical telomerization of tetrafluoroethylene initiated by benzoyl peroxide (BP) photolysis at λ ≥ 365 nm is studied in acetone, dichloromethane, carbon tetrachloride, and Freon 114B2 at 25°C. The products of synthesis are a mixture of telomers of different molar masses, segregated into soluble and insoluble fractions. To characterize the radicals initiating telomerization, crystalline BP and its solution in ethanol are subjected to low-temperature (77 K) photolysis, with the liquid system serving as a model for BP behavior in solutions of telogens. It is established that radicals are not only initiators but also participate in chain termination reactions, lowering the telomers' molar mass and thus raising the proportion of the soluble fraction. Telomerization initiated by an initiator compound versus initiation by gamma radiation are compared and discussed.

  19. Locating bomb factories by detecting hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romolo, Francesco Saverio; Connell, Samantha; Ferrari, Carlotta; Suarez, Guillaume; Sauvain, Jean-Jacques; Hopf, Nancy B

    2016-11-01

    The analytical capability to detect hydrogen peroxide vapour can play a key role in localizing a site where a H2O2 based Improvised Explosive (IE) is manufactured. In security activities it is very important to obtain information in a short time. For this reason, an analytical method to be used in security activity needs portable devices. The authors have developed the first analytical method based on a portable luminometer, specifically designed and validated to locate IE manufacturing sites using quantitative on-site vapour analysis for H2O2. The method was tested both indoor and outdoor. The results demonstrate that the detection of H2O2 vapours could allow police forces to locate the site, while terrorists are preparing an attack. The collected data are also very important in developing new sensors, able to give an early alarm if located at a proper distance from a site where an H2O2 based IE is prepared.

  20. Unusual hydrogen peroxide decomposition on stoichiometric insulating oxide ultrathin films

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Zhenjun

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide dissociation on MgO(001) films deposited on Mo(001) surface is investigated by employing periodic density-functional theory methods. The pristine MgO(001) surface showing chemical inertness prefers the weak adsorbing molecular configuration and is extremely difficult to react with hydrogen peroxide. As far as we know, energetically favorable decomposition state of hydrogen peroxide has never been obtained on MgO(001) surface. In this work the hydrogen peroxide is successfully dissociated on perfect stoichiometric MgO(001) films by depositing on transition metal substrate, without any activation barrier. The spontaneous dissociation of hydrogen peroxide on metal supported oxide films is rationalized by characterizing the geometric structures and electronic structures.

  1. New insights into impairment of mucosal defense in portal hypertensive gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomikawa, M; Akiba, Y; Kaunitz, J D; Kawanaka, H; Sugimachi, K; Sarfeh, I J; Tarnawski, A S

    2000-01-01

    Portal hypertension (PHT) increases susceptibility of the gastric mucosa to injury. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PHT affects rat gastric mucosal defense mechanisms in vivo at the pre-epithelial, epithelial, and/or post-epithelial levels. PHT was produced in rats by staged portal vein ligation and sham-operated (SO) rats served as controls. The gastric mucosa was exposed, chambered, and continuously superfused with buffers under in vivo microscopy. We measured gastric mucosal gel layer thickness, surface epithelial cell intracellular pH (pHi), mucosal blood flow, and mucosal/serosal oxygenation. In PHT rats, gastric mucosal gel layer thickness was significantly reduced (88 +/- 16 microm in PHT rats vs. 135 +/- 25 microm in SO rats; P oxygenation of the gastric mucosal surface was decreased by 42% (P portal hypertensive gastric mucosa to injury.

  2. Clinical features of the head and neck mucosal melanoma. А review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ignatova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is an aggressive and rare neoplasm of melanocytic origin. Mucosal melanomas of the head and neck account for 1 % of neoplasms, 0,2–8,0 4 % of all melanomas and over 50 % of all mucosal melanomas. To date, in Russian and foreign literature only few retrospective series and case reports have been reported on mucosal melanoma. Despite melanoma’s common histological origin, head and neck mucosal melanoma presentation has some specific features due to its anatomical localization and poor clinical outcomes compared with those of cutaneous melanomas. Mucosal melanoma has a high metastatic potential. Five-year overall survival does not exceed 30 %. Advances in understanding of the clinical presentation can be used for prediction of behaviour and prognosis of this disease. We considered and analised articles devoted to clinical features of head and neck mucosal melanoma according to its localization.

  3. Durability of bleaching results achieved with 15% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Reus, Monika; Rosenberger, Albert; Attin, Thomas; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the durability of bleaching results achieved with (1) 15% carbamide peroxide home bleaching and (2) 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching. A total of 231 extracted anterior teeth were randomly divided into three groups (n = 77 in each group) with comparable mean baseline L*-values (68.24 ± 0.8): a non-bleached control group A, a 15% carbamide peroxide group B (5 bleaching intervals of 8 hours), and a 38% hydrogen peroxide group C (3 intervals of 15 minutes). Durability of bleaching was assessed by comparing CIE-L*a*b* data after intervals of 2, 4, 12, and 26 weeks from baseline. Both bleaching regimes initially produced a highly significant increase in lightness parameter L*, with no significant difference between the respective bleaching regimes (B: 68.23 / 72.48; C: 68.32 / 73.25). Six months after starting the trial, L*-values for group B yielded no significant differences compared to baseline (69.55), whereas L*-values for group C were still significantly raised (69.91), despite a highly significant decrease when compared to initial bleaching results. In both treatment groups, there was a lasting response to bleaching in terms of CIE-a* and -b* value decreases. Results for both home- and in-practice regimes were found to be similar for about 12 weeks. However, in-office results were longer lasting, despite the shorter treatment intervals. Summarized bleaching effects, in terms of delta E values, revealed no significant differences between treatment groups and the control group after 6 months, indicating an abatement of the bleaching results achieved.

  4. PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HALGREN DL

    2010-03-12

    The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

  5. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Yan Yeung; Wai-Tao Chan; Chun-Bin Jiang; Mei-Lien Cheng; Chia-Yuan Liu; Szu-Wen Chang; Jen-Shiu Chiang Chiau; Hung-Chang Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orall...

  6. A protocol to generate phthaloyl peroxide in flow for the hydroxylation of arenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasen, Anders M; Thedford, Randal P; Claussen, Karin R; Yuan, Changxia; Siegel, Dionicio

    2014-07-18

    A flow protocol for the generation of phthaloyl peroxide has been developed. This process directly yields phthaloyl peroxide in high purity (>95%) and can be used to bypass the need to isolate and recrystallize phthaloyl peroxide, improving upon earlier batch procedures. The flow protocol for the formation of phthaloyl peroxide can be combined with arene hydroxylation reactions and provides a method for the consumption of peroxide as it is generated to minimize the accumulation of large quantities of peroxide.

  7. Synthesis of five- and six-membered cyclic organic peroxides: Key transformations into peroxide ring-retaining products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander O. Terent'ev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review describes the current status of synthetic five and six-membered cyclic peroxides such as 1,2-dioxolanes, 1,2,4-trioxolanes (ozonides, 1,2-dioxanes, 1,2-dioxenes, 1,2,4-trioxanes, and 1,2,4,5-tetraoxanes. The literature from 2000 onwards is surveyed to provide an update on synthesis of cyclic peroxides. The indicated period of time is, on the whole, characterized by the development of new efficient and scale-up methods for the preparation of these cyclic compounds. It was shown that cyclic peroxides remain unchanged throughout the course of a wide range of fundamental organic reactions. Due to these properties, the molecular structures can be greatly modified to give peroxide ring-retaining products. The chemistry of cyclic peroxides has attracted considerable attention, because these compounds are used in medicine for the design of antimalarial, antihelminthic, and antitumor agents.

  8. Synthesis of five- and six-membered cyclic organic peroxides: Key transformations into peroxide ring-retaining products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terent'ev, Alexander O; Borisov, Dmitry A; Vil', Vera A; Dembitsky, Valery M

    2014-01-08

    The present review describes the current status of synthetic five and six-membered cyclic peroxides such as 1,2-dioxolanes, 1,2,4-trioxolanes (ozonides), 1,2-dioxanes, 1,2-dioxenes, 1,2,4-trioxanes, and 1,2,4,5-tetraoxanes. The literature from 2000 onwards is surveyed to provide an update on synthesis of cyclic peroxides. The indicated period of time is, on the whole, characterized by the development of new efficient and scale-up methods for the preparation of these cyclic compounds. It was shown that cyclic peroxides remain unchanged throughout the course of a wide range of fundamental organic reactions. Due to these properties, the molecular structures can be greatly modified to give peroxide ring-retaining products. The chemistry of cyclic peroxides has attracted considerable attention, because these compounds are used in medicine for the design of antimalarial, antihelminthic, and antitumor agents.

  9. Synthesis of five- and six-membered cyclic organic peroxides: Key transformations into peroxide ring-retaining products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, Dmitry A; Vil’, Vera A; Dembitsky, Valery M

    2014-01-01

    Summary The present review describes the current status of synthetic five and six-membered cyclic peroxides such as 1,2-dioxolanes, 1,2,4-trioxolanes (ozonides), 1,2-dioxanes, 1,2-dioxenes, 1,2,4-trioxanes, and 1,2,4,5-tetraoxanes. The literature from 2000 onwards is surveyed to provide an update on synthesis of cyclic peroxides. The indicated period of time is, on the whole, characterized by the development of new efficient and scale-up methods for the preparation of these cyclic compounds. It was shown that cyclic peroxides remain unchanged throughout the course of a wide range of fundamental organic reactions. Due to these properties, the molecular structures can be greatly modified to give peroxide ring-retaining products. The chemistry of cyclic peroxides has attracted considerable attention, because these compounds are used in medicine for the design of antimalarial, antihelminthic, and antitumor agents. PMID:24454562

  10. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among chewing tobacco users: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha S Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and Fisher′s exact tests were used to assess the statistical significance. Results: Of the 901 subjects with CT habits, 55.8% revealed no clinically detectable oral mucosal changes and 44.1% showed mucosal changes of which 63.8% were males and 36.1% were females. The most common finding was chewers mucositis (59.5% followed by submucous fibrosis (22.8%, leukoplakia (8%, lichenoid reaction (6.5%, oral cancer (2.7%, and lichen planus (0.5%. Conclusion: This study provides information about different CT habits and associated mucosal lesions among this population.

  11. Quantification of peroxide ion passage in dentin, enamel, and cementum after internal bleaching with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, R M; Bonetti-Filho, I; Valera, M C; Camargo, C H R; Camargo, Sea; Moura-Netto, C; Pameijer, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of peroxide passage from the pulp chamber to the external enamel surface during the internal bleaching technique. Fifty bovine teeth were sectioned transversally 5 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), and the remaining part of the root was sealed with a 2-mm layer of glass ionomer cement. The external surface of the samples was coated with nail varnish, with the exception of standardized circular areas (6-mm diameter) located on the enamel, exposed dentin, or cementum surface of the tooth. The teeth were divided into three experimental groups according to exposed areas close to the CEJ and into two control groups (n=10/group), as follows: GE, enamel exposure area; GC, cementum exposed area; GD, dentin exposed area; Negative control, no presence of internal bleaching agent and uncoated surface; and Positive control, pulp chamber filled with bleaching agent and external surface totally coated with nail varnish. The pulp chamber was filled with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Endo, Ultradent). Each sample was placed inside of individual flasks with 1000 μL of acetate buffer solution, 2 M (pH 4.5). After seven days, the buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube, in which 100 μL of leuco-crystal violet and 50 μL of horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn-Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). All experimental groups presented passage of peroxide to the external surface that was statistically different from that observed in the control groups. It was verified that the passage of peroxide was higher in GD than in GE (pperoxide passage than did GD and GE (pperoxide placed into the pulp chamber passed through the dental hard tissues, reaching the external surface and the periodontal tissue. The cementum surface

  12. [Malignant mucosal melanoma of the head and neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavícek, A; Astl, J; Válková, D; Betka, J; Petruzelka, L

    2000-01-01

    Mucosal melanoma comparison to cutaneous melanoma of the head and neck are rare and do poorly. Approximately 0.5-2% of all melanomas occur from the mucous membranes of aerodigestive tract. Most common site of the tumor are the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses but melanoma of the oral cavity are described too. Therapy usually consists of surgical resection with or without postoperative radiotherapy and immunochemotherapy eventually. The definite role of a kind of therapy in the treatment of mucosal melanoma is not remains to be defined as the small number of cases make prospective study challenging. This article reviews 19 patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck treated at the Department of ENT and Head and Neck Surgery Charles University of Prague since 1980 to 1999. Clinical data were obtained from the patient's charts. Analysis of the metastatic disease, type of therapy and follow-up was retrospectively reviewed. The site of the tumor was the lateral wall of the nasal cavity (five cases), nasal septum (four cases), maxilar cavity (two cases), and ethmoidal cavity, orbitoethmoidal complex, nasopharynx, saccus lacrimalis to ethmoidal sinuses diffused, tonsilla (one case each) and hypopharynx (two cases). Primary treatment was surgical resection in ten cases, in one case with radiation therapy, and in seven cases chemotherapy. In three cases were diagnostic surgery only and one patient was without therapy. Three patients received radical neck dissection more. Four patients were treated radiation therapy and three chemotherapy after surgery. In two cases were surgery after primary radiotherapy. For nine cases of recurrence of the disease were surgery (in five cases) and chemotherapy (in four cases). Overal and disease free interval was from 2 to 22 month, approximately 9.3 month and 3-year survival was 41.18%.

  13. Changes in intestinal mucosal immune barrier in rats with endotoxemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Liu; Ang Li; Yi-Bing Weng; Mei-Li Duan; Bao-En Wang; Shu-Wen Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the dysfunction of the immunological barrier of the intestinal mucosa during endotoxemia and to elucidate the potential mechanism of this dysfunction. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into two groups: control group and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group. Endotoxemia was induced by a single caudal venous injection of LPS. Animals were sacrificed in batches 2, 6, 12 and 24 h after LPS infusion. The number of microfold (M)-cells, dendritic cells (DCs), CD4~+ T cells, CD8~+ T cells, regulatory T (Tr) cells and IgA~+ B cells in the intestinal mucosa were counted after immunohistochemical staining. Apoptotic lymphocytes were counted after TUNEL staining. The levels of interleukin (IL)-4, interferon (IFN)-γ and forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) in mucosal homogenates were measured by ELISA. The secretory IgA (sIgA) content in the total protein of one milligram of small intestinal mucus was detected using a radioimmunological assay. RESULTS: This research demonstrated that LPS LPSinduced endotoxemia results in small intestinal mucosa injury. The number of M-cells, DCs, CD8~+ T cells, and IgA~+ B cells were decreased while Tr cell and apoptotic lymphocyte numbers were increased significantly. The number of CD4~+ T cells increased in the early stages and then slightly decreased by 24 h. The level of IL-4 significantly increased in the early stages and then reversed by the end of the study period. The level of IFN-γ increased slightly in the early stages and then decreased markedly by the 24 h time point. Level of Foxp3 increased whereas sIgA level decreased. CONCLUSION: Mucosal immune dysfunction forms part of the intestinal barrier injury during endotoxemia. The increased number and function of Tr cells as well as lymphocyte apoptosis result in mucosal immunode- ficiency.

  14. Rectal dexmedetomidine in rats: evaluation of sedative and mucosal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Hanci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, we investigated the anesthetic and mucosal effects of the rectal application of dexmedetomidine to rats. METHODS: Male Wistar albino rats weighing 250-300 g were divided into four groups: Group S (n = 8 was a sham group that served as a baseline for the normal basal values; Group C (n = 8 consisted of rats that received the rectal application of saline alone; Group IPDex (n = 8 included rats that received the intraperitoneal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1; and Group RecDex (n = 8 included rats that received the rectal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1. For the rectal drug administration, we used 22 G intravenous cannulas with the stylets removed. We administered the drugs by advancing the cannula 1 cm into the rectum, and the rectal administration volume was 1 mL for all the rats. The latency and anesthesia time (min were measured. Two hours after rectal administration, 75 mg kg-1 ketamine was administered for intraperitoneal anesthesia in all the groups, followed by the removal of the rats' rectums to a distal distance of 3 cm via an abdominoperineal surgical procedure. We histopathologically examined and scored the rectums. RESULTS: Anesthesia was achieved in all the rats in the Group RecDex following the administration of dexmedetomidine. The onset of anesthesia in the Group RecDex was significantly later and of a shorter duration than in the Group IPDEx (p < 0.05. In the Group RecDex, the administration of dexmedetomidine induced mild-moderate losses of mucosal architecture in the colon and rectum, 2 h after rectal inoculation. CONCLUSION: Although 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine administered rectally to rats achieved a significantly longer duration of anesthesia compared with the rectal administration of saline, our histopathological evaluations showed that the rectal administration of 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine led to mild-moderate damage to the mucosal structure of the

  15. Mucosal microbiome in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, K; Lowe, T; Meharg, C; Berry, S H; Foley, J; Hold, G L

    2015-03-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common disease affecting oral mucosae. Etiology is unknown, but several factors have been implicated, all of which influence the composition of microbiota residing on oral mucosae, which in turn modulates immunity and thereby affects disease progression. Although no individual pathogens have been conclusively shown to be causative agents of RAS, imbalanced composition of the oral microbiota may play a key role. In this study, we sought to determine composition profiles of bacterial microbiota in the oral mucosa associated with RAS. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we characterized the most abundant bacterial populations residing on healthy and ulcerated mucosae in patients with RAS (recruited using highly stringent criteria) and no associated medical conditions; we also compared these to the bacterial microbiota of healthy controls (HCs). Phylum-level diversity comparisons revealed decreased Firmicutes and increased Proteobacteria in ulcerated sites, as compared with healthy sites in RAS patients, and no differences between RAS patients with healthy sites and HCs. Genus-level analysis demonstrated higher abundance of total Bacteroidales in RAS patients with healthy sites over HCs. Porphyromonadaceae comprising species associated with periodontal disease and Veillonellaceae predominated in ulcerated sites over HCs, while no quantitative differences of these families were observed between healthy sites in RAS patients and HCs. Streptococcaceae comprising species associated with oral health predominated in HCs over ulcerated sites but not in HCs over healthy sites in RAS patients. This study demonstrates that mucosal microbiome changes in patients with idiopathic RAS--namely, increased Bacteroidales species in mucosae of RAS patients not affected by active ulceration. While these changes suggest a microbial role in initiation of RAS, this study does not provide data on causality. Within this limitation

  16. Thalidomide induces mucosal healing in postoperative Crohn disease endoscopic recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huiqin; Wang, Xinying; Liu, Side

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thalidomide has been successful use in patients with refractory Crohn disease (CD) in recent years. Methods: We collected the data of a postoperative CD patient who was prescribed thalidomide to induce remission and reviewed the relevant literatures. Results: A 51-year-old female was diagnosed as CD after an urgent terminal intestinal resection and presented endoscopic recurrence despite the prophylactic treatment with azathioprine (AZA). Fortunately, she achieved mucosal healing (MH) at a low dose of thalidomide for 15 months. Conclusion: Thalidomide is effective to induce MH in the postoperative CD endoscopic recurrence. PMID:27603389

  17. Alpha-Toxin Promotes Mucosal Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele J Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes numerous diseases in humans ranging from the mild skin infections to serious, life-threatening, superantigen-mediated Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS. S. aureus may also be asymptomatically carried in the anterior nares, vagina or on the skin, which serve as reservoirs for infection. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis clonal type USA200 is the most widely disseminated colonizer and a major cause of TSS. Our prior studies indicated that α-toxin was a major epithelial proinflammatory exotoxin produced by TSS S. aureus USA200 isolates. It also facilitated the penetration of TSS Toxin-1 (TSST-1 across vaginal mucosa. However, the majority of menstrual TSS isolates produce low α-toxin due to a nonsense point mutation at codon 113, designated hly, suggesting mucosal adaptation. The aim of this study was to characterize the differences between TSS USA200 strains [high (hla+ and low (hly+ α-toxin producers] in their abilities to infect and disrupt vaginal mucosal tissue. A mucosal model was developed using ex vivo porcine vaginal mucosa, LIVE/DEAD® staining and confocal microscropy to characterize biofilm formation and tissue viability of TSS USA 200 isolates CDC587 and MN8, which contain the α-toxin pseudogene (hly, MNPE (hla+ and MNPE isogenic hla knockout (hlaKO. All TSS strains grew to similar bacterial densities (1-5 x 108 CFU on the mucosa and were proinflammatory over 3 days. However, MNPE formed biofilms with significant reductions in the mucosal viability whereas neither CDC587, MN8 (hly+, or MNPE hlaKO, formed biofilms and were less cytotoxic. The addition of exogenous, purified α-toxin to MNPE hlaKO restored the biofilm phenotype. Our studies suggest α-toxin affects S. aureus phenotypic growth on vaginal mucosa, by promoting tissue disruption and biofilm formation; and α–toxin mutants (hly are not benign colonizers, but rather form a different type of infection, which we have termed high density pathogenic

  18. Endoscopic mucosal resection of early gastric cancer: Experiences in Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Haeng Lee; Jae J Kim

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) has been established as one of the treatment options for early gastric cancer (EGC). However, there are many uncertain areas such as indications of EMR, best treatment methods, management of complications and follow-up methods after the procedure. Most studies on this topic have been carried out by researchers in Japan. In Korea,gastric cancer is the most common malignant disease,and the second leading cause of cancer death. In these days, EMR for EGC is widely performed in many centers in Korea. In this review, we will provide an overview of the techniques and outcomes of EMR in Korea.

  19. In vivo multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of mucosal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ju; Shilagard, Tuya; Bell, Brent; Motamedi, Massoud; Vargas, Gracie

    2004-05-01

    We present a multimodal nonlinear imaging approach to elucidate microstructures and spectroscopic features of oral mucosa and submucosa in vivo. The hamster buccal pouch was imaged using 3-D high resolution multiphoton and second harmonic generation microscopy. The multimodal imaging approach enables colocalization and differentiation of prominent known spectroscopic and structural features such as keratin, epithelial cells, and submucosal collagen at various depths in tissue. Visualization of cellular morphology and epithelial thickness are in excellent agreement with histological observations. These results suggest that multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy can be an effective tool for studying the physiology and pathology of mucosal tissue.

  20. Endoscopic mucosal resection in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anis Ahmadi; Peter Draganov

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is a technique used to locally excise lesions confined to the mucosa. Its main role is the treatment of advanced dysplasia and early gastrointestinal cancers. EMR was originally described as a therapy for early gastric cancer. Recently its use has expanded as a therapeutic option for ampullary masses, colorectal cancer, and large colorectal polyps. In the Western world, the predominant indication for EMR in the upper gastrointestinal tract is the staging and treatment of advance dysplasia and early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus. This review will describe the basis, indications, techniques, and complications of EMR, and its role in the management of Barrett's esophagus.

  1. Oral mucosal precancer and cancer: A helpful discriminating clinical tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Crispian; Sciubba, James J; Bagan, Jose V

    2015-09-01

    The authors have collaborated with many colleagues in several countries in formulating a useful and practical clinical tool for evaluating oral mucosal findings on routine examination. Consideration of several factors including history, evolution of positive findings and clinical information allows placement of examination results into one of three categories which are graded by a color scheme along a spectrum of concerns (green to red, or no concern to serious concern). Afforded to the clinician is a straightforward grading system as a starting point for office end clinic use for all patients.

  2. Review: Gp-340/DMBT1 in mucosal innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Mollenhauer, Jan; Holmskov, Uffe

    2010-01-01

    Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumour 1 (DMBT1) is a gene that encodes alternatively spliced proteins involved in mucosal innate immunity. It also encodes a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 340 kDa, and is referred to as gp-340 (DMBT1(gp340)) and salivary agglutinin (DMBT1(SAG)). DMBT1(gp340...... proteins, including serum and secretory IgA, C1q, lactoferrin, MUC5B and trefoil factor 2 (TFF2), all molecules with involvement in innate immunity and/or wound-healing processes. Recent generation of Dmbt1-deficient mice has provided the research field of DMBT1 with a model that allows research...

  3. Amalgam tattoo mimicking mucosal melanoma: a diagnostic dilemma revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, K; Schmidt, G; Bonde, C

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal melanoma of the oral cavity is a rare but highly aggressive neoplasm. However, the clinicians need to be aware of the other and more frequent etiologies of intraoral pigmentation, such as amalgam tattoos. As amalgam has been extensively used for dental restorations and can cause pigmentations in the oral mucosa, this is a differential diagnosis not to be forgotten. We describe the characteristics of these two phenomena and present a case vignette illustrating the differential diagnostic issues. Other causes of intraoral pigmentation are summarized.

  4. Permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier via mucosal engrafting: implications for drug delivery to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin S Bleier

    Full Text Available Utilization of neuropharmaceuticals for central nervous system(CNS disease is highly limited due to the blood-brain barrier(BBB which restricts molecules larger than 500Da from reaching the CNS. The development of a reliable method to bypass the BBB would represent an enormous advance in neuropharmacology enabling the use of many potential disease modifying therapies. Previous attempts such as transcranial catheter implantation have proven to be temporary and associated with multiple complications. Here we describe a novel method of creating a semipermeable window in the BBB using purely autologous tissues to allow for high molecular weight(HMW drug delivery to the CNS. This approach is inspired by recent advances in human endoscopic transnasal skull base surgical techniques and involves engrafting semipermeable nasal mucosa within a surgical defect in the BBB. The mucosal graft thereby creates a permanent transmucosal conduit for drugs to access the CNS. The main objective of this study was to develop a murine model of this technique and use it to evaluate transmucosal permeability for the purpose of direct drug delivery to the brain. Using this model we demonstrate that mucosal grafts allow for the transport of molecules up to 500 kDa directly to the brain in both a time and molecular weight dependent fashion. Markers up to 40 kDa were found within the striatum suggesting a potential role for this technique in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This proof of principle study demonstrates that mucosal engrafting represents the first permanent and stable method of bypassing the BBB thereby providing a pathway for HMW therapeutics directly into the CNS.

  5. Permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier via mucosal engrafting: implications for drug delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleier, Benjamin S; Kohman, Richie E; Feldman, Rachel E; Ramanlal, Shreshtha; Han, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Utilization of neuropharmaceuticals for central nervous system(CNS) disease is highly limited due to the blood-brain barrier(BBB) which restricts molecules larger than 500Da from reaching the CNS. The development of a reliable method to bypass the BBB would represent an enormous advance in neuropharmacology enabling the use of many potential disease modifying therapies. Previous attempts such as transcranial catheter implantation have proven to be temporary and associated with multiple complications. Here we describe a novel method of creating a semipermeable window in the BBB using purely autologous tissues to allow for high molecular weight(HMW) drug delivery to the CNS. This approach is inspired by recent advances in human endoscopic transnasal skull base surgical techniques and involves engrafting semipermeable nasal mucosa within a surgical defect in the BBB. The mucosal graft thereby creates a permanent transmucosal conduit for drugs to access the CNS. The main objective of this study was to develop a murine model of this technique and use it to evaluate transmucosal permeability for the purpose of direct drug delivery to the brain. Using this model we demonstrate that mucosal grafts allow for the transport of molecules up to 500 kDa directly to the brain in both a time and molecular weight dependent fashion. Markers up to 40 kDa were found within the striatum suggesting a potential role for this technique in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This proof of principle study demonstrates that mucosal engrafting represents the first permanent and stable method of bypassing the BBB thereby providing a pathway for HMW therapeutics directly into the CNS.

  6. ALTERATIONS IN EXPRESSION OF p11 and SERT IN MUCOSAL BIOPSIES OF PATIENTS WITH IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Andrews, Christopher N.; Bharucha, Adil E.; Carlson, Paula J.; Ferber, Irene; Stephens, Debra; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Urrutia, Raul; Aerssens, Jeroen; Thielemans, Leen; Göhlmann, Hinrich; Wyngaert, Ilse Van Den; Coulie, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aim The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains enigmatic; abnormalities in serotonin metabolism have been implicated. Two proteins that influence the function of serotonin and serotonergic receptors are serotonin transporter protein (SERT or soluble carrier protein SLC6A4) and p11 (S-100A10, or calpactin I light chain). Both proteins are reported to be associated with depression-like states, a frequent co-morbid condition in IBS. We explored the hypothesis that expression of these two proteins in colonic and rectal mucosa is abnormal in patients with IBS as compared to healthy controls. Methods mRNA expression of SLC6A4 and p11 was measured in sigmoid and rectal mucosal biopsies. Genotype of the promoter for SLC6A4 was also assessed in all participants. Validation studies explored reproducibility of two biopsies taken from the same region, and biopsies taken an average of ~3 months apart. Results We found normal colonic mucosal expression of SLC6A4 in diarrhea (IBS-D) or constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C). On the other hand, p11 expression was increased in IBS. No significant effect on p11 mRNA expression in sigmoid colon or rectum was noted from antidepressant treatment in any of the analyzed subgroups. Conclusion Colonic mucosal expression of SLC6A4 in IBS is normal. Given that overexpression of p11 can increase serotonergic receptor functions (e.g. 5-HT1B receptors), these data support the need for further study of the interaction between p11 expression in health and disease and its role in the therapeutic response to serotonergic agents, including antidepressants. PMID:17241856

  7. Determination of the Membrane Permeability to Water of Human Vaginal Mucosal Immune Cells at Subzero Temperatures Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zhiquan; Hughes, Sean M; Fang, Cifeng; Hou, Zhiyuan; Zhao, Gang; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen; Hladik, Florian; Gao, Dayong

    2016-08-01

    To study mucosal immunity and conduct HIV vaccine trials, it is important to be able to cryopreserve mucosal specimens and recover them in functional viable form. Obtaining a good recovery depends, in part, on cooling the cells at the appropriate rate, which is determined by the rate of water transport across the cell membrane during the cooling process. In this study, the cell membrane permeabilities to water at subzero temperatures of human vaginal mucosal T cells and macrophages were measured using the differential scanning calorimetry method proposed by Devireddy et al. in 1998. Thermal histograms were measured before and after cell lysis using a Slow-Fast-Fast-Slow cooling program. The difference between the thermal histograms of the live intact cells and the dead lysed cells was used to calculate the temperature-dependent cell membrane permeability at subzero temperatures, which was assumed to follow the Arrhenius relationship, [Formula: see text], where Lpg is the permeability to water at the reference temperature (273.15 K). The results showed that Lpg = 0.0209 ± 0.0108 μm/atm/min and Ea = 41.5 ± 11.4 kcal/mol for T cells and Lpg = 0.0198 ± 0.0102 μm/atm/min and Ea = 38.2 ± 10.4 kcal/mol for macrophages, respectively, in the range 0°C to -40°C (mean ± standard deviation). Theoretical simulations predicted that the optimal cooling rate for both T cells and macrophages was about -3°C/min, which was proven by preliminary immune cell cryopreservation experiments.

  8. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  9. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  10. Peroxide cross-linked UHMWPE blended with vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, Ebru; Doshi, Brinda N; Gul, Rizwan M; Neils, Andrew L; Kayandan, Sanem; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2016-04-15

    Radiation crosslinked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is the bearing surface material most commonly used in total joint arthroplasty because of its excellent wear resistance. Crosslinking agents such as peroxides can also effectively increase wear resistance but peroxide crosslinked UHMWPE has low oxidative stability. We hypothesized that the addition of an antioxidant to peroxide crosslinked UHMWPE could improve its oxidation resistance and result in mechanical, tribological, and oxidative properties equivalent to currently utilized radiation crosslinked UHMWPEs. Various vitamin E (0.1-1.0 wt % and peroxide concentration (0.5-1.5 wt %) combinations were studied to investigate changes in crosslink density, wear rate, mechanical properties, and oxidative stability in comparison to radiation crosslinked UHMWPE. Peroxide crosslinking was more efficient as compared to radiation crosslinking in the presence of vitamin E with the former resulting in lower wear rate with vitamin E concentrations above 0.3 wt %. The tensile mechanical properties were comparable to and the impact strength was higher than those of the clinically relevant radiation crosslinked controls. We also determined that gamma sterilization of peroxide crosslinked vitamin E blends improved wear resistance further. In summary, peroxide crosslinking of vitamin E-blended UHMWPE may provide a feasible and economical alternative to radiation for achieving clinically relevant properties for total joint implants using UHMWPE. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  11. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Ceftazidime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devbhuti P*,1

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid peroxidation is the oxidative deterioration of polyunsaturated lipids which is a free radical related process and responsible for thedevelopment of many diseases and disorders like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cancer etc. End products of lipid peroxidation aremalondialdehyde (MDA, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, etc. which are the ultimate mediator of toxicity. Antioxidants have the capability toinhibit lipid peroxidation. Keeping in mind this fact, the present in vitro study was carried out to evaluate lipid peroxidation induction potential of ceftazidime, a cephalosporin antibiotic and its suppression with ascorbic acid considering some laboratory markers of lipid peroxidation like MDA, 4-HNE and reduced glutathione (GSH. Goat liver was used as the lipid source. After treatment of the liver homogenate with drug and/or antioxidant the levels of 4-HNE, MDA and GSH were estimated in different samples at different hours of incubation. The results showed that the drug ceftazidime could significantly induce lipid peroxidation and the antioxidant ascorbic acid has the capability to inhibit ceftazidime-inducedlipid peroxidation.

  12. Dissolution of spent nuclear fuel in carbonate-peroxide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Chuck; Hanson, Brady

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that spent UO2 fuel can be completely dissolved in a room temperature carbonate-peroxide solution apparently without attacking the metallic Mo-Tc-Ru-Rh-Pd fission product phase. In parallel tests, identical samples of spent nuclear fuel were dissolved in nitric acid and in an ammonium carbonate, hydrogen peroxide solution. The resulting solutions were analyzed for strontium-90, technetium-99, cesium-137, europium-154, plutonium, and americium-241. The results were identical for all analytes except technetium, where the carbonate-peroxide dissolution had only about 25% of the technetium that the nitric acid dissolution had.

  13. The expression of mucosal IL-1β, TNFα and serotonin transporter in chronic visceral hypersensitivity rats%内脏高敏感大鼠白细胞介素-1β、肿瘤坏死因子α与5-羟色胺转运体的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迟雁; 刘新光; 王化虹; 李懿璇

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究内脏高敏感大鼠结肠细胞因子和5-羟色胺(5-HT)转运体(SERT)的表达,为细胞因子和5-HT系统在内脏高敏感性产生机制中的作用提供依据.方法 16只胎龄小于8 d的新生SD大鼠被随机分为2组,每组8只.采用乳鼠醋酸灌肠法建立大鼠慢性内脏高敏感动物模型,以盐水灌肠作为对照组.待乳鼠成年后应用直肠内球囊扩张检测腹碓收缩阈值和弓背抬起阈值的方法评估其内脏敏感性;通过检测髓过氧化物酶(MPO)评价肠道黏膜炎症程度;采用免疫组化的方法检测大鼠结肠组织中IL-1β和TNFα的水平;采用Western blot方法检测大鼠结肠组织SERT的表达水平.结果 两组大鼠体重增长趋势基本一致,HE染色显示结肠黏膜未见明显急、慢性炎症改变;两组大鼠结肠组织MPO水平相比,差异无统计学意义[(0.497±0.570)U/g湿片比(0.623±0.739)U/g湿片,P=0.724];实验组大鼠腹壁收缩阈值和弓背抬起阈值分别为(0.19±0.06)ml和(0.47±0.13)ml,较对照组大鼠[(0.40±0.14)ml和(0.91±0.26)ml]显著减低,P<0.01;实验组大鼠结肠IL-1β、TNFα的表达水平(0.196±0.002和0.194±0.001)均显著高于对照组(0.185±0.001和0.182±0.001),P<0.01;实验组大鼠SERT蛋白相对表达水平(0.298±0.038)较对照组(0.634±0.200)显著减低,P<0.05.结论 内脏高敏感大鼠IL-1β和TNFα的表达升高,SERT的表达水平减低,细胞因子与SERT可相互影响,IL-1β、TNFα和SERT可能在大鼠内脏高敏感性的发生机制中具有一定的作用.%Objective To assess the expression of TNFα, IL-1β and the serotonin transporter (SERT) in adult rats of chronic visceral hypersensitivity induced by colon irritation during postnatal development, and to provide evidence to clarify the complex relationship between inflammatory cytokines and SERT among visceral hypersensitivity. Methods Sixteen neonatal male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly separated into two groups undergoing

  14. Mucosal immunity and B cells in teleosts: effect of vaccination and stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eParra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fish are subjected to several insults from the environment, which may endanger animal survival. Mucosal surfaces are the first line of defense against those threats and they act as a physical barrier to protect the animal but also function as immunologically active tissues. Thus, four mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues have been described in fish, which lead the immune responses in gut, skin, gills and nose. Humoral and cellular immunity, as well as its regulation and the factors that influence the response in these mucosal lymphoid tissues is still not well known in most of fish species. Mucosal B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins (Igs are one of the key players in the immune response after vaccination. Recent findings about IgT in trout have delimited the compartmentalization of immune response in systemic and mucosal. The existence of IgT as a specialized mucosa Ig gives us the opportunity of measuring mucosal specific responses after vaccination, a fact that was not possible until recently in most of the fish species. Vaccination process is influenced by several factors, being stress one of the main stimuli determining the success of the vaccine. Thus, one of the major goals in a vaccination process is to avoid possible situations of stress, which might interfere with fish immune performance. However, the interaction between immune and neuroendocrine systems at mucosal tissues is still unknown. In this review we will summarized the latest findings about B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins in mucosal immunity and the effect of stress and vaccines on B cell response at mucosal sites. It is important to point out that a small number of studies have been published regarding mucosal stress and very few about the influence of stress over mucosal B-lymphocytes.

  15. The role of intestinal microbiota in the development and severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel J van Vliet

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mucositis, also referred to as mucosal barrier injury, is one of the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. Clinically, mucositis is associated with pain, bacteremia, and malnutrition. Furthermore, mucositis is a frequent reason to postpone chemotherapy treatment, ultimately leading towards a higher mortality in cancer patients. According to the model introduced by Sonis, both inflammation and apoptosis of the mucosal barrier result in its discontinuity, thereby promoting bacterial translocation. According to this five-phase model, the intestinal microbiota plays no role in the pathophysiology of mucositis. However, research has implicated a prominent role for the commensal intestinal microbiota in the development of several inflammatory diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, pouchitis, and radiotherapy-induced diarrhea. Furthermore, chemotherapeutics have a detrimental effect on the intestinal microbial composition (strongly decreasing the numbers of anaerobic bacteria, coinciding in time with the development of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. We hypothesize that the commensal intestinal microbiota might play a pivotal role in chemotherapy-induced mucositis. In this review, we propose and discuss five pathways in the development of mucositis that are potentially influenced by the commensal intestinal microbiota: 1 the inflammatory process and oxidative stress, 2 intestinal permeability, 3 the composition of the mucus layer, 4 the resistance to harmful stimuli and epithelial repair mechanisms, and 5 the activation and release of immune effector molecules. Via these pathways, the commensal intestinal microbiota might influence all phases in the Sonis model of the pathogenesis of mucositis. Further research is needed to show the clinical relevance of restoring dysbiosis, thereby possibly decreasing the degree of intestinal mucositis.

  16. Distribution of Gaseous and Particulate Organic Peroxides Formed in the Ozonolysis of α-Pinene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Chen, Z.; Huang, L.; Huang, D.

    2015-12-01

    Organic peroxides, an important species in the atmosphere, will affect HOx cycling, promote SOA aging, and cause adverse health effect. However, the formation, distribution and evolution of organic peroxides are extremely complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigate in laboratory the production of peroxides and gas-particle partitioning in the ozonolysis of α-pinene. The molar yields of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydromethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA) and total peroxides (TPO, including unknown peroxides) and contribution of peroxides to SOA mass are carefully determined. Comparing the gaseous and particulate peroxides, we find that more than 75% peroxides formed in the ozonolysis remain in the gas phase, and water vapour will significantly influence the formation and distribution of peroxides. Such an unexpected large amount of gaseous peroxides deserves more attention, especially to their effect on HOx cycling.

  17. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D.; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L.; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C.; Verdu, Elena F.; Bai, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  18. Cyclic GMP-AMP displays mucosal adjuvant activity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Škrnjug

    Full Text Available The recently discovered mammalian enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase produces cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP after being activated by pathogen-derived cytosolic double stranded DNA. The product can stimulate STING-dependent interferon type I signaling. Here, we explore the efficacy of cGAMP as a mucosal adjuvant in mice. We show that cGAMP can enhance the adaptive immune response to the model antigen ovalbumin. It promotes antigen specific IgG and a balanced Th1/Th2 lymphocyte response in immunized mice. A characteristic of the cGAMP-induced immune response is the slightly reduced induction of interleukin-17 as a hallmark of Th17 activity--a distinct feature that is not observed with other cyclic di-nucleotide adjuvants. We further characterize the innate immune stimulation activity in vitro on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and human dendritic cells. The observed results suggest the consideration of cGAMP as a candidate mucosal adjuvant for human vaccines.

  19. Alginate-based hybrid aerogel microparticles for mucosal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, V S S; Gurikov, P; Poejo, J; Matias, A A; Heinrich, S; Duarte, C M M; Smirnova, I

    2016-10-01

    The application of biopolymer aerogels as drug delivery systems (DDS) has gained increased interest during the last decade since these structures have large surface area and accessible pores allowing for high drug loadings. Being biocompatible, biodegradable and presenting low toxicity, polysaccharide-based aerogels are an attractive carrier to be applied in pharmaceutical industry. Moreover, some polysaccharides (e.g. alginate and chitosan) present mucoadhesive properties, an important feature for mucosal drug delivery. This feature allows to extend the contact of DDS with biological membranes, thereby increasing the absorption of drugs through the mucosa. Alginate-based hybrid aerogels in the form of microparticles (alginate and further dried with supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2). Spherical mesoporous aerogel microparticles were obtained for alginate, hybrid alginate/pectin and alginate/κ-carrageenan aerogels, presenting high specific surface area (370-548m(2)g(-1)) and mucoadhesive properties. The microparticles were loaded with ketoprofen via adsorption from its solution in sc-CO2, and with quercetin via supercritical anti-solvent precipitation. Loading of ketoprofen was in the range between 17 and 22wt% whereas quercetin demonstrated loadings of 3.1-5.4wt%. Both the drugs were present in amorphous state. Loading procedure allowed the preservation of antioxidant activity of quercetin. Release of both drugs from alginate/κ-carrageenan aerogel was slightly faster compared to alginate/pectin. The results indicate that alginate-based aerogel microparticles can be viewed as promising matrices for mucosal drug delivery applications.

  20. T-bet as a key regulator of mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Rami; Lord, Graham M

    2016-04-01

    Initially understood to be a key regulator of interferon-γ-producing helper T cells, our knowledge of T-bet's functional roles has expanded to encompass a growing range of cellular lineages. In addition to regulating other interferon-γ-producing adaptive immune cells, it is now clear that T-bet plays a fundamental role in the regulation of innate immune responses across mucosal surfaces. This homeostatic role is demonstrated by the spontaneous colitis that occurs when T-bet is deleted from innate immune cells in RAG(-/-) mice. Using this model as a focal point, we review our understanding of T-bet's regulation of adaptive and innate immune systems, focusing particularly on mucosal populations including innate lymphoid cells, dendritic cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes. With the increasingly diverse effects of T-bet on different lineages, the classical binding-centric paradigm of T-bet's molecular functionality has increasingly struggled to account for the versatility of T-bet's biological effects. Recent recognition of the synergistic interactions between T-bet and other canonical transcription factors has led to a co-operative paradigm that has provided greater explanatory power. Synthesizing insights from ChIP-seq and comparative biology, we expand the co-operative paradigm further and suggest a network approach as a powerful way to understand and model T-bet's diverse functionality.

  1. Cytotoxic Effects of Intranasal Midazolam on Nasal Mucosal Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, I; Kucur, C; Değer, A; Ital, I; Kasim, Cayci M; Oghan, F

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the cytotoxic effects of intranasal midazolam on nasal mucosal tissue in rats. Forty healthy rats were randomly divided into 5 groups. Group 1 (n = 8) was the control group, group 2 (n = 8) received intranasal saline, group 3 (n = 8) received intranasal midazolam, group 4 (n = 8) received intraperitoneal saline, and group 5 received intraperitoneal midazolam (n = 8). Midazolam and saline were administered via intraperitoneal and intranasal routes at doses of 200 μg/kg. Nasal septal mucosal stripe tissues were removed at the 6th hour. All materials were evaluated according to Ki67 and p53 staining to evaluate proliferation and apoptosis, respectively, and hemotoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histopathology evaluation. Ki67 values and inflammation in group 3 were statistically higher compared to group 1, group 2, and group 4. P53 values in group 3 were statistically higher compared to group 1. Assessment of subepithelial edema between group 3 and the other groups revealed no statistically significant differences. Assessment of cilia loss between group 3 and group 1, group 2, and group 4 revealed no statistically significant difference. The evaluation of goblet cell loss between group 3 and group 1 revealed a statistically significant difference. Intranasal midazolam had adverse effects on nasal mucosa. However, intranasal midazolam is as safe as systemic midazolam administration with respect to nasal mucosa.

  2. [Efficacy of Rebamipide Gargle against Chemotherapy-induced Oral Mucositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Masato; Onikubo, Toshihide; Nakamura, Kumi

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (CIOM) is a severe adverse event resulting from cancer chemotherapy. Toxic free radicals and pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by anticancer drugs have been reported to be associated with CIOM. Rebamipide has been shown to increase gastric endogenous prostaglandin E2 and I2, to promote gastric epithelial mucin, and to behave as an oxygen free-radical scavenger in addition to other anti-inflammatory actions. We developed a gargle solution of rebamipide, adding ultrahydrogel for mucosal protection and to maintain rebamipide on the oral mucosa. A 300 mL rebamipide gargle solution combines 600 mg rebamipide, 3 g high molecular-weight polyethylene oxide, 1.2 g carrageenan, pineapple flavoring, and water. The efficacy of the rebamipide gargle was evaluated in 175 patients with CIOM from November 2009 to December 2012, each instructed to use the rebamipide gargle 5-6 times daily. The severity of CIOM was assessed according to the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, version 4.0). Their CTCAE scores (3/2/1/0) changed from n=13/64/98/0 to 0/10/103/62, respectively, after initiation of the rebamipide gargle (pRebamipide gargle was well tolerated and demonstrated to have significant therapeutic efficacy against CIOM.

  3. Dentists' knowledge and opinions about oral mucosal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, S; Ozel, S; Koray, M; Kürklü, E; Ak, G; Tanyeri, H

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to identify, compare and analyse the knowledge and opinions of dentists regarding oral mucosal lesions and evaluate the differences between the attitudes of dentists by practice settings. 300 dentists were enrolled in the study. Three groups were formed. The first group included general dental practitioners working in private dental offices; the second group were dentists practising in dental polyclinics; the third group was composed of dentists employed at universities in Istanbul, working in departments except for the department of oral surgery and medicine. A 17-item self constructed questionnaire investigating demographic attributes, dental practice characteristics, oral mucosal lesions (OML) knowledge and respondents' opinions was completed and all questions were asked by the same author. 85% of the dentists admitted difficulties in diagnosing OML. 62% failed to update their knowledge from the literature, 93% did not undertake biopsies or consult other practitioners. Dentists practising at universities attempted to treat fewer patients with OML (p=0.0001). The results of this questionnaire conclude that most dentists experience difficulties in diagnosing some OML.

  4. Langerhans cells and their role in oral mucosal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhi Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are arguably the most potent antigen-presenting cells and may be the only cells capable of initiating the adaptive immune response. The epithelial residents of dendritic cells are Langerhans cells, which serve as the "sentinels" of the mucosa, altering the immune system not only to pathogen entry but also of tolerance to self antigen and commensal microbes. Oral mucosal Langerhans cells are capable of engaging and internalizing a wide variety of pathogens and have been found responsive to nickel in patients with nickel allergies, oral Candida species, oral lichen planus, lichenoid drug eruptions, graft versus host diseases, periodontal diseases median rhomboid glossitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, hairy leukoplakia of the tongue, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Review focuses on the role of antigen-presenting cells in particular Langerhans cells to better understand the mechanisms underlying immune responses. In this review, comprehensive detail about mucosal diseases has been compiled using the PubMed database and through textbooks.

  5. Omeprazole promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, J; Bukhave, K; Rask-Madsen, J

    1996-01-01

    The proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, surprisingly resulted in higher rates of proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion than previously reported using an H2 receptor antagonist for gastric acid inhibition. Gastroduodenal perfusions were performed in healthy volunteers to evaluate whether this incidental finding is explained by more potent gastric acid inhibition by omeprazole or might be caused by the different mode of drug action. Basal and stimulated gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion rates were measured in the same subjects in control experiments (n = 17) and after pretreatment with high dose omeprazole (n = 17) and ranitidine (n = 9), respectively, by use of a technique permitting simultaneous measurements. Concentrations of bicarbonate were measured in the respective effluents by the method of back titration. Both omeprazole and ranitidine completely inhibited gastric acid secretion (pH 6.9 v 6.8; p > 0.05). Omeprazole caused higher rates of basal (mean (SEM)) (597 (48) v 351 (39) mumol/h; p 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion compared with control experiments. Also the combination of omeprazole and ranitidine increased (p = 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion, while ranitidine alone caused no change in either basal or stimulated secretion. In the stomach basal as well as vagally stimulated bicarbonate secretion was independent of the means of acid inhibition. These results show that the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion apparently independent of its gastric acid inhibitory effect. The mechanism of action remains speculative.

  6. Long term immunologic consequences of experimental stroke and mucosal tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gee J Michael

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An inflammatory insult following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO is associated with a predisposition to develop a deleterious autoimmune response to the brain antigen myelin basic protein (MBP. Induction of immunologic tolerance to brain antigens prior to MCAO prevents this deleterious autoimmune response and is associated with better functional outcome early after stroke. In this study, we sought to determine the long term immunologic consequences of experimental stroke and induction of mucosal tolerance. Methods Male Lewis rats were tolerized to MBP or ovalbumin (OVA by intranasal administration prior to MCAO and administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Neurological outcome was assessed at set points after MCAO and animals sacrificed at 3 months; the immune response to MBP in brain and spleen was determined using ELISPOT assay and degree of cellular inflammatory brain infiltrate assessed by immunocytochemistry. Results Animals that developed a pro-inflammatory (TH1 response to MBP experienced worse outcome, while those that developed a regulatory response (TREG experienced better outcome. A TREG response in spleen was also associated with decreased inflammation and an increase in the number of FoxP3 positive cells in brain. In this study, tolerization to MBP prior to MCAO was associated with a tendency to develop a TH1 response to MBP by 3 months after MCAO. Conclusion These data show that induction of immunological tolerance to MBP is associated with improved outcome after stroke. This study, however, raises concern about the potential for inadvertent induction of detrimental autoimmunity through mucosal administration of antigen.

  7. Epidemiology of the most common oral mucosal diseases in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioboo-Crespo, Maria del Rosario; Planells-del Pozo, Paloma; Rioboo-García, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Dentists who treat children must be alert to the possibility of finding diseases of the oral mucosa, especially in younger children. The present study aimed to review the most updated information and the experience of our group in order to yield epidemiological data that assist diagnosis of the most common diseases of the oral mucosa in children. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown a wide variability in the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in different regions of the world and have led researchers to draw disparate conclusions. Moreover, studies have not been designed using standard criteria, further explaining the wide variability in the percentage of different groups of children with oral lesions, which ranges from 4.1 to 52.6%. The lesions most frequently considered by authors and that most often appear in the different studies are: recurrent aphthous stomatitis (0.9-10.8%), labial herpes (0.78-5.2%), fissured tongue (1.49-23%), geographic tongue (0.60-9.8%), oral candidiasis (0.01-37%) and traumatic injury (0.09%-22.15%). Dentists must be able to detect any of the numerous possible disorders and perform the correct differential diagnosis, key to the treatment plan. The aim of this paper, based on a review of the different national and international studies, is to contribute data on the most important oral mucosal diseases in the paediatric population in terms of prevalence and differential diagnosis.

  8. Buccal adhesive nanofibers containing human growth hormone for oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Suk; Han, Suk-Hee; Hyun, Changbaig; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2016-10-01

    Due to a lack of proper drug carriers to deliver treatments for mucositis, many cancer patients suffer from oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We prepared a double-layered electrospun nanofibrous sheets composed of Eudragit and chitosan to accelerate the healing rate of oral mucous ulcer. Human growth hormone (hGH) and Eudragit in a mixture of dimethylacetamide and ethanol were co-electrospun to nanofibrous sheets. The electrospun fibrous mat was subsequently layered with chitosan by a dip-coating method. Chitosan-layered sheets showed attenuated mass erosion while uncoated sheets were instantly melted at the physiological condition. The released hGH was trapped on the chitosan layer by the ionic interaction between positively charged chitosan and negatively charged hGH, and a large number of entrapped proteins remained on the SIS membrane due to the muco-adhesive properties of chitosan. hGH-incorporated sheets significantly increased proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts. In vivo study employing oral ulcers in dogs, the ulcers dressed with chitosan-layered sheets showed enhanced wound recovery and the chitosan layers on the sheet greatly assisted prolonged recovery. Therefore, chitosan-layered Eudragit nanofibrous sheets can be potentially applied to developing muco-adhesive wound dressing materials with pH-dependent drug release by adjusting the thickness of chitosan sheath on the sheets. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1396-1406, 2016.

  9. Oral Mucosal Disorders in Pregnant versus Non-Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Rezazadeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of pregnancy on the Oral Mucosa Disorder (OMD have been sporadically documented in some developed countries. Less known is the status of OMD during pregnancy in less developed/developing countries. Iran is no exception. This study assesses the prevalence of OMD in 200 pregnant women and compares the findings with the findings from a 200 non-pregnant woman of similar age distribution in Iran. The participants had been referred to a clinic to receive reproductive age-related services. Participants suffering from systemic chronic diseases, those on medications/drugs, smokers, needing biopsies, and those with urgent Oral Mucosal Lesion (OML treatments were excluded from the study. Oral mucosal of all 400 participants were examined. The participants’ age ranges were from 17 to 47; with the average age of 33.14 for one group; and 30.23 for the other group. Both groups had the same level of formal education. Out of 400 examined women; 62 had lesions, including 47 pregnant (23.5%; and 15 non-pregnant (7.5% women. This result shows that the OMD rate of occurrence was significantly higher among the pregnant women. Higher OML prevalence in pregnant women, as compared to the non-pregnant women, indicates the importance of timely oral examination of pregnant women and subsequent treatment plans for them.

  10. Stable magnesium peroxide at high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Sergey S; Zhu, Qiang; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Oganov, Artem R; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2015-09-01

    Rocky planets are thought to comprise compounds of Mg and O as these are among the most abundant elements, but knowledge of their stable phases may be incomplete. MgO is known to be remarkably stable to very high pressure and chemically inert under reduced condition of the Earth's lower mantle. However, in exoplanets oxygen may be a more abundant constituent. Here, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we show that MgO and oxygen react at pressures above 96 GPa and T = 2150 K with the formation of I4/mcm MgO2. Raman spectroscopy detects the presence of a peroxide ion (O2(2-)) in the synthesized material as well as in the recovered specimen. Likewise, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirms that the recovered sample has higher oxygen content than pure MgO. Our finding suggests that MgO2 may be present together or instead of MgO in rocky mantles and rocky planetary cores under highly oxidized conditions.

  11. Stable magnesium peroxide at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Sergey S.; Zhu, Qiang; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Oganov, Artem R.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-09-01

    Rocky planets are thought to comprise compounds of Mg and O as these are among the most abundant elements, but knowledge of their stable phases may be incomplete. MgO is known to be remarkably stable to very high pressure and chemically inert under reduced condition of the Earth’s lower mantle. However, in exoplanets oxygen may be a more abundant constituent. Here, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, we show that MgO and oxygen react at pressures above 96 GPa and T = 2150 K with the formation of I4/mcm MgO2. Raman spectroscopy detects the presence of a peroxide ion (O22-) in the synthesized material as well as in the recovered specimen. Likewise, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy confirms that the recovered sample has higher oxygen content than pure MgO. Our finding suggests that MgO2 may be present together or instead of MgO in rocky mantles and rocky planetary cores under highly oxidized conditions.

  12. Documentation of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Scoring Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riesenbeck, D. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie - Radioonkologie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Doerr, W. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: Radiation therapy of tumors in the head and neck region is frequently associated with severe side effects in the oral mucosa which often necessitate interruption of the prescribed treatment protocol. In order to compare therapeutic strategies and, more important, in order to perform multicenter studies, generally accepted scoring systems have to be applied for uniform documentation of the oral mucosal response. Methods: Different scoring protocols are found in the literature. The scoring protocols most widely accepted are the CTC classification and the RTOG/EORTC classification. These are compared with more detailed systems. Results: In the CTC classification, grading of stomatitis is included in the responses of the gastrointestinal tract and emphasizes dietary effects. For effects of radiation alone or of radiochemotherapy, the RTOG/EORTC system, focusing on therapeutic interventions, has been established. However, there are only minor differences in the grading of mucositis between these 2 protocols. Based on the RTOG/EORTC classification, Maciejewski et al. introduced a classification system with inclusion of the area affected, but also changed the sensitivity of the scores. The latter may be confusing if the source of the system used is not cited in a report. An alternative system was proposed by Dische, which in addition to objective morphologic criteria also includes the symptoms induced by the mucosal response, and hence includes some subjective aspects reported by the patient. Conclusions: For routine documentation of acute radiation side effects in the oral cavity, the German version of the RTOG/EORTC classification can be recommended. In studies with particular interest in oral mucositis, a more sensitive scoring system may be applied. In any publication concerning mucositis, a table or a detailed description of the system used should be included. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Die Strahlentherapie von Tumoren der Kopf-Hals-Region ist haeufig

  13. Role of Serum Iron in the Activation of Lipid Peroxidation in Critical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Orlov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four critically ill patients due to generalized purulent peritonitis, pancreatonecrosis, thermal skin injuries, and severe poisoning by acetic acid were examined. The general regularities of the effect of high serum iron concentrations on the health status of patients, on the activity of antioxidative enzymes, and on the initiation of lipid peroxidation (LPO processes, as supported by the values of Fe2+-induced chemiluminescence, were revealed. In critically ill patients, iron metabolism occurs with the overload of a transport protein, such as transferrin, which is caused by intravascular hemolysis and hemoglobin metabolism to ionized iron. The overload of proteins responsible for iron transport leads to the tissue accumulation of free (ferrous and ferric iron that is actively involved in the processes of LPO initiation with excess synthesis of cytotoxic radicals, which in turn accounts for the severity of endotoxicosis.

  14. Growth factors and cytokines in the prevention and treatment of oral and gastrointestinal mucositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Bultzingslowen, [No Value; Brennan, MT; Spijkervet, Fred K.L.; Logan, R; Stringer, A; Raber-Durlacher, JE; Keefe, D

    Goals of work: Growth factors and cytokines may be useful in preventing chemotherapy (CT)- and radiotherapy (RT)-induced oral and gastrointestinal mucositis. Two systematic reviews of the medical literature on growth factors and cytokines for the amelioration of CT- and RT-induced mucositis

  15. Quantification of oral mucositis due to radiotherapy by determining viability and maturation of epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, MA; Spijkervet, FKL; Wymenga, ANM; Burlage, FR; Timens, W; Roodenburg, JLN; de Vries, EGE

    2002-01-01

    Background: An in-vitro assay has been developed for quantitative assessment of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis. In the present study this method was evaluated for assessment of irradiation mucositis at a cellular level. Methods: Ten patients participated in this consecutive study. All patients

  16. Mucosal immunogenicity and adjuvant activity of the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, Lolke de

    1997-01-01

    Many pathogens invade their host via mucosal surfaces. The mucosal immune system forms a first line of defense against such pathogens, through secretion of pathogen-specific antibodies of the IgA isotype, preventing infection of the host. Current vaccination strategies, which generally involve intra

  17. Use of inactivated E.Coli enterotoxins to enhance respiratory mucosal adjuvanticity during vaccination in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to augment responses to respiratory vaccines in swine, various adjuvants were intranasally co-administered with an antigen to pigs. Detoxified E. coli enterotoxins LTK63 and LTR72 enhanced mucosal and systemic immunity to the model peptide, exhibiting their efficacy as mucosal adjuvants for...

  18. Jun N-Terminal Protein Kinase Enhances Middle Ear Mucosal Proliferation during Bacterial Otitis Media▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Masayuki; Ebmeyer, Jörg; Pak, Kwang; Austin, Darrell A.; Melhus, Åsa; Webster, Nicholas J. G.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal hyperplasia is a characteristic component of otitis media. The present study investigated the participation of signaling via the Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase in middle ear mucosal hyperplasia in animal models of bacterial otitis media. Otitis media was induced by the inoculation of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae into the middle ear cavity. Western blotting revealed that phosphorylation of JNK isoforms in the middle ear mucosa preceded but paralleled mucosal hyperplasia in this in vivo rat model. Nuclear JNK phosphorylation was observed in many cells of both the mucosal epithelium and stroma by immunohistochemistry. In an in vitro model of primary rat middle ear mucosal explants, bacterially induced mucosal growth was blocked by the Rac/Cdc42 inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin B, the mixed-lineage kinase inhibitor CEP11004, and the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Finally, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly inhibited mucosal hyperplasia during in vivo bacterial otitis media in guinea pigs. Inhibition of JNK in vivo resulted in a diminished proliferative response, as shown by a local decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein expression by immunohistochemistry. We conclude that activation of JNK is a critical pathway for bacterially induced mucosal hyperplasia during otitis media, influencing tissue proliferation. PMID:17325051

  19. Distribution patterns of mucosally applied particles and characterisation of the antigen presenting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, Eveline D; Degen, Winfried G J; van Haarlem, Daphne A; Schrier, Carla; Broere, Femke; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal application is the most common route of vaccination to prevent outbreaks of infectious diseases like Newcastle disease virus (NDV). To gain more knowledge about distribution and uptake of a vaccine after mucosal vaccination, we studied the distribution pattern of antigens after different muc

  20. Mucoadhesive propolis gel for prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Vladimir R A S; Araujo, Gustavo S; Gomes, Rafael T; Iwanaga, Samara H; Barbosa, Maralice C; Abdo, Evandro N; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigenia; Viana Campos, Ana C; Souza, Alexandre A; Abreu, Sheila R L; Santos, Vagner R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this phase II study was to determine the effectiveness of a mucoadhesive propolis gel in the prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Twenty-four patients who were selected to undergo radiation therapy for oral cancer were included in this open-label trial. They were advised to use a mucoadhesive gel containing propolis 5,0% w/v three times a day starting one day before the course of radiation therapy and concluding after 2 weeks of radiation therapy. A weekly follow-up for evaluation of food intake, pain and grading of mucositis was performed. In order to confirm the absence of Candida-related mucositis in patients who developed mucositis, it was performed exfoliative cytology of buccal mucosa, palate and tongue and the material for Candifast(®) Candida species identification. At the end of the study was made the compliance of patients, quality, appreciation and acceptance of product evaluation. Twenty patients did not develop mucositis, two patients developed grade 1 mucositis and two patients developed grade 2 mucositis. None of the patients discontinued food intake and no pain was observed during the study. Candidosis was not detected in any patient. Mucoadhesive propolis gel could be considered as a potential topical medication for preventing radiation-induced oral mucositis. However, comparative phase III study with larger number of patients should be done for confirmation of the efficacy of the product.

  1. Clinical effects of flurbiprofen tooth patch on radiation-induced oral mucositis. A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, MA; Spijkervet, FKL; Burlage, FR; Roodenburg, JLN

    Background: Mucositis is an oral sequela of radiotherapy. In the development of mucositis several mechanisms play a role, such as inflammation and the effect of radiation on the high proliferation rate of oral basal epithelial cells. Therefore, administration of a drug with antiinflammatory and

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Pedobacter sp. Strain Hv1, an Isolate from Medicinal Leech Mucosal Castings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Brittany M; Beka, Lidia; Graf, Joerg; Rio, Rita V M

    2015-12-17

    The Pedobacter sp. Hv1 strain was isolated from the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, mucosal castings. These mucosal sheds have been demonstrated to play a role in horizontal symbiont transmission. Here, we report the draft 4.9 Mbp genome sequence of Pedobacter sp. strain Hv1.

  3. Inflammatory response to mucosal barrier injury after myeloablative therapy in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Donnelly, J.P.; Pauw, B.E. de

    2005-01-01

    We noted a significant increase of interleukin-8 (IL-8), LBP and CRP mirroring the pattern of mucosal barrier injury as measured by gut integrity (lactulose/rhamnose ratio), daily mucositis score (DMS) and serum citrulline concentrations of 32 haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients fo

  4. M cell targeting by a Claudin 4 targeting peptide can enhance mucosal IgA responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo David D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucosal immune surveillance is thought to be largely achieved through uptake by specialized epithelial M cells. We recently identified Claudin 4 as an M cell target receptor and developed a Claudin 4 targeting peptide (CPE that can mediate uptake of nanoparticles through Nasal Associated Lymphoid Tissue (NALT M cells. Methods Recombinant influenza hemagglutinin (HA and a version with the CPE peptide at the C-terminal end was used to immunize mice by the intranasal route along with a single dose of cholera toxin as an adjuvant. Serum and mucosal IgG and IgA responses were tested for reactivity to HA. Results We found that the recombinant HA was immunogenic on intranasal administration, and inclusion of the CPE targeting peptide induced higher mucosal IgA responses. This mucosal administration also induced systemic serum IgG responses with Th2 skewing, but targeting did not enhance IgG responses, suggesting that the IgG response to mucosal immunization is independent of the effects of CPE M cell targeting. Conclusions M cell targeting mediated by a Claudin 4-specific targeting peptide can enhance mucosal IgA responses above the response to non-targeted mucosal antigen. Since Claudin 4 has also been found to be regulated in human Peyer's patch M cells, the CPE targeting peptide could be a reasonable platform delivery technology for mucosal vaccination.

  5. Systematic review of anti-inflammatory agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Sarri, Triantafyllia; Bowen, Joanne; Di Palma, Mario; Kouloulias, Vassilios E.; Niscola, Pasquale; Riesenbeck, Dorothea; Stokman, Monique; Tissing, Wim; Yeoh, Eric; Elad, Sharon; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this project was to review the available literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of anti-inflammatory agents for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients. Materials and methods A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study

  6. Systematic review of amifostine for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Sarri, Triantafyllia; Bowen, Joanne; Di Palma, Mario; Kouloulias, Vassilios E.; Niscola, Pasquale; Riesenbeck, Dorothea; Stokman, Monique; Tissing, Wim; Yeoh, Eric; Elad, Sharon; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    The aim of this study was to review the available literature from 1966 until December 31, 2010 and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of amifostine for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients. A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study Group of

  7. Adrenergic influence on gastric mucosal blood flow in gastric fistula dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovendal, C P; Bech, K; Gottrup, F;

    1984-01-01

    by an initial increase in mucosal blood flow and in the last two periods a decrease in blood flow. alpha-Blockade (phentolamine) reduced the pentagastrin stimulated gastric acid secretion and gastric mucosal blood flow but the ratio between blood flow and acid secretion was increased, indicating a relatively...

  8. The role of sucralfate oral suspension in prevention of radiation induced mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Emami

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Mucositis is one of the most common complications of radiotherapy in head and neck cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate sucralfate mouthwash in prevention of radiation induced mucositis.
    • METHODS: A clinical randomized trial performed on 52 patients with head and neck cancers in Sayyed-Al-Shohada Hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. These patients randomly assigned in 2 groups of 26 patients. Placebo and sucralfate was used for control and experimental patients respectiv ly, from the beginning of radiotherapy. Patients were visited weekly until the end of treatment. Grade of the mucositis was evaluated according to WHO grading scale.
    • RESULTS: Sucralfate significantly reduced the mean grade of mucositis in weeks one to four (with P-values of 0.02, 0.02, 0.001 and 0.004, respectively. Development of grade3 mucositis was also lower in sucralfate group (P-value = 0.0001. But, time interval between radiotherapy and appearance of mucositis was not statistically different in the two groups (P-value = 0.9
    • CONCLUSIONS: This study indicated that using oral suspension of sucralfate reduced the grade of radiation-induced mucositis, but did not prevent or delay it.
    • KEYWORDS: Mucositis, radiotherapy, sucralfate, head and neck cancers.

  9. Host responses to Candida albicans: Th17 cells and mucosal candidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Conti, Heather R.; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans causes mucosal and disseminated candidiasis, which represent serious problems for the rapidly expanding immunocompromised population. Until recently, Th1-mediated immunity was thought to confer the primary protection, particularly for oral candidiasis. However, emerging data indicate that the newly-defined Th17 compartment appears to play the predominant role in mucosal candidiasis.

  10. The Potential Effect of Oral Microbiota in the Prediction of Mucositis During Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xia Zhu

    2017-04-01

    Interpretation: Oral microbiota changes correlate with the progression and aggravation of radiotherapy-induced mucositis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Microbiota-based strategies can be used for the early prediction and prevention of the incidence of severe mucositis during radiotherapy.

  11. USE OF CULTURED MUCOSAL GRAFTS TO COVER DEFECTS CAUSED BY VESTIBULOPLASTY - AN IN-VIVO STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RAGHOEBAR, GM; TOMSON, AM; SCHOLMA, J; BLAAUW, EH; WITJES, MJH; VISSINK, A

    Purpose: In oral and maxillofacial surgery palatal mucosal grafts are routinely used to cover mucosal defects caused by vestibuloplasty. However, the quantity of palatal mucosa is a limiting factor in more extensive operations. This study investigated whether autologous cultured sheets of mucosa can

  12. Systematic review of agents for the management of gastrointestinal mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson, Rachel J.; Keefe, Dorothy M. K.; Lalla, Rajesh V.; Bateman, Emma; Blijlevens, Nicole; Fijlstra, Margot; King, Emily E.; Stringer, Andrea M.; van der Velden, Walter J. F. M.; Yazbeck, Roger; Elad, Sharon; Bowen, Joanne M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the available literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of agents for the prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal mucositis. A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study Group of the Multinational Association of Supportive Car

  13. Lab-scale hydrogen peroxide data from ECBC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from small lab scale tests conducted at ECBC. It contains efficacy data as well as data on env conditions such as temperature, RH, and hydrogen peroxide vapor...

  14. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beijing K.; Sikes, Hadley D.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies. PMID:25460730

  15. [Risks of hydrogen peroxide irrigation in military surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïssy, J M; Guignard, B; Pats, B; Lenoir, B; Rouvier, B

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of severe complications due to injection of hydrogen peroxide under pressure into areas of muscular attrition in war wounds are reported. In both cases the administration of hydrogen peroxide was associated with tachypnoea, with major arterial desaturation and a precordial "mill-wheel" murmur was heard. In one case, these symptoms were followed by hemiplegia caused by paradoxical arterial gas embolism, and in the other case by a pulmonary oedema confirmed by computerized tomography. Both patients recovered under hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The release of gaseous oxygen under the effect of tissue catalase and the membrane peroxydasic activity of hydrogen peroxide initiate such complications. The injection of hydrogen peroxide under pressure into a closed or partially closed cavity should therefore be strictly prohibited.

  16. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen...... evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...... sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively....

  17. Acute toxicity, lipid peroxidation and ameliorative properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OKEY

    2014-01-29

    Jan 29, 2014 ... The lethal toxicity and lipid peroxidation studies of Alstonia boonei on alloxan induced diabetic rats were analysed. ... carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism (Sky, 2000;. Rother ..... as safe (GRAS) (Lorke, 1984). However ...

  18. High Test Peroxide High Sealing Conical Seal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High Test Peroxide (HTP) Highly Compatible High Sealing Conical Seals are necessary for ground test operations and space based applications. Current conical seals...

  19. A Novel Fluorescent Reagent for Analysis of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董素英; 苏美红; 聂丽华; 马会民

    2003-01-01

    8-(4,6-Dichloro-1,3,5-trazinoxy)quinoline(DTQ) was evaluated as a new fluorescent reagent for determining hydrogen peroxide.It was found that the fluorescence intensity of DTQ in alkaline medium could be dramatically enhanced upon addition of H2O2.Based on this effect,a simple and selective method for the spectrofluorimetric determination of hydrogen peroxide was estabhlished.The relative standard deviation of the method was found to be 1.1?for 9 replicate determinations of a 4.6×10-6mol/L hydrogen peroxide solution.The linear range was 2.3×10-7-2.3×10-5mol/L with a detection limit of 2.2×10-8mol/L(S/N=3).The ,method was attempted to determine hydrogen peroxide in synthetic human serum samples with satisfactory results.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide in breath condensate during a common cold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rijn Q. Jöbsis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in exhaled air condensate is elevated in inflammatory disorders of the lower respiratory tract. It is unknown whether viral colds contribute to exhaled H2O2.

  1. Assessment of hydrogen peroxide in breath condensate as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    resulting in the production of reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide 2. ... inflammation and oxidative stress in asthmatic patients. Keywords: ... cough sedatives, oral theophylline]. - Allergic ... PC for statistical analysis. Quantitative ...

  2. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beijing K. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies.

  3. Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Water Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electrochemical cell is proposed for the efficient generation of 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in pure water using only power, oxygen and water. H2O2 is an...

  4. Alkene dihydroxylation with malonoyl peroxides: catalysis using fluorinated alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picon, Sylvain; Rawling, Michael; Campbell, Matthew; Tomkinson, Nicholas C O

    2012-12-21

    The effect of fluorinated alcohols on the dihydroxylation of alkenes using cyclopropyl malonoyl peroxide is described. Addition of perfluoro-tert-butyl alcohol to a toluene solution of alkene and peroxide increases the rate of product formation and the stereoselectivity observed, providing a simple and effective method for acceleration of this important class of reaction. Basic hydrolysis of the crude reaction mixture provides access to syn-diols in high yield and stereoselectivity.

  5. Sodium Borohydride/Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells For Space Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Deelo, M. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Sodium Borohydride and Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells as they are applied to space applications. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell Test Stands; 4) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 5) MEA Performance; 6) Anode Polarization; and 7) Electrode Analysis. The benefits of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and benefits of sodium borohydride as a fuel are also addressed.

  6. Pilot study of ice-ball cryotherapy for radiation-induced oral mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyama, Waichiro; Ebihara, Satoshi [National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    Oral mucositis caused by radiotherapy is intractable and may worsen the patient`s nutritional condition and interrupt treatment. To reduce the incidence and severity of oral mucositis induced by cancer therapy and promote early improvement of its symptoms, we devised cryotherapy by ice balls using Elase (fibrinolysin and deoxyribonuclease, combined). The therapeutic effect of ice-ball cryotherapy was evaluated in 10 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity and pharynx who were undergoing radiotherapy. Cryotherapy was continued from the development of oral mucositis until its disappearance. The severity of various symptoms of mucositis were reduced by cryotherapy. Healing required 3 to 16 days (median, 7 days) after the end of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was not interrupted in any cases. This preliminary report suggests that ice-ball cryotherapy is an effective treatment for radiation-induced oral mucositis. (author).

  7. PPS nanoparticles as versatile delivery system to induce systemic and broad mucosal immunity after intranasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Armando; van der Vlies, André J; Martino, Mikael M; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Simeoni, Eleonora

    2011-01-17

    Degradable polymer nanoparticles (NPs, 50 nm) based on polypropylene sulfide (PPS) were conjugated to thiolated antigen and adjuvant proteins by reversible disulfide bonds and evaluated in mucosal vaccination. Ovalbumin was used as a model antigen, and antigen-conjugated NPs were administered intranasally in the mouse. We show penetration of nasal mucosae, transit via M cells, and uptake by antigen-presenting cells in the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue. Ovalbumin-conjugated NPs induced cytotoxic T lymphocytic responses in lung and spleen tissues, as well as humoral response in mucosal airways. Co-conjugation of the TLR5 ligand flagellin further enhanced humoral responses in the airways as well as in the distant vaginal and rectal mucosal compartments and induced cellular immune responses with a Th1 bias, in contrast with free flagellin. The PPS NP platform thus appears interesting as a platform for intranasally-administered mucosal vaccination for inducing broad mucosal immunity.

  8. Jumbo biopsy is useful for the diagnosis of colonic prolapsing mucosal polyps with diverticulosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shingo Kato; Kazutoshi Hashiguchi; Ryuichi Yamamoto; Mitsuru Seo; Takashi Matsuura; Kazuro Itoh; Akinori Iwashita; Soichiro Miura

    2006-01-01

    We report here a case of multiple prolapsing mucosal polyps with diverticulosis in the sigmoid colon. A 52-yearold man was admitted to our hospital because of bloody diarrhea. Colonoscopy and barium enema showed multiple diverticula, markedly thickened mucosal folds and polypoid lesions with mucus on the top of them in the sigmoid colon. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed thickening of the mucosal and submucosal layers.Several endoscopic biopsy specimens were taken from the polypoid lesions. Histological examination revealed only chronic inflammatory cell infiltration. In order to obtain a definite diagnosis, we performed endoscopic jumbo biopsy for the polypoid lesions after obtaining informed consent. Histological examination revealed marked lymphocyte infiltration, hemosiderin deposits and fibromuscular obliteration in the lamina propria, features similar to those of mucosal prolapsing syndrome. After anti-diarrhetic treatment, clinical findings were improved.Thus, jumbo biopsy is useful for diagnosis and treatment of prolapsing mucosal polyps.

  9. [Roxatidine in the treatment of gastroduodenal mucosal lesions in hepatic cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardini, C; Ventura, P; Abbati, G L; Rigo, G; Cioni, G; Cristani, A; Tincani, E; Ventura, E

    1994-11-01

    In about 50% of patients with liver cirrhosis, upper digestive bleeding is not due to oesaphageal varices rupture, but to a group of peculiar mucosal lesions usually referred as "congestive gastropathy" and "hepatogenic ulcer". The pathogenesis of such mucosal damage is still unclear: an important causative role is commonly thought to be played by portal hypertension, but the role of peptical pathway and of the mucosal barrier impairment must not be underscored as well. Aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of roxatidine in the long-term treatment of mucosal damage in 19 patients with liver cirrhosis. Patients showed a good tolerance and no side effects. The improvement of endoscopic pattern after a three months period of roxatidine therapy was statistically significant; moreover there was no occurrence of digestive bleeding. In conclusion, H2 antagonist may be considered as the drug of choice for the treatment of mucosal damage in patients with liver cirrhosis, for both its safety and effectiveness.

  10. Synthetic polyacrylate polymers as particulate intranasal vaccine delivery systems for the induction of mucosal immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Mehfuz; Simerska, Pavla; Toth, Istvan

    2010-04-01

    The nasal route as a site of vaccine delivery for both local and systemic effect is currently of considerable interest. The administration of vaccines to mucosal surfaces such as the nasopharynx associated lymphoid tissues confers many advantages since the nasal mucosa is a primary site through which most inhaled antigens are encountered. However, the success of intranasally delivered mucosal vaccines is limited by lack of effective vaccine formulations or delivery systems suitable for use in humans. This review provides a brief overview of the mucosal immune system at the nasal surface, enhancement techniques for induction of mucosal immune response after intranasal administration of particulate systems and an explanation of the inherent properties of polyacrylate polymer-based particulate systems that may facilitate mucosal immune responses.

  11. Changes of nitric oxide system and lipid peroxidation parameters in the digestive system of rats under conditions of acute stress, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomenko Iryna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in combination with being physiologically stressed often occurs in in the course of different pathologies. This situation may result in the alteration of digestive system functioning. The effect of stress brings about changes in the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS, arginase, cyclooxygenase (COX and lipid peroxidation, whereas the use of NSAIDs interrupts the multiple functions of the cell via the inhibition of prostaglandins (PGs synthesis. Taking into account that NOS and COX-systems are connected in their regulation, the aim of the study was to determine the role played by NOS and lipid peroxidation under conditions of the combined action of NSAIDs and stress. In our study, male rats were used. The NSAIDs (naproxen - a non-selective COX inhibitor, celecoxib - a selective COX-2 blocker, and the compound 2A5DHT (which is the active substance of dual COX, and the lipoxygenase (LOX inhibitor, darbufelone were all administered at a dose 10 mg/kg, prior to water restraint stress (WRS. WRS brought about an increase of inducible NOS (iNOS activity in the intestinal mucosal and muscular membranes, as well as in the pancreas. Because of this, constitutive NOS izoform (cNOS and arginase activities decreased. Moreover, the MDA concentration increased, indicating the development of oxidative stress. In our work, pretreatment with naproxen, as in the WRS model, engendered a decrease in iNOS activity. What is more, administration of Celecoxib did not change iNOS activity, as compared to WRS alone, and it showed a tendency to reduce lipid peroxidation. In addition, 2A5DHT prior WRS brought about a decrease of iNOS activity, with the subsequent rise of cNOS activity. Of note, MDA concentration decreased in all studied organs, indicating the reduction of lipid peroxidation under the action of the darbufelone active substance.

  12. An improved method for the quantification of SOA bound peroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutzel, Anke; Rodigast, Maria; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Böge, Olaf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-03-01

    An improvement is made to a method for the quantification of SOA-bound peroxides. The procedure is based on an iodometric-spectrophotometric method that has been commonly used for the determination of peroxides in a wide range of biological and environmental samples. The improved method was applied to determine the peroxide content of laboratory-generated SOA from α-pinene ozonolysis. Besides main improvements for the detection conditions, the use of more environmentally sound solvents is considered instead of carcinogenic solvents. In addition to the improved method for peroxide determination, the present study provides evidence for artefact formation caused by ultrasonic agitation for the extraction of organic compounds in SOA filter samples. The concentration of SOA-bound peroxides in the extracts from ultrasonic agitation were up to three times higher than those from a laboratory orbital shaker under the same extraction conditions, indicating peroxide formation caused by acoustic cavitation during extraction. In contrast, pinic acid, terebic acid and terpenylic acid showed significantly lower concentrations in the sample extract prepared using ultrasonic agitation, indicating that these compounds react with OH radicals that are formed from acoustic cavitation. Great care should be taken when extracting SOA samples and the use of ultrasound should be avoided.

  13. Recent Development in Hydrogen Peroxide Pumped Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledebuhr, A G; Antelman, D R; Dobie, D W; Gorman, T S; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; McMahon, D H; Ng, L C; Nielsen, D P; Ormsby, A E; Pittenger, L C; Robinson, J A; Skulina, K M; Taylor, W G; Urone, D A; Wilson, B A

    2004-03-22

    This paper describes the development of a lightweight high performance pump-fed divert and attitude control system (DACS). Increased kinetic Kill Vehicles (KV) capabilities (higher .v and acceleration capability) will especially be needed for boost phase engagements where a lower mass KV DACS enables smaller overall interceptors. To increase KV performance while reducing the total DACS dry mass (<10 kg), requires a design approach that more closely emulates those found in large launch vehicles, where pump-fed propulsion enables high propellant-mass-fraction systems. Miniaturized reciprocating pumps, on a scale compatible with KV applications, offer the potential of a lightweight DACS with both high {Delta}v and acceleration capability, while still enabling the rapid pulsing of the divert thrusters needed in the end-game fly-in. Pumped propulsion uses lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks, as the main vehicle structure and eliminates the need for high-pressure gas bottles, reducing mass and increasing the relative propellant load. Prior work used hydrazine and demonstrated a propellant mass fraction >0.8 and a vehicle propulsion dry mass of {approx}3 kg. Our current approach uses the non-toxic propellants 90% hydrogen peroxide and kerosene. This approach enables faster development at lower costs due to the ease of handling. In operational systems these non-toxic propellants can simplify the logistics for manned environments including shipboard applications. This DACS design configuration is expected to achieve sufficient mass flows to support divert thrusters in the 1200 N to 1330 N (270 lbf to 300 lbf) range. The DACS design incorporates two pairs of reciprocating differential piston pumps (oxidizer and fuel), a warm-gas drive system, compatible bi-propellant thrusters, lightweight valves, and lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks. This paper summarizes the current development status and plans.

  14. Hydrogen Peroxide in Groundwater at Rifle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X.; Nico, P. S.; Williams, K. H.; Hobson, C.; Davis, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as a reactive transient presenting ubiquitously in natural surface waters, can react with a large suite of biologically important and redox-sensitive trace elements. The dominant source of H2O2 in natural waters has long been thought to be photo-oxidation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by molecular oxygen to produce superoxide radical, which then proceeds via dismutation to generate H2O2. However, recent studies have indicated that dark production of H2O2 in deep seawater, principally by biological production, is potentially on par with photochemical generation. Here, we present evidence for abiotic dark generation of H2O2 in groundwater in an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO. Background H2O2 concentrations were determined in situ using a sensitive chemiluminescence-based method. Our results suggest H2O2 concentrations ranged from lower than the detection limit (1 nM) to 54 nM in different monitoring wells at the site, and the concentrations exhibited close correlations with profiles of dissolved oxygen and iron concentrations in the wells, indicating a possible metal redox cycling mechanism. In addition, dissolved natural organic matter, which could potentially coordinate the interconversion of ferric and ferrous species, might also play an important role in H2O2 formation. While biologically mediated activities have been recognized as the major sink of H2O2, the detected H2O2 pattern in groundwater suggests the existence of a balance between H2O2 source and decay, which potentially involves a cascade of biogeochemically significant processes, including the interconversion of ferrous/ferric species, the generation of more reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl radical, the depletion of dissolved oxygen and further transformation of natural organic matter and other chemical pollutants.

  15. The therapeutic effect of PLAG against oral mucositis in hamster and mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha-Reum Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced mucositis can limit the effectiveness of cancer therapy and increase the risk of infections. However, no specific therapy for protection against mucositis is currently available. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of PLAG (1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-3-acetyl-rac-glycerol, acetylated diglyceride in 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-induced oral mucositis animal models. Hamsters were administered 5-FU (80 mg/kg intraperitoneally on days 0, 6, and 9. The animals’ cheek pouches were then scratched equally with the tip of an 18-gauge needle on days 1, 2, and 7. PLAG was administered daily at 250 mg/kg/day. PLAG administration significantly reduced 5-FU/scratching–induced mucositis. Dramatic reversal of weight loss in PLAG-treated hamsters with mucositis was observed. Histochemical staining data also revealed newly differentiated epidermis and blood vessels in the cheek pouches of PLAG-treated hamsters, indicative of recovery. Whole blood analyses indicated that PLAG prevents 5-FU–induced excessive neutrophil transmigration to the infection site and eventually stabilizes the number of circulating neutrophils. In a mouse mucositis model, mice with 5-FU–induced disease treated with PLAG exhibited resistance to body-weight loss compared with mice that received 5-FU or 5-FU/scratching alone. PLAG also dramatically reversed mucositis-associated weight loss and inhibited mucositis-induced inflammatory responses in the tongue and serum. These data suggest that PLAG enhances recovery from 5-FU–induced oral mucositis and may therefore be a useful therapeutic agent for treating side effects of chemotherapy, such as mucositis and cachexia.

  16. Hydrophobicity of mucosal surface and its relationship to gut barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaofa; Caputo, Francis J; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2008-03-01

    Loss of the gut barrier has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and, thus, understanding the intestinal barrier is of potential clinical importance. An important, but relatively neglected, component of the gut barrier is the unstirred mucus layer, which through its hydrophobic and other properties serves as an important barrier to bacterial and other factors within the gut lumen. Thus, the goal of this study was to establish a reproducible method of measuring mucosal hydrophobicity and test the hypothesis that conditions that decrease mucosal hydrophobicity are associated with increased gut permeability. Hydrophobicity was measured in various segments of normal gut by measuring the contact angle of an aqueous droplet placed on the mucosal surface using a commercial goniometer. Second, the effect of the mucolytic agent N-acetyl cysteine on mucosal hydrophobicity and gut permeability was measured, as was the effects of increasing periods of in vivo gut ischemia on these parameters. Gut ischemia was induced by superior mesenteric artery occlusion, and gut permeability was measured by the mucosal-to-serosal passage of fluoresceine isothiocyanate-dextran (4.3 kDa) (FD4) across the everted sacs of ileum. Intestinal mucosal hydrophobicity showed a gradual increase from the duodenum to the end of the ileum and remained at high level in the cecum, colon, and rectum. Both N-acetyl cysteine treatment and ischemia caused a dose-dependent decrease in mucosal hydrophobicity, which significantly correlated increased gut permeability. Mucosal hydrophobicity of the intestine can be reproducibly measured, and decreases in mucosal hydrophobicity closely correlate with increased gut permeability. These results suggest that mucosal hydrophobicity can be a reliable method of measuring the barrier function of the unstirred mucus layer and a useful parameter in evaluating the pathogenesis of gut barrier dysfunction.

  17. Optimization of mucosal responses after intramuscular immunization with integrase defective lentiviral vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Rossi

    Full Text Available Many infectious agents infiltrate the host at the mucosal surfaces and then spread systemically. This implies that an ideal vaccine should induce protective immune responses both at systemic and mucosal sites to counteract invasive mucosal pathogens. We evaluated the in vivo systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune response induced in mice by intramuscular administration of an integrase defective lentiviral vector (IDLV carrying the ovalbumin (OVA transgene as a model antigen (IDLV-OVA, either alone or in combination with sublingual adjuvanted OVA protein. Mice immunized intramuscularly with OVA and adjuvant were compared with IDLV-OVA immunization. Mice sublingually immunized only with OVA and adjuvant were used as a positive control of mucosal responses. A single intramuscular dose of IDLV-OVA induced functional antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in spleen, draining and distal lymph nodes and, importantly, in the lamina propria of the large intestine. These results were similar to those obtained in a prime-boost regimen including one IDLV immunization and two mucosal boosts with adjuvanted OVA or vice versa. Remarkably, only in groups vaccinated with IDLV-OVA, either alone or in prime-boost regimens, the mucosal CD8+ T cell response persisted up to several months from immunization. Importantly, following IDLV-OVA immunization, the mucosal boost with protein greatly increased the plasma IgG response and induced mucosal antigen-specific IgA in saliva and vaginal washes. Overall, intramuscular administration of IDLV followed by protein boosts using the sublingual route induced strong, persistent and complementary systemic and mucosal immune responses, and represents an appealing prime-boost strategy for immunization including IDLV as a delivery system.

  18. The effect of i.v. indomethacin on the gastric mucosal electrical potential difference and blood flow in anaesthetized dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Ewald, H; Holm, I E

    1988-01-01

    Indomethacin inhibits prostaglandin synthesis and causes gastric mucosal damage. The correlation between the gastric mucosal function and gastric blood flow was investigated. The intragastric liquid junction corrected potential difference (PD) across the stomach wall was used to characterize...... reduction was seen after indomethacin. PD and flow reductions correlated (R = 0.92). As indomethacin given IV caused a parallel impairment of gastric mucosal function and blood flow, part of the indomethacin-related mucosal damaging effects might be due to the flow reduction....

  19. Bioreactor Mass Transport Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Begley, Cynthia M.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research efforts were to develop both a simulation tool and a series of experiments to provide a quantitative assessment of mass transport in the NASA rotating wall perfused vessel (RWPV) bioreactor to be flown on EDU#2. This effort consisted of a literature review of bioreactor mass transport studies, the extension of an existing scalar transport computer simulation to include production and utilization of the scalar, and the evaluation of experimental techniques for determining mass transport in these vessels. Since mass transport at the cell surface is determined primarily by the relative motion of the cell assemblage and the surrounding fluid, a detailed assessment of the relative motion was conducted. Results of the simulations of the motion of spheres in the RWPV under microgravity conditions are compared with flight data from EDU#1 flown on STS-70. The mass transport across the cell membrane depends upon the environment, the cell type, and the biological state of the cell. Results from a literature review of cell requirements of several scalars are presented. As a first approximation, a model with a uniform spatial distribution of utilization or production was developed and results from these simulations are presented. There were two candidate processes considered for the experimental mass transport evaluations. The first was to measure the dissolution rate of solid or gel beads. The second was to measure the induced fluorescence of beads as a stimulant (for example hydrogen peroxide) is infused into the vessel. Either technique would use video taped images of the process for recording the quantitative results. Results of preliminary tests of these techniques are discussed.

  20. Effect of Oral Insulin on the Severity and Recovery of Methotrexate-induced Gastrointestinal Mucositis in the Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, Nicoline S S; Rings, Edmond H H M; Havinga, Rick; van der Aa, Stijn A J; Groen, Albert K; Tissing, Wim J E

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gastrointestinal (GI) mucositis is a severe side effect of chemo- and radiotherapy. Oral insulin has been suggested as possible intestinal growth factor and possible intervention for GI mucositis. We aimed to determine the effect of oral insulin on the severity and recovery of mucositis

  1. Continuous enteral administration can overcome the limited capacity to absorb glucose in rats with methotrexate-induced gastrointestinal mucositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijlstra, Margot; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; van Dijk, Theo H.; Plosch, Torsten; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis often suffer from weight loss. It is not well known how to enterally feed mucositis patients, potentially experiencing malabsorption. Recently, we showed in a rat model of methotrexate (MTX)-induced mucositis that intestinal absorption of

  2. Herpetiform genital lesions in a heifer with mucosal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabis, J J; Szkudlarek, L; Risatti, G R; Sura, R; Garmendia, A E; Van Kruiningen, H J

    2008-03-01

    A 14-month-old heifer with a 17-day history of unresponsive bloody diarrhea was necropsied. There were focal, pink-red erosions of the nares and hard palate; ulcers and fissures of the tongue; and multiple ulcerative lesions of the alimentary canal. Interdigital skin of both rear limbs was ulcerated and bleeding; and the margins of the vulva contained punctiform red ulcers. The gross lesions were consistent with mucosal disease. Histopathology and laboratory testing ruled out rinderpest, foot-and-mouth disease, and vesicular stomatitis, and identified bovine virus diarrhea virus to be the cause of this disease. Lesions of the vulva similar to those seen in some stages of infectious pustular vulvovaginitis were negative for bovine herpesvirus-1 and tested positive for bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen by immunohistochemistry.

  3. Ligation-assisted endoscopic mucosal resection of gastric heterotopic pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mouen A Khashab; Oscar W Cummings; John M DeWitt

    2009-01-01

    Heterotopic pancreas is a congenital anomaly characterized by ectopic pancreatic tissue.Treatment of heterotopic pancreas may include expectant observation,endoscopic resection or surgery.The aim of this report was to describe the technique of ligation-assisted endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for resection of heterotopic pancreas of the stomach.Two patients (both female,mean age 32 years) were referred for management of gastric subepithelial tumors.Endoscopic ultrasound in both disclosed small hypoechoic masses in the mucosa and submucosa.Band ligation-assisted EMR was performed in both cases without complications.Pathology from the resected tumors revealed heterotopic pancreas arising from the submucosa.Margins were free of pancreatic tissue.Ligation-assisted EMR is technically feasible and may be considered for the endoscopic management of heterotopic pancreas.

  4. NOD1-Mediated Mucosal Host Defense against Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Watanabe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the stomach with Helicobacter pylori is an important risk factor for gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Although it has been well established that persistent colonization by H. pylori is associated with adaptive Th1 responses, the innate immune responses leading to these Th1 responses are poorly defined. Recent studies have shown that the activation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1 in gastric epithelial cells plays an important role in innate immune responses against H. pylori. The detection of H. pylori-derived ligands by cytosolic NOD1 induces several host defense factors, including antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, and chemokines. In this paper, we review the molecular mechanisms by which NOD1 contributes to mucosal host defense against H. pylori infection of the stomach.

  5. Effects of Mycotoxins on mucosal microbial infection and related pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Dongwook; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2015-10-30

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites detected in many agricultural commodities and water-damaged indoor environments. Susceptibility to mucosal infectious diseases is closely associated with immune dysfunction caused by mycotoxin exposure in humans and other animals. Many mycotoxins suppress immune function by decreasing the proliferation of activated lymphocytes, impairing phagocytic function of macrophages, and suppressing cytokine production, but some induce hypersensitive responses in different dose regimes. The present review describes various mycotoxin responses to infectious pathogens that trigger mucosa-associated diseases in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts of humans and other animals. In particular, it focuses on the effects of mycotoxin exposure on invasion, pathogen clearance, the production of cytokines and immunoglobulins, and the prognostic implications of interactions between infectious pathogens and mycotoxin exposure.

  6. Contributions of Neutrophils to Resolution of Mucosal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Sean P.; Ehrentraut, Stefan F.; Glover, Louise E.; Kominsky, Douglas J.; Campbell, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMN) recruitment from the blood stream into surrounding tissues involves a regulated series of events central to acute responses in host defense. Accumulation of PMN within mucosal tissues have historically been considered pathognomonic features of both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. Historically PMNs have been deemed necessary but detrimental when recruited, given the potential for tissue damage that results from a variety of mechanisms. Recent work, however, has altered our preconcieved notions of PMN contributions to inflammatory processes. In particular, significant evidence implicates a central role for the PMN in triggering inflammatory resolution. Such mechanisms involve both metabolic and biochemical crosstalk pathways during the intimate interactions of PMN with other cell types at inflammatory sites. Here, we highlight several recent examples of how PMN coordinate the resolution of ongoing inflammation, with a particular focus on the gastrointestinal mucosa. PMID:22968707

  7. Histopathology of cutaneous and mucosal lesions in human paracoccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Uribe

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available Biopsies from cutaneous and mucosal lesions from 40 patients with active paracoccidioidomycosis, were studied histopathologically. All cases exhibited chronic granulomatous inflammation and 38 also presented suppuration; this picture corresponded to the mixed mycotic granuloma (MMG. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and the transepidermic (or epithelial elimination of the parasite, were observed in all cases. In paracoccidioidomycosis elimination takes place through formation of progressive edema, accompained by exocytosis. The edema gives rise to spongiosis, microvesicles and microabscesses which not only contain the fungus but also, various cellular elements. Cells in charge of the phagocytic process were essentialy Langhans giant cells; PMN's, epithelioid and foreign body giant cells were poor phagocytes. An additional finding was the presence of fibrosis in most biopsies.

  8. Colonic Mucosal Epigenome and Microbiome Development in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Alan Harris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic and microbiome changes during pediatric development have been implicated as important elements in the developmental origins of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs including Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, which are linked to early onset colorectal cancer (CRC. Colonic mucosal samples from 22 control children between 3.5 and 17.5 years of age were studied by Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips and, in 10 cases, by 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Intercalating age-specific DNA methylation and microbiome changes were identified, which may have significant translational relevance in the developmental origins of IBD and CRC.

  9. CCL5 regulation of mucosal chlamydial immunity and infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igietseme Joseph U

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following genital chlamydial infection, an early T helper type 1 (Th1-associated immune response precedes the activation and recruitment of specific Th1 cells bearing distinct chemokine receptors, subsequently leading to the clearance of Chlamydia. We have shown that CCR5, a receptor for CCL5, is crucial for protective chlamydial immunity. Our laboratory and others have also demonstrated that CCL5 deficiencies found in man and animals can increase the susceptibility and progression of infectious diseases by modulating mucosal immunity. These findings suggest the CCR5-CCL5 axis is necessary for optimal chlamydial immunity. We hypothesized CCL5 is required for protective humoral and cellular immunity against Chlamydia. Results The present study revealed that CCR5 and CCL5 mRNAs are elevated in the spleen, iliac lymph nodes (ILNs, and genital mucosa following Chlamydia muriduram challenge. Antibody (Ab-mediated inhibition of CCL5 during genital chlamydial infection suppressed humoral and Th1 > Th2 cellular responses by splenic-, ILN-, and genital mucosa-derived lymphocytes. Antigen (Ag-specific proliferative responses of CD4+ T cells from spleen, ILNs, and genital organs also declined after CCL5 inhibition. Conclusion The suppression of these responses correlated with delayed clearance of C. muriduram, which indicate chlamydial immunity is mediated by Th1 immune responses driven in part by CCL5. Taken together with other studies, the data show that CCL5 mediates the temporal recruitment and activation of leukocytes to mitigate chlamydial infection through enhancing adaptive mucosal humoral and cellular immunity.

  10. Comparison of Alloderm and mucosal graft in mandibular vestibuloplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoodhashemi H.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The usage of free gingival grafts for vestibuloplasty is a routine procedure. The free gingival procedure requires harvesting the graft from a donor site which increases morbidity and the risk of surgical complications. In addition, adequate amount of donor tissue may not be available. Acceptable results of Alloderm application as a substitute for autogenous soft tissue grafts are: Not exposing the patient to an additional surgery, no donor site morbidity, unlimited availability, decreasing the bleeding during the surgery, decreasing the surgical complications, and better color match. The aim of this study was to evaluate the maintenance of the vestibular depth in vestibuloplasty with mucosal graft and Alloderm."nMaterials and Methods: Both methods of anterior mandibular vestibuloplasty by Clark, utilizing Alloderm and mucosal grafts, were employed in ten clinical cases. During the surgeries, half the prepared recipient sites received Alloderm, while the remaining half received autografts in a randomized fashion. Immediately, 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively, the variables of graft rejection, depth of vestibule and the degree of relapse were evaluated. SPSS software was used for analysis of the data and the methods used for "statistical tests" were as follows: Friedman Method, Paired sample t-test, Smirnov-kolmogrove Method. (The statistical significance level was established at P-value<0.05."nResults: The mean difference of the relapse measurements in both methods throughout the survey did not have significant predictive value (P>0.05. Similar results were achieved for the mean difference of depth of the vestibule."nConclusion: In patients undergoing Vestibuloplasty, Alloderm could be material of choice to be utilized as autogenic soft tissue grafts in pre-prosthesis procedures.

  11. RpoS controls the Vibrio cholerae mucosal escape response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Toftgaard Nielsen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae causes a severe diarrhoeal disease by secreting a toxin during colonization of the epithelium in the small intestine. Whereas the initial steps of the infectious process have been intensively studied, the last phases have received little attention. Confocal microscopy of V. cholerae O1-infected rabbit ileal loops captured a distinctive stage in the infectious process: 12 h post-inoculation, bacteria detach from the epithelial surface and move into the fluid-filled lumen. Designated the "mucosal escape response," this phenomenon requires RpoS, the stationary phase alternative sigma factor. Quantitative in vivo localization assays corroborated the rpoS phenotype and showed that it also requires HapR. Expression profiling of bacteria isolated from ileal loop fluid and mucus demonstrated a significant RpoS-dependent upregulation of many chemotaxis and motility genes coincident with the emigration of bacteria from the epithelial surface. In stationary phase cultures, RpoS was also required for upregulation of chemotaxis and motility genes, for production of flagella, and for movement of bacteria across low nutrient swarm plates. The hapR mutant produced near-normal numbers of flagellated cells, but was significantly less motile than the wild-type parent. During in vitro growth under virulence-inducing conditions, the rpoS mutant produced 10- to 100-fold more cholera toxin than the wild-type parent. Although the rpoS mutant caused only a small over-expression of the genes encoding cholera toxin in the ileal loop, it resulted in a 30% increase in fluid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Together, these results show that the mucosal escape response is orchestrated by an RpoS-dependent genetic program that activates chemotaxis and motility functions. This may furthermore coincide with reduced virulence gene expression, thus preparing the organism for the next stage in its life cycle.

  12. Classification of pulmonary airway disease based on mucosal color analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Melissa; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Riker, David; Ferguson, John Scott; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Airway mucosal color changes occur in response to the development of bronchial diseases including lung cancer, cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma. These associated changes are often visualized using standard macro-optical bronchoscopy techniques. A limitation to this form of assessment is that the subtle changes that indicate early stages in disease development may often be missed as a result of this highly subjective assessment, especially in inexperienced bronchoscopists. Tri-chromatic CCD chip bronchoscopes allow for digital color analysis of the pulmonary airway mucosa. This form of analysis may facilitate a greater understanding of airway disease response. A 2-step image classification approach is employed: the first step is to distinguish between healthy and diseased bronchoscope images and the second is to classify the detected abnormal images into 1 of 4 possible disease categories. A database of airway mucosal color constructed from healthy human volunteers is used as a standard against which statistical comparisons are made from mucosa with known apparent airway abnormalities. This approach demonstrates great promise as an effective detection and diagnosis tool to highlight potentially abnormal airway mucosa identifying a region possibly suited to further analysis via airway forceps biopsy, or newly developed micro-optical biopsy strategies. Following the identification of abnormal airway images a neural network is used to distinguish between the different disease classes. We have shown that classification of potentially diseased airway mucosa is possible through comparative color analysis of digital bronchoscope images. The combination of the two strategies appears to increase the classification accuracy in addition to greatly decreasing the computational time.

  13. RpoS controls the Vibrio cholerae mucosal escape response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Toftgaard Nielsen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae causes a severe diarrhoeal disease by secreting a toxin during colonization of the epithelium in the small intestine. Whereas the initial steps of the infectious process have been intensively studied, the last phases have received little attention. Confocal microscopy of V. cholerae O1-infected rabbit ileal loops captured a distinctive stage in the infectious process: 12 h post-inoculation, bacteria detach from the epithelial surface and move into the fluid-filled lumen. Designated the "mucosal escape response," this phenomenon requires RpoS, the stationary phase alternative sigma factor. Quantitative in vivo localization assays corroborated the rpoS phenotype and showed that it also requires HapR. Expression profiling of bacteria isolated from ileal loop fluid and mucus demonstrated a significant RpoS-dependent upregulation of many chemotaxis and motility genes coincident with the emigration of bacteria from the epithelial surface. In stationary phase cultures, RpoS was also required for upregulation of chemotaxis and motility genes, for production of flagella, and for movement of bacteria across low nutrient swarm plates. The hapR mutant produced near-normal numbers of flagellated cells, but was significantly less motile than the wild-type parent. During in vitro growth under virulence-inducing conditions, the rpoS mutant produced 10- to 100-fold more cholera toxin than the wild-type parent. Although the rpoS mutant caused only a small over-expression of the genes encoding cholera toxin in the ileal loop, it resulted in a 30% increase in fluid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Together, these results show that the mucosal escape response is orchestrated by an RpoS-dependent genetic program that activates chemotaxis and motility functions. This may furthermore coincide with reduced virulence gene expression, thus preparing the organism for the next stage in its life cycle.

  14. Ganglion Cells Are Frequently Present in Pediatric Mucosal Colorectal Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Alexandra E; Pacheco, M Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HD) rarely presents as chronic constipation after the newborn period. At our institution, calretinin immunohistochemistry (CAL) is frequently requested by clinicians on rectal mucosal biopsies (RMBs) taken during colonoscopy in older children in whom suspicion for HD is low. We hypothesized that review of these biopsies would frequently reveal ganglion cells (GCs). We reviewed features of mucosal biopsies (November 2013 to September 2015) from children ≥1 year of age on which clinicians had requested CAL on at least one specimen. A total of 93 biopsies with paired CAL from 83 patients were suitable for study (ages 1-18 years, M:F 1.2). Submitted clinical indication was constipation in 62 patients (75%). GCs were found within or subjacent to muscularis mucosa in 63 biopsies (68%), 12 (19%) of which were designated from a specific anatomic site, eg, 2 or 3 cm. In 25 of 63 (40%) cases, GCs were identified on one of the first 3 sections (median 5th, range 1st-54th). Forty-six cases (73%) contained no or 1 mm of SM, and 21 (70%) had no SM. CAL was positive in 28 (93%) and equivocal/weak in 2 (7%); no additional work-up for HD was pursued. The data suggest that H&E sections of RMBs can exclude HD at a specified site in many cases and provide the basis for a future study examining the utility of CAL in RMBs without SM as a means for excluding HD.

  15. Serological assessment of gastric mucosal atrophy in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bornschein Jan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive tools for gastric cancer screening and diagnosis are lacking. Serological testing with the detection of pepsinogen 1 (PG1, pepsinogen 2 (PG2 and gastrin 17 (G17 offers the possibility to detect preneoplastic gastric mucosal conditions. Aim of this study was to assess the performance of these serological tests in the presence of gastric neoplasia. Methods Histological and serological samples of 118 patients with gastric cancer have been assessed for tumor specific characteristics (Laurén type, localisation, degree of mucosal abnormalities (intestinal metaplasia, atrophy and serological parameters (PG1, PG2, PG1/2-ratio, G17, H. pylori IgG, CagA status. Association of the general factors to the different serological values have been statistically analyzed. Results Patients with intestinal type gastric cancer had lower PG1 levels and a lower PG1/2-ratio compared to those with diffuse type cancer (p = 0.003. The serum levels of PG2 itself and G17 were not significantly altered. H. pylori infection in general had no influence on the levels of PG1, PG2 and G17 in the serum of gastric cancer patients. There was a trend towards lower PG1 levels in case of positive CagA-status (p = 0.058. The degree of both intestinal metaplasia and atrophy correlated inversely with serum levels for PG1 and the PG1/2-ratio (p Conclusions Glandular atrophy and a positive CagA status are determinant factors for decreased pepsinogen 1 levels in the serum of patients with gastric cancer. The serological assessment of gastric atrophy by analysis of serum pepsinogen is only adequate for patients with intestinal type cancer.

  16. Loss of NHE8 expression impairs intestinal mucosal integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiping; Li, Jing; Zhao, Yang; Johansson, Malin E. V.; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The newest member of the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE) family, NHE8, is abundantly expressed at the apical membrane of the intestinal epithelia. We previously reported that mucin 2 expression was significantly decreased in the colon in NHE8−/− mice, suggesting that NHE8 is involved in intestinal mucosal protection. In this study, we further evaluated the role of NHE8 in intestinal epithelial protection after dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) challenge. Compared with wild-type mice, NHE8−/− mice have increased bacterial adhesion and inflammation, especially in the distal colon. NHE8−/− mice are also susceptible to DSS treatment. Real-time PCR detected a remarkable increase in the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-4 in DSS-treated NHE8−/− mice compared with DSS-treated wild-type littermates. Immunohistochemistry showed a disorganized epithelial layer in the colon of NHE8−/− mice. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed a reduction in the number of mature goblet cells and the area of the goblet cell theca in NHE8−/− mice. Phyloxine/tartrazine staining revealed a decrease in functional Paneth cell population in the NHE8−/− small intestinal crypt. The expression of enteric defensins was also decreased in NHE8−/− mice. The reduced mucin production in goblet cells and antimicrobial peptides production in Paneth cells lead to disruption of the intestinal mucosa protection. Therefore, NHE8 may be involved in the establishment of intestinal mucosal integrity by regulating the functions of goblet and Paneth cells. PMID:26505975

  17. Ileal mucosal bile acid absorption is increased in Cftr knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somasundaram Sivagurunathan

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive loss of bile acids in stool has been reported in patients with cystic fibrosis. Some data suggest that a defect in mucosal bile acid transport may be the mechanism of bile acid malabsorption in these individuals. However, the molecular basis of this defect is unknown. This study examines the expression of the ileal bile acid transporter protein (IBAT and rates of diffusional (sodium independent and active (sodium dependent uptake of the radiolabeled bile acid taurocholate in mice with targeted disruption of the cftr gene. Methods Wild-type, heterozygous cftr (+/- and homozygous cftr (-/- mice were studied. Five one-cm segments of terminal ileum were excised, everted and mounted onto thin stainless steel rods and incubated in buffer containing tracer 3H-taurocholate. Simultaneously, adjacent segments of terminal ileum were taken and processed for immunohistochemistry and Western blots using an antibody against the IBAT protein. Results In all ileal segments, taurocholate uptake rates were fourfold higher in cftr (-/- and two-fold higher in cftr (+/- mice compared to wild-type mice. Passive uptake was not significantly higher in cftr (-/- mice than in controls. IBAT protein was comparably increased. Immuno-staining revealed that the greatest increases occurred in the crypts of cftr (-/- animals. Conclusions In the ileum, IBAT protein densities and taurocholate uptake rates are elevated in cftr (-/- mice > cftr (+/- > wild-type mice. These findings indicate that bile acid malabsorption in cystic fibrosis is not caused by a decrease in IBAT activity at the brush border. Alternative mechanisms are proposed, such as impaired bile acid uptake caused by the thick mucus barrier in the distal small bowel, coupled with a direct negative regulatory role for cftr in IBAT function.

  18. The Amoebicidal Effect of Ergosterol Peroxide Isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Menchaca, Thuluz; Suárez-Medellín, Jorge; Del Ángel-Piña, Christian; Trigos, Ángel

    2015-12-01

    Dysentery is an inflammation of the intestine caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica and is a recurrent health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. Because of the magnitude of this disease, finding novel strategies for treatment that does not affect human cells is necessary. Ergosterol peroxide is a sterol particularly known as a major cytotoxic agent with a wide spectrum of biological activities produced by edible and medicinal mushrooms. The aim of this report is to evaluate the amoebicidal activity of ergosterol peroxide (5α, 8α-epidioxy-22E-ergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol isolated from 5α, 8α-epidioxy-22E-ergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol) (Jacq.) P. Kumm. f. sp. Florida. Our results show that ergosterol peroxide produced a strong cytotoxic effect against amoebic growth. The inhibitory concentration IC50 of ergosterol peroxide was evaluated. The interaction between E. histolytica and ergosterol peroxide in vitro resulted in strong amoebicidal activity (IC50  = 4.23 nM) that may be due to the oxidatory effect on the parasitic membrane. We also tested selective toxicity of ergosterol peroxide using a cell line CCL-241, a human epithelial cell line isolated from normal human fetal intestinal tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the cytotoxicity of ergosterol peroxide against E. histolytica, which uncovers a new biological property of the lipidic compound isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.) P. Kumm. f. sp. Florida.

  19. [Determination of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater by fluorometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yan-Fen; Huang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Guang-Fu; Li, Rui-Ping

    2008-04-01

    The present paper introduces a new method using spectrofluorimetric analysis to determine the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater. In this method, an oxidation reaction is conducted between o-phenylenediamine (OPDA) and hydrogen peroxide in the buffer medium of NaAc-HAc at pH 4. 48 to form a new product 2,3-diaminophenazine (DAPN). Then the fluorescence intensity of DAPN is measured and 426 and 554 nm are chosen as the excitation and emission wavelengths. Therefore, with the foreknown concentration of input hydrogen peroxide, a series of fluorescence intensities of DAPN are acquired according to a series of different concentration of hydrogen peroxide as input, greatly improving the selectivity and sensibility of the system. A relationship between the input concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the fluorescence intensity of DAPN is then obtained using a linear regression. Results show that fluorescence intensity of DAPN is in proportion to the increase in the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the range of 9.0 x 10(-7) -3.56 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1) almost linearly. The linear equation is F = 1.15c (micromol x L(-1))+398.6 (r = 0.999 1) and the detection limit is 2.7 x10(-7) mol x L(-1) (n = 11). The relative standard deviation of 11 parallel measurements with the concentration of H2O2 at 7.5 x 10(-6) and 3.0 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1), is 2.2 and 1.0%, respectively. Results from DPD method was used to verify this method. The interference of foreign iron was studied. Compared to the traditional methods, this binary system has a simplified operation and high sensitivity. The proposed method has been successfully applied to determine the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide potentiates organophosphate toxicosis in chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banan K. Al-Baggou

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of hydrogen peroxide(H2O2 on the acute toxicity of organophosphate insecticides dichlorvos and diazinon and their inhibitoryactions on plasma, brain and liver cholinesterase activities. Material and Methods: H2O2 was given indrinking water (0.5% v/v for 2 weeks in unsexed day old chicks, a regimen known to induce oxidativestress in this species. A control group received drinking tap water. All experiments were conducted onthe chicks at the age of 15 days after exposure to H2O2. The acute (24 h oral LD50 values of dichlorvosand diazinon in the insecticidal preparations as determined by the up-and-down method in the controlchicks were 9.4 and 15.6 mg/kg, respectively. Results: The poisoned chicks manifested signs ofcholinergic toxicosis within one hour after the dosing including salivation, lacrimation, gasping, frequentdefecation, drooping of wings, tremors, convulsions and recumbency. The acute (24 h oral LD50 valuesof dichlorvos and diazinon in chicks provided with H2O2 were reduced to 3.5 and 6.5 mg/kg, by 63 and58%, respectively when compared to respective control LD50 values. The intoxicated chicks also showedcholinergic signs of toxicosis as described above. Plasma, brain and liver cholinesterase activities of thechicks exposed to H2O2 were significantly lower than their respective control (H2O values by 25, 28 and27%, respectively. Oral dosing of chicks with dichlorvos at 3 mg/kg significantly inhibited cholinesteraseactivities in the plasma, brain and liver of both control (42-67% and H2O2-treated (15-59% chicks.Diazinon at 5 mg/kg, orally also inhibited cholinesterase activities in the plasma, brain and liver of bothcontrol (36-66% and H2O2-treated (15-30% chicks. In the H2O2 groups, dichlorvos inhibition of livercholinesterase activity and diazinon inhibition of liver and brain cholinesterase activities weresignificantly lesser than those of the respective values of

  1. Challenges in Mucosal HIV Vaccine Development: Lessons from Non-Human Primate Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskra Tuero

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An efficacious HIV vaccine is urgently needed to curb the AIDS pandemic. The modest protection elicited in the phase III clinical vaccine trial in Thailand provided hope that this goal might be achieved. However, new approaches are necessary for further advances. As HIV is transmitted primarily across mucosal surfaces, development of immunity at these sites is critical, but few clinical vaccine trials have targeted these sites or assessed vaccine-elicited mucosal immune responses. Pre-clinical studies in non-human primate models have facilitated progress in mucosal vaccine development by evaluating candidate vaccine approaches, developing methodologies for collecting and assessing mucosal samples, and providing clues to immune correlates of protective immunity for further investigation. In this review we have focused on non-human primate studies which have provided important information for future design of vaccine strategies, targeting of mucosal inductive sites, and assessment of mucosal immunity. Knowledge gained in these studies will inform mucosal vaccine design and evaluation in human clinical trials.

  2. Cryotherapy effect on oral mucositis severity among recipients of bone marrow transplantation: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyem, Abdel-Qader Mahmoud

    2014-08-01

    Oral mucositis is a distressing toxic effect of cancer therapy and one of the major side effects of the myeloablative conditioning used to prepare patients for bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Oral cryotherapy is one of the recent modalities used to prevent and manage oral mucositis. The purpose of this review is to clarify the cryotherapy effect on oral mucositis severity among patients receiving myeloablative conditioning followed by BMT. A literature search was performed using six different electronic databases: CINAHL®, MEDLINE®, Nursing Ovid, PubMed, Springer, and Science Direct. Six articles were deemed relevant and included in this review. Oral mucositis increases mortality rate, length of hospital stay, opioid use, and the need for parenteral nutrition usage. It also decreases patient's quality of life and his or her desire to complete treatment. However, oral cryotherapy significantly minimizes the incidence and severity of oral mucositis and decreases secondary oral mucositis complications. Using oral cryotherapy concurrently with a regular oral care protocol can improve its efficacy for preventing and managing oral mucositis. Additional studies should be conducted to create standard oral cryotherapy protocols.

  3. Effect of glutathione on gastric mucosal lesion induced by restraint water-immersion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Li Wan; Chang Liu Wang

    2000-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of glutathione (GSH) on stress gastric mucosal lesion.METHODS The stress gastric mucosal lesion as produced by restraint water-immersion in rats and gastricmucosal lesion, gastric mucosal GSH content, gastric acid secretion and gastric barrier mucus secretion wereexamined. We also observed the effect of GSH on gastric mucosal lesion and the effect of N-ethylmaleimine(NEM) and indomethacin on GSH protection. Comparisons between two groups were made using the Students t test.RESULTS GSH (100 and 200 mg/kg) intraperitoneally protected against stress gastric mucosal lesion(P0.05). The preinjection of NEM (10 mg/kg, sc.), a sulfhydryl-blocking reagent, or indomethacin(5 mg/kg, im.), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, had no effect on protection of GSH (P>0.05). GSH(100mg/kg) significantly increased secretion of gastric barrier mucus (P0.05).CONCLUSION GSH can inhibit the formation of gastric mucosal lesions induced by restraint water-immersion. The protective effect of GSH was due, in part, to promoting the secretion of gastric barriermucus, but not to suppress the gastric acid secretion. The protection effect of GSH has no relation withgastric mucosal GSH and PGs.

  4. The oesophageal zero-stress state and mucosal folding from a GIOME perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donghua Liao; Jingbo Zhao; Jian Yang; Hans Gregers

    2007-01-01

    The oesophagus is a cylindrical organ with a collapsed lumen and mucosal folds. The mucosal folding may serve to advance the function of the oesophagus, i.e.the folds have a major influence on the flow of air and bolus through the oesophagus. Experimental studies have demonstrated oesophageal mucosal folds in the noload state. This indicates that mucosal buckling must be considered in the analysis of the mechanical reference state since the material stiffness drops dramatically after tissue collapse. Most previous work on the oesophageal zero-stress state and mucosal folding has been experimental. However, numerical analysis offers a promising alternative approach, with the additional ability to predict the mucosal buckling behaviour and to calculate the regional stress and strain in complex structures. A numerical model used for describing the mechanical behaviour of the mucosal-folded, threelayered, two-dimensional oesophageal model is reviewed.GIOME models can be used in the future to predict the tissue function physiologically and pathologically.

  5. Colonic mucosal mediators from patients with irritable bowel syndrome excite enteric cholinergic motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, B; Vicini, R; Cremon, C; Zecchi, L; Dothel, G; Vasina, V; De Giorgio, R; Paccapelo, A; Pastoris, O; Stanghellini, V; Corinaldesi, R; De Ponti, F; Tonini, M; Barbara, G

    2012-12-01

    Mediators released in the mucosal milieu have been suggested to be involved in visceral hypersensitivity and abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, their impact on myenteric neurons remains unsettled. Mucosal biopsies were obtained from the descending colon of patients with IBS and controls. Mucosal mast cells were identified immunohistochemically. The impact of spontaneously released mucosal mediators on guinea pig electrically stimulated longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (LMMP) preparations was assessed in vitro by means of selective receptor antagonists and inhibitors. Patients with IBS showed an increased mast cell count compared with controls. Application of mucosal mediators of IBS to LMMPs potentiated cholinergic twitch contractions, an effect directly correlated with mast cell counts. Enhanced contractions were inhibited by 50.3% with the prostaglandin D2 antagonist BW A868C, by 31.3% and 39% with the TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine and HC-030031, respectively, and by 60.5% with purinergic P2X antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid. Conversely, the serotonin1-4, histamine1-3, tachykinin1-3 receptor blockade, and serine protease inhibition had no significant effect. Colonic mucosal mediators from patients with IBS excite myenteric cholinergic motor neurons. These effects were correlated with mast cell counts and mediated by activation of prostanoid receptors, TRPV1, and P2X receptors. These results support the role of mucosal inflammatory mediators and mast cell activation in altered motor function of IBS. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Utility of Computed Tomographic Enteroclysis/Enterography for the Assessment of Mucosal Healing in Crohn's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Hashimoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. When determining therapeutic strategy, it is important to diagnose small intestinal lesions in Crohn's disease (CD precisely and to evaluate mucosal healing as well as clinical remission in CD. The purpose of this study was to compare findings from computed tomographic enteroclysis/enterography (CTE with those from the mucosal surface and to determine whether the state of mucosal healing can be determined by CTE. Materials and Methods. Of the patients who underwent CTE for CD, 39 patients were examined whose mucosal findings could be confirmed by colonoscopy, capsule endoscopy, balloon endoscopy, or with the resected surgical specimens. Results. According to the CTE findings, patients were determined to be in the active CD group (n=31 or inactive CD group (n=8. The proportion of previous surgery, clinical remission, stenosis, and CDAI score all showed significant difference between groups. Mucosal findings showed an association with ulcer in 93.6% of active group patients but in only 12.5% of inactive group patients (P<0.0001, whereas mucosal healing was found in 62.5% of inactive group patients but in only 3.2% of active group patients (P<0.0001. Conclusion. CTE appeared to be a useful diagnostic method for assessment of mucosal healing in Crohn's disease.

  7. Mucosal Vaccination Overcomes the Barrier to Recombinant Vaccinia Immunization Caused by Preexisting Poxvirus Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, Igor M.; Moss, Bernard; Strober, Warren; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    1999-04-01

    Overcoming preexisting immunity to vaccinia virus in the adult population is a key requirement for development of otherwise potent recombinant vaccinia vaccines. Based on our observation that s.c. immunization with vaccinia induces cellular and antibody immunity to vaccinia only in systemic lymphoid tissue and not in mucosal sites, we hypothesized that the mucosal immune system remains naive to vaccinia and therefore amenable to immunization with recombinant vaccinia vectors despite earlier vaccinia exposure. We show that mucosal immunization of vaccinia-immune BALB/c mice with recombinant vaccinia expressing HIV gp160 induced specific serum antibody and strong HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. These responses occurred not only in mucosal but also in systemic lymphoid tissue, whereas systemic immunization was ineffective under these circumstances. In this context, intrarectal immunization was more effective than intranasal immunization. Boosting with a second dose of recombinant vaccinia was also more effective via the mucosal route. The systemic HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response was enhanced by coadministration of IL-12 at the mucosal site. These results also demonstrate the independent compartmentalization of the mucosal versus systemic immune systems and the asymmetric trafficking of lymphocytes between them. This approach to circumvent previous vaccinia immunity may be useful for induction of protective immunity against infectious diseases and cancer in the sizable populations with preexisting immunity to vaccinia from smallpox vaccination.

  8. Clinical assessment of oral mucositis and candidiasis compare to chemotherapic nadir in transplanted patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patussi, Cleverson; Sassi, Laurindo Moacir; Munhoz, Eduardo Ciliao; Zanicotti, Roberta Targa Stramandinoli; Schussel, Juliana Lucena

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a chief complication in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). It is considered a toxic inflammatory reaction that interferes with the patient's recuperation and quality of life. Oral candidiasis is a common fungal infection observed in dental practice, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of oral mucositis and oral candidiasis in patients who underwent HSCT and their correlation with the chemotherapeutic nadir (lowest possible outcome). We evaluated patients with different diagnoses who underwent HSCT at the Hospital Erasto Gaertner. No chemotherapeutic nadir curves could be associated with mucositis, and patients had different presentations of mucositis. No patient developed oral candidiasis during hospitalization. Together with cell counts, we collected demographic data including age, oral hygiene, habits harmful to health, and the use of oral prostheses. It was observed that patients who smoked cigarettes before hospitalization showed less mucositis, resulting in no feeding problems or other comorbid conditions due to the effect of mucositis. However, the nadir of the chemotherapy curve, in isolation, is not a predictive tool for the appearance (or no appearance) of oral mucositis.

  9. Characterization of atmospheric oxidants during, and after 2014 APEC summit: a case study of peroxides and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H.; Chen, Z.; Huang, L.

    2016-12-01

    Peroxides and ozone (O3) are important atmospheric oxidants, and are directly related to the cycling of radicals in the atmosphere. They have a profound impact on many critical atmospheric chemical processes, and are closely associated with regional air pollution and global climate change. Many filed measurements have been conducted to study their concentrations, budget, and roles in the atmospheric chemistry in the past few decades. However, the characteristic and influencing factors of concentrations of peroxides and O3 are still not fully understood, especially in the polluted area. In this study, measurements for atmospheric peroxides and O3 were conducted simultaneously at PKU site in Beijing, China during, and after the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit when strict pollution control measures were deployed. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was the predominant peroxide observed, and occasionally, hydroxylmethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP) was detected. The average concentrations of H2O2 and O3 were 22.6±23.7pptv and 14.8±13.4ppbv, respectively. Both H2O2 and O3 showed distinct diurnal variations, with a peak between 14:00-16:00 for O3, and 18:00-20:00 for H2O2. However, the emergence of the H2O2 peak shifted to the night further both during, and after APEC compared to summer observations at the same site and in clean areas, but the exact mechanism is not clear. Concentrations of H2O2 and O3 were higher during APEC with A (After APEC)/D (During APEC) ratios of 0.3 and 0.7, respectively, contrary to the changes of most of the other observed trace constituents. We discussed the influencing factors in detail, and confirmed that the reduction of NOx was the decisive factors. Additionally, we found a sudden increase of concentrations of H2O2 and O3 on the early morning of 11 November. By analyzing the changes of related meteorological parameters, backward air mass trajectories, and pressure vertical velocity, we ascribed this to the downward transport of air

  10. Icing oral mucositis: Oral cryotherapy in multiple myeloma patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joey; Seabrook, Jamie; Fulford, Adrienne; Rajakumar, Irina

    2017-03-01

    Background Up to 70% of patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplant develop oral mucositis as a side effect of high-dose melphalan conditioning chemotherapy. Oral cryotherapy has been documented to be potentially effective in reducing oral mucositis. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the cryotherapy protocol implemented within the hematopoietic stem cell transplant program. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of adult multiple myeloma patients who received high-dose melphalan conditioning therapy for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Primary endpoints were incidence and severity of oral mucositis. Secondary endpoints included duration of oral mucositis, duration of hospital stay, parenteral narcotics use and total parenteral nutrition use. Results One hundred and forty patients were included in the study, 70 patients in both no cryotherapy and cryotherapy groups. Both oral mucositis incidence and severity were found to be significantly lower in the cryotherapy group. Fifty (71.4%) experienced mucositis post cryotherapy compared to 67 (95.7%) in the no cryotherapy group (p < 0.001). The median oral mucositis severity, assessed using the WHO oral toxicity scale from grade 0-4, experienced in the no group was 2.5 vs. 2 in the cryotherapy group (p = 0.03). Oral mucositis duration and use of parenteral narcotics were also significantly reduced. Duration of hospital stay and use of parenteral nutrition were similar between the two groups. Conclusion The cryotherapy protocol resulted in a significantly lower incidence and severity of oral mucositis. These results provide evidence for the continued use of oral cryotherapy, an inexpensive and generally well-tolerated practice.

  11. ٍEvaluating Baremoom Mouthwash Efficacy in Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Akhavan Karbasi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis is regarded as a painful and discomforting chemotherapy complication , affecting patient’s quality of life and endurance to continue the treatment. Hence, treatment of mucositis is of great significance. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of Baremoom mouthwash in treatment of chemotherapy-induced mucositis . Methods: This interventional double-blinded randomized clinical trial study was performed on 40 adult patients under chemotherapy in blood and oncology department of Shahid Sadouqhi hospital. The total of 40 patients were randomly divided into two groups: an experimental baremoom group and a control placebo group each containing 20 subjects. Baremoom mouthwash (30% extract, Soren Tektoos, Mashhad and placebo mouthwash ( Sterile water with allowable additives ,Soren Tektoos, Mashhad with same apparent properties were given to the patients (3 times a day for 7 days after mucositis detection. The patients were evaluated in regard with mucositis grade (0-4 WHO and wounds extension on 1th , 3th and 7th days after the study begining. In order to statistically analyze the collected data, Freidman, Mann–Whitney, and wilcoxon W tests were applied utilizing SPSS software (ver, 17. Results: On 3rd  and 7th  days, mean degree of wound extension and mucositis were demonstrated to be significantly different between the two groups. According to Friedman test, both experimental and control groups revealed a significant difference in regard with wound extension and mucositis grade within the three time periods. Conclusion: The study findings indicated that Baremoom mouthwash was more effective in chemotherapy- induced mucositis than placebo. Hence, this agent can be recommended as an appropriate medicine in order to eliminate mucositis symtoms and decrease oral ulcers.

  12. Prophylaxis and therapy of allergy by mucosal tolerance induction with recombinant allergens or allergen constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedermann, Ursula

    2005-10-01

    The mucosal immune system, present along the respiratory, gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract, has to discriminate between harmful pathogens and innocuous antigens, such as food, airborne antigens or the commensal bacterial flora. Therefore the mucosal immune system has acquired two opposing immunological functions, i.e. the induction of immunity and defence of mucosal pathogens, and the induction and maintenance of tolerance to environmental antigens and bacterial flora. As described for autoimmunity a breakdown or failure of tolerance induction is believed to lead also to allergies and food enteropathies. Based on the physiological role to prevent hypersensitivity reactions, tolerance induction via the mucosa has been proposed as a treatment strategy against inflammatory diseases, such as allergies. The aim of our research is to develop mucosal allergy vaccines based on the induction of mucosal tolerance and/or the induction of counter-regulatory immune responses with or without the use of certain mucosal antigen delivery systems, such as lactic acid bacteria. The use of recombinant allergens instead of allergen extracts with varying allergen content and composition may be essential for improvement of the treatment efficacy. In the present review we give examples of different animal models of type I allergy/asthma. Using these models we demonstrate that recombinant allergens or hypoallergenic variants thereof can be successfully used to induce mucosal tolerance in a prophylactic as well as a therapeutic treatment regime. That the concept of mucosal tolerance induction/mucosal vaccine delivery may in principal also function in humans is supported by recent clinical trials with locally (sublingual) applied immunotherapy.

  13. Mucosal Regulatory T Cells and T Helper 17 Cells in HIV-Associated Immune Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Talla, Aarthi; McDonald, David; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Levine, Alan D; Weinberg, Aaron; Sekaly, Rafick P

    2016-01-01

    Residual mucosal inflammation along with chronic systemic immune activation is an important feature in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and has been linked to a wide range of co-morbidities, including malignancy, opportunistic infections, immunopathology, and cardiovascular complications. Although combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can reduce plasma viral loads to undetectable levels, reservoirs of virus persist, and increased mortality is associated with immune dysbiosis in mucosal lymphoid tissues. Immune-based therapies are pursued with the goal of improving CD4(+) T-cell restoration, as well as reducing chronic immune activation in cART-treated patients. However, the majority of research on immune activation has been derived from analysis of circulating T cells. How immune cell alterations in mucosal tissues contribute to HIV immune dysregulation and the associated risk of non-infectious chronic complications is less studied. Given the significant differences between mucosal T cells and circulating T cells, and the immediate interactions of mucosal T cells with the microbiome, more attention should be devoted to mucosal immune cells and their contribution to systemic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we will focus on mucosal immune cells with a specific emphasis on CD4(+) T lymphocytes, such as T helper 17 cells and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play crucial roles in maintaining mucosal barrier integrity and preventing inflammation, respectively. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory milieu in cART-treated patients with immune activation significantly contributes to enhanced loss of Th17 cells and increased frequency of dysregulated Tregs in the mucosa, which in turn may exacerbate immune dysfunction in HIV-infected patients. We also present initial evidence to support this hypothesis. A better comprehension of how pro-inflammatory milieu impacts these two types of cells in the mucosa will

  14. Effect of carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide on enamel surface: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouassi, Thaer; Wolkewitz, Martin; Hahn, Petra

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate changes in the micromorphologyl and microhardness of the enamel surface after bleaching with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) and carbamide peroxide (CP). Bovine enamel samples were embedded in resin blocks, and polished. Specimens in the experimental groups (n = 10) were treated with bleaching gels containing 10% CP, 35% CP, 3.6% HP, and 10% HP, respectively, for 2 h every second day over a period of 2 weeks. The gels had the identical composition and pH and differed only in their HP or CP content. The roughness and morphology of the enamel surface were analyzed using laser profilometry and SEM. Microhardness was measured using a Knoop hardness tester. The data were evaluated statistically. Specimens in the 10% HP group showed significantly higher roughness after bleaching compared to the control group (ΔRa, p = 0.01). Bleaching with 35% CP showed only a tendency to increase roughness (ΔRa, p = 0.06). Application of 10% CP or 3.6% HP had no significant influence on Ra. Enamel microhardness was significantly higher after application of 10% HP compared to the control (ΔMic = 8 KHN, p = 0.0002) and 35% CP (ΔMic = 20KHN, p = 0.01) groups. In summary, application of CP and HP showed only small quantitative and qualitative differences. In addition, the influence of bleaching procedure on the morphology and hardness of the enamel surface depended on the concentration of the active ingredients.

  15. Seasonal variations of hydrogen peroxide and water vapor on Mars: Further indications of heterogeneous chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Lefèvre, F.; Montmessin, F.; Forget, F.; Fouchet, T.; DeWitt, C.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Atreya, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    We have completed our seasonal monitoring of hydrogen peroxide and water vapor on Mars using ground-based thermal imaging spectroscopy, by observing the planet in March 2014, when water vapor is maximum, and July 2014, when, according to photochemical models, hydrogen peroxide is expected to be maximum. Data have been obtained with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) mounted at the 3 m-Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) at Maunakea Observatory. Maps of HDO and H2O2 have been obtained using line depth ratios of weak transitions of HDO and H2O2 divided by CO2. The retrieved maps of H2O2 are in good agreement with predictions including a chemical transport model, for both the March data (maximum water vapor) and the July data (maximum hydrogen peroxide). The retrieved maps of HDO are compared with simulations by Montmessin et al. (2005, J. Geophys. Res., 110, 03006) and H2O maps are inferred assuming a mean martian D/H ratio of 5 times the terrestrial value. For regions of maximum values of H2O and H2O2, we derive, for March 1 2014 (Ls = 96°), H2O2 = 20+/-7 ppbv, HDO = 450 +/-75 ppbv (45 +/-8 pr-nm), and for July 3, 2014 (Ls = 156°), H2O2 = 30+/-7 ppbv, HDO = 375+/-70 ppbv (22+/-3 pr-nm). In addition, the new observations are compared with LMD global climate model results and we favor simulations of H2O2 including heterogeneous reactions on water-ice clouds.

  16. Characterization of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter species isolated during the Mars Phoenix spacecraft assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derecho, I; McCoy, K B; Vaishampayan, P; Venkateswaran, K; Mogul, R

    2014-10-01

    The microbiological inventory of spacecraft and the associated assembly facility surfaces represent the primary pool of forward contaminants that may impact the integrity of life-detection missions. Herein, we report on the characterization of several strains of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter, which were isolated during the Mars Phoenix lander assembly. All Phoenix-associated Acinetobacter strains possessed very high catalase specific activities, and the specific strain, A. gyllenbergii 2P01AA, displayed a survival against hydrogen peroxide (no loss in 100 mM H2O2 for 1 h) that is perhaps the highest known among Gram-negative and non-spore-forming bacteria. Proteomic characterizations reveal a survival mechanism inclusive of proteins coupled to peroxide degradation (catalase and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase), energy/redox management (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase), protein synthesis/folding (EF-G, EF-Ts, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase, DnaK), membrane functions (OmpA-like protein and ABC transporter-related protein), and nucleotide metabolism (HIT family hydrolase). Together, these survivability and biochemical parameters support the hypothesis that oxidative tolerance and the related biochemical features are the measurable phenotypes or outcomes for microbial survival in the spacecraft assembly facilities, where the low-humidity (desiccation) and clean (low-nutrient) conditions may serve as selective pressures. Hence, the spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter, due to the conferred oxidative tolerances, may ultimately hinder efforts to reduce spacecraft bioburden when using chemical sterilants, thus suggesting that non-spore-forming bacteria may need to be included in the bioburden accounting for future life-detection missions.

  17. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandekar S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Mammalian spermatozoa are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are very susceptible to attack by reactive oxygen species (ROS and membrane lipid peroxide ion. Normally a balance is maintained between the amount of ROS produced and that scavenged. Cellular damage arises when this equilibrium is disturbed. A shift in the levels of ROS towards pro-oxidants in semen and vaginal secretions can induce an oxidative stress on spermatozoa. The aim was to study lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD and to correlate the same, with the ′water test′, in male infertility. SETTINGS: Experimental study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ejaculates from a total of 83 infertile and fertile healthy individuals were obtained. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme levels were studied and correlated with water test. RESULTS: The results indicate that (i the antioxidant enzyme catalase showed no significant changes in the various pathological samples, (ii antioxidant enzymes SOD and glutathione peroxidase correlate positively with asthenozoospermic samples and (iii the degree of lipid peroxidation also correlates positively with the poorly swollen sperm tails. The increase in SOD and glutathione peroxidase values, in the pathological cases represents an attempt made to overcome the reactive oxygen species. CONCLUSION: Water test could be used as a preliminary marker test for sperm tail damage by reactive oxygen species, since it correlates very well with lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes.

  18. Chlamydia trachomatis and sperm lipid peroxidation in infertile men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Segnini; M.I.Camejo; F.Proverbio

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To relate thepresence of anti-Chlamydial trachomatis IgA in semen with sperm lipid membrane peroxidation and changes in seminal parameters.Methods:Semen samples of the male partners of 52 couples assessed for undiagnosed infertility were examined for the presence of IgA antibody against C.trachomatis.The level of sperm membrane lipid peroxidation was estimated by determining the malondialdehyde(MDA) formation.Results:Sperm membrane of infertile males with positive IgA antibodies against C.trachomatis showed a higher level of lipid peroxidation than that of infertile males with negative IgA antibody(P<0.05).There was a positive correlation(P<0.01) between the level of C.trachomatis antibody and the magnitude of sperm membrane lipid peroxidation.All the other tested semen parameters were found to be similar in the two groups.Conclusion:The activation of immune system by C.trachomatis may promote lipid peroxidation of the sperm membrane.This could be the way by which C.trachomatis affects fertility.

  19. Micellar electrokinetic chromatography of organic and peroxide-based explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Cameron; Hutchinson, Joseph P; Guijt, Rosanne M; Hilder, Emily F; Haddad, Paul R; Macka, Mirek; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Gaudry, Adam J; Dicinoski, Greg W; Breadmore, Michael C

    2015-05-30

    CE methods have been developed for the analysis of organic and peroxide-based explosives. These methods have been developed for deployment on portable, in-field instrumentation for rapid screening. Both classes of compounds are neutral and were separated using micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). The effects of sample composition, separation temperature, and background electrolyte composition were investigated. The optimised separation conditions (25 mM sodium tetraborate, 75 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate at 25°C, detection at 200 nm) were applied to the separation of 25 organic explosives in 17 min, with very high efficiency (typically greater than 300,000 plates m(-1)) and high sensitivity (LOD typically less than 0.5 mg L(-1); around 1-1.5 μM). A MEKC method was also developed for peroxide-based explosives (10 mM sodium tetraborate, 100 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate at 25°C, detection at 200 nm). UV detection provided LODs between 5.5 and 45.0 mg L(-1) (or 31.2-304 μM), which is comparable to results achieved using liquid chromatography. Importantly, no sample pre-treatment or post-column reaction was necessary and the peroxide-based explosives were not decomposed to hydrogen peroxide. Both MEKC methods have been applied to pre-blast analysis and for the detection of post-blast residues recovered from controlled, small scale detonations of organic and peroxide-based explosive devices.

  20. Multistage Extractive Reaction for Hydrogen Peroxide Production by Anthraquinone Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; L(U) Shuxiang; WANG Yaquan; MI Zhentao

    2005-01-01

    The extractive reaction process of oxygen-working solution-water three-phase system for the production of hydrogen peroxide by the anthraquinone method was investigated in a sieve plate column of 50 mm in internal diameter. The oxidation reaction of anthrahydroquinone in the working solution with oxygen and the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from the working solution into aqueous phase occurred simultaneously in the countercurrent mode. The agitating effect caused by gaseous phase made the droplets of the dispersed phase become smaller, thus, increasing the liquid-liquid interfacial contact areas and resulting in the improvement of the mass transfer velocity. Results showed that the gas-agitation had a beneficial effect on the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from the working solution into the aqueous phase; the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the raffinate decreased with the increase of the gaseous superficial velocities; and the concentration of H2O2 in the raffinate increased with the increase of the dispersed phase superficial velocity at the same superficial velocity of the gaseous phase. In the G-L-L extractive reaction process, with the increase of the gaseous superficial velocities, both the conversion of the anthrahydroquinone oxidation and the extraction efficiency of hydrogen peroxide first increased significantly, then increased gradually.

  1. Safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Greenwall, L

    2013-07-01

    In-office tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) has been practised in dentistry without significant safety concerns for more than a century. While few disputes exist regarding the efficacy of peroxide-based at-home whitening since its first introduction in 1989, its safety has been the cause of controversy and concern. This article reviews and discusses safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials, including biological properties and toxicology of H₂O₂, use of chlorine dioxide, safety studies on tooth whitening, and clinical considerations of its use. Data accumulated during the last two decades demonstrate that, when used properly, peroxide-based tooth whitening is safe and effective. The most commonly seen side effects are tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation, which are usually mild to moderate and transient. So far there is no evidence of significant health risks associated with tooth whitening; however, potential adverse effects can occur with inappropriate application, abuse, or the use of inappropriate whitening products. With the knowledge on peroxide-based whitening materials and the recognition of potential adverse effects associated with the procedure, dental professionals are able to formulate an effective and safe tooth whitening regimen for individual patients to achieve maximal benefits while minimising potential risks.

  2. Sphingosine induces the aggregation of imine-containing peroxidized vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; Viguera, Ana R; Collado, M Isabel; Sims, Kacee H; Constance, Chad; Hill, Kasey; Shaw, Walt A; Goñi, Félix M; Alonso, Alicia

    2014-08-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of many diseases like atherosclerosis and multiple sclerosis. We have analyzed the interaction of sphingosine with peroxidized bilayers in model membranes. Cu(2+) induced peroxidation was checked following UV absorbance at 245nm, and also using the novel Avanti snoopers®. Mass spectrometry confirms the oxidation of phospholipid unsaturated chains. Our results show that sphingosine causes aggregation of Cu(2+)-peroxidized vesicles. We observed that aggregation is facilitated by the presence of negatively-charged phospholipids in the membrane, and inhibited by anti-oxidants e.g. BHT. Interestingly, long-chain alkylamines (C18, C16) but not their short-chain analogues (C10, C6, C1) can substitute sphingosine as promoters of vesicle aggregation. Furthermore, sphinganine but not sphingosine-1-phosphate can mimic this effect. Formation of imines in the membrane upon peroxidation was detected by (1)H-NMR and it appeared to be necessary for the aggregation effect. (31)P-NMR spectroscopy reveals that sphingosine facilitates formation of non-lamellar phase in parallel with vesicle aggregation. The data might suggest a role for sphingosine in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H2O2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  4. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonios, George [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Dimou, Aikaterini [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Galaris, Dimitrios [Laboratory of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2008-01-07

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  5. Seatbelt syndrome with gastric mucosal breaks and intra-gastric wall air leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hirohito; Tsushimi, Takaaki; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Fujihara, Shintaro; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Chiyo, Taiga; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    As numerous reports were published regarding the so-called seatbelt syndrome involved in car crashes, most of them were mentioned about small intestine, duodenum and colon perforations and solid organ bleeding. No reports have been published regarding multiple gastric mucosal tears with intra-gastric wall air leakage with massive bleeding. A 65-year-old woman was admitted after a motor vehicle crash. She vomited massive fresh blood. Gastric mucosal breaks, approximately 5 cm in length, were observed. Computed tomography imaging revealed multiple gastric mucosal breaks. We report a rare case wherein a traffic accident caused a serious condition associated with massive digestive bleeding.

  6. Interaction between Host Cells and Microbes in Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Stringer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy often develop mucositis as a direct result of their treatment. Recently, the intestinal microbiota has attracted significant attention in the investigation of the pathobiology of mucositis, with a number of studies investigating the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on the microbiota. With significant effects on the intestinal microbiota occurring following the administration of chemotherapy, there is now interest surrounding the downstream pathological effects that may be associated with the altered intestinal ecology. This review seeks to identify links between signalling pathways previously demonstrated to have a role in the development of mucositis, and the altered intestinal microbiota.

  7. [Therapeutic effect of rebamipide for oral mucositis associated with FEC therapy for breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enami, Akiko; Masuda, Norikazu; Yamamura, Jun; Mizutani, Makiko; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Shikata, Ayako; Masaoka, Miyuki; Takada, Seiko; Bamba, Nao; Yamamoto, Mie; Abe, Megumi; Makihara, Katsuya

    2014-11-01

    No guidelines for supportive drug therapy have been established for oral mucositis occurring during cancer chemotherapy. We retrospectively examined the progression of oral mucositis in 91 patients with breast cancer who received the 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC)-100 regimen between September 2007 and August 2008. Daily rebamipide was administered to patients with oral mucositis as per hospital protocol to evaluate the hypothesized preventive and mucosal protective effects of rebamipide(Mucosta®). Oral mucositis was observed in 43 patients (47%)during 4 courses of FEC. The median age of the patients was 55 years(range, 32-76 years). Of the 91 patients, 49 patients who did not receive rebamipide during the 4 FEC courses were classified as group A, 14 patients who received rebamipide before the start of FEC were classified as group B, and 28 patients who received rebamipide after developing oral mucositis were classified as group C. The incidence of oral mucositis at the start of FEC with or without rebamipide administration was observed in 5 patients in group B (36%) and 38 patients in groups A and C (49%) (p=0.3472). The mucositis grade was G1 in 4 patients and G2 in 1 patient in group B, and G1 in 20 patients and G2 plus G3 in 18 patients in groups A and C (p=0.2467). In group C, the grade decreased in 25 patients (89%) and did not occur (G0) in 17 patients (61%) during the next course, and 15 patients (54%) continued to the final course without any occurrence of mucositis. These results suggest that rebamipide is effective for the treatment of oral mucositis. Although significant differences were not observed in the groups, rebamipide has the potential to prevent development of oral mucositis and alleviate its symptoms, and seems promising as a new supportive drug therapy. We hope to verify the preventive and protective effects of rebamipide by conducting a prospective, randomized trial while treating oral mucositis with basic oral care

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 as a treatment for chemotherapy-induced mucositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kissow, Hannelouise; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2012-01-01

    : To determine whether endogenous GLP-1 contributes to the healing processes and if exogenous GLP-1 has a potential role in treating mucositis. METHODS: Mice were injected with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or saline to induce mucositis and were then treated with GLP-1, GLP-2, GLP-2 (3-33), exendin (9-39) or vehicle....... The mice were sacrificed 48 or 96 h after the 5-FU injections. The end points were intestinal weight, villus height, proliferation and histological scoring of mucositis severity. Rats were injected with 5-FU or saline, and after 48 h, blood was drawn and analysed for GLP-1 and GLP-2 concentration. RESULTS...

  9. A Classification Proposal for Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis: A Critical Update

    OpenAIRE

    Ata-Ali, Javier; Ata-Ali, Fadi; Bagan, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Definitions of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis vary in the literature, and no clear criteria have been established for the diagnosis and treatment of such disorders. This study proposes a classification for peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis based on the severity of the disease, using a combination of peri-implant clinical and radiological parameters to classify severity into several stages (Stage 0A and 0B = peri-implant mucositis, and Stage I to IV = periimplantitis). F...

  10. How to prevent contamination with Candida albicans during the fabrication of transplantable oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Takagi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have utilized patients' own oral mucosa as a cell source for the fabrication of transplantable epithelial cell sheets to treat limbal stem cell deficiency and mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection of esophageal cancer. Because there are abundant microbiotas in the human oral cavity, the oral mucosa was sterilized and 40 μg/mL gentamicin and 0.27 μg/mL amphotericin B were added to the culture medium in our protocol. Although an oral surgeon carefully checked each patient's oral cavity and although candidiasis was not observed before taking the biopsy, contamination with Candida albicans (C. albicans was detected in the conditioned medium during cell sheet fabrication. After adding 1 μg/mL amphotericin B to the transportation medium during transport from Nagasaki University Hospital to Tokyo Women's Medical University, which are 1200 km apart, no proliferation of C. albicans was observed. These results indicated that the supplementation of transportation medium with antimycotics would be useful for preventing contamination with C. albicans derived from the oral mucosa without hampering cell proliferation.

  11. Exposure to oxidized nitrogen: lipid peroxidation and neonatal health risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacova, S; Baird, D D; Balabaeva, L

    1998-01-01

    Pregnant women exposed to extensive environmental contamination by oxidized nitrogen compounds were studied at parturition, their neonatal health status was assessed and the involvement of oxidative stress in pathology was evaluated. Methemoglobin in maternal and cord blood was measured as a biomarker of individual exposure. Blood lipid peroxides and glutathione (reduced and total) were determined as oxidative stress biomarkers. Birthweight, Apgar scores, and clinical diagnosis at birth were used as neonatal health endpoints. Elevated exposure to oxidized nitrogen compounds was associated with increased lipid peroxidation in both maternal and cord blood. Poor birth outcome was associated with high blood lipid peroxides. Controlling for maternal age, parity, and smoking did not affect the relationships materially. The results showed that maternal/fetal exposure to oxidized nitrogen compounds is associated with increased risk of adverse birth outcome and suggest a role of oxidative damage in the pathogenic pathway.

  12. Synthesis of unstable cyclic peroxides for chemiluminescence studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoloni, Fernando H.; Oliveira, Marcelo A. de; Augusto, Felipe A.; Ciscato, Luiz Francisco M.L.; Bastos, Erick L.; Baader, Wilhelm J., E-mail: wjbaader@iq.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Fundamental

    2012-11-15

    Cyclic four-membered ring peroxides are important high-energy intermediates in a variety of chemi and bioluminescence transformations. Specifically, a-peroxy lactones (1,2-dioxetanones) have been considered as model systems for efficient firefly bioluminescence. However, the preparation of such highly unstable compounds is extremely difficult and, therefore, only few research groups have been able to study the properties of these substances. In this study, the synthesis, purification and characterization of three 1,2-dioxetanones are reported and a detailed procedure for the known synthesis of diphenoyl peroxide, another important model compound for the chemical generation of electronically excited states, is provided. For most of these peroxides, the complete spectroscopic characterization is reported here for the first time. (author)

  13. Study of catalase electrode for organic peroxides assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horozova, Elena; Dimcheva, Nina; Jordanova, Zinaida

    2002-12-01

    The catalytic activity of immobilized catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) for two model peroxide compounds (dibenzoyl peroxide and 3-chloroperoxibenzoic acid) in a non-aqueous medium was used to prepare an organic-phase enzyme electrode (OPEE). The enzyme was immobilized within a polymeric film on spectrographic graphite. The amperometric signal of the enzyme electrode in substrate solutions was found to be due to the reduction of oxygen generated in the enzyme layer. The electrode response is proportional to peroxide concentrations up to about 40 microM within the potential range from -450 to -650 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl), and the response time is at most 90 s. The enzyme electrode retains about 35% of its initial activity after a 3-week storage at room temperature.

  14. Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

  15. Reproducing Phenomenology of Peroxidation Kinetics via Model Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslanov, Anatole D.; Bashylau, Anton V.

    2010-06-01

    We studied mathematical modeling of lipid peroxidation using a biochemical model system of iron (II)-ascorbate-dependent lipid peroxidation of rat hepatocyte mitochondrial fractions. We found that antioxidants extracted from plants demonstrate a high intensity of peroxidation inhibition. We simplified the system of differential equations that describes the kinetics of the mathematical model to a first order equation, which can be solved analytically. Moreover, we endeavor to algorithmically and heuristically recreate the processes and construct an environment that closely resembles the corresponding natural system. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to theoretically predict both the kinetics of oxidation and the intensity of inhibition without resorting to analytical and biochemical research, which is important for cost-effective discovery and development of medical agents with antioxidant action from the medicinal plants.

  16. Catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of a petrochemical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente, M I; Melero, J A; Martínez, F; Botas, J A; Gallego, A I

    2010-01-01

    Continuous Catalytic Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation (CWHPO) for the treatment of a petrochemical industry wastewater has been studied on a pilot plant scale process. The installation, based on a catalytic fixed bed reactor (FBR) coupled with a stirred tank reactor (STR), shows an interesting alternative for the intensification of a continuous CWHPO treatment. Agglomerated SBA-15 silica-supported iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)/SBA-15) was used as Fenton-like catalyst. Several variables such as the temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration, as well as the capacity of the pilot plant for the treatment of inlet polluted streams with different dilution degrees were studied. Remarkable results in terms of TOC reduction and increased biodegradability were achieved using 160 degrees C and moderate hydrogen peroxide initial concentration. Additionally, a good stability of the catalyst was evidenced for 8 hours of treatment with low iron leaching (less than 1 mg/L) under the best operating conditions.

  17. Five Decades with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Chemical Synthesis, Enzymatic Formation, Lipid Peroxidation and Its Biological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Catalá

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available I have been involved in research on polyunsaturated fatty acids since 1964 and this review is intended to cover some of the most important aspects of this work. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have followed me during my whole scientific career and I have published a number of studies concerned with different aspects of them such as chemical synthesis, enzymatic formation, metabolism, transport, physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of a reconstructed desaturase system in liposomes, lipid peroxidation, and their effects. The first project I became involved in was the organic synthesis of [1-14C] eicosa-11,14-dienoic acid, with the aim of demonstrating the participation of that compound as a possible intermediary in the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid “in vivo.” From 1966 to 1982, I was involved in several projects that study the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the eighties, we studied fatty acid binding protein. From 1990 up to now, our laboratory has been interested in the lipid peroxidation of biological membranes from various tissues and different species as well as liposomes prepared with phospholipids rich in PUFAs. We tested the effect of many antioxidants such as alpha tocopherol, vitamin A, melatonin and its structural analogues, and conjugated linoleic acid, among others.

  18. Patch Test Results in Patients with Allergic Contact Dermatitis / Mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Su

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: The aims of our study were to determine the frequency of positive patch reactions and the most common allergens in patients with allergic contact dermatitis (ACD and/or mucositis(M who underwent with T.R.U.E. “Thin-layer Rapid-Use Epicutaneous” test and evaluate supplemantal series used with T.R.U.E. test effect on patch test results.Material and Method: In this study 161 ACD, 5 ACM, 1 ACD and ACM were enrolled. While 139 of all patients were patch tested with T.R.U.E. test alone,out of 28 patients were tested for T.R.U.E. test and also with supplemental series that included textile colours (9 of tested patients, plastic and glues (9, dental screening (6, backery (2, cosmetic (1 and plastic and glues and dental screening (1. Supplemental series were chosen according to patient’s occupation and clinic presentation. The data from our patients were analyzed as percentage. The relationship between contact sensitization and atopic status was evaluated with Yate’s correlation x2 test.Results: Eighty-six male, 81 female were taken into this study. The median age was 36.5.While 25.9% of 139 patients tested with T.R.U.E. test alone,46.4% of 28 patients applied supplemental series in addition to T.R.U.E. test showed positive reaction to one or more allergens. The most common allergens were nickel sulphate (14.4%, potassium dichromate (4.8%, fragrance mix (2.9% and colophony (2.9%. The most common supplemental allergens were octil gallat (50% in bakery and copper sulphate, goldsodiumthiosulphate (42.8% in dental screening. Positive patch reactions were detected 83.3% in 6 patients with AKM, 80% of these positive reactions was againts dental screening. The rate of contact sensitization between atopics and non-atopics was not significant (p>0.05. Conclusion: We suggest in presence of mucositis and/or occupational dermatoses using supplemental series in addition to T.R.U.E. test would be more beneficial in identifing the

  19. Regulation of intestinal mucosal growth by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Amino acids, especially glutamine (GLN) have been known for many years to stimulate the growth of small intestinal mucosa. Polyamines are also required for optimal mucosal growth, and the inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, blocks growth. Certain amino acids, primarily asparagine (ASN) and GLN stimulate ODC activity in a solution of physiological salts. More importantly, their presence is also required before growth factors and hormones such as epidermal growth factor and insulin are able to increase ODC activity. ODC activity is inhibited by antizyme-1 (AZ) whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines, thus, providing a negative feedback regulation of the enzyme. In the absence of amino acids mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is inhibited, whereas, mTORC2 is stimulated leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis but increasing the synthesis of AZ via a cap-independent mechanism. These data, therefore, explain why ASN or GLN is essential for the activation of ODC. Interestingly, in a number of papers, AZ has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, or increase autophagy. Each of these activities results in decreased cellular growth. AZ binds to and accelerates the degradation of ODC and other proteins shown to regulate proliferation and cell death, such as Aurora-A, Cyclin D1, and Smad1. The correlation between the stimulation of ODC activity and the absence of AZ as influenced by amino acids is high. Not only do amino acids such as ASN and GLN stimulate ODC while inhibiting AZ synthesis, but also amino acids such as lysine, valine, and ornithine, which inhibit ODC activity, increase the synthesis of AZ. The question remaining to be answered is whether AZ inhibits growth directly or whether it acts by decreasing the availability of polyamines to the dividing cells. In either case, evidence strongly suggests that the regulation of AZ synthesis is the

  20. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.